Concordance for The Flemmings, or, Truth triumphant / By Mrs. Anna H. Dorsey...

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. > ' « < « . • < . Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1869, b
3. APTEE The inner life of Wolfert Flemming 75 CHAPTEE VH. Mrs. Flemming is thankfu
4. rt Flemming 75 CHAPTEE VH. Mrs. Flemming is thankful for the prosperity AND HAPP
5. shadow VIII. , 102 CHAPTER The floating shadow IX. 116 CHAPTER X. 128 Mrs. Flem
6. dow IX. 116 CHAPTER X. 128 Mrs. Flemming has a great shock CHAPTER XL Light out
7. n. The new day 161 CHAPTER Mrs. Flemming at bay. XIII. 177 CHAPTER Sacrifice XIV
8. ts XIX. 273 CHAPTER XX. WOLEERT FlEMMING's BIRTHDAY 294 CHAPTEE Mrs. Flemming is
9. ING's BIRTHDAY 294 CHAPTEE Mrs. Flemming is XXI. last.. glad of something at 318
10. lemming is XXI. last.. glad of something at 318 CHAPTEE The man with the hammer
11. ght so stormy and cold that not a living thing was unhoused, far or near, either
12. stormy and cold that not a living thing was unhoused, far or near, either on th
13. farm- steads which lay upon the sloping lands between Only the wild the mountai
14. his way among the drifts. Since morning the snow had been steadily falling, unt
15. rning the snow had been steadily falling, until not even the bleached head of Oh
16. ough the mountain gorges with a blending of fierce, shrill sounds, as if the spi
17. riors were abroad on the storm, mingling their savage war-whoops and death-songs
18. -way and road became impassable. Memming's great rambling farm-house, there was
19. ame impassable. Memming's great rambling farm-house, there was ruddy light, warm
20. e —with depths of shadow, It dan- cing lights and glowing warmth. was a large,
21. shadow, It dan- cing lights and glowing warmth. was a large, low-rafted room, a
22. s and high mantlepiece were representing goodly scenes from the Old Tes- tament,
23. burnished brass, were piled with blazing logs of hickory and resinous pine which
24. the smoke, ruddy with fire, went curling with a if soft roaring sound up the it
25. ire, went curling with a if soft roaring sound up the it deep chimney as the tho
26. re golden bees, THE FLEMMINGS. y humming and swarming home to their hives. On pl
27. s, THE FLEMMINGS. y humming and swarming home to their hives. On plat- the broad
28. d arrows and the toons of sweet-smelling herbs, which were in vari- ous ways sec
29. , until one might have thought, watching it flashing in and out, that birds with
30. might have thought, watching it flashing in and out, that birds with wings of fl
31. irds with wings of flame were ; flitting through the shadit ows under the roof a
32. all others was the most worthy of being glorified. And right bravely they gleam
33. bravely they gleamed in the red dancing fire-light, those antique pieces of sil
34. d — on Plymouth line, Rock, a Flemming, the last of the European his wife foun
35. ow-raftered, room and a smaller sleeping apartment. the Indians, taxation Those
36. mbled to dust. And here Wolfert Flemming decreed they should remain, although hi
37. to his house but their special pleading availed noth- ing, the old heirlooms of
38. their special pleading availed noth- ing, the old heirlooms of his where his for
39. umsier old oak tables, they were shining and glistening in the red cheery fire-l
40. tables, they were shining and glistening in the red cheery fire-light. This room
41. " Forefather's Day," or a grand quilting or apple paring, or something of that s
42. ay," or a grand quilting or apple paring, or something of that sort, when all th
43. d quilting or apple paring, or something of that sort, when all the young folk,
44. GS. Memmings, old and young, a something which made them feel nearer and dearer
45. any un- charitableness or heart-burning. Here also, in plain and genuine sincer
46. oved each other with christianly holding up one another's hands, warming one ano
47. holding up one another's hands, warming one another's hearts, until the bonds t
48. clung to the hopeful, and the desponding came and wholesome mirth bask in the ch
49. ction, they had gathered gether, morning and evening, around their father and mo
50. had gathered gether, morning and evening, around their father and mother, to wor
51. her and mother, to worship God according hearts hear read the word of God, which
52. were taught, and lived justly according to the lights they had. But the Flemmin
53. mmings took no thought if of ana- lyzing their lives, and any one had said to th
54. into existence, there was not a Flemming of them who would not have martyrdom al
55. of the believe the old almost inclining one to Saxon superstition that angels w
56. on that angels were fire, always basking in the light of a wood truth. a very Ev
57. wood truth. a very Eva and Hope Flemming sat together, their of patch- young fac
58. , while known as which they were uniting with much when it they chattered togeth
59. gether in an under- tone of the quilting bee they would have was finished. Very
60. ike pearls be- their teeth lips, showing tween their red and their beauty crowne
61. FLEMMINGS. pushed back loose and curling from Eva's rounded forehead, but which
62. little Their father, Wolfert Eleni- ming, sat a apart from them, at a table upon
63. amily Bible, a of early English printing, for which the savans and to literary p
64. he looks of it, He the obsolete spelling, the ; quaint all, letters, the rude li
65. John's Gospel, self, and he was reading a him- with a reverent but troubled loo
66. set, cleft in the chin just redeem; ing his countenance from grimness his eyebr
67. n THE FLEMMINGS. 15 him without anything to relieve its homeliness of color or s
68. ated high-backed chairs, rich in beading and grotesque carving, all filled in wi
69. s, rich in beading and grotesque carving, all filled in with fine cane-work whic
70. spiritual them with a sacred or meaning. Mrs. Flemming had just flitted from he
71. with a sacred or meaning. Mrs. Flemming had just flitted from her chair, knitti
72. ad just flitted from her chair, knitting in hand, to see after the welfare of a
73. he family group present, who sat leaning against an angle of the fire-place, por
74. ainst an angle of the fire-place, poring over the pages of a well worn book, whi
75. hair, parted in the middle, fell waving masses over his cheeks and neck. This w
76. heeks and neck. This was Reuben Flemming, the youngest strong, practical, oi the
77. Nicolas did, or turn white and trembling with a strange sickness which neither h
78. ey could understand. But Reuben Flemming had a marvellous ; energy for books ind
79. lared that it moods, was equal to seeing the rich glory of the distant of sunset
80. on his lovely countenance. Mrs. Flemming came in now and brought good wholesome
81. ess as she fluttered around, and passing her hand pered lightly and tenderly ove
82. roubled over the text left " and getting no answer, throne. tidy him and took he
83. A little body was alert, Martha Flemming, and with a quick, shrewd intelligence
