Concordance for A garden of roses : Stories and sketches / By Maurice Francis Egan.

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1.   S B. NOONAN 1887. & CO. CASHMAN, KEATING & Co. ELECTROTYPERS AND PRINTERS, 597 W
2. 81 THE SECRET OF THE OLD VIOLIN FLOATING ON A BOAED JUNE EOSES A PASSION FLOWER
3. OY WHO WANTED TO BE OLD THE LAST MEETING OF THE T. I. AND B. A DAY AT EIDGEWOOD
4. e. Outside, there was a pleasant-looking house, with a broad and wide lawn edged
5. stood on the to centre table, supplying the place of the exiled daylight. were
6. her book, One Margaret and was lounging on a comfortable sofa, her Three girls
7. ms stretched above her head in a yawning attitude. She was not over sixteen, wit
8. of discontent. She seemed to be dreaming. Not far from her, on a low stool, with
9. londe nor brunette. ; She, too, dreaming and her dreams apwere not very pleasant
10. at in front of a cabinet-piano, striking a few notes of a waltz, to be seemed a
11. eemed a march, or a galop ; now starting off into a series of brilliant movement
12. with her right and then suddenly making the bass rumble like the echo of a depa
13. bass rumble like the echo of a departing thunderstorm in the mountains. She was
14. idst of A GARDEN OF ROSES. work, leaving his business affairs very His wife, wit
15. ght or study, but much to social calling, entertainments, and the gossip of soci
16. them from the necessity ill how of doing anything that she could do. They accept
17. the necessity ill how of doing anything that she could do. They accepted the se
18. kin sacks certainly her more interesting in every way than But daughters, wore c
19. ht ! for a moment that they were lacking in duty or respect. They were only help
20. were only helpless in her eyes, nothing more. Since they had come into the coun
21. y a Swedish woman, whose manner of doing things was often very different from Mr
22. They had more time on hands now. missing. Their city occupations were Mrs. Wycko
23. RDEN OF ROSES. 9 vented her from keeping a horse and carriage. Anna and Rosalie
24. ied that this " very little" was lacking. Anna and Rosalie did not believe it; i
25. rs and teas as possible, she was wearing herself out in seeing were served as da
26. e, she was wearing herself out in seeing were served as daintily and that her da
27. em everywhere in the house. gowns making her She was a little over fourteen year
28. m since ; she was sure he had no feeling for Art. No attempt had been made to ed
29. Wyckoff had always insisted upon taking them to the Episcopal A GARDEN OF ROSES
30. l duties of Christians they knew nothing. daily Mrs. Wyckoff saw that something
31. g. daily Mrs. Wyckoff saw that something was Avrong ; of the broadest culture ;
32. age to tell them that ; they were living in a fool's paradise, they were such da
33. reacher beautiful." He had called making life had not intended to say to ; them
34. d English life. Dear me I wish I hunting lived in England They have such lovely
35. ties and luncheons, they enjoy life. ing ! ! ! The English know how to live in t
36. novel " " I don't see how tired of being I wish I tired of everything. rich ! I
37. ed of being I wish I tired of everything. rich ! I am you can reconcile this you
38. d makes one discontented." novel-reading to A GARDEN OF ROSES. 13 reconcile "/ d
39. ented. said the other day you practicing of You know would rather that you live
40. 's gentle face, flushed and wearylooking, quarrel, appeared at the door, " Do no
41. t my is dears." "Rose we're only talking nonsense, mother, not quarrelling. Is t
42. alking nonsense, mother, not quarrelling. Is the skirt of my yet, black gown don
43. uch it. Hannah was busy with the washing, and I had hunt for eggs in the barn fo
44. e things of which you girls know nothing. Dear, dear to know I ; ! am tired " !
45. tired, " ! mamma. I wish I had something " There are some towels that want hemmi
46. There are some towels that want hemming, Madge," said Mrs. Wyckoff, with a sigh
47. sew, mamnia I mean I wish had something to do worthy of myself and ! my "A girl
48. . I Margaret paused, evidently expecting that announcement would be received wit
49. e. " Oh, that's what you were scribbling about in your room for so many mornings
50. pride; "but just wait till I run beaming down and see if the kettle is boiling."
51. ng down and see if the kettle is boiling." "Oh, the sordid cares of life!" said
52. en sounds of greetlight footsteps in ing, a pleasant laugh, the hall. and Mrs. W
53. ugh, the hall. and Mrs. Wyckoff, opening " it's Philomena " the parlor door, Phi
54. nterrupted you," she continued, noticing the paper in Margaret's hand. is "This
55. said Philomena. "Would you mind getting me " asked Margaret. water, mamma ? of
56. it, and began in a clear, sweet feeling " home " voice " : were a garden of ros
57. e episode of the glass cf water, She ing : does not mean ' ' it." Life offers us
58. offers us so few opportunities of " ing a garden of roses sighed Margaret. ! ma
59. hat offers us some opportunity of living Philomena. "I want to tell you. Aunt Wy
60. o earth. " I haven't any time, dear. ing I must get tea myself. Hannah wants to
61. hat their mother Don't they " is working and worrying herself to death ? ' ' ! '
62. her Don't they " is working and worrying herself to death ? ' ' ! ' ' "What Marg
63. nk of my poem?" "It was said the turning suddenly. of the thought of a lifetime.
64. sister. stay?" Philomena asked, helping her aunt to some cake, and smiling. "Am
65. lping her aunt to some cake, and smiling. "Am I to "Of course," said are very we
66. e o'clock. The young enjoyed her morning walk to Mass. The road ran by the lake
67. was, and went to their favorite lounging place, the parlor. Margaret took up her
68. d," as she called it which meant playing snatches of nearly tried to evolve anot
69. The autumn air was crisp and refreshing, the scent of the pines deShe saw Mrs.
70. the pines deShe saw Mrs. Wyckoff digging polightful. tatoes in the back garden.
71. ork, rather than to see her aunt wearing herself away. Sisters, The good committ
72. ese girls fail to see the sin of leaving their mother, sick and weak, to face al
73. e the cast- do it yet. It would look ing of a reproach on her cousins. Hannah, f
74. ah, frills who had long been complaining that the and flounces and fancies of th
75. f looked hopelessly at the conand dining-room Hannah had gone suddenly. fusion o
76. rgaret's poem to music ; she was singing as Philomena entered " I : would that m
77. ife. She restrained prayer ; ; murmuring her usual little for Philomena had temp
78. I could gain riches and fame by anything but a poem; it "I wish my talent ; I wo
79. omena. "No," answered Margaret, coloring. "No; not exactly. I have seen them in
80. o do all our serious work in the morning, you know. At the convent, embroidery w
81. r, and said with their eyes, "No feeling for art !" "I have heard," Margaret sai
82. !" "I have heard," Margaret said, laying down her novel, and taking her favorite
83. said, laying down her novel, and taking her favorite yawning attitude, "that co
84. r novel, and taking her favorite yawning attitude, "that convent girls get only
85. that convent girls get only a smattering of things acquire only a superficial id
86. reat possibilities." Margaret was paying her cousin back for 1 her late frank qu
87. on myself; but I do know,- without being able to make comparisons of the differe
88. we are. But, Madge," she added, blushing, "you must We not take me as an example
89. f you did it at all," said Anna, putting an unnatural eye into a peaI should thi
90. done language. and well, without talking much about simply it. Indeed, the girls
91. gion has always been somewhat of a thing apart." Philomena raised her head in su
92. a emo- She came back few minutes, bring- ing a roll of velvet in her hand. " Th
93. o- She came back few minutes, bring- ing a roll of velvet in her hand. " This is
94. is part of a curtain for the decorating of the repository on Holy Thursday." An
95. reat part), "show" piece, by improvising the bass Margaret offered her some cara
96. autumn leaves. a good reason for staying at home. As soon as her cousins One ran
97. you She pushed sit down in that rocking chair, ' aunt; I'm going to have a good
98. in that rocking chair, ' aunt; I'm going to have a good work.'" into Mrs. Wyckof
99. the old- fashioned rocker, and, putting on a big apron, went to work. Difficult
100. ficulties disappeared before her willing and skilful hands. Mrs. Wyckoff protest
101. s well as Hannah? And tea. My I am going to make cake for cake took a prize at t
102. work, or keep my temper, or do anything I I am naturally a very did not want to
103. e Mother Superior sent her a note saying that I was one of her children, and tha
104. religion is lucidity," she said, making a cross of maple and beech leaves. "To
105. d " demanded Mrs. life Philomena, losing patience. "Am in my life? Our friend, T
106. e rude," continued Philo; mena, coloring slightly, and keeping her eyes on the l
107. lo; mena, coloring slightly, and keeping her eyes on the leaves in her hand " bu
108. hilomena; ' ! "a girl of sixteen talking of ' Ouida I'd be ashamed do it. The Si
109. not have seats for all of us. I am dying to make her acquaintance. ! She gives t
110. en aback by this cool method of crowding out Mrs. Wyckoff. Your mother has not b
111. '" said Philomena, her impatience rising again. " She asked aunt, and particular
112. ace towards the window, her color rising. " Come, Kose," said Margaret, loftily
113. omena and honestly, dear, I have nothing to wear." want to ! ; Philomena's cheek
114. ad a struggle, and she conquered, saying to her- A GARDEN OF ROSES. out of the "
115. GARDEN OF ROSES. out of the " Following of Christ they who freely and willingly
116. Margaret," she said, her voice trembling a little, " if you will give me your bl
117. ight I O am sure I can make That evening Rosalie seemed rather thought" There is
118. eemed rather thought" There is something in Philomena's religion that is noble,"
119. t Margaret's dress now. I saw her saying her beads this morning, and I felt that
120. I saw her saying her beads this morning, and I felt that she was really speakin
121. and I felt that she was really speaking to God. Now, ful. ! Anna, you know we a
122. , you know we always seein to be praying at God. Don't you think we might help m
123. nds." " I am to help her, anyhow." going Anna looked after her sister in amazeme
124. TCHES. and watch the sunset that evening. Rosalie's offer to help her heart. had
125. hted with her. "You have a very charming mother," Mrs. " I d'Eresby said, as the
126. ea of the elegant Mrs. d'Eresby offering poor, prosaic mamma as a model Margaret
127. and Rosalie chatted, the former try- ing to explain to her cousin the details of
128. ill hear did. It is worth the choir sing the Magnificat. more to a woman, young
129. ave it ' to Philo- " I will mena, saying, with a smile, " alone.' thorns for mys
130. conciliated by She did not speak during the quotation. of the drive. Rosalie ea
131. lingly to the who spoke with no doubting voice. When the sermon was over, she dr
132. d worried herself almost sick in getting a tea ready worthy of the excursionists
133. s. d'Eresby graciously declined, leaving an invitation for them all to her next
134. as she explained, was a quiet gathering. During the following week Philomena an
135. explained, was a quiet gathering. During the following week Philomena and Rosali
136. a quiet gathering. During the following week Philomena and Rosalie saved steps.
