Concordance for From Killarney to New York, or, How Thade became a banker / by Sister Mary Francis Clare.

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. OND. Chapter Chapter I. Where am I Going ? Blood-Guiltiness 58 64 72 77 II. III.
3. ducate him the moment my The you " tling —the speaker paused. — The grey sha
4. as a fine scorn on the face of the dying man a scorn which even an angelic being
5. man a scorn which even an angelic being might have expressed if tempted by Luci
6. The little flame of life was flickering in the frail socket of humanity, but it
7. replied honest Tim: " you know am dying and you want me to face God Almighty wi
8. face God Almighty with a lie thundering these mountains wouldn't cover, " and h
9. ns wouldn't cover, " and his trem- bling finger pointed to the glowing rocks, la
10. rem- bling finger pointed to the glowing rocks, last rays of the setting sun. no
11. glowing rocks, last rays of the setting sun. now purpled with the old Ireland a
12. ou. the Virgin will Mary you're trusting Why, my good man, you be so foolish ? I
13. oments how foolish you are to be putting your trust in a mere woman. Why, how do
14. ? " How do I know !" exclaimed the dying man, and ' for a moment a shade of the
15. ?" Mr. Blanders was well used to meeting his match fn arguments with the Irish p
16. red gold and flung from him, not knowing He had, indeed, at times, a hazy idea t
17. very well, but that there was something t 1 — OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER.
18. and which he called obstinacy. One thing, however, was certain he was bound to g
19. with the diabolical cruelty of standing beside him with bread and gold while he
20. m with bread and gold while he was dying inch by inch of starvation. The heathen
21. crime. It remained for the Bible-loving zealots of the nineteenth century to in
22. tant mountains. The cold grey of evening ; was fast settling into the still gloo
23. cold grey of evening ; was fast settling into the still gloom of still night, a
24. ttle silver streak of little light being visible in the far depths of heaven, an
25. epths of heaven, and one clear twinkling star, and the tempting fiend was there.
26. e clear twinkling star, and the tempting fiend was there. angels came and went w
27. eath hovered very close to the departing athlete. He waited till the victory was
28. e hour-glass of time. Moments were being weighed against eternity. Seconds were
29. hed against eternity. Seconds were being counted against centuries. every passin
30. counted against centuries. every passing But there was no sign of weakness of so
31. the angels rejoiced; with every passing their hate moment the demons scowled an
32. a from his English employers, informing him of their extreme disgust at the 1 ,
33. nt efforts to secure converts. Reasoning from their own point of view these good
34. hy those " ignorant when they were dying of starvation, they should prefer death
35. n, they should prefer death to violating their consciences. But, notwithstanding
36. their consciences. But, notwithstanding their wonder, the fact remained the sam
37. and very emphatic language that morning. Mrs. Blanders had advised the partner
38. roof-tree until he had " done something," and Mr. Blanders, model husband that
39. sband that he was, had a habit of taking his wife's advice. The letter which had
40. t there was to be a great public meeting in one month from that day, in Exeter H
41. ondon, and that some thoroughly striking death-bed conversions from the errors o
42. ery were wanted, and must be forthcoming. It was hard, it should be so difficult
43. f an Irish conscience was the only thing which could not be purchased with indee
44. ety, whose income depended on "something being done," and if a child was snatche
45. hose income depended on "something being done," and if a child was snatched as "
46. as snatched as "a brand from the burning," no very particular inquiries would be
47. ssion," people. as his miserable calling long to have any doubt about the sincer
48. his favorite calumny. ; around him dying of starvation and if the priest could g
49. n and if the priest could give lingering agony, when they could so easily have o
50. btained relief? Tim O'Halloran was dying of famine-fever. prosperous not actuall
51. ine-fever. prosperous not actually dying of starvation —he was He rented a lar
52. s well worked; there were rich, ripening fields of grain, fair meadows, where th
53. ds of untouched, withered stalks rotting in the winter frost. The kine had long
54. rs still and friends A strong were dying for need of them. man takes long to die
55. uld see. Tim O'Halloran turned his dying gaze on the wretched intruder. Even in
56. him quite. sir," " I fear you're losing time, he murmured, faintly; " the pries
57. he words of hope, the heart of the dying His little Thade, his boy, sore with ap
58. , his fair-haired lad, with the laughing eye of the mother that was gone, and th
59. never saw the anniversary of her wedding-day. His little Thade. The boy lay slee
60. . His little Thade. The boy lay sleeping heavily, wearily, on Poor little lad th
61. same straw on which his father lay dying. he had been nurse and comforter to his
62. father for weeks now, faithful, untiring, with a rare thought and care beyond hi
63. oung by the wayside. Granny was sleeping, too, in an inner room. In the early ho
64. hly comfort. Mr. Blanders started coming. for a moment when he heard the priest
65. any definite plan of action for securing his prey, but he had great faith in ; c
66. ut he had great faith in ; ciety waiting. m fa WHM—M 14 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW
67. t-agony had furrowed the most beseeching pathos had bent the noble form, open br
68. orm, open brow, and had added a touching, an alto the dignity. children dying of
69. ing, an alto the dignity. children dying of hunger, How could he see his and not
70. Virgin, and the whole church was crying out, with her, for the coming DelivHe h
71. was crying out, with her, for the coming DelivHe had said mass that morning with
72. oming DelivHe had said mass that morning with trembling hands erer. and breaking
73. ad said mass that morning with trembling hands erer. and breaking heart. With wh
74. with trembling hands erer. and breaking heart. With what tears, with what praye
75. the dead Bands of men had been parading the streets of the neighboring town the
76. parading the streets of the neighboring town the day previous, demanding food a
77. hboring town the day previous, demanding food and threatening vioWho could blame
78. previous, demanding food and threatening vioWho could blame them ? Yet such open
79. st past power of complaint. Heartrending scenes had come before him. He had foun
80. be in her arms and a dead child clinging to her skirts. She was just so far on h
81. ort and plenty once had found the living and the dead lying together on the same
82. had found the living and the dead lying together on the same bed of straw and c
83. ther James had administered that morning, as of the Church we have said, to Tim
84. its nigh passed. rich All the suffering here was soon to meet with reward on th
85. gh more than one of them, with unfailing Irish charity, had offered to take care
86. O NEW YORK; orphans. He could do nothing; at best ha could but try to see him sa
87. c houses, where the poor found by loving and tender hands have to thank the lice
88. t of clay. for a O'Halloran that evening again, fearing, indeed, that in the mor
89. a O'Halloran that evening again, fearing, indeed, that in the morning he might f
90. in, fearing, indeed, that in the morning he might find only the frail He paused
91. human or divine, do you dare to my dying parishioner?" Mr. Blanders hesitated fo
92. hesitated for a moment, and then, being a bully, as cowards generally are, he r
93. l right. By divine right, for this dying man is answerable to God, and not to yo
94. himself into your presence in your dying moments against your will? Is there one
95. the priest and remained beside the dying man, " preaching the gospel " to him to
96. mained beside the dying man, " preaching the gospel " to him to his last breath.