84. as, until to her hard one clear thinking all that seemed doubtful in principle o
85. herself of her sock ; and began turning the heel last " that the chore is finis
86. : 18 It is still THE FLEMMINGS. snowing ; indeed it falls thicker than ever. "
87. round is ; wellfrozen, and the sleighing will be perfectly splendid. fall of I d
88. s and walls fell with a shrill whistling sound that rose and with al- the wind l
89. se and with al- the wind like despairing shrieks. The women, though accustomed t
90. stood beside Uriel in the sun, listening to the cherub who sought knowledge of E
91. ht knowledge of Eden, his soul thrilling with horror, as at the angel's touch th
92. 's touch the beautiful heaven-clad thing faded into the swart, defiant, scowling
93. faded into the swart, defiant, scowling image of Lucifer. Wolfert Flemming lift
94. wling image of Lucifer. Wolfert Flemming lifted his head from the in- spired pag
95. of a soul was the spontaneous outflowing of the whose thoughts dwelt habitually
96. on the infinite attributes Supreme Being, and who searched the Scrip- tures dail
97. searched the Scrip- tures daily, hoping to find in them —nay, believing after
98. hoping to find in them —nay, believing after a lit- that he had —the words o
99. I guess father," said Mrs. tle Flemming pause, " that is we ought to be thankfu
100. yThere's no such apples, potatoes, thing housed. or pumpkins either, around as o
101. eacon Sneath- " Yes," said Eva, laughing slyly, " he promised to tell Huldah how
102. ngers." "So. It is early to begin spring gardening," said the Elder, with a grim
103. o. It is early to begin spring gardening," said the Elder, with a grim smile, no
104. industrious ; girl," said Mrs. Flemming, knitting vigorously girl too, "a God-f
105. us ; girl," said Mrs. Flemming, knitting vigorously girl too, "a God-fearing and
106. ting vigorously girl too, "a God-fearing and raises the finest chickens and spin
107. rom here to Alton Bay." Wolfert Flemming called —or "the Elder," as he was sec
108. do wish that Nick had not gone away ing." morn- " Mother, you forget that Nicho
109. t ; but it would be frightful any living thing to be exposed to the fury of litt
110. t it would be frightful any living thing to be exposed to the fury of little thi
111. own at say about the new-fangled meeting house ?" They are greatly excited over
112. oned around every night to prevent being torn down," said the Elder, sternly. "W
113. and night, and branded, in for preaching strange doctrines our borders. "What's
114. . "What's that?" exclaimed Mrs. Elemming, with a start. " Mother, I hear nothing
115. , with a start. " Mother, I hear nothing but the wind," said her husband. " Land
116. s ; ! I certainly heard it is a knocking somewhere I hope not Indians. don't ove
117. it is — " "Yes, some one was knocking at the side-door of the new lull part o
118. mentary and they — low, quick knocking, a smothered cry silence. and sudden ou
119. followed by Eva and Hope. Mrs. Flemming and knit with nervous at the rapidity,
120. pleased prospect strode of entertaining Indians. The Elder ' through the room a
121. . The Elder ' through the room adjoining the old homestead,' and turned down a g
122. e candle to Eva, He it who stood shading it, with her hand, and unlocked the doo
123. nd, and unlocked the door; then, turning the latch, quickly opened and was almos
124. n him. off his feet by a man and falling heavily The wind rushed and snow, in wi
125. and snow, in with a wild shriek, driving in sleet extinguished the light. Eva TH
126. ment, rose out of the darkness, bidding her close the door: 'I am not hurt/ he
127. he door quickly.' The wind was blow- ing with tremendous force, but the strong h
128. quickened her breath, ceeded in closing and locking it. By this time Mrs. Flemm
129. er breath, ceeded in closing and locking it. By this time Mrs. Flemming and Hope
130. d locking it. By this time Mrs. Flemming and Hope, uneasy at their long absence,
131. hem — all in the dark together, asking and answering questions, as they groped
132. the dark together, asking and answering questions, as they groped their way bac
133. hey groped their way back to the sitting-room, moving slowly, for the weight of
134. eir way back to the sitting-room, moving slowly, for the weight of the frozen ma
135. Elder." "I knew that I heard a knocking," said Mrs. Flemming; "and now, suppose
136. I heard a knocking," said Mrs. Flemming; "and now, suppose he should be frozen
137. be frozen to death through our not going at first." " I don't think he's frozen
138. ," replied. he " God forbid such a thing should is happen at our door. I think h
139. k he only benumbed with to their sitting- the cold and fatigue together." They w
140. he swallows it —rub his wrists; bring in warm flannels — " And they rubbed
141. ee and he held the while he put steaming cup to the stranger's his lips, arm und
142. anger's his lips, arm under him, lifting his head from the pillow. Who was this
143. ppy household, or were they entertaining an angel unaware?" They did not know; t
144. ght of who or what he might be. Flemming was only was not THE FLEMMINGS. an Indi
145. not the smallest ment large of anything in his possibility of appearance in whi
146. covered with leisure. which were melting at their thought he was a Jew ; The sis
147. they recognized only one fact concerning him, and that was he was their guest, p
148. in He and with some began to swallowing; then he vest, fumble about his breast,
149. ngers and about his neck, with trembling perplexed look. and "He " Is it misses
150. d look. and "He " Is it misses something," said Mrs. Flemming. your money that y
151. it misses something," said Mrs. Flemming. your money that you are looking for ?"
152. lemming. your money that you are looking for ?" ; He shook his head in the negat
153. d silver watch, as big as woman, holding a turnip, before his eyes. No, it was n
154. minia- " Well," exclaimed Mrs. Flemming, " I'm beat out. Come here, is Keuben ;
155. ; this stranger it ; has lost something, and fretted about see if you can help
156. ns." Reuben had just he had been helping with the rest to restore the frozen man
157. d out additional at his mother's bidding to fetch an blanket from an upper room.
158. ps it is this ; while father was rubbing his breast, this flew off upon the floo
159. loor; father must have broken the string," said Eeuben, holding by " a bit of br
160. broken the string," said Eeuben, holding by " a bit of broken cord a brass medal
161. to take his treasure, and into pressing it to his lips, murmured, "Blessed Mofe
162. ed, "Blessed Mofell ther;" then, folding it close to his breast, he a quiet slee
163. if howled without as " enraged at losing its prey. his Poor man, I am glad he fo
164. Poor man, I am glad he found that thing of it is mother's; I guess some keepsak
165. wonder she is dead," said Mrs. Flemming, settling herself once at her knitting.
