Concordance for Names that live in Catholic hearts : memoirs of Cardinal Ximenes, Michael Angelo, Samuel de Champlain, Archbishop Plunkett, Charles Carroll, Henri de Larochejacquelein, Simon de Montfort / by Anna T. Sadlier.

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1.   l * ^ A ... MICHAEL ANGELO AND HIS DYING SERVANT. Pare 78. NAMES THAT LIVE IN CA
2. ind us make our lives sublime, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sand
3. onized Saints, yet worthy of everlasting remembrance. How names of few, of our i
4. orthy of the proud dis tinction of being one of the sponsors of the Great Republ
5. r variety to the series in thus changing from one country to another the scene o
6. ld of the Church, and the ever- changing circumstances wherein the Christian peo
7. ical truth dry as possible, and to bring out, as far as strict his permitted, wh
8. these truly noble lives, each presenting in itself a grand and little most compl
9. able." Even Catholic writers, going to work with the highest and purest mot
10. lume, then, of the series to the reading public, and bespeaking for it a kindly
11. es to the reading public, and bespeaking for it a kindly welcome, I leave it to
12. e, I leave it to its own will Commending merits. MARY MONTREAL, CANADA, March 23
13. pe the whisper of the throne; And moving up from high to higher, Became on Fortu
14. to higher, Became on Fortune s crowning The pillar of a peopled The centre of a
15. pass on in shadow of the tall projecting houses, which some what obscure the lig
16. s patio is at We tached to each dwelling, and has a temporary cover for the day,
17. MES THAT we will LIVE. endeavor to bring into these pages, as in the clearly and
18. the expenses of his education by giving lessons in civil and canon law. Later o
19. w. Later on, we find told, Twice setting out for Rome to seek his fortune. upon
20. d from the Holy Father a Bull empowering him to fill the first This was a curiou
21. ecclesiastic into this period of During to him Toledo. " that where he rem
22. him may have had influence in preparing and retirement then led by him for CARD
23. he chaplaincy of Siguenza, a neighboring diocese, but as the salary was larger t
24. wonderful austerity. himself, according to his chroniclers, gives us a de light
25. etreat. He He speaks of it as a charming oasis. There he devoted himself to that
26. biblical studies. Clad in a hair holding, as he expresses it, the Bible in one h
27. " I Suddenly, Sanchez awoke, crying out: dreamt only a moment ago, Father F
28. om of Spain wonderful events were taking place, wars and rumors of war relating
29. g place, wars and rumors of war relating to the succession, till at last Ferdina
30. the defeat of the Moors in Spain, taking place, Ximenes was still an humble monk
31. e him. She was, however, desirous seeing this man, of whom fame already spoke so
32. h had crept into his Order. His zeal ing was untiring; accompanied by his secret
33. nto his Order. His zeal ing was untiring; accompanied by his secretary, Brother
34. ited all the monasteries on foot, During only occasionally in case of illness mo
35. occasionally in case of illness mounting upon a mule. As far as possible he adhe
36. that they should support them by begging. It is related that his secretary upon
37. upon one occasion said to him, laughing: Most Reverend Father, you will certain
38. pray for me, " selves I am begging for you." was about this time, too
39. , that this arch second only to the king in bishop was regarded as being said th
40. the king in bishop was regarded as being said that Mendoza named power and influ
41. on successor. Majesties, as his fitting Good Friday of the same year, when the
42. e year, when the Franciscan after having heard her appeared in the queen s prese
43. s presence, at the same time presenting confession, she said to him, the Papal
44. ents respectfully, but " on opening them, and ob To our venerable brother,
45. and ob To our venerable brother, serving the superscription: Ximenes de Cisneros
46. ," deadly pale, room without taking said: " leave of the queen. Isabel
47. eek his companion Francisco Ruyz, saying here without delay." brother, we m
48. ompelled to write to the Pope concerning queen Ximenes refusal to accept the arc
49. ue of obedience, before he would manding bilities. consent to undertake these ne
50. der at Tarazona, in presence of the king and queen. After the consecration, he c
51. ter the consecration, he came, according to custom, to kiss the hands of the kin
52. to custom, to kiss the hands of the king and queen. In doing so he used these ch
53. he hands of the king and queen. In doing so he used these characteristic words:
54. ssist See in in Spain, but me supporting the burden which they have placed upon
55. old by various biographers that the king and queen were deeply moved, and that t
56. hands, and knelt to receive his blessing. After this he was conducted with all d
57. enthusiasm, as he treads with unwilling feet that new path of glory opening be
58. ling feet that new path of glory opening be fore him. We are in the Cathedral, t
59. magnificence worthy the earthly dwelling of the King of In the middle or grand n
60. worthy the earthly dwelling of the King of In the middle or grand nave is the k
61. , of massive carvings and dark panelling, on of Spanish piety and munificence; t
62. through chancel; it woke each slumbering echo, and it fell upon the hearts of th
63. n the hearts of the worshippers, rousing them to almost nave and irrepressible e
64. st to \ g acknowledge the and unwavering voice, the solemn oath to maintain all
65. t time in the great carved chair, rising like a throne above the rows of stalls
66. rows of stalls within the choir. During the concluding ceremonies he sits with
67. within the choir. During the concluding ceremonies he sits with bowed head, as
68. h scenes as this remind us of the saying of a modern author, * that from whateve
69. ect of unapproach " things. Arising, he takes, in a firm human able grandeu
70. Order, went everywhere on foot or riding on a mule, and permitted not a trace of
71. of state or splendor about his dwelling. interfere. At length the Pope was obli
72. e public in rich garments, while wearing underneath a hair shirt; he spread his
73. ept strenuously secret, was So appalling accidentally discovered by his servant.
74. f life, but cannot refrain from dwelling a moment longer on those private virtue
75. crucifix, which from time to time during the day he drew out and looked upon mos
76. ishop s address to his clergy, reminding them of his unworthiness, and asking th
77. ing them of his unworthiness, and asking the co-operation of their prayers, as a
78. him, he replied, power, and has nothing wherewith to reproach himself, the wise
79. o enjoy the poor consolation of avenging their wrongs by words." As an inst
80. inistration, we may relate the following He incident which took place soon after
81. k to his convent, whither he was willing to depart on the instant, but that no p
82. E. ever operate with him in distributing the honors of the Church. Soon after, h
83. the Church. Soon after, however, having found Don Pedro worthy, he confirmed hi
84. Archbishop appeared among them, reading petitions, distributing alms, and givin
85. ng them, reading petitions, distributing alms, and giving to every one a patient
86. petitions, distributing alms, and giving to every one a patient and kindly heari
87. o every one a patient and kindly hearing. Little wonder that his name is still r
88. evered in his Cathedral city, re maining forever dear to its humblest inhabitant
89. ngly he It is said that labored, sparing himself no personal toil. thousand conv
90. this end, we may men custom of inviting the chief Moorish priests, or alfaquis,
91. faith, and often succeeded in convincing them. The conversion of the alfaquis le
92. e. is recorded for Ximenes, and bursting again the bond of time and space, we sh
93. . Ah, noble Ximenes hearts are throbbing with yours; while the multitude are swa
94. h yours; while the multitude are swaying like a mighty and resistless sea, drums
95. upon each dusky forehead the life-giving waters of the The Koran and the paradis
96. ses in dusky cloud-racks, as an offering in the sight of the Most " High, a
97. around great piles of volumes containing the delusive doctrines of Mahomet. f Mo
98. f left the broad and flowery the ringing of bells. * The Mahomet forbade \Dublin
99. eir new brethren in Christ are trampling its rocks and thorns and brambles under
100. eir feet, with Ximenes valiantly leading the van. the subject of these Moorish c
101. that he destroyed all documents relating to it, that * Dalton, in his Preface to
102. e The unconverted Moors forever existing government. remained the dangerous foes
103. menes and Talavera side by side teaching catechism to the Moorish children and c
104. ws grandeur, steeped in golden a soaring solitude of light." woods His gaze
105. city; the distance was hourly lessening, and through the gates of pearl came to
106. it, therefore, if the way feet bleeding from the CARDINAL XIMENES. 27 thorns an
107. ith the partition of Naples, the sending of Peter Martyr as envoy to the Sultan,
108. reaks among successful. Moors inhabiting the Sierras, and many other affairs of
109. zed with a severe fit of illness, during which he experienced the greatest kindn
110. est kindness and attention from the king and queen. their request and by the com
111. ut his malady showed no signs of abating, till Francisca, a Moorish convert, who
112. d brought thither an old woman in curing Ximenes by the use 28 NAMES THAT LIVE.
113. ter to return to Alcala.* An interesting account is given of the reception of th
114. thedral, " the ceremony of offering homage. This was also cele in. the cath
115. af terwards Ferdinand I., Ximenes having met a criminal on his way to the gallow
116. of Ximenes. This Venetian pos following sessed a ring which he offered for sale
117. his Venetian pos following sessed a ring which he offered for sale to Ximenes. T
118. f Portugal, Queen of Spain, one for King Emmanuel one for Cardinal Carvajal, and
119. ther stone upon which to say Mass during his life, and resolutely kept After his
120. ce and art. Isabella s love for learning was indeed only surpassed by that of Xi
121. be fore the death of Philip, and during the absence of the king in Italy. As a
122. ilip, and during the absence of the king in Italy. As a statesman he was far-see
123. Italy. As a statesman he was far-seeing, saga sions of Philip, cious, and just,
124. quot; till the occasion of their meeting, Ximenes accom panied Philip, who came
125. d simply apparelled and attended. During their interview Ximenes kept all the co
126. nes kept all the courtiers away, wishing that the two sovereigns might come to a
127. igns might come to a full understand ing, "I and saying to the attendants,
128. full understand ing, "I and saying to the attendants, door." will mys
129. llors, and moreover succeeded in putting an end to long and san guinary feuds be
130. induce some time without avail. * During this interregnum, despite the unsettled
131. l-trained and which, without interfering with their various employments, gave to
132. rthy force of 30,000 men, far surpassing in every respect the cor rupt and degra
133. ldiery in other countries where standing armies were in existence. Various outbr
134. o effect the double purpose of defending Spain from their future incursions, and
135. om their future incursions, and carrying the Gospel among dren, had them. The li
136. e African shore May iyth, and at evening of the Before the following day the tow
137. d at evening of the Before the following day the town of Oran was theirs. army m
138. er, and preceded by a Franciscan bearing the Episcopal cross, harangued the sold
139. cross, harangued the soldiers, exhorting them in a glowing address by all that t
140. he soldiers, exhorting them in a glowing address by all that they held dearest,
141. h, and God, to combat bravely, reminding them that the contest was, as it were,
142. oratory of San Miguel, in the adjoining fortress, and 32 NAMES THAT LIVE. prost
143. ess, and 32 NAMES THAT LIVE. prostrating himself upon the altar steps, like anot
144. hands in supplication. On the fol lowing day Oran was carried by assault, and th
145. e gates, preceded by the clergy chanting the Psalm, Non nobis "Not unto but
146. e hundred Christian captives, but seeing the number of dead lying on the ground,
147. ves, but seeing the number of dead lying on the ground, he burst into tears, exc
148. ground, he burst into tears, exclaiming: They were indeed infidels, but they mi
149. ich gave rise to the contemptuous saying on the part of the grandees, that this
150. the great captain (Cordova) was telling his beads in Valladolid, the Franciscan
151. lid, the Franciscan Father was preparing for battles and sieges." have been
152. hest tower of the fortifications, crying, At the siege s dinal "Santiago y
153. were aston him speak rather of learning and art than of wars and conquests. One
154. ppearance, to which Ximenes : re glowing with wonderful ardor You do not know, F
155. it as the dear Christian truly touching. fection oasis in a desert of infidelit
156. d also died and went to his rest, having first appointed Ximenes regent an appoi
157. nd could not at present be declared king, as his mother was still alive. The Car
158. m Charles, in which occurs the following passage referring to the will of his gr
159. h occurs the following passage referring to the will of his grand Ferdinand: &qu
160. hich you, Most Reverend Sir, are, during }ur absence, entrusted with the governm
161. been already done we could, considering your integrity, wisdom, and zeal for Go
162. s came to his ears of the great uprising which was in prepara the tion, "Th
163. n him to know his intentions re specting the government of the kingdom, he led t
164. led them to a said, window, and showing the soldiers and artillery, Behold the
165. bret, the exiled " will of the king, !" of Navarre, who, aided by the
166. quot; of Navarre, who, aided by the King of France, was seeking to recover his t
167. aided by the King of France, was seeking to recover his territory. After a short
168. his territory. After a short but de King cisive struggle the Navarrese were tota
169. return to their allegiance, but finding remonstrance useless, despatched Don An
170. y put down, Ximenes obstinately refusing to give up to Queen Germaine the fortif
171. hastened to obtain pardon from the king for the chief rebel, Count Gutierre Vel
172. ssels against Horac Barbarossa, a daring and successful pirate, who had succeede
173. ful pirate, who had succeeded in rousing a portion of the Saracens against their
174. gainst their Spanish masters. this Owing to the incompetency of the generals, Bu
175. pletely failed. services to Spain during the period of administration, as indeed
176. riod of administration, as indeed during the whole course of his long life, were
177. his military expeditions, his abolishing of oppres- 36 sive taxes, will NAMES TH
178. erican missions, we devote the remaining pages of our sketch to his principal fo
179. bered that Columbus appeared before King and Queen of Spain, somewhere about the
180. about the time when Ximenes was entering upon his glorious career as confessor t
181. World the Cardinal had little or nothing to do, though some few years afterwards
182. ater fourteen Franciscan monks went King gave them every facility for their voya
183. m to persevere in their holy undertaking. thither, one of of Scotland. Ximenes w
184. ainst it, and issued an edict forbidding importation of negro slaves.* Among the
185. les, remonstrated with him, representing the danger of a revolt, Ximenes re plie
186. will so arrange matters that everything shall end well." And they did end
187. for Alva was induced to accept the king s terms, which he refused to do. had hi
188. on the " Ximenes: If you are going to the Cardinal, hasten yourselves, and
189. See of Toledo that we find him beginning to think seriously of founding and endo
190. beginning to think seriously of founding and endowing out of the revenues of his
191. think seriously of founding and endowing out of the revenues of his new office a
192. s of his new office a centre of learning and the arts. He had already, like Isab
193. ready, like Isabella, done much to bring the then infant art of printing into re
194. to bring the then infant art of printing into repute, having given prizes for th
195. fant art of printing into repute, having given prizes for the best workmanship,
196. principal towns. Isabella, and following her example most of the grandees of Spa
197. here the pure fresh breezes came blowing down from the He and where the beautifu
198. rs, it was ordained, were to be teaching. distinguished from the other members o
199. niversity by a long red, closely fitting robe, with a scarf of the same color th
200. rown over the left shoulder, and falling in folds to the ankle.* Besides this he
201. college, Ximenes founded the fol lowing useful institutions in connection there
202. Thus, for instance, the and two boarding-schools of St. Eugenius where forty-two
203. s in philosophy; St. Isidore, a building for students who fell ill, this latter
204. students who fell ill, this latter being under the invocation of the Blessed Vir
205. et with great also Francis from the king. It is related that the illustrious I.