137. to satisfy Rosalie's curiosity regarding the doctrines of the Church, awakened b
138. you time now," Philo- mena said, kissing her aunt's worn hand. life Margaret and
139. spirations, Margaret's her by ridiculing Mrs. d'Eresby's bad taste Philomena and
140. sympa" "consoled thized with in inviting Philomena and Rosalie. Philomena refuse
141. et kept her mother very busy rearranging old laces and stuffs. Mrs. Wyckoff plan
142. . was hotter than Mrs. Wyckoff, standing at the ironing" felt her head reel. boa
143. an Mrs. Wyckoff, standing at the ironing" felt her head reel. board, Oh, that Ph
144. istance, she could hear Margaret singing, "Gently, gently as rose-life closes, T
145. Mere she She sank to the floor, dropping the began. smoothing-iron from her hand
146. the floor, dropping the began. smoothing-iron from her hand. Anna heard the fall
147. usin," cried Margaret, suddenly throwing herself at Philomena's feet, "teach me
148. mena's tears head. if I could only bring her back!" fell fast on her cousin's Sh
149. AID. old violin was silent. The E string THE hung loose, and the bow beside it o
150. it on the wall showed strands of waving horse -hair. The hands of its master ha
151. in her black May ; gown, in sat looking at the old violin with tears her eyes.
152. olin with tears her eyes. On the evening of the Resurrection Day, her father had
153. e nearer to you for that." Every morning at Mass and the May devotions each prev
154. ld father. The thought ; of the swelling veins in those kind hands which had toi
155. remembrance of the dim blue eyes looking through their glasses at the scores of
156. best. She had kept rooms in the lodging-house, in Brooklyn, as neat as wax. She
157. father comfortable. His coffee ; morning was always just right and when he came
158. n bleu," the old man often said, growing cheerful as the appetizing aroma met hi
159. said, growing cheerful as the appetizing aroma met him at the door. Mary never k
160. new what a cordon bleu meant but knowing that it was a compliment to her cookery
161. smallest dot could be taken for anything else. She had them all now in her scrap
162. than of her age are. Her need of looking after girls her father, who w as old an
163. hair, a turned-up nose, and a sprinkling of 46 STOEIES AND SKETCHES. freckles al
164. ! ! ! And Mary There were people passing in the children playing, and the German
165. e people passing in the children playing, and the German woman street, " Wil-hel
166. the floor above was all alone ! calling out, " ! meena to ! You, Wilhel-rneena
167. ntle, and the men expressed kind feeling too. But, as there had been no "wake,"
168. n the front room, whose constant tapping had annoyed him, was gone at last. Ever
169. nnoyed him, was gone at last. Everything was quiet as he liked it but he, too, w
170. little to leavo you, dear; but, knowing how won't blame violin, feeble the poor
171. There's you my and you may it something in that which value, dear, because my f
172. he only investment make for you, darling. You won't be turned out before you can
173. She shared with him the horror of being "turned out." She had, after all paid,
174. nd an unknown woman had called, bringing with her a tract, "Advice to the Crimin
175. the " Evangelical Society for Obtaining Employment for Females." "You itor, are
176. Romanist," I see, said the vis- noticing the crucifix and the picture of the Sac
177. he in Heaven," cried Mary, light tearing the tracts and stamping her foot. "Don'
178. y, light tearing the tracts and stamping her foot. "Don't you come here again!"
179. ell, I never!" said the visitor, leaving. But come to the Evangelical Home on We
180. opI should not ' ' portunity of gaining employment that offered itself. She cou
181. sew, she could cook. to earn her living But how could she ? start ' by these ac
182. ery badly, depend on, except her cooking and sewing. The world seemed very bleak
183. depend on, except her cooking and sewing. The world seemed very bleak, cold, and
184. ot see that her father had left anything for her within it. so she had nothing t
185. ng for her within it. so she had nothing to ; Where should she ask for work ? Sh
186. r work ? She knew She had walked nothing of the two great cities. to Mass throug
187. wice crossed the Ferry to the glittering, noisy, wonderful great city beyond the
188. child's voice and loud lamentaof crying Then a knock at Mary's tions by a woman
189. stood in the door-way, big tears making tracks over a face showed marks of rece
190. marks of recent occupation in the making of mud pies. The Schmids, six and the b
191. bThey bage, the odors of which, mingling with the noise of the children ant. gar
192. myself," thought " without Mary, taking other people's troubles on my shoulders
193. lways 54 STOUIKS AM) SKETCHES. something the matter with that nasty Schmid baby.
194. tairway and into the close, ill-smelling rooms of the Schmids. was Sunday mornin
195. rooms of the Schmids. was Sunday morning. August Schmid, boy of fifteen, was rep
196. st Schmid, boy of fifteen, was replacing the table which had been overturned Kat
197. , his sister, next in years, was picking up the coffee-pot and some slices of br
198. y, who, in her mother's arms, was crying in a way that showed her lungs were uni
199. omena is not Ach, see the blood !" dying. The child was bleeding. There was a cu
200. e blood !" dying. The child was bleeding. There was a cut that the THE SECRET OF
201. s forehead was really slight. Forgetting the risks that might attend the entranc
202. little old maid," a region in which ing to the had never been permitted to pene
203. h she poked at the baby's nose, say- ing, in German : " It will make thee well,
204. ll truth, her chief reason for disliking the Schmids was that the children had a
205. children had acquired a habit of singing out, whenever they could " little old i
206. ld " little old into her without falling hands, maid self. " ! "I said. She had
207. oman. "You see," she continued, speaking another. in English, "how they mind one
208. however, shook expression, said nothing ; his fist at his sister. "Does August
209. " It is true," said Mrs. Schmid, turning to Mary. "I cannot sew. My fingers are
210. very ragged about ' the sleeves. Having received the thanks of Mrs. Schmid, sta
211. his is will not be selfish. is I morning. hard for the poor to go to Mass when t
212. o. I have I ought to help them." nothing to do. prayed for work at my hand. It H
213. took some pieces of black Then providing herself with her needle, she thread, an
214. " Oh, come," she was "come to the saying called ; man who had little Bethel ; th
215. Popish ! words of your poor Good-morning, ma'am." And then to Mrs. Schmid, "I am
216. he cloth she had brought. are committing sin. Is this what at once you ; your pr
217. appetite for self-saeritice increas- ing with practice, volunteered to take care
218. ves of the saints were Mary, considering that more appropriate, entranced them w
219. tory of St. Gudula. She was just telling how the evil spirits tried to blow out
220. me she went to Mass early in the morning, and how they tried to make her afraid
221. s, when Mrs. Schmid came back, releasing her. How quiet and peaceful Mary's room
222. gh the shut glass doors into the sitting-room, hinting of the richness and sweet
223. ass doors into the sitting-room, hinting of the richness and sweetness of the co
224. the richness and sweetness of the coming summer. The ivy against the walls of th
225. on" quivered in time l)c to the trilling of the canary, singing the last words w
226. c to the trilling of the canary, singing the last words which seemed to " the li
227. of the 62 STORIES AND SKETCHES. morning had lifted the burden of her grief; and
228. d ribbon, and with marks of much rubbing on her shining face. Mrs. Schmid asked
229. ith marks of much rubbing on her shining face. Mrs. Schmid asked ilia fraulem to
230. very hot and greasy. Schmid was ladling out soup from a the deal table. steamin
231. out soup from a the deal table. steaming kettle into the plates of the children,
232. Schmid's standings. knowledge of cooking led to some waste. She asked permission
233. s, apologetically. She was said, smiling. of the boy's question thinking The Sch
234. smiling. of the boy's question thinking The Schmid family did not long remain e
235. ary had showed their sympathy by fishing out the moist pieces of dough from thei
236. their soup and layShe was glad when ing them on her plate. dinner was over. In
237. nted, though. "I wish Authe others bring so ust had something to do wash. is ; l
238. Authe others bring so ust had something to do wash. is ; little in." Mary had b
239. Mary had been of these others. thinking, not of herself, but Alphonsus' remark
240. hon " exclaimed I ! Mrs. Schmid, kissing Mary on both cheeks; " are an angel "yo
241. ry, "till else to do." he gets something "It is well, it Is well," said the moth
242. ecially the girls, who were very willing to go to the in a Sisters' school with
243. ed was hard work for Mary this attending to them amid continual confusion and ba
244. wer was the most in demand, Mary minding the baby for him while he was away. " T
245. ast." The Japanese rose was a straggling bush, picked up on the docks by her fat
246. that flowers are scarce, and the evening best time to sell them." is says the "V
247. ome to take care of the August something grinned. He was all baby." eager to ear
248. er-blossoms. was good. " They wont bring will help." " but much," she thought, t
249. rapped She flew up to August, forgetting her usual primness and dignity, and als
250. ned smooth. " I saved them from smok ing-tobacco packbox. It tilled was ages. I
251. thanked him. August never threw anything away. He had marvellous collections of
252. irty red, white, and green in glittering silver holders and bunches, had not tou
253. peace " ! May his She took up her sewing a frock for Filomena and smiled now and
254. er bare, red arms in her apron. wrapping August, running all over with grins, ma
255. s in her apron. wrapping August, running all over with grins, marched proudly up
256. went yours," cried August, with shining to the florist in Fulton Street, and sh
257. the pride in August's " ! "I am am ening. so glad so glad cried Mary, her eyes b
258. it. But it was dark," he added. I bring," said " "It is all yours. Take it, Aug
259. st. I am so glad !" cried Mary, thinking of the pleasure must give him. Mrs. Sch
260. tice of this, divided it into two seeing Mary parts. "This take it." is yours, A
261. for many days. Unconsciouswhile thinking least of herself, of her convenience, o
262. wer-seller made the most of that lagging May. Summer weather did not come that s
263. d Mrs. Schmid had also saved some- thing. In September, August heard of an old g
264. est ; One day, sent a in the next spring, Mary having bower of the lucky Japanes
265. , sent a in the next spring, Mary having bower of the lucky Japanese rose as Aug
266. hat rewhich, over gretfully, was selling at ten cents a bud to the church for th
267. et it old violin. "I wonder what kissing it tendtrly. "I wonder what my holds,"
268. ld have read, pasted around the sounding stick, a paper containing these words,
269. d the sounding stick, a paper containing these words, from the "Imitation of Chr
270. od; because thou hast not here a lasting abode." ' ' FLOATING ON A BOARD. yVTEKR
271. not here a lasting abode." ' ' FLOATING ON A BOARD. yVTEKROT tanny ; lived in N
272. h temper, and was much given to scolding, with rot or without provocation but I
273. ot was to one of her seen wildly rushing a helmet. down the street with one of h
274. et with one of her tin his head, cooking utensils on by way of He was enact- ing
275. utensils on by way of He was enact- ing a Prussian, pursued by the French soldi
276. various sizes. "He'll break for-nothing ! my He has already heart some day, the
277. day, the goodmade a great dent FLOATING ON A BOARD. in 73 my stew-pan. Pi-er-ro
278. lly head proached her, and made covering, as he apa low bow. This was adding ins
279. ring, as he apa low bow. This was adding insult to injury, Madame thought. She g
280. ce, and gave Pierrot a box in him flying several yards away. " What's that for ?