166. e is dead," said Mrs. Flemming, settling herself once at her knitting. "I do wis
167. g, settling herself once at her knitting. "I do wish Nick was home with us — i
168. HE FLEMMINGS. 27 alto- "Wolfert Flemming's own heart was not gether easy about h
169. be ; housed at Deacon Sneathen's, tying cold and stark among the frozen drifts
170. lf, and talked of other things, trusting all the while in of God for the safety
171. o us ;" ; so may and somehow he Flemming, was comforted. " I tell you what, fath
172. sturbed, wife," said the Elder, frowning. " I shan't sleep a wink to-night," she
173. halter in one hand, when they do a thing for God's sake with the other? wife ; B
174. al." break not through and Mrs. Flemming had too much respect for the genuine go
175. point with him; she felt that, according to her common-sense view of the matter,
176. might be in principle ; so this managing little woman determined on a piece trea
177. id sures from harm, and at the ; obeying her husband she would, under some domes
178. e domestic pretence, stay in the sitting-room a little while after the family ha
179. ther one occupied by the first and being always the the morning, she could slip
180. e first and being always the the morning, she could slip the bolt back, and no o
181. f her sock with much complacency, taking the Elder walked part now and then ; in
182. his hands clasped behind him, pondering over that chapter of the Gospel of Sain
183. years trou- bled him secretly, thinking deep thoughts which led him into a ment
184. , stars did the Eastern kings, it having come to Jerusalem disappeared. THE FLEM
185. ared. THE FLEMMINGS. 29 The next morning Mrs. Flemming found everything safe non
186. MINGS. 29 The next morning Mrs. Flemming found everything safe none of her treas
187. t morning Mrs. Flemming found everything safe none of her treasures had taken to
188. be on the safe side ; there's no knowing what may have bestirred herself to prep
189. ow-white cloth by the time their morning devotions were over. They and were all
190. their guest came ance He had a stooping, ungainly figure, returned their saluta
191. rd obeis- made a place and Mrs. Flemming began ; the Elder for him near himself,
192. guilty as sat of coffee for him, feeling a little she looked into his honest eye
193. ed into his honest eyes. The man lifting down, right little it, then he bowed hi
194. tter of his fingers, as he were catching sign, in flies, but a slow, deliberate,
195. " to be mistaken him, that Mrs. Flemming, who had been watching ! exclaimed : Go
196. hat Mrs. Flemming, who had been watching ! exclaimed : Good gracious " and gave
197. s with a clatter upon the tray, spilling into a freshly-filled bowl of her best
198. T him bacon and eggs, and Mrs. Flemming, w ith a red on her cheeks, poured out
199. awkwardly poised, and with a hesitating bashfulness, said : " I'm heartily obli
200. m your windows,; after remember anything." "Where were you go- We were thankful
201. re thankful to have saved a fellow-being from such a dreadful death. ing?" said
202. ow-being from such a dreadful death. ing?" said the Elder. " " To Wier's Landing
203. ?" said the Elder. " " To Wier's Landing," he replied, A long journey, been even
204. was on my way back when tains, blinding the snow caught so that I lost me on th
205. ce his heavy eyes " lit up, and, folding his hands to- gether, he leaned towards
206. ich they in greater horror ; had nothing roof, and here, eating at their table,
207. ror ; had nothing roof, and here, eating at their table, practicing his supersti
208. here, eating at their table, practicing his superstitious rites and uttering hi
209. ing his superstitious rites and uttering his idolatrous prayers, before this the
210. m acts of devotion confessed ; according to the orthodox teachings of Luther and
211. tle him the combination was overwhelming, and the meal was finished in silence,
212. seldom seen, but when on Martha Flemming's seen they all face, knew the it. port
213. up beside Reuben, and "pack," containing " told him, with an it, effort to be br
214. him feel as happy as if he were reading a new book. The girls were busy answers
215. e busy answers, which over their morning duties in the household, and when Mrs.
216. in the household, and when Mrs. Hemming came back she saw her son, his arm lean
217. me back she saw her son, his arm leaning on the man's shoulder, their heads so c
218. grizzled locks mingled, the one telling strange tales of other lands, the other
219. ales of other lands, the other listening entranced. " Reuben," she said sharply,
220. n't see are busy." how you around idling, where all CHAPTEE III. WHAT THE FLEMMI
221. d gave vent to his gratitude by invoking the prowife. Mother duced of God to rew
222. l-chest, some book-shelves, a of fishing tackle fowling-piece, and an array comp
223. ook-shelves, a of fishing tackle fowling-piece, and an array completed the furni
224. e, and an array completed the furnishing. The books were sermons, essays, and ar
225. etened the bitter waters w ith something r of Christian charity ; books cherishe
226. em and there for coun- he stood, girding his thoughts together sel, when Mrs. Fl
227. houghts together sel, when Mrs. Flemming, who left the table almost immediately
228. until she got close to him, then laying her hand upon his arm, she said : "Elde
229. that miserable pedler. papist. Fleinming, after seeing and hearing what happened
230. pedler. papist. Fleinming, after seeing and hearing what happened at the breakf
231. ist. Fleinming, after seeing and hearing what happened at the breakfast That man
232. re we to do ? We cannot have him staying on," she replied, in her quick decided
233. ay ? " he asked in the same even snowing as ness ; " Yes, I have looked out, fas
234. - I will not have that man contaminating if my house with his idolatrous breath,
235. faith ; but in this case, after looking at in all its bearings, I can come to b
236. r to my —the storm arose the bid- ding of hair Him who takes into account the
237. r Him who takes into account the falling of a from my head and this, His creatur
238. n an hour " But consider, Elder Flemming," responded the in spite of herself lit
239. ed by his of- simple practical reasoning, " consider fence it is what an to our
240. it is what an to our simple God-fearing faith, to :'n have him flouting his cro
241. -fearing faith, to :'n have him flouting his crosses our very faces, and say- TH
242. ry faces, and say- THE FLEMMINGS. 37 ing his idolatrous prayers to the Virgin Ma
243. ry out against you!" she added, pointing to the bookshelves. "I do not hold with
244. —and is I tell that there's something lying at my heart which it means us. tr
245. d is I tell that there's something lying at my heart which it means us. trouble,
246. ans us. trouble, and that man I to bring upon up a I never it felt so. am not us
247. kitchen are at ours," said Mrs. Flemming. " whilst He shall eat at wife," my tab
248. lst he is my Now, little he said, laying his broad hand 38 THE FLEMMINGS. kindly
249. you have me, your husband and a Flemming, lose spect, my self-re- and offend my
250. f-re- and offend my conscience, by doing unto It others that which I would not t
251. d to his call a blush cheek to his dying day." to blush to your dying "lou ought
252. o his dying day." to blush to your dying "lou ought said, giving day for eat- in
253. sh to your dying "lou ought said, giving day for eat- ing and drinking with a pa
254. "lou ought said, giving day for eat- ing and drinking with a papistical Irishman
255. id, giving day for eat- ing and drinking with a papistical Irishman," she her he
256. etween us one that must settle according to the precepts of the gos- pel, and no
257. cepts of the gos- pel, and not according to the old code, which would have hung
258. h would have hung that papist for coming within our borders." — ; THE FLEMMING
259. trines might not imperil the God-fearing," she said, holding her head very would
260. eril the God-fearing," she said, holding her head very would be and left erect;
261. y would be and left erect; then, knowing how useless it to argue the matter furt
262. pedler, to go up with her to the weaving-room, among the yarn hanks rather a pro
263. mong the yarn hanks rather a prosy thing to come to, after listening to a rudely
264. prosy thing to come to, after listening to a rudely eloquent account of a battl
265. Reuben cobof a webs for banners, scaling the loom instead little rampart, the sh
266. ver the heavy, twisted hanks —thinking stop," of the Spaniards all the time :
267. face ; and besides, you are ; get- ting everything in a muss up there come down
268. besides, you are ; get- ting everything in a muss up there come down." 40 THE F
269. gh his great astonishment loom, breaking about five hundred threads, and to bump
270. out five hundred threads, and to bumping his head as it fell where his " feet ou
271. ood for ?" thought his mother, look; ing with disrTiay at the broken threads eve
272. ith him ? I intended to begin !" weaving my carpet this very day He was to very
273. fter he had scrambled loose, and putting his arms tenderly around his mother, pr
274. pon which he laughed, and fol- gathering up the yarn he had pitched down, lowed
275. the day, the Elder came into the sitting room the Flemmings — old homestead wh
276. aw the — and It saw his guest standing at a pitiless window, looking disconsol
277. t standing at a pitiless window, looking disconsolately out at the white storm.