206. given time they had the choice marrying or entering a religious life. Ximenes w
207. they had the choice marrying or entering a religious life. Ximenes was besides o
208. ted the various manuscripts appertaining to this rite and had them carefully rev
209. pent large sums of money in the printing of brevi and missals. But we have now c
210. iality noble monument of piety, learning, and munificence, which entitles its au
211. born by Ximenes magnificent undertaking sometimes he was obliged to of the Old
212. ever Even before he was made of learning and art. patron we are led to suppose P
213. t and foster-mother of ignorance, giving ages, so-called assistance rendered in
214. , so-called assistance rendered in bring public thanks to a Pope for out the fir
215. first Polyglot edition of the Bible. ing Whilst the learned men whom he had chos
216. very joyful. The Cardinal, on receiving the intelligence, cried out: " I g
217. " I give thee thanks, O me to bring to the desired Lord! that Thou hast ena
218. the benefit of my country, there nothing, my on which you ought to congratulate
219. f Lives of the Saints and other edifying works. Amongst these was the life of St
220. ead of immoral publications by supplying good read ; ing in their place. Being a
221. ublications by supplying good read ; ing in their place. Being anxious to promot
222. ng good read ; ing in their place. Being anxious to promote classical knowledge,
223. ion of Aristotle but his death occurring soon after, put an end to this enterpri
224. he Polyglot Bible was, indeed, a fitting close to the life of the great Cardinal
225. lf * Canon Dalton, to be proclaimed king, though his Feller. in his Preface to H
226. arned him, he wrote a cold and unfeeling intimating that his services as Re gent
227. he wrote a cold and unfeeling intimating that his services as Re gent were no lo
228. oyal Senate. For the end was approaching. Already Ximenes stood upon the shores
229. dark river; faintly he heard the dipping of the boatman s oars; brighter and bri
230. e gates of pearl, upon which his longing eyes had been fixed during all those ye
231. h his longing eyes had been fixed during all those years of labor and tri umph f
232. world receded, and ; the jasper failing sight. " domes of the heavenly cit
233. ith deep and tender piety. for the Dying were read, after which the Cardinal pas
234. human sorrow accompanied him to his ing-place, where he lay down joyfully, cont
235. the eyes deepset, clear, and penetrating; the face long; the nose like tall, wis
236. f the multi tudinous testimony, exalting him above all the statesmen or prelates
237. , it may be well to quote the follow ing significant opinion, which is one biogr
238. hom he ruled ascribed, even while living, the power of working miracles." A
239. even while living, the power of working miracles." Arnao, a modern Spaniar
240. it of his Order; as a patron of learning, unsurpassed. Not only was he irreproac
241. the "If," Holy See, forgiving and even kind adds he, can inspire my r
242. im full of the Spirit of God, practising almost unparalleled s austerities. Unde
243. Cardinal robe we find him still, wearing his habit of St. Francis and a rough ha
244. al and penitential in his diet, sleeping upon a plank, his tranquil mind undistu
245. brought in to him, left not a farth ing to any private friend or kinsman. In a
246. MENES. 47 heroic generosity in forgiving personal enemies, an ex ample to the na
247. of which his enemies severity, bordering upon accuse him, was ,the quality which
248. he fulness of the Holy Spirit descending upon him made him superior to any conte
249. omitable will, fiery ardor, all-grasping faith, has slept for ages beneath the m
250. h serves as a fit a spirit as death ting monument to as grand and pure ever free
251. on balconies and barred win dows, giving them the appearance of miniature fortre
252. where, with organ peal, amid the waving of banners and the rich of painted wind
253. Madonna, where, amid a gorgeous mingling of jasper, porphyry, and other precious
254. as with Eastern magnificence. According to the Spanish custom, her robe is of r
255. laid its vandal hand. We bid a lingering farewell to the beau The splendid pagea
256. . midst we leave, as in a worthy setting, the noble, the he roic, the mighty Fra
257. d with the twilight shadows en shrouding the Campagna, till they melt in golden
258. ophy of his a pledge of his thanksgiving. faith, For, as ages rolled the heathen
259. d upwards to the Eternal Throne, filling the dark vaults with sweet aroma; and t
260. ; and the white-haired Pontiff, kneeling, upraised his hands in supplication for
261. nturies elapsed, and another mighty king came out of the West, and gave unto the
262. t often jestingly alluded, as explaining his taste for the chisel. While still y
263. eady mysterious whisperings were calling the student into another world, peopled
264. lured him: the dusky purple of the dying day, the mellow light 54 NAMES THAT LIV
265. ent he could spare from study in drawing and painting. He soon formed the acquai
266. spare from study in drawing and painting. He soon formed the acquaintance of som
267. master s studio. Thenceforth, neglecting all else, Angelo devoted himself to his
268. a German So desirous was he of imitating nature, that he print. went to the mark
269. head, and so well succeeded in copy ing it, that he returned his imitation and
270. latives, the profession of painter being held as a degradation. Their interfer e
271. nterfer ence, however, proved unavailing, and his father was finally induced to
272. se, for the master, instead of receiving the usual compensation from the pupil,
273. usly envious of his From pupil s growing reputation. Once, however, it is relate
274. ne Church of Santa Maria Novella. During his master s absence An gelo drew the s
275. r s absence An gelo drew the scaffolding, desks, the whole apparatus, sketch and
276. hool for the study of sculpture, feeling that its progress had not kept pace wit
277. had not kept pace with that of painting. garden in or A about the Piazza di San
278. vited to send thither his most promising pupils; and Angelo and his friend Grana
279. became regular attendants, thus gaining a correct knowledge of the antique.* Th
280. o tried his apprentice hand at modelling in marble. Lorenzo de Medici, in one of
281. nzo de Medici, in one of his vis carving its to the garden, observed a copy of a
282. hat the teeth were too Angelo perceiving the justice perfect for so old a faun.
283. m to give up for his son, also promising to assist in procuring an office himsel
284. n, also promising to assist in procuring an office himself. The father consented
285. ly after wards we find Lorenzo obtaining a situation in the customs for Lodovico
286. onarotti, which was given him, something better should turn Angelo, who was then
287. ed as a son. "till up." During his residence there he pursued his stud
288. the Angelo executed marble, representing the It was never battle of Hercules wit
289. to declare that he regretted not having devoted himself entirely to sculpture.
290. re Michael Angelo, and a Spanish running footman, remarkable for the artist that
291. on, and so swift of foot that one riding on horseback could not overtake him.* A
292. occupied himself at this time in carving a great statue of Hercules, which after
293. then in force that a foreigner entering Bologna should have his thumb sealed wi
294. h red wax. Angelo and his friends having neglected this precaution, were detaine
295. e, a San Petronio; the other, a kneeling angel bearing a branch for candles in t
296. nio; the other, a kneeling angel bearing a branch for candles in the hand. After
297. uted a statue of an Infant John sleeping, and the celebrated figure of Cupid, so
298. vely copied in marble and his Concerning this piece of sculpture the follow ing
299. g this piece of sculpture the follow ing anecdote is told. Angelo on one occasio
300. , and found a number of persons standing in admiration before the Pietd. A stran
301. k was a cartoon of St. Francis Receiving the Stigmata;" but about this time
302. of the Palazzo Vecchio. His patron being brought to see it, just or so the story
303. ritic was not convinced Angelo, stepping upon a ladder, seized a chisel, and pre
304. nd pre tended to alter the nose, letting the dust, as it were from the marble, f
305. t in for the great facility of designing the human figure, for the Floren tine s
306. for the Floren tine soldiers are bathing in the Arno when the call to battle com
307. . Up the steep banks they rush, buckling on their armor and preparing for combat
308. h, buckling on their armor and preparing for combat. There are thirty or more li
309. ork was received with uni foreshortening." Alzog, versal applause, and just
310. the full power of the human frame being portrayed with consummate Yet it lacks
311. rried out, political changes interfering with their execution, and Angelo was ca
312. but one small copy remains. The reigning Pope, Julius, was eminently a lover of
313. ulius, was eminently a lover of learning and the arts, both of which he most lib
314. summoned Angelo to the Vatican, sending an order for a hundred ducats to defray
315. hundred ducats to defray his travelling Of this Pope an eminent biographer has
316. and it was found that the then existing Church of St. Peter s would not suffice
317. y tered so many geniuses in the building were suggested, and the project grew an
318. w and grew till it led to the rebuilding of St. Peter s. Angelo, how began his w
319. spired law giver is represented grasping with one hand his flowing So beard, and
320. ented grasping with one hand his flowing So beard, and with the other the tables
321. NGELO. 6l and efforts were made to bring about dissensions between him and his p
322. funds might be necessary in the carrying on of the work. On one occasion Angelo
323. not be seen. Disappointed, but attaching no importance to the cir cumstance, the
324. ers not to admit him. A prelate standing by reproved the officer, asking him if
325. standing by reproved the officer, asking him if he knew to whom he spoke. "
326. was deeply hurt, and sent the following message Pope: Henceforward, if his Holi
327. eek me in another place." Hastening home he left orders for his furniture t
328. d departed at once for Florence. hearing of it sent five couriers to bring him b
329. earing of it sent five couriers to bring him back, but as he was beyond the papa
330. return. So he refused decidedly, saying, "That being expelled the antecham
331. used decidedly, saying, "That being expelled the antechamber of his Holines
332. his Holiness, conscious of not meriting the disgrace, he had taken the only cou
333. to return. Some political matter having brought to the the ity Pope to Bologna,
334. " LIVE. him Instead of your coming sternly, saying coldly, to us, you seem
335. m Instead of your coming sternly, saying coldly, to us, you seem to have expecte
336. e Pope then gave him favor. his blessing and restored him to The artist patron,
337. ompleted was of such severe and imposing aspect that the Pope asked if the sculp
338. sculptor had represented him as blessing or cursing; to which Angelo replied, &q
339. d represented him as blessing or cursing; to which Angelo replied, "Only as
340. ngelo replied, "Only as threatening the unruly." This was placed in th
341. ld be decorated. It is said his Painting in fresco might prove a failure. enemie
342. ssed since then, and travellers paus ing in amaze have no need to ask the name o
343. nted this portion of the plan from being car So that the ceiling and some of the
344. plan from being car So that the ceiling and some of the walls ried out alone be
345. le brilliancy when that wondrous ceiling of to-day was a vast white blank. and c
346. -day was a vast white blank. and ceiling bears various decorations in chiaro-osc
347. nd moon, with outstretched arms, calling them out of chaos and fixing them in th
348. ms, calling them out of chaos and fixing them in their orbits; stretching His Al
349. fixing them in their orbits; stretching His Almighty hand we have over the dark
350. e animal tribes, thereupon, the crowning touch of the divinity given in the crea
351. primal dwellers, cursed by the unending curse, are all before us, with the sad
352. ayed in the promise of another Eden, ing whose joy the heart leading thitherward
353. er Eden, ing whose joy the heart leading thitherward of death. of is cannot conc
354. d fathoms beneath; and above the surging waters wild, despairing faces, distorte
355. bove the surging waters wild, despairing faces, distorted limbs, and all the sig
356. s of a new earth. For the mighty surging of the waters has forever borne the old
357. e. All this in the centre of the ceiling. But in the surround ing and intersecti
358. of the ceiling. But in the surround ing and intersecting curves are the prophet
359. But in the surround ing and intersecting curves are the prophets and sibyls, who
360. ion, and the might of some overmastering power which burst asunder the myriad bo
361. liness and restful quietude, contrasting well with the awful sublimity of his pr
362. ANGELO. 65 In one corner of the ceiling is the majestic figure of Judith, full
363. the other corners are David vanquishing Goliath, the Punishment of Aman, the Br
364. of her of the people of Israel, pointing as it does to the salva tion of mankind
365. the pedestals, and as it were supporting the cornice, are fortyeight figures of
366. ivides the and there part of the ceiling from the coved. Here the ornamentation
367. tervals, and ten medallions representing historical flat in we behold Angelo dur
368. storical flat in we behold Angelo during the progress of this marvellous work, p
369. rogress of this marvellous work, pausing with brush upraised; his won drous inte
370. ings spellbound, his great soul dilating upon its conception of the Eternal Crea
371. long hours of day he labors; the morning s early sweetness steals upon him at hi
372. steals upon him at his work, and evening s peaceful loneliness finds him toiling
373. s peaceful loneliness finds him toiling still adding new and tender touches of
374. oneliness finds him toiling still adding new and tender touches of majestic beau
375. of the Incarnate Son of God, perfecting each fold and wrinkle of that seamless
376. kissed with grateful rapture ; embodying his thoughts of the purity, the divine
377. holy agony on Calvary hosts, ; peopling all the air with the angelic lending ne
378. ing all the air with the angelic lending new brightness * Mrs. Jameson. to Cheru
379. to the Thrones and Dominations picturing the saints with the various insignia of
380. of the divers dark of paths of suffering by which they entered the Kingdom In tw
381. d passed. His earnest faith, his adoring love, his reverent devotion, were image
382. his soul, full of an undefinable longing, urged him to accomplish something whic
383. nging, urged him to accomplish something which would satisfy his high aspiration
384. term to the soarings of his all-grasping intellect. He worshipped before the alt
385. nd. loftiest that mountain-top, touching that pinnacle, breathing that purer air
386. n-top, touching that pinnacle, breathing that purer air, he need ac knowledge no
387. the arts; but he encouraged the growing genius of Raphael, and aided him to lay
388. im to lay the foundation of his enduring fame. Yet he forwarded the plans of Ang
389. st undertook with some reluctance, being desirous of com pleting the mausoleum o
390. eluctance, being desirous of com pleting the mausoleum of Pope Julius, though, a
391. the Pope was difficulty of transporting it thence. anxious that it should be tr
392. d may not be out of place here regarding the constant encouragement and support
393. horizon upon which appeared the dawning light of Raphael s fame, glowed the fer
394. med, neither accomplished so much during his reign as in that of his predecessor
395. ists, poets, dition to a certain feeling of discontent he knew surely that his r
396. nt he knew surely that his reign as king of artists was over. after the accessio
397. . He was succeeded by Adrian VI., during whose pontificate Angelo was principall
398. d by Clement VII., also a Medici. During his reign Rome was sacked by the soldie
399. ained principally at Florence, excepting a brief interval passed at Rome, and co
400. y was now threatened by the all-grasping ambition of Charles V., and it was deem
401. at first concealed himself, but on being offered the most favorable terms by Pop
402. Pope Clement, came forth from his hiding-place, and continued his work upon the
403. he same a statue of the Madonna bear ing the Child Jesus in her arms. He was dir
404. this he did with some reluctance, being anxious to complete the mausoleum of Ju
405. be executed by Angelo, and the remaining three by other artists of 70 his choice
406. nt in His infinite brightness, appalling in His infinite wrath. The artist has p
407. ayed Him, as it were, in Depart uttering the dread sentence of unending woe, fro
408. uttering the dread sentence of unending woe, from Me, ye cursed, into everlasti
409. oe, from Me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire." He would seem to crush to a
410. m to crush to annihilation the trembling, shrinking " withering away with t
411. to annihilation the trembling, shrinking " withering away with the expectat
412. he trembling, shrinking " withering away with the expectation of what is fi
413. adiant intercession, at last, unavailing. with the glory of heaven, she turns co
414. ate eyes upon the multitude. Surrounding them, in the clouds, are the twelve Apo
415. the one hand "just made everlasting joy is passed, and eternity in store fo
416. htness of the abyss, demons are dragging the souls of the damned, and a boat, wi
417. at, with a fiend at the helm, is sailing over the awful lake of fire It is laden
418. beings, the faces of whom are appalling in their The whole idea of the picture
419. cation of those saints. These were being the last pictures of importance ever pa
420. time he began a group del Pieta, bearing the Dead Christ in It was never complet
