Concordance for Harry Dee, or, Making it out / by Francis J. Finn.

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. rrydeeormakingOOfinn HARRY DEE OR MAKING BY IT OUT FRANCIS J. FINN, S.J. Author
3. ful On the Run Bobby in Movteland Facing Danger His Luckiest Year. A Sequel to o
4. b" Hint Lucky Bob Percy Wynn; or, Making a Boy Tom Playpair; or, Making a Start
5. r, Making a Boy Tom Playpair; or, Making a Start Harry Dee; or, Working It Out C
6. r, Making a Start Harry Dee; or, Working It Out Claude Lightfoot; or, How the Pr
7. our battles o'er In which we go swimming and meet with an adventure, 49 VIII. ag
8. II. again and spend a pleas. ant evening in the infirmary, . 55 4 CONTENTS. CHAP
9. der will find . has an important bearing upon this story, 87 CHAPTER XIV. fish I
10. n which this story ters is XV. of losing its within a to tittle chief charac. an
11. to tittle chief charac. and thus coming an abrupt end, . . 108 CHAPTER Mr. Scar
12. ntance, and sings us several astonishing songs, .... 206 In which a strange reve
13. s her strange story, and to two charming little ones, who entertale, me with a n
14. Mr. Lang obtains further data concerning the missing money, and Tom bids us fare
15. ains further data concerning the missing money, and Tom bids us farewell, 236 .
16. I have the doubtful pleasure of renewing Mr. 242 James Caggett's acquaintance, .
17. XIII. In which Caggett makes a startling disclosure and my life, .... I . pass 2
18. a close, ........ difficulty in bringing his 278 HARRY CHAPTER IN WHICH I DEE. I
19. ificant self. am not the hero; and owing to a strange run of circumstances, am s
20. possible make any of sort of a beginning without telling somewhat my own early h
21. y of sort of a beginning without telling somewhat my own early history. And, to
22. a very small boy I succeeded in throwing my father and mother into a state of te
23. t my mother, who had a habit of stealing to my little bed to tuck me in securely
24. and to her horror discovered me walking, fast asleep, up and in at once. down o
25. to the examination by tones to bursting into tears. Madam," he at length said i
26. of my case was on the point of bringing my distress to a climax, when my father
27. to walk in my sleep, and that its being an idiosyncrasy of mine was another way
28. ncrasy of mine was another way of saying that it was very odd on my part to do s
29. walk." it My my father's way of putting not only dispelled of alarm, but even I
30. hat proud once looked upon sleep-walking as Even at this moment I canan accompli
31. s moment I canan accomplishment. smiling recall my conversation with not without
32. oors of us. I "Willie," began, hastening over to his house, in do you snore your
33. p?" "No." I looked on him with something akin to contempt HARRY as I DEE. 9 adde
34. e, you haven't got any iddy-sink- racing." "What!" gasped Willie. "I can walk in
35. I can walk in my sleep, iddy-sink-racing. Willie, and that's an Proud both of th
36. news to our cook and house-maid, leaving Willie in a state of perplexity not to
37. remember how often that soft, caressing mother's hand would gently stroke my br
38. e troubled dream, and how, as her loving eyes fixed themselves on me, her lips w
39. would touch my cheek, while her soothing voice would charm my dream-haunted fanc
40. -haunted fancies into peace. One morning it was in my ninth year I awoke bright
41. ngered about her features. was something in her face which I had never seen befo
42. is, the supreme sorrow oi my Even during the first sharp agony of loss, it becam
43. unguarded. mother had a very disturbing effect on me, and my restlessness durin
44. effect on me, and my restlessness during sleeping hours grew more alarming. The
45. me, and my restlessness during sleeping hours grew more alarming. The question
46. during sleeping hours grew more alarming. The question then arose as to the choi
47. the Demin and accordingly the following appeared columns: reliable. WANTED —A
48. souri. Apply Quite promptly that morning the applicants came pouring in. My fath
49. that morning the applicants came pouring in. My father and the doctor made short
50. some, found great difficulty in putting off others, and finally, through sheer
51. s they thought, in the pera woman giving her name as Mrs. Ada RayI say, it As wa
52. vidences of a "character," as the saying is, were dark. To their searching inqui
53. saying is, were dark. To their searching inquiries her answers were vague and un
54. which she put her answers, while giving evidence of a good education, and, inde
55. ned As at an for myself, notwithstanding the fact that age when inquisitiveness
56. when the was future is nificent brimming with unknown wonders and magpossibiliti
57. Here was Mrs. Raynor bright and smiling, with pleasant answers to all my questi
58. away an idle hour. Her past was nothing to me. In brief, I came very shortly to
59. n. She had a soft, gentle way of calling me " Harry " which brought back vividly
60. I first addressed her by that endearing name. Nor at the time did it seem as th
61. ence of a child's innocent, unsuspecting love. go to prove, was within a little
62. o prove, was within a little of wrecking my life. Every term of affection was af
63. thday. I was December, the day was lying on a rug close to the glowing hearth-fi
64. was lying on a rug close to the glowing hearth-fire in our sitting-room, readin
65. o the glowing hearth-fire in our sitting-room, reading for the tenth or eleventh
66. hearth-fire in our sitting-room, reading for the tenth or eleventh time the abso
67. the tenth or eleventh time the absorbing tale of " Ali Baba and the Forty Thieve
68. ieves," and where Morgiana pours boiling water into the jars wherein the, thieve
69. ootfall, and I hastened from the sitting-room into the hallway to meet and greet
70. ened the door he always found me waiting within; and raising me in his arms woul
71. ays found me waiting within; and raising me in his arms would give me a fatherly
72. occasion, had just reached that exciting passage however, he did speak. began as
73. y fear and aversion were not astonishing in- HARRY DEE. asmuch old as 1 my uncle
74. es, papa? Indeed I do!" "Well, something strange has come over him poor James! h
75. ond in the rough; for he's really making a show of being genial. Look at — thi
76. ; for he's really making a show of being genial. Look at — this!" And unbutton
77. nial. Look at — this!" And unbuttoning letter. his overcoat, my father took ou
78. ch he produced a "See!" he said, holding it before I my eyes. "Pead ing." for me
79. , holding it before I my eyes. "Pead ing." for me, papa; you know can't read wri
80. he term "dear." out I He went on reading, however, with- comment: want your son
81. n my wish thus curtly expressed in being gratified by the this letter, he was ce
82. ainly deceived. HARRY my DEE. of passing a nigftit The thought under uncle's roo
83. o my surprise than to my upon his asking her " Is it to accompany me, she showed
84. sary," answered not go." cried, catching her hand, "will my father. I'll "Then M
85. ccordingly, we took must say the morning train for nightfall Tower Hill, and I d
86. station, where Toward we found awaiting us a rusty carriage under charge of a r
87. tately seemed to was cold and forbidding. be the dominant note of its did the in
88. to library and from library to sleeping apartments was severe, massive, and glo
89. rew open the door 10 HARRY DEE. groaning on its hinges; and you may be sure that
90. e's hand from the moment of our entering through the gloomy portals to the momen
91. dark, old uncle, ugly, musty, forbidding books, sat my gloomiest among the gloom
92. ely; and I fancied that she was stifling a rising sob. How her hand trembled wit
93. I fancied that she was stifling a rising sob. How her hand trembled with in mine
94. l frost, and his neglected hair, falling about his shoulders, appeared to be whi
95. As I gazed at him in fear and trembling I wondered whether were possible for hi
96. " he began, while I was still ruminating it upon this remote possibility, "who i
97. stood face to face with this forbidding old man, she manifested that there were
98. fested that there were other smouldering fires in her bosom; for the flash of an
99. ," "this to, is she cried, still holding I my hand, the last place upon the eart
100. a perAs she went on, her voice gathering ceptible start. passion and volume with
101. oy ; you remain. 1 HARRY I DEE. Catching If was terrified I beyond measure. my y
102. out: "Mamma, go, I go too. 44 I'm going to stay with you. Harry," answered Come
103. y," answered Come on, my nurse, resuming " the gentle tones my ear knew it so we
104. ouse together; there's a curse hang- ing over ing, it, and some day will fall."
105. ther; there's a curse hang- ing over ing, it, and some day will fall." And turn-
106. ay will fall." And turn- we were leaving "Hold on! Stay! the library. One minute
107. paused and faced him; her bosom heaving and her eyes still sparkling with anger
108. som heaving and her eyes still sparkling with anger, she stood like a deer at ba
109. t enough, O my God, that voice trembling. he should have brought ruin to the hus
110. ssure you that to-night I have something to settle which is of great importance
111. after-events, to believe this consoling for me much of that wretched, loveless
112. his came presently the hideous, scowling ser< vant who had admitted us into the
113. in "Caggett," rasped my uncle, returning that gentleman's scowl of inquiry with
114. atility and power in the way of growling and scowling now. He departed with a sn
115. ower in the way of growling and scowling now. He departed with a snarl which bro
116. way out of the room, and after bestowing a look upon me which forced me to hold
117. and you, boy The last are you listening?" three words he brought out with a bur
118. as of unmusical cymbals brought clanging together by a furious hand. "Yes, sir,"
119. ghtened out of my senses. I was clasping my nurse's hand, and even in my excess
120. strong tempest of passion was yet raging in her bosom. She was muttering to hers
121. t raging in her bosom. She was muttering to herself, inaudibly for the most part
122. scoundrel," and the I like came hissing from between her set teeth. felt that I
123. n her set teeth. felt that I was growing in fear of her too. " Are you listening
124. in fear of her too. " Are you listening, cook?" said my uncle. " I'm a-listenin
125. ut further prelude, read ^loud something to this effect: " I, James Dee, being a
126. ng to this effect: " I, James Dee, being and bequeath all of sound mind, do here
127. kind and value soever to 21 my serv- ing-man, James Caggett. The old man here ra
128. other paper from the gloomy, smouldering hearth-fire. "Listen again." He his des
129. read in substance: " I, James Dee, being of sound mind, do hereby devise and beq
130. an old man. Boy," he continued, turning to me, "I want to see you alone for a m
131. t at woman, dinner at one." Then, taking my hand, he conducted me up the broad s
132. room at the head of the stairs, leaving Mrs. Raynor in charge of Caggett. He dr
133. hair beside the hearth-fire, and seating me in it, stood looking down on me not
134. ire, and seating me in it, stood looking down on me not unkindly. "Harry," he sa
135. were dim and there was a faint quivering about his lips. "I was a little boy lik
136. ather. HARRY DEE. 23 -Harry, I'm getting old, and if I die soon you must get you
137. to-morrow?" "O uncle!" I cried, jumping to my feet and catch- — — — — i
138. o my feet and catch- — — — — ing his hand. In an instant kissed my uncle
139. y into the long corridor, and perceiving light streaming from an open door at th
140. corridor, and perceiving light streaming from an open door at the further Mrs. R
141. at the further Mrs. Raynor was awaiting *nd, hastened toward it. writing as tho
142. waiting *nd, hastened toward it. writing as though me. Her agitation was extreme
143. nd I could see that she had been weeping. Mrs. Raynor was communicative that nig
144. roken with emotion she related something It was a feel tale of sorrow and do wro
145. the ask DEE. scene with like a affecting my it uncle was driven from and as allo
146. an early On this Christfull mas morning, however, it must have been seven o'clo
147. oke. I shall never forget that awakening; and for it was join not the slow trans
148. s to semi- consciousness, where sleeping waking hands. No; I passed from sound s
149. mi- consciousness, where sleeping waking hands. No; I passed from sound sleep to
150. ed. Happily for me, even in this passing frenzy, the sweet words of my poor nurs
151. . Gradually I became calmer, and arising from my grovelling position on the floo
152. e calmer, and arising from my grovelling position on the floor, I fell upon my k
153. than he had shown himself the preceding night. His conduct was singular. Catchi
154. ight. His conduct was singular. Catching me roughly by the arm, he hurried me fr
155. s. My poor uncle had been stabbed during the night and lay dead uoon his bed. No
156. ARS ENTER UPON A NEW LIFE. I WHEN my ing over came to my senses I found myself i
157. ven suspected you. The police have thing seems to be now quite clear. examined i
158. had read the Your nurse, after dabbling your night-shirt wilL with blood, kille
159. iserable old man had a habit of sleeping with a large sum of money by his side
160. sum Caggett, fifty my brother's keeping on that night was thou- sand dollars."
161. a tale of strange groanings and mocking laughs and weird sighs. As for Caggett,
162. ry made much of his bravery in remaining alone in a " haunted of the house. How
163. of little feet, nor bright faces peering from the open windows softened the gloo
164. ed it by night. Strange tales concerning it flew from mouth to mouth and in cour
165. me ceased to be uttered and his dwelling came to be called the "haunted house."
166. rt conversation with in the my beginning of this chapter I Brain fever set in, s
167. without of death. loss. My sleep-walking habit, it is true, disappeared with the
168. , he concluded that the active, stirring boy-life of boarding-school might prove
169. he active, stirring boy-life of boarding-school might prove the best remedy. Acc
170. t on the outskirts of a village. Jumping to my feet, I grasped my I valise, hurr
171. and followed with my no college building loomed up before me from this point of
172. hat by the sight of three boys advancing along the track. Two of them were of ab
173. college students. While I stood looking at the approaching trio and endeavoring
174. While I stood looking at the approaching trio and endeavoring to nerve myself to
175. at the approaching trio and endeavoring to nerve myself to address them, my val
176. enly jerked from my hand; and on turning I was confronted by a rather roughly-cl
177. th in a year and a eye the fast-receding train: day's journey. HARRY DEE. 3 "You
178. Yah'" ejaculated the young man, swinging closed and his tongue sticking out in t
179. swinging closed and his tongue sticking out in the valise behind his back and f
180. in the valise behind his back and facing me, with one eye unmistak- able derisio
181. ade several circles about my tantalizing acquaintin precisely the ance, only to
182. e situation as when I began; if anything, one of his eyes was closed more tightl
183. ur gripsack." I stood still, not knowing what to do. It had seldom fallen sonage
184. had though my outraged from considering for — Caggett, indeed, was the only o
185. prevented a moment I the idea of giving the fellow a quarter, yet I " was extre
186. " No quarter, no grip-sack, man, running aside. bub." " I say, handover that gri
187. surprised me with a salutation bordering closely upon a profound bow. On hearing
188. closely upon a profound bow. On hearing these words my victimizer backed away f
189. Yah!" answered the baggage-thief, making deri- sive signals with his fingers, wi
190. ers thrust in the act, me aside, letting his gun drop and exclaiming as he dashe
191. ide, letting his gun drop and exclaiming as he dashed forward: I'll "Leave him t
192. nnel means to get it, if he has to bring back the fellow's scalp with it." " Had
193. ay. at a glance that Donnel's overtaking his opponent was only a matter of a few
194. a few minutes. surely Donnel was nearing his quarry. tion it. Slowly but was not
195. cook the difficulty would be in meeting. This seemed " to occur to the smaller
196. cy run," continued my companion, talking with as much composure as though he wer
197. s much composure as though he were going at an ordinary walk. "You us " It shoul
198. a better boy in off Hallo! John's taking the game-sack. down in no time, once he
199. houlder from the But instead of throwing it aside, he suddenly swung it round an
200. claimed the fallen highway* man, picking himself up and directing a savage took
201. y* man, picking himself up and directing a savage took at Donnel. " How much a s
202. much time will you give me for training?" continued Donnel, tranquilly. "You'd
203. the smallest my friends. /ou're talking to John Donnel." the pugilist, changing
204. to John Donnel." the pugilist, changing counteoff. "Oh!" exclaimed nance, and w
205. xcuse us, sir, " said Percy, controlling his mirth, "but the village boys are aw
206. laimed my stout little friend, extending his well-browned hand and shak* " That
207. shak* " That red-haired boy," he con ing mine heartily. tinued, " My who just ma
208. t you mind that Tom," said Percy, taking my hand and bowing again; "he's always
209. ," said Percy, taking my hand and bowing again; "he's always poking fun at me."
210. nd and bowing again; "he's always poking fun at me." In the matter of hair, ther
211. , there was no doubt that Tom was poking fun. Percy's hair was indeed of a beaut
212. a beautiful gold, refined, a fit setting for a face delicate, and wearing an exp
213. setting for a face delicate, and wearing an expression singularly en- gaging. Jo
214. ring an expression singularly en- gaging. John Donnel was a fair-complexioned bo
215. ble boys; and I may add that the passing of many years has not weakened that imp
216. and my father thought that the bustling, active life in a boarding-college migh
217. the bustling, active life in a boarding-college might give tone to my nerves."
218. to make it a point to smile of laughing. before and after meals," he said good-
219. ips and eyelids had a trick of quivering in and out of time, due no doubt to the
220. sunny as the brightest of days in spring; they talked and laughed with an abando
221. a freedom from care, that was something new to me. Neither of them said one wor
222. . Neither of them said one word smacking of piety, and yet I could not but perce
223. s and innocence. Just as we were passing out of the village Tom rejoined us in a
224. nd brought himself to a stop by plunging into Percy, who incontinently sat down.
225. own. " Here you go, " cried Tom, tearing open the package he bore, and offering
226. g open the package he bore, and offering no apology to his pros"Pies for the mil
227. ay it alternated with cake-day; and, ing, the ter to goes without saymatas boys
228. erested in the know what was forthcoming each day little regards that part of th
229. h an entire pie; and on my remonstrating, he in turn was of still more astonishe
230. ered. "You see, I'm too for hard batting or throwing or fast running. can curve
231. ee, I'm too for hard batting or throwing or fast running. can curve a ball down
232. hard batting or throwing or fast running. can curve a ball down and in and out,
233. ou first came Why," he added, addressing himself to me, here. "you should have s
234. rl's hair, and used to walk about taking short steps like a pigeon, and the firs
235. 's our left-fielder and holds everything and my! you just ought to And see him o
236. terror if he's not as for base-stealing slide. He can run farther in less time
237. ee, always became eloquent when speaking of his friend Percy, who on this occasi
238. him as though he were desirous of hiding himself. John Donnel, who had been watc
239. self. John Donnel, who had been watching me intently during Tom's panegyric, now
240. who had been watching me intently during Tom's panegyric, now said: " Percy, I a
241. hy — mistaken. All he needs is filling out; he'll get that soon enough. And we
242. hority came Tom Playfair, whose training and executive abilities were rated so h
243. ities were rated so high that on joining the Blue Clippers at the beginning of t
244. ining the Blue Clippers at the beginning of the 38 HARRY DEE. present school yea
245. school year he had at once, mainly owing to the influence of Donnel and Keenan,
246. ar as I have had opportunity of noticing, they Boys are and dislikes; and By a s
247. on they seldom judge amiss. form lasting friendships where the older and wiser a
248. nd confidence of the young; and, looking back, it strikes me that the friendship
249. me by Tom, Percy, and John is something of which I may well be proud. Tom and P
250. ace ever serene, with mischief twinkling ever eyes. face, in his But if fun proc
251. s them!" The conversation on our nearing St. Maure's, by a natural school-boy tr
252. a In fact, I've studied hardly anything but Latin, Greek, and arithmetic; and I
253. rithmetic; and I went through everything in the morning hours from nine to twelv
254. I went through everything in the morning hours from nine to twelve and had the a
255. ut in Percy " Did you begin with reading Histories Sacra ? " "Yes; for seven mon
256. ; for seven months I was kept on nothing but the accidence and Historian Sacra.
257. nd conjugated till there was no sticking me. Then I began translating Cicero's l
258. no sticking me. Then I began translating Cicero's letters. My first lesson was h
259. alf a line; but I had to know everything that could be known about it, and I stu
260. ly," said Tom ; " you've just been going on the lines Mr. Middleton sets for us.
261. Middleton sets for us. heart everything that we translate. We learn by How far
262. observed Tom. year. " They are getting closer to " it every But how about the
263. p»a vei'borum ? "Well, besides learning the inflection and mean- ing of every w
264. es learning the inflection and mean- ing of every word put four or five themes.