278. tely out at the white storm. was ironing-day, and Eva and ; Hope were ironing th
279. ing-day, and Eva and ; Hope were ironing the family linen rosy, cheerful and hap
280. nd laughter, and scraps of song, filling the room with homely but sweet and from
281. rant kitchen linen to air. Mrs. Flemming sitting was getting dinner, and Reuben
282. chen linen to air. Mrs. Flemming sitting was getting dinner, and Reuben was fire
283. o air. Mrs. Flemming sitting was getting dinner, and Reuben was fire, by the mak
284. nner, and Reuben was fire, by the making strenuous exertions by way of being use
285. king strenuous exertions by way of being useful ; to half- sole his boot, but hi
286. mmer so often that he felt like throwing the whole affair into the fire. And so
287. be done, while the thought of his being a papist and a wholesome dread of their
288. spect. "I lost silence, and was brooding over the am sorry to learn from my son
289. r his host offered him. "It may be lying within arm's length of us, Mr.—" : ;;
290. u the snow. last night ; it may be lying there under it Do you remember having w
291. ng there under it Do you remember having when you came towards the house ?" "Yes
292. y/' said Patrick, brightremimber, seeing if ening up. " It is the last thing I t
293. Patrick, brightremimber, seeing if ening up. " It is the last thing I the lights
294. eing if ening up. " It is the last thing I the lights and feeling to see my pack
295. the last thing I the lights and feeling to see my pack was safe ; but I niver s
296. ty be THE FLEMMINGS. 43 the man, opening wide his dull grey eyes and look- ing "
297. ng wide his dull grey eyes and look- ing " full in the Elder's face. Are you con
298. gious ideas ; there was, to his thinking, an arro- gance, a profanity, and a som
299. rro- gance, a profanity, and a something in the Irish- man's reply, which came v
300. an's reply, which came very near calling him a heathen, that tried his patience
301. account of his religion but the crowning paradox of " I'm it all was, the man ha
302. what he Catholic religion or faith being in his opinion beof (the Elder) knew as
303. s "What. had he then? "What teas be- ing a Catholic? Was that a religion? He tho
304. eligion? He thought not, Catholics being idolaters, and where there was religion
305. blood of the But the Elder said nothing of all this to all Patrick McCue, who,
306. " The grace of are a simple, God-fearing family, serving spirit Him in and takin
307. re a simple, God-fearing family, serving spirit Him in and taking no account ; o
308. family, serving spirit Him in and taking no account ; of outward observanus, ces
309. o do until the roads are if you be doing us a favor you will omit this making th
310. ing us a favor you will omit this making the morning " signs over yourself that
311. or you will omit this making the morning " signs over yourself that you did at t
312. s?" cried Patrick " McCue, alive staring with wide open eyes. Why, man to, I alw
313. o the his fur cap, and was about putting on when left the Elder laid his : hand
314. hpspitality my and was always something sacred with the I have done Elemmings.
315. before God and my children in protesting against what I consider ; idolatrous bu
316. him, help Then the Elder could wondering if not, " after ail it 46 THE FLEMMINGS
317. me. bit it if I know whether he's poking fun at ; me if or not, he's in seems so
318. ASSED, AND HOW IT. ENDED. Elder Flemming came in with snow- shovels and gave one
319. search among the drifts for the missing pack. Nearly up to their shoulders in s
320. snow, they worked with a will, clearing a space around the door and a success,
321. to the fire ; but the sight of Flemming, whose face exercise, was ruddy with dr
322. th drifts aside as who worked on, plying his shovel vigorously while lightly as
323. d, and he bent his will to his shivering hands, pitch- ing off the snow here and
324. will to his shivering hands, pitch- ing off the snow here and there as well as
325. re and there as well as he could, seeing that he was cold and nearly out of brea
326. ath w hen suddenly, T just when Flemming himself began it to think the search us
327. t lay under a he had finished shovelling off, just where the broad flagged footw
328. in from the road — its leather casing still frozen, but otherwise joyed, unin
329. ut the Elder hurried in to avoid hearing " the spot in voluble eloquence and pio
330. o recover his pack, but that in- helping the volved no obligation on him to list
331. w Patrick McCue pack in, it his sleeping place to stow his and Reub°n turned mo
332. cher However, —but comfortless looking and bare. this did not disturb Patrick,
333. imself in the name Holy Trinity, knowing it to be a sign of his belief in a cruc
334. resented to him the love which for dying on the cross God showed mankind by him.
335. en him in from after his let perish; ing in the snow, without or hindrance and p
336. though faith! it does seem like thrying to move a mountain to pray for their co
337. ountain to pray for their conversion ing, I'll ; but there's nothing like thry-
338. nversion ing, I'll ; but there's nothing like thry- and if my faith's no bigger
339. ck McCue's mind while he was unstrapping his pack, never uttering a word but tug
340. was unstrapping his pack, never uttering a word but tug- ging away at the straps
341. ack, never uttering a word but tug- ging away at the straps and buckles, and unl
342. at the straps and buckles, and unlocking the padlocks at each end, until finally
343. l finally he open- ed it, Eeuben looking on with all the natural of it. curiosit
344. zoned with gilt, and altogether dazzling, which he gave with a beaming smile to
345. r dazzling, which he gave with a beaming smile to Reuben, saying: Faith ! it's t
346. e with a beaming smile to Reuben, saying: Faith ! it's the very one I was lookin
347. Faith ! it's the very one I was looking afther it, ; and do you take It's the m
348. he sowl of you; and some of the stirring- ; 50 est ditties THE FLEMMINGS. about
349. y lad, with a hearty wel- come." willing And Patrick McCue thrust it into Reuben
350. sudden shame upon him, and he to taking gifts : have never been used my father
351. t, I'll make short work of it by putting the hottest place I can find under the
352. " said Patrick down pack McCue, buckling up " his with an irate sparkle in his d
353. , ; only I was afraid I might be robbing you I'll 1 ) 7iis ri'EMMiNG^/ 51 it tak
354. t be robbing you I'll 1 ) 7iis ri'EMMiNG^/ 51 it take it with many thanks, and k
355. erses, while his imagination and glowing, felt as if under a spell of enchant- m
356. til indeed he else, McCue and everything suddenly his vision of delight was disp
357. dispelled by his mother's voice calling them with rather a ; sharp accent to co
358. and put the book in his pocket, feeling richer in session than if its pos- some
359. its pos- some one had given him a string of diamonds. "I knew you'd ; like it,"
360. be a fiery ordeal to sit ; Mrs. Flemming felt it to at the table with the Irish
361. had touched her flesh, but said nothing. Then the Elder began about Boston, to
362. family had ever visited, distant, being a hundred miles facilities for travel-
363. s for travel- and in those days the ling were few, and at the best difficult as
364. deterred THE tfLEMtoNGSL from attempting the journey; but little as Patrick coul
365. t his too kindly there, "for just taking a suck pipe on Sunday evening, coming f
366. ust taking a suck pipe on Sunday evening, coming from Vespers, and was troubling
367. ng a suck pipe on Sunday evening, coming from Vespers, and was troubling nobody
368. , coming from Vespers, and was troubling nobody at all ; wid the smoke of it it,
369. y at all ; wid the smoke of it it, being in the open street 'bating that, it see
370. it it, being in the open street 'bating that, it seemed to be a flourishing sor
371. ting that, it seemed to be a flourishing sort of a town, but to looked small him
372. - keen day and day out without molesting him. This was not very satisfactory abo
373. t Boston to any one except Mrs. Flemming, who, although she did not say so, was
374. ler had been made to suffer for breaking the Sabbath, and thought Boston must be
375. e and the Elder wanted to know something travelled here about the vine-growing i
376. ng travelled here about the vine-growing in France; and Patrick McCue, who had a
377. ound the board and Mrs. amused, Keniming, -even while she knitted her brows to p
378. m, this free and easy way of tellall ing things they had been dreaming of lives,
379. ellall ing things they had been dreaming of lives, their and thought of as they
380. m, they chairs, rose from their standing while their father "returned thanks" an
381. he was nothto the spiritual life it ing daunted of ; it was as natural him to m
382. ot him understand how any rational being, who to a was not a heathen, could obje
383. . But he sat down with Mr, Flemfell ming, and smoked with him, and back into the
384. on which was interrupted by their rising from the table; and away to his when th
385. Elder went "workroom*" and Mrs. Flemming later, started to go to look after the
386. to the fire." "Tut," she replied, coming in for a it moment, " I'm not so old or
387. he man about his doings," began Fiemming. "I wonder now! " exclaimed she. ; "I d
388. ind you; him that his cross, and praying offence to the simplicity of to the sai
389. and put on his hat, and was about going out into the storm, he said, c rather t
390. God would be merci- him and he was going, mother ; —going, rewhat he wel- memb
391. him and he was going, mother ; —going, rewhat he wel- member, to his death bu
392. to his death but I held him back, seeing his sincerity in being ready to perish
393. him back, seeing his sincerity in being ready to perish for thought was right ,
394. r a thoughtful pause. said Mrs. Flemming " It beats me, though, that a man ; sho
395. uld be ready to die for so small a thing as that." " It seems so at first lie th
396. he would it have felt guilty of denying his whole Faith, of which the cross is
397. which the cross is a symbol, by putting father, under foot at any to man's bidd
398. ther, under foot at any to man's bidding. I am ashamed have asked him. "Land's L
399. sten sake's, ! what may that be? singing ; now The man must be singing some of h
400. e? singing ; now The man must be singing some of his ungodly songs there, where
401. ere's a jingle like sleigh-bells keeping Hope and Eva shall come away," exclaime
402. hall come away," exclaimed Mrs. Flemming, a move towards the door to call ; them
403. the door to call ; them der but Flemming laid his hand upon her shoulher, saying
404. laid his hand upon her shoulher, saying : and detained ; "Let them be, mother l
405. novelties, wary how we go about pulling up the pull we up good wheat with them.