421. m. But the weight of years was beginning to weigh him down, and but for the expr
422. utterly refused However, to the lasting glory of his he at length consented, as
423. from his desire to accomplish something for the honor of the Most High. Such wa
424. grasp, and whose vast propor tions bring home to our minds the consciousness of
425. f He continued his labors upon it during the his death. pontificate of four pope
426. ion, which, the dews of age gave warning, it was not for him to complete. Still
427. ality r month of February, 1563, leaving unfinished that monu ment of the ages w
428. n dignity and repose of death shad owing his face and lending emphasis to his wo
429. of death shad owing his face and lending emphasis to his words In your passage t
430. had but entered into ages. life, leaving his lived memory He had fifteen eighty-
431. e painter, architect, and sculptor being ended, our task is done, save as it beh
432. th we find that the grand work of During the period preceding his though princip
433. rand work of During the period preceding his though principally occupied with St
434. akings. of the He continued the building Farnese Palace, begun by San Gallo, and
435. of sculpture and and ornamented painting, the spot with such antique relics as w
436. e still from time Rome. He to time being discovered among Rome. On the summit of
437. e temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. Winding up this steep eminence and leading dire
438. nding up this steep eminence and leading directly to the church are In the choir
439. church the Capuchin Friars were singing their vespers in the gray hush of when
440. hush of when without, among the evening, ruins of ancient Rome, the infidel Gib
441. k which he then first thought of writing, The Decline " and Fall of the Rom
442. Fall of the Roman Empire." reigning idea of turning the Baths of Dioclesian
443. n Empire." reigning idea of turning the Baths of Dioclesian, then in a ruin
444. rta Pia, in honor of Pius V., the During these He also carried out the Pope s gr
445. elo s work." stupendous undertaking, which alone would have served to immor
446. its glory was but as a dim foreshadowing. Beholding it, his other works sink int
447. as but as a dim foreshadowing. Beholding it, his other works sink into for there
448. he air, 75 dome of the Pantheon, placing between the earth and the battlements o
449. battlements of heaven the grand admiring est and the loftiest thing that mind of
450. rand admiring est and the loftiest thing that mind of man has^ever con Before us
451. ved. the the stupendous bulk slow moving upward to crown the mighty edifice; and
452. he figure of the weak old man, directing, commanding, following its mo and falli
453. the weak old man, directing, commanding, following its mo and falling back exha
454. ld man, directing, commanding, following its mo and falling back exhausted when
455. commanding, following its mo and falling back exhausted when the dome tion upwar
456. , had reached must not, however, resting-place. work of might, St. Peter s; nor
457. and his ceil- ?6 NAMES THAT is LIVE. ing of the Sistine Chapel and variety of th
458. rt was his mistress, the sole, absorbing interest of his life. No toils were too
459. nscription, Ancora im^ara Still learning. Such was the constant de sire of impro
460. which followed him from boyhood learning." he replied, remitting, when offe
461. od learning." he replied, remitting, when offered at her shrine. Perfection
462. is told that a certain Cardinal, finding him one day among the ruins of ancient
463. ncient Rome, asked him what he was doing, to which "I am still was one of a
464. lated, some by Wordsworth; but elevating. effect tained a most enthusiastic admi
465. r in paint those of a religious char ing, sculpture, or architecture acter were
466. hat of very fond of solitude, preferring the society of men. Yet no one ever pos
467. ith the habits, the ways of think It ing, and the various peculiarities of his f
468. which gained him the reputation of being both morose and In temper he was undoub
469. egiano became so enraged by the stinging sarcasms of Angelo, that he seized a ma
470. d flattened the great man s nose, giving him a mark which he bore till his death
471. tory of his servant Urbino is a striking illustration of his more qualities. Whe
472. his more qualities. When will endearing he felt himself growing old, he asked U
473. n will endearing he felt himself growing old, he asked Urbino one day: " Wh
474. t departed before the master, and during his last ill ness Angelo watched beside
475. ever made over to ; Vasari the following touching words: My Urbino is dead, to m
476. over to ; Vasari the following touching words: My Urbino is dead, to my infinit
477. to my infinite grief and sorrow. Living he served me truly, and dying he taught
478. ow. Living he served me truly, and dying he taught me how to die. I now have but
479. o die. I now have but the hope of seeing him again in " Paradise." Ang
480. pondence with Urbino s widow, expressing the greatest affection for the children
481. atest affection for the children, making them various gifts, and in short giving
482. them various gifts, and in short giving every proof of his sincere attachment t
483. ve already hinted at them in a preceding-paragraph. These faults of tem which ma
484. been Mi chael Angelo, unique in painting, unparalleled in sculp and a divine tur
485. uot; Ariosto thus addresses him, playing upon his " name: E quel, ch a par
486. me of Michael Angelo." A for having been born learned Siennese writer, Clau
487. I., that occasion, received him standing and seated him on his right " pont
488. d and labored, each in turn in the being his munificent patron. So we have done,
489. lo at * " Michael, both by painting and sculpture divine." more than m
490. VE. rest in the great vaailt of painting, sculpture, his tomb. end, he pursued u
491. ich would not give him rest. The surging waves of time and death closed over all
492. s burst asunder, to the gaze of admiring posterity. Upon a mountain of living fl
493. ing posterity. Upon a mountain of living flame stands Angelo, with the threefold
494. with the threefold art he loved crowning him with a diadem of immortal fame. Beh
495. ith a diadem of immortal fame. Beholding him thus, we mondo ha cry aloud: Hail t
496. the hero of an ancient leg * The saying of the illustrious Aretino, " The
497. ichael Angelo." atttt of[ Wandering there mongst the red men, I bless d God
498. FOUNDER OF QUEBEC. ]HE Canada containing of to-day is a flourishing dominion, ma
499. da containing of to-day is a flourishing dominion, many prosperous and populous
500. loom of gnarled oaks olden, white spring-time with the blossoms of the acacia, t
501. s and cedars. Canada of the past rolling St. was then, as now, the Canada of the
502. ois, or Algonquins, beside their rolling streams, upon the bosom of their 84 NAM
503. valleys, in the wigwams, near the dying, at the altar, at the stake, were forev
504. as they occur, but meantime shall bring forth such facts as we have found in th
505. of the missionaries in Canada was owing to the indefati gable efforts of the il
506. at Brouage, in Saintonge, and according The exact to the most authentic account
507. a, and the full witchery of her changing moods and rest The gray mists that rose
508. motion. caverns, like voyagers embarking on a new journey; the 1 felt SAMUEL DE
509. of the noontide plentifully besprinkling the azure plain of waters; the evening
510. g the azure plain of waters; the evening glories that, as a miser con ceals his
511. ar charm for him. But the storm bursting over the seething main, the foam, like
512. But the storm bursting over the seething main, the foam, like white, despairing
513. g main, the foam, like white, despairing faces on the surface of the waves, the
514. and the war to death between contending elements, possessed a fatal fascination
515. er was mightiest. a hint of this feeling in a letter addressed later to the &quo
516. and impelled me to expose myself during many years of my life to the fury of th
517. not, how ever, prevent him from devoting most of his leisure time to study, and
518. leisure time to study, and the acquiring of that accurate and com prehensive kno
519. im to have followed his father s calling, and accompanied him on some of his &qu
520. The He gives many years art of seafaring," short voyages. of The first accu
521. ed seaman and a successful pilot, having been once employed as chief pilot to th
522. once employed as chief pilot to the King of Spain. Somewhere about 1598 he recei
523. de Brissac to proceed to Spain, piloting thither the Spanish vessels. Champlain,
524. hamplain, all enthusiasm for a seafaring life, and 86 filled NAMES THAT LIVE. bl
525. d NAMES THAT LIVE. ble to with a craving for adventure, determined if possi acco
526. is uncle. He had also an ulterior hoping that during his stay in Spain some oppo
527. had also an ulterior hoping that during his stay in Spain some oppor tunity mig
528. ained in the service of the Spanish king. So Champlain remained in Spain, hoping
529. . So Champlain remained in Spain, hoping for some fortu nate circumstance which
530. not, however, prevent him from occupying each mo ment of his time. He made out c
531. ened by the English; gratified. the King of Spain was determined to protect it,
532. , and for "Saint vessels, including the that purpose thought of sending out
533. ding the that purpose thought of sending out a fleet of twenty Saint Julien.&quo
534. uot; While the vessels " were being rigged and put into order for this long
535. e a voyage to the West Indies, and being pleased with the Saint Julien," an
536. ien," and aware of her fine sailing powers, de take, " termined to tak
537. his nephew, already known as a promising sailor, was appointed in his place. SAM
538. ts of which he fairly revelled, visiting all those places in the Antilles and th
539. eaks of these countries in the following glowing terms: No one," he says, c
540. these countries in the following glowing terms: No one," he says, could see
541. ; the eye loses itself in wide-spreading plains, over which roam " " i
542. res are always and streams inter secting the greater part of the kingdom; divers
543. eful note of places; he gives us glowing ac counts of the exquisite natural scen
544. . returned to Europe he brought the king such details of the Spanish-American te
545. t, and was granted a pension by the king for faithful and accurate accounts of t
546. was the cele He had long been revolving in his mind the certain great schemes r
547. advice and information upon Some hoping the subject. At last he determined to p
548. eur Chauvin, whom he had the undertaking, died, and at first chosen for De Chast
549. ion to Champlain. Due prepara tion being made, the vessel sailed from Honfleur o
550. uot; harangue to the savages. In glowing terms, full of the wild hyperbole of hi
551. country of the pale-faces; of their king, and of his reception at the court. He
552. for them with the Iroquois, or, failing that, assist them in their wars. The In
553. ound the calumet or peace-pipe, offering it first to to the principal Indian Cha
554. dship towards chiefs. the whites. Making but a short delay at Tadoussac, Champla
555. the shore, and before them they foaming beheld the seething rapids dashing over
556. re them they foaming beheld the seething rapids dashing over the rocks and sendi
557. aming beheld the seething rapids dashing over the rocks and sending up volumes o
558. apids dashing over the rocks and sending up volumes of spray. They found further
559. rs, especially the St. Lawrence. Pending the conclusion of a treaty with the red
560. es. He then returned to France, bringing reports as to the condition of affairs
561. e was at that time the accounts reigning sovereign, and. inspired by the glowing
562. sovereign, and. inspired by the glowing of the mariners, he became very desirou
563. s, he became very desirous of possessing 90 NAMES THAT LIVE. a portion of that b
564. ial mystery, goods. hung The in his king, therefore, resolved to encourage Champ
565. rigor climate, to the lot of the dar ing pioneer who sought to make a home amid
566. im, the latter had experienced something of the severity of the Canadian climate
567. uraged He always felt a sort of yearning for the south. to him came gentle breez
568. us luxuriance of the Southland, haunting him with a yearning to a home under its
569. Southland, haunting him with a yearning to a home under its fervid sky. make hi
570. next he visited the land of the setting sun, SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN. his course la
571. dian shore, they saw Port Royal, resting like a gem upon by its beautiful scener
572. and more fertile shores was still spring when they rounded Cape but the summer h
573. re they de It the waters, and attracting them and natural advantages. M. de &quo
574. ee years amid the forests within hearing of the deep-mouthed ocean" primeva
575. ter the Mayflower" was to land, ing and the Pilgrim Fathers, in their sad-c
576. was, of romantic interest, of exceeding peril, of inevitable hardship and priva
577. nd neck of one of our people, appointing him thus for the his place, day our cat
578. 7 Champlain returned to France, bringing with him, as before, accurate accounts
579. the rivers he had navigated, describing also their residences at Port Royal, as
580. farther north, in defiance of the biting winds and intense of a Canadian winter.
581. nd of colonists landed upon a projecting and lost no time in preparing temporary
582. projecting and lost no time in preparing temporary dwellings, where the red man
583. the great But clearings river stretching before and around them. were soon made,
584. d to prosper under Champlain s fostering care; but envy and jealousy had not bee
585. but some of the con spirators repenting, divulged the plot, and the leader was
586. n it sent to the galleys. Disease having broken out among the colonists, Champla
587. uccessfully used by Cartier in combating maladies peculiar to their mode of life
588. enemies, the Iroquois. hoped everything from the assistance of the and as Champ
589. nces proved themselves their unrelenting enemies. Besides many this, the Hurons
590. d the colonists, and were from beginning to end stanch and devoted allies of Cha
591. bison, and returned empty-handed. Seeing they might be allowed this, the Iroquoi
592. antly refused, and the Iroquois, waiting till night, went forth by the light of
593. eturned from his voyage the neigh boring tribes began to remind him that ten moo
594. also Anxious to conciliate them, hoping their deadly foe. to bring about a fina
595. them, hoping their deadly foe. to bring about a final reconciliation with the a
596. could to Iroquois, the allies. So taking with him some twenty or thirty of he se
597. ugh the still, blue waters, the plashing of the oars in the hands of Indian oars
598. rs in the hands of Indian oarsmen making scarce a ripple on the Past those beaut
599. nded on a portion of the shore adjoining the camp of the Iroquois. Night came do
600. s glowed in the forest darkness, showing the outlines of the wigwams, and the du
601. as broken; the night-bird fled shrieking to her covert, as the savages chanted t
602. and reluctantly through the overarching forests down upon the two camps. The Ir
603. s. The Iroquis advanced with the bearing of conquerors, proud and self-confident
604. e about two hundred in number, and being tall and symmetrically formed, presente
605. his whole retinue, the remainder having stayed behind. The Iroquois gazed at hi
606. d they knew not the best mode of dealing with him. How shower of arrows, but to
607. ly unmanned, fled in confusion, leav ing behind them the killed and wounded, and
608. as compelled to witness a most appalling The savages assembled at night in front
609. spectacle. their wigwams, and fastening one of their prisoners to a tree, chant
610. vor to save him from an end so appalling; but the savages would not be balked of
611. e mained but a short time, and returning found the Algonquins and Montagnais imp
612. quins and Montagnais impatiently waiting for the coming of the French chief to l
613. gnais impatiently waiting for the coming of the French chief to lead them to bat
614. d expe them better prepared, they having erected fortifications, consisting of s
615. aving erected fortifications, consisting of stakes driven into the ground. Champ
616. y victorious, In this tive land, leaving Du Pare in command at Quebec. The king
617. g Du Pare in command at Quebec. The king was dead; certain intrigues relative to
618. igues relative to the colony were taking place at Brouage, and Champlain remaine
619. lain remained there some time, arranging the affairs of the settlement. It was d
620. affairs of the settlement. It was during this absence from Quebec that Cham- Wit
621. mind, and in spite of weighty the roving, desultory life he had led, he seems to
622. ene plain s Boulle, daughter of the king s private secretary, was only twelve ye
623. e Algonquins. This was the great trading-post, whither the trappers came in grea
624. itate intercourse the design of building a habitation in that region to fa with
625. was cleared and made ready for building. called ,the spot Place Royale, and fro
626. e Royale, and from this humble beginning sprang in later years Montreal, the Que
627. of ex " the heathen tribes. tending their authority over idolatrous nations
628. ns, except for the purpose of subjecting them to Jesus Christ." On one occa
629. word, told chief said, "Yes; thing else, him the old story of the beautifu
630. f the beautiful garden and its ravishing delights, amid which man had spent his
631. d which man had spent his primal morning. The Indian further said that they beli
632. nt yonder to the red home of the setting sun, and as they journeyed they met the
633. mountain top. And he asked them, saying, Whither go ye? : "In " "
634. eat Spirit told them, it here. Unheeding, the warriors passed on, and the Great
635. ut they heard not, and the Spirit taking a stick turned two of them into sticks.