281. errot. He had become quite used to being boxed on the ear he minded them as much
282. . I'm very sorry," said Pierrot, picking up the "I'll never be a Prussian damage
283. ged article. but one must have something on his again; I did not " I did'nt thin
284. rd." "As I see," Madame returned, gazing upon " X o dinner for her stew-pan. you
285. ierrot's part was a sure sign of brewing mischief. As Pierrot made no noise went
286. ordingly stairs to see what he was doing. Her indignation was very great, indeed
287. is step-mother was inexorable ; FLOATING ON A BOARD. as she noticed several half
288. the town, and Pierrot dreamed of working on it at some future time. to stay wher
289. e Choux did not relent and one ; morning Pierrot, with eyes red from weeping, an
290. ning Pierrot, with eyes red from weeping, and with his basket, containing his cl
291. weeping, and with his basket, containing his clothes and two white mice, present
292. ong the Loire. till He beautiful morning for He was kept running from He had no
293. eautiful morning for He was kept running from He had no leisure now night. but i
294. he had gained parent quietness, playing tricks, clung to still him. When anythi
295. ricks, clung to still him. When anything went wrong, the blame was, as a matter
296. rose above its great banks, overflowing the surrounding country. Summer Madame
297. great banks, overflowing the surrounding country. Summer Madame Choux's house st
298. use was situated on low ground. FLOATING ON A BOARD. 77 Le Cheval Rouge was comp
299. comparatively safe from the encroaching flood. As soon as Pierrot heard of the
300. he inundation, he hurried to some rising ground, in order to observe a view of h
301. e space between himself and the dwelling was one rippling expanse of water. "Whe
302. imself and the dwelling was one rippling expanse of water. "Where is my step-mot
303. ps unable to move, and Boats were plying rising. various directions, removing pe
304. le to move, and Boats were plying rising. various directions, removing people dw
305. ing rising. various directions, removing people dwellings. and furniture from th
306. meantime, Madame Choux might be drowning. A peasant's cart was standing on the h
307. drowning. A peasant's cart was standing on the hill. Beside it lay several long
308. ng and very wide boards. all were Seeing these, a a pole new idea entered Pierro
309. one of these into the water, and seizing from a bundle of newly cut saplings, 78
310. wonder of the lookers on. " I will bring Madame Choux back on this," he said, in
311. on his lips, struck out boldly, pushing along by means of his pole. The water s
312. nto this window Pierrot climbed, drawing his board in after him. He saw at once
313. unable to move, her head just appearing above the surface of the flood. She utt
314. some words of encouragement, and keeping one end of the board on the window, pus
315. ridge across the room. sill thus forming a " This it is dry at least," he said,
316. it is dry at least," he said, advancing on to the middle of the room. " Now, mo
317. t me help you to get up there." FLOATING ON A BOARD. 79 " I cannot move, Pierrot
318. sprained my ankle. The ; water is rising. O, Pierrot, I shall drown " ! "No, you
319. ndow had been washed away in the rushing of the flood and so Pierrot and his ste
320. , and to say he might be worth something yet. His step-mother embraced him tende
321. p-mother embraced him tenderly, scolding him at the same time for having been so
322. scolding him at the same time for having been so reckless as to venture out on a
323. out on a board. " I thought I was going to die," she whis" and with pered to he
324. led him." JUNE ROSES a beautiful morning ! The azure sky was flooded with sunlig
325. s flooded with sunlight, which, escaping from the meshes of the graceful white c
326. raceful white clouds, was just beginning to touch the earth and sip the dew from
327. s' yard was not capable of accommodating half a pint of dew, and so the sun did
328. so the sun did not gain much by sipping from The Thornes' yard was so very smal
329. very side. One little girl was searching for any tiny weed that might presume to
330. f above the ground the other was looking for bugs and ; SUCH 81 82 STORIES AND S
331. come here her Isn't ! Thome, addressing buds half open see ! sister. " Two new
332. ck the thorny branches, engently pushing joyed the perfume to her heart's conten
333. will " A ; "The " nosegay with a meaning, replied Nora. red roses remind me of O
334. for its perfume is al; ; ways ascending." " I'm glad you ter, self." told me, N
335. s !" called a shrill, pip- "Good-morning, ing voice above them. "Who's " that?"
336. called a shrill, pip- "Good-morning, ing voice above them. "Who's " that?" they
337. that?" they both asked. ! ! Good-morning, girls Good-morning, girls " Good-morni
338. ed. ! ! Good-morning, girls Good-morning, girls " Good-morning, girls The girls
339. girls Good-morning, girls " Good-morning, girls The girls looked up, and saw sus
340. "Jack has taught him to say Good-morning.' " ' "Dear me?" said Bridget, in an in
341. might teach his bird to say Good-morning, " young ladies,' instead of girls.' '
342. Nora. " People needn't be always telling us so. If I had a long dress, and my ha
343. arlie is a Charlie Charlie responded ing. by imitating a dog bark- "Brother Jack
344. rlie Charlie responded ing. by imitating a dog bark- "Brother Jack thinks a grea
345. our house just as Charlie was whistling 'Yankee Doodle.' He stopped and listene
346. a single rose in town." The next morning a chorus, or rather, a duet of lamentat
347. Thornes' yard. The two girls, on coming down to resume their gardening operatio
348. on coming down to resume their gardening operations as usual, had discovered tha
349. " Let us ask Jack," said Bridget, trying not know anything about it, to cry. ''J
350. " said Bridget, trying not know anything about it, to cry. ''Jack doesn't sure,"
351. quiet," ' ' a Jack, who had been trying to do " What do stubborn sum in fractio
352. ou Jack's club met every Tuesday evening, in a room over Mrs. Thome's back kitch
353. kitchen. Its members were boys belonging to the school that Jack attended. The c
354. but they were strictly forbidden to sing in concert. They had done so once, and
355. for the tabernacle," said Nora beginning to cry. "How was I to know that?" deman
356. I to know that?" demanded Jack, feeling sorry. " " Couldn't " Come said Bridget
357. s in bloom he did not like the of asking Mr. Morgan for some of his thought rose
358. winkled his eyes and said: "Good-morning." " Yes must Charlie, for I can't you g
359. or the tabernacle," Jack sighed. Feeling very sad, Jack took Charlie and his cag
360. g around it, and surrounded by a growing Jack's irarden filled with the choicest
361. , pink, yellow, and white roses, telling him at the same time that he might have
362. sters them. STORIES AND SKETCHES. On ing!" the following morning, when Jack awok
363. IES AND SKETCHES. On ing!" the following morning, when Jack awoke, ' ' : he hear
364. SKETCHES. On ing!" the following morning, when Jack awoke, ' ' : he heard somebo
365. k awoke, ' ' : he heard somebody calling out Good-morn- looked from his window,
366. he would quietly wait to be carried ing back to his new master. : ! A PASSION F
367. sies and clover-blossoms, and staggering beneath her great load of the flowers o
368. the flowers of the peach and MAY adding a and dandelions, and with an ocean of
369. ns, and with an ocean of perfume flowing from her floral burden, she hastens eac
370. gh the balmy air and through the morning sunlight, which touched each head cherr
371. ong line of boys and girls were entering a church. They were going in procession
372. were entering a church. They were going in procession to May Queen the fairest
373. n the other side of the street, watching the procession, stood a little newsboy
374. at the crowd of a slight breeze rustling happy children, until among the unsold
375. children, until among the unsold morning " business." papers in his to hand remi
376. hen two passed him, one of them carrying a large bouNed Murphy, the newsboy, ran
377. newsboy, ran after quet. them. " Morning papers, ladies !" and the one with the
378. cious flower in his button-hole, holding his hand over it, for fear some envious
379. m in charge of an old woman who kept ing an apple stand on a corner. This old wo
380. n a corner. This old woman died, leaving him her business, and to his own resour
381. r books, and he read He eagerly anything that came in his way. had been taught h
382. , the procession of children was coining out. He stood and watched it as he had
383. elt a pang as he thought lie had nothing to offer to that Holy Mother. Yes, he h
384. d bought the paper from Ned that morning knelt at the same altar. She noticed he
385. ils, and, as she went out, saw Ned going down This lady felt the steps. Mrs. Woo
386. d and delighted brother newsboys, seeing it, became so polite as to offer him a
387. after a time she succeeded in procuring place as assistant to a friend's garden
388. often makes him the ment of distributing her bounty. very thankful, too. Looking
389. her bounty. very thankful, too. Looking back, he very often wonders what he wou
390. -flower on is Ned the altar that morning in May. BLUFFS BOY. CHAPTER I. ALONE IN
391. he always did it on pretense of keeping his birthday. He was good-natured and g
392. ikely to be very ; if happy. One evening, when his ship was in port and he had b
393. ship was in port and he had been keeping his birthday about the he went reeling
394. g his birthday about the he went reeling through the sixth that year 95 96 STORI
395. ES AND SKETCHES. streets to his boarding-house his foot slipped, he tried to ste
396. eady himself, failed, and fell, striking his head on the corner of the curbstone
397. l boy crept from under a pile of packing-boxes and hesitatingly The stone approa
398. h a stream of blood was slowly trickling. The small boy raised the head of the u
399. a large coarse bag. The dusk of evening was fast giving place to the darkness o
400. bag. The dusk of evening was fast giving place to the darkness of night. Having
401. g place to the darkness of night. Having torn a large piece from the bag, the bo
402. d at the wound. He staunched the flowing blood with a portion of the bag, and wi
403. lied " BLUFF'S BOY. 97 the boy, speaking with a refined accent that ac- corded i
404. "I am rather unsteady on my Tom, trying to rise, " but I to get manage up and g
405. ight in a second." succeeded in reaching the boxes, and stretched himself on the
406. uch obliged, youngster," he said, having as comfortable as circumstances made hi
407. e in particular," said the boy, creeping into a box that was turned on in' its s
408. "Great Julius Caesar " exclaimed opening his eyes in Tom, amazement. " You don't
409. ur parents ? mother is dead since spring," answered the boy, in a trembling voic
410. pring," answered the boy, in a trembling voice, " paid my father ' ' Where " My
411. oor boy," muttered the ; sailor, winking "Blame it! the damp gets into a violent
412. youngster?" " I sell matches And during the day." Lewis Arlyn took several bund
413. the "They're first rate, sir; warpacking-box. ranted to strike fire at " " Eye t
414. t. better now; come and help me Catching hold of Lewis' hand, the sailor rose As
415. ave when they reached the about boarding-house, shoulder. but Tom held him by th
416. his rough, but kindly tone, " I'm going to adopt you. I'll give you an educatio
417. up accounts was in The boy was stunning," as the sailor expressed it. Lewis Arl
418. influence over Tom, who, before starting on his a was next voyage, received time
419. could not bear the knowledge was working hard for him. He do something to help h
420. as working hard for him. He do something to help his benefactor. Around his neck
421. became a cabin boy on board the Morning Star, bound for Greenland. His exemplar
422. rd. The him Tom Bluff's boy. The Morning Star lay in an inlet on the Around coas
423. w of the "frozen light." She The Morning Star was ice-bound. would be compelled
424. present This position until the breaking up of the ice. takes place in the month
425. July. generally The sailors were amusing themselves on the ice in various ways p
426. elves on the ice in various ways playing leap-frog, build- ing sleds, and skatin
427. rious ways playing leap-frog, build- ing sleds, and skating. Tom Bluff and Lewis
428. leap-frog, build- ing sleds, and skating. Tom Bluff and Lewis had wandered dista
429. RIES AND SKETCHES. brothers were helping Tom and Lewis to build a hut of ice in
430. the Esquimau fashion. The dogs belonging to Muk-he-be-out's family were fighting
431. to Muk-he-be-out's family were fighting and snarling among themselves around th
432. -out's family were fighting and snarling among themselves around the hut. The hu
433. -he-be-out first noticed it, and seizing his spear, aimed a blow at the bear's h
434. ore him. "Rim, Lewis," said Tom, keeping his eye on the foremost bear. " Run bac
435. eapon of defence. raised himself seizing a his The foremost bear upon legs and s
436. red a prayer, at the same time preparing to launch his block of ice. Tom lay who
437. ck of ice. Tom lay wholly at the falling, his knife had been mercy of the bear.