406. They are good little children, according to the natural law, and a harmless amus
407. o wonder that people say you are wanting in orthodox discipline in your over-ind
408. here another minute that cow is needing me," said Mrs. Flemming, in tones of re
409. t cow is needing me," said Mrs. Flemming, in tones of reproof. Yes, it was Patri
410. ick McCue, after the bull-fight, singing. Feeling tell more genial he began to H
411. , after the bull-fight, singing. Feeling tell more genial he began to Hope and E
412. Spanish muleteers, and ended by singing a muleteer song while he accomsoftly ji
413. eteer song while he accomsoftly jingling the tongs against the brass globe of th
414. ic slope on the Sierra Nevada, listening to the bells of the mules and the songs
415. lody itself, that they forgot everything of the —even Bunyan's picture Pope si
416. he —even Bunyan's picture Pope sitting at the door of THE FLEMMINGS. 57 a cave
417. bones and skulls strewn around, watching like an ogre for unwary pilgrims, to de
418. got their wholesome dread of displeasing their mother ; they for- got Patrick Mc
419. he sang with such pathos that the sewing dropped from their fingers moistened wi
420. t through broken bars of cloud, fringing the black overhanging edges above with
421. of cloud, fringing the black overhanging edges above with brilliance, and crowni
422. dges above with brilliance, and crowning the snow- clad mountain peaks with diad
423. med and reddened by the like the setting sun, floated in the air plumage of some
424. slopes of the mountains, all glistening in robes of crystal as the full moon an
425. spangled heavens/while Orion, glittering in full armor, seemed to rest his jewel
426. this grand repose, only a low quivering chime rang out now and then, whenever t
427. the wind soughed through the glittering ice^covered trees of the forest belts,
428. vered trees of the forest belts, smiting them like cymbals with a soft clash tog
429. e country-side, led by Nicholas Flemming their and John Wilde, were out with hea
430. eavy sleighs, and snow-shovels, breaking the road by moonlight, and when they go
431. they got in sight of the lights gleaming through door and window of the " Old Ho
432. nd clear on the night, while the panting oxen and put forth tired horses, scenti
433. xen and put forth tired horses, scenting the well-filled racks, : THE FLEMMINGS.
434. gth to get to them. in the Mrs. Flemming was soon clasped pard," lifted his litt
435. d I up there had at the Deacon's, having the in best time I ever as he put her m
436. as he put her my life," he said laughing, down to kiss his sisters, shake hands
437. how things come Almighty God was holding you in your people here saved safe keep
438. u in your people here saved safe keeping, my life ; may the Blessed irre- Mother
439. pressible Patrick, with " Hilloa beaming countenance. ? The what any but never m
440. still John Wilde and Hope were standing holding the hand she had held out to to
441. ohn Wilde and Hope were standing holding the hand she had held out to to each ot
442. r that apart, he welcome him, whispering words 60 THE FLEMMINGS. brought a softe
443. nderstand better what the art of cooking and this the spreading of a hospitable
444. he art of cooking and this the spreading of a hospitable table means. On ; occas
445. pples and nuts its — while the roaring fire cast ruddy ; light like a broad sm
446. fered by the Elder, to like hungry doing ample justice to the inviting fare, whi
447. ngry doing ample justice to the inviting fare, while Mrs. Elemming flitted aroun
448. o the inviting fare, while Mrs. Elemming flitted around, attending with compla-
449. Mrs. Elemming flitted around, attending with compla- THE FLEMMINGS. cent happin
450. rate her domestic superiority by showing that however sudden the emergency her w
451. the country-side, enter- to be something of a flirt tained two or three of her s
452. company. Some of the youngsters, seeing that he was a dull- looking fellow, beg
453. ters, seeing that he was a dull- looking fellow, began to chaff him, but the New
454. they sat in merry groups around, talking over their bear-hunts and other adventu
455. nd other adventures, until Mrs. Flemming, assisted by her daughters, cleared awa
456. ments of the feast and placed everything in perfect order, leav- ing only the El
457. d everything in perfect order, leav- ing only the Elder's table, upon which lay
458. a high chat with Nicholas Mrs. Flemming was chair; and seated, at last, in her
459. and Eeuben, ; 62 THE FLEMMINGS. sitting were ces near her, while a cheerful hum
460. is table, sat all, his throat, and going fell down, and a last deep silence upon
461. stepped bed if had known what was coming, and comforting prayers of his Faith ;
462. ad known what was coming, and comforting prayers of his Faith ; said the dear ol
463. at Almighty God had never ceased working miracles as great as these, by the hand
464. sent time faith ; his Faith was a living, deathless or sleeping, full of — nei
465. aith was a living, deathless or sleeping, full of — neither torpid dreams r ;
466. l. He sat and listened, gravely twirling his thumbs over each other, benignly th
467. ut, first lines of a familiar hymn being given they all sang together, old and y
468. ly, all those full round voices swelling out in devotional harmony to THE ELEMMI
469. eams and sleds on their The next morning, about ten o'clock, the young men were
470. men were to start with the road-breaking mission, to unite with other parties fo
471. bly get as far as Centre McCue was going with them, and Mrs. Flemming thankful t
472. e was going with them, and Mrs. Flemming thankful to him for going ; and with a
473. Mrs. Flemming thankful to him for going ; and with a womanly sort of pity for t
474. tone, but without the faintest relenting towards the superstitious and papistica
475. a basket with provisions, not forgetting a bottle of their best cider,which woul
476. ay the saints hould yez in their keeping, for your kindness to a homeless strang
477. ady, up where I slept; and may she bring yez both into the fold of her Son." No
478. ike Greek to them, so far as his meaning went then the waif of the storm, the si
479. und shoul- deres, w^ent his way, leaving what ? Little brown bills sparrows some
480. rown bills sparrows sometimes, in flying, drop from their a rare seed, which, fa
481. p from their a rare seed, which, falling into the earth, germinates and grows in
482. ows into strength and beauty, cover- ing with vines, blossoms, leaves and fruits
483. e ruined wall or blasted tree, affording shade and re- freshment to the noonday
484. ; the wind goes on its mis- sion wafting eastward the germs of mighty trees, whi
485. s of of His will, as prophets His coming, to plant the seed of His word in deser
486. e of the young men, to see about mending the double and saw that sleigh harness,
487. w a neatly took it wrapped package lying on it He up was addressed to "Mister Fl
488. e up was addressed to "Mister Flem- ming, from his grateful friend, Patrick McCu
489. cCue;" and of then he snapped the string, opened the wrapper, and found a book n
490. r, and found a book neatly bound turning to the title-page, he read Eeligious :
491. id of his desk, with a snap, and lifting the thinking : threw it "To waste time