636. * Onward " Here thou to the setting sun, that I may seek for shalt find lif
637. pirit came to a warrior, who was smoking, and asked him to lend him The warrior
638. he had no other. And the Manitou, giving him a new pipe, bade him take it to the
639. be should his pipe. want it, for nothing." it to the chief, and the chief g
640. country of perpetual joy, far surpassing the happy hunting-grounds, whereon The
641. al joy, far surpassing the happy hunting-grounds, whereon The sav they hoped to
642. ain soon after sailed for France, hoping to obtain assistance which should enabl
643. istance which should enable him to bring out missionaries to labor among the sav
644. e down meet Champlain; that, not finding him, they loudly expressed their grief
645. . that year to the Great Falls to During this visit to France, Champlain succeed
646. o France, Champlain succeeded in placing the colony under the patronage of the C
647. in was inspired with the hope of finding the long-sought north westerly passage.
648. nt of a pretended voyage thither, during which he had seen the wrecks of English
649. seen the wrecks of English vessels lying upon the This had some show of probabil
650. ng shore. lish were at that time pushing their explorations very far north. Anim
651. s honor, and invited all the neighboring tell This over, the calumet was smoked,
652. tance. them told He of his plans, asking their advice them that he had been main
653. indignant were the savages at his daring imposition, that Champlain could scarce
654. ould scarcely restrain them from putting him to death on the Overcome with fear
655. have deterred Champlain from attempting it, and that he should have gained a re
656. ard for his information, without running fell any risk of detection. The voyage,
657. to good account; for the savages during Champlain s absence had become alienate
658. even declared their inten tion of going no more to the trading-posts. The gov e
659. ten tion of going no more to the trading-posts. The gov ernor, notwithstanding,
660. ng-posts. The gov ernor, notwithstanding, succeeded in re-establishing the old f
661. thstanding, succeeded in re-establishing the old friendly terms between them and
662. e, long-cherished design of establishing a powerful com pany, composed of mercha
663. nearer to his heart. . 103 In the spring of 1615 he sailed for Quebec, bringing
664. g of 1615 he sailed for Quebec, bringing with him three fathers and a lay brothe
665. ets belongs the honor of first preaching the gospel to the savages in the vicini
666. ier. Champlain busied him self preparing accommodations for them, and caused a c
667. et Father Le but most of Caron returning to Quebec for church ornaments, as he i
668. to dissuade him from his purpose, urging upon him the terrible hardships to whic
669. ance which He would grant him in working for His service " IO4 NAMES THAT L
670. ardent charity, he that, made no seeing him inspired by such further attempts t
671. Bancroft speaks in the follow " ing terms: the The unambitious Franciscan,
672. in Cape Cod, had passed into the hunting grounds of the Wyandots, and, bound by
673. fe of a beggar, had, on foot or paddling a bark canoe, gone onward and still onw
674. oe, gone onward and still onward, taking alms of the savages, till he reached th
675. his heart full of joy at this promising beginning of the great work in which he
676. full of joy at this promising beginning of the great work in which he was so de
677. its waters. He describes Lake Nipissing, and the country in its vicinity, and f
678. by a triple pali sade of wood, reaching to the height of thirty-five feet. Here
679. ted by the missionary. Before proceeding to Cahiague, or St. John the Baptist, w
680. the Baptist, which was to be the meeting-place of the the allies, Champlain visi
681. corn stretch- IO6 NAMES THA T LIVE. ing away into the distance, and besides gra
682. r the army set out from Cahiague. Having crossed Lake Ontario, they hid their ca
683. as at first proposed to await the coming of the Caran touanais braves; but Champ
684. touanais braves; but Champlain, fearing to give the Iro quois time for reinforc
685. visited several of the tribes, receiving in every instance a most cordial welcom
686. r returned to Quebec early in the spring, and thence took passage for France to
687. CHAMPLAIN . 107 necessity for providing against all changes affecting the inter
688. providing against all changes affecting the interests of the settlement, as, fo
689. the company, the Huguenot members being de sirous to prevent the growth of Cath
690. new settlement, and the Catholics being equally anxious to forward it. A specia
691. . from the command, and, while occupying him Champlain colonial in the explorati
692. uthority in Pont-Grav6. Champlain, being lieutenant-governor of the colony by ap
693. of the colony by appointment of the king, refused to give up his rights; while h
694. " and showed a letter from the king, commanding that Champlain should be fu
695. howed a letter from the king, commanding that Champlain should be furnished with
696. ned an order from the Council, investing fullest he proceeded to France and ob h
697. t indisputable authority, and commanding the associates to desist from all furth
698. its dangers, bride. cheerfully forsaking her native France to share her hus band
699. s band s home in the land of the setting sun. Her brother, Eustace Boulle, was b
700. ht hand of wel Four years passed, during which the young wife strove hard to bec
701. soms fell abundantly in the early spring-time, and the winter was neither long n
702. ery and cruelty of the red-skins. Taking all these things into consideration, Ch
703. ideration, Champlain determined to bring her back to France, and we do not read
704. absence she was alone, and a prey During to a Heleme de Saint Augustin, and ende
705. d her gray quiet of the cloister. During these four years changes had been takin
706. these four years changes had been taking place in the affairs of the Conde had r
707. ssisted at a solemn Mass of thanksgiving for his safe arrival. That was a day of
708. PLAIN. IOQ cannons discharged, startling the displayed, guns fired, the people o
709. i tion, once began the work of repairing it. He on the St. Lawrence for also cau
710. nd pre commissions to Champlain, warning of M. de Caen serve peace in the colony
711. new fort, soon reduced plain, stationing await in the mutineers to order, and fo
712. lain to proceed some means of protecting the colony from measures which were so
713. lf, Le Baillif, who succeeded in ob king Father George the Council uniting the t
714. b king Father George the Council uniting the two com taining an order from and p
715. the Council uniting the two com taining an order from and putting an end to all
716. wo com taining an order from and putting an end to all further violence. panies,
717. s wife remained there a year, consulting with the new viceroy, his uncle, the Du
718. uke ardently embraced the project, being heartily in terested in the evangelizat
719. n to Quebec he occupied himself building of a new habitation, continued the work
720. Near the site of the old in the building was placed a tablet recording the date
721. e building was placed a tablet recording the date upon which the new one had bee
722. , the name of the viceroy then governing the colony, and that of Champlain, the
723. whole surmounted by the arms of the king. The new building was to be about eight
724. y the arms of the king. The new building was to be about eight hundred feet in l
725. ected large stables at Petit-Cap, having a small dwelling adjoining them and bro
726. es at Petit-Cap, having a small dwelling adjoining them and broad pasture-lands
727. t-Cap, having a small dwelling adjoining them and broad pasture-lands stretching
728. them and broad pasture-lands stretching around them. By this means the cattle c
729. built on a much larger scale. had During the winter of 1626-7 a treaty was pendi
730. he winter of 1626-7 a treaty was pending with the Iroquois, and Champlain had gr
731. d Champlain had great hopes of effecting a reconciliation foes. between them and
732. their ancient Meantime some neighboring Indians, who had suffered great loss fr
733. xpedition against the Iroquois, offering them as SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN. an inducem
734. plain he was justly indignant, declaring to assist them in their just quar had b
735. their just quar had been always willing but that in an unprovoked attack he wou
736. er, to propitiate Champlain, of offering him some they soon after conceived the
737. for the purpose could be found to bring provisions thither. Meantime, three Hug
738. c " and then returned the following character answer: the English care to s
739. e garrison, the enemy retreated, burning all the vessels that lay along the coas
740. e reader. France of the Fathers, writing to his superior in about a year after t
741. e climate, the neces sity for travelling on show-shoes, and gives some particu l
742. the world to come, country. He relating that having asked a savage why they loa
743. o come, country. He relating that having asked a savage why they loaded the grav
744. hey supposed that they were worship ping the sun. This planet, they told him, ha
745. e made through the earth, and at evening went end to come out next morning at th
746. vening went end to come out next morning at the other. The in at one lives Jesui
747. dreamt of one at they met in the morning, being most superstitious on the subjec
748. of one at they met in the morning, being most superstitious on the subject of dr
749. ionaries, and his constant and unvarying kindness to them. in the slightest degr
750. Black-Robes would be content with being asked if In these early his nation 114
751. T like theirs, LIVE. them a lodge adding that they could not give Quebec. One of
752. t, who afterwards died amid excruciating tor ments at the stake, writes, "O
753. en in process of erection, under placing also He " Our Lady of the Angels.&
754. mountain-tops or the He mentions saying Mass on the spires of churches." F
755. n earth. enormous " glaciers during the in the they shone " therefore,
756. he they shone " therefore, teaching all nations, baptizing them in the name
757. erefore, teaching all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of
758. trustfulness, and relates the following They came to the hut of the missionarie
759. told him that they were about departing for the hunting-grounds, and wished to
760. hey were about departing for the hunting-grounds, and wished to leave their trea
761. eave their treasures with him, promising to return in the moon of the falling le
762. ing to return in the moon of the falling leaves to reclaim them. The missionary
763. ither with the greatest care, depositing them in the wigwam, and expressing a ho
764. iting them in the wigwam, and expressing a hope that no thieves would find them.
765. which had been lately saved from failing into the hands of the English by the co
766. continued, but grew daily more alarming, and a vessel sent out by the company t
767. ly met with the English fleet, and being taken at a disadvantage, was utterly de
768. nd ground, two large flat stones serving as a mortar. Finding the plan successfu
769. flat stones serving as a mortar. Finding the plan successful, he had a mill erec
770. peas could be crushed in greater During this life and death struggle for the qu
771. ys were sent from the Abenakis demanding aid against the Iroquois. This was impo
772. were more favorable, and meantime asking a supply of food. Boulle met M. de Caen
773. Boulle met M. de Caen s vessel bringing reinforcements to the col ony, and as h
774. to the col ony, and as he was returning to Quebec was taken pris oner by the En
775. of the state of Quebec, again ap gaining peared before its walls. A sloop was se
776. ore its walls. A sloop was sent, bearing a Such was the condition I! 6 NAMES THA
777. to the English flag of truce by hoisting a one upon the fort. An English gentlem
778. ish gentleman then came ashore, offering favorable terms from Louis Kertk in the
779. t of capitulation. The governor, knowing resistance to be impossible, acceded, o
780. nce to be impossible, acceded, obtaining the most honorable conditions. town was
781. opos of this we may relate the following anecdote, English which probably occurr
782. sachusetts. A gov ernor of Boston, being desirous of conciliating the sav The sp
783. f Boston, being desirous of conciliating the sav The spokes ages, once offered t
784. i But the English captain dently seeking to avoid it. signalled it to approach.
785. , and as the French seemed to be gaining an advantage, Thomas Kertk, the command
786. t will be a most dishonorable proceeding on your part; for by doing so you break
787. le proceeding on your part; for by doing so you break the promise made me by you
788. uld not hinder those on board from doing their duty." The French vessel, ho
789. red, and pro ceeded to Tadousac, sailing thenee for Europe early in September. W
790. their Champlain occupied himself during preparing a new edition of his voy This
791. mplain occupied himself during preparing a new edition of his voy This work cont
792. with the revenues thereunto appertaining, to tion of the places city reimburse h
793. e him for losses sustained at the taking of the by the English. M. Plessis du Bo
794. ns, includ- SAMUEL DE CHAMPLA IN. ng ing some Fathers of the Society of Jesus, a
795. urse towards the "land Twice during the voyage they s hope" were drive
796. As the English fleet was still cruising about at Quebec. the coast, Champlain m
797. rt to dissuade the savages from treating with those on board, justly repre senti
798. ith those on board, justly repre senting that the French were likely to be the p
799. ith him. The governor s next undertaking was the establishing of a trading-post
800. s next undertaking was the establishing of a trading-post on the island of Rich
801. taking was the establishing of a trading-post on the island of Richelieu, making
802. -post on the island of Richelieu, making it for the Indians of the north, as goo
803. olony, so, too, do we find him watch ing over its spiritual interests. He devote
804. r mis sions, which were already yielding an abundant harvest of souls. He sent o
805. e altar he placed a picture representing Our Lady saving a ves sel from shipwrec
806. d a picture representing Our Lady saving a ves sel from shipwreck. In this "
807. in the Jesuites" of Champlain going to visit the year, Fathers at their hum
808. , Fathers at their humble abode, hearing Mass in their chapel, and dining with t
809. hearing Mass in their chapel, and dining with them. It was his first visit after
810. were still in a great state of rejoicing at the return of Father Brebceuf, who h
811. made if people in France saw them eating bear s flesh they would turn away in di
812. rs and cheese. When they were de parting the captain had a salute fired in their
813. fired in their honor, and at the booming of the cannon the savages were both ama
814. amazed terrified. Champlain was busying himself at this time in the establishme
815. distinguished authors. Washington Irving, who are in the least familiar with the
816. e West, know with what pure and untiring zeal the Catholic missionaries pursued
817. river, the Jesuits pressed on unresting, and, with a power which no other Chris
818. er," says Father Le Petit, speaking of some of the martyrs. * Knickerbocker
819. n the mighty forests of West would bring down greater blessings on those * whom
820. alien land was called away, after having given such proofs of a lively faith and
821. ith his cloak wrapped around him, during his the interests of the colony. explor
822. s the interests of the colony. exploring expeditions to the far northwest. In th
823. e love of his peo ple and the unwavering attachment of the savages. For to them
824. nd bleak on plain and hillside, lighting only into faint reflections of their au
825. autumnal beauty when the day was waning and the sun gleamed upon them in deep c
826. eep crimson and gold. The snow was lying softly upon the little city he had foun
827. in their primitive dwellings were making good-cheer for the birthday of the Son
828. s grief, and grand his obsequies. spring-time the bright stream he had loved flo
829. d again on its way with vernal rejoicing, the blossoming trees people he had cul
830. ay with vernal rejoicing, the blossoming trees people he had cultivated loaded t
831. savages came down the river when spring had made it navigable, and asked for th
832. e. Solemnly they pointed upwards, saying he had gone to the land of the Great Sp
833. irit, beyond the red home of the setting sun. The colony prospered and flourishe
834. ad Peace to the hero s ashes and lasting memory Honor to the ! ! anil ^rintaU nf
835. raws near, The cruel crowd are gathering for the sight, The July day dawns innoc
836. tern Europe, none, perhaps, so deserving of atten tion, especially from Catholic
837. from the period of St. Patrick s landing upon her shores down to the present day
838. ribed, with great justice, as resembling from afar a country of ruins; and how s
839. y ruins lend her! The gray and crumbling walls, thickly covered with lichen and
840. on, which is con stantly at work resting in its throughout this beautiful island
841. primal days of Irish his tory, mounting at dawn to watch for the appearance of
842. merged from the East, and with lingering reluctance showed himself to his worshi
843. nd the with one accord lit their adoring fires, or bent to people the ground, in
844. hoary beards, silvery locks, and flowing garments tossing in the wind. They play
845. very locks, and flowing garments tossing in the wind. They play upon their Druid
846. acrifice with the moon blood of a living holocaust, while the moon shows, with p
847. es, the mournful ivy and the encroaching moss, feeding upon their decay. Portion
848. ul ivy and the encroaching moss, feeding upon their decay. Portions of the walls
849. remain, with mullioned win dows, bearing remnants of delicate tracery carved by
850. d. I2Q Most High offered up their living holo in wonder, and we ask: Did the mon
851. als We pause ; the sons of a neighboring island, who in the first centu ries cam
852. Eighth and was continued in the learning from the Irish monks, early famed for t
853. f his daughter Elizabeth. regnum, during which Queen Mary, miscalled "Blood
854. though with diminished violence, during the reign of the hapless Charles the Fi
855. on vents; the great soldier, the canting psalm-singer; the far-seeing statesman,
856. the canting psalm-singer; the far-seeing statesman, the superstitious trembler a
857. ector of the Commonwealth from beginning to end of his career in one thing onlyc
858. inning to end of his career in one thing onlycruelty. was who, following out the
859. ne thing onlycruelty. was who, following out the course traced by un Eighth and
860. ," alty; the new masters, not being "to the qualities which had endear
861. above all were without the all crowning title to their obedience, hereditary ri
862. stablished when they set about utilizing the old abbeys, which had been founded
863. scribed noble mission, too, of imparting the treasures of knowl noble or peasant
864. T. The smoke to j^l the of their evening sacrifice ascended not now throne of th
865. eness of the dawn; their prayers, rising once like aromatic incense to the Most
866. ng went up from the cloisters, se curing for themselves a blessed immortality an
867. y and for their brethren the fertilizing shower of God s grace. Driven forth fro
868. wn to town, from city to city, preaching the Gospel and en deavoring to keep ali