265. , " we count on Mr. Miadleton's teaching us next year; he's very anxious for us
266. hat he will go off and study of teaching. And if we don'J theology and come back
267. Shake hands on that," said Tom, grasping my " We're none of us particular who ge
268. ll seven boys in our class who are going to work from now next April, one year,
269. r and Sallust which they had seen during their two years' study, while I in retu
270. air of sombre spectacles. He was writing at his desk as we entered, and before h
271. minated with a smile, genial and winning; and as he advanced to greet me all my
272. t me all my fears vanished. His greeting was indeed cordial. After-experience pr
273. her. what class shall He's been studying Latin and Greek the " ?" two years." In
274. im into your hands." On Tom's Tom. going out the president said very "Harry, I c
275. ry "Harry, I congratulate you on meeting He's a good boy, a very good boy, but h
276. and, what's best of each thinks nothing of himself and each other. the world of
277. contrived to find out nearly everything I knew, and, to be frank, an infinite n
278. and I felt more gratified in exhibiting my ignorance to him than my knowledge "
279. k, fair in English, and somewhat wanting in history and geography, which you mus
280. ARRY DEE. spread the news of your coming and got our fellows together. That's Mr
281. ." spoke Mr. Middleton advanced, smiling a welcome as he neared us. as Even Tom
282. to St. Maure's, over my and Percy. being in his class fully as much as Tom It st
283. ck me at once that there was some- thing of the boy in Mr. Middleton ness, vivac
284. icest boys I ever met; — he's charming," was my answer. "Charmingcharming
285. he's charming," was my answer. "Charmingcharming," he echoed. Why?" "That's
286. ," was my answer. "Charmingcharming," he echoed. Why?" "That's a good word.
287. , and proceeded to relieve it by putting me another question. threw this monosyl
288. name?" "Indeed, I do." "So'm I. coughing at this juncture, and the small interro
289. . in the world. else, don't say anything against any one you understand; but all
290. forget that, please," and again breaking into a smile, this Very serious small b
291. ked away. Few youngsters on first coming to boarding-college escape the ordeal o
292. w youngsters on first coming to boarding-college escape the ordeal of being teas
293. rding-college escape the ordeal of being teased. Nervous and timid, I had looked
294. "blue grass." "I got pe/mission to bring you here," he remarked," because 1 want
295. 1 wanted to try your hand at pitcl* ing. We've a strong nine; the only thing in
296. ing. We've a strong nine; the only thing in the box. If is we're weak you've got
297. produced a "b^y's league," and retiring to the proper distance, asked me to pit
298. t it go again," he ex;, aimed, returning me the ball " same way." This time he h
299. l bars and the dumb-bells and the boxing-gloves, and in three weeks you'll be ab
300. wice a day." Just as Tom ceased speaking Harry Quip came running over breathless
301. ceased speaking Harry Quip came running over breathless with excitement. "Oh, I
302. ared at Master Quip, who was now dancing. "In the shade?" asked Tom. " Who's tal
303. n the shade?" asked Tom. " Who's talking about the weather ?" shouted Quip. "It'
304. you're a fit subject. Stop your wobbling and talk sense." Thus adjured, Harry Qu
305. e." Thus adjured, Harry Quip, supporting himself on ^ne leg, roared forth " Two
306. of which I gradually fished the meaning. I was to return to the small yard and,
307. ntly believed, obtain a holiday as being the two hundred and fiftieth boy of the
308. n each grasped an arm and began hustling me unceremoniously back to the yard. My
309. ce there were some twenty of us, panting and breathless, outside the door of Fat
310. his hat in the air, but missed it coming down, whereupon he blushed and retired
311. d, presto! twenty-odd their eyes shining with pleasurable excitea cheer, which a
312. the CHAPTER IN WHICH VII. WE GO SWIMMING AND MEET WITH AN VENTURE. that AD- IN f
313. almost at once, to the bell next morning. wake only sound of Mr. Middleton, the
314. ayed by teacher and pupils was something extraordinary. The theme-work and trans
315. sm which had distinguished the preceding hour. Very quickly, indeed, noontime ca
316. ook the road through the village leading to the river. It was to be the The morn
317. e already last swim of the year. growing chilly, and in the fall months the rive
318. essed Virgin whenever we go out swimming; that's to prevent accidents. It's a go
319. trium- Frank was about to add something further, when he was interrupted by Per
320. ?" "Let her go," answered Tom, imparting to the words a seriousness which took a
321. sound of the bell, the scene of bustling life and play in the yard was at once c
322. ck-still noon-time at the while reciting the angelical salutation. 44 Presently
323. ooks as many cigarettes," for undressing. " I'm afraid off it's pretty cold," pu
324. 's pretty cold," pursued Tom, throw- ing his jacket. "Are you a good swimmer, ta
325. er," several of us went this rusticating in Wisconsin on the shore of the pretti
326. e could wish to see. We went in swimming once or twice every day, and now we're
327. laimed Tom, who, arrayed in his swimming-tights, was impatiently awaiting the la
328. wimming-tights, was impatiently awaiting the laggards. In a few minutes we were
329. s. In a few minutes we were all plunging about in the water; and there rose upon
330. lemn air the mingled sounds of splashing and happy laughter. "Come HARRY DEE. $3
331. cold. was hard to refrain from shivering. We were soon engaged in a game of tag.
332. a few seconds, but succeeded in catching Tom Playfair napping. Next to Tom, and
333. cceeded in catching Tom Playfair napping. Next to Tom, and standing a little mor
334. yfair napping. Next to Tom, and standing a little more than waist-deep in water,
335. . I struck out at once, never reflecting that it was With a all that I could do
336. t that the cut was free from the washing of the water a stream of blood marked h
337. ter a stream of blood marked his sinking for the second time. 4 clear voice now
338. would almost think that they were racing for a wager. Suddenly they paused and,
339. ager. Suddenly they paused and, treading the water, But seemingly they gazed aro
340. not been idle in the mean time. Throwing off his coat and shoes, he now plunged
341. eir knees as Mr. Middleton, after saying something to Torn and Percy which we co
342. as Mr. Middleton, after saying something to Torn and Percy which we could not he
343. me from Tom and Percy, who were treading water side by side. Oh, those terrible
344. om was by his side at once, and catching one of Frank's hands, helped his prefec
345. er arose from the shore, such as nothing but excitement and enthusiasm at highes
346. shore. There never was such hand-shaking since college began, and there was reas
347. recovered consciousness before reaching land. CHAPTER VIII. IN WHICH WE FIGHT O
348. O'ER AGAIN AND SPEND A PLEASANT EVENING IN THE INFIRMARY. "'T^HAT Middleton is
349. sight to watch George Keenan. him making for you, Frank. You'd think he waw runn
350. r you, Frank. You'd think he waw running in the water." Mr. Tom, what was you an
351. r I think I got off more genuine praying in those few seconds than I did since t
352. few seconds than I did since the morning I made my First Communion. I said the H
353. rcy. "That's it, exactly. The next thing I knew I found myself lying on the sand
354. e next thing I knew I found myself lying on the sandy bottom, and there was a ru
355. e sandy bottom, and there was a rumbling sound, like thunder, in my ears. Now, b
356. I frightened? I felt that I was choking and that I'd be dead in less than a min
357. afraid of death, and I just began saying the Hail Mary to myself, and when I got
358. ur death, amen,' I felt a hand clutching my arm, and that's all I knew till I fo
359. ill I found Mr. Middleton and Tom towing about myself. I — — — — — me
360. and &> HARRY fell DEE. it 57 to thinking. Miracle or not, came home life, to us
361. ot been deaf to the wishes of her loving young sodalists. Shortly before supper
362. in "you remember the time Percy running you down out toward I!" Pawnee Creek."
363. ir." the infirmary?' "Well, a good thing will stand repetition. You and Percy an
364. es. seven. There's a priest here staying overnight who And by the way, will say
365. ut short Tom's ardent thanks by hurrying away. I was standing beside Tom as he r
366. thanks by hurrying away. I was standing beside Tom as he received this I had co
367. ero, with off to no little ardor, saying which to the he dashed others. communic
368. reader must ex- cuse me, but can't bring myself to narrate how pen these life-re
369. im health and appetite. had been tossing restlessly in bed for half an hour, whe
370. Tom was beside me. His face was beaming with sympathy. "Old you ?" fellow," he
371. h I'm very tired." "You've got a shaking up from that river busiI'm sorry for yo
372. You've been an eye-witness or something in that line— a to something terrible
373. something in that line— a to something terrible murder, maybe." I almost leape
374. ou, and sc I Watched and saw you tossing and tumbling about, and then I thought
375. Watched and saw you tossing and tumbling about, and then I thought we might as w
376. t alongside of yours, without disturbing the other fellows. Now, if you get nerv
377. few inches can I "How mine of "By going extraordinary. to sleep," Tom made 'ans
378. c*v look as though you thought was doing something There's not a. Not at all. *q
379. s though you thought was doing something There's not a. Not at all. *q 60 the pl
380. before the time of Jimmy Aldine's thing death tell I had the horrors everv ni^h
381. 'll try our hands on Cicero's And making the sign of the cross, Tom closed his e
382. fast asleep. His presence had a calming effect upon me, and I felt so happy for
383. their priceless presence. ular breathing that he — CHAPTER IN WHICH I IX. HA V
384. N IN THE DORMITORY. to orders, ACCORDING we all arose at half-past seven the nex
385. rose at half-past seven the next morning, thoroughly refreshed. After a substant
386. rom what I've seen and yet, heard during I've it my three years in boarding-coll
387. uring I've it my three years in boarding-college, come to believe that a small b
388. if nurse killed your uncle, I'm willing to bet that she didn't do it my your he
389. eat feel- money." "You think not?" I ing of relief. The reader should remember t
390. est," answered Tom. " Now, another thing; did your nurse ever act queerly that i
391. ly that is, did you ever notice anything in her conduct which might lead you to
392. ad you to think that there was something wrong about her head ?" Before replying
393. wrong about her head ?" Before replying, I considered for a moment. "No," I at
394. but with me she was ever kind and loving. I can't say that she at any time acted
395. ressibly soothed by Tom's. Another thing," he continued " what about that house?
396. ARRY DEE. "Well, we mustn't take a thing like that for granted. Now, I've got an
397. ake one little Now, I really don't thing or another for granted. see what that h
398. r for granted. see what that house being haunted or not haunted At any has to do
399. red my romantic friend. "But next spring I'll ask you the same question, and I'm
400. aunted. But my new friend liked anything that gave promise of adventure, and the
401. f adventure, and the prospect of passing a night in a lone house was something a
402. ng a night in a lone house was something after his heart. During the day my imag
403. se was something after his heart. During the day my imagination, despite my en-
404. n- deavors to the contrary, kept running on the unlovely HARRY rible DEE. 6^ mef
405. I was myself were haunted. The swimming incident had unstrung my nerves; and my
406. ever were without with Tom my recalling them. memories grew stronger; to use a
407. t I was in an extreme these With evening haunting state of nervousness. There th
408. n an extreme these With evening haunting state of nervousness. There they came,
409. uncle, the scowlAt once the picture ing Caggett, my angry nurse. changed, and I
410. angry nurse. changed, and I was standing, terror-stricken, gazing into my uncle'
411. I was standing, terror-stricken, gazing into my uncle's room and contemplating
412. g into my uncle's room and contemplating that sad This picture stared at me for
413. y and at once another picture was gazing at me. I say gazing at me, for I know n
414. r picture was gazing at me. I say gazing at me, for I know no other form of word
415. ctures came and went. little boy leaping from a bed, a scream of terror upon his
416. r no vision, but a reality, and reaching the last degree of vividness, I become
417. rom my bed just as on that awful morning, and again scream in an ecstasy of —
418. E- "Help! murder!" broken: and trembling in every limb, with a great sob burstin
419. in every limb, with a great sob bursting from my bosom, I find myself standing i
420. ng from my bosom, I find myself standing in the dormitory surrounded by boys wit
421. s with faces white as a sheet and gazing upon me in awe and horror; and is with
422. where I am, is a soft hand is caressing my cheek, a soft voice whispering sooth
423. essing my cheek, a soft voice whispering sooth- ing words into frightened babe.
424. heek, a soft voice whispering sooth- ing words into frightened babe. the boys my
425. on. "Now, boys, hop into bed. I'm acting prefect." HARRY DEE. The gave a boys, 6
426. HE nervous attackwas, which spoke ceding chapter might I in the pre- say, the fi
427. r. Little by my nervous facial twitching disappeared, and Maure's. before Christ
428. ly these golden months glided on. During October and the early part of lege Nove
429. the yard. Tom was unwearied in training his nine. Although he seldom called upo
430. the flowers that bloom and in the spring, give promise of merry sun- shine.' The
431. yard a trick or two." It was his darling idea to was ambitious. play and defeat
432. nor was he baseman. reliable in stopping grounders; but for holding a thrown bal
433. e in stopping grounders; but for holding a thrown ball he was perfect in his way
434. faultless fielder he was called the king of second base and the strongest batsma
435. d that John was superior in safe hitting to any of the Tom — — large-yard Ju
436. the bat, he was at his best when running the bases. He could twist and turn with
437. e was a strong batter, excellent running catches, but not over-reliable at stopp
438. tches, but not over-reliable at stopping for ground balls. As for the outfield,
439. ed this defect by excellent base-running. Percy was the left fielder; he He had
440. one weak point, and that was in throwing. could scarcely put a ball on a line fr
441. ary oosition to second base. But, saving this, he was a field. George Keenan cov
442. ck, which few fielders possess, of being able to judge a fly almost as soon was
443. all that came within their was something Tom, Keenan, and even Donnel had to giv
444. h he was not Thus as quick in recovering himself as George. grasp. for running,
445. ng himself as George. grasp. for running, As his speed extraordinary. had done l
446. done little in the way of base-stealing. But it was just on this point that Tom
447. on this point that Tom founded something of his hopes. He counted on Percy's bec
448. is hopes. He counted on Percy's becoming a phenomenal basestealer before spring;
449. g a phenomenal basestealer before spring; and he himself had Percy in far Percy,
450. Percy in far Percy, fair in his batting, private training during the winter. To
451. y, fair in his batting, private training during the winter. Tom be. himself was
452. in his batting, private training during the winter. Tom be. himself was our cat
453. a point in the game. attention^ throwing to bases he was considered second only
454. ll was unusual. As to my general playing abilities, beyond doubt I was the worst
455. of all the " Blue Clippers." My batting was wretched and my baserunning of a pi
456. batting was wretched and my baserunning of a piece with it. Worst of all, I was
457. unless I gained very unsure in catching those twisting flies that are V) often
458. d very unsure in catching those twisting flies that are V) often ponn^d un for t
459. tested that I'd be on hand in the spring with speed enough and endurance enough
460. f the Juniors for nine innings. opposing nine, they were clearly our superiors i
461. ey were clearly our superiors in batting, and they were provided, moreSo matters
462. with the boys whom we purposed defeating in the spring. I should add that the Ju
463. whom we purposed defeating in the spring. I should add that the Juniors were in
464. that the Juniors were in blissful During the winignorance of our lofty aspiratio
465. hours to sports suitable to the changing months. all at Not so with us. ; Tom be
466. ular course of gymnastics which training, he contrived to pay special attention
467. whole of the Latin class-hour in trying to catch one another. In this Percy was
468. o the It was clear to me that for taking in new study. matter Tom and Percy were
469. ed lines as I did myself; so that during the holidays we were all casting about
470. during the holidays we were all casting about for someI was at the end of my te
471. I was at the end of my tether; the thing new. others had all read the same autho
472. but we knew that what with his teaching and his prefecting he had all the work
473. hat with his teaching and his prefecting he had all the work Mr. Middleton solve
474. ladly assented to our request and during the months of January, February, and Ma
475. very worst, a strong fight the following year for the intercollegiate gold medal
476. t a.l*ve and nourished by his heartening words. During the second half of the ye
477. ourished by his heartening words. During the second half of the year we began to
478. very pretty picture. It was the morning of March 21st; the sun, which had risen
479. in a burst of splendor, was now shining with the bridal brightness of spring. T
480. ing with the bridal brightness of spring. The sweet our twitter of the early ear
481. while the fresh green grass just peeping out of the earth and the swelling buds
482. eeping out of the earth and the swelling buds on the trees gave promise of beaut
483. oves life; and therefore he loves spring. To him there is a glory about the budd
484. o him there is a glory about the budding tree and divinely-painted flower which
485. f an adult. The wild freshness of spring touches a wild freshness of sympathy in
486. sted upon the landscape, " " it's spring." "I've observed here?" 11 it," I answe
487. remember, on or about the well by spring. 15th of April we're going to play the
488. ell by spring. 15th of April we're going to play the large boys one game." "Only
489. 've counted on," said Tom. " We're going to make that a success, you know; and t
490. ir wits as with their limbs; in choosing his nine he had selected those intellec
491. in muddier 72 HARRY DEE. She set Spring, then, passed on with even pace. the bi
492. d on with even pace. the birds a-singing and painted the flowers in all their gl
493. till April 12th arrived — the morning of the specimen. CHAPTER IN WHICH PERCY
494. ards delivered a neatly-worded open- ing address, concluding his remarks by invi
495. tly-worded open- ing address, concluding his remarks by inviting the distinguish
496. ress, concluding his remarks by inviting the distinguished visitors to examine t
497. Middleton; we'll take them on something where we'll get a chance of puzzling th
498. ing where we'll get a chance of puzzling them." Then came the tug of war. HARRY
499. the tug of war. HARRY Sallust, bristling with DEE. 73 idiom, formed a splendid p
500. as invaded. ground; we had taken nothing for gi anted in getting up our position
501. ad taken nothing for gi anted in getting up our position, and consequently had n
502. re flushed and protected points. smiling; the more they asked, the more their sm
503. ut what pleased us most was the fact ing grew. that Mr. Middleton was gratified.
504. here to see what these boys are lacking in, and here they've been parading thei
505. cking in, and here they've been parading their knowledge for over an hour. Can't
506. y them in off-hand theme-work, modelling your sentences on the passages they hav
507. among you who holds out the longest ing correct off-hand translations. giv- You
508. author, each one o f us in turn building sentences in English, and the rest of u
509. in English, and the rest of us rendering them into Latin similar in form and idi
510. n the examiners were hard at us, pelting One by one we were us with simple sente
511. s seat. But now the examiners, following the initiative of the president, "kinks
512. first fierce At the next onset, leaving fifteen of us in the field. charge seve
513. thers, Richards, and fell to introducing myself. To the surprise and dismay of a
514. ipped on an irregular verb and, blushing violently, went to We all pitied him, f
515. rry Quip, and myself. But, as the saying is, we had gained our second wind. Tom
516. ery much to fail. But to my mind nothing succeeds like failure." And then Percy
517. A GREA T BASEBALL GAME. in was wondering, as I proceeded to First Academic, how
518. " he attention ?" said, after concluding prayers, "will you be good enough to pr
519. ddleton?" was almost pathetic in putting this question. "So," continued Mr. Midd
520. Middleton, "you Blue Clippers are going to put on your baseball uniforms foi th
521. ces as one. "Yes, "And "No, you're going to be beaten hands down." sir!" "Well,
522. e to read professor gravely, "I am going you a story." I wish we could have been
523. that moment. genial smiles and sparkling eyes never yet, say, fell I dare under
524. e. Tom, had selected a tale oi absorbing interest, and he made what would have b
525. Blue Clippers emerged from our dressing-room in uniforms. all The "teacher and
526. of the small yard, who had been awaiting our appearance with no little impain fu
527. n full We came tience, gave us a rousing cheer; and, indeed, I think HARRY that
528. ace of motion made him the most striking figure of us all. Our costume was simpl
529. served. "It's a pity," he added, turning to me, "that we didn't pad your legs a
530. a noisy fol* The large boys were lowing, to the baseball field. like already at
531. 3:30 Willie Tipp set himself to beating a tin can as an indication that we were
532. were to take the field. On not a taking little my place in the pitcher's box, I
533. ay follow the game, 1 append the batting order and the positions of the contendi
534. rder and the positions of the contending sides: BLUE CLIPPERS. Wynn, 1. f. Quip,
535. ulin, p. Bennett, 1st base. First Inning. — Cleary tapped his bat against the
536. gainst the home plate and stood awaiting my pleasure. " One ball," called the um
537. handle of his bat and sent I it bounding fumbled the it then got a firm hold of
538. on first. ever, and caught it. Following Tom's directions, I gave O'Connor a num
539. nt the third ball I pitched him bounding Keenan came in at a slowly toward short
540. his bat met the ball, which went sailing far over Quip's head into centre field,
541. ned to the diamond O'Malley was standing breathless on second, while Drew, amid
542. , had scored. tired his side by striking out. When Percy Wynn stepped up to the
543. e first came He could hardly do anything One would never have imagined except lo
544. likes Percy," said " ! they're shouting for him at the top of their voices." Pe
545. The boys expect some great base-running from him. They know he's a good runner,
546. stood near first base and began coaching. 80 HARRY DEE. "Double A, double E," he
547. n consternation, at the coacher. staring blankly "Triple A," shouted our captain
548. the experience of any one that coaching had been done by algebraic formulas. Wi
549. de?" Keenan drove the next ball bounding to the second baseman and was called ou
550. the catcher did not succeed in touching him, and Percy emerged from a cloud of
551. more confidence in myself Second Inning. Followas I resumed my place in the pit
552. sumed my place in the pitcher's box. ing Tom's signs, I easily struck out Earle
553. base. Score at the end of second inning, i to i. Third Inning. Bennett took the
554. d of second inning, i to i. Third Inning. Bennett took the first ball I offered
555. ed, and three hundred pairs of straining eyes were bent upon our left fielder, w
556. pon our left fielder, who was — racing at full speed in the direction of the f
557. ll speed in the direction of the falling ball. Hardly; and even if he does he wi
558. to the air and then there's such roaring and shouting and clapping of hands as o
559. d then there's such roaring and shouting and clapping of hands as only a phenome
560. s such roaring and shouting and clapping of hands as only a phenomenal play by a
561. can excite. "That's what I call fielding," said the second Will he get his hands
562. en struck. He's got the trick of judging a ball as soon as it's T've seldom seen
563. t's T've seldom seen as pretty a running touched. the ball before catch." For tw
564. nor followed up the good work by popping a fly into short right field, where no
565. ird made for home. no time; his catching the ball and touching the runner seemed
566. time; his catching the ball and touching the runner seemed to be simultaneous; t
567. h Cleary out on home, thus accomplishing a neat double play. Our first baseman s
568. get his base by other than hard hitting. He bunted the third ball pitched to hi
569. ed ran for third. It was an exhilarating sight to see his slender, supple figure
570. see his slender, supple figure bounding over the say, I followed his example. t
571. ird." Tom Playfair, who had been hopping abo«it \t\ at ecstasy on the coaching-
572. g abo«it \t\ at ecstasy on the coaching-line, turned about at thest words, and,
573. ced upon the alarmed umpire, and dancing with rage, hissed out: " Get a pair of
574. that poor little Frank's early training had not been of the best; and in this m
575. ts asserted themselves. Without stopping for breath, Frank went on: "Come on, yo
576. college, but quailed beneath the blazing rage of the very diminutive boy. "Safe
577. ought him, with a few kind yet reproving words, to a sense of his scandalous beh
578. e captain of the Juniors, was now giving the umpire a piece of his mind, and Tom
579. ain case. been intimidated into changing his decision. Tom poured oil upon the t
580. he field, and we began the Fourth Inning. Drew led off with a bounder to O'Malle
581. seman and was thrown out. after knocking several fouls, was sent to first base o
582. nd and Hudson came to the bat, receiving an ovathird. tion from the large boys,
583. iors, 2 ; Blue Clippers, was an exciting inning. on a line hit over second. Poul
584. ; Blue Clippers, was an exciting inning. on a line hit over second. Poulin reac
585. der to Donnel, who succeeded in throwing him out without allowing O'Connor knock
586. ded in throwing him out without allowing O'Connor knocked me a slow Poulin to ta
587. hrow close upon third base. Fifth Inning. — This first it to third, but seeing
588. . — This first it to third, but seeing that it was too late I lost my head, an
589. t field. on a low line Percy was playing deep, but he made for the ball at once.