492. k, with a snap, and lifting the thinking : threw it "To waste time over the page
493. o Boston by the person he heard of going there." Then he all went about his harn
494. en he all went about his harness-mending and forgot about it. Mrs. Flemming, sen
495. nding and forgot about it. Mrs. Flemming, sent who was busy over her Hope and Ev
496. but ran up first stairs, and on entering the their sight, it, room the object th
497. t, room the object that greeted standing upon the Bible where he had placed was
498. foot high, of the Blessed Virgin holding in her arms her divine Son, and lying n
499. ng in her arms her divine Son, and lying near her feet in was a picture of the C
500. xion, which she was represented standing by His Cross, bearing with Him the bitt
501. presented standing by His Cross, bearing with Him the bitter passion and It it p
502. —while they stood, Eva's head it. ing on Hope's shoulder, gazing upon "Only t
503. head it. ing on Hope's shoulder, gazing upon "Only think, Hope," said Eva in a
504. a in a low voice, it which had something of her father's tone in " only think of
505. ther's tone in " only think of her being there, close beside Him, seeing all tha
506. er being there, close beside Him, seeing all that was done and not able to give
507. t be Mary, the Mother of Jesus, standing there, for we read ; in the Bible ! tha
508. It better up and get back to our sewing. seems to I see no me that you might ke
509. ver comes and there's no use in fretting her by ; letting it her know. I will le
510. re's no use in fretting her by ; letting it her know. I will leave the image her
511. gh. Yes I can see old Father Bay peering at little over his big horn spectacles,
512. just because Patrick McCue Eva laughing, while she and her quilts. sister folde
513. l you, Hope, that Father Bay's preaching from now until doomsday could not give
514. mn prayer last hauled out a great string of black beads and that sign on himself
515. himself while made in- began whispering ; he counted them one by one deed he di
516. d never do. never heard her say anything about it ; but old lit- Sarah Gill, who
517. ld who had been in the habit of com- ing here to beg, was taken in out of a stor
518. t night in this room. Mother was leaning over and make her around mothfell her,
519. and make her around mothfell her, doing all she could to soothe more comfortabl
520. all at once she screamed, and fastening her long bony together on the fingers s
521. wn for mustard and hot water, was coming terrible cry ; up with them, she heard
522. cry ; up with them, she heard the rying in, found mother nearly suffocated and
523. nd the her, with squaw stark dead, lying across fingers 70 still THE FLEMMINGS.
524. ingers 70 still THE FLEMMINGS. clutching her throat. It was some time before bef
525. signs and witches. No ! There is nothing to dread here except the thought of the
526. except the thought of the dreadful thing that happened here long years ago, when
527. etch not conscious of what she was doing and fidelity had always loved her with
528. it," said Eva, as they went out, locking the door after them ; and having put aw
529. locking the door after them ; and having put away THE FLEMMINGS. the 71 comforts
530. down their stairs and were soon chatting merrily over sewing, about the grand sl
531. d were soon chatting merrily over sewing, about the grand sleighride they expect
532. hed over them there it, but was nestling light invisibly — cumbering it nothin
533. s nestling light invisibly — cumbering it nothing, so its was and giving them
534. light invisibly — cumbering it nothing, so its was and giving them no uneasine
535. bering it nothing, so its was and giving them no uneasiness by and spring into b
536. giving them no uneasiness by and spring into beautiful ; presence; but by-and-b
537. lished marble and over them from morning until morning, filled until night, from
538. and over them from morning until morning, filled until night, from night sometim
539. of a winter apple, and children shouting and laughing down the country, to the j
540. pple, and children shouting and laughing down the country, to the jingle of numb
541. It and near in scales of sweet-sounding was the gay season of the sedate purita
542. orhood, and tea was drunk, much visiting was done, much and warm hospitalities e
543. there was and scandal, and match- making, and even merry-making, and heart-burn-
544. and match- making, and even merry-making, and heart-burn- ; 72 ings, THE ELEMMIN
545. ty then more than one or two disparaging hints were thrown out against Elder Fle
546. s were thrown out against Elder Flemming for giving the man hospitality 1 ; " if
547. wn out against Elder Flemming for giving the man hospitality 1 ; " if r he must
548. nities to the " he winked, even allowing them to dance sound of the viol" in the
549. f the viol" in the assemblies concluding, with : of the wicked ; " there is some
550. h : of the wicked ; " there is something un- sound at the core," —meaning him.
551. thing un- sound at the core," —meaning him. among them ; And there was they th
552. ht no want of kindness they were serving God, and vigilant in His service, when
553. lf-righteousness meant, without dreaming that they were clothed garment duty to
554. defend — THE FLEMMINGS. 73 everything in their religion in the sternest antit
555. ere is as antithetical to the real thing as darkness light. to This was the rall
556. darkness light. to This was the rallying point where all agreed; scat- the forlo
557. scat- the forlorn hope which kept tering, them from wildly infidelity alert, ; a
558. wildly infidelity alert, ; and straying into open vigilant, the enemy which kep
559. ild- at times, when stranded among ering rocks of the right of " private interpr
560. s, until there was danger of their being lost in sects of the utter darkness. So
561. of this region, with the sun sprinkling millions of lesser suns on ice-crowned
562. ndly of heart as most people, fulfilling all the duties of the natural laws with
563. ndostanee or Central Africa. But nothing of this disturbed the sedate carnival-
564. re and up the mountain slopes stretching back from its frozen waters. Eva, Hope,
565. then's, lifted Huldah, who was expecting them, into the midst of them, smotherin
566. them, into the midst of them, smothering her laughter under the ; soft furry man
567. allow along the up-country road, singing chat- ting and laughing aerial motion,
568. the up-country road, singing chat- ting and laughing aerial motion, by turns, e
569. ry road, singing chat- ting and laughing aerial motion, by turns, enjoying the e
570. ughing aerial motion, by turns, enjoying the ecstatic of a and the prospect good
571. E Vie THE INNER LIFE OF WOLFERT FLEMMING. Never shone the sun on a scene more gr
572. Whiteface Hill ;" " to " Red and rising beyond these, the chain stretching nort
573. ising beyond these, the chain stretching northward, whose cheeks could be seen l
574. seen looked like jeweled crests flashing in the sunlight, as if fashioned by gia
575. d they appear through the crisp dazzling atmosphere, so gracefully did the long
576. t like jewels on its bosom, lay gleaming in the sunshine, a level sea of crystal
577. e, a level sea of crystal, its murmuring waters holding gay revel beneath their
578. of crystal, its murmuring waters holding gay revel beneath their roofing of ice.