438. ear uttered a roar of pain, and, leaving Tom, hastened to 104 STORIES AND SKETCH
439. a new assailant. him to the ice, roaring with rage and brought The second bear,
440. ought The second bear, probably thinking pain. that discretion was the best part
441. and hood of the Esquimaux, and carrying a revolver in his hand, emerged from am
442. e and lichen-covered rocks. Not noticing Lewis, the man fired another shot at th
443. r shot at the bear. With a low, rumbling groan, the animal expired. to in examin
444. He had just near Tom succeeded loosening the sailor's neck-cloth turned pale, an
445. it?" He "That cross!" gasped "Where ing English. clutched Tom's arm convulsivel
446. he had watched and waited for the coming of a vessel to deliver him. Hearing tha
447. ming of a vessel to deliver him. Hearing that a ship was weather-bound on the co
448. oast of the island, he had come, fearing yet hoping to make sure of it. He had a
449. island, he had come, fearing yet hoping to make sure of it. He had arrived in t
450. d death. Tom from a horrible The Morning Star safely reached home. Tom no He all
451. SHAMROCK. a certain ON as March morning, when the air was full of sunlight, and
452. ht, and the faint breath of early spring, Joe Murphy canie down stairs whistling
453. , Joe Murphy canie down stairs whistling blithely as a lark. In the small room w
454. h served the parlor, Murphys Mrs. dining-room, was getting breakfast ready break
455. r, Murphys Mrs. dining-room, was getting breakfast ready breakMurphy fast for tw
456. hat shone there was a sight worth seeing. It did not take long to prepare breakf
457. nd this "Well, mother," said Joe, taking his hat and pushing his chair back, " T
458. r," said Joe, taking his hat and pushing his chair back, " To-morrow is St. Patr
459. shamrock is. You'll have a fine blooming sprig to wear in your coat to-morrow."
460. row." Joe laughed cheerily, and, walking over to the window, looked admiringly a
461. mysterious air, "I'll give you something for your sprig of shamrock, mother." Hi
462. ETCHES. " I can wait," she said, knowing that Joe was more eager to speak than s
463. ther. not impatient, said this provoking "It's time you were off, Joe." keep pro
464. " spectacles with gold rims And, having unburdened his mind of the shuffle. ! !
465. tortured him since the previous evening, he hastened away to his daily labor. "
466. , at all," murmured Mrs. Murphy, lifting the corner of her apron to wipe away a
467. as fifteen a year older than Joe. During the hur- ried seasons he divided Joe's
468. Patrick's ; early Mass ! ters. Entering the office, Joe opened the shutAfter a
469. hutAfter a while, Tyrell came in yawning. " Good morning," said Joe. " Early eno
470. , Tyrell came in yawning. " Good morning," said Joe. " Early enough to-day, I ho
471. ld Maher. I say, what's that green thing you've got in in your button-hole, Murp
472. neered Tyrrell; faith I'd not be letting every one know I was ' ' Irish." " More
473. oe, gravely. a gray-haired, kind-looking Tyrrell at once rushed to his and prete
474. HAMROCK. Ill Mr. Maher said good morning, and then went into his private office.
475. came out in a short time, with something in his hand. " You've never seen anythi
476. n his hand. " You've never seen anything like this, have a dainty cotton-lined y
477. isitely cut. While Mr. Maher was showing the watch a loud burst of music sounded
478. unded without, accompanied by applauding voices. " What is that?" asked Mr. Mahe
479. ose on the sidewalk, and the inspiriting melody from the various bands added lif
480. scene. Mr. Maher and Joe stood watching the gay pageant, but Tyrrell stole back
481. k to the desk, opened it, took something out, hesitated an instant, and then joi
482. to the desk," suggested Tyrrell. putting Mr. Maher shook his head negatively ; t
483. atch in the desk. While we were standing in the doorway no one entered, that is
484. came very red. Tyrrell had been watching him. He seized Joe's right hand, and dr
485. Mr. Maher spoke " While you were looking at the watch in niy hand, I noticed tha
486. no longer in my employ." With a bursting heart and a throbbing brain, Joe walked
487. ." With a bursting heart and a throbbing brain, Joe walked home. In an hour all
488. flown. The streets were gay with flying flags and martial music, but for him ev
489. nd martial music, but for him everything was gloomy. His mother comforted him. S
490. of work on ; name James Tyrrell is lying ill with smallpox in the close room at
491. ence of these three witnesses, the dying boy confessed that he, to satisfy his h
492. sees a sprig of shamrock without feeling " Who made it all right." grateful to H
493. I loved were called to away by pressing duties. I did not care in counting the
494. ssing duties. I did not care in counting the flowers on the wall-paper, or in tr
495. flowers on the wall-paper, or in tracing the design of the sofa placed near a ca
496. laughed. "You will see servants shaking carpets, and maids gossiping instead of
497. nts shaking carpets, and maids gossiping instead of minding their work." It's a
498. , and maids gossiping instead of minding their work." It's a great pity My that
499. t all we have is two apartments fronting on ; the street." " Don't be discontent
500. things in my little court. This evening you what I have seen." Hardly had I bee
501. ad known ment. ' ' me all my old waiting-maid, who my life, looked up in astonis
502. e me on Sunday, every two weeks. Sighing, I turned my attention to the children
503. ure table and an arm-chair, both seeming to be part of the furniture of a doll's
504. se. was adorned by a cover of laceHaving placed a small looka basin, and a soap-
505. basin, and a soap-dish upon it, the ing-glass, yellow-haired maiden poured out
506. destroyed and her limbs broken by being washed in a basin of water? " " And hot
507. What could it be ? A small gray morning gown, trimmed with It green ribbons, an
508. ity of a A GOOD EXAMPLE. 119 human being (and with more than the gravity of come
509. ts paws, and shook them tress. consoling caresses, they tempered the heat with c
510. logne and^ried ; but at this interesting moment I sunk back fatigued among my cu
511. re, Louise?" Louise, bent on discovering what had interested me so strongly, had
512. sted me so strongly, had ceased knitting, to look from the other window. "That c
513. d, " Ten tunes at least before answering me. I thought the beast would have scra
514. tched the little and The idea of washing a cat stupids. detest water on their fe
515. eem very melancholy," I thought, turning again to the window, but the The cat re
516. ested on its breast, and it was sleeping after the fatigues "They ; of the day.
517. , sometimes, he will and that by sending his little girls perform an act of ; tr
518. t doubt that," said my husband, laughing. " They'll fatigue you " ; this busines
519. the weight ; life my visitor had nothing of this. She crossed her arms on her br
520. y hands, "Theresa wanted elder. to bring our cat," said the "It was Genevieve, w
521. pet at each side of me. "We didn't bring his bed," said Theresa, " and so he mus
522. ch than a doll isn't he ? We the evening, like a little tiny jug of hot water at
523. much noise in her room." "Are we making a noise now, niadame?" asked Theresa, a
524. much amused," cried Genevieve, embracing me energetically. The cat awakened he w
525. s he is not at home," said the following him in order to tell him the articles o
526. Mignon of Amy Sheifer. " She has no ing and If you were there, my Faradet" cat.
527. to come back to-morrow ' ' father being willing," I said, turning to the " and
528. back to-morrow ' ' father being willing," I said, turning to the " and not to d
529. ' father being willing," I said, turning to the " and not to disturb nurse, you,
530. obliged to perform some errands, during which time she would leave her charges
531. s ; friends. " We are to Faradet, coming again to-morrow," they said whom they h
532. whom they had great trouble to to bring catch. "Do you want us Raton? "cried Th
533. f a to They both ought have a whip- ping," she observed; "the cat will be trying
534. ," she observed; "the cat will be trying There it is, open at to raise the windo
535. ever seen such an animal," said stopping her work to look at our "he is seated i
536. ; night-gown. a tray" They are bringing him a dish on and ' ' my old attendant
537. an infant. What is that runlaughter ning along the curtains I can't tell ? Truly
538. hese girls keep the I beasts from eating one another. ing time." But am los- Lou
539. he I beasts from eating one another. ing time." But am los- Louise managed to pr
540. udently decided at home." keep something The dog Ravande and the white rat had n
541. yet been admitted to the honor of paying me a visit but the most perfect harmony
542. not them at all," said Genevieve, trying in her turn, with the same success as h
543. re obliged to give up the idea of making me comprehend Raton's ex- pressions of
544. oy. 128 STOEIES AND SKETCHES. will bring "We promise. leave I him and you will s
545. sed and provoked each other from morning to night. two boys act in like manner O
546. ner On Sunday, I sent for while awaiting their appearance, my two little girls.