590. t once. On he came at a dead run, making what seemed to be a hopeless endeavor t
591. ud were the huzzas " as he rose, holding the ball in his hand. "Batter out!" cal
592. the umpire had blundered. The squabbling went on. Every man on our nine came in
593. ther Quip were serious or not in putting this question. be absurd," answered Per
594. a fly catch. a to the game by announcing very nice; but the writer didn't unders
595. . When the umpire blundered into calling him out at When the umpire third, he su
596. ed gracefully. again blundered in giving him a put-out where he In both cases he
597. cases he had made none, he said nothing. acted on the principle that the umpire
598. he field. We at of the Blues did nothing at the bat. Quip and Richards struck ou
599. ly first. But as this chapter is getting very long, and as the most exciting par
600. ting very long, and as the most exciting part of the game is yet to come, I thin
601. come, I think the reader will be willing to begin the sixth inning in CHAPTER XI
602. ill be willing to begin the sixth inning in CHAPTER XIII. IN WHICH IS CONTINUED
603. FIND OUT LATER, HAS AN IMPORTANT BEARING UPON THIS STORK O'MALLEY presented got
604. her ball as I him in the first it inning. It had went further this time, and had
605. t been for Percy's promptness in chasing and fielding the ball he would have mad
606. rcy's promptness in chasing and fielding the ball he would have made a home run
607. ugly to bound Richards and went rolling beyond it him. scored. Before he could
608. t. Our half of Whyte batted a the inning fly caught with ease. was mercilessly s
609. on a very close Bennett's Seventh Inning. — Keenan accepted on an easy grounde
610. thrown by the events of the last inning. Tom went to the bat evidently determin
611. to the bat evidently determined to bring in a run. He struck at the first ball p
612. he bit his lip, and at length recovering himself, called for time. — Few if an
613. . I myself, as I happened to be standing near the home plate at the time, had no
614. . put that fellow in the field and bring in O'Malley," he said. "No, no, Dan," o
615. Earle But his lights are acted according to his lights. mighty poor. It's no use
616. lights. mighty poor. It's no use making a show of him; but if you'd just tell h
617. 'd just tell him that we'll stop playing if he does anything like that again, I
618. t we'll stop playing if he does anything like that again, I think he'K take the
619. hen he returned to his position, leaving the audience to wonder what had been th
620. ver Tom with unaffected respect. Nothing daunted, Tom more ardor than ever. set
621. more ardor than ever. set about coaching with You never heard such flying throug
622. oaching with You never heard such flying through the air. a storm of vowels as h
623. and I, O, U, and what-not came volleying forth; and when Harry Quip hit safely h
624. res and cubes till he drove the opposing and triple E, Double A pitcher desperat
625. against this lingular system of coaching. clearly that he Our captain had pre- p
626. Richards and Ruthers struck out, leaving three men on base, and the tongue?" alg
627. ase, and the tongue?" algebraic coaching. score 3 to i Tom in our disfavor. Eigh
628. to i Tom in our disfavor. Eighth Inning. — I think I was now at my best. In n
629. nervous dread consequent first I facing large boys for the pletely disappeared;
630. ught me to study each batter. In playing among ourselves I had followed his advi
631. an's strong and weak points after facing him twice or thrice. Drew which, struck
632. example. Joe Whyte succeeded in hitting the ball, but was awaiting him at first
633. ed in hitting the ball, but was awaiting him at first. I, too, sent the ball rol
634. at first. I, too, sent the ball rolling feebly toward short field. The shortsto
635. Percy again became a runner by securing his base on balls, thus advancing me to
636. curing his base on balls, thus advancing me to second whereupon Tom began ; vowe
637. st him. Tom liie bat. received a rousing cheer as he stepped up to He was calm a
638. HARRY DEE. 9t He gave yard was preparing to cheer as one man. the third ball pit
639. into left But O'Malley had been playing far out for Tom's particular benefit, a
640. and with a side run succeeded in pulling down what might have been a three-bagge
641. ore, 3 to 1 in favor of the Ninth Inning. — Assured that the game was now to l
642. here would be a tie. Richards, following Harry's example, dashed for second on t
643. at and concluded the innings by striking out. Score, 3 to 3. As every boy reader
644. s every boy reader knows, a tenth inning became necessary to decide the game. Te
645. cessary to decide the game. Tenth Inning. Bennett sent a very hot grounder direc
646. all, thrown as it had been, is something that the boys discussed for days afterw
647. ad each doffed his cap to the applauding spectators. Just as play was about to b
648. strong hopes upon this, the tenth inning of the game; for Percy was to be first
649. He advanced to the home plate, blushing yet cool. And well might he There was a
650. since his them actually danced. scoring with bent and averted outburst had been
651. s- ported with enthusiasm, came crowding about diamond. slide. As before, Percy
652. course sent Drew, who was still waiting fcr the ball, He head over heels. Percy
653. Burdock, "get a glass of water and bring it to Percy while I'm talking." Then fo
654. and bring it to Percy while I'm talking." Then for five minutes or more did Tom
655. legality of Poulin's method of pitching. He quoted the rules, brought out "Spal
656. quoted the rules, brought out "Spalding's Base Ball Guide," and fought every po
657. ise to the bitter end. He gained nothing he claimed, but everything he wanted, n
658. ained nothing he claimed, but everything he wanted, namely, time for Percy to re
659. or Percy to recover from the bad shaking-up he had suffered. Of course Tom might
660. universal with a suppleness, a lightning quickness to recover- HARRY to turn DEE
661. down to third; nor, despite the throwing to base of both catcher and pitcher, co
662. and pitcher, could he be caught napping. On the seventh ball pitched, Percy ran
663. ual to the shortstop's position, keeping his eye He saw that it was over fixed s
664. e would strike at So instead of stopping midway he threw back his head, and look
665. dway he threw back his head, and looking straight before him, made for third. He
666. tact between and ball, and still running at full speed, turned bat to see it bou
667. shortstop, who made a feint at throwing it to third, but seeing it. was already
668. eint at throwing it to third, but seeing it. was already within a yard of the ba
669. y one, had not stopped at third. Turning sharply turn, by the way, that no other
670. me was in his hands, and with full swing of the arm he sent it straight and 96 H
671. is mask and cal thrown off, was standing upon the home plate, his eyes straining
672. upon the home plate, his eyes straining and his hands stretched imploringly tow
673. er's hand while Percy was still shooting along the ground, but before Earle coul
674. s with him, and he'll faint or something, and I know he hates to pose." The pref
675. prefect clapped his hands, and standing in front of Percy so as to keep the boy
676. Percy so as to keep the boys from seeing him, waited till all had passed into th
677. asked Tom sympathetically. "It's nothing — just a little scratch, I think," an
678. , and as he leaned with his head resting against the back of the players' bench
679. nch and HARRY his lips DEE. 97 quivering, we all perceived that he was suffering
680. , we all perceived that he was suffering keenly. "Look'" said Tom; " The blood w
681. om; " The blood we saw was he's bleeding." just beginning to enpurple his knicke
682. e saw was he's bleeding." just beginning to enpurple his knickerbockers a little
683. y Won't you forgive me, Percy?" swearing. The sufferer smiled, and with the smil
684. rer smiled, and with the smile something of his color returned. "I'm not going t
685. ng of his color returned. "I'm not going to die, Frank. I In fact, I feel all ri
686. out at first." "Now," said Percy, rising, "I think we can start for home." "You
687. bmitted. "Now, Harry," said Tom, turning to me with his most taking air, " how a
688. Tom, turning to me with his most taking air, " how about spending a night ir< y
689. is most taking air, " how about spending a night ir< your uncle's house this sum
690. res on memory's wall," count the ensuing months of May and June the at St. happy
691. ed with May and June splendors of spring; our natural eagerness was, as it were,
692. rcely believe his eyes lege My on seeing me. He had counted on finding me health
693. on seeing me. He had counted on finding me healthier and stronger, but, as he s
694. hey asked tion he said: a single sitting; in the burning ques- HARRY "Harry coul
695. e said: a single sitting; in the burning ques- HARRY "Harry couldn't be he DEE.
696. loriIt is fied clouds, the sun is giving his parting benedicIn the zenith are he
697. ed clouds, the sun is giving his parting benedicIn the zenith are here and tion
698. . there gauzy bits of fleece, reflecting faintly, yet so beautifully, something
699. g faintly, yet so beautifully, something of that blaze of glory which the sun ha
700. d upon their western sisters, and moving onward air over like stately, dainty sh
701. over the tranquil, well-nigh slumbering waters of a romantic lake upon whose qu
702. of a romantic lake upon whose quivering bosom in mirrored splendor. changing co
703. ing bosom in mirrored splendor. changing colors of the heavens -eproduce themsel
704. s But the At anchor bank four is holding scene is not without its human element.
705. eep, grassy lads are seated in a fishing-boat. a rod in his hands, but their Eac
706. es, and as they silently follow changing splendors, they forget the object of th
707. I'm nc good at quotations." " Something to the effect that nothing should so be
708. " " Something to the effect that nothing should so become us Percy. in our life
709. ome us Percy. in our life as our leaving it?" suggested "You have spoken," answe
710. pt her husband steady instead of putting crazy notions into If I marry at all,"
711. ind a girl who will keep me from getting cranky." The twilight meanwhile had com
712. nd the clouds in the west were softening in color; a classic beauty succeeded th
713. the waters, while light breeze springing up carried its perfumed mes- sage of ni
714. red Percy. "I'd make the sun stand thing still. I ain't no poet I like you, Perc
715. t him!" he cried. " Just get the landing- net read.v. HARRY DEE. ioi "Play him c
716. ss clasp, and away went his line, paying out at a rate which indicated that his
717. hurry. "You've a curious way of showing your bravery,'* said Tom, as Frank reco
718. ny catHaving killed our fish at once a merciful act,
719. made, and each of us set about reeling in our lines IQ2 HARRY DEE. and throwin
720. in our lines IQ2 HARRY DEE. and throwing them again, according to the current st
721. DEE. and throwing them again, according to the current style of fishing which o
722. ccording to the current style of fishing which obtained among the approved angle
723. every — detail of her dress betokening the taste and care of a refined home; h
724. ed home; her unbound golden hair falling free and reaching almost to her sash of
725. nd golden hair falling free and reaching almost to her sash of blue, tossed alte
726. would satisfy an observer that in gazing upon the boy he was gazing upon the own
727. hat in gazing upon the boy he was gazing upon the owner of the yacht, and a prou
728. claimed Frank fish. vivaciously, holding up his "Ah!" exclaimed his his "haughty
729. aimed his his "haughty majesty," passing hand through his hair with an aesthetic
730. n a all myself," answered Frank, putting into the " level with Tom's. buy your f
731. and "your ludship's humble fish doffing his cap as he spoke, servants have not
732. have not put up their stall for selling yet, but, me lud, when we have, me lud,
733. lvery laugh which there was no resisting; I broke into a roar, and even serious
734. ed at the very thought. "Me lud," having thus disposed of her, cast a cold eye u
735. Chesterfield " of w your very improving company." "I'm no lord." "Oh, I beg par
736. he an- nouncement. "Are you boys staying around here?" "Your majesty, we are. Yo
737. der 'neath the shade of a wide-spreading beech tree — it isn't a beech tree, b
738. o he adopted a middle course by scowling. "Are you fellows Catholics?" HARRY DEk
739. royal highness; we But it isn't catching." were born that way. The yacht was now
740. The yacht was now almost beyond speaking distance, and as Tom uttered his last r
741. last remark the haughty owner, yielding to his rage, stamped hi9 foot, shook hi
742. erchief and sent a silvery "good-evening, vision sirs," across the dividing wate
743. ening, vision sirs," across the dividing water; and as the boat went beyond the
744. inferred, that his lordship was scolding her bitterly, for the little lady bent
745. re no earthly love so pure and elevating as the love between brother and sister.
746. mind made to me one day. He was speaking of a boy who had been at St. Maure's th
747. extremely polite, amiable, and obliging. He gained favor with all and soon rose
748. he entire faculty. Yet before the spring had come he was dismissed from the coll
749. eks,' he said, 'I could discover nothing out of the way in this boy. But one day
750. ay in this boy. But one day, in speaking with me, he said that he was the only c
751. nswered Percy, "because a cold, unloving disposition." " showed One of that kind
752. y tempt to run away with Percy's fishing outfit. was an expert, and with little
753. with little trouble succeeded in landing a lusty four-pound black bass. Before h
754. ad it fairly in the boat Tom was playing another, and before Tom could announce
755. ould announce the fact Frank was reeling in vigorously. As for myself, I was kep
756. myself, I was kept busy with the landing-net. Tom's fish proved to be a three-po
757. ow." " No, no, Frank," said Tom, pulling up the anchor. " — I Why, just look a
758. cloud in the west," cried Percy, growing larger and blacker. Yes, we'd better hu
759. 'd better hurry or we'll get a drenching." There were two sets of oars in the bo
760. on this seat were Tom and I, each using one oar. Percy was behind us wielding t
761. ng one oar. Percy was behind us wielding the other pair, while Frank, with the t
762. sound came upon our ears. " It's coming, boys. The wind is storming among the t
763. It's coming, boys. The wind is storming among the trees on the western bank," I
764. lume; gradually, above the deep groaning and fluttering, arose a shrill shriekin
765. , above the deep groaning and fluttering, arose a shrill shrieking like the exag
766. and fluttering, arose a shrill shrieking like the exaggerated sounds of a millio
767. atter, Frank?" For Frank, who was facing us, had become deadly pale and jumped t
768. THIS STORY IS WITHIN A TITTLE OF LOSING ITS CHIEF CHARACTERS AND THUS COMING TO
769. ING ITS CHIEF CHARACTERS AND THUS COMING TO AN THE three of sight which us turne
770. saw a The Aurora^ which, after skirting the eastern and southern shore, had tak
771. ank, was now with full sails set bearing the brunt Yielding to the of raging wat
772. ull sails set bearing the brunt Yielding to the of raging water and roaring wind
773. ring the brunt Yielding to the of raging water and roaring wind. had bowed down,
774. lding to the of raging water and roaring wind. had bowed down, down, till her sa
775. t, she seemed to be lapped by the rising waters. Clinging to a mast with one han
776. be lapped by the rising waters. Clinging to a mast with one hand, the boy was va
777. one hand, the boy was vainly endeavoring with the other to take in sail, while t
778. sail, while the girl, her hair streaming in the wind, was stretching toward us o
779. ir streaming in the wind, was stretching toward us one little hand in pitiful We
780. e of us was a novice in Every day during the the art of managing a boat. past fe
781. Every day during the the art of managing a boat. past few weeks we had practised
782. st few weeks we had practised at pulling together. compressing our lips, we held
783. actised at pulling together. compressing our lips, we held an even stroke agains
784. Pull, boys, pull hard. Oh, they're going to capsize!" " Don't turn round," whisp
785. on the tiller-ropes; "their ment keeping a capsized!" there arose above the howl
786. capsized!" there arose above the howling of As Frank spoke the blast and the bea
787. As Frank spoke the blast and the beating of the waters a piercing, heart-rending
788. and the beating of the waters a piercing, heart-rending scream. my heart-beats,
789. of the waters a piercing, heart-rending scream. my heart-beats, and I That scre
790. —the sweat of agony. Frank was sobbing. "For God's sake, Frank," cried Tom hoa
791. Frank was on the goes. point of jumping up. " Don't move," cried Tom. "If you d
792. Quick are they under no chance of saving them. ! water yet?" "The girl is up aga
793. caught hold of the yacht and is hanging on to There's the boy now. Good! he is
794. here's the boy now. Good! he is clinging to too." The " If three of us breathed
795. able to save them; the yacht is drifting this way." But pull as we might, it was
796. was slow work. Still more disheartening was the gathering gloom. Shadows seemed
797. ill more disheartening was the gathering gloom. Shadows seemed to be literally r
798. . Shadows seemed to be literally rushing down upon us. Our every stroke was tall
799. ugh some genie of the air was scattering huge handfuls of darkness on our course
800. to it." As he spoke there was a dazzling flash of lightning that broke zig-zag a
801. there was a dazzling flash of lightning that broke zig-zag across the heavens,
802. Tom. Then followed a series of blinding flashes and rumbling detonations, which
803. series of blinding flashes and rumbling detonations, which, added to the fury o
804. to the fury of the wind and the lashing of the waves, impressed us, I am sure,
805. our oars in silence, each of us praying and guidance from above. Desperate as w
806. white-caps would hurl themselves raging into our boat. We for help plainly saw,
807. should we succeed in all this. reaching the yacht any attempt at rescue would b
808. xclaimed. Again the " in clear, piercing cry of the little child air. I shivered
809. ed through the The little girl is giving out, think," said Frank, answer to our
810. ," said Frank, answer to our questioning glances. M Her hold has slipped ah! she
811. d ah! she's got it again. Keep on rowing; we'll be beside them in a minute." As
812. m in a minute." As Frank ceased speaking there came a lull in the In the western
813. e In the western sky appeared an opening in storm. the clouds, through which str
814. clouds, through which streamed something of the — cwi light beauty, and the ve
815. died almost completely away, and nothing out the lashing waves gave evidence of
816. letely away, and nothing out the lashing waves gave evidence of the fierce eleme
817. erce elemental conflict so lately raging about us. During this lull we heard wha
818. nflict so lately raging about us. During this lull we heard what, should we live
819. et, clear, delicate voice came throbbing over the waters in trembling melody: in
820. e throbbing over the waters in trembling melody: into the centuries, * 'Jesus, S
821. changed a point northward, came howling through the trees and across the waters
822. amed Frank. "The girl has and is sinking. You're very near. A few strokes more."