579. holding gay revel beneath their roofing of ice. This region was not thickly set
580. nt roar, — 76 THE FLEMMINGS. thrilling had not yet sent the echoes back with a
581. e from the where they had sur- " setting sun " to revisit the scenes roamed at w
582. ers of the lake, brown cottages nestling between the mill here slopes, a wind- a
583. opes, a wind- and there, and the meeting-house as near it the centre of the scat
584. as listened to with respect. The meeting-house was open every Sabbath day by a s
585. ate resurin- rection of Christ, dreaming that they are it debted to her authorit
586. E FLEMMINGS. words of their well-meaning teacher, an old 77 man who had been nur
587. law as he understood it, disintegrating the Scriptures blindly and at will with
588. unction, and had devoted the to building labors of his tion, life upon a sandy f
589. s of the devil and thus in the believing, much of their shadow of severe restrai
590. THE FLEMMINGS. matters got to measuring the morality and purity of their own li
591. f and the unregenerate together, looking as had all taken a dose of the waters o
592. doctrine " until they felt like marching into the lightnings of those Sinai, whi
593. s who cared looked as if they were going to be hanged. Then it was all over unti
594. n it was all over until the next meeting and they went their ways the members
595. ir ways the members — — — carrying nothing with them to sanctify and sweet
596. the members — — — carrying nothing with them to sanctify and sweeten the r
597. h ; Holy Scriptures in there was nothing done for the sake of Him who preached t
598. y believed He had done all, and anything that they might do would be idle works
599. pere- rogation ; so they went on reading the Bible, and thinking of "Free Grace"
600. went on reading the Bible, and thinking of "Free Grace" and "Predestination," a
601. e" and "Predestination," and symbolizing the teachings of Christ, and driv- THE
602. of Christ, and driv- THE FLEMMINGS. ing sharp 79 other bargains with each betwe
603. s with each between whiles, never losing sight of their worldly affairs, until a
604. ther Sabbath rolled round. Mrs. Flemming was one of the stern disciples of Fathe
605. husband, although a just man and living a godly life before the world and his b
606. — and in their private conby broaching of the versations startled the old mini
607. y, when amidst the pearly lights resting on the glistening peaks and sharp edges
608. pearly lights resting on the glistening peaks and sharp edges of the snow-cover
609. brown mare the minister was seen bearing down towards the and clothed Flemming h
610. ng down towards the and clothed Flemming homestead. Sitting erect in a severe su
611. and clothed Flemming homestead. Sitting erect in a severe suit of black, his bl
612. mare would have looked like a sprawk ing blot on the fair face of nature but tha
613. hich streamed over his shoulders, giving to the cold white foreground of the lan
614. tle dash of scarlet it needed. in Biding with him was a young furs, man wrapped
615. sian sable, from which escaped a curling fringe of yellow This was Father Bay's
616. ay's grandson and ward, hair. who having graduated at Yale was studying law in B
617. ho having graduated at Yale was studying law in Boston. He had come up to the "W
618. suppressed yawns — and was now riding over with him to visit his old friends,
619. himself that Eva Flemthe world all ming was unchanged went well with him. ; not
620. at home, and he received a warm greeting; on seeing their old their delight play
621. d he received a warm greeting; on seeing their old their delight playmate taking
622. their old their delight playmate taking much of the edge off the reproving salu
623. aking much of the edge off the reproving salutations of the minister, whom Mrs.
624. ions of the minister, whom Mrs. Flemming took immediate charge of, helping him i
625. emming took immediate charge of, helping him ic off with his wraps and giving hi
626. ing him ic off with his wraps and giving him a comfortafire, ble seat near the a
627. ities of a feast while she kept thinking and could not get it out of her head "
628. was glad to go away with Elder Flemming to the quiet warmed parlor in the new p
629. orge Merill, full of delight at see- ing them all again in the beautiful quaint
630. ented irreverence; while father twirling his Ray sat bolt upright, thumbs over e
631. right, thumbs over each other and gazing fire with a displeased countenance into
632. ntenance into the as if he were settling their final doom, So he was as much as
633. ere relieved to go ont from at his going. among them "When they were comfortably
634. e Merill came down with me. He's go- ing away in a day or two, and wanted to see
635. n. "I have come to think," said Flemming in his slow level tones, " that there a
636. r fathers. There seems to be some- thing wanting to hold them from running here
637. s. There seems to be some- thing wanting to hold them from running here and ther
638. thing wanting to hold them from running here and there after strange doctrines.
639. n the dust cipline. all orthodox meaning and dislike yourself i But when a man e
640. milk of the whose head already whitening in the ser- vice of the filled —then,
641. he filled —then, "Wolfert way Flemming, I am with fearful misgivings as to his
642. ost despair in fact, I have been wishing for some time past have arisen in tures
643. ities which my mind listen, from reading the Scrip- Flemming. I can tell " I am
644. listen, from reading the Scrip- Flemming. I can tell " I am ready to you nothing
645. . I can tell " I am ready to you nothing on 84 THE FLEMMINGS. doctrinal points t
646. help to you, at your service." Flemming got up and walked to and fro the room t
647. be as I was at first but how can seeing that I believe Jesus Christ to be the "
648. a limited sense, or is go beyond meaning, there your condemnation. But I do not
649. child, we deny that it has a even saving, a cleansing that significance or power
650. y that it has a even saving, a cleansing that significance or power, when we kno
651. rth of the spirit is the essential thing How can water wash the total depravity
652. o not Absurd " ! know how" said Flemming, with a " I troubled expression in his
653. res shall even these enter without being 'born of water;' and what becomes of to
654. as of Jesus shall re- a figurative thing. Paul says Arise and be baptized every
655. e Church, and gave himself for cleansing Life.' it it, that He might sanctify it
656. disturbs me ; but while we are thanking God that we are not as we stand blind a
657. ch other men, "Wolfert, Wolfert Flemming! that old Bible of you take such pride,
658. imself." " Beware then, Wolfert Flemming. how you turn the word of ercises of Go
659. ombat these doubts. Pray without ceasing, and both hope deliver you from may He
660. 88 THE FLEMMINGS. CHAPTER MRS. FLEMMING IS VII. THANKFUL FOR THE PROSPERITY AND
661. ER FAMILY. " Yes, I will pray on, hoping for light," said Flemming in his grave,
662. ray on, hoping for light," said Flemming in his grave, level tones. ; " So far m
663. d my soul on a lie." is Wolfert Flemming's mental condition at all side one not
664. at all side one not uncommon to thinking religious minds outthe One True Fold, t
665. ividual experience ; they go stum- bling on over their doubts and misgivings, an
666. t a science of eternal principles coming from Himself, sealed God by the preciou
667. shaken after the tempests, and buffeting of nearly nineteen centuries ing hills,
668. ffeting of nearly nineteen centuries ing hills, more glorious her battlements gl
669. more glorious her battlements glittering with the souls she has won, her watch-t
670. e has won, her watch-towers enlightening the ends of the earth ; awaiting the co
671. htening the ends of the earth ; awaiting the consummation of time to as- cend in
672. l heavens. Our good Puritan knew nothing of this True : 90 Faith ; THE FLEMMINGS
673. than the ; priestcraft of Egypt a thing so full of the abomination of desoits l
674. it ; ; made him almighty God in bearing with but beyond this mistaken view he k
675. eyond this mistaken view he knew nothing he was as ignorant as any pagan in the
676. Dogmas, Precepts and usages. He was ing only one of many God-fearing, truth-see
677. He was ing only one of many God-fearing, truth-seek- men who, like Saul of Tars
678. l of Tarsus, think they are best serving God when in their blindness they rage a
679. Wolfert," said the old minister, laying his the strong man ; " hand upon the bo
680. n household ; pray, pray without ceasing." Jacob, overwearied with fatigue in hi
681. to Mesopotamia, took a stone and laying it under his head gels, slept there and
682. ery gate of heaven to him, Mrs. Flemming came in to invite them out to dinner, a
683. vite them out to dinner, and her beaming smile was somewhat checked when she not
684. oth saints. The young people were having a cheerful time around the bright heart
685. e bright hearth of the old room, judging from the hum and laughter that came sou
686. the hum and laughter that came sounding through the open doors; but it smote up
687. some and innocent young hearts chilling a cold wave, them into sudden silence.