97. he word was breathed so low by the dying man, needed, indeed, the ear of a fathe
98. h the sound. that it was well used dying beds when the priest to patient listeni
99. eds when the priest to patient listening, to tender lingering failing But the by
100. o patient listening, to tender lingering failing But the by breath gives forth s
101. t listening, to tender lingering failing But the by breath gives forth such soun
102. like his can be best understood ! dying man, and bent over him with a more than
103. their agents on those who were unwilling to receive them. It was no matter what
104. ! people, who were no forever accusing Catholics of subterfuge and falsehood,
105. after and bribery.* more gave the dying penitent the last he had called Granny
106. of death. Granny watched by him, saying her beads and rocking herself to and fr
107. hed by him, saying her beads and rocking herself to and fro, Poor Granny ! It wa
108. and by months of starvation. The morning came, but the straggling beams of the D
109. on. The morning came, but the straggling beams of the December sun shone on two
110. passed away to her long last rest, dying with her beads in her hand. soon after
111. to come. When he arrived in the morning he found there soul to care. Tim O'Hall
112. re. Tim O'Halloran and his was no living aged mother were in the keeping of the
113. o living aged mother were in the keeping of the holy angels. Little *It is Thade
114. urious true that process of " converting the Irish " has been discarded, but the
115. At this very moment active proselytizing is going on in some parts of Ireland, a
116. ery moment active proselytizing is going on in some parts of Ireland, and it is
117. nowledge instances of this proselytizing. Within the last few weeks a Galway pri
118. weeks a Galway priest has a young having been actually detained forcibly in Prot
119. se him; he was not in the habit of using strong language. " I saw Father James a
120. saw Father James after mass this morning, and he told me Mick Moriarty had been
121. as dead, and Granny O'Halloran was lying dead beside him but Thade was nowhere t
122. — the express purpose of continuing his father's sentence. if " You young d
123. affliction. When Tim found himself dying, he sent a message to the "master," as
124. to tell the world the tale of suffering father, "Well, Father James, and — an
125. heard his daughter's and he was looking in every direction But Miles Junior had
126. ady's blood was up he was use strik- ing arguments, and, in the present instance
127. ch of the peace would have been anything but desirable. For once discretion had
128. modest residence, cooler thoughts having suggested proceeding than the general a
129. ler thoughts having suggested proceeding than the general and particular onslaug
130. caution, with a very decided misgiv- ing that his advice would be utterly lost o
131. ely necessary. Mrs. Blanders was sitting in her parlor, not counting out her mon
132. was sitting in her parlor, not counting out her money, like the traditional que
133. the traditional story, but she was doing what was, perhaps, quite as pleasant. S
134. aps, quite as pleasant. She was counting up the probable gain of a rather dirty
135. ed her in the early hours of the morning of that day. Her reverie was interrupte
136. ny number of gentlemen call that morning. She had rather expected the police. 4
137. o policy of hers to keep any one waiting ' ' that day. For once Mr. Miles O'Grad
138. fellow by no means so easy a proceeding as he had anticipated. *jfc " " 22 FROM
139. ot the slightest intention of committing herself by speaking. But the silence wa
140. ention of committing herself by speaking. But the silence was broken by an inter
141. expectedly into the room, and not seeing or not heeding the stranger, roared out
142. the room, and not seeing or not heeding the stranger, roared out: ma, that boy
143. e great signs," she said, coolly turning to Mr. O'Grady. mystery." He suspected
144. to finish his sentence. " Really missing, poor boy how kind of you. ! But you kn
145. spoken. Mr. O'Grady could scarcely bring himself to say hard words to any woman,
146. e muttered to himself. stairs, Something very like a scuffle was heard at this m
147. nd if, in his anger, he used threatening language to her, she could the sooner v
148. u call me (the noise on the was becoming louder every moment) but in courts of l
149. ch made the house tremble. A lad passing by, who had not had all the buoyance of
150. eration had provoked in Kate's sparkling eye. "What is to be done?" she inquired
151. be done?" she inquired, without noticing her father's pause. " I suppose you cou
152. I suppose you could it's scarcely bring the case into court." '* Faith, an' the
153. the divil himself ye might as well bring into coort as the like o' they," exclai
154. s on them." " And what were you thinking of?" asked Mr. O'Grady, who suspected M
155. aith, said, when — sir, I was thinking *of nothing,' as me grandmother But the
156. when — sir, I was thinking *of nothing,' as me grandmother But the occasion on
157. one moment doubt that the father's dying faith will be abundantly rewarded." " I
158. in', sure, sir ?" she added, half crying, it. for there had been some little ten
159. neously. It was Mick was up to something, and he was not exactly the difficult p
160. sdom and Pat has a knack of succeed- ing when he takes any subject to heart. lit
161. olden haired Thade was, to use " supping sorrow. a graphic Irish expression, "Yo
162. I should like to know what you are going to do with him." Mrs. Blanders would ha
163. s subject herself, but she was not going to lessen her prestige by In the meanti
164. stige by In the meantime, poor admitting the fact. "I think when I caught the bi
165. you. if How before you and go on paying you, do nothing ?" you sit all state of
166. ore you and go on paying you, do nothing ?" you sit all state of mental do you e
167. er part of the out of season," according to the terms of his agreement with his
168. hearth was often still more embarrassing. "Well, Mr. Blanders?" Mr. Blanders had
169. landers had a happy knack of abstracting himself from exterior affairs when he w
170. rs when he was not desirous of attending to them. He was at the moment occupied
171. e was at the moment occupied in studying some abstruse problem which appeared to
172. orbed itself into a crack in the ceiling. 11 Very well, Mr. Blanders, very good,