547. id to Louise, "that I wish them to bring Raton and Eavande." "And the cat?" adde
548. 29 avowed, to count her linen by placing its little paw on each napkin that she
549. ransformed into a menagerie. In entering, A two boys jostled the dog who lay ext
550. sses had retired to a corner, ; carrying Faradet. I had some trouble silencing t
551. ng Faradet. I had some trouble silencing the low growls of the old dog and the m
552. ow growls of the old dog and the meowing of the cat; peace, however, was at last
553. to their old employment of teas- My ing each other, while the girls played with
554. e room. The rat had come from his hiding place to climb up the bars of the cage.
555. the bars of the cage. Faradet, standing on his hind before the cage, made sligh
556. cosily stretched at Faradet was running hither and full length. he shook Raton'
557. length. he shook Raton's cage in passing, and thither ; dog a box on the ear the
558. ls can live together without quarrelling," I said in a low " tone why cannot my
559. py in the little group room, and evening he embraced me before departing for col
560. evening he embraced me before departing for college and murmured in my ear " I
561. ies as he had formerly done. The morning sunlight, shooting little arrows into t
562. rly done. The morning sunlight, shooting little arrows into the O'Mearas' its go
563. ra sat by her mother's side, repeat- ing the following " hymn : Brightest and be
564. mother's side, repeat- ing the following " hymn : Brightest and best of the sons
565. test and best of the sons of the morning, Dawn on our darkness and lend us thine
566. ; Star of the East, the horizon adorning, Guide where Our Infant Redeemer is lai
567. . STORIES AND SKETCHES. It has something sweet in : it about dew- And Please say
568. d on His cradle the dewdrops are shining, Low lies His head with the beasts of t
569. ber now," cried Nora, eagerly continuing " : Angels adore Him, in slumber reclin
570. : Angels adore Him, in slumber reclining, Maker, and Monarch, and Saviour of all
571. nd Saviour of all." They were proceeding to the second when Thomas O'Meara enter
572. , " Sure, and what's the use of learning the child that?" he said. "She'd better
573. tter be learnGo and get your primer, ing her A B C's. Nora, and leave hymns to o
574. ke them, her "said Nora, father, raising eyes imploringly. "Do as I bid you." An
575. I bid you." And Nora, obeyed, dampening the wellthumbed primer with her tears.
576. ved a letter from her husband, inclosing a sum of money, and telling her to come
577. d, inclosing a sum of money, and telling her to come at once to him. As soon as
578. d her mother were on shipboard, speeding over the ocean. The steamer that carrie
579. omas O'Meara had promised at the landing-place, but he meet them there. was not
580. ent saw that it was not he side, waiting for his coming. comer she fancied to be
581. was not he side, waiting for his coming. comer she fancied to be him, As the ex
582. new he worked on a farm the next morning she left the city, and went out into th
583. fever. She grew worse, finally becoming delirious. There was no house in sight.
584. Little Nora was alone with her suffering mother. It was two days since they ente
585. since they entered the barn, and during that time they had eaten no food. Poor
586. en no food. Poor little Nora was growing very weak. She brow. pressed her lips t
587. " she thought, "father would let me sing my hymn now, to cheer her up, I know."
588. shone coldly bright on the far-reaching expanse of snow. said the driver it was
589. of the night came the child's faltering voice, singing: " Cold on His cradle, t
590. ame the child's faltering voice, singing: " Cold on His cradle, the dewdrops are
591. on His cradle, the dewdrops are shining; Low lies His head with the beasts of t
592. ; Angels adore Him, in slumber reclining Maker, and Monarch, and Saviour of all.
593. nd Nora. He was almost frantic at having missed them. ones, he would never relig
594. he joins with grateful heart in singing the hymn which he once thought was usel
595. r toys were kept in the tent, and during the long, bright days there were no hap
596. they would rest awhile before beginning to fill their baskets with roses. Jenni
597. s, "Yes, dear," said his mother, smiling the kind smile that mothers smile for l
598. 139 said, " there's a bee in my stocking ! "Take "Bees proudly. Jennie it off qu
599. will bite me " ! don't bite; they sting," said Eddie, "screeched," and, as her
600. Eddie, "screeched," and, as her stocking for Jennie was was hanging over her sho
601. her stocking for Jennie was was hanging over her shoe not the tidiest girl in t
602. d Belt to be enticed out of the stocking ? Eddie was in favor of treading on the
603. tocking ? Eddie was in favor of treading on the stockbut Jennie said it ing and
604. ading on the stockbut Jennie said it ing and killing the bee would be wrong to k
605. stockbut Jennie said it ing and killing the bee would be wrong to kill a bee. "
606. s honey, you know." " But it might sting somebody else." " It may help to make h
607. ; suggestion. Jennie shook her stocking violently, threw on the ground and ran
608. d ran under the cedar tree, Eddie taking refuge in the tent. But no bee it buzze
609. . But no bee it buzzed from the stocking. " I tell you," the bee won't come out
610. ee won't come out of the of the stocking, because it is afraid of us top ; 140 I
611. . cut a hole in the heel of the stocking, and then the bee will drop out." The s
612. hen the bee will drop out." The stocking was Eddie, taking his laid little on th
613. rop out." The stocking was Eddie, taking his laid little on the ground, and pen-
614. , cut a hole in the heel of the stocking. Breathlessly Jennie shook the stocking
615. . Breathlessly Jennie shook the stocking. Eddie and Jap watched anxiously for th
616. s " ! Eddie. Jennie dropped the stocking, and there fell upon the grass a dried
617. o bad to have cut a hole in her stocking and to have found no bee. What said. wo
618. and all around the sunlit air. Climbing, but scentless roses, wreathed the trun
619. d trees and summer-house. Bushes bearing ! ' ' ! above sweet, rich red roses sto
620. RIES AND SKETCHES. white roses, uttering an exclamation rnustn t of pleasure. ao
621. se pluckroses for the altar and offering them to ing Our Dear Lord, if we had ba
622. s for the altar and offering them to ing Our Dear Lord, if we had bad thoughts i
623. Wilde." Kitty was sometimes very trying to Aunt Martha. Anybody's nerves would
624. e shocked by the sight of Kitty clinging to Brindle's horns riding around the Ea
625. Kitty clinging to Brindle's horns riding around the East Meadow. Brindle was one
626. ry, after she had been told and annoying it was, but the how dangerous next day
627. " on Friday nights, because the sweeping, the wash" ing and the baking were over
628. hts, because the sweeping, the wash" ing and the baking were over. The company '
629. e sweeping, the wash" ing and the baking were over. The company ' ' generally wa
630. while they and Aunt Martha were drinking tea, and exchanging cooking receipts an
631. Martha were drinking tea, and exchanging cooking receipts and the news of the ne
632. ere drinking tea, and exchanging cooking receipts and the news of the neighborho
633. they would see the " Germantown" dashing down the road, driven by Kitty tites fo
634. d Kitty, with her pitcher, to the spring behind the house, where all day long in
635. bbled up, she had been found idly ga/ing into the brook, trying wreaths of daisi
636. found idly ga/ing into the brook, trying wreaths of daisies on her head or makin
637. wreaths of daisies on her head or making paper-boats ! 146 STOEIES AND SKETCHES.
638. le son, who had been ; hurt by a reaping machine, that he told her she might hav
639. ig oxheart cherry-tree for the gathering. Kitty picked the cherries every summer
640. ed it to the bank every It was something for a " rainy day." year. Aunt Martha l
641. Aunt Martha would have stood everything, for dislike to " Aunt sold ; except Ki
642. to " Aunt sold ; except Kitty's meeting." Martha was a Methodist, and she wante
643. a Methodist. Twice Kitty went to meeting. WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE. 147
644. uld not go again. She said the preaching and the shouting frightened her. " " cr
645. She said the preaching and the shouting frightened her. " " cried Aunt Martha i
646. cried Aunt Martha indignantly. Shouting " You shout from morning until night, a
647. antly. Shouting " You shout from morning until night, and you don't seem to care
648. d child I don't know where you are going when you ! ! die " ! "I can't help tyin
649. when you ! ! die " ! "I can't help tying a is it, Aunt Martha," new ribbon aroun
650. to child ? " cried Aunt Martha, turning seated at the tea-table. the "company"
651. well, She went unto a ball, Full knowing 'twas the road to Hell, Oh, it was awfu
652. e," said Mrs. Briggs, " good-for-nothing Aunt Martha straightened herself up and
653. t I guess, if you saw your Kitty tearing around the country with the Irish child
654. y ? " "I saw her with these eyes picking blackberries with Rose and Anna O'Raffe
655. of this Their father was a hard-working carcolony. and an admirable man, quite
656. East Hampton this word meant everything that was low and coarse. It was a blow,
657. nst them She was about ; She had nothing but they were " Irish." to to say to th
658. and Kitty enOne followed by two dripping figures. was Rose O'Raflerty, her frock
659. e O'Raflerty, her frock tightly clinging to her, and the water from it trickling
660. to her, and the water from it trickling in little She led a boy named Willie Ne
661. l into the creek. / thought he was going to drown, when Rose jumped in after him
662. Mrs. Briggs, "I'll " never say anything against 'em again ! " Well, Aunt Martha
663. that Aunt Martha herself has a " leaning towards Rome." THE BOY WHO WANTED TO BE
664. opped asleep, and his grandfather coming in, awakened him. "I dreamed must be, t
665. ED TO BE OLD. tacles. 153 see everything without See what an advantage you have.
666. Oh, but, grandpapa, you can do anything Now, you can you please. You can " No,"
667. her ; ride a pony." grandfather, smiling, silent. "I can't; I have the rheumatis
668. ndependent. I Now too old to do anything useful. have to depend on others for ma
669. me, and I hope soon to join in praising Him in Heaven, if he thinks me worthy,
670. if he thinks me worthy, after purifying my soul in Purgatory." "Grandfather, I
671. ant afternoon together, THE LAST MEETING OF THE T. & B. B. E.'S. I. "w ' ' IIO g
672. and John McDermott. Harry was holdIn ing up one side of his father's cellar-door
673. ar-door. the cellar an important meeting was about to take place. Against a barr
674. and B. B. John McDermott entered. bring'st thou to the banquet?" dethe captain,
675. to the banquet?" dethe captain, chewing the core of his apple, which had just b
676. od of the " red-skin he cried, wrinkling his nose savage " Ha Ha " ferociously.