869. y, preaching the Gospel and en deavoring to keep alive the love and sufferings o
870. ster in the hearts of the people, giving them God; rather bright glimpses of the
871. eternal land whither they were hastening. They constantly preached forgiveness o
872. giveness of enemies, the duty of praying for them, and warned the people against
873. and warned the people against harboring resentment towards any one whomsoever;
874. r caverns, or burrowed themselves hiding-places in the bowels of the earth, and
875. permitted to hold even the most trifling office; the possessors of new 132 NAMES
876. their func tions; and the few remaining native nobles, who had the power, were
877. d the power, were constantly endeavoring to conceal the monks, seculars and Jesu
878. ter the Sacra ments, or attend the dying. The Remonstrance Act, giv ing absolute
879. the dying. The Remonstrance Act, giv ing absolute authority to the king, soon fo
880. , giv ing absolute authority to the king, soon followed upon the restoration of
881. suit Fathers in Rome was then attracting the attention of all Europe by the fame
882. s Thither young Plunkett now re learning and piety. of Fingall solved to repair,
883. youth returned with him to Rome. During his residence there his pre ceptors pre
884. since their by foundation the Thundering Legion of the Church. As we have said,
885. that illustrious from Ireland; rivalling the atrocities of the Roman Em perors w
886. he death by Catholic Ireland, was riding in the chariot of his love of ease over
887. ife of Plunkett. 134 NAMES THAT as being LIVE. named worthy of the dignity. At l
888. who had career is Why are we discussing uncertainties, when certainty before ou
889. tried virtue, ! and consummate learning Him, by my apostolic authority, I appoi
890. nt enter tained the thought of remaining abroad, though he knew that his return
891. sky of Erin mirrored, haunted his waking thoughts to him in dreams; memories of
892. shipped God, and in the came surrounding alleys of which he had played, or of th
893. roon, whose kindly smile and encouraging OLIVER PLUNKETT. 135 word had been amon
894. e reflected where "the in sparkling waters. indeed, that his native land wa
895. oncealed for a considerable time. During the Lord-Lieutenant Robarts period of h
896. ay that he had information from the king that two persons, one of whom was Olive
897. , had arrived from Rome and were lurking Lord Conway, acting on his mischief. to
898. ome and were lurking Lord Conway, acting on his mischief. to do the country orde
899. d be an acceptable service if he telling him that "it could dexterously see
900. Robarts, who is com described as hav ing been virtue; a stanch Presbyterian, sou
901. spiritual interests of his flock. During this first year of his Primacy, he held
902. ss, at which the Puritans were exceeding wroth. En couraged by the leniency of B
903. aliantly for the restoration of the king, and as their reward had seen Cromwelli
904. y a petition before his Majesty, begging him to take cognizance of their grievan
905. who was of the Catholic cause, the king appointed a commissioner to inquire int
906. rt. The matter was dis missed, resulting chiefly in the recall of Berkeley, who
907. Parliament now met and induced the king to re scind any acts of indulgence towa
908. remacy was declared incapable of holding it was decreed that all Cath any olic p
909. ists and encourage planters and the king s civil or military office; Protestants
910. ry. Visions rose before him, overpassing the bounds of time and space: Tara, the
911. palace of the ancient kings, where king and warrior, and chief and brehon liste
912. ed to the voice of the minstrel, singing in rude verse the lofty deeds of the re
913. e green heights of Tara the first rising of their god, and bowed down in adorati
914. in adoration. The Primate, even dur ing the troublous times we have described,
915. ction, where the apostle of Erin, coming from the shores of ancient Gaul, 138 NA
916. y, every prophetic word or sign, seeming to point to new greatness hidden in the
917. ous life, which was spent in alleviating the miseries of the people, corporal as
918. , and on these expedi tions his food ing to " Rome in was usually a piece o
919. ad. December, 1673, he says: Writ During this past year I have confirmed forty-e
920. ry part of and adminis Ulster, preaching, instructing the people, his biographer
921. d adminis Ulster, preaching, instructing the people, his biographer Sacraments.
922. ts. "These Sacraments," tering tells us, "were often administered
923. wind He in a special manner in reforming in among the clergy. A contem porary wr
924. years of bloodshed and disorder, during which the dio ceses were without chief
925. wo months have been spent in a fatiguing and most laborious visitation of my dio
926. ede English and my tongue from preaching both The Irish languages." Prelate
927. e famous Remonstrance Act. As far-seeing as he was wise and pru dent, he was wel
928. lost not a moment critical in preparing for it. He believed that in the affairs
929. n the affairs, the clergy, while working to keep alive the spirit of faith among
930. ublic or political affairs. appertaining to the spiritual welfare of the kingdom
931. ap pointed viceroy of Ireland, and being too much under the control of the Purit
932. e held in the highest esteem, describing him in a letter to the Protestant wise
933. stant wise and sober man, fond of living Bishop Burnet as and in due subjection
934. severest measures against Catholics, ing to believe affect them guilty, while in
935. on Ormonde s life; Talbot was in a dying yet he privately declared that way, and
936. ered two years in prison, suf in a dying way fering excruciating agony, and then
937. ars in prison, suf in a dying way fering excruciating agony, and then found his
938. , suf in a dying way fering excruciating agony, and then found his release where
939. and ecclesiastical dignitaries, holding their authority from Rome, as well as a
940. A proclamation was also issued declaring service.* that no Catholic should come
941. where the Catholics were in the alarming ascendency of one to every hundred Prot
942. their wise counsels and their preaching of the maxims of the Gospel, the poor p
943. Archbishop labor among them, continuing to exercise his ministry at the imminen
944. tatute had ever been passed which soling, as though no bade him fear for his own
945. Church, with its hosts and self-denying confessors, angelic virgins, heroic mar
946. angelic virgins, heroic martyrs, meeting in all times and places, through out th
947. on and imprison of ment and death! Dying upon the common battle-field one leader
948. Meanwhile Oliver Plunkett was preparing by his holi But so ness and austerity o
949. he in every duty, so mild, so forbearing, so meek, so full of sweetness and char
950. e country, though the storm was lowering over his devoted head. On the 6th of De
951. dy, treat, 144 NAMES THAT LIVE. Learning their errand, he at once arose and adva
952. nd advanced meet his captors, addressing them with the utmost gentleness and cou
953. ctive aiders and abettors. Murphy, being in prison for these treasona ble practi
954. rder to become prose cutor, for the king, of Oliver Plunkett, Primate of Ar magh
955. in one letter that witnesses were being brought over from Ireland to give testi
956. hich they openly profess to know nothing," f and this was undoubtedly the c
957. e, the material for their evidence being manufactured by Hetherington and others
958. which Lord Ormonde was guilty in tak ing so active a part in a persecution which
959. ace to the English nation, in which king, parliament, judges, juries, witnesses,
960. t to deserve credit in the most trifling cause upon the most immaterial facts ga
961. ied and con it, demned only crime having been, as the that attorney-general, Sir
962. little library of We can see him sitting on the his thatched house. wooden bench
963. is thatched house. wooden bench, reading his Breviary by the dim light, or prayi
964. is Breviary by the dim light, or praying, with his soft, dark eyes looking out t
965. raying, with his soft, dark eyes looking out through the grated window over the
966. f the land he loved. jailer, We dressing his gently and can almost hear him ad c
967. e great troublous world that was working out its own ends. Only one consideratio
968. ger go about among the people, preaching with fervent heart and ardent speech, i
969. he jailer entered and found him kneeling before the crucifix, with a rapt expres
970. and the softened light from the grating falling like a halo around him, the man
971. softened light from the grating falling like a halo around him, the man started
972. m, the man started back in fear, feeling that this indeed was a servant of God.
973. ories, and were by pro and spies, giving information to both parties when succes
974. England. On the 3d of May, 1681, during the Easter term, Dr. Plunkett was again
975. hom he sent over to Ireland, after being two days at sea, were obliged to cast b
976. he journey records of conviction showing the character of the op posing witnesse
977. n showing the character of the op posing witnesses without an order from England
978. ome as far as Coventry. On the preceding day he moved that his trial should be p
979. refused, both then and on the following day when he again made application. Yet
980. eries, and some were infamous peo adding that if they only allowed him a few day
981. hey only allowed him a few days to bring his witnesses and records he would defy
982. his occasion, that they desired to bring a defenceless it." man alone and u
983. entered, attired in his cassock, wearing the pastoral cross con a moment spicuou
984. nkett fore seen his trial before leaving Ireland, he would have made arrangement
985. he was under the impression that having been tried in Dublin he could not be tr
986. ty. After which, the procla mation being read by the clerk of the crown, the Pri
987. ould not be tried in England, concluding with the touching words: "lam come
988. in England, concluding with the touching words: "lam come here where no jur
989. e proved." the Chief Justice having answered that he had not been prosecute
990. 0 full I NAMES THA7^ LIVE. time to bring my records and witnesses all together,
991. r lordship that I may have time to bring my records and witnesses, and then I wi
992. arth and under the earth to say anything against To which the Chief Justice answ
993. if only till the end of the term, saying: "I am get ten days to have not th
994. hey do come you may go if asked pleading was in vain, and he was he took exceptf
995. the jury, to which he re plied by asking if it was this same jury who condemned
996. he insti gation of the devil, not having in his heart the fear of " God, fr
997. dial love and obedience he owed the king; that he was contriving with all his mi
998. he owed the king; that he was contriving with all his might against the peace an
999. of Ireland and that of England, stirring up war and rebellion against the king,
1000.ng up war and rebellion against the king, and working in parts beyond the sea s
1001. rebellion against the king, and working in parts beyond the sea s to subvert th
1002.n and put him to death; as also to bring destruction on the true worship of God
1003.h divers other traitors unknown to bring destruction upon the crown and governme
1004.ngdom, and compass the death of the king, and did for these purposes unlawfully,
1005.h he pleaded not guilty." According to the cruel " custom of those tim
1006.orney-General began his speech by making the following observation: that the cha
1007.began his speech by making the following observation: that the character proved.
1008. been The various witnesses were now ing forced to suspend and excommunicate the
1009.the same statements, their lesson having been readily learned: that he had colle
1010.purposes, was in collusion with the king of France, to send men to Carlingford f
1011.nderstood in Ireland (the wit ness being evidently in the confidence of the dign
1012.pressed himself more capable of managing affairs with the king of France; that h
1013.apable of managing affairs with the king of France; that he had sent letters by
1014. Ireland for the pur pose of introducing the French; that he had commis solicit
1015. Neal to demand aid from the French king; that he had written to Cardinal de Bou
1016.tten to Cardinal de Bouillon, exhort ing him to impress on the Catholic powers t
1017.rovinces; that he had fixed upon Carling ford as the best place of invasion for
1018.ve him the names." paper containing the " " asked the Chief Justi
1019.st his cause," but Gorman, becoming frightened, denied this. " He, how
1020.on to his previous declaration of having reveal plots: "It come from Irelan
1021.not against you; they knew I had nothing against you. I thought you did more goo
1022.n made an address to the jury, reminding them that the evidence was strong again
1023.st the prisoner, and that he had nothing to say in his be half, except that his
1024.me over. " " I can say nothing to it," said Plunkett, is own prot
1025.for a quarter of an hour, and re turning gave the verdict: is How say you, "
1026.d the falsehood of all of them, alluding to the fact of having been tried for tr
1027. of them, alluding to the fact of having been tried for treason when he was arre
1028.e him malice; he also made the following declaration, which he afterwards repeat
1029.hich he afterwards repeated in his dying attestation: If I were a man that had n
1030.ccuse anybody, or take away one farthing man s goods, one day of his liberty, or
1031.ery well; for they will do it accord ing to the rites of our own Church, which i
1032.iests and others of that nation, hearing that England was at that time disposed
1033.ER PLUNKETT. 157 man, who was for living quietly and in due submission governmen
1034. submission government, without engaging into intrigues of state. Some of these
1035.rd Baker "He we find the fol lowing: [Dr. Plunkett] was a worthy and good m
1036.orthy and good man, who, notwithstanding his high title, was in a very mean stat
1037.was in a very mean state of life, having nothing to subsist on but the contribut
1038. very mean state of life, having nothing to subsist on but the contributions of
1039.n in the province of Ulster, who, having little themselves, could not spare much
1040.eanly, quietly and contentedly, meddling with nothing but the concerns of his fu
1041.y and contentedly, meddling with nothing but the concerns of his function, and d
1042.oncerns of his function, and dis suading all about him from entering into any tu
1043. dis suading all about him from entering into any turbulent or factious intrigue
1044., mention that Essex applied to the king to obtain the pardon of Plun kett. Says
1045.p that he generously applied to the king " * Chronicle of Sir Richard Baker
1046.rd Baker, continued to the death of King George I. 158 NAMES THAT LIVE. for pard
1047.icle of Sir Richard Baker gives the king s reply: Why did you not declare this,
1048.pardon nobody;" and ended by saying, His blood be upon your head, and not &
1049.ot; upon mine." f the day following that on which he had received his sente
1050.rker, in the most beautiful and touching language: "DEAR SIR: I am obliged
1051.all witnesses, nay, the Judge will bring them in a moment if there will be need
1052. the world. Image In the time of waiting he knelt all day long before the of the
1053.apt in holy contemplation, sup plicating Jesus, the Lamb of Calvary, to strength
1054.ciated for the sacrifice. with suffering and austerity; upon his face shone glim
1055.nal light towards which he was hastening. Father Corker, in his last * who was h
1056.d three or four days a week with nothing but bread; that he appeared always mode
1057. that came near him. But his trial being ended, and he condemned, his man had le
1058.ords, actions, and countenance something so divinely elevated, such a composed m
1059.for Christ Jesus, by his very Concerning the manner and state of his prayer, and
1060.e let his soul dilate in love, following herein the sweet impulse and dictates o
1061. dictates of the Holy Ghost, and reading his book, " his prayers, writ rath
1062. rather in his heart than in * according to that ii. unctio ejus docet vos de it
1063. inspire plained to me as the only thing that troubled him. This love had exting
1064.ath. " OLIVER PLUNKETT. died, being now as it were at he went to bed at ele
1065.tly and soundly till four in the morning, at which time his man, who lay in the
1066.become more and more an entire, pleasing, and perfect holocaust; to which end, a
1067. martyr. There appeared in him something beyond expression something more than h
1068.im something beyond expression something more than human; the most savage and ha
1069.s sight; many Protestants, in my hearing, wished their All believed him inno sou
1070.pressed his joy at the prospect of being put to death for the faith, he says, &q
1071.emed, in fact, full of joy, anticipating on morrow a happy release from all that
1072.e. "When I came to him this morning," says Richard* See both these let
1073.ES THAT LIVE. he was newly awake, having slept all night with out any disturbanc
1074.e sledge as uncon * if he had been going to a wedding." was his awakening f
1075.ncon * if he had been going to a wedding." was his awakening for the last t
1076.ng to a wedding." was his awakening for the last time upon Calmly and tranq
1077. peaceful and serene than on the morning when, by the This, then, grace of the H
1078.n the hideous gibbet. It was the morning of the ist July, 1681, a day never to b
1079. and stood in presence of the who gaping multitude, who were crowded close toget
1080.f fear that crept upon the cen something turion on Calvary when the darkness cam
1081., but a calm yet glorious light, seeming to proceed from within, illumining his
1082.eming to proceed from within, illumining his emaciated features, and lending dig
1083.ning his emaciated features, and lending dignity " !" * Memoirs and Re
1084. for a moment afar as if he were seeking to penetrate the distance that separate
1085. and golden sunlight of Ireland, praying, as he would thenceforth pray at the th
1086.t of the scaffold, and the overmastering joy and gladness upon his face told of
1087.adness upon his face told of the longing by which he had been consumed to be wit
1088.ew days past abided my trial at the King Bench, and now very soon I must hold up
1089. soon I must hold up my hand at the King of kings bench, and appear before a Jud
1090.e misled by respect of persons; He being all good ness, and a most just Judge, w
1091.s against His com mandments. Which being a most certain and undoubted truth, it
1092.trary to my per should now, by declaring anything contrary to truth, commit a de
1093.my per should now, by declaring anything contrary to truth, commit a detestable
1094. I must receive sentence of ever lasting damnation; after which there is no repr
1095.ion, and make use of the words according to their accustomed signification; assu
1096.their accustomed signification; assuring you, moreover, that I am of that certai
1097.. and I protest upon the word of a dying man, hope for salvation at the hands of
1098.agitious and infamous lives), perceiving that I had records and witnesses who wo
1099.f several other circum stances conducing to a fair trial. city to trial " H
1100.eather, and of the difficulty of getting copies of records, and bringing many wi
1101. getting copies of records, and bringing many witnesses from several counties in
1102.ciless perjurers who did aim at accusing me of these following points," my
1103.id aim at accusing me of these following points," my life OLIVER PLUNKETT.