173. words and come to a plain understanding." (When Mrs. though he found a when he
174. f that's what you mean. Here am I losing my time, and every moment precious, wai
175. time, and every moment precious, waiting the last two hours to hear one word of
176. 'd keep your eyes open, and do something for the good of your family — — and
177. sir." And Mrs. Blanders subsided, having lost her breath, and really having noth
178. aving lost her breath, and really having nothing more to say. She seated herself
179. st her breath, and really having nothing more to say. She seated herself in a la
180. idea out of the head of any human being subjected , much hours imploring you to
181. n being subjected , much hours imploring you to speak. to the process. When Mrs.
182. east to hint at the difficulty of making the observations she so much desired to
183. rs. Blanders was not slow in pronouncing an opinion when she had an opinion to g
184. the latter part of the observation being made in faith, Miss, it's all the " Oh,
185. and that she did not pay for her keeping. Ellen listened to it all, and let it p
186. ars periodically. Ellen was hard-working, industrious and cleanly, as Mrs. Bland
187. y to service, let us hope little knowing the sin she was committing. It may be s
188. ittle knowing the sin she was committing. It may be supposed that Ellen had very
189. rs. Blanders, or, had written a touching report. with an air of their roof, sion
190. ather belied the appearance and engaging manners, [" What do you want, Ellen ?"
191. t girl is a perfect nuisance at engaging manners— oh, yes. Well, you can put
192. he could buy one that was the real thing."] have constantly found her poring cam
193. hing."] have constantly found her poring came into her possession we over its pa
194. Blarney comes down here to inspect thing. the mission he will certainly question
195. ked improvement in her way of expressing herself on religtrines in which she has
196. en well taught Gospel truths, are having a share in the blessed work of her inst
197. d have taught her [the eldest hope being and hearing himself mentioned inclusive
198. t her [the eldest hope being and hearing himself mentioned inclusively, observes
199. y, observes, that I heard Ellen teaching Tommy what Hail Mary, full she said was
200. one day it of grace it was, or something like was bad to say it, and how can it
201. bad if it's in the Bible?" The inquiring mind receives, however, a severe shock
202. iness, which the result of not attending to a similar recommendation on other oc
203. recommendation on other occasions being vividly remembered he proceeded to do w
204. fice, ["Had you not better say something about compensa- tion ? Those who live b
205. pel, you know." "I will not say anything about compensation, Mr. Blanders. painf
206. ng." It was a little strong, considering that there was not even a substratum of
207. good as to remember that you are writing of what would have happened if we had n
208. of." Mr. Blanders thought he was writing (from dictation) of what had happened,
209. be the same hope of success." " Anything more, my dear?" "I think not. Stay! you
210. think not. Stay! you had purpose sending this young she better mention that we d
211. oney and without price;' and contrasting my dear wife's disinterested generosity
212. sinterested generosity with the grasping and avaricious spirit constantly exclai
213. avaricious spirit constantly exclaiming: of the Church she has mother, left. Sh
214. Church to her poor when is she was dying of starvation, because she had no money
215. s knew the truth about Catholic teaching there would be many converts; hence the
216. pecial and very deep interest in keeping them in ignorance. . OR, HOW THADE BECA
217. she did not know by for twenty something in Mick's face, sight. "Thrue for ye, m
218. while this short conversation was being carried on, and that gave her some hope
219. bit, you know," he added quickly, seeing the information did not appear very acc
220. lorans', miss?" replied Mick, avail- ing himself of the Celtic propensity to rep
221. sity to reply to a question by repeating it. But Mrs. Blanders gave him no assis
222. ance. he was aware that she was watching him very And, moreover, closely. ' r—
223. BANKER. 35 is it, miss? Sure, me hearing's But maybe," he said, brightening up a
224. aring's But maybe," he said, brightening up as if with a sudden and happy inspir
225. inspiration, and with the most charming assumption of a desire to exert his mem
226. e the lady" "maybe, miss, you're meaning the boy that gave the English gentleman
227. , miss. There was a lot of chaps working up at the church, you mind, there near
228. comes along, and walks round everything, for all the world as if they were payi
229. for all the world as if they were paying God Almighty a compliment for looking a
230. ng God Almighty a compliment for looking at the beauties of nature and art; and
231. n his ugly mouth: " * What are you doing, my man?' "'Makin' morthar, sir,' says
232. on. " And pray, what ' is this building going to be ?' " 'A church, sir,' says
233. And pray, what ' is this building going to be ?' " 'A church, sir,' says O'Hall
234. ividual. untidy apartment. and something should be done For once Mrs. Blanders w
235. Blanders entered the in, But the evening was closing " Mornin', your honor," sai
236. ered the in, But the evening was closing " Mornin', your honor," said Mike, with
237. r, I'm a man," said Mick, without moving a — — — " Who " The devil said wa
238. d man, I am sure we are only too willing to help you. There are a few little con
239. e conditions beforehand, without hearing them, an' I'm sure nothin' in life coul
240. is mouth when he roared out, not knowing the good ye was doing that night the fa
241. d out, not knowing the good ye was doing that night the father died his bed, him
242. had not seen Mrs. Blanders administering personal chastisement to the unhappy vi
243. tainly he had not seen the child looking out of the back window as he came in at
244. on. Mr. Blanders was literally trembling. The mention of the police was too much
245. stances he had kind intention of serving people efit Whatever their might be and
246. might not answer to have popular feeling run feeling if " " " OR, HOW THADE BECA
247. swer to have popular feeling run feeling if " " " OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER.