677. was Pat Brady, a fat boy with twinkling eyes. "Hast thou brought the bloody lim
678. was no red-skin on Broadway this morning, or I should have torn him limb from li
679. & B. B. E." cried the captain, smearing more brick-dust on his hands, and light
680. re brick-dust on his hands, and lighting a " smoker." " Ma said we cried Harry J
681. T. and B. B. E.'s trembled, while going to do?" demanded Pat Brady. " Hunt mosq
682. ptain. " What do you mean?" I up reading dime novels and talking nonsense about
683. n?" I up reading dime novels and talking nonsense about Indian fighting, when yo
684. d talking nonsense about Indian fighting, when you're afraid of a crab and a mea
685. t one side of the fire with her knitting, Aunt Frances at the other, making a ca
686. tting, Aunt Frances at the other, making a cap for Baby. children, Lousia and El
687. along. But somehow or other, the coming of the snow seemed to make everybody ou
688. ful. Jack and Willie left their building blocks and went to the window. After aw
689. antly. brooms and shovels, began to ring bells and 161 162 STORIES AND SKETCHES.
690. hat it would look queer to see me making snow-balls." "May we go?" "Do let us go
691. Grandmother at last consented, mak- ing all kinds of stipulations. A DAY AT EID
692. ard-sleigh passed, crowded with laughing children. to A " " Oh, how cried Aunt h
693. ! ' ' " ! ' ' sleigh Gracefully turning the corner, like a swan floating on a l
694. turning the corner, like a swan floating on a lake, came a beautifully curved !
695. er " sleigh, big and comfortable-looking. The man who drove was heavily muffled
696. ind that, will you? We'll have something to eat at the hotel, so you needn't wai
697. assed the little cried the boys cleaning !" church, whose golden cross gleamed b
698. the blue sky. Redmond was just entering his house, and he waved his hand to the
699. em. They all " cried out, " Good morning, Father in return. Father ! They crosse
700. g through the Park as quickly as driving-rules would let them, and they in the o
701. try. They met a man on a bicycle, making tracks through young the were soon the
702. the young man had a hard time ploughing nlo ig. Jack said that winter bicycles
703. ngled lightly ; and Walter, gold finding the country was very quiet, and there w
704. here was nobody to listen, began to sing : " The robin in his leafy tent Sings a
705. ar, hear, hear, Hear the horses neighing, See, see, see, see, See the children p
706. see, see, see, See the children playing, We, we, we, we, We all go a-sleighing,
707. g, We, we, we, we, We all go a-sleighing, Jing, jing, jing, jing!" The will ; ch
708. we, we, we, We all go a-sleighing, Jing, jing, jing, jing!" The will ; children
709. e, we, We all go a-sleighing, Jing, jing, jing, jing!" The will ; children joine
710. We all go a-sleighing, Jing, jing, jing, jing!" The will ; children joined in t
711. l go a-sleighing, Jing, jing, jing, jing!" The will ; children joined in this ch
712. ren joined in this chorus with a singing when Walter the horses at Ridge wood Ho
713. l. stopped It was a long wooden building, with a porch they were still running a
714. ng, with a porch they were still running around of a hill. it. It was perched on
715. they were out again in the snow, rolling up a big snow-ball. The whole four push
716. e big snowball rolled over her, knocking down Ellen and Willie. It did not stop
717. er like it, stood on the porch, laughing. "How do you now?" said Jack, as the ot
718. id Ellen. The dinner was good everything was "just " and the drive home was the
719. heir principal amusement was in avoiding the policemen who objected to their jum
720. policemen who objected to their jumping off anchor-chains and barges at the ris
721. hts the sight women and children sitting on 168 of many poor the door-steps GRAC
722. s GRACE COURT. and pavements and gasping for wretched. air 169 was very Nearly a
723. en and at children in Grace cigar-making. The men found employment along the wha
724. at night. The Sisters were come. willing to undertake this new work, but Father
725. . Beresford would all not After teaching not to think of renewing their labors i
726. After teaching not to think of renewing their labors in the In this emergency,
727. this emergency, Father Beresford evening. day in a close room, they ought could
728. and mothers. One afternoon in the spring he entered the It school-room. was late
729. s late in March, and one of those spring showers that are the heralds of GRACE C
730. of GRACE COURT. 171 April was beginning to pelt the sidewalks. There was only o
731. enly that I took the liberty of knocking "Pardon me," he at this door." Afraid o
732. me," he at this door." Afraid of getting wet ? "No, Father," answered the boy, w
733. ht object at all. ; " " Not home, having found out Go home with her and if why s
734. the d'rty flight of stone steps leading to Grace Court. Once within the narrow
735. y was prevented by Robert from stumbling several times. GRACE COVET. 175 Loud ta
736. ral times. GRACE COVET. 175 Loud talking could be heard on almost all the landin
737. ndings, and the angry voices of scolding mothers were very loud. At last, when M
738. ped before a door on the highest landing. She turned the knob nervously. The roo
739. om was full of smoke. A woman was frying meat in a pan over the fire. She turned
740. s plain that the woman had been drinking too much liquor from the black bottle t
741. ou go. me, see what you mean by bringing these strangers the priest hadn't I sho
742. d as they left Grace Court. do something but I'm afraid we can't. Poor little gi
743. rk to get tea in the cosy little sitting-room of their big house, which had been
744. an office uptown, where he was studying law. "We have too much room here, mothe
745. his mother's poached eggs, and, looking at the bright lamp, the pretty red curt
746. ! sees to hopeless it is to get working children school on week-days, and that
747. . Half the children are made sick making. I want to teach by the unhealthy work
748. he unhealthy work of cigarthem something else Will you " let to do, as well as t
749. way that will help them to earn a living, you my way. Cigar-making injures the h
750. earn a living, you my way. Cigar-making injures the health of the children, par
751. l, would take the control for decorating them. 180 STORIES AND SKETCHES. father
752. stood in Mrs. Wisby's barn-like drawing-room. The carpet had been taken up long
753. little and arithmetic, while the reading, writing, children busily pasted pictur
754. d arithmetic, while the reading, writing, children busily pasted pictures on the
755. secured a large contract for decorating Christmas boxes. Mrs. Wisby'a evening c
756. ng Christmas boxes. Mrs. Wisby'a evening classes were successes. Mary Thorn show
757. school helped everyIt was the beginning of a great change Grace Court. WHAT THE
758. ey were much alike in appearance, having light-colored hair, and sweet voices. C
759. t was now April. 182 WHAT THEY FOUND ing, they IN THE COUNTRY. 183 went into the
760. arcely dared play for fear of disturbing her. One day the doctor said to Mrs. De
761. ave. n. Kose sat at the piano practising and counting " one and two and three."
762. sat at the piano practising and counting " one and two and three." Cecilia was c
763. e and two and three." Cecilia was crying softly to herself over a seam which wou
764. retend that it is a new piece." " Making believe had great charms for the childr
765. he Maiden's Prayer.' " " But I am making believe.' Besides a is a maiden, and a
766. Dear, dear Cecilia!" cried Rose, putting her arms around her sister, "You always
767. says " Ah, yes," said Cecilia, refusing to be com" but forted, you have one too
768. "Don't!" again. said Cecilia, beginning to cry "Why, Cecilia!" silly?" asked '
769. ?" asked ' "Don't!" "What are you crying call for, Eose, indignantly. "I knew yo
770. Cecilia was in a mournful mood. Nothing pleased her. She objected It to Anna's
771. her. She objected It to Anna's murmuring of her catechism little lesson. left so
772. esson. left so These three girls, having been much their themselves, had come to
773. tions as more to important than anything else in the world. They were growing mo
774. ing else in the world. They were growing more selfish every day. They loved thei
775. but their mother never exacted anything from them. They had no interest outside
776. at what they chose ; ; ; ; without being bothered by anybody. Cecilia compared t
777. lla. And as she long career of suffering. went through But had a happy ending to
778. ing. went through But had a happy ending to her story. She always liked to die a
779. e ; she concluded her story by imagining herself as dead, killed by her cruel st
780. rave in an omnibus surrounded by weeping friends. the situation, on this day in
781. runk on to the door. it, drew up smiling face appeared at the door of the cab. T
782. ee her. Cecilia could not help wondering whether Aunt Susan had brought her anyt
783. ther Aunt Susan had brought her anything, and saying to herself that it would no
784. san had brought her anything, and saying to herself that it would not be so pret
785. s. Anna was divided between at something having happened and pleasure the hope t
786. was divided between at something having happened and pleasure the hope that Aun
787. a's tearful moods and her habit of using words she had caught up without knowing
788. words she had caught up without knowing their meaning. She meant " desolate" an
789. caught up without knowing their meaning. She meant " desolate" and "ostracized.
790. entered the room at ment, like a spring breeze. this mo- "Your mother "Now you
791. Now you shall better," she said, smiling. open the satchel, and guess is the new
792. e eight Beatitudes," said again, curling herself on the sofa next to Susan. "I k
793. laughed. "Right through without stopping?" Anna repeated them without a blunder.
794. d ceremoniously. was an ordinary-looking alligator-skin bag, but it seemed to ho
795. Oh, what's the matter, Cecilia?" nothing, is it, Aunt Susan." "What dear?" all."
796. Aunt Susan." "What dear?" all." "Nothing at "Tell me," said Aunt Susan, coaxingl
797. the "sulks "in other people. Not knowing what 192 STORIES AND SKETCHES. She look
798. , to say, she was silent. half expecting her to give up her piece of music to Ce
799. said Anna. "/ wouldn't give her anything of mine." "No," said Rose, devouring he
800. ing of mine." "No," said Rose, devouring her caramels Cecilia " without offering
801. her caramels Cecilia " without offering them to the others. "I wouldn't cither.