1104.sed Carlingford for the French s landing, all would but laugh at me, it being we
1105.ing, all would but laugh at me, it being well known that all the revenues of Ire
1106.pe you will believe the words of a dying man. "And that you may be the more
1107.hristian, especially a man of my calling, being a clergyman of the Catholic Chur
1108.n, especially a man of my calling, being a clergyman of the Catholic Church and
1109.v ance or toleration; and I by preaching, and teaching and statutes, have endeav
1110.ration; and I by preaching, and teaching and statutes, have endeavored to bring
1111.g and statutes, have endeavored to bring the clergy of which I had a care to a d
1112.d a care to a due comportment, according to their calling; and though thereby I
1113. comportment, according to their calling; and though thereby I did but my duty,
1114. untimely death; which wicked act, being a defect of persons, ought not to refle
1115. the Roman Catholic clergy; see it being well known that there was a Judas among
1116.juries O spill my innocent blood, saying as St. Stephen did, Lord, lay not this
1117.hem, and also the judges who, by denying me sufficient time to bring my records
1118., by denying me sufficient time to bring my records and witnesses from Ireland,
1119.ive all those who had a hand in bringing me from Ireland to be tried here, where
1120.l that His Divine Majesty grant our king, queen, the Duke of York, and all the r
1121. this world, and in the next everlasting felicity. Now that I have shown suffici
1122. charity to believe the words of a dying man, I again de clare before God, as I
1123.tion, or secret evasion whatever; taking the words in their usual sense and mean
1124.e words in their usual sense and meaning, as Protestants do when they discourse
1125.NKETT." Then he turned away, saying the psalm Miserere, Parce animai"
1126.he people who was near and meekly bowing his head, received absolu tion. Some th
1127.all that the heaven whither he was going had already transfigured him with its l
1128.nts and elect, praise God with exceeding praise for the mar tyr s a preconcerted
1129. drawn away, and the Primate was hanging by the neck. When he seemed insensible
1130.ETT. 169 His body was begged of the king, and was interred, all St. Giles s but
1131.nscrip was placed a copper-plate bearing the this tion: "In tomb resteth th
1132.." his heart fire. and bowels being suffered He martyrdom with constancy, t
1133. the Benedictine monastery at Lambspring in Germany,* where they rested for some
1134.ent erected by Father Corker and bearing was a Latin inscription. We have but li
1135.1. 1 70 NAMES THAT Yet this LIVE. living a cen does not prevent his execution fr
1136.oes not prevent his execution from being, as a Protestant writer, Goldwin Smith,
1137.uot;a suffered very decently, expressing himself in ticulars as many par became
1138.any par became a bishop. He died denying every * thing that had been sworn again
1139. a bishop. He died denying every * thing that had been sworn against him."
1140.ry; his head was brought from Lambspring to Rome in 1683, and fell into the poss
1141.Mahon became Archbishop of Armagh. Being an ardent admirer of his martyred prede
1142.ration. While we are conscious of having fallen far short of the also aware of h
1143.en far short of the also aware of having greatness of the subject, we are and co
1144. our mite labored faithfully in bringing before the Catholic public this great a
1145. dered him illustrious, had the crowning glory of martyr dom never been vouchsaf
1146.s portraits readers may find interesting. extant of him, as well as in the accou
1147.n, attest same high, broad forehead, ing the mingled strength and gentleness of
1148. w orn and sorrowful expression, lending a chastened dignity and an exalted sanc
1149.d at the time of his r martyrdom, having been born at Loughrea in or about In ch
1150. heroic LIVE. courage; profound learning, with remarkable modesty and simplicity
1151.ified submission to authority; a burning Patient, full of char extraordinarily h
1152.aster whom he ity, zeal with an untiring gentleness. In order that for the contu
1153. the vision served. of light everlasting, infinite brightness, To such privilege
1154.ons of that supernal city with something of the dis through a So it is well with
1155.ndemned to perpetual imprisonment, being also deprived of his pension. Rouse and
1156.ters, who had been so active in bringing about his death, were themselves persec
1157. year, the laws against Dissenters being put in force. Most of the witnesses aga
1158. Dr. Hugh McMahon, his successor, crying out in agony, Am I never to have peace
1159.istory of the world has a more inspiring struggle taken place than that which be
1160.red cause of liberty. The soul-thrilling words of Patrick Henry give in the Asse
1161.Letter VI. from Inchiquin, dated Washing Jesuit s Letters These letters are a pr
1162.e admirable. The fol No political lowing passage occurs in a not-, to one of the
1163.try. rYom the grand old Potomac sweeping on its way, from the calm shores of Lak
1164.t their majesty to the graves of Washing ton and the patriots of the revolution.
1165.lorious panorama of battles now open ing out before us would be apart from the p
1166.ither be out of place nor un interesting to the Catholic reader to observe the p
1167.Frenchman, Du Bourg, gives the following in his description of America, quoted b
1168.Biography of Arch bishop Carroll: During the last war which the United States wa
1169.lonists in their when, bravely fight ing against adverse circumstances, they had
1170.holic France stood from the out The king gave substantial set at the head of the
1171.say, It is " fortunate for the king that Lafayette did not take it into his
1172.needed, and none more active in laboring, even with their hands, in the construc
1173.rench officer appeared There was Estaing, D moment of vital in Philadelphia, and
1174.uthority. said, " it." drawing his hand across his throat, " I sh
1175.s rank, who claimed from the French king the mean such men and best right to fig
1176.amp to Washington; as Barry, the dashing and brilliant Barry, the father of the
1177.an soldiers had their share in promoting this good cause. The rea obvious; and i
1178.tle of Princeton occurred the follow ing incident of retreating. men and the the
1179.ed the follow ing incident of retreating. men and the the point hinuelf between
1180. hinuelf between his Washington, placing Will you give up your enemy, cried out,
1181. that of the enemy, both lines levelling for the decisive fire that was to de ci
1182. while dimly amid the glimpses of flying, the smoke was seen Washington, alive a
1183.n Washington, alive and unharmed, waving his hat and cheering his comrades to th
1184.nd unharmed, waving his hat and cheering his comrades to the pur raising On brok
1185.cheering his comrades to the pur raising On broken and suit. I dashed my rowels
1186.flanks, and flew to his side, exclaiming, Thank God Your Excel- * Mr. G. Washing
1187.nt part in the history of those stirring times we must not forget the Abbe Nicol
1188. But the latter s conclusive I am a king by assistance. His heart was closed aga
1189.ependence, that we cannot help regarding with the highest admiration, deepest re
1190.sion The governor, commissioners bearing a large cross. and many others took par
1191.is procession, and a site tection having been chosen, the cross was planted ther
1192.. to Christ the Saviour, humbly chanting, and on trophy bended knees, the Litany
1193.ers took " their places, was making its first steps in After the colony whe
1194.yland, had its view of the broad rolling Patuxent, its plantation, and its wide
1195.me degree, for the want of a neighboring church, and here the Carroll family on
1196. and danger and discour a small boarding-school, where the youth of agement, the
1197. in Bohemia Manor. the face of shadowing years "on of that great College of
1198.Archbishop Carroll, and most captivating spots on the But many years had to elap
1199.et to feel more than a brief and passing sadness at this separation from home, w
1200. Here the boy s natural love of learning displayed itself, and that fine and pol
1201.of that celebrated sanctuary of learning. St. Omer was followed by a year at Rhe
1202. of Domremy, restored to France her king. Bourges, that living chronicle of olde
1203.to France her king. Bourges, that living chronicle of olden days, all were to ha
1204. all were to have their effect in making the boy what he afterwards became. But
1205.apital could entirely dispel the growing shadows of age that were darkening arou
1206.owing shadows of age that were darkening around newer and more varied phases of
1207. s ineffaceable mark its ; the something indefinably chivalrous in bearing, inde
1208.ething indefinably chivalrous in bearing, indefina bly courteous in manner, the
1209.d many warm friendships in London during the seven years of his stay there. At t
1210.end of that time he thought of returning to America. all He returned alone. His
1211.rom the mother country. But were growing every day more determined to pre they s
1212.ment which the mother country was trying to impose upon the colonies. It was som
1213.ty. He was, in fact, already fast coming into prominence as a bold and fearless
1214. they would not be deterred from joining in consti " tutional measures for
1215. continued they, "by a few sounding phrases from what we think to be right.
1216.m what we think to be right." doing It was about this time, too, and when t
1217.ir protest to those which had been going up from the other States. Some time bef
1218. CARROLLTON. 191 of liberty that nothing but an armed force could ever overcome
1219.afterwards he famous and truly inspiring words : British troops, if sent here, w
1220. to exertion, until, tired of combatting in vain against a spirit which victory
1221.of our sketch. champion Mr. Carroll ning to make s eminent public services were
1222. Meantime, strange events were occurring in Europe. There was the bitter and imp
1223. He declared that he shuddered in saying that the men were by violence dispensed
1224. Benedict, was spent in vainly defending this noble company. During the reign of
1225.nly defending this noble company. During the reign of Clement XIV. such pres sur
1226." " demptor," suppressing the Society of Jesus, offices." &q
1227.tions and It would be idle here to bring forward the innumera ble proofs of what
1228.mely, that the Bull, as its very wording suggests, was a mere matter of expedien
1229.nd by spiritual favors, the enterprising and active and zeal of those religious.
1230.Bull, indeed, piety marked the beginning of his pontificate, and served but to b
1231.his pontificate, and served but to bring down upon his head the full fury of the
1232.o this subject here, and if our so doing should seem an unwarrantable digression
1233.ably upon the infant Church, by bringing out Father Carroll, the Jesuit, to his
1234. Father Carroll s arrival, in the spring of 1776, Charles Carroll was requested
1235.n with the United Colonies in the coming struggle, or, at least, to Charles Carr
1236.rate with them to the extent of inducing the Cana dians to remain neutral; furth
1237.he declared he which was just then being planned could not go, deeming it incomp
1238.then being planned could not go, deeming it incompatible with his profession On
1239.orts and hardships which made travelling The voyage lasted in those days a speci
1240.long and te dious journey, after meeting with several delays on account of the w
1241.fficers, gen etc., and saluted by firing of cannon and other military honors.&qu
1242.chbishop Carroll, pp. 40-43), describing the journey homeward, speaking of New Y
1243.escribing the journey homeward, speaking of New York as "no more the gay, p
1244.ore the gay, polite place at the landing it used to be esteemed;" but as &q
1245.rs generally encamp in the woods, making a covering of the boughs of trees, and
1246.y encamp in the woods, making a covering of the boughs of trees, and large fires
1247.rge fires at But as we had a good awning to our boat, etc., I chose to their fee
1248. of the Quebec Act; the Quebec Act being simply legislation to con firm the Fren
1249.eople of Canada were chary of connecting themselves with a country wherein relig
1250. a stain which it required the purifying influence of the Revolution to purge ou
1251.istricts, combatted the Americans during the progress of the war with little ent
1252.min Franklin first, the others following. From this journey dates a warm friends
1253.THA T LIVE. first Charles Carroll having returned to Maryland, pay ing a visit t
1254.oll having returned to Maryland, pay ing a visit to Washington, then to New York
1255.t and soul into the plans for the coming contest. must be remarked that his cous
1256.in unmoved. The cry of freedom was going up from the heart of that vast con tine
1257. that vast con tinent, the broad rolling streams of which, the lofty mountains a
1258.tened signatures to patriots, assembling to frame and s affix their * Bancroft U
1259.hat it will be celebrated by suc ceeding generations as the great Anniversary Fe
1260.uot; The vicinity of It was an inspiring moment indeed. the old State House, Phi
1261. State House, Philadelphia, was a living mass of The city streets were breathles
1262. when post in the belfry of the building, son below, bidding him tell him the De
1263.lfry of the building, son below, bidding him tell him the Declaration was passed
1264. the Declaration was passed. All morning long he at his his stayed at his post,
1265. his his stayed at his post, alternating between hope and fear, and sometimes ex
1266. hope and fear, and sometimes exclaiming in despair, They ll never, About two o
1267.AMES THAT LIVE. each in turn. No writing was clearer or more unfalter ing than t
1268.writing was clearer or more unfalter ing than that of Charles Carroll. The sligh
1269.ched to his name a peculiar and enduring As he signed the paper, a glory, occurr
1270.ellows. He advanced " again, adding to his signature the significant append
1271.ppendage, of Carrollton," remarking as he did so, They cannot " "
1272.tationed below clapped his hands, crying out to the bell-ringer, Ring, ring!&quo
1273.nds, crying out to the bell-ringer, Ring, ring!" There was a peal of joy su
1274.rying out to the bell-ringer, Ring, ring!" There was a peal of joy such as
1275.throughout all the land, to Such booming of cannon as there was after that, such
1276.n as there was after that, such cheering among the people, such lighting of bonf
1277.cheering among the people, such lighting of bonfires, such congratulations and s
1278.s, such congratulations and such wishing each other joy! Surely they forgot the
1279.s but sanguinary drama. nies, The During the years that followed Mr. Carroll con
1280.from the Continental Congress, remaining two or three years after the Declaratio
1281.many and varied. he were, at this trying crisis of affairs, needed to stand in H
1282.ion to the cause, and his uncompromising hon esty made him the man amongst men,
1283. religionists, sent to him the following address, do not think it out of place t
1284.: and unbounded confidence on your being called, by a unanimous vote, to the fir
1285.ted the communication and the collecting of those But the delay sentiments which
1286.he opportunity, not merely of pre saging the happiness to be expected under your
1287. tration, rience already. but of bearing testimony to that which we expe It is y
1288.s so much depends, that a superintending Providence governs the events of the wo
1289.elves, we derive additional recollecting, that you, sir, have been the principal
1290.en the principal instrument in effecting so rapid a change in our political situ
1291.ional pros perity is peculiarly pleasing to us on another account, because, whil
1292.F CARROLLTON. 2OI can omit, recommending your preservation to the singu lar care
1293.faction your congratulations on my being called, by a unanimous vote, to the fir
1294. duly notice your politeness in offering an apology As that delay has given you
1295. for the unavoidable delay. of realizing, instead of anticipating, the an opport
1296.y. of realizing, instead of anticipating, the an opportunity benefits of the gen
1297.te circumstance, and extraordi resulting from the able support degree, all denom
1298.sperity now before us is truly animating, and ought to excite the exertions of a
1299.it of Christianity, and still conducting themselves as the faithful subjects of
1300.3 to consider the necessity of obtaining some recog The from Congress of their r
1301. themselves by every title, in demanding recognition from the government. A memo
1302.a renewal of. the old policy of inviting disunion by His personal esteem for man
1303.ained the highest esteem, and when going from place to place, and met, as usual,
1304.at Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohi
1305.stablishment of religion, or prohibiting the free " exercise thereof."