248. d have accused the unhappy man of having precipitated its arrival. "Ye'd better
249. e night," observed Mick, keenly enjoying the sensation he had occasioned. the bi
250. come with me;" and Mrs. Blanders, having signed to Mick to — — — remain wh
251. to her husband to follow her, room. ing to say. left the " Now, Mr. Blanders, I
252. er father's Paddy Malone, ye bewildering boy, own jewel, yer mother's own joy. "
253. bandage in which it was swathed. Having expressed by many groans and contortion
254. and contortions, he asked for something to ease the pain, and on being provided
255. something to ease the pain, and on being provided with a remedy, he said that he
256. , and Mrs. Blanders did not like sending the servants out his sufferings of mess
257. nce of the severe and excellent training to which he had been subjected since hi
258. one shop-boy to another, to had anything and give him a sleep that would keep hi
259. m a sleep that would keep him from doing the work for a day or two. Whether the
260. ble expedition in our mode of travelling in Ireland at present, but journeys fro
261. speed now to what they were then. Having commenced the farce of the toothache, M
262. When and he was told that Mick was going him home to father the Blanders househo
263. gun to dawn on him that Mick was playing a game, and he knew pretty well by this
264. . What man is there of any right feeling, of any refinement, of any conscience,
265. told you so !" was mild to the greeting he expected to get when he reached Kill
266. before a magistrate on a charge of being drunk and disorderly. It is true, indee
267. they do when they could not get anything else? Clearly, they had to make the bes
268. was quite prepared to do all the talking. "Is it drunk and disorderly, you say?
269. u say? Faith, that chap there," pointing to the unhappy souper, "was a little ov
270. ble to deny the charge, was past bearing. "Ah, thin, is it a heart ye have in ye
271. ven a dry police case, but the presiding magistrate was getting more than he wan
272. but the presiding magistrate was getting more than he wanted, and he lost his te
273. At left last he stooped down, and having divested himself of his toe, shoe and s
274. ed himself of his toe, shoe and stocking with the utmost coolness produced the m
275. e to complete the five shillings, having doled out each piece of money as slowly
276. f it," himself with the air of a telling his story. man honor? Well, I'll tell a
277. ny better, but I can't let you you bring that one, an' ye must go an' get it for
278. s.' "Sure a mighty ill-con vanient thing it would be for me goin' down below loo
279. here, however, by a respectable-looking countryman, who told us that he took pi
280. ver, to assure you that there is nothing really dangerous the matter, Mrs. Soupe
281. and an orphan boy whom they were trying to rescue from some proselytizers. He s
282. and more than he could bear, never being a very strong man, and that this was th
283. t he had taken too much, notwithstanding Mr. M'Grath's watchfulness, on the even
284. . M'Grath's watchfulness, on the evening of the day that he was brought to us, a
285. take a little nate propensity for doing so when he he is at all On this evening
286. so when he he is at all On this evening, unfortunately, first cursed overcome b
287. ly, first cursed overcome by drink. King William and then cursed the Pope, and w
288. parties as a consequence fined for being drunk and disorderly. his the fine for
289. him out of own pocket. ; of his cursing both Catholics and Protestants, both pa
290. NEY TO NEW YORK; Our reason for thinking so is his very strange manner. any ques
291. me, with profound respect, as Mr. making this request, "Your obedient servant, "
292. u will pardon me, I am sure, for writing so familiarly, but Mr. M'Grath said so
293. a second self —and that by addressing you thus the shock will be broken to yo
294. on. this communication will so appalling The catastrophe was As soon and so whol
295. course Mick had thought fit to purHaving disposed of Mr. Blanders, he would cert
296. cess, but at the cost of great suffering to my devoted and zealous husband. It i
297. d out of season, through the surrounding We have distributed gratuitously the 2,
298. t us, and we hope when the Irishspeaking population of this district has learned
299. ll bear fruit at last in this travelling, in season districts with the Word of L
300. urred here lately. ciety, that of saving a poor, benighted soul has ocassured, Y
301. table farmers in this district was dying my husband scarcely left him in his las
302. eft him in his last hours, administering with the tenderest care to his spiritua
303. my husband away. Late at night the dying man was, however, most anxious that his
304. s, suggested an expedient. M On entering very late at night, we found the father
305. s about seven years of age, was sleeping by his side. I went with my husband, as
306. y of the weather, though just recovering from severe illness caught in the disch
307. at he did not awaken until the following morning, when he found himself in a com
308. d not awaken until the following morning, when he found himself in a comfortable
309. er had given the child up to him, having no witness present, and of course the p
310. and how we have always avoided anything that could compromise us in the eyes of
311. e us in the eyes of the public, or bring the mission into difficulties, unless w
312. husband lost him in a crowd, and having attempted to address a few words of Scr
313. pense for medical attendance and lodging in a private house will be very heavy.