823. nick of time; the child was just sinking. He made for her with rapid stroke, fai
824. er with rapid stroke, failed of reaching her, and followed Tom her down into the
825. within a to few feet of our boat. "Bring the stern round Obedient to the large w
826. t turned broadside to the wind, shipping in the movement difficulty the crest of
827. lanched with terror^ his eyes protruding from their sockets, was shouting to us
828. truding from their sockets, was shouting to us inarticulately. Before Tom could
829. ly. Before Tom could succeed in climbing into our boat, the storm suddenly came
830. with We new force. The wind was blinding and sent the waves lashing against our
831. was blinding and sent the waves lashing against our frail boat. Panic-stricken,
832. boat. Panic-stricken, the boy, throwing out his arms toward us, plunged into th
833. his own destruction than Tom, releasing his hold on the boat, made for the spot
834. boat, when with a wild cry the drowning boy threw his arms about his would-be r
835. e I me estimate. Upon their disappearing whispered Percy not to leave the oars t
836. e an effort to assist Tom; and disposing myself to spring to their rescue, watch
837. sist Tom; and disposing myself to spring to their rescue, watched eagerly for th
838. rescue, watched eagerly for their coming to the surface. Oh, what a weary, long,
839. l gloom of that storm-beaten twigrasping Tom, had clasped him light. The boy, in
840. ut somewhat in the grasp of the drowning boy so as to face him partially, and as
841. e mad rage of despair. There was nothing human in the expression. It was a hideo
842. animal-like, muffled voice, the drowning lad caught at the free arm, and would h
843. om emerged, paler than before, bear- ing in his arms a senseless form. "Quick! c
844. gasped. I took the body from the panting hero, and striking out for our boat, wh
845. body from the panting hero, and striking out for our boat, which Percy had contr
846. boat, which Percy had contrived to bring within a few feet of safety. last us, r
847. in Violent as the storm had grown during the few minutes, it was just then, I th
848. hen, when the grave question of studying how to get three persons into a frail b
849. ail boat presented itself. Tom, swimming solution. at my side — how feeble his
850. nk, pull off your shoes." In a twinkling Frank was in his stocking-feet, but bef
851. In a twinkling Frank was in his stocking-feet, but before Percy could lay aside
852. who ^4&d the greatest difficulty, being a poor swimmer, in n6 deed, it HARRY DE
853. in n6 deed, it HARRY DEE. In- sustaining the senseless form of the brother. woul
854. we were fain to be content with holding the boy's face above water till the In
855. !" said Percy, when we were all clinging beside each other, "thank God we're saf
856. we can only hold out the wind will bring us to shore within an hour." had now an
857. ur." had now an opportunity of observing Tom, and my heart sank at the sight. Hi
858. s, little else but the sleeves remaining upon him. His undershirt was torn just
859. t below the armpits, and there, standing out on each side upon his naked flesh,
860. e upon his naked flesh, was the bleeding print of five fingerThe poor boy's face
861. outh nails. was open, and he was panting from the terrible Next him was little F
862. self and Frank, was Percy, still holding the little girl. "Give me the girl, Per
863. f need should I arise. had been watching Tom's face for some moments. How wan it
864. for some moments. How wan it was growing! Presently his eyes closed. "Percy! Per
865. beside him, and just as he was slipping away caught him by the arm' I HARRY "Po
866. "Oh!" he continued in dismay, on seeing the cruel fingerprints on Tom's bosom,
867. ufferings he must have borne I in saving that senseless boy!" think this was the
868. ie, " he whispered. Where are " Drifting right in to shore, Tom; patience — do
869. ll," whispered Tom feebly, " if anything happens you look out for yourselves- do
870. nded us to be His instruments in hearing that prayer. Oh! I'm awful tired !' The
871. t was the hardest, bitterest — v thing of my life, but I had to do in fact it.
872. e his frightened face, his eyes starting with terror? Oh! what a look of agony c
873. lf and his Maker. His mind was wandering but into what beautiful fields! We had
874. Tom for his gay, happy ways, his abiding cheerfulness, his noble qualities; but
875. ng she sang, Percy ?" he quired, opening his eyes a few moments later. " Jesus,
876. ep up your "We're talmer, and I drifting on splendidly. Tom," said Percy. The la
877. y. Tom," said Percy. The lake is getting danger." think there's little HARRY DEE
878. if H9 and you till too, Frank, anything happens, you'll pray for me, and you to
879. No, you won't," returned Tom, something of his ; work remember, you're not to d
880. ." old energy and strong voice returning for you. And Tom fainted again. Now fol
881. erer than a brother's seemed to be dying in our sight; dying ex- dying surrounde
882. s seemed to be dying in our sight; dying ex- dying surrounded by friends who cou
883. o be dying in our sight; dying ex- dying surrounded by friends who could not str
884. p him, yet How changed he was from dying as he had lived. the gay, happy, sunny
885. ce of health. Little looked so startling upon the ghastly pallor which had now u
886. ive face. Percy had succeeded in pulling his over-shirt. 120 HARRY it DEE. banda
887. . 120 HARRY it DEE. bandaged and tearing into strips deftly, tenderly the bleedi
888. nto strips deftly, tenderly the bleeding breast. "Now," he exclaimed, "perhaps t
889. "Yes; but I think the color is returning," an- swered Percy. And while the two m
890. as a cry of joy from Percy. "He's coming to, boys! His face is quite warm. 1 can
891. t I think his color " Is is it returning." the brave boy that jumped into the wa
892. 'll be able to talk and laugh of bathing, little girl?" continued before long."
893. ok at the lights along shore." was going to die. I never my life. But now you ne
894. e to number of torches which were moving up and down the border of the lake, and
895. uggested to our imaginations men running come on, and out anything save a along
896. ns men running come on, and out anything save a along shore in anxious search, a
897. ous search, and, saddest of all, weeping mothers. "Oh, poor mamma!" exclaimed Pe
898. e told Gordon not to sail without having papa or one of the hired men along to m
899. d off. He said he knew all about sailing He didn't do what he was told." a boat.
900. l be frightened. rah' is the right thing. If we shout — hip— hur- They'll th
901. just the same as though we were bawling for help. Do you hear, little girl? You
902. "Now, boys ready?" continued Tom. thing is lovely, — — — two, three." 44
903. t again." "Pshaw! they weren't listening, or they might have heard," growled Fra
904. ard," growled Frank. " There's something in what you say, Frank, " said Tom. " N
905. pistol, or a " cannon, or even a Gatling gun HARRY DEE. 123 "Oh!" cried Percy; "
906. " " You don't mean to say you're running a Gat" ing gun along Tom was interrupte
907. 't mean to say you're running a Gat" ing gun along Tom was interrupted by a pier
908. along Tom was interrupted by a piercing whistle which rang out startlingly upon
909. leavits track. by a sky-rocket shooting up into the sky and ing a golden furrow
910. -rocket shooting up into the sky and ing a golden furrow in " "Thank God!" Percy
911. tle girl, " added Tom buoyantly. yelling "Your mamma's happy now; she heard you
912. hurrah,' and she thinks you're having said it's "But I'm not," awful wet, and
913. e ingenuously. "I'm dark, and everything's Wrong, in bed." I and I wish I I, was
914. ear the stroke of oars? " They're coming." Hereupon Gordon made his presence kno
915. ," I whispered " there's a boat ; coming and we'll be "safe in two minutes. See
916. e in two minutes. See the lights drawing near they're coming straight toward us.
917. e the lights drawing near they're coming straight toward us." And as I spoke I f
918. om. We gave it with a will. An answering cheer came gratefully upon our ears. "B
919. . "Boat ahoy!" cried one of the rescuing party. "Ahoy!" answered Percy. "Are you
920. "Papa! papa!" he bellowed, "I'm drowning." "No, he isn't," cried Percy, and to m
921. my astonish ment he went on, addressing himself to Master Gordon, " and it's my
922. — HARRY DEE, mother, and 125 crying, —but the for hugging, and and kissin
923. , and 125 crying, —but the for hugging, and and kissing are too much my pen, a
924. —but the for hugging, and and kissing are too much my pen, and this chapter h
925. , who, shortly after gentleman attaining had chosen America for his home. During
926. had chosen America for his home. During the preceding summer he had taken a wee
927. erica for his home. During the preceding summer he had taken a week's outing at
928. ding summer he had taken a week's outing at " our lake," as we boys called it, a
929. that he purchased several acres fronting upon the eastern shore, and commenced a
930. we Even not been resolute in reas fusing, he would have encumbered us with an ex
931. avagance of was, he succeeded in forcing upon each of us a complete summer outfi
932. accept the Aurora, and it was only owing to our friend's eloquent expostulations
933. won't go," protested DEE. ; about being lionized." But for all that Tom did go,
934. mal party. As we walked into the sitting-room, and found ourselves in the presen
935. he bright particular star of the evening, and my little light was but a He was s
936. surrounded by a reflection from him. ing beside Percy. listening group, who dran
937. on from him. ing beside Percy. listening group, who drank in eagerly his account
938. seated herself at the piano, and running her fingers lightly over the keys by wa
939. g gentleman, who was still busy chaffing the little girl. — "Mr. Playfair," sa
940. ayfair," said Mr. Scarborough, advancing upon Tom with a smiling young miss lean
941. rough, advancing upon Tom with a smiling young miss leaning upon his arm. " Perm
942. on Tom with a smiling young miss leaning upon his arm. " Permit me to introduce
943. hat I'm particularly awkward at anything, You see, we're rather a solemn crowd i
944. we're rather a solemn crowd it's dancing. in our family. I have no sisters at ho
945. s as kite-flyir.g and baseball." nothing; if "You don't look so awfully solemn,"
946. her uot. She was not or Tom was speaking seriously 128 HARRY my feelings." DEE.
947. he grave "I labor There was no mistaking the twinkle in Tom's eyes this time, an
948. this time, and the young miss, breaking into a giggle, was led away by Mr. Scar
949. wall-flowWe were not surprised on seeing Percy taking ers." his place in the qua
950. ere not surprised on seeing Percy taking ers." his place in the quadrille, but w
951. ugh was a kindly old gentleman. Stealing up to us while the little figures were
952. us while the little figures were moving lightly about in what to me were litera
953. ee And I'm too stiff for people enjoying themselves. games at present. As we tur
954. rnly. foot. "There you are " — smoking again," said the father it Perhaps he w
955. he father it Perhaps he was only holding for another fel- low," volunteered Tom,
956. , consciously or unconsciously borrowing his little witticism. " I had to do som
957. ittle witticism. " I had to do something, " growled Gordon. " You HARRY DEE. kno
958. and I can't bear to every- body enjoying things and myself out in the cold." "We
959. n no little astonishment. "Yes; anything wonderful in that?" "Why, I thought you
960. said insist "<£od doesn't on our giving up amusements, unless they run sturdily
961. face. No wonder some boys give up trying to be good." "Hear! hit the nail hear!"
962. Gordon has been associaton the head. ing with a queer lot of boys at the militar
963. of laughter, of cards, baseball, smoking, chewing in fact, they mix up innocent
964. er, of cards, baseball, smoking, chewing in fact, they mix up innocent amusement
965. ustice, he was quite skilful in handling the cards. He and I were partners, and
966. were partners, and succeeded in winning three games hand-running from Tom and M
967. eded in winning three games hand-running from Tom and Mr. Scarborough. The fourt
968. I said, " some of the cards are missing. "Yes," said Gordon, "some fellow's che
969. s," said Gordon, "some fellow's cheating." " Suppose we turn our cards faces up
970. Jacks are gone," snarled Gordon, looking over the faces of the cards. "It only t
971. the cards. "It only two had been missing," continued suavely, "they might not ha
972. t is," said Tom The Tom. with increasing serenity, as he picked the knave of hea
973. man. "You're a cheat!" howled — Taking him firmly by the collar, Tom assisted
974. air. "There!" said Tom sternly, pointing to the missing knaves upon which Gordon
975. aid Tom sternly, pointing to the missing knaves upon which Gordon had been sitti
976. naves upon which Gordon had been sitting. "I've been waiting for five deals to s
977. don had been sitting. "I've been waiting for five deals to spot the man who's be
978. deals to spot the man who's been keeping two cards out of the pack reguPious boy
979. s. that we won few games for the ensuing two After the game, there was a late su
980. ded in regard to accommodations. Feeling tired, I was shown The to my room some
981. time before the others. One was sleeping apartment had two double beds. alloted
982. ary academy at once set about exchanging confidences among them- Tom took off hi
983. y academy, as he pointed to the kneeling form. The three of them engaged hypocri
984. e hypocrites. Maybe I Tom in him dancing and laughing." was now staring, but the
985. Maybe I Tom in him dancing and laughing." was now staring, but they were too ab
986. m dancing and laughing." was now staring, but they were too absorbed - The Percy
987. ck his hand upon his thigh, and catching up a valise drew from broidered slipper
988. a pair of very prettily emone, Selecting he turned to- ward Percy, poising the s
989. ecting he turned to- ward Percy, poising the slipper in the air. "Don't, Eugene,
990. this noble youth the justice of stating that must do The yellow-faced one lowhe
991. re any little jokes in the way of flying slippers, Percy Wynn will show what a c
992. d Tom knelt down and prayed with amazing composure. The least, military students
993. itary students presently took to talking in a louder key. The tone of conversati
994. I'm sorry to say that we forgot to bring any more cotton along." "I beg your par
995. "bu<; I don't exactly take your meaning." "Well, the fact is," continued Tom, "
996. fact is," continued Tom, "we've nothing to stuff our ears with. So if you and y
997. omplexioned young gentleman as a parting made some confused remarks about girls,
998. Y DEE. changed his opinion the following morning. Mr. Scarborough brought us all
999. hanged his opinion the following morning. Mr. Scarborough brought us all upon th
1000. see Tom and Percy run." "Just the thing," said Mr. Scarborough, "who'll try a r
1001.a race. I'll give a fine jointed fishing-pole to the winner." The bilious young
1002. Eugene?" asked Mr. Scarborough, looking around. too slow for him." "I'm at afra
1003.it you can. it But you must make holding out. a long run. I'll fix it. Make a qu
1004.nced about him. A gravelled path opening from the gate on both sides. HARRY and
1005.he gate on both sides. HARRY and leading up complete circle. " DEE. It 135 to hi
1006.ough ?" he asked. "Pshaw! that's nothing," said Eugene. "Very good; we will make
1007.ow, you'll both start from thi" hitching post here, and the one who touches it f
1008.these and other preliminaries were being arranged, Rose, who had stolen over to
1009. who had stolen over to Tom, was begging him to take part. "Oh, no, little girl.
1010.t it every word. Mamma taught me to sing when I was little that is, I mean," she
1011.e sweet in- nocence of childhood shining from her lovely eyes, Tom felt a lump r
1012. her lovely eyes, Tom felt a lump rising in his throat. "That's right, little on
1013.t's right, little one," he said, patting her golden hair, "and I hope and pray y
1014.The two runners, meantime, were standing on a line, while Mr. Scarborough was co
1015.line, while Mr. Scarborough was counting: "One !" two three go "God bless me!" e
1016.an run." — — "He's not even exerting himself," said Tom. "He's taking it eas
1017.xerting himself," said Tom. "He's taking it easy; a little too easy, perhaps." F
1018. Tom. " But look Percy See! he's gaining a little, is putting on more speed. I t
1019.y See! he's gaining a little, is putting on more speed. I think. I'll bet on him
1020. bet on him yet." Eugene was now nearing the hitching post; he was breathing som
1021.et." Eugene was now nearing the hitching post; he was breathing somewhat heavily
1022.ring the hitching post; he was breathing somewhat heavily, and the perspiration
1023.eavily, and the perspiration was rolling down his face. Percy, about fortyfive o
1024.e or fifty feet behind him, was fetching his breath anxiously, as ! quite easily
1025.ad passed us with- HARRY DEE. out moving his head one us, bowed and Tom's feet.
1026.urned his doffed his cap, Not so smiling face upon which he threw at a spurt," s
1027.to, too." I think Frank was exaggerating in this latter statement; for Percy was
1028.ter statement; for Percy was now running at his best. By the time Eugene had mad
1029.r Eugene to arise and resume his running. "There's a gentleman for you," ejacula
1030., with a great spurt, he comes pattering closer and closer upon his rival. Now t
1031.d, Eugene with swollen veins and panting breath. Now Percy breaks away from him:
1032.he reason that graver matters are coming. The quiet tenor of school-life is to b
1033. strange and improbable that, in looking back upon them, I sometimes fancy that
1034.false, later events will some show being solved; and so, leaving the pretty lake
1035. some show being solved; and so, leaving the pretty lake, and innocent Rose, and
1036.ed for the occasion, and rapidly nearing the house whose horrid memories had so
1037.'t look any too cheerful in the gloaming," Tom observed. "What an awful racket t
1038.t an awful racket those crows are making!" There was a number of these ugly blac
1039.umber of these ugly black birds hovering in mid-air, uttering their raucous crie
1040.lack birds hovering in mid-air, uttering their raucous cries above the house, an
1041.trange and eery they looked in the dying of the day. To my excited imagination t
1042.oodshed and robbery and murder, gloating over a mansion conse- — crated to the
1043.nsion conse- — crated to their darling rites- We On dismissed the driver at th
1044.ismissed the driver at the gace, bidding him return for us at six the next morni
1045.im return for us at six the next morning. reaching the massive, gloomy door I pu
1046.for us at six the next morning. reaching the massive, gloomy door I put down and
1047.sive, gloomy door I put down and opening it produced a heavy bunch of keys. They
1048.st of the keys in the lock. In inserting it, not without difficulty, I shook the
1049.s 14© HARRY my ribs. I DEE. of flapping noises within that sent my heart thump-
1050.ly water along; it's a good style. thing to have in a house whether it's haunted
1051.st wait till I get a good hold on my ing against cane." Tom raised grasped his c
1052.which had subsided while we were talking, were again renewed. "Don't mind the ra
1053.jump aside." As I sent the door swinging ajar the hinges growled and grated, sou
1054.been their owner, while You the flapping noises grew louder and quicker. may be
1055.to one side nor the other; but, standing full in the doorway, strained HARRY DEE
1056.all. For some moments he stood listening intently; then an expression of relief
1057.on of relief came upon "Bats!" something the hall. this side his features. he sa
1058.y uncle, seated at his desk, and peering at me over his spectacles. It was the s
1059.o its hole. There was dust on everything; dust on the straightbacked chairs, dus
1060.r every footfaU a muffled voice, warning us to leave unexplored th « ; ; horrid
1061.d th « ; ; horrid home of dark-brooding silence. " Let's get out of here," I sa
1062.presume), and, before traced his leading the way into the hall, name I4» HARRY
1063.pon the dust-covered table. were passing by the door we noticed hanging over it
1064.e passing by the door we noticed hanging over it a clock of medium size. It had
1065.t relieved, subsequently, by discovering that other clocks in the house had stop
1066.about her dry-goods." Instead of dusting the top, therefore, tented himself with
1067.herefore, tented himself with inscribing his forefinger on top of the clock. Tom
1068.had ascended the stairs and were looking down the gloomy length of the gloomy, l
1069., long corridor, veiled in the gathering is Tom. gloom of night, "this the floor
1070.l the door of the corner room. awakening came back to me! My own scream of him a
1071.prang from the bed, in dismay at finding that Mrs. Raynor had disLook!" I contin
1072.ynor had disLook!" I continued, pointing to a dark appeared. stain on the floor.
1073.ere, to my relief, there was no striking sign of the tragedy. The bed was made,
1074.The bed was made, the room clean, saving, of course, the covering of dust upon e
1075.m clean, saving, of course, the covering of dust upon everything. "Now,"' contin
1076.se, the covering of dust upon everything. "Now,"' continued Tom, placing the lam
1077.erything. "Now,"' continued Tom, placing the lamp upon a table, "here's where we
1078. upon a table, "here's where we're going to pass the night." At that moment I wo
1079.bility of a murdered man's spirit coming or not coming at night, and in the room
1080.rdered man's spirit coming or not coming at night, and in the room where the man
1081.een murdered, is an exhibition of daring in a small boy as rare as in it is rema
1082.any of Loretto. "Now," said Tom, looking at his watch, "it's in order to take lu
1083.onished, not so much at our volunteering to pass a night in a haunted house as a
1084.ed in the bud. For on my first proposing the matter to my Howfather he had shown
1085.im of all that Tom had said conv cerning the mystery he had become lost in thoug
1086.there's no ques* tion of the house being haunted; that's superstition. a bit of
1087. But there are some things worth looking up there in regard to your uncle's deat
1088.e goes there one can hardly help staying all You ought to know now, my dear Harr
1089.emed to me that were we to suc- bringing to justice the woman whom you had loved
1090.ion, though romantic, may have something of good in it. Yes; I'll pass a night a
1091.n sleep there, you know, and if anything happens you can wake us up." "Well, on
1092.ned off to indite a note to Tom, telling him of my father's decision and pressin
1093.him of my father's decision and pressing him to come on at once. But before the
1094.at it would AU 146 HARRY far DEE. moving about for he madness weefcs. him to thi
1095. en route for my uncle's former dwelling. We I dispatched our lunch very pleasan
1096.ch very pleasantly, though was beginning to The meal, all the same, gave me hear
1097.ave taken a nap while we were journeying here. You see, old fellow, I can stand
1098. smoker and smoked. succeeded in smoking just as well as it did in sleeping, and
1099.oking just as well as it did in sleeping, and it wouldn't have been so much of a
1100.night hideous." For a few moments taking out the conversation dragged. I On my w
1101.icate the discovered that he was nodding. all the bravery I had plucked for all
1102.s a little sleep. You've been travelling now a quarter HARRY to eleven. of you."