1306.rs, and the pursuit of elegant learn ing and classical literature. Need we that
1307.t. pupil accomplished classics, find ing in them, as lights, Cicero." it we
1308.veteran statesman s life form a charming picture. He dwelt at the old Manor Hous
1309.ose early colonial days were no Speaking of a date much anterior to this an stra
1310.ers, in regard to the elegance of living which they witnessed, which led to the
1311. the fashion. in Remember, I am speaking of people good circumstances, which rem
1312.ongly marked, his eye quick and piercing, his manners easy, affable, and gracefu
1313.ent for evermore, but forcibly attesting their convictions. as it now stands, is
1314.nor, to added date by several succeeding generations, until at this presents a l
1315.Lodge. The several parts of the building now form a pleasing whole. At one end i
1316.arts of the building now form a pleasing whole. At one end is a pretty little ch
1317.s heard on Sundays, although neighboring families also attend there. The walls a
1318.with panels of blue ; The chapel calling all at the distant Quarter" to Mas
1319.t; marble slab at the very fine painting, likewise let into the floor of the ais
1320. the floor of the aisle. A Christ Curing the Sick and Maimed Temple," hangs
1321.uriilo s Immaculate Conception. The wing at the other end of the building, corre
1322.he wing at the other end of the building, correspond ing to that in which is the
1323.ther end of the building, correspond ing to that in which is the chapel, has a b
1324.to the just oldest part contains drawing-rooms and dining-rooms, where George Wa
1325.t part contains drawing-rooms and dining-rooms, where George Washington and most
1326., laid out in terraces, smooth spreading lawns, and flower-beds, but especially
1327.act the eye. They are the more deserving of notice that they were planted by the
1328.nd Australian ferns summer-time. Sloping down beyond the circle is an avenue of
1329.cle is an avenue of locust-trees leading to the Quarter," which This is qui
1330.nhabited by the colored people belonging to the and who, now no longer slaves, s
1331.r slaves, still prefer re manor, maining with the old family. In the house are s
1332.t the Revolution, and the causes leading thereto, may have put a check upon a lu
1333.h a kind and valued friend, now residing with the Carroll family, and the letter
1334. pomp and a stateliness to the declining years of the venerable patriot, which s
1335.t from England,* as well as the clothing for the family. In such surround to wom
1336.uot;the Lord Lieutenant s lady attending chapel." Strange sight indeed ther
1337. She ruled right royally; and, according to an account given by an eye-witness o
1338. afterwards became First Lady-in-Waiting at Windsor Castle, in the reign of Will
1339.as "admired excessively by the king, because of her freedom from all court
1340.om which they sprung. Meanwhile, far ing " off was receiving the homage the
1341.nwhile, far ing " off was receiving the homage there in America, their gran
1342.rank ness and integrity; richly meriting and largely receiving the esteem and ve
1343.y; richly meriting and largely receiving the esteem and veneration of a nation o
1344., grave gentle Washington, not unwilling to exchange reminiscences with this pil
1345.perity, to speak of it as of a something past. Jefferson, Adams, Hancock, Monroe
1346. all met betimes in that ancient drawing-room, and in the courtly parlance, dres
1347. besides his store of anecdotes relating to the early colonial times, and the ro
1348.des of his stay at that seat of learning and chivalry, the of Louis le Grand. es
1349.s le Grand. est; for of note, travelling merely for pleasure; College can imagin
1350.d great made pilgrimages to his dwelling to behold with their own eyes the vener
1351.ed to adorn the attached to his dwelling, which was richly and chapel He was pre
1352.on at the * The author remembers hearing the late illustrious Dr. Brownson upon
1353.plays the sentiments of the accompanying American people batim. in his regard, t
1354.esident I have the honor of transmitting to of the United States, you two fac-si
1355.copies, as exact as the art of engraving can pre sent, of the instrument of itse
1356.s of the signers to it. While performing the duty thus assigned me, per mit me t
1357. you, and the country, which is reap ing the reward of your labors, as well that
1358.ent " have the honor of subscribing myself, Your fellow-citizen, "JOHN
1359.terance upon the occasion of the signing of the Declaration : to says he, have e
1360.and truly eventful career. The following extracts from two letters to his son wi
1361. "April " 12, 1821, In writing to you I deem it my duty to call your a
1362. not set our hearts too much on anything in this world, since everything in it i
1363.anything in this world, since everything in it is so precarious, as health, rich
1364.lee signers" of America was holding the golden her independence, and but th
1365.ference, were now bent and But, towering above them all in the majesty of grey.
1366.y his con His last moments were edifying and impressive a life in the highest de
1367. life in the highest degree, the fitting close to spent in the love and fear of
1368.n. Though aware that end was approaching, and already overcome by weak the Body
1369.w had gone. " extract the following from a contemporary article * But he sh
1370.tre not wholly die. No. shall glittering diadem, and the purple of the monarch a
1371.sted the one round his name while living sweetly tempered the evening of his vir
1372.hile living sweetly tempered the evening of his virtuous life, till, the object
1373.ollowed them in turn to a " resting-place, where the nation, with a sob of
1374. train, the young hero hails the glowing fight ! the troops And though around hi
1375.. The young, the old, alike, commingling tears, His country s heavy grief bedews
1376.of his native Poitou, beside her winding streams and over her broad fields, whil
1377.as even then remarkable. But the smiling landscape passed from sight. A day of h
1378. fiercely 220 NAMES THAT LIVE. following the scent, rushed abroad through the ve
1379.Massillon, poured forth words of burning elo quence; the council-chambers in whi
1380. in which every fair and gra cious thing was gathered to enrich and beautify the
1381.re childhood and innocence lay weltering in the bright heart s-blood of youth. V
1382.thunder bolts of the Most High trembling above their heads. That land so rich in
1383.w its importunate blessings, and raising their second Babel, the Temple of Reaso
1384.and ? HENRI DE LAROCHEJAQUELEIN. knowing not each man 221 his brother, they fell
1385.foremost defenders. The life of the king was already threatened, and our hero, i
1386. arms to strike a blow for God, for king, for country, gave himself up by an act
1387.nts, into the hands of the overshadowing childhood s his I am come into National
1388.l Needless to dwell upon these harrowing scenes; the poor king s trust in the af
1389.on these harrowing scenes; the poor king s trust in the affection of his people;
1390.ny months; that gentle and gracious king whose grave, sad face, so full of mourn
1391.ister, come down through the intervening France and the w orld like a pale ghost
1392. orld like a pale ghost. years, haunting And that queen whose hair, once the hue
1393.eadly sorrow; whose eyes, once sparkling with hope and delight, had grown dull a
1394.n a scaffold. Here, then, was a touching appeal to chivalry, and Larochejaquelei
1395.uelein felt that he must be up and doing; must stand among the few loyal ones th
1396.es that formed an outwork round the king an outwork stanch and true indeed, but
1397. hero re " turned to Poitou, crying: " I go to my native long." p
1398. and exalted sanc Never, to our thinking, in the annals of the world, tity. occu
1399.the priests who will not take the crying: There were human tigers within ready t
1400.were human tigers within ready to spring oath!" upon their prey. The Conven
1401.nnot make I should be too sure of losing both did I take the oath re " &quo
1402.LEIN. now 22 3 disgrace myself by taking the oath required by your decrees. I wi
1403.harmony. Hence the latter, never feeling themselves oppressed, took no part in t
1404. no part in the widespread and revolting measures of the revolutionists. They lo
1405.nists. They loved and respected the king, and had no abuses of which to complain
1406.ongst the nobles. of The Moreover, being in complete submission to the laws of t
1407.nquilly in of false liberty, and willing in all sincerity to render to Caesar th
1408.p the stony sides of the cross, covering it quietly, noiselessly, and surely, as
1409.rth with new-made graves. People passing the stealing cross began to mutter with
1410.made graves. People passing the stealing cross began to mutter with ominous shak
1411.nous shake of the head moss was creeping up. In 1793, when the storm had fairly
1412.ir risen, of velvet green.* first rising at Bres roused by the danger of their k
1413. Bres roused by the danger of their king to take part in the deadly struggle tha
1414.t in the deadly struggle that was raging throughout France, the peasantry began
1415.ritory were numbers of royalists willing and even anxious to strike a blow in th
1416.ces of Bonchamps and d Elbee. Perceiving the need of a general rising in that po
1417. Perceiving the need of a general rising in that portion of the country between
1418.d, poorly provisioned, they were wanting in everything but courage, trust in God
1419.isioned, they were wanting in everything but courage, trust in God, and a firm b
1420.ad entrenched themselves. Before setting out the young leader made a soul-stirri
1421.ut the young leader made a soul-stirring address to his sol diers, concluding wi
1422.ing address to his sol diers, concluding with the immortal words: My friends, if
1423.o the very thickest of the foe, shouting, See, the Blues are flying. Charge!&quo
1424.foe, shouting, See, the Blues are flying. Charge!" Charge they did, and wer
1425.d were left masters of the field, Waving his " enemy having deserted their
1426.he field, Waving his " enemy having deserted their artillery, arms, and am
1427.artillery, arms, and am munition. Taking possession of these, the Vendeans the h
1428.be so brief and glorious. Lescure having left Clisson about this time in com pan
1429. roi!" To his great surprise crying as they rode, and delight he discovered
1430. they congratula ted each other on being at last in the service of the king; but
1431.being at last in the service of the king; but their greetings were necessarily s
1432.were necessarily short, and, exchang ing a cordial God-speed, each hastened upon
1433.my advanced in four divisions, one being under the command of Larochejaquelein a
1434. name a short but The ammunition failing, furious encounter took place. rode off
1435.HEJAQUELEIN. 227 absence Lescure, hoping to take the bridge, rushed down the slo
1436. Suddenly a shout was was seen advancing at full heard, and Larochejaquelein gal
1437.n several divisions be escalade, calling upon Larochejaquelein began the his men
1438.n to follow him. There r were no scaling-ladders at hand, ) et some effort had t
1439. to be made to reach the walls. Mounting on the shoulders of a brave peasant, Ti
1440. and cried for quarter. once the lasting praise of the Vendeans, justly irritate
1441. with remarkable modera Truth to showing mercy to all the prisoners. were more o
1442. prisoners. were more occupied in giving thanks to God they At Thouars than in t
1443.ks to God they At Thouars than in taking vengeance on their foes. they obtained
1444.munition, which they victories of Having now gained some minor impor tance, they
1445.enemy s ranks which riddled his clothing ley Undaunted he cried out, and tore aw
1446.sistible charge. On they rushed, meeting and repulsing the enemy s cavalry. The
1447.e. On they rushed, meeting and repulsing the enemy s cavalry. The onslaught was
1448. the great leaders in the Vendean rising. The council after much deliberation se
1449.Cath and Roman faith, and to have a king apostolic who would be a father within
1450.e, Vihiers, and Montreuil. Concentrating their forces, they now marched on towar
1451.ise the enemy at Varin mead ows. Leaving a small force to guard the Bridge of St
1452. made an assault upon the rear. Throwing his cap over the ramparts, he cried: So
1453.ldiers, who will get me my cap So saying, he leaped over himself, followed tumul
1454.t the re hold. publicans had fled during the night from Saumur under cover of th
1455.hrill and high above the deafen- 230 ing rot! NAMES THAT shouts of " LIVE.
1456. were now placed therein. On the morning after the vic tory Larochejaquelein was
1457.tory Larochejaquelein was found standing as in deep A friend, approaching, refle
1458.tanding as in deep A friend, approaching, reflection, with eyes cast down. asked
1459. down. asked him of what he was thinking. "I am lost in astonishment,"
1460.ed the some what arduous post of keeping Saumur, which he did with equal courage
1461.e died upon the scaffold, thus expiating his de Paris, Nor was his execution the
1462.n. Meanwhile the Vendean army was making some im movements. Charette succeeded i
1463. movements. Charette succeeded in taking Machecoul; he had hitherto acted indepe
1464.mann, the republican leader, was passing with fire and sword through the portant
1465.gh the portant Bocage territory, burning, devastating, slaying. He re duced to a
1466.t Bocage territory, burning, devastating, slaying. He re duced to ashes the anci
1467.territory, burning, devastating, slaying. He re duced to ashes the ancient chate
1468. and Stofflet the centre; the right wing, their vigor ous charge completely brok
1469.force was their terror of without having fired a shot, so great the Larochejaque
1470.e, seized upon a park Stofflet, pursuing were the it against the foe. Already ar
1471.faithful souls they charged The opposing forces far outnumbered them again. they
1472. the armies met. A panic spread opposing among the peas ants in vain their despa
1473.g the peas ants in vain their despairing leaders called upon them, for the honor
1474. comrades with words of hope, whispering of the which at that teeth of their opp
1475.ted valor, and that was Henri de Nothing could subdue his dauntless life and hop
1476.eded in dis order to St. Florent, hoping to effect the passage of the Loire. The
1477.homes in ruins. They were still smarting, too, HENRI DE LAROCHEJAQUELEIN. 233 un
1478.ense of failure and defeat; and learning that four or five thousand republican p
1479.ition of their leaders. A stormy meeting was held in the council-chamber; of the
1480. the leaders were in favor of condemning all the prisoners to instant execution,
1481. to instant execution, and thus acceding to the soldiers demands. Lescure, who h
1482.fer But he was not Horrible horrible ing, and cried, and already without in the
1483.treets the peasants, heard, disregarding every authority, were pointing the cann
1484.regarding every authority, were pointing the cannon towards the church. Terror p
1485. addressed himself to Autichamps, saying My friend, the last order I shall ever
1486. shall ever give you : is that of saving the republicans. it Tell me, I implore
1487.rter Before the quiet of another evening had fallen upon the town Bonchamps was
1488. and to him was mercy shown when, laying down his command, he appeared before th
1489.RS! BONCHAMPS L ORDONNE"* a fitting tribute to the noble and gentle qualiti
1490. and remonstrance were alike un availing; enfeebled by fatigue, half crazed with
1491.n his eyes he refused the honor, begging of them to elect one whose moments of y
1492.e. more in readily inspire con declaring that he alone could restore the fallen
1493.JAQUELEIN. to the 235 wounded, the dying, the helpless, the oppressed, he was a
1494. that, in the event of success, the king would " give him command of a regi
1495.dy hearts of the peasants were beginning to fail them, their arms to grow feeble
1496. now pressed forward to Laval, defeating a republican force at Chateau-Gonthier
1497.ejaquelein was unarmed and one arm being quite helpless from a partially disable
1498.rom a partially disabled, wound. Evading the blow, the hero rode up at full spee
1499. then gave you your After which, putting spurs to his horse, he regained the lif
1500.o the engagement, Lescure, who was dying, as it were, by inches, caused himself
1501.n a few impres sive words, which, coming as they did from a beloved leader now u
1502.ejaquelein also harangued them, dwelling upon all that could inflame their patri
1503.fame and the consciousness of well-doing as their reward, and on the other marty
1504.rmy into three great columns. Proceeding onwards, he gained fresh victories, and
1505., he gained fresh victories, and hav ing carried Fougeres and Ernee, began to co
1506. her he declared that besides in leaving her unprotected, his sole regret his dy
1507.r unprotected, his sole regret his dying was that he could not place king upon f
1508.s dying was that he could not place king upon first the throne. When the grief-s
1509.usterity of his life. his as the evening of the i4th November, the royalists The
1510.ted, and the fire royalists, approaching nearer, began The republican garrison.