314. paid the usual grant of £50 for saving a child, besides expenses. The boy's na
315. if he remained in this country. "Hoping to have a remittance from you at your e
316. l were equally interested in multiplying statistics, there was no question about
317. feelings and done her duty by informing her husband that he was a fool, careful
318. ullivans' came in from New York, looking for the chickens which his mother promi
319. " I axed the captain an Englishman going down the ored sir, gentleman enough for
320. d they say it is done by the quare thing up in the sky which, glory be to God, I
321. ther saw it, for I was too long wakening up when he called me. "They tell me, to
322. in mind that I've come to the beginning of me letther, which I forgot before. T
323. paper and puts this end at the beginning, it'll be all the same, as the chaps is
324. Sure I thought of her when we were going to be drowned comin' over in the sea, a
325. ver in the sea, and the man kept turning the wheel to keep the vessel up but we
326. holdin' the pen says his hand is aching with listening to me and I believe if i
327. n says his hand is aching with listening to me and I believe if it was a putting
328. to me and I believe if it was a putting down all this, bad manners to him. fact
329. rry up now, for I hear we are just going to land, and I want to get round to the
330. Killarney, where they never had anything particular except a few dip candles and
331. away, and then one-half of me be looking for the other half at the day of judgme
332. t the end and haven't said the beginning him in at the hall door, Sure I suppose
333. PART II. CHAPTER WHERE AM But I I. GOING? this my black despair, when thou wert
334. s my black despair, when thou wert dying No breath of prayer did waft thy soul t
335. Hush, my dear, you'll only make I going?" yourself worse." But still she cried
336. she cried and moaned, as only the dying can cry and moan, " Oh, my God, my God,
337. , " Oh, my God, my God, where am I going?" A pitiful sight it was, indeed, and o
338. still she to do with death, when wedding con- gratulations were ringing in her e
339. n wedding con- gratulations were ringing in her ears, and wedding presents were
340. ns were ringing in her ears, and wedding presents were all untouched by time ? D
341. , when her young life was just beginning, when the young blood was bounding joyo
342. nning, when the young blood was bounding joyously ! through her veins, and the t
343. er. young have a strange way of thinking death impossible for She was face to fa
344. it now, and she knew it. with a roaring lion face to face with a savage animal
345. th ! The would have had —with a raging of defeathowever vague, of escape —th
346. ry nerve, deenemy —the so great as ing tiger, A man — less fear. possibility
347. y now. could wealth do for her ? Nothing. If all the gold and all the jewels and
348. e or comfort to her now as a stone lying on the road; side. She looked round the
349. have been saved. Her husband sat moaning out his anguish at the foot of her bed.
350. not even notice it. There was something now which claimed her for its own somet
351. which claimed her for its own something which demanded all her strength. For on
352. of selfishness in her character. Loving and lovable, gentle and tender, true an
353. le and tender, true and faithful, caring less than most young girls for the attr
354. wn attractions she only wanted one thing; and in that supreme hour all that she
355. some popular preacher, a man who, living himself a life that even his friends ?
356. ly call moral, yet dared to take the ing name of the Liv- God in vain by preachi
357. ame of the Liv- God in vain by preaching a Christianity of his own invention. He
358. , though he would pass an hour listening to his preaching as he would pass an ho
359. pass an hour listening to his preaching as he would pass an hour at the opera o
360. . realities in life which need something more than It She only noticed the baby
361. and the summer least, roses were giving out all their fragrance —such fraganc
362. fresh buds, bathed with dew, were lying on her bed. She took one in her hand, a
363. t come to her also. Again the poor dying girl moaned, "Oh, my God, my God! ^qwy^
364. f those who had educated her. Everything in this world was treated as if it was
365. if it were all to go on where am I going ?" forever. Eternity, if thought of at
366. he should never have thought of anything else. How she would have envied Tim O'H
367. s good, were what the world well-meaning people. They did no evil, indeed, to an
368. se that we have been the means of saving the whole world by our prayers, and Tha
369. ! Doom, we should see thousands entering should be the means of their having don
370. ring should be the means of their having done so, and heaven, and yet should fin
371. lings of a man on the point of perishing from a violent death with the feelings
372. h death. lie had not to Where am I going ?" He was not in the position life is c
373. ad come the agony of death in no dulling stupor of insensibility, which sends so
374. e, so that the the terror that is coming no; her life — — was ebbing away, y
375. s coming no; her life — — was ebbing away, yet her change, each advance of t
376. r, Death. The saints who have lain dying —who have cried out in transtheir por
377. cried out in transtheir ports of adoring joy, lived for heaven, its " When shall
378. hell. chosen. And alas ! the poor, dying girl had knew it now, too late. She had
379. loud expressions of blasphemy or defying of God. She had simply and quietly pass
380. ason, that his wife'j mind was wandering. "Kathleen?" "Yes." But there seemed no
381. ." But there seemed no sign of wandering, though the voice had grown perceptibly
382. se to a far better position. "My darling, what can you want with Kathleen?" " Sh
383. nt with Kathleen?" " She knows something about religion, I am sure; they say all
384. servants do. Their priests do something for them when they are dying. Oh, Willi
385. o something for them when they are dying. Oh, Willie, Willie!" she cried, and wr
386. die!" Her place was an humble My darling, what should you be any harm." " I am a
387. Him faithfully. What have God ? Nothing. ever done for Him?" And she True; what
388. she was face to face with death. Nothing We do something for those whom we love.