1103. me before twelve?" Tom, without opening his eyes. " Yes. Here, come over to the
1104.hen he threw himself on a chair standing at the head, and burying his face in hi
1105. chair standing at the head, and burying his face in his arms and his arms upon
1106.er that from the moment of Tom's falling asleep to his awakening desire to I tel
1107.of Tom's falling asleep to his awakening desire to I tell the events as I then h
1108.ooked around I lis- the room; everything was in perfect order. tened ; nothing b
1109.ng was in perfect order. tened ; nothing but the quiet breathings of my sleep* i
1110.ut the quiet breathings of my sleep* ing friend broke upon the silence. my Then
1111.d broke upon the silence. my Then making the sign of the cross, I took out of va
1112.rded it as a book which would this bring sunshine into a desert. I selected for
1113.into a desert. I selected for my reading that very curious chapter where Mr. Sam
1114.Samuel Weller writes a valentine. During a quarter of an hour's reading little a
1115.e. During a quarter of an hour's reading little after I felt it no nervousness a
1116.dim way I dis- that my head was becoming I Presently covered that was nodding, a
1117.ing I Presently covered that was nodding, and even in the act my imagination had
1118.Samivel" and his father and was dwelling upon those two clocks which had stopped
1119.voice had made. and I arose and In doing so I passed took a turn about the room.
1120.s hands pressed upon the pillow. Feeling more wakeful, I again composed myself t
1121.once more I began to grow heavy. Shaking off the feeling, I took a glance at my
1122.n to grow heavy. Shaking off the feeling, I took a glance at my watch, which was
1123.ok a glance at my watch, which was lying before me on the table. It was twenty m
1124.olume. It seems to me that after reading two pages and a half I caught myself no
1125.pages and a half I caught myself nodding again; and I think that I half formed a
1126.ened intently. There was a loud whirring noise and my hair Beemed to stand on en
1127.lve to the minute. As I was still gazing upon its face, the watch fell from my n
1128.ce, and on I the moment a cold shivering came upon me. I made for the bed callin
1129.came upon me. I made for the bed calling turned to wake Tom. "Tom!" What was I i
1130. no doubt to my mind that I was standing before the ghost of James Dee. "Uncle!"
1131.e from — that weird form, yet carrying in its hollow, sepulchral tones a hint
1132. gloomy and heavy, stern and unrelenting as it had been when I met him for the f
1133.ough I My uncle, meanwhile, stood gazing had not spoken. 15© at HARRY DEE. I me
1134.ou that night?" "You made a will leaving me all your property." "What happened t
1135." — "Not " yet, uncle." Are you taking any measures to have it avenged ?'* "No
1136.Oh! how I trembled beneath his searching glance. " Nephew, listen: swear that yo
1137. measures. You are not bound to anything extraordinary. Do you understand ?" "Ye
1138.fined became beside my friend. Clutching him by the shoulder "Tom! Tom!" I cried
1139.the feet matter?" cried Tom, 1 1 jumping to his "Is it twelve?" and rubbing his
1140.mping to his "Is it twelve?" and rubbing his eyes. could say no more, but clingi
1141.is eyes. could say no more, but clinging to him, sobbed like a little child. Tom
1142.? went to sleep my uncle!" me everything from the time I 1 till now." incoherenc
1143. was ished. very particular in inquiring into the exact words my These words and
1144. he inuncle used. sisted on my repeating over and over again, and he seemed to f
1145. in my uncle's garden, and their singing sank into balm. my heart like a healing
1146. sank into balm. my heart like a healing "Whoop-la! The sun!" exclaimed my compa
1147. "I've got it. Come along." And catching me by the hand, he hurried down the ref
1148.eady gaze upon the hall clock, expecting from Tom's animation was about to read
1149."Well," I said at length, "I see nothing striking " If it, ^bout that clock." yo
1150. said at length, "I see nothing striking " If it, ^bout that clock." you don't s
1151.bout that clock." you don't see anything striking about naps you hear something
1152. clock." you don't see anything striking about naps you hear something striking?
1153.g striking about naps you hear something striking?" " per- Look here, Tom, if yo
1154.g about naps you hear something striking?" " per- Look here, Tom, if you've hust
1155.ries?" "Yes. The two years before coming to St. Maure's I read every ghost-story
1156. me out and told my father I was ruining myself. The doctor said that an occasio
1157.at for one in my state of health nothing could be worse." "Oh, bother the doctor
1158.come across a good many ghosts appearing at midnight and just on the stroke of t
1159.a born fool. " There's no use in getting excited, Harry, it's and no sign of foo
1160.opened the clock-door, and after peering about for a few moments discovered the
1161.covered the key. " Now, Harry, I'm going to put the hand of this There.' clock b
1162.e. so and now that's done. Now I'm going to wind it both wait for results." that
1163.y a grin, which I interpreted as meaning "that's all right, Harry." It is thus t
1164.rr— whirr— to set the clock- rasping convulsion seemed case into a tremble a
1165.of the forest just then as this striking clock With much groaning and wheezing a
1166.s this striking clock With much groaning and wheezing and internal agitation the
1167.ng clock With much groaning and wheezing and internal agitation the clock gave f
1168.es. Had it not been for Tom's protecting arm I fear should have run away. The re
1169. like my poor uncle and Caggett growling and groaning together." "Whoo! what an
1170. uncle and Caggett growling and groaning together." "Whoo! what an imagination y
1171. the chair. a little "Your name a-flying, blurred by the dust," it I said. "Prec
1172. " 157 put Now you're my name up talking sense. there last night; is I'm mighty
1173.s. Raynor, and you'll find out something more." — CHAPTER IN XIX. WHICH THE CH
1174.m est hujus vocis signification" meaning of this word?" I asked, pointing him to
1175.meaning of this word?" I asked, pointing him to the word " naviculariis" in the"
1176. counter-jumpers and ship" owners having been severely sat upon. "Were I asked t
1177.et strike the vernal earth with changing — where are ye one but Percy could ha
1178. — back against a tree; the were lying about in various easy postures. Here we
1179.e in the class of Humanities and talking Latin twice a week. Not one of us had l
1180.ne of us had laid aside our Latin during the vacation months. Before leaving sch
1181.ring the vacation months. Before leaving school we had agreed, " for the honor o
1182.number of hours each week to the reading of Cicero's " De Amicitia." To make to
1183. Amicitia." To make to this more binding, we had furthermore agreed submit ourse
1184.dal if human about. exertion could bring On our return to college he had at once
1185. to the matter of rhetoric class, During this hour but we took it up all the sam
1186. up all the same. Latin. all the talking was in Strange as it may emy. came toge
1187.ernoon we looked much the same as during the preceding year. Percy had grown som
1188.ed much the same as during the preceding year. Percy had grown somewhat taller,
1189.promoted to the senior division, leaving the leadership of the small yard to Per
1190. On the occasion of this present meeting Tom was bubbling over with good-humor,
1191.of this present meeting Tom was bubbling over with good-humor, but he found Lati
1192.ary put into Latin," said Percy, smiling. Rem !) acu tetigisti. Ok quomodo volo
1193.ome time before we came at Tom's meaning of " supra. " Percy announced the disco
1194.r. Middle- — ; ton thinks we're losing too at this Latin business " much of ou
1195.sar- castically. you? He's been thinking about the matter, and he's gone to the
1196.from six pairs of vigorous lungs! inning out, will "Let me have my HARRY "And th
1197."And that's not all. DEE. 161 He's going to superintend is our work himself. Lis
1198.s are to spend ten minutes in — making out the translation. Then the next nigh
1199. and put it back can, into Latin, trying to reproduce, as nearly as we the idiom
1200.. "We'll get a better course of training than the boys in day colleges," Joe Why
1201.Tom dryly. "Allow me to finish my inning. During this half-hour we can talk as m
1202.y. "Allow me to finish my inning. During this half-hour we can talk as much as w
1203.st I'd canonize our teacher the 44 thing." No, you wouldn't," contradicted Richa
1204.hat." Metbinks," exclaimed Tom, throwing himself 44 1 see a golden medal." into
1205., Then he spoils the attitude by leaping into the 444 air, knocking his heels to
1206.de by leaping into the 444 air, knocking his heels together, and adding: In " my
1207. knocking his heels together, and adding: In " my mind's eye, Horatio.' 44 Just
1208."They're older and they've been studying longer." 44 Age hasn't very much to do
1209.had a great He's foladvantage in keeping the same teacher. lowed us, and knows j
1210.strong. week or two each year in finding out what we don't The boy know. Best of
1211. In the third place, we're in a boarding-colmud. lege, where it's easier to stud
1212.ay college. Now, the six other competing colleges are day schools." "Yes," said
1213.umanities, we've much Latin when leaving we ought already as boys have ordinaril
1214.aw much two years. This year we're going to do double work in Latin again; and o
1215. HARRY DEE. one single purpose of making ourselves good theme^ writers." "That's
1216.er argument which Tom did was. not bring forward and which, in fact, could never
1217. bright, quick, energetic. little Taking it all in all, these boys in their knic
1218.ight. The progress we made was something remarkable. after Week week passed away
1219.ake rank with me, and long before spring he was my superior, not only in idiom A
1220.pped was I in my studies that in looking back into that year I remember but few
1221.ken with regard to discoverMy father ing the whereabouts of Mrs. Raynor. had pla
1222.d up into his bloodwould be a good thing for this at St. Maure's, vigilant detec
1223.wo nights after the tragedy, few missing links. missing link, for that was the l
1224. the tragedy, few missing links. missing link, for that was the last Probably De
1225.cy and Tom were instrumental in bringing about a the small boys. it is great cha
1226.. nec- essary to say a word about During my first year at fine Dodgers." Maure's
1227.humor seemed to develop with the passing months, in so far that in the spring he
1228.ing months, in so far that in the spring he was already recognized as the wag of
1229.arted. When he returned at the beginning of September he became a leader at once
1230.d. At this time "Oliver Twist" was being read to Tipp's sense of fun and lively
1231.Tipp's sense of fun and lively us during meals. imagination were taken by the ch
1232.l Dodger." He procured, one fine evening in Sep- tember, a set of garments, such
1233.ickens bestowed upon his too-fascinating thief, and taking the pose and manneris
1234.on his too-fascinating thief, and taking the pose and mannerisms of his prototyp
1235.totype, Master Tipp conFrom that evening he vulsed us all with laughter. answere
1236.ugh the yard for the purpose of stealing handkerchiefs, pencils, and whatever th
1237.hatever they could discover worth taking out of their fellowstudents' pockets. "
1238.hen he comes up, you will tell something. him that you're a poor old man named F
1239.s will, and very soon Frank was standing behind a bench, gay with six handkerchi
1240.sed into Frank's hands up to the ringing of the first bell for studies. Then in
1241. "Now, boys," continued Tipp, addressing the happy pickpockets, "we'll have a sq
1242.'ll have a square division. Frank, bring out the candy." Frank was astonished. "
1243. had the qualities that go to the making of a leader of boys. He was good-nature
1244.good-natured, energetic, and truthloving. This latter was a very necessary quali
1245.power of invention. He was ever devising something new. One day it might be a ga
1246.nvention. He was ever devising something new. One day it might be a game; anothe
1247. it was, his followers counted on having some fun in the issue and they were rar
1248.l- his, commonly known Anarchist," owing to his bristling hair and and order, ta
1249.known Anarchist," owing to his bristling hair and and order, taking out a beanTh
1250.his bristling hair and and order, taking out a beanThe shooter, had aimed a drie
1251.ward the study-keeper's desk, exclaiming aloud as he advanced: "O Mr. Middleton,
1252.s nose red. kerchief, he rushed Covering his mouth and lips with his hand' up to
1253.adhead's turn. courage when, on entering the ber's place. his part, tle. hall, h
1254.. Au- Indeed, he contemplated abandoning a note from when Tipp put him on his me
1255.in the study-hall watched the proceeding. "Stand here with your nose to the wall
1256. as the tip of it to a single boy during this hour, I'll attend to you privately
1257.e were no further cases of nose-bleeding after that. Tipp next turned his attent
1258.variably consulted Tom; and it was owing to the latter's influence upon the lead
1259.Mr. Auber in season and out. One evening a number of us were seated on a bench a
1260.fty feet west of the old church building, when Anarchist produced a cigarette. "
1261.rchist produced a cigarette. " I'm dying for a smoke," he observed. Tipp glanced
1262.as twilight, and Mr. Auber was presiding prefect. " I'll tell you what, Anarchis
1263. along without the least danger of being caught. You sit where you are, and ten
1264.tand around you. that somebody's smoking, but he won't know who it is." The crow
1265.ry soon noticed the smell of the burning cigarette, and moved slowly down toward
1266.ong before he got near us. "Good-evening, boys." 17* HARRY all lifted DEE. We ou
1267.erful, but no one ventured upon uttering a word. Poor Mr. Auber became nervous.
1268.rough his hair, and walked away, leaving Broadhead to : Tesume his smoke undistu
1269. his smoke undisturbed. On the following evening I took care not to go number of
1270.ke undisturbed. On the following evening I took care not to go number of the Dod
1271.pp, Broadhead, and several others having made provision, and the air soon became
1272.them. "He can't find out who was smoking, anyhow," suggested Richards. "Maybe us
1273.atch him. You can just bet I'm not going to take any punish- ment." down, boys,"
1274. down, boys," said Mr. Middleton, giving no sign to show that he had heard the w
1275.Now," continued the prefect, " I'm going to give you fellows a lesson in catechi
1276.e." "But suppose the thief died, leaving no effectswho in that case would have t
1277.court to have had a hand in the stealing, how many of them would be punished?" "
1278.red Tip. "Now, apply all this to smoking on the sly,* it's against the college l
1279.ere. He was a timid man, rather retiring, and one could see that he was at a los
1280.hrough his hair fined himself to running his and looking annoyed. The Dodgers us
1281.fined himself to running his and looking annoyed. The Dodgers used to feel sorry
1282.w was not sufficient to induce a lasting amendment. One morning in December matt
1283. induce a lasting amendment. One morning in December matters went worse than usu
1284.d on the stove set all the boys sneezing; the water-pipes Were stuffed so that t
1285.found themselves locked out. The locking-out had not been set down in the origin
1286.a fair and successful start in disDuring this day it order, know not where to st
1287.s ings, abroad. After supper the leading members of the Dodger crowd took their
1288.cy, Harry Quip, and myself were standing by the wash-room. "I say, boys," said T
1289.I say, boys," said Tom, " Tipp is losing control of his crowd." "Is that so?" sa
1290.nger." "So he could, but they're getting the start on him of late; and now Anarc
1291. of late; and now Anarchist is beginning to get HARRY the run of things. DEE. 1
1292.eader, but because the Dodgers are going too far and he feels that he's He was t
1293.ar and he feels that he's He was talking to me to-day and to blame for it. I adv
1294. I advised him to draw out." Is he going to ?" asked Harry. " He'd like to, he s
1295., he says, but he thinks that by staying with them he can keep them from follow-
1296.m from follow- much because he is 11 ing Anarchist blindly." you what," pursued
1297.rsued Quip, "those fellow» are hatching something now, or I'm badly mistaken. T
1298., "those fellow» are hatching something now, or I'm badly mistaken. Tipp is the
1299.ipp is there, but the Anarchist is doing most of His hair is standing up worse t
1300.st is doing most of His hair is standing up worse than the talking. ever, and if
1301.ir is standing up worse than the talking. ever, and if he keeps on getting excit
1302.alking. ever, and if he keeps on getting excited it will raise tell "I his hat o
1303.here that both Tom and Percy were, owing to their popularity, honorary members o
1304.h he's responsible for nearly everything that's happened himself, and now he's a
1305., and now he's afraid that they're going to give Mr. Auber just pecks and bushel
1306.ouble straight ahead. I've been thinking about the matter all day, and can't see
1307.y, u and once we get the fellows talking, you might 176 strike HARRY DEE. upon a
1308.o now?" asked Tom. "We were just talking about the way we worked Auber this morn
1309.out the way we worked Auber this morning," volunteered Broadhead. " It was a pre
1310.all except place for Tom — the locking-out business," of course commented Tom,
1311.that you did that. It's like is standing out in the cold funny." "I am told," sa
1312.e the pigs killed. One day, after seeing a thousand pigs done up, Anarchist got
1313. pigs done up, Anarchist got to laughing so hard that he nearly died of it." " O
1314.l you fellows get go away." if to poking this "Heavens!" ejaculated Quip. "He ca
1315.s; and I'll 177 end the joke by throwing you over be nicer if the fence," snarle
1316.y, by a quick movement, The fence-paling awaited Broadhead's escaped it. fist; a
1317.d's escaped it. fist; and the next thing we knew Percy was bandaging Broadhead's
1318.e next thing we knew Percy was bandaging Broadhead's hand as though they were in
1319.le friends, at the same time apologizing profusely for the words he had just utt
1320.w how to take a friend's beauty roasting just the same as the rest of us." "That
1321. a good step Tom saw there was in making fun of Broadhead. And even point to be
1322., had deliberately continued the teasing for the one purpose of lessening Broadh
1323.teasing for the one purpose of lessening Broadhead's influence with the crowd. B
1324.nce with the crowd. Broadhead, by losing his temper, had helped them in their pu
1325. " So," continued Tom, "you were talking about the surprise-party you gave Mr. A
1326.se-party you gave Mr. Auber this morning. Is that all ?" "No; we're for to-morro
1327.all ?" "No; we're for to-morrow. getting up another surprise-party He'll run his
1328.mpletely hatched out yet, but it's going to begin this way. To-morrow afternoon'
1329. the privilege for all to go out walking if they get permission. Of course most
1330.t on the conduct list. Well, we're going to get permission anyhow." "How'll you
1331.ogether by the pump and begin whispering and monkeying, as though we were up to
1332. pump and begin whispering and monkeying, as though we were up to some mischief.
1333. and he'll come over to see what's going on. Now, just as soon as he's very near
1334.out?' Then those two 'yes,' or something of the sort. will give a whoop and say
1335.ch other up by the tallest kind of lying." Tipp's jaw dropped. "I don't like tha
1336.pped. "I don't like that. straight lying so far." " We Dodgers have kept out of
1337. out of And, of course, you're not going to begin now," added Percy. " Then ther
1338.dded Percy. " Then there's another thing, too. Aren't you boys imposing on Mr, A
1339.her thing, too. Aren't you boys imposing on Mr, Auber too much? He lets you off
1340.tly. "He gave me fifty lines for talking in ranks, and we were But as at it for
1341.s you're born, it when I got to thinking about I it, looked as if he had been pu
1342.had all the fun." "There's another thing," put Tom. "Mr. Au» it. ber doesn't be
1343.u» it. ber doesn't believe in punishing he can avoid you fellows keep on he mig
1344.ave me out of this Sunday-school meeting," growled Broadhead, rising from his se
1345.hool meeting," growled Broadhead, rising from his seat and walking off. Whereupo
1346.adhead, rising from his seat and walking off. Whereupon the boys, following time
1347.lking off. Whereupon the boys, following time to his footsteps, whistled, with z
1348.aid that Mr. Auber was the nearest thing to a genius that he ever met." "All the
1349.and it was that like a book, astonishing to hear all the little traits of kindne
1350.nd consideration they had noticed during the preceding three months. "And all ye
1351.on they had noticed during the preceding three months. "And all yet," said Percy
1352.and one me to- day a bad job." " Talking about giving him a surprise-party," tha
1353.- day a bad job." " Talking about giving him a surprise-party," that he felt he'
1354. he felt he'd have to give up prefecting a? said Tom me with great animation, "i
1355.there's a rule in the college forbidding the boys to give presents to any of the
1356. "Yes, Percy," said Tom, wHo was helping Quip count the money, "you and Tipp and
1357.president was seated at his table poring over a bit of paper; he started on seei
1358.ver a bit of paper; he started on seeing who we were and with an effort smiled.