1511.n escalade was suggested; but no scaling-ladders were at hand. After a moment of
1512. rear of the royal dawn of the following morning, Laroche jaquelein and Stofflet
1513. the royal dawn of the following morning, Laroche jaquelein and Stofflet, in acc
1514.ttempt a failure, the republicans having provided against it. Moreover, the roya
1515.to the republicans, the Vendeans gaining the day, with consid erable loss to the
1516.d the priests and thither, administering indiscrimi nately to republican and roy
1517.endeans were now destitute of everything, shoes, demanded Scores of gallant sol
1518. demanded Scores of gallant sol clothing, and, worst of all, food. diers died of
1519. place at Dol. The republicans, burn ing to avenge their late defeats, and thirs
1520.avenge their late defeats, and thirsting for the blood of the Vendean heroes, pr
1521. Noise and confusion prevailed appalling in the gloom. it would seem that chaos
1522. which was under Stofflet With that wing of the army command, he succeeded in dr
1523.he army command, he succeeded in driving Meanwhile making a brave resist the van
1524.he succeeded in driving Meanwhile making a brave resist the vanguard of the foe
1525., by a vigorous onslaught, in repuls ing the republicans; but so terrific was th
1526.o leave the Larocheja quelein, appearing at the moment, and taking in at a glanc
1527.ein, appearing at the moment, and taking in at a glance the critical situation,
1528., rushed into their very midst, shouting the inspiring war-cry and calling upon
1529.their very midst, shouting the inspiring war-cry and calling upon the terrified
1530.outing the inspiring war-cry and calling upon the terrified peasants to rally. D
1531.hildren, the this wounded, and the dying were juncture behind. At a venerable pr
1532. upon a high mound of earth, and holding 240 NAMES THAT He LIVE. soldiers to tak
1533.ot;be guilty of the infamy of abandoning your wives and children to the knives o
1534.and fight; it is the only way of sav ing them. Will you abandon your general in
1535.at your Kneel down, you who are will ing to follow me, and I will give you absol
1536.e remission of their sins; then, placing them selves under the standard of Laroc
1537.ached their hero s side, he was standing with his arms crossed upon his breast,
1538.his arms crossed upon his breast, facing a alone, When he saw that not a man rem
1539.eless, he stood thus, side, When braving death, too proud to turn his back upon
1540.came to him that Talmont was endeavoring to keep another portion of the field wi
1541.h only eight hundred men. Hasten the ing to his assistance, he succeeded in rall
1542.his assistance, he succeeded in rallying upon to hold way a mere handful of men,
1543.ht field was won by * "We are going to heaven " !" Long live the
1544.heaven " !" Long live the king!" HENRI DE LAROCHEJAQUELEIN. 24! t
1545.on their en trance to the town, chanting the Vexilla Regis," and " hol
1546. Vexilla Regis," and " holding aloft that crucifix the sight of which
1547.rage. This victory was but the beginning of a series of con quests by which the
1548.n to La Vendee. Their leader, submitting, first reluctantly proceeded towards An
1549.took place. A heavy was continued during the day, but with out much result. On t
1550.t with out much result. On the following day cannonading was again opened by the
1551.result. On the following day cannonading was again opened by the Vendeans upon S
1552.s Gate. After some hours severe fighting a breach was made. Here, as everywhere
1553.efs gave them a noble example by rushing onwards themselves into the Not a man f
1554. of artillery foes." On the morning of the 4th the army retreated to Bauge.
1555.orce. opposite Larochejaquelein, leaving Piron to defend their first position, c
1556.MES THAT LIVE. river, their leader going first, They met and surprised the garri
1557.d famine was daily and hourly enfeebling the remnants of that once vigorous army
1558.undismayed, which he succeeded in taking, and there a small supply He made an ef
1559.share the fate of their comrades. Taking three thousand picked men, he placed th
1560.rees, whence they succeeded in repulsing Westermann and Miiller. This effort see
1561.seemed to have exhausted their remaining strength, and the peasants began to wav
1562.Larocheja quelein rushed forward, making a desperate charge upon the enemy s cen
1563.pon the haggard, hollow-eyed men who ing, remained to follow him, besought them
1564.alike to have deserted the half-starving men. Hope was dead within their hearts,
1565.et with a most disastrous defeat. Having retreated within the walls, they gave t
1566.e possession of Larochejaquelein. Riding through the streets, he forced a few th
1567.gst many of the royalist leaders. Having collected the tattered when remnants of
1568.mnants of his flag, he was about leaving the town in a narrow street he met an o
1569.ted a gun in order to assist in covering the retreat of their companions. Stoffl
1570. recognized him, and begged lay bleeding him to save her child. "Give it he
1571." he cried, and Stofflet As placing it in front of his horse, with the flag
1572.royalists hastened on to Ancenis, hoping to cross the Loire. Larochejaquelein an
1573.in two frail fishingtheir progress being watched with intense eager smacks, ness
1574.cks, ness by the entire army. On landing they were attacked men made by a small
1575.ent of the enemy under Westermann coming up, an engagement was inevitable. The p
1576.t the main body of their troops arriving, the peasants either fled in dismay or
1577.nly a mere handful succeeded in crossing the river. Thus were they separated fro
1578. of their fate. Larochejaquelein, having penetrated into the heart of the countr
1579.de lived over again the fierce, exciting, and most glorious struggle in which he
1580.e in which he had been engaged, devising new plans for a final effort in favor o
1581. a final effort in favor of God and king and country. For, inspired by the crumb
1582. country. For, inspired by the crumbling walls and ancient towers, by the storie
1583.not safe. News of his whereabouts having been conveyed to the republican camp ha
1584. prisoner. He concealed himself by lying on the entablature of that portion of t
1585.at portion of the facade still remaining. After a hasty search the enemy with dr
1586. him with marked cold am about departing for However, he said, Mortagne; if you
1587.olumns," Cordelier, was devastating La Vendee on every side. Larocheja; &qu
1588.e the peasants a safeconduct, and having thus entrapped, to fall upon and So ter
1589.Larochejaquelein in great numbers. Being therefore reinforced and in command of
1590.epublican army, upon each time defeating him with considerable loss to the The t
1591.o burn the town of As they were applying their blazing torches Noisailles. to th
1592.n of As they were applying their blazing torches Noisailles. to the walls, Laroc
1593.to gain for the cause he loved. Pursuing the fugi tives, he discovered two grena
1594.o grenadiers hidden behind a Approaching them, he cried: "Surrender, and yo
1595.e of the hedge. Vendean officers, riding up, called his leader by name, implorin
1596.up, called his leader by name, imploring him to hold no further parley with the
1597.is musket, one of the grenadiers, taking aim, dead. fired, and the hero fell bac
1598.e the grass grew very green and a waving tree played at cross-bars with the suns
1599.pure and unsullied. With bitter, burning tears they looked their last upon the y
1600. awe and wonder fathers, little guessing that he should take his place among the
1601.t soundly in thine early grave, leav ing to fame a pure, noble, and unsullied re
1602., loyal among the loyal, to God, to king, to country, their names stand out upon
1603.t I heard him relate to a rustic, gaping crowd last relic His adventures thereab
1604. the reason why, The Blues, first having killed the good king our sire, Burnt ou
1605.Blues, first having killed the good king our sire, Burnt out such poor devils as
1606.hom they sought For months, from morning till night; We insurgents of le Bocage
1607.etreat to entrap. Sustained a despairing fight. Before the avalanche, forever at
1608.I seem to see him now, his noble curling head When waving his hat on high. He ru
1609. now, his noble curling head When waving his hat on high. He rushed to the front
1610.: Forward, lads, for God and " King, Rang " his words me, like trumpet
1611. no balls, nor powder, at this inspiring cry army in sabots like a mountain torr
1612.with voice and Thus he Round the failing slow, Evoked for us days of old. Breath
1613.hung upon his words, While, with feeling rare to see, He ended Of his brave with
1614.writers of all times have been unsparing in their denunciations of him, and [ROM
1615.pt, which only succeeded in establishing a short-lived Latin empire at Constanti
1616.protector of his co-religionists. During the absence of the western lords in Pal
1617. unnatural, and they were besides daring arid unscrupulous rebels, dangerous to
1618. Toulouse, espoused their cause, lending them every support in his power, and ho
1619.m every support in his power, and hoping by this means to increase his own estat
1620.crease his own estates. Inno cent having, as his predecessors had, loudly de his
1621.rough the province of Languedoc, calling upon sinners to do penance for their si
1622.officers. !" He " died, crying out, O Lord, forgive do This was the si
1623.This was the signal for a general rising against the Albigenses, who had already
1624.gns of the day were unanimous in calling for their sup pression. in Frederic II.
1625.the bitterest enemy of the Pope, framing laws for the government of Sicily decre
1626.VE. and wasted attested by their smoking ruins the fury of the fanatical sectari
1627.gns of the day were unanimous in calling for their * suppression." At this
1628. the good cause by prayer and preach ing, but Simon de Montfort was destined by
1629.on A same author; to the fearless daring of Cceur de Lion he joined the fervent
1630.who fought in the Oriental wars, wearing it upon their shoulder. upon the Amongs
1631.Augustus, 2$? the then reign who was ing king of France, and husband of Blanche
1632.tus, 2$? the then reign who was ing king of France, and husband of Blanche of Ca
1633. the cross was victorious. fort, setting out to battle, "for praying for me
1634.setting out to battle, "for praying for me !" A of importance taken by
1635.e solemn bells had been heard at evening recalling Christ s Incarnation; where o
1636.ells had been heard at evening recalling Christ s Incarnation; where on Sab bath
1637.re told of the heroic men now mouldering into dust upon the sands of Pal estine,
1638.e, the descendants of whom were swelling the Chris tian host which now beleaguer
1639.ives as they followed the faith of ening their fathers and worshipped at the sam
1640.s, and over the beleaguered town evening cast its myriad their streets and dwell
1641.aged with ished fury. There was clashing of arms and knightly steel, the neighin
1642.of arms and knightly steel, the neighing of war-horses, the undiminclank of shou
1643. combatants, and the groans of the dying. High above all, mighty as the rushing
1644.g. High above all, mighty as the rushing of mountain torrents, was the sound of
1645.led the soldiers with enthusiasm. Waving his sword above his head he cheered his
1646.e cheered his follow ers on, or wielding his ponderous battle-axe he carried dea
1647.RT. 259 were heard ever and anon calling upon the Christian him to the death for
1648.rs were gentlemen; their gentle breeding Christians, knights and and the noble c
1649.character and tendency of their teaching will go far to The con supply the motiv
1650.ave been indulged in by those professing themselves the champions of the faith,
1651.692. SIMON DE MONTFORT. ner, 261 winning by all his soldierly frankness of beari
1652.y all his soldierly frankness of bearing the hearts of clers tell us So that old
1653. also much beloved. He was never failing to hear Mass every remarkably religious
1654.postolic; and of his faith the following illustration is given: "He told th
1655.han those of the angels, for they, being face to Well face with God, have not th
1656.ot to the made church in in thanksgiving therefor. He was again besieged Muret,
1657. the small force at his command. morning of that eventful day he laid his sword
1658.nd we are told disposed of the dead king s armor for the benefit of the poor.f B
1659.to receive the investiture from the king of France and pay him feudal tribute. T
1660.e are told, intrepid Montfort, despising all obstacles and every peril, now unde
1661.he 25th of June, 1218, he went according to custom to early Mass. Just as Mass w
1662.o early Mass. Just as Mass was beginning the sound of mail-clad feet was heard c
1663.sound of mail-clad feet was heard coming up the nave. A mes senger advanced to w
1664. advanced to where Montfort was kneeling. " My lord count," said he, i
1665.religious quiet of the church, pondering upon that Mystery of the altar which he
1666.ar which he had spent years in defending. He prayed ardently, indeed, for the wa
1667.rayed ardently, indeed, for the wavering Christian cause, and begged that the en
1668. with fervent, child like faith. Adoring the Sacred Host, he exclaimed, " N
1669.in peace." He had adored the living " Thy servant depart God for the l
1670.vation he rushed from the church, crying, Now onward to death for Him who suffer
1671.erate, but Montfort succeeded in driving the enemy back within their ramparts. A
1672.ows and He beat his breast, recommending his soul to God and the Blessed Virgin,
1673.God and the Blessed Virgin, and so doing expired. stones. Truly his was a death
1674.sader, for he fell sword in hand, facing the enemy, and offering his soul to God
1675. in hand, facing the enemy, and offering his soul to God. his son, Amauri, was o
1676.l Chapter of Citeaux, "com plaining with tears that the Albigenses, for who
1677.rief, he made the fol sals." lowing energetic protest: Men are hairs,"
1678.pled upon; I shall call there is nothing left but to appeal to arms. the king of
1679.ing left but to appeal to arms. the king of France to meet the heretics, and giv
1680.ras adds: "The Church in organizing a crusade against these formidable enem
1681.and gave his noble life. To our thinking he is the grandest figure of his centur
1682.sketch has lent its mite towards placing him in the true light before Cath olics
1683.larger portion of English literature ing public. If the deals out praise to hero
1684.moreover, their singular glory, enduring even to this day, that the noblest exam
1685.ll other virtues have never been wanting among POPE LEO XIII. TO THE IRISH BISHO
1686.NIALS OF THE CATHOLIC PRESS. most loving tribute to the Catholic Irish race. It
1687.ll of interest of wholesome and edifying instruction and incident. Particularly
1688.lume "A ; . . . in these unsettling times that all may recognize the happy
1689. born and bred on foreign soil, speaking out of the abundance of his heart, find
1690." "A sprightly and interesting volume, replete with Irish repartee and
1691.ord. book that contains many interesting illustrations of the devotion of the Ir
1692.c Church. It is replete with interesting anecdotes, and is a book that should be
1693.ither so well brought out nor containing such useful and The author had varied o
1694. author had varied opportuni interesting matter sold for over three times the pr
1695.er three times the price. ties of noting down facts connected with the fidelity
1696.ms to have lost no-opportunity in noting the leading characteristics of those am
1697.ost no-opportunity in noting the leading characteristics of those amongst whom h
1698.re It is not only a deserved interesting book people, but will prove appreciativ

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/