389. face with death. Nothing We do something for those whom we love. We are never we
390. hom we love. We are never weary of doing for them. Our hearts are full of desire
391. she gazed awe-stricken upon the rushing mass of waters, a thought of God had co
392. od had come into her heart. The flashing lights, the rainbow clouds, the thunder
393. ers and lightnings sur- — — rounding the throne of the great Creator music u
394. e voice of Nature, in the mighty falling of the cataract waters she heard the wh
395. r a moment. God had She had done nothingnothing whatever to merit He had r !
396. God had She had done nothingnothing whatever to merit He had r ! ' " 66 FRO
397. had never given for her, him one loving thought. God, if we may say so, had set
398. to hesitate for a — mo- ment complying with any desire which she might express
399. he door. " Your in her mistress is dying," he said; " she is greatly distressed
400. " she is greatly distressed do anything to help her or comfort sir, what can I
401. a Catholic." It seemed as if, in saying that, he had said all that need be said
402. yourself, girl. If you can help my dying wife, for God's sake do;" and he forced
403. r Already the eyes, once so extolled ing in death. It were glaz- seemed, indeed,
404. s of the future kept her still lingering here. The this little vitality left was
405. flung herself on her knees by her dying mistress. She scarcely knew her. There
406. ic. thought Catholics could do something for the dying. ' I — -£# OR, HOW T1I
407. tholics could do something for the dying. ' I — -£# OR, HOW T1IADE BECAME A B
408. ed to fered a death-agony with her dying mistress. and Kathleen sufShe realized
409. ad time for repentance; but to her dying hour she would go bearing about the bit
410. t to her dying hour she would go bearing about the bitter burden of blood! guilt
411. ew it. had been faithful to the teaching of the holy faith in which she had been
412. not have done for the soul of that dying woman ? How she might have comforted he
413. LARNEY TO NEW YORK; and taught her dying mistress how to tism, make an act of co
414. blessed face in heaven. This poor dying woman, then, is deprived not by ignoran
415. s prey, she cried out, with an exceeding loud and bitter cry, "Oh, my mistress,
416. girl had come, with thought of anything except to advance herself in the world.
417. into these snares. A man who is walking along a road which ends in a dangerous
418. a dangerous and often where he is going. He will not Far is going to walk into
419. re he is going. He will not Far is going to walk into destruction. from it. He w
420. that road, he must end by precipitating himself into the yawning chasm from pit
421. y precipitating himself into the yawning chasm from pit-fall is told often say d
422. consequence of her success in obtaining such a good situation and such high wag
423. salvation of their souls, ! lest, having gained first all in this world, they sh
424. EY TO NEW YORK; lost grace by neglecting to attend to her religious York, and sh
425. r. Her fellow-servants, who knew nothing about religion, ridiculed, as the ignor
426. temporal loss; is for in She was giving away truth, no one ever man or woman wh
427. true to their religion. She was risking her eternal salvation for what ? Becaus
428. had met her ears now and then. What king would fling away his crown Poor fool po
429. ears now and then. What king would fling away his crown Poor fool poor fool and
430. prepared for them in heaven, will fling it all aside because they fear some lit
431. eers or persuasions of some bad combeing who will laugh at them in the their fol
432. t was in her power. If a mother, looking at her little babe in its cradle, could
433. em —the glorious mission of converting the world. It is the Irish God has From
434. or the mission in every English-speaking country in the world. the Irish who fai
435. ness, since he does his best, according to the world's if example, to but the h
436. CHAPTER TRADE. *' III. A sunny, laughing Irish boy, His father's pride, his moth
437. his mother's joy." " It Thade is growing up a fine lad, father." was Kate O' Gra
438. ed her feelings on their first meet- ing by the emphatic utterance of the words:
439. nders demurred. He had a habit of taking things au pied de la her wits. lettre,
440. for once his wife had lost On venturing a slight remonstrance, accompanied by a
441. hat he would, on the whole, prefer dying a natural was silenced very peremptoril
442. ed very peremptorily. say you were going to live with the cannibals or near them
443. ployers, or for her humiliation in being obliged to earn her living cious procee
444. tion in being obliged to earn her living cious proceedings, own by such menda- w
445. Ireland ; while there is a fine opening for commerce ; and, I am told, on good
446. y ologies " as a professor. Good reading, ' ' good penmanship and good arithmeti
447. y for himself, had never tasted anything stronger than water, and had not the sl
448. rom all fear of future misery, by taking the simple precaution of not allowing t
449. ng the simple precaution of not allowing them the opportunity of acquiring a tas
450. lowing them the opportunity of acquiring a taste for the poison, which does the
451. school, and Mr. O'Grady was now thinking of binding him to a trade, or even of p
452. Mr. O'Grady was now thinking of binding him to a trade, or even of placing him
453. nding him to a trade, or even of placing him in an office. Let us have a glance
454. t him as he stands in the bright morning I — OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER. 75
455. o our race, which too do deeds of daring reckless to defiance, under the mistake
456. istaken im- pression that they are doing deeds of true bravery. Such a character
457. an intellectual and needs only a guiding hand and a wise director to develop int
458. decision may be made. Here, in a passing second of time, we may win or lose a hi
459. graceful to find ourselves on the losing side in it is earthly conflict, through
460. ace to be conquered when we are fighting for our eternal interests. Kate O'Grady
461. into the battle of life without knowing what he must do in order to be on the w
462. he must do in order to be on the winning side, is, indeed, in a And, besides kno
463. I dare you to do it." Now there nothing a as to be called a coward, high-spirit
464. and with there Thade's careful training, was a weak point there. Many a boy has