1359.ce that he was disturbed about something. " Father," began Percy, "we'd like to
1360.E. Mr. "Excuse me, Father; we're talking about Auber." The " president sat bolt
1361. the paper over which he had been poring and tore it into small bits. The Artful
1362.swered the president, "may give anything they like to Mr. Auber." "I wonder what
1363.tained reasons pro and con for expelling Tipp. as door he had determined to expe
1364.ned to expel Tipp on the morrow as being a promoter of at his we knocked disorde
1365. was a unanimous — chorus of assenting voices. HARRY DEE. 183 Five minutes lat
1366.and twenty-five cents were still wanting. Then Tipp went to the wash-room and br
1367. time boy in the small yard. ; Tom being, in St. Maure's, and, heart. I verily b
1368.s just what I'd like to find out. During tfrst recess, while Tom and Tipp and my
1369.ile Tom and Tipp and myself were walking up and down talking about the silver wa
1370. myself were walking up and down talking about the silver watch " T we're going
1371.g about the silver watch " T we're going to buy Mr. Auber, Broadhead came up and
1372. pretty quick, too.' walked off swearing in an awful way." he "The Anarchist is
1373. his bed, un- able to sleep for thinking of Broadhead's words and was hard upon
1374. a troubled sleep. Tom. Tom was standing upon the edge of a precipice; stealthil
1375.edge of a precipice; stealthily creeping upon him was Broadhead. Percy essayed t
1376.ad. Percy essayed to shout out a warning, but his tongue seemed to be tied; agai
1377.er came not. the Anarchist made a spring upon Tom, and Percy's best friend, with
1378., disappeared over the edge. The rolling cry seemed to awaken Percy; he found hi
1379.awaken Percy; he found him- self sitting up in bed with drops of perspiration do
1380.ver to Tom. 1 85 His friend was sleeping soundly, his face, tranquil and compose
1381.t. Broadhead was not there. Not stopping to think, but acting by a sort of in- P
1382.there. Not stopping to think, but acting by a sort of in- Percy pulled on his kn
1383.ut through one of the two windows giving upon To the shed at the eastern end of
1384.it was necessary to pass over a sleeping form: Mr. Middleton was in one bed, Har
1385.midnight adventurer was upon the sloping roof of the shed. The ground, twelve fe
1386. Percy would not have thought of jumping down even in his shoes. But on this occ
1387. in its third quarter, Broadhead jumping out of the window. Broadhead, on the in
1388.o, and at once took to his heels, making toward the college gate with a start of
1389.n his career in St. Maure's by thrashing some five or six of the Dodgers; conseq
1390.yet engaged in a fight, was now pursuing. Percy was slightly taller, but he was
1391.ds. that Broadhead Broadhead, on passing through the gate, turned Whether he kne
1392.d an Very soon Broadeven pace, breathing quite easily. head lost his wind: he wa
1393.r, and saw himself that unless something be done his capPercv saw it, ture would
1394.ered what he should do upon their coming together. His deliberations were cut sh
1395. on the highway where repairs were being made, suddenly dashed aside to a pile o
1396.w past him. inevitably lead to his being knocked senseless. Broadhead was throwi
1397.nocked senseless. Broadhead was throwing with all his force. Suddenly a light fl
1398.trusted it to Percy's care. DrawI'll ing this from his pocket, Percy covered Bro
1399.d, but moved on steadily, still covering his antagonist. " Say, put down that pi
1400. "I won't hurt you " I promise." holding the pistol in his hand, but pointed tow
1401.our pockets and see what you're carrying away. There were twenty in Tipp's box d
1402. to find out." you what, Wynn, I'm going to give you the worst thrashing you eve
1403.'m going to give you the worst thrashing you ever heard about." "Maybe; but you'
1404.ard about." "Maybe; but you're not going to get away till I know what you're tak
1405. get away till I know what you're taking with you." Percy had restored the pisto
1406.the pistol to its place and was watching every move of his adversary. " Oh, you
1407. find out at any cost what you're taking away." Broadhead laughed; he knew that
1408. to back you up, Wynn." "Well, I'm going to go through your pockets anyhow, Broa
1409. sides, when Percy succeeded in striking Broadhead a blow under the chin that se
1410. under the chin that sent him staggering. Before Broadhead could recover himself
1411.himself Percy delivered two very telling blows which sent the thief to the earth
1412.to the earth. was astride him, pinioning his legs by the position he took, and h
1413.egs by the position he took, and holding him down in such a manner that Broadhea
1414.t be seen for the blood that was flowing from them. There was a time when Percy
1415.ht of blood now he gave it but a passing thought as he stared straight into the
1416.though he seemed to be intent on staring Broadhead out of countenance, he was fe
1417.dhead out of countenance, he was feeling his way for the money. By moving his le
1418.feeling his way for the money. By moving his legs, now one way, now another, in
1419.satisfied himself that there was nothing pocket-knife and Broadhead's trousers p
1420.er that there was no necessity of taking Broadhead's vest into account. It follo
1421.o bed. He is nervous and afraid of being caught, otherwise he'd have taken that
1422.that the money Here Percy, before acting upon this hypothesis, breathes a short
1423.breathes a short prayer. He is beginning to suffer from the cold night air and s
1424.d night air and sharp pains are shooting through his bare feet. Then suddenly he
1425.e to examine Playfair's hands. springing to his feet dashes at full speed back i
1426.o the infirmary, With pain and exceeding difficulty he and there he was kept his
1427.week. He had Tom by under strict morning, and there, secrecy, related his advent
1428.power. Before supper on a Monday evening Tipp ap- proached Mr. Auber: "Mr. Auber
1429.r. Auber: "Mr. Auber," he said, touching spectfully, "I wish you'd kindly keys o
1430.odgers want to fix up A vision of flying shoe-brushes, knotted towels, missing s
1431.ng shoe-brushes, knotted towels, missing shoe-blacking, much raising of dust, an
1432.s, knotted towels, missing shoe-blacking, much raising of dust, and general conf
1433.els, missing shoe-blacking, much raising of dust, and general confusion shot bef
1434.riously. Tipp very " Oh, we're not going to cut up —honor bright, Mr. Auber. I
1435.ht, Mr. Auber. If there's a single thing out of place you can punish me." Mr. Au
1436.ty minutes DEE. 193 refrained from going near the wash-ioom, though for it boys
1437.ily. One would think they were preparing for a funeral. "There's one thing I not
1438.paring for a funeral. "There's one thing I notice, boys," said Tipp, when nearly
1439.We've buen in here nearly worth thinking about. minutes-, I reckon, and Mr. Aube
1440.wn at the other end of the yard, looking on at a game of 'nigger baby' just as i
1441.dn't trust the Dodgers half eyes dancing and his face flushing, takes my word as
1442. half eyes dancing and his face flushing, takes my word as far as we could in se
1443.y were a. wild set of fellows, but owing partly to their natgood dispositions an
1444.ispositions and their religious training partly to Tipp's control and Playfair's
1445.r, that you take their word as something serious and sacred, and you 194 HARRY D
1446.nfallibly. of the small boy. am speaking here The Dodgers tered the yard. create
1447.s association, the popular taste tending rather slouchiness. stiff led the proce
1448.iness. stiff led the procession, wearing a " among them But now! Tipp hat, and u
1449.s it the perfunctory style of black- ing which generally characterized his effor
1450.ipp's splendors perfectly as the shining toes. ; were emulated, though not surpa
1451. several others. In a word, and to bring the picture vividly before all, there w
1452. diced in the matter of dinarily feeling it hats, each member in or- to be his d
1453. with his hand. Clearly, then, something great was at hand. The bell rang for su
1454. together. The large boys, still waiting the signal to start, at once noticed th
1455.at once noticed that there was something strange about the advancing line, and M
1456.as something strange about the advancing line, and Mr. Cavanne, who with his bac
1457.ne, who with his back to the approaching procession was eying his charges, sudde
1458. to the approaching procession was eying his charges, suddenly saw one hundred s
1459.iff serious small toys, hats variegating the procession like so many banners; an
1460.pushed out of the refectory, which being interpreted means that we ate a good qu
1461.h one watch. hand while he began passing the other through his hair very rapidly
1462.uip in my ear. Go on, Tipp, you're doing immensely," said Tom in the voice that
1463.Auber, " continued the orator, shuffling his and getting one shoulder hopelessly
1464.ed the orator, shuffling his and getting one shoulder hopelessly higher than the
1465.d we're and we like you, and we're going to do betfeilows?" — ain't we, Every
1466.ery variety of affirmation came mumbling forth from the chorus. Then Tipp made a
1467. away. He looked like a person suffering from paralysis. almost total hand out o
1468., but I'm "Boys," said Mr. Auber, taking "I'm astonished; I'm hair, his. his dee
1469.ut not a boy laughed. his "There's going to be a dead-lock," whispered Joe Whyte
1470.ed and his hands moved in easy, striking gestures; and in a flow of English, str
1471. and adventure that set our eyes blazing, riveted us to our seats, brought the t
1472. and convinced us that we were listening to the most eloquent story-teller we co
1473. Tipp remarked: "Well, that was stunning." "It's the story of the 'Hidden Gem' a
1474.id HARRY Tom; "and DEE. I the only thing that it. feel bad about is that Percy m
1475. crowd. Twice a week after supper during the winter did we assemble in the wash-
1476.y with him and up. His stories elevating; they filled us with longings to be wer
1477.an, certainly." want you to stop calling me Dodger.' Get Percy and all your chum
1478.QAY, went to Holy Communion this morning," said Frank as he came upon me in the
1479. breakfast on a certain beautiful spring morning. I O HARRY DEE. "Why, Frank?" "
1480.st on a certain beautiful spring morning. I O HARRY DEE. "Why, Frank?" " For the
1481. honor. all the thought in the beginning of the year that you'd come out ahead.
1482.rksecond place on the list of honor. ing at it at nine o'clock this morning, don
1483.. ing at it at nine o'clock this morning, don't you?" "Yes, Frank." "Well, I hop
1484.d been in a feverish state the preceding morning, and could not even take part i
1485.n a feverish state the preceding morning, and could not even take part in the sp
1486. take part in the sports of early spring with any For my own part, my sleep was
1487. given out justice. I neglected to bring the murderer to Well, the day had come.
1488.s so much as looked at each other during the four hours allowed us for our effor
1489.e Then, indeed, was there much scurrying and scratching of pens. Time was called
1490. was there much scurrying and scratching of pens. Time was called at length, and
1491.me. His own name, with the corresponding nom de plume\ he put into aiv envelope
1492.st in the order of — the merit gaining the prize and the others taking the nin
1493. gaining the prize and the others taking the nine places of honor. The according
1494. the nine places of honor. The according to this plan, could have no more idea a
1495.is more than success—on your deserving it. You have done you* to leave the cla
1496.type, they were spoken with such feeling that Mr, Middleton came your duty," the
1497.ception of myself, all of us were During the month I learned more fully Tom's me
1498.eekness and Percy's sweetness of closing exercises. of disposition. It was the n
1499.n the hall, and how we did growl singing. at the When music and speech-making an
1500.ing. at the When music and speech-making and these things had come to an end we
1501.rty thanks. "There's the president going up. Why doesn't " Oh, gracious! he's go
1502.Not one of us attended to the conferring of degrees or listened with the least b
1503.ho addressed the graduates for something over an hour. At length our " innings"
1504.collegiate contest between six competing colleges has been awarded to a student
1505. and was about to disgrace us by dancing, a feat, by the way, which Frank Burdoc
1506.ll, did actually perform, to the smiling amusement of the astonished audience. P
1507.applause, under which Percy was blushing had subsided. " First — Thomas Playfa
1508." Tom and myself came very near blushing, and were happier than if we had won th
1509.s. "Third place John Ray, of a competing college." There was a silence. "Hurrah
1510. ejaculated Harry, his merry face taking on the hue of an angry sunset and retai
1511.the hue of an angry sunset and retaining its color — — long after the clappi
1512.ts color — — long after the clapping of hands had subsided. " Fifth place "
1513. college. — John Cynic, of a competing college. — John Robertson, of a compe
1514.lege. — John Robertson, of a competing Richards, of St. "Seventh Joseph Whyte,
1515." Eighth Charles Seebert, of a competing college. — — "Ninth— Charles Each
1516.iorSt. Maure's, for bouquets came flying upon the stage. Nothing could be seen o
1517.uets came flying upon the stage. Nothing could be seen of Percy 204 HARRY DEE. p
1518.lief, Master Frank Burdock came bounding upon the stage, his eyes flashing with
1519.unding upon the stage, his eyes flashing with his eyes excitement. "I'll help yo
1520. But what's the use of my congratulating you on your success? The great thing is
1521.ing you on your success? The great thing is that you've deserved it." He shook e
1522.r. Middleton," said Percy, "you're going away ?' "Yes; but after what happened l
1523.ve the field of my college labors saying with holy " Simeon, " ' Nunc dimittis s
1524.on, to love one another, and in teaching us all this to love you. Should we neve
1525.here we found Donnel and Keenan awaiting us and looking unusually grave. "Good-b
1526.onnel and Keenan awaiting us and looking unusually grave. "Good-by, boys," " we'
1527.ly grave. "Good-by, boys," " we're going for good." they said; that benediction
1528. HARRY DEE. "What! where?" "John's going off and I'm going to the Novitiate to t
1529. where?" "John's going off and I'm going to the Novitiate to try and become a Je
1530., There was a great deal of hand shaking, though we spoke softly parting is ever
1531. shaking, though we spoke softly parting is ever a sorrow, no matter how sweet.
1532.s envied them. For all this, our parting was sad. And so we broke up for the vac
1533.p for the vacation. Changes were marking the inexorable flight of time. When we
1534. is no shadow of vicissitude, no parting, but everlasting peace and death- — l
1535.vicissitude, no parting, but everlasting peace and death- — less reunion. CHAP
1536.T^ ANCE AND SINGS US SEVERAL ASTONISHING SONGS. HARRY QUIP, took Percy, Frank, T
1537.om, and myself pretty lake in our outing beside the Wisconsin, where we renewed
1538.allo, sir" HARRY DEE. * 207 Can you sing yes, sir; 'Jesus, Saviour of my soul' y
1539.ce. us in turn, but relented on catching Percy's eye. The enfante terrible did n
1540.e in what she had been witty, but taking it for granted that there were sufficie
1541.ere were sufficient reasons for laughing, she joined She continued: *as in our m
1542.to school now; and Cincinnati. I'm going to be a Catholic next year; and that's
1543.year; and that's where I learned to sing twelve new tunes, and I'm going to sing
1544. to sing twelve new tunes, and I'm going to sing them all for Tom Playfair, beca
1545. twelve new tunes, and I'm going to sing them all for Tom Playfair, because he [
1546.cause he [Here she gave likes my singing and I like him. Tom an ingenuous look,
1547.Mr. Tom's cheek.] Oh, yes! I was talking about your sisters. They're the sweetes
1548.n we all departed incontinently, leaving "Oh, — the artless miss not a little
1549.he came over of set purpose that evening to sing, for Tom's Lover of my soul." V
1550.over of set purpose that evening to sing, for Tom's Lover of my soul." Very vivi
1551.an ever, little girl." "Is it? I'll sing you another song, Tom." Thereupon the d
1552.like that ?" she asked, her eyes dancing. Did you "We did, little girl." "Then h
1553.ture she sang I I German song, beginning "How can when she came to the words, "
1554. years more at least before you can sing that song for Percy." "Oh! but I've got
1555.s, ' 'Believe me, of all these endearing " young charms. Even Tom could keep his
1556.composedly. "I don't care! I'm not going to be a nun." Whereupon Tom gave up. Fr
1557. Vacation passed all too quickly. During thess letters summer months I received,
1558.u, each and every one of them announcing a fresh clew. My father got weary of th
1559. I shall resign all hope of ever meeting Tell your sleepless detectives to Mrs.
1560., were it necessary, he would be willing to pay him a certain yearly allowance t
1561.unsteady their intellects on the looking up of labyrinthine clews, 14 210 HARRY
1562. English are directed toward stimulating sentiment, developing it in some direct
1563.toward stimulating sentiment, developing it in some directions, pruning it in ot
1564.eveloping it in some directions, pruning it in others, rendering it, in short, a
1565.ections, pruning it in others, rendering it, in short, a noble instrument for ap
1566.ort, a noble instrument for appreciating all that is highest and holiest in huma
1567.hen we undertake to render The following year at St. them. — — It is hardly
1568.ehouse of fancies, sweet, pure, charming he had but to touch a seemingly dry ide
1569. in the small yard, muse. He was growing fast, not a little to his disgust. howe
1570.st. however, and gave promise of joining us the following year. Whenever he met
1571.gave promise of joining us the following year. Whenever he met me he invariably
1572."Say, Harry, don't you think I'm growing?" and he would draw himself up and look
1573.eye. was a bright, cool Thursday morning toward the Percy, Tom, and myself were
1574. about what your lawit make yer is doing." I "That reminds me," answered; "my fa
1575.is little hope. He says that our finding Mrs. almost a matter dependent upon cha
1576.robability she is He thinks alias. going under an Then he adds: 'From the fact t
1577.e terms for several years without giving any clew to her former life up to the v
1578.to think that this woman, whom I winning you looked upon in the sacred relation
1579. bakery and confectionery, where, taking seats in a back room, screened from the
1580.tains, we ordered our lunch of a smiling young man with heavy eyes, who looked a
1581.ry late and hadn't succeeded in sleeping well even then. "Bring in your shop," s
1582.eeded in sleeping well even then. "Bring in your shop," said Tom. "Shop! shop!"
1583.surd remarks. In the midst of an amusing story short. Tom stopped "What in the w
1584.pon me. I "Catch him, Percy he's falling." For I staggered, the wheels of life s
1585.r. "Here, drink this," said Tom, putting a glass of in a my lips. louder voice.
1586.r voice. "Hallo, there!" he added "Bring in some wine, quick!" Startled by his t
1587.a bottle of wine. shopman came hastening Tom very calmly knocked me a glass. As
1588.inquired Tom as I showed signs of coming to. " I just saw Mrs. Raynor. She's in
1589.nd peeped cautiously through the opening. He saw standing at the coun ter a woma
1590.sly through the opening. He saw standing at the coun ter a woman of middle age,
1591.efined face, on which lines of suffering and, "What is it, 214 it HARRY DEE. may
1592.t bought a loaf of bread and was turning to go out. "Harry," he said, "you I'll
1593.stay where you are. But leave everything tome." Saying which, he drew the curtai
1594. are. But leave everything tome." Saying which, he drew the curtains aside and h
1595.e. stared me in the face and conflicting emotions fought strong within me. At si
1596.friend," he said, his blue eyes swimming. "Be brave and strong; trust \q not spe
1597.we'll be near, so as help you." anything happens to "O Tom! true, if what shall
1598.ARRY tered. DEE. 215 the merry, laughing, happy-eyed boys who had en- Walking do
1599.ing, happy-eyed boys who had en- Walking down the length of the street and turni
1600.own the length of the street and turning to our left, we presently found ourselv
1601.e a tiny cottage overgrown with creeping plants and standing back in a small, ta
1602.rgrown with creeping plants and standing back in a small, tastily-arranged garde
1603.oked in. an agony even to think of going one step farther. At a sewing-machine s
1604.k of going one step farther. At a sewing-machine sat Mrs. Raynor, her face, furr
1605.-haired, neatly but poorly clad, working at a lathe. His beautiful face was ligh
1606.expression of joy. Near them and playing upon the floor was a bright all Summoni
1607.pon the floor was a bright all Summoning my courage, I little girl of six or sev
1608.girl of six or seven. As I stood looking in upon the scene, the boy turned proud
1609. spirit common to children, came running over fast, to claim her share, too. "In
1610.you know and said the boy. "I'm learning mamma," — — then you're going to ge
1611.arning mamma," — — then you're going to get a so happy!" rest, mamma. sis An
1612.rept HARRY DEE. away like a guilty thing, the earth, and prayed! dug his hands i
1613.ry; Tom's words so often repeated urging me to see Mrs. Raynor; the sense of dut
1614.spired to so, move me " like on. And ing in tune," with the merry laugh of the c
1615.e I threw the door open and stood gazing at my former attendant, who on the inst
1616., who on the instant had arisen, putting aside her sewing as she did so. The eye
1617.ant had arisen, putting aside her sewing as she did so. The eyes I knew so well
1618.den start, then cry, and she was weeping with joy upon dear Harry!" she sobbed.