802. em so much to themselves, and not having seen them for a year, she knew she was
803. ight give us Cecilia's She is not eating it." candy, Aunt Susan. WHAT THEY FOUND
804. little cows!" exclaimed Rose. And swing Cecilia. "Oh, ' ' in the apple orchard
805. s. together in a grassy nook, stretching out their boughs to a group of younger
806. of younger trees wreathed with climbing vines. Thus a glimpse of the blue water
807. e on the soft grass, which in the spring was fringed with early, scentless viole
808. ies It weather fair. shall every evening, if tho be the children's WHAT THEY FOU
809. e angels she thought a they ought During her stay in the house with them period
810. y in the house with them period reaching through the month of April she to be. b
811. d that they had been "spoiled" by having been kept too much in their own little
812. ad wanted, and they could not everything they understand the possibility of anyb
813. stand the possibility of anybody needing They were rapidly becoming selfanything
814. ybody needing They were rapidly becoming selfanything. ish ; and the over-indulg
815. They were rapidly becoming selfanything. ish ; and the over-indulgence of their
816. heir unconscious very unequal to dealing it to Mrs. Desmond, the latter only smi
817. hen she spoke of the world. said nothing to Mrs. Desmond She spoke frequently of
818. oon saw, however, that they were willing to accept her services as a matter of c
819. orchard. fume of the blossoms, drifting in the fresh breeze under the clear blu
820. tree, and out from the barn came running Aunt Susan's pet lamb. Rose was wild wi
821. than me," " I am said Cecilia, bursting into tears. only an outcast. I believe
822. an outcast. I believe I am a changeling, and that mamma only adopted me." Aunt
823. ted me." Aunt Susan laughed. a foundling, Cecilia " Perhaps you Don't ii!e:iu de
824. in was almost due. Aunt Su- san, leaving the trunks at the station in charge of
825. not ac- customed The old ' ' to offering courtesies to strangers. " a little gir
826. a pretty smile. ' ' ! " Oh, how cunning " cried Cecilia. " Do me hold her." fas
827. st to the little fat But Rose held thing, wrapped in a heavy blue mother gave he
828. course, I'm nobody!" " Why, we're moving ! ! After a short And The past them Cec
829. s and fences faster seemed to be running with and faster. and Anna looked to at
830. neighbor's talk. ductor, used to seeing children travel How Aunt The confrom on
831. er, took up their tickets without giving them especial attention. 200 STORIES AN
832. was a large town. The delight of minding the baby had occupied the children up t
833. her little teeth, and was very charming to the children. The station, a frame b
834. I I mean the hungry, the crackers having They huddled close disappeared long ago
835. oed Cecilia. baby!" said Rose, shivering. "I will put my silk handkerchief aroun
836. n all directions. policemen were walking slowly along the road in search of some
837. ly along the road in search of something. Suddenly the light flashed under Rose'
838. , Joe !" cried the policeman, " laughing. at Idlewild, The little vagabonds ! Au
839. nt Susan sat under the and Anna climbing about her, Cecilia said 204 STORIES AND
840. ink so too," cried Rose, who was feeding her lamb some distance away from them.
841. am little glad," said Aunt Susan, making a prayer of thanksgiving. BIANCA. MALAT
842. t Susan, making a prayer of thanksgiving. BIANCA. MALATESTA She was BIANCA she c
843. ey spend large sums of money in building clumsj'' warvessels, while the poor hav
844. ed. down. The poor Sunny Italy is losing its sunshine, for joy has left the hear
845. the poor. One day, in the orange-picking season, when everybody was busy, Giovan
846. fever. Father Caracci, who was something of a doctor, shook his head when he cam
847. lone ; in the world. She but the willing hearts and strong hands that would have
848. ed her struggled on bravely were wasting away in the barracks, and poor Bianca h
849. in her great sorrow. Her home was being The dear little house in which irone jj
850. ittle house in which irone jjone ! ! ing a moment. 208 STORIES AND SKETCHES. her
851. saw the old house and the trees swimming before. Whither could she go? place ope
852. tears fast chapel of her Mother. falling from her eyes, she rushed to the little
853. er knees, she saw Father Caracci waiting for her at the church. door of the "Poo
854. . But poor Beppo is God made them, going to I cannot send him alone in the ship.
855. l her grief gone, and her cheeks flaming. "None of our family ever served in the
856. ood man. Perhaps he could find something for Bianca to do in the new country. a
857. them his and he said to Bianca blessing, "You will have to learn to be a servan
858. kept watch over the two children during the rough passage. On landing in New Yo
859. ren during the rough passage. On landing in New York, Bianca and Beppo were take
860. always busy she would knit from morning to night, but she wanted to do only wha
861. oor Bianca became very homesick. Nothing but bricks and mortar, dingy crowds of
862. this world. Remember that the best thing you can do in your state of life is to
863. o have her own way. She would do nothing, except what she liked to do. She helpe
864. ot need help. "You must earn your living," said the aunt, good" There is natured
865. You " Ees like-a school-a?" One evening, just as the steaming dish of macaroni
866. ol-a?" One evening, just as the steaming dish of macaroni was placed on the tabl
867. orked," Beppo's uncle yes, said, looking his wife affectionately ; and storm, in
868. cold ' " worked cried Bianca, recalling certain battles at the fruit-stand. " W
869. can forget all, except the joy of going home." Bianca was radiant. " Oh, how I
870. rento again. " My army ! " Are you going?" asked Beppo's uncle. Biauca was silen
871. ot been at" why do you weep when tending to the talk, we are all going back to b
872. en tending to the talk, we are all going back to beautiful Italy ? " "Why," said
873. May day steamer sailed the bay, carrying Beppo and his uncle and aunt. Bianca st
874. aunt. Bianca stood on the dock, weeping bitterly. for She was alone now she mus
875. of her spare time in the church, praying for meekness. She neglected nothing tha
876. ying for meekness. She neglected nothing that was given her to do. Her care was
877. ard which patient incontent. One morning she bought dustry always gains. a ticke
878. take her home and to leave her something over, for in Italy money is scarce, and
879. t ! For two weeks you have been counting the days to come, as the writer used to
880. e pass into the pected them more glowing hours of July, and the schools the last
881. last of children are set free ! watching a waving bough through the school-house
882. hildren are set free ! watching a waving bough through the school-house window a
883. ough the school-house window and wishing you were the bird No more upon it. No m
884. the bird No more upon it. No more hoping that the would go faster and bring near
885. oping that the would go faster and bring nearer the clock hour of "letting out."
886. bring nearer the clock hour of "letting out." No more lagging steps to school !
887. k hour of "letting out." No more lagging steps to school ! course you enjoy your
888. berries hide in the bushes, just peeping out to see that you are coming, the 221
889. t peeping out to see that you are coming, the 221 222 streams are cries STORIES
890. RIES AND SKETCHES. warmed ! for swimming, all nature welcome if But, in spite of
891. ood work. Protestants are fond of saying that Spain has lost her force and great
892. day say " tomorrow" too much. Everything is "manana." "To-morrow to-morrow." Don
893. asure in long rambles, besides expanding your lungs. I think to the Catholic Chu
894. d. You will find many reasons for loving 224 STORIES AND SKETCHES. Him you which
895. ut two boys, one of whom sees everything, the other He had not ; sees nothing. "
896. ing, the other He had not ; sees nothing. "Now," thought Ned, "why should use I
897. , gave him some books, one of them being a book on geology. It was a simple text
898. longed to give him some means of making a livelihood in the future. This troubl
899. on. yours," said Squire Warner, slapping Mr. Acton on the back. "I want you to u
900. nough to do a great deal of in educating that five ; ; good work, and, after a t
901. hildren. How had he done this ? By using his eyes. A TALK IN THE FALL. ATOVEMBER
902. olic, writes these words in the "Passing of Arthur." ! 227 228 STORIES AND SKETC
903. blind life within the brain, If, knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer Both
904. this world dreams This is worth reading. Lord Tennyson found the old story of K
905. ord Tennyson found the old story of King Arthur and the a Catholic story, Knight
906. poets the world has had since the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ have as gotten
907. ght to make yourself as perfect anything of to as you can, that you may be worth
908. oulder tells me that I have been talking over the heads of you children, and tha
909. d him that a trade would be a good thing There are too many clerks, too many to
910. g men with white hands, expert at making A TALK IN THE FALL. and adding up pente
911. at making A TALK IN THE FALL. and adding up penters. figures, 231 and too few go
912. ," in the wall, "I want I said, pointing to a recess a bookcase there; but, alth
913. y?" ' ' I think if I asked Jack, looking at the plan. were a carpenter / could m
914. work, and had kept your eyes open during your apprenticeship, you might. But all
915. hem, unless you resolve to do everything well not a 'first-class' ; 232 STORIES
916. AND SKETCHES. to slur the smallest thing. as hard as it can be driven. To drive
917. ut, ; honest, patient carpenter, putting brains into your work, than a clerk wit
918. And the Little Elephant? And the Living Skeleton. Yes, And a Lion? Yes. And the
919. ts, or nurses, got out. band was playing a march in lively it sounded as if the
920. suit, painted on a green ground, playing with two hideous serpents there was a l
921. hat the impertinent man was " exhibiting you as a curiosity, Joe ? " " And why d
922. verybody who paid a There was the Living Skeleton, with There velvet breeches on
923. the Circassian Girl, her hair stretching 236 STORIES AND SKETCHES. from her head
924. , much smaller than Joe himself, wearing a gold watch and a diamond ring. There
925. wearing a gold watch and a diamond ring. There was a lean Lion in a cage, and a
926. ean Lion in a cage, and a hungry looking Monkey in another. Lucy's Joe began to
927. and Aunt Lucy had a hard time answering them. At last it was time to go. The br
928. s time to go. The brass band was playing " Home, Sweet Home." " Oh, dear " said
929. a good time. They just stand do nothing, and eat peanuts. Why, still and the Fa
930. , still and the Fat Woman and the Living Skeleton were eating peanuts, " Aunt Lu
931. oman and the Living Skeleton were eating peanuts, " Aunt Lucy. Oh, it must be lo
932. Y. 237 When he was asked go for anything for his father or mother, he " Wait a m
933. it a minute." He was said, always saying for, as I said, he was a very His healt
934. , as he was exget up to go every morning with his father, pected this laziness g
935. always when he was asked to do anything requir: ing exertion ' ' I wish I were
936. he was asked to do anything requir: ing exertion ' ' I wish I were a curiosity
937. lazy all winter, he must ; in the spring. So Aunt Lucy She travelled with Grandm
938. ve a poor sailor some money for carrying our trunks up-stairs he told her he had
939. uriosity. Curiosities get paid for doing nothing. They eat peanuts every day I s
940. . Curiosities get paid for doing nothing. They eat peanuts every day I saw 'em a
941. me. Oh, dear, when I grow up, I am going to be a curiosity." "You severely; will
942. hair ; in another, a small girl hav; ing her hair combed in another, a woman set
943. hair combed in another, a woman setting a table for dinner ; and in still anoth