465. t choose to bear the reputation of being one a reputation not given him by the g
466. act, indeed. Thade had gone on a boating expedisome other lads during the preced
467. n a boating expedisome other lads during the preceding summer. They had upset th
468. pedisome other lads during the preceding summer. They had upset the boat, as boy
469. is it which prevents boys from learning so useful and desirable an accomplishme
470. brave, and he had that self-sacrificing generosity which invariably accompanies
471. mpanies such a disposiThe idea of saving himself never seemed to have occurred t
472. to any of his companions. The capsizing of the boat had flung all the boys into
473. at, called out to the other two to cling to the capsized and had landed terrifie
474. Thade was not a coward; but he was doing wrong afraid as only a good and brave b
475. e boys did ill to taunt Thade with being a coward, and they were half ashamed of
476. f which they are very far from realizing. Moreover, boys do not like to be baffl
477. ns, good or bad, and, human nature being what it is, the boys were determined Th
478. boys were determined They were not going to that Thade should do as they desired
479. see a man do deeds of the utmost daring which only — 4 '<*- OR, HOW TIIADE BE
480. t — for their deeds of physical daring; they will meet with gibes and con- —
481. that the shafts of ridicule were telling. " Oh, you're not afraid, ov coorse," s
482. run All of which was exceedingly galling to Thade's high as it spirit, was inten
483. the very boy he had saved from drowning; " don't let the chaps have that to thr
484. glory and fame and a swimmer was melting away, and would soon disappear from hum
485. lost his well-earned fame by attempting what was beyond his It poor Thade that
486. when he took the horse to water morning and evening at the lakes, and they both
487. k the horse to water morning and evening at the lakes, and they both assumed tha
488. ortal. when he could stand the bantering no longer, or thought he could not. He
489. assaults, if he had only acted according to the dictates of his con- " Come on,
490. as it for this absurd taunt he was going to disobey the best master boy ever had
491. was run, when Thade found himself flying along the road at a more rapid pace tha
492. when he He won dashed wildly on, leaving his companions J far behind. He the rac
493. t what a price The noble animal, finding his rider thither in his boulder at had
494. e an apparent helpless mass of suffering. When Thade came he was only stunned ;
495. Lady dear, Help the sinful and suffering here; Listen to the sinner's cry Aid th
496. ," observed Mr. O'Grady, without looking up from the paper, which he usually per
497. d Brian Bora were unquestionably passing the house, it was not in the usual fash
498. usic, might generally be heard whistling some lively and popular pass the window
499. n his air in the intervals of addressing affectionate observations to the horse.
500. espect to his master. But this whistling; he morning Thade certainly was not rid
501. s master. But this whistling; he morning Thade certainly was not riding; he was
502. e morning Thade certainly was not riding; he was not was not even giving the pas
503. t riding; he was not was not even giving the passing glance that he always gave.
504. was not was not even giving the passing glance that he always gave. Clearly som
505. e that he always gave. Clearly something was seriously wrong ; but whether with
506. er that was so — awful when it feeling quite sure that was aroused harm had co
507. to rouse, to him or his charge, knowing well that her father, in his anger, mig
508. ve finished breakfast?" she said, rising from table, u Oh, I'm done," and Tom wi
509. rance of gaiety she was far from feeling. " I will go and have rose also. a look
510. aper he had noticed that her was reading to be likely to follow them. " Tom, I'm
511. follow them. " Tom, I'm afraid something has happened to the horse or to Thade.
512. h, nonsense, Kate; you're always fearing things," observed Tom, with a young bro
513. -confidence. He had not noticed anything wrong, so there could not be anything t
514. ng wrong, so there could not be anything to notice. who was lingering at the fat
515. be anything to notice. who was lingering at the father was too much absorbed in
516. dared not do so now. Tom was recovering the shock which had stunned him at firs
517. ed Kate, afraid lest interference rising might do harm, and yet dreading the ang
518. e rising might do harm, and yet dreading the anger in Tom's eyes. young scoundre
519. as I can see hopelessly lamed, of being gentle Wait till my father comes, and y
520. be admitted that this Tom was forbearing when he com- plied with her request. "
521. en tempted by the boys, until, believing that they only wanted " a bit of fun,"
522. s rare indeed. And yet for a few mocking words he had disobeyed the most express
523. But we are all too apt, both in blaming ourselves and in blam- ing others, to l
524. th in blaming ourselves and in blam- ing others, to look more at the consequence
525. orse!" exand see for himself if anything The sight that claimed Mr. O'Grady. It
526. ulders. He certainly deserved a flogging, but, to his credit be it said, he felt
527. vere. But the sharp pain seemed to bring him to himself. Before this he had been
528. the stable and into the street. A riding-whip lay at hand. to inflict a and —
529. Thade. thought, no doubt, in the evening —where else had he to go ? and the ho
530. mmediate attention. Thade, after running wildly for some time he knew not whithe
531. tupor of grief. no note of time. Evening he did not stir. At last a care-taker n
532. . At last a care-taker noticed him lying on the ground, and told him he could no
533. NE. Airy, fairy Rosaline, Gentle, loving Rosaline, » Beauty gains more grace fr
534. ; but it was a human impression, nothing more, and, as such, it had little effec
535. believe seem to men like "I know nothing — be of all the evils in the country,
536. we are to of the Irish, and care nothing for them," re- " but I would certainly
537. see Ireland, and half think of crossing the ocean this summer. Will you plied M
538. le, indeed, the demon, who was unwilling to let go his prey, fought a battle wit
539. have given such blessed help to a dying thing terrible; but happily fellow-crea
540. given such blessed help to a dying thing terrible; but happily fellow-creature.