1619.y story. I told my nurse rible awakening on Christmas morning, of the scene in m
1620.rse rible awakening on Christmas morning, of the scene in my throat of my terPla
1621.urse's neck had not a peculiar quivering of her lips, a growing paleness in her
1622.eculiar quivering of her lips, a growing paleness in her face, warned me that sh
1623.e, warned me that she had left something untold. "Who was it?" I cried. "You kno
1624. seen him nor he me. I counted on saying nothing when in his presence, but the v
1625.m nor he me. I counted on saying nothing when in his presence, but the very mome
1626.him all my pent-up wrongs came thronging upon my memory. I failed to restrain my
1627.uncle, and at ten o'clock, me meditating on the wrongs James Dee had done my bab
1628.went to sleep at ten you left me sitting beside you, worn out with a day's journ
1629.t. vividly busy. a sort of heavy feeling; sleep was coming upon me. I arose and
1630. sort of heavy feeling; sleep was coming upon me. I arose and paced the room; bu
1631.ut walk as I might, sleep was struggling with me and I detected myBut not' self
1632.nd I detected myBut not' self staggering as I moved up and down. withstanding al
1633.ing as I moved up and down. withstanding all that, I would have fought it off, I
1634.at all, and even then I continued During this to lie half-conscious upon the flo
1635.t I heard, the sound of some one walking on tiptoe, and it occurred to me that p
1636.our I tried to move and uncle was coming to kill me. failed; the nightmare becam
1637.althy, I stood for a moment It listening to catch those I ominous footfalls. But
1638.I ominous footfalls. But I heard nothing. ! Then turned to your bed. Oh my dear
1639. strange I shivered as it house, walking in your sleep. occurred to me that you
1640.y. How I thanked God as I saw you coming along quietly, ! — from the further e
1641.ocent face and eyes wide open yet seeing nothing walking along unconscious of th
1642.ce and eyes wide open yet seeing nothing walking along unconscious of those awfu
1643.yes wide open yet seeing nothing walking along unconscious of those awful stains
1644. I saw an open door. I entered trembling, and holding the lamp up gazed around.
1645.n door. I entered trembling, and holding the lamp up gazed around. Then, my dear
1646.boy, I saw what you saw tht next morning your uncle cold in death." easily, —
1647. STORY AND INTRODUCES ME TO TWO CHARMING LITTLE ONES, WHO ENTERTAIN ME WITH A NO
1648.e what you had so innoAs for sacrificing my own reputation, cently done. I was t
1649.trangers and had little to gain, nothing to lose. But when sacrifice I I thought
1650. you, my dear boy, I felt the was making. If I could have let you know that I wa
1651.me, my course would have cost me nothing. But that was out of the question. The
1652.r back to your room. after first drawing it across my chair by your bedThen I tu
1653.r hand red with blood. You were sleeping calmly, and even as 1 gazed down upon y
1654. shall I ever forget it? without opening your eyes you threw your little arms ab
1655. memories of your nurse. So after making good my escape I wrote out a full accou
1656.ment. " Of course I foresaw that, acting as I did, I would throw a shadow on you
1657.are." I pass over in silence the ensuing few minutes. My brain was in a whirl. L
1658.r and then I burst into a fit of weeping. Mrs. Raynor hurried to the door and se
1659.hem away and devoted herself to soothing me. Slowly I became calmer, until, afte
1660.r, I was exteriorly, at least, something like my old self. quite sure that had A
1661. of the story-book into — came dancing girl — and the bright little castle,
1662.d HARRY DEE. 223 as I caught the willing hands of brother and sistef and drew th
1663. red, friend. " Brother Harry, " playing with my watch-guard. I "Poor mamma! she
1664.esn't have a bit of fun; mamma's working hate needles." time with big needles. "
1665. needles," put in Harold. " I on teasing mamma till she let me try them now and
1666.se is too young to do anyjust kept thing yet." "and I'll be six in free months;
1667.w and was 224 HARRY She was LEE. looking out. strong feelings. under the influen
1668.! how little had I dreamed, still during those years of separation, of the stren
1669.it." "Now, Harold," said Louise, raising an admoni- tory finger, "that isn't fai
1670.tn't let brother Harry know what's going pened." to happen till it's all hap- "A
1671. hap- "All right," said Harold, laughing. Louise." "Go ahead, "Once upon a time,
1672. Harold. this," said Louise, 2^3 jumping to the floor, opening her eyes very wid
1673.ouise, 2^3 jumping to the floor, opening her eyes very wide, and walking about.
1674. opening her eyes very wide, and walking about. "And notice so," she " continued
1675. succeeded in Indeed, this fairyriveting story had " at length my atten- And the
1676.y had " at length my atten- And the king said that the lady should always watch
1677. a minute," added the boy. "And the king had heard from a magician that if ever
1678. happen to Prince Harry. And so the king said that if ever the lady went asleep
1679. Harry for good. many years wivout going to sleep. Now, the young prince had an
1680.aid softly. Mrs. Dome was still standing at the window with her face against the
1681.r maybe he was killed by "You're getting hotter," put "Harold, don't tell. his u
1682.e prince killed his uncle wivout knowing it." "Yes," said Harold; "he stabbed hi
1683.ory isn't over yet. ae day there's going to come a pretty fairy to tell HARRY DE
1684.denly exclaimed. "Here I've been sitting nearly two hours, and two of the best b
1685.wo of the best boys in the world waiting for me down the street." Harold jumped
1686.et. "I'll get em," he exclaimed, rushing to the door. There he paused. "But how'
1687.e other, who is darker and jolly-looking, will be pretty sure to say something."
1688.ng, will be pretty sure to say something." Very shortly in danced Harold, pullin
1689." Very shortly in danced Harold, pulling Tom Playfair by the hand and evidently
1690.mpressively. Then there was a scampering of little feet; and as they left the fe
1691.ittle feet; and as they left the feeling of bewilderment and exhausI could not t
1692.ttentively. Percy was shocked on hearing that I myself murdered my Tom's face ga
1693.m's face gave no signs of emotion during uncle. the whole course of the recital,
1694.umstance, I am sorry to say, in throwing the suspicion upon you, and which I am
1695.ple in their sleep hide remember nothing of it when they "Another thing, Harry,"
1696.r nothing of it when they "Another thing, Harry," continued Tom, turning to me w
1697.er thing, Harry," continued Tom, turning to me with a broad grin: "that ghost yo
1698. of a ghost on record. of a ghost coming to the murderer and persuading him to s
1699.st coming to the murderer and persuading him to swear that he'll bring himself t
1700.persuading him to swear that he'll bring himself to justice. Worse than that, th
1701.orse than that, think of a ghost wanting justice to be inflicted on one who wasn
1702.ld nodded 230 HARRY DEE. "The next thing is," continued Tom, "to find out someth
1703.," continued Tom, "to find out something about that money." "I'll go there this
1704.that episode in substantially in telling it same words which she had used sudden
1705.?" like to go to "What! The big boarding-school?" cried Harold. "Yes. Percy, Tom
1706. tfork hard any more." It was a touching: scene when the little lad with a HARRY
1707.by and allow Harold to do all the loving. She added herself to the group in no l
1708. join us at St. Maure's on the following Monday, which was June 1st. A little be
1709.hink of all fifty thousand dollars lying unused for these years." "I don't belie
1710.ve you. didn't see any way of accounting for the money. But there's no doubt to
1711.eard heavy steps as of your uncle coming to kill her the steps When she sprang o
1712.en she sprang of a grown person stealing along. to her feet she could not hear t
1713. More than that! I think- how everything squares that the person who stole the m
1714.e your Percy, "you'd nurse was examining your uncle's body." "Tom!" exclaimed ce
1715.." make an ex* "I hope to make something better," said Tom gravelv: "and that br
1716.iness threw it DEE. 233 intended talking about when we started. clear out of my
1717.rate to God. James died the very morning and as I knelt over his I made my First
1718.dy I promised God that with His blessing I'd great many things about himself —
1719.d to soliloquize?' " " said Tom, quoting from The Mikado. " I " Evidently promis
1720.ended to give his life to God by working for God; since the death of James I've
1721.istmas, as I was praytake his place. ing before the Tabernacle, thought, to foll
1722.t Boys, this call, as I summer I'm going to join Keenan." I caught Tom's hand an
1723.cordially, and was warmly congratulating him, when we were both silenced by Perc
1724.d by Percy's strange manner of receiving this For Percy, instead of joining me i
1725.iving this For Percy, instead of joining me in connews. gratulating our dear fri
1726.ad of joining me in connews. gratulating our dear friend, of whom we were both s
1727.rcy," I exclaimed, "that Tom is choosing the more perfect life?" Of course he's
1728.RY DEE. "Sorry!" exclaimed Percy, taking down his hands from his tearful eyes an
1729.hands from his tearful eyes and catching Tom's hands. "Of course you're not," sa
1730.f course you're not," said " Tom, gazing ear- nestly into Percy's face. But ther
1731.into Percy's face. But there's something or other troubling you." " Up to this p
1732.But there's something or other troubling you." " Up to this present answered Per
1733.wered Percy. year it had been my darling wish to take the course you're going to
1734.ing wish to take the course you're going to take, Tom. But this year it's all "T
1735.st familiar I had thought that I footing with one another. knew my two friends t
1736.ears the one idea of Tom, the mainspring of all his actions, had been to take th
1737. of noble thoughts he had been suffering silently. I saw between his words the d
1738.st to Him. I remembered how often during the course of the year Percy had been c
1739.s saintly young man had gone on treading the wine-press of doubt and difficulty
1740.ntage the thief will be able, of getting the money back, you where you got that
1741.housand dollars stolen?" "That's a lying? It's certain it's because large sum in
1742.said there to think about it, is putting it rather "Perhaps," said I, "it was ev
1743.at case, unless he's a genius in cunning, would be the last man to accuse you of
1744.t before very long you'll succeed making out." CHAPTER XXIX. IN WHICH MR. LANG O
1745.MR. LANG OBTAINS FURTHER DATA CONCERNING THE MISSING MONEY AND TOM BIDS US FAREW
1746.AINS FURTHER DATA CONCERNING THE MISSING MONEY AND TOM BIDS US FAREWELL. THAT ve
1747.r, other to Mr. Lang, our lawyer, giving them a full account of the inter- view
1748.between Mrs. Dome and myself, and asking Mr. Lang to study up the records of the
1749.. I insisted particularly on his finding out, if possible, whether my uncle actu
1750.had fifty thousand dollars The following day I wrote again in his possession. to
1751.is possession. to my father, who, during my minority, had charge of the property
1752.arge of the property and moneys accruing tome, and submitted a plan for putting
1753.g tome, and submitted a plan for putting out a certain sum of in money Mrs. Dome
1754.rs. Dome's father's favor and for giving her children an education. My letter ca
1755.t in his posjobs off and on, but nothing steady. ; : session that night. cate in
1756.on that night. cate in you have anything further to communithe matter of Caggett
1757.hink we'll have no difficulty in tracing up all the money he took in subsequent
1758.ther has no objections pert at examining your uncle's books permission. On the v
1759.day of school I received the fol- lowing: , Dear Sir : —After an examination o
1760.irst seem to have — . taken everything for granted. It James Nagle, a stock-br
1761. was in the library at the time, waiting for a receipt for six thousand dollars
1762.cle's chair ac 238 counts for your using the farmer HA*iRY DEE, it, the fact tha
1763.nd I were engaged letter. in a wrestling contest, Tom, who was with a dressed in
1764., who was with a dressed in a travelling suit, when came out "Mr. Harry Dee," cr
1765.y did not enjoy the pleasure of throwing me just then, for I broke away at once,
1766.ars from yourself." "So you're wrestling, are you?" continued Tom. " I've just w
1767. high, and, if I can believe my look ing-glass, the best-looking fellow in the c
1768.ieve my look ing-glass, the best-looking fellow in the crowd." "Take a walk," sa
1769." said Tom apologetU cally, while taking off his coat, "but I'm willing to ruin
1770.le taking off his coat, "but I'm willing to ruin the whole suit rather than stan
1771.he next moment he and Harry were pulling The coneach other about in the approved
1772.one of 'em — touch." Tom arose, gazing ruefully at his cuffs. I "They'll think
1773. a bit of India rubber, and the spinning, and swelling of muscles, and quick cha
1774.a rubber, and the spinning, and swelling of muscles, and quick changes of positi
1775.st a draw. There they stood, two panting, blushing young men, looking, one would
1776. There they stood, two panting, blushing young men, looking, one would think, as
1777.two panting, blushing young men, looking, one would think, as though their whole
1778.. HARRY Even DEE. as they were wrestling, the carriage which was to take Tom to
1779.s to take Tom to the depot was had being drawn out from the coach-house. Percy n
1780.picked Tom up and put on), and producing a pocketcomb proceeded to give Tom's ha
1781.ne for boys and girls. Instead of having Catholic writers growl at the books boy
1782.ead, we must get them to write something that they will American boys don't care
1783. and Harry Castlemon. Instead of running these writers down, our writers ought t
1784.ows but we might use that money to bring out just such stories? One good Catholi
1785.do more than a dozen volumes of snailing against books that boys ought not to re
1786.ail at the ill,' " said Percy, employing one of his favorite quotations. HARRY "
1787.RY "Precisely. DEE. 241 But as I'm going to take a vow of poverty, it wouldn't b
1788.f poverty, it wouldn't be just the thing for me to count upon having a big sum i
1789.st the thing for me to count upon having a big sum in the bank at my disPercy is
1790.and prayed for me not to think of taking the religious state my mind But now sho
1791. magazine. But alas! the hour of parting came. I still see our dear Tom standing
1792. came. I still see our dear Tom standing upon the rear platform as the train mov
1793.platform as the train moved away, waving his hand and smiling till a curve shuts
1794. moved away, waving his hand and smiling till a curve shuts off from our view on
1795.our emotion* m* his peculiar way. Taking 24* HARRY DEE. an ancient slipper from
1796.I HAVE THE DOUBTFUL PLEASURE OF RENEWING MR. JAMES CAGGETT'S ACQUAINTANCE. FOR c
1797.in November Percy was called home, owing to the serious sickness of his mother,
1798.nd felt that the "old order was changing, yielding place to new." Late in Novemb
1799.at the "old order was changing, yielding place to new." Late in November I recei
1800.am certain that stock-broker had nothing to do with making away with that forty-
1801.ock-broker had nothing to do with making away with that forty-three thousand-odd
1802.reted the money before or after stabbing yout This is the only possible solution
1803. the premises. If However, before taking any steps in the there it can be found.
1804.have used all human prudence in studying up this very complicated case. Will cal
1805. : Yours sincerely, Lang. After reading this letter I fell into a brown-study.
1806. one blow of a it dagger, even in waking sleep I had struck hours. And still in
1807.uncle's death had now become the leading thought of my life. There was no risk I
1808.to venture I my life for the unravelling of this tangle. should state here that
1809."You have shown your obedience by asking my ad= and I am grateful. Now show your
1810.. Now show your selfreliance by choosing your own course." That boy is blessed w
1811.ho knows but the second visit will bring out more than our first? But you can ge
1812.d as a lion. He's not afraid of anything in this world or the next, except sin.
1813. now I that Tom's prediction could bring visit to was coming it and determined,
1814.ediction could bring visit to was coming it and determined, about, that in case
1815. before I was allowed for error. leaving him I was convinced that I had slain mj
1816.away with a large sum of money belonging to myself. was too troubled in mind to
1817.s presented themselves. said one evening in mid-December, "I'm not satisfied wit
1818. Without delay I wired him the following message: It Will you accompany me to th
1819. reply came: start we can on the morning of Dec. 24th. Percy Wynn. The following
1820. of Dec. 24th. Percy Wynn. The following morning I received this letter: is My D
1821. 24th. Percy Wynn. The following morning I received this letter: is My Dear will
1822.r. But how much better than cold writing will it be to speak to you from my hear
1823.of a when he does with us, stop laughing — which wag chan ever happens seldom
1824.ought let of him, we were I entertaining an angel unawares. He sends you his dea
1825. heaven with all storms of prayer during that midnight mass for our intention. I
1826. I what pleasure look forward to meeting you. I'll have examined the time-table
1827. there'll be no difficulty in my calling at your house and making the connection
1828.y in my calling at your house and making the connection. Good-by once more, dear
1829.im my sincere regards. P. W. was walking homeward toward nightfall, when a man c
1830.ard nightfall, when a man came shambling up to me asking for an alms. I was stru
1831.hen a man came shambling up to me asking for an alms. I was struck, for some ine
1832.st was his iron-gray. rugged, forbidding forehead fixed in gloom, and bordered b
1833. and bordered below by heavy, forbidding eyebrows. I gazed at him for a moment,
1834.on me that no less a person was standing before me than my uncle's old James Cag
1835. was the very man who, of all men living, was best acquainted with the interior
1836.Caggett should accompany me, if anything short of downright physical force could
1837. downright physical force could it bring " If about. I I'm not mistaken," began,
1838.I'm not mistaken," began, " I am talking to an old friend of my family, James Ca
1839."Who are you?" he said, with the rasping voice which he appeared to have caught
1840.w you ha, ha, ha!" (what a bloodcurdling laugh it murderer once harm. Honestly
1841.th me. An honest man can't make a living in these hard times. Yes, sir; I've bee
1842.ldn't you get in "So you're me something "Yes," I to do, sir?" answered quickly.
1843.er's house at eight sharp on the morning of December the twenty-fourth, and I'll
1844. a good sum from me on Christmas morning. Here are two dollars and a half for yo
1845.nd a half for your present needs. making it? " Thank you more, only up when we m
1846.'ll money!] You may be sure that morning of December 24th." His rasping voice st
1847.t morning of December 24th." His rasping voice still rasped call on the in my ea
1848.DEE. made my way home; and tramp, moving about in into the disordered 249 of tha
1849.d, they were positively frightful during My uncle came and went in the succeedin
1850.My uncle came and went in the succeeding night. Caggett came and various loathso
1851.mbers together, and their harsh, rasping voices These cut my agonized dream-self
1852.me within the sphere of my life. morning I arose in disgust, took a cold shower-
1853.I threw my things into my and was taxing my memory to find whether anything had
1854.axing my memory to find whether anything had escaped me, when I heard a sharp ri
1855.ad escaped me, when I heard a sharp ring at the door-bell. Being on the tiptoe o
1856.ard a sharp ring at the door-bell. Being on the tiptoe of expectation I hastened
1857.on a boy, who delivered me the following telegram Train delayed at Sessionsville
1858. 250 HARRY DEE. My heart sank on reading these lines; the disI appointment was k
1859.l men — Caggett To The fear and it ing with which the very thought of this fel
1860.strong, healthy, well developed, feeling and logisms. his way impressions made o
1861.child- superior in intellectual training, nearly his equal in strength. Thus I r
1862. my companion that But I could not bring myself to too was certain. I — — th
1863.was certain. I — — think of spending a single night alone with him. Accordin
1864.ingly, within three minutes of receiving the telegram I I sent a note to Mr. Lan
1865. I I sent a note to Mr. Lang, at telling him sent needed him once, and unfolding
1866. him sent needed him once, and unfolding the circum- stances that this note made
1867.ceedingly that business of most pressing moment, and to which I have pledged mys
1868.t interested in the case. The best thing I can do the only thing is to send you
1869.. The best thing I can do the only thing is to send you the only availMr. John N
1870.s yet much — — — — HARRY wanting in physical bravery. DEE. will 251 It w
1871.ot raise my already depressed Everything seemed to be going awry, even spirits.
1872. depressed Everything seemed to be going awry, even spirits. the weather, which
1873. as Mr. John Nugent. with his retreating chin, weak mouth, and general air of ir
1874.d, as I shook his hand, "that I'm taking you upon a very uncongenial task." "Oh
1875.face unnecessary and injuI dicious lying be a passport to success in your profes
1876.es for a special occasion. "Good-morning, Caggett," and as grateful for the I sp
1877. insignificant splendid job. encouraging presence of even the Mr. Nugent; "you'r
1878.y uncle's house." What in these a living horror his face became as he took words
1879. think of old boss was mururged. Staying there alone where my I ''But you'll not
1880.aughed a laugh which was as the swinging stronger motive. HARRY of DEE. 253 wher
1881.t to be alone for a single second during this "That you may instructions." rely
1882.on, arrived there on a in gloomy evening, and established ourselves currences, s
1883.ve changed that opinion. As I was saying, I have reason to think that if this mo
1884. slept that night. We'll begin by making a thorough search of the library then w
1885.ry." it my uncle's bedchamber, according to takes us to complete our search in t
1886.errified Nugent was con- stantly looking over his shoulder, while his fingers we
1887. shoulder, while his fingers were flying up and twitching his mustache every Cag
1888.his fingers were flying up and twitching his mustache every Caggett was less ner
1889.d drawn. All this, I repeat, was amusing at first. But the amusement was short-l
1890.t the amusement was short-lived. Nothing is more contagious than fear; and very
1891.hat Unconsciously I beI too was yielding to fright. gan to take an occasional lo
1892.ed unexamined. Here my weak the flooring and the walls. sounded friend, the cler
1893.. So interested did he become in tapping the walls and partitions that he lost s
1894.We can go to your uncle's in the morning." I said, minutes to eleven. "Now, gent
1895.Come "Very on," I said sternly, catching up the lamp. "I'll not go," he growled.