944. ; and in still another, two boys making a kite. Grandmother was glad to see Joe
945. ow up. be, a carpenter, a " "Oh, nothing," answered Joe, cheerfully; HE WANTED T
946. EIOSITY. 241 don't intend to do anything, I'm going to be a curiosity." Grandmot
947. 1 don't intend to do anything, I'm going to be a curiosity." Grandmother was ast
948. e museum. it's When I grow up, I'm going to be either a Tattooed ; Boy to or a F
949. " * ' because good fun be paid for doing nothing but just eating pea- Dear ! dea
950. cause good fun be paid for doing nothing but just eating pea- Dear ! dear " said
951. e paid for doing nothing but just eating pea- Dear ! dear " said ! Grandmother ;
952. ot," answered little. Aunt Lucy, smiling a "I tell you, Aunt Lucy, as we've alwa
953. n engagement when I grow up, as a Living With your hair fluffed out, you'd Curio
954. lved ; the sled which ran like lightning ; on a wooden track ; the gay and, abov
955. e to see men, women, and children riding around to the loud music of an organ, o
956. m sure it's my Fat Woman, and the Living Skeleton must be the one I saw Pleasant
957. tated a minute, and then, fathers seeing that other boys were going in with thei
958. athers seeing that other boys were going in with their and mothers, smiled and s
959. TCHES. This was Joe's conclusion, having seen the views. The Curiosity of Curios
960. into the the Learned Pig. It was getting dark. about to close for an hour, that
961. hat the Curiosities might have something to eat. The Learned Pig was kept in a p
962. from view, except when he was performing on the stage. Joe, in admiration of the
963. escended to take her place at The Living Skeleton sat on her right hand, and han
964. al. There was some trouble about carving the cold beef. The manager, a bald man,
965. hiskers, wanted to do it, but the Living Skeleton would He said the manager had
966. er had a not permit it. habit of cutting the slices of meat too thin, and he wou
967. s amazed at the greediness of the Living Skeleton. He had never seen anybody eat
968. re money. Curiosity. I am tired of being a Living Are you : at once "Yes, no fun
969. Curiosity. I am tired of being a Living Are you : at once "Yes, no fun to be ti
970. fun to be tied up the way we are, making people believe there is only one boy I'
971. om a ! the happiest of beings Joe Living Curiosity waited for the manager to reb
972. ager to rebuke him or them ; but nothing was said. "Oh, herself dear," said the
973. f dear," said the Fat Woman, all fanning quite I with her handkerchief; I "Tin h
974. le. to an end. CURIOSITY. 247 This thing must come said Joe, taking off "Excuse
975. 47 This thing must come said Joe, taking off "Excuse me, ma'am," his hat, and st
976. Excuse me, ma'am," his hat, and stepping forward, "but I must say Where do you e
977. l day, and eat peanuts. I saw you eating peanuts in Pleasant City, and you ; are
978. s in Pleasant City, and you ; are eating peanuts here. You ought I to be thankfu
979. ht?" asked the Fat Woman, "Know, turning her eyes on Joe. rash youth, that I was
980. TORIES AND SKETCHES. left denly becoming aware that he had been by his guardians
981. aid the good-natured Fat Woman, changing her tone. " Here, you Two-headed Idiots
982. ne. " Here, you Two-headed Idiots, bring a chair for the child near me. I guess
983. le Columbine," she continued, addressing the Cirafter him. cassian Girl. "Sure t
984. joined the museum. year, though, wearing a wig, and being " stared at Joe soon f
985. . year, though, wearing a wig, and being " stared at Joe soon felt quite at home
986. WANTED TO BE A CURIOSITY. 249 "I wiping do. do," It's his Feejee Boy, solemnly,
987. inson fellow, as my name "It's a loafing, idle, useless life," said the Fat Woma
988. ll!" voice outside. "Good-night! running out. he said, "Oh, Joe a fright you gav
989. he sky. of delight. Then he said, taking Grandmother's hand on one side, and Aun
990. D SKETCHES. "I don't want to be a Living Curiosity. I'm going in for honest work
991. want to be a Living Curiosity. I'm going in for honest work. Grandmother, you or
992. s from a brother of Frau Julia's, living in America. It said : " DEAR JOSEF AND
993. e you will send her If who may be coming ing, over here. with anybody nobody is
994. u will send her If who may be coming ing, over here. with anybody nobody is com-
995. h money in the box to pay for everything." A MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE. 253 Fran
996. t from Gretchen, who was quietly playing with Lilia in a corner. Josef shook his
997. here among peasants, who can do nothing but cut toys out of wood." Frau Julia f
998. o," said Josef, " our boys will, smiling, I hope, go with us over across the sea
999. Gretchen go, unless I was sure of seeing her again." It was agreed that Josef sh
1000.her pillow wet with tears in the morning and for a whole week the twin babies we
1001.bies were in constant danger of catching cold, so often did Gretchen weep over t
1002. plaited for the tenth time that morning, seemed to smile out of her china blue
1003.er n. Josef had no difficulty in getting the purser of the steamer to promise to
1004.ho, with six children, woman, were going to America. She promised, also, Gretche
1005.ile they were Gretchen was asked to sing, and she singing. a little Alsatian son
1006.tchen was asked to sing, and she singing. a little Alsatian song began : " Petit
1007.or did She smiled all the time, anything naughty. 256 STORIES AND SKETCHES. said
1008.a pencil, she smiled on Gretchen, having rescued her, felt that such meekness un
1009.r in Milwaukee had been received, asking the people at the Garden to watch for a
1010.tand a the kind matron had done speaking, she did Now, she did not under- know n
1011.of English, so she could only was saying something from the kind look in her fac
1012., so she could only was saying something from the kind look in her face. The tha
1013.e?" cried "Have matron. German, wringing her hands. you lost your sister?" asked
1014.d thee, thou dearest Lilia " "Poor thing!" find said the matron. I didn't " "We'
1015. to be comforted. She ran about, looking in all the holes and corners. Where was
1016.'s no use feet," said the matron looking "You on the floor for her. What a queer
1017. "the whole place is in a bustle looking for her. She can tell her name, you kno
1018.egram came from her step-brother, saying ? he would reach New York the following
1019. ? he would reach New York the following day. How could Gretchen go away without
1020.es. There was a group of anxious-looking people around it in the box, ! her. "It
1021.g, wicked city. cried the matron, wiping her eyes. orphan Suddenly Gretchen burs
1022. sister!" cried the Irish "The deceiving little creature." ' ' girl. A DOLL " !
1023.f the delights of vacation times dancing beyour eyes. It used to be hard in my t
1024.History of Jack Halyard" was our reading-book; there were one or two wood-cuts i
1025.lyard or Halifax, but one of the leading incidents turned on the amazement of tw
1026.tan descended, and he wept. Wood-carving was not encouraged in those days Dear,
1027.far as ! ! I should be constantly asking "Where are the friends of youth?" and l
1028.e are the friends of youth?" and looking for "J. McGinniss, 1848," and for "Eplu
1029.ever to ' ' ! We threw a piece of string away, or to cut a cord AT SCHOOL AGAIN.
1030. do not You may make spoil it by wishing to be old. up your mind to this you wil
1031. time will come when you will The coming days may bring you the fine things you
1032. when you will The coming days may bring you the fine things you dream of, but i
1033.make the beloved faces younger, or bring them back to you after they have gone.
1034.y have gone. There is an important thing you often forget yes, you, John, Patric
1035., George, or whoever may be that reading this. The important thing is, All this
1036.e that reading this. The important thing is, All this are getting ready for life
1037.important thing is, All this are getting ready for life. going to school is only
1038.l this are getting ready for life. going to school is only a making ready. First
1039.r life. going to school is only a making ready. First you 264 STORIES AND SKETCH
1040. time whenever your parents have nothing for you to do. Don't play when you don'
1041.to help mother when What more disgusting than to see a boy standing with his han
1042.re disgusting than to see a boy standing with his hands in his pockets whistling
1043. with his hands in his pockets whistling, while his mother almost faints under a
1044.rket-basket? or strains herself carrying a bucket of water from the pump ? Boys
1045.ember ready to earn your own are getting living, and that readand arithmetic wil
1046.eady to earn your own are getting living, and that readand arithmetic will help
1047.adand arithmetic will help you to do ing, writing, that. And, while you are lear
1048.thmetic will help you to do ing, writing, that. And, while you are learning geog
1049.iting, that. And, while you are learning geography, that you AT SCHOOL AGAIN. 26
1050.wered an advertisement. His hand-writing He seemed "bright," suited the advertis
1051. A few refugees had settled there during the war. They were very had come up fro
1052.unday Father on the necessity of reading Mooney preached month to say Mass. Cath
1053.olic boys in other things are concerning their bright Everybody reads the story-
1054.e meetings but he saw no way of breaking them up, for the boys had ; nothing to
1055.king them up, for the boys had ; nothing to do at home. to He would have liked o
1056.ld have liked open a library and reading-room, but the missions he served were p
1057.and spent what money they had in smoking and drinking. They were idle and listle
1058.t money they had in smoking and drinking. They were idle and listless, with no i
1059.e and listless, with no idea of anything beyond the dime novels and foolish stor
1060.a crowd of dark-skinned beggars, Basking in the pleasant sun, One an old man he
1061.ward light Told his black beads, praying softly For all poor souls still in nigh
1062. will kneel and Christ adore ! " Passing was the Lady Inez When the dark group m
1063.eaned from out her litter ' They Smiling on them tenderly. are poor; they are Go
1064.. 271 Sneered, and laughed, and laughing, wondered All the other ladies gay ; An
1065. the city." ! not," said Seth, thrusting out his wrist about half a foot beyond
1066. me that is, dad's got them. for helping him with the hay." Tim's countenance fe
1067.ut. Cousin Grace sent me a very exciting book, But it was a or The Escaped Nun.'
1068.ook, and mother tore it up. I've nothing to read except the old school-books, an
1069.can't read, and I don't want to. Reading makes you bow-legged." Seth punched Dan
1070.must be a lovely story, if it's anything like what Father ' Mooney too. told us
1071.stinate home Dan after lightly, dragging the her. She was to read those lovely b
1072.s. She was very happy. Her mother, being told that Father Mooney had recommended
1073.spent to better advantage than in buying "fables." Seth's father, having not yet
1074.n buying "fables." Seth's father, having not yet spent all his he was a carpente
1075.what I wanted to find," he said, turning to page nine and reading Pancratius' st
1076.e said, turning to page nine and reading Pancratius' story of his quarrel with C
1077. from you you don't!" said Seth, closing the " You can't read that book unless y
1078.nd every fellow that comes in must bring in a good book." let "All right! Just D
1079. and or, I'll Old Sleuth "Xo, no!" bring over The Red-headed Detective ; " It's
1080.e other books were left in Tim's keeping. For the first time in many years, Seth
1081.ith her, instead of in the dark. roaming about Poverty Hollow On the the next to
1082. so interested that he stayed up reading it until two o'clock. "Mary," he said t
1083.Surely, what the Christians were willing to die for, is early worth living for."
1084.illing to die for, is early worth living for." "Thank God !" said Mrs. Blake. Ti
1085.ARY FACILITY 305 De Neve Drive - Parking Lot 17 Box 951388 it LOS ANGELES, CALIF

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/