541. f the good and merciful God, by allowing her to live so long, was not actually c
542. o live so long, was not actually calling her to repentance. She was ashamed to g
543. ashamed to go to the priest after having remained away so It many years from the
544. trembled at the very thought of entering the con- fessional. triumphed. The devi
545. the sin against her mistress by devoting herself, heart soul, to the little baby
546. e left the gentlemen too long conversing unnoticed. The question of a voyage to
547. iable child, and with a promise of being as beautiful as she was good. m^tm OR,
548. h attention, for the moment, to anything. He held it in his hand for a second or
549. ehow. from the terror and dread of going back to Dublin, to his master. His good
550. e one great thought was the overwhelming joy that he thought could now provide f
551. nature, the shame and disgrace of having acted so badly toward those to whom he
552. sh Irish heart. Rich in his Thade giving imaginary presents to those he loved, w
553. of alarm and horror; " I was near being a thief." Never that, Thade, boy, whate
554. . the Thade flew home. The fear of being tempted to sin if he kept money a momen
555. a moment consider that he was performing an act of virtue. As he came near the h
556. of all my troubles, and I was just going to run away with it, and go to the devi
557. e for what I had done, and I was praying all the time to the Blessed Virgin unkn
558. s Kate, like you might do if I was doing wrong, and all in a moment I knew what
559. sson, hard as it seems, at the beginning of your life." Kate was no hand at " pr
560. r life." Kate was no hand at " preaching," and so she said no more; but her holy
561. ove, but with the noble and invigorating sadness of holy fear. ; Before lie lay
562. per which Kate had brought him, guessing that he had been fasting all day he kne
563. t him, guessing that he had been fasting all day he knelt down and thanked God f
564. she room where Mr. O'Grady sat, looking as if he had never stirred since mornin
565. as if he had never stirred since morning, for he was occupied, as he had been th
566. y contradiction. Mr. O'Grady was looking really pleased, but, man-like, he would
567. is womankind the satisfaction of hearing any expressions of his satisfaction. "T
568. nd that you would see him in the morning." tell of course you didn't. see him wi
569. write, father?" Kate had been occupying herself during this conversation in pro
570. " Kate had been occupying herself during this conversation in providing pens and
571. lf during this conversation in providing pens and paper; but Mr. O'Grady would n
572. and to the hotels, Mr. O'Grady insisting on writing all himself, though Tom and
573. hotels, Mr. O'Grady insisting on writing all himself, though Tom and Kate were q
574. , though Tom and Kate were quite willing to help him. But if he permitted A note
575. ins " and vicious propensity for finding purses "? Mr. O'Grady wrote to the poli
576. ady wrote to the police, and the writing ran thus: "Sir: A lad in my employment
577. resent in my posses- owner on his making personal application for it, and descri
578. sonal application for it, and describing purse and contents." " There they are !
579. e !" exclaimed Tom, as, on the following morning, the O'Gradys sat at breakfast.
580. laimed Tom, as, on the following morning, the O'Gradys sat at breakfast. "Who an
581. 9 slight gleam of malice. fond of having a hit at Tom's is random speeches. " Wh
582. tent and self-evident, since a loud ring was heard at that very moment. and the
583. y host of the Lake Hotel was introducing two American gentlemen " of fortune and
584. personal favor to myself; " and, handing him a bank note of some value, "here is
585. me for sir. Virgin ? Oh, no, said, being honest and for plaasing the Blessed Ind
586. no, said, being honest and for plaasing the Blessed Indeed, I am grateful to yo
587. " exclaimed Mr. Mr. Hillman said nothing, but it Maxwell, as they drove back to
588. he was deeply absorbed in thought during the remainder of the day. ' ISjtm OR, H
589. er, and I never even thought of marrying again." "But you are still a young man;
590. heir only concern. If you knew something of our people, and if you had been, as
591. n a convent school." is at present being educated Mr. O'Grady was surprised, but
592. elt to be one great objection to parting with Thade. He knew very well that thos
593. ple. Mr. Maxwell 's friend was listening to this assurance with an indifference
594. lly assumed; to hide the deepest feeling. " Wei 1,*' he tle said, "gentlemen, I
595. for himself. Thade was summoned, looking, certainly, very much brighter than on
596. very much brighter than on the preceding day. "Thade," said Mr. O'Grady, " here
597. A BANKER. IO3 to travel "Well, something like it, Thade. I'm afraid I'm rather o
598. u this offer." Thade's eyes were filling fast with tears. He began clearly to un
599. , and, on their return, Thade, following the advice of Mr. O'Grady and of Miss K
600. rmer master, attired in his new clothing, no one could deny that, in appearance
601. with Thy holy shores to see. u And going to so, constant love, my darling, the w
602. d going to so, constant love, my darling, the wedding-day is fixed, and you are
603. , constant love, my darling, the wedding-day is fixed, and you are my dear old c
604. country, my own old Ireland." Something like a tear glistened in the great eye
605. enance that could be put upon the erring saint was that he should never see Irel
606. had been to renounce all hope of seeing motherland again. If the desire to do s
607. terest of young girls who were preparing for service that she had eloquent and a
608. ose with whom they associated, by giving bad example, or prove themselves unwort
609. Roman Catholic, and no one knew anything about his family, though, in truth, his
610. ine, when all particulars of the wedding and the wedding tour had been fully dis
611. rticulars of the wedding and the wedding tour had been fully discussed. " You kn
612. om him to- me this," she said, producing an exquisitely- bound missal, his weddi
613. n exquisitely- bound missal, his wedding gift. " He is to be ordained priest the
614. ained priest the Sunday after my wedding day." Sister Mary Magdalen ejaculated a
615. ly. He felt that there must be something in a faith which could lead a hoy to su
616. y that they were very far from deserving the contempt which the ignorant too oft
617. deep and blessed impression. was living for, and what was his life likely to be
618. rance, his own future career; and having been received into the Holy Catholic Ch
619. e humble, lowly, laborious, self-denying to ask himself what he life Then Mr. Hi
620. whose death-bed scene forms the opening chapter of our tale, ever imagine the m
621. be returned at 8 A. M. the next morning. Failure to return a Reserve 5. book on

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/