1896. growled. well," I said, "then I'm going to lock you " up here alone without lig
1897.at I could feel that they were trembling, and hear, as I thought, their heart-be
1898.tairs. Soon we were hard at it examining my uncle's room. Nugent was now a trifl
1899. now a trifle brave. There was something of the detective in him, for he was rea
1900.as really earnest in the work of finding out every nook and cranny of the apartm
1901.andy. After we had examined the flooring he threw himself into a chair, and addr
1902.he other room now?" he inquired, turning to me. Neither Nugent nor myself paid h
1903. at- tention. We were both busy sounding the walls. I had come within a few feet
1904.aid sternly. — He " complied, yielding rather to his own terroi than to my wor
1905.o my words, and ever I continued tapping the wall. a close examination of the Ha
1906.examination of the Have you made bedding," asked Nugent, turning to me. " Tom Pl
1907.you made bedding," asked Nugent, turning to me. " Tom Playfair and myself took a
1908.replied. "But we didn't "There's nothing there," growled Caggett. "I made it up
1909.eft this horrible house." Nugent, taking no notice of the remark, proceeded to t
1910.e. bloodshot, and his face was quivering with fear and HARRY rage. DEE. 25} sigh
1911.d He stepped back, and this stood gazing spell-bound upon wretched figure. "Here
1912.I'll "You try your hand this wainscoting. examine the bed myself." Caggett close
1913. made a few steps toward me, brandishing his fists as he advanced. "Stand still!
1914.would-be aggressor in silence. Muttering a Caggett quailed before our stare. cur
1915.e. " What's this?" I exclaimed, pointing to a letter which was pinned to the und
1916.a bed-slat. The clerk, without answering, pulled away the pin, and the letter fe
1917. heart. I James Dee. " awake or dreaming. " Nugent took the note from my palsied
1918. again so toward Caggett. sight glancing as he did the terror of that seemed to
1919.eemed to penetrate Nugent's inmost being. "Look! look!" he gasped. Well might he
1920.horror his facial muscles were twitching madly, his eyes were fixed upon us with
1921.s open, and he appeared to be struggling for breath. It appeared to me at once t
1922.hed man had been taken by a fit. Placing the lamp on the table, — ; just at hi
1923.red from his hands to the floor. Picking it up I read it aloud. HARRY DEE. "Do 2
1924.d a few deep gurgles as of a man choking to death, before he succeeded in forcin
1925.to death, before he succeeded in forcing out the words: " Yes, and !" I it's tru
1926.my uncle's suicide?" The same struggling and play of his throat ensued that " Wh
1927.he began with an effort, " I was working in the celWhen I came upstairs lar till
1928.entered, and then X saw your uncle lying in the bed, dead killed by his own knif
1929. explanation, the more so as his halting to suspect that way of delivering it ga
1930.alting to suspect that way of delivering it gave me reason he was holding someth
1931.ivering it gave me reason he was holding something back. " Now, Caggett, why sho
1932. gave me reason he was holding something back. " Now, Caggett, why should you wa
1933.e here." our hands. which Nugent, taking another shuddering look With at the hid
1934. which Nugent, taking another shuddering look With at the hideous tramp, turned
1935.sumed his examination of the wainscoting. " Caggett," I repeated, catching him b
1936.coting. " Caggett," I repeated, catching him by the shoulder and shaking him, "w
1937.catching him by the shoulder and shaking him, "was there any other reason?" He o
1938. him earnestly; he seemed to be speaking the truth. "Mrs. Raynor stole it," he a
1939.ent suddenly broke in. "Here's something!" Kneeling beside the bed, which I ran
1940.y broke in. "Here's something!" Kneeling beside the bed, which I ran to his side
1941.. moved out from the wall, he was gazing into he had an opening in the partition
1942.ll, he was gazing into he had an opening in the partition, evidently much fright
1943. much fright- HARRY DEE. 261 The opening ened at the discovery he had made. reve
1944.d this?" I asked. "I I touched something or other; it must have been a spring, a
1945.ing or other; it must have been a spring, and a part of the wainscot rolled —
1946.unable to proceed fur- He fell sprawling shoved him aside. Putting as though I h
1947.fell sprawling shoved him aside. Putting as though I had struck him with a club.
1948.avy wooden box open at the top. Bringing it nearer to the lamp I perceived almos
1949.lmost at a glance that I was all holding a fortune in values, gold my hands. Ban
1950.ver, every species of money. The missing treasure was found. But who had placed
1951.secreted the large sum before committing suicide? This train of thought brought
1952.d taken care to set early in the evening, broke into a peculiar whirring noise,
1953. evening, broke into a peculiar whirring noise, at which sound Caggett gave a ne
1954.gett gave a nervous start, and in moving his I As arm struck the shade of the se
1955.nnected with it the wick, and in turning lowered at once in a dim, ghostly light
1956.ble gasp and fell upon his knees, facing toward my uncle's bed. Nugent, whose fe
1957.d. Nugent, whose fears had been mounting with every moment since the discovery o
1958.XIII. IN WHICH CAGGETT MAKES A STARTLING DISCLOSURE, AND I PASS THROUGH THE GREA
1959. lowered lamp, in presence of a kneeling I man It writh- ing with agony, stood h
1960.esence of a kneeling I man It writh- ing with agony, stood horror-stricken. in i
1961.in what it promised. Caggett was looking with a strained gaze not at the bed but
1962.ned gaze not at the bed but at something on a line with it. His hands were alter
1963.t from his body as though he were waving off some hideous vision. Inarticulate g
1964.rticulate gasps and groans were laboring from his and groans beastlike in their
1965. span of time I stood motionless, gazing with awe upon this uncanny sight. At la
1966.e direction of the bed, almost expecting to see the — for luminous spectre of
1967.s spectre of my uncle. But I saw nothing. "It was all your own doing, Mr. Dee; y
1968. saw nothing. "It was all your own doing, Mr. Dee; you drove me me to it. Didn't
1969.r up the will which made I was listening, and I knew you had over forty thousand
1970.d tried to get your money without waking you. But you opened your eyes, and reco
1971.mouth. gave a wild cry, and fell foaming the With an effort I freed myself from
1972.he spell which had bound me, and turning on the full light of the lamp I hastene
1973. soul sickened as I could scarcely bring myself to touch this inaniclot of crime
1974.condition of that man of could not bring myself to touch his loath- some body ag
1975.ody again. Even his stertorous breathing 264 filled HARRY me with disgust, DEE.
1976. time passed on, my feelings of loathing lessen. To add to my disquietude, I fou
1977.ble and treasure-trove. I about counting my spent quite a time in separ* ating t
1978.ng my spent quite a time in separ* ating the gold, silver, and the bills of vari
1979.ry out my intention. Then I began pacing up and down the room, keeping my face t
1980.gan pacing up and down the room, keeping my face turned from the bed, endeavorin
1981.my face turned from the bed, endeavoring to put Caggett out of my mind, and forc
1982. put Caggett out of my mind, and forcing I my ; thoughts into lovelier channels.
1983.hat his prayers were with me and helping me Now. That one word brought back the
1984.at the uncle, as uncle's note announcing his intention of committing suicide? Ho
1985.e announcing his intention of committing suicide? How, too, did it happen money
1986.ang, had not been in the habit of hiding his money. Had he actually intended to
1987.ht that my uncle had contemplated making away with himI remembered my last inter
1988.s did I ponder and consider, endeavoring vainly to piece these contradictory cir
1989.horizon. I stood for some moments gazing upon this joyous promise of daylight. B
1990.hat Caggett's figure was again asserting its horrible fascination: and once more
1991.turned my face to the wall, and, seating myself, I forced my thoughts to dwell u
1992. that all boys take pleasure in thinking of Bethlehem and the angels' songs. It
1993. multitude of the heavenly host praising and glorifying God; almost saw the grea
1994.he heavenly host praising and glorifying God; almost saw the great light which c
1995.almost heard the heavenlv chorus singing Gloria in 266 txcelsis HARRY Deo it DEB
1996.he sun, bright and cheerful, was peeping over the eastern This I noticed in a fl
1997. upon me in a way there was no mistaking in his right hand he grasped an open kn
1998. my feet, while a sav- Caggett, throwing aside his attempt at stealthiness, spra
1999.hed myself that I had neglected to bring a pisI was face to face with a man stro
2000.customed, I had good reason for thinking, to deeds of violence; he was armed wit
2001.s were in his favor. I thought of making a dash for the door, but it was evident
2002.e in my back. Again I thought of picking up a chair, and fighting him with that
2003.ught of picking up a chair, and fighting him with that weapon. But a thing this
2004.ghting him with that weapon. But a thing this wowld involve a hand-to-hand confl
2005. HARRY For DEE. 267 hope was in getting assistance from That cowardly law-clerk
2006.st hope. resolved, therefore, by putting the table between Caggett and myself, t
2007.s an angler would play a With the coming of day his bravery had returned; and it
2008.erver with the idea that we were playing a game of "tag. " Round and round we mo
2009.e length of time, we were soon breathing table, ; heavily. I could feel ordinary
2010.. I could feel ordinary my heart beating in a way that under circumstances I ala
2011.ly by 268 HARRY DEE. our heavy breathing, a crashing noise; and with For the moi
2012.RRY DEE. our heavy breathing, a crashing noise; and with For the moit the room g
2013.much head. was occasioned by the falling of the window curtain, which, owing dou
2014.ling of the window curtain, which, owing doubtless to our violent motions, had b
2015.t motions, had broken from its fastening above the window. As I had been facing
2016.g above the window. As I had been facing in that direction, I had taken in the c
2017.taken in the circumstance, without being obliged to turn my eyes from my enemy.
2018.nemy. But quick as I had been in hurling the lamp at As he ducked his Caggett, I
2019.t bit late. head, the lamp went crashing against the wall, within a few inches o
2020.ble: I was almost too late in recovering myself and indeed, as I darted away, th
2021. his knife touched my coat. The throwing of the lamp had Upon the table there st
2022., heavy with its store of coins. passing around the table I seized it, determine
2023.w moments. I hesitated between replacing it or throwing it at Caggett. It was pr
2024.sitated between replacing it or throwing it at Caggett. It was probably the hesi
2025.ile the papers and nores went fluttering about the room, and with a thousand jin
2026.ions upon the carpetless floor, mingling confusedly with the fragments of the gl
2027.s; and while I stood motionless, waiting for Caggett's head to reappear suddenly
2028.rgy I broke away. I succeeded in tearing myself from his grasp; but I lost my ba
2029.of a moment, there was a sharp, stinging pain in my left leg just above the ankl
2030.e dangerous, for the blood was streaming from the wound; and I grimly foresaw th
2031.turned and sprang upon Caggett, catching him above the wrist of his right hand,
2032.ight hand, so as to prevent his stabbing me, and bearing him, with the force of
2033. to prevent his stabbing me, and bearing him, with the force of my spring and th
2034.bearing him, with the force of my spring and the unexpectedness of the onset,
2035.ulted a fearful He was under me, glaring at me with same murderous look, and des
2036.ook, and despite all my efforts prodding me here and there about the shoulders w
2037.t firmly, while the blood came trickling down my arm and fell upon his upturned
2038.hat gone; for I felt my strength leaving me. Strange 27° noises HARRY DEE. —
2039.hin or without?-^ broke like the beating of drums upon my ear. Ths firmness of m
2040.ss of my grasp relaxed, and as a feeling of intense lassitude came over my frame
2041.th; and indeed I needed it all. Catching Caggett's hand, which had just escaped
2042.n I was certain that some qne was coming. I felt now that my grasp upon him was
2043.lt now that my grasp upon him was losing its firmness and then the door burst op
2044.rry! Merry Christmas." Percy was bending over me with a scared face. "Thank God!
2045.hat saved me? I never counted on looking upon your dear face again." "Yes, Harry
2046.ce again." "Yes, Harry, without boasting I can say that I Caggett had you down,
2047.hich I was 1 1 "TJALLO, HARR\ DEE. lying, stiff 271 but found I could scarcely l
2048.again. I've spent over an hour bandaging you, and if you move my bandages will c
2049.ble for Caggett. he?" I inquired, trying to take a full view of the room, and no
2050.ke a full view of the room, and noticing in the effort that the is "Where bed wa
2051.uld be pleasanter for you to miss seeing him." " But, Percy, you haven't told me
2052.r late than never,' and took the evening in the "He's room next this — the wre
2053.next this — the wretch! — — paying your father a visit. I got to the depot
2054.our before sunrise; and I found standing there, solitary and train after stupid,
2055.n after stupid, an insignificant looking little man, who seemed to be in a state
2056.n, who seemed to be in a state bordering on insanity." "Oh, Mr. Nugent!" I put i
2057.poor I plied could get the least inkling of the way things had been going on her
2058.inkling of the way things had been going on here. He gave me *7 2 HARRY DEE. ide
2059. wait for ghost, and that you were dying. anything more, but set off for the hou
2060.ghost, and that you were dying. anything more, but set off for the house at a de
2061.I was content to walk I came on, getting nearer and nearer, when, as I was withi
2062.d that time, and came me run; I bounding into the house, and up the stairs. I co
2063.he stairs. I could hear an awful rolling and tumbling going on and guided by the
2064.could hear an awful rolling and tumbling going on and guided by the sound I made
2065.hear an awful rolling and tumbling going on and guided by the sound I made for t
2066. whole story; Caggett told me everything." " How ?" I exclaimed incredulously. "
2067.as nervous, and I thought that by taking him on his weak point I might get all t
2068. and said: Caggett, will you be obliging enough to answer a HARR? DEE. 273 And M
2069.e; for he professed himself willobliging ing and ready to answer any and all que
2070.or he professed himself willobliging ing and ready to answer any and all questio
2071.ol away from his ear, and began patching you up, poor boy, while I put him throu
2072.I believe, will never ear. What drinking has left be hanged for the murder. undo
2073.hanged for the murder. undone in ruining his health the terror and the wounds an
2074.me remarks about your uncle's not living long. Caggett overheard every word. He
2075. of He became very angry, and made using a keyhole. up his mind to get something
2076. a keyhole. up his mind to get something out of your uncle. He knew that Mr. Dee
2077. very cautiously, and without disturbing the sleeper; he knew your uncle general
2078.attempt to rob him." " Precisely knowing Caggett pretty well, it might have occu
2079. that his servant had been eavesdropping and might attempt to visit him that Any
2080. hours ago, he didn't even know anything Finally he approached the of that secre
2081.o silence. ; HARRY DEE. 275 and grasping the dagger, which had slipped from your
2082.n told me this as though he was speaking on the state of the weather. Having ass
2083.king on the state of the weather. Having assured himself that your uncle was dea
2084.ch walked over to the table, and turning up your uncle, it seems, always slept w
2085.ays slept with a the light light burning low he wrote a note in imitation of " J
2086.n imitation of " James Dee's handwriting, announcing "Ah," I gasped, "there's mo
2087.of " James Dee's handwriting, announcing "Ah," I gasped, "there's more light." "
2088.hen he heard a footstep Scarcely knowing what he was doing and without. certainl
2089.tstep Scarcely knowing what he was doing and without. certainly not knowing why,
2090.doing and without. certainly not knowing why, Caggett hastened over to the bed a
2091.hen he brought out a pistol and, cocking it, The steps drew nearer and nearer. C
2092.cked up a heavy walkof you, old boy. ing-stick, and advanced with the intention
2093.ntention of brainBut, instead of drawing back, you walked ing you. right in. He
2094. instead of drawing back, you walked ing you. right in. He remembered then that
2095. breast, and even touched the In leaning against the bed, Caggett saw that knife
2096.ARRY DEE. murdered your uncle. Resolving to destroy the letter he had forged nex
2097.made his way hastily to his own sleeping-room, which was half-way down the hall.
2098.nute, when he heard some one else coming along the corridor. He put a chair besi
2099.ugh the transom. very agitated, carrying a lamp in her hand, and then he saw the
2100.in her hand, and then he saw the meeting between you and her. He watched your nu
2101.e spent a part of the night in searching your uncle's Even when all else had des
2102.able way, and left precipitately, vowing never to come near the house again." "
2103.nnounced your intention to him of making a search for the money, he remembered h
2104.e remembered how in the hurry of leaving he had fall " neglected to destroy the
2105.the treasure, Percy ?" "Yes; so removing Mr. Caggett I I gathered up a long time
2106., allow me to return your first greeting I wish you a happy Christmas." And as w
2107.eard voices without, and people entering, and we knew that the mystery of Tower
2108.ARRY DEE HAS SOME DIFFICULTY IN BRINGING HIS STORY TO A CLOSE. one year and eigh
2109.e Arrayed in all the glory of graduating costumes, several very fine young gentl
2110.all. first He knows Harry Quip, grinning from under the hint of a mustache. He k
2111.e, dark young man, with bright twinkling eyes and merry face, he knows Mr. Playf
2112.Tom, impelled with the desire of serving God, and trusting in His infinite sweet
2113. the desire of serving God, and trusting in His infinite sweetness and mercy, vo
2114. say is the hap* "Well. Harry, consoling to think that HARRY DEE. 279 The poor f
2115.hospital, and his sickness and suffering proved to be the greatest And how's the
2116.t And how's the new magazine ?" blessing of his life. "Strong in spe" I answered
2117.can wait better than We feel like making a Percy and I. determined to be prudent
2118. mean Mr. Playfair, " said Quip, feeling for the down upon "You see, I'm thinkin
2119.for the down upon "You see, I'm thinking of taking to his upper lip. journalism
2120.wn upon "You see, I'm thinking of taking to his upper lip. journalism that is, i
2121.ournalism that is, if I take to anything." "And I," said Joe Whyte, " intend to
2122.o looks so mild and gentle, is — going to be a sawbones," added Quip grimly. "
2123.ded Quip grimly. " What are you thinking of, Frank?" asked Mr. Playfair. "My pre
2124.t a wife." "I've got stock in a building association," said Frank seriously. "Th
2125.llows, Mr. Playfair," " They're starting in at once, all exsaid Percy. cept Harr
2126. cept Harry Dee and myself." "He's doing "Don't believe Percy," said I. He's the
2127.nnati who doesn't know and He's studying up the lives and condifove him. tions o
2128.ons of that class, and he intends giving much attention to bettering the poor fe
2129.tends giving much attention to bettering the poor fellows, and he's done ever so
2130.RY DEE. he's only had a chance of making their acquaintance fact, that the last
2131.as determined to help them on, beginning with the little ones, on the theory tha
2132.ow up. "Very soon," said Percy, changing the subject, " Harry and I shall take a
2133.l take a trip to Europe." with the dying tramp. "What II then, Percy?" asked Mr.
2134.al course You see we intend is preparing a longe for the great magazine that be.
2135.e there's a big sum of " money gathering interest." By the way, where is Mr. Kee
2136.ect beam- HARRY but little, DEE. 281 ing upon us with his old-time smile. He had
2137.ings. While we were out: still welcoming him, Tom called "Boys, that's not Mr. M
2138. us knelt, and Father Middleton, passing from one to another, gave us his priest
2139.ve us his priestly benediction. What ing! a delightful time of it we had that mo
2140.d with an abandon which sent time flying on the swiftest and lightest of — —
2141.Burdock brought him to a stand by saying: When "Harry, have you been drinking?"
2142.ing: When "Harry, have you been drinking?" "No," fair. said Harry. "It's worse."
2143.ious; so were we; we «aw that something more was to come. to Mr. " I just made
2144.r Middleton; and in a few days I'm going to join Donnel in the Baltimore Seminar
2145., Harry Quip," exclaimed Percy, grasping his hand warmly, "you always were a luc
2146.d me out in the cold." Percy was smiling as he spoke, but there was sadness in b
2147.he reader may to think I am exaggerating; a fact that before dinner Joe, Percy,
2148.ne of us came from it with the abounding joy that Harry had carried away; still
2149.e," he exclaimed, with the most engaging of smiles, as he grasped my hand warmly
2150.s the night of "And now life." my During the hour that preceded dinner Percy and
2151.me warm friends. They struck me as being remarkably similar in their tastes and
2152.layed our service old position, pressing Frank Burdock and Arthur Vane, we put o
2153.occasion, I was 284 HARRY DEE. I praying with more than usual fervor, when light
2154.pointed said reverently, to the kneeling figures of Tom and Percy. The evening s
2155.ng figures of Tom and Percy. The evening sun was shining upon them, mingling the
2156.m and Percy. The evening sun was shining upon them, mingling the glory of earth
2157.ning sun was shining upon them, mingling the glory of earth with the heavenly gl
2158. Percy. We were on the eve of separating, and taking different walks in life; bu
2159.ere on the eve of separating, and taking different walks in life; but, different
2160.sted, to the same goal to an everlasting union with Him before whom we were now

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/