688. ii. to be laugh- 92 THE FLEMMINGS. 1 ing on the brink of woe." at Then he looked
689. while in their hearts they were thinking then, as if "how unlovely religion is;"
690. is;" satisfied with this outward seeming, he folded his hands, and closing his e
691. eeming, he folded his hands, and closing his eyes began to " offer thanks." It w
692. rge Merill wondered a harpy or something would not fly down and in seize the goo
693. the Elder, the minister and Mrs. Hemming in got into a talk "justification about
694. of Father Bay's presence. But everything comes ; to an end, and so did the dinne
695. ness that kept them from Said he : being converted." You harden your small voice
696. you repent." her children Mrs. Flemming sighed a genuine sigh from the depths o
697. E FLEMMINGS. " to indeed " but one thing needf ul fect mate them per- —but wis
698. d and make ; try religion a more winning and lovely yearned tenderly over true t
699. lovely yearned tenderly over true thing to them for his heart them that they mi
700. s of God. and faithful ser- That evening the Elder and his wife over the fire sa
701. r and his wife over the fire sat talking —the young : people having gone off i
702. sat talking —the young : people having gone off in a sleigh to the old meeting
703. gone off in a sleigh to the old meeting-house, a mile distant, to attend the si
704. e, a mile distant, to attend the singing class. They were quite alone, Said Mrs.
705. hey were quite alone, Said Mrs. Flemming " I think, father, we ought to feel ver
706. hope that we are I will Elder smoothing her hair. " on. And tell you what, fath
707. ay to it who oughtn't and they are going of that marry so suitably, and will hav
708. athen's a is and Huldah a good, managing, wife ; natty girl, and will make Nick
709. w in his eyes to-day I ever saw anything." it What a clever ; little mother is,"
710. ther is," said the you'll Elder, smiling to sit " and what a proud one be down a
711. dren and dren some of these Thanksgiving-days. are mistaken, it is likely, grand
712. ," was so deceived my said Mrs. Flemming, poking up the with the tongs. "It woul
713. o deceived my said Mrs. Flemming, poking up the with the tongs. "It would be a g
714. she likes him," an- swered Mrs. Flemming. " will That go. Why, mother, the old h
715. d be very lonesome ; but, to my thinking, young people are best off to themselve
716. appiness passed over her face, softening away every hard then " It will line unt
717. ss, to have them us, father ; all coming to see have Keuben " and j^ou know we s
718. ed. " Ah well ! there is no use fretting our hearts to fiddle-strings over Keube
719. trings over Keuben. I dare say something will turn " up to suit him," replied sh
720. to suit him," replied she, also sighing. But I feel pretty well tuckered out, a
721. ed feet after their cold ride —talking : over the evening after the manner of
722. cold ride —talking : over the evening after the manner of young girls "I thin
723. handsome." "Yes, George is good-looking. I don't think replied the city has cha
724. ously." " "Well I guess that's something ; I have to be like to sit up betimes a
725. ike to sit up betimes all in the morning. if it here night were not for that," s
726. t were not for that," said Hope, getting for rest —" good night up ; to begin
727. en Soon Hope's ; low, soft sat breathing told she was asleep but Eva still mo- 9
728. r Bible from a small work-table standing near, opened it and drew out the pictur
729. full of deep thought, her heart stirring to strange pulsations, upon it. The pic
730. ter where she was or what she w as doing, the thought of the Virgin Mother; and
731. re, beyond the natural fact of her being the Mother of Jesus. She had read ton,
732. er of the Gracchi, the mother of Washing- and many other noble and true mothers
733. soul had glowed with a sort of burn- ing ire and pity at the sevenfold martyrdom
734. sus to her, it actually seemed something new think of it now she came to that th
735. let which would not her alone, and being possessed of a clear analytical brain a
736. head upon her pillow, stead of dropping off to sleep she got to wondering how t
737. opping off to sleep she got to wondering how this Mother could only stand weepin
738. how this Mother could only stand weeping and sinless suffering by the Cross upon
739. only stand weeping and sinless suffering by the Cross upon which her it Son was
740. Cross upon which her it Son was expiring in cruel torments, when seemed only the
741. ice to protest endurance without lifting hand or ; 100 THE FLEMMINGS. against th
742. termined to begin, the very next morning, at the of Genesis, first chapter and s
743. e. Eva could not make asleep murmur- ing " unlike other mothers." Unlike other m
744. ! Tes ! promised from the all beginning, this Virgin Mother was unlike this fir
745. was to be repaired; this which the King of glory was to enter this Virgin expec
746. and dumb and passive in her woe, bearing in her soul the cruel wounds and bitter
747. e Him every nerve and fibre of her being pulsing with the dread sword-thrust of
748. ery nerve and fibre of her being pulsing with the dread sword-thrust of grief th
749. hroughout His dolorous Passion ; sharing every pang, immolating her nature, and
750. Passion ; sharing every pang, immolating her nature, and offering with great Him
751. ang, immolating her nature, and offering with great Him w ork r the sacrifice of
752. were like the fibres of a root in a ing themselves towards a slender thread of
753. towards a slender thread of light coming through a narrow prison bounds crevice,
754. narrow prison bounds crevice, unknowing of the boundless wealth of sunshine and
755. pulsations subside, and the sun gleaming down into the clear transparent depths,
756. E SHADOW. It was true. There was nothing, humanly speaking, for the Flemmings to
757. rue. There was nothing, humanly speaking, for the Flemmings to wish ,were for. T
758. py in each ; other and, as Mrs. Flemming said : " What better It is could they h
759. ut she scarcely gave herself time during the busy week days to feel troubled abo
760. days to feel troubled about it, finding her solace in ; her household and famil
761. s a chronic counter irritant, perplexing her without measure verses, ; and now t
762. , ; and now that he had taken to writing and drawing pictures and faces upon the
763. that he had taken to writing and drawing pictures and faces upon the wall, barn
764. chrome red, which was left from painting a new out-building, she had a perfect f
765. as left from painting a new out-building, she had a perfect fever of the heart,
766. d then vented '••what 1 in wondering oh 'earth 'would become .- of him!" to
767. ld not endure to think and he a Flemming George Merill staid on from day to day,
768. time at the old homestead then something happened which gave them all great happ
769. s. John Wilde expe- rienced the " saving evidence," and professed conversion, an
770. w hours old, beside the bed of his dying father. His heart was softening when he
771. is dying father. His heart was softening when he thought ; of this and he felt i
772. t ; of this and he felt in administering this christian rite that he was redeemi
773. his christian rite that he was redeeming a pledge made long ago to a dying man,
774. eeming a pledge made long ago to a dying man, and he rejoiced that he was spared
775. red for the work, no doubt ever crossing his mind as it. to the method, or his r
776. o the method, or his right in performing John ; Wilde was always a good, moral y
777. ose who were " members" and a safe thing for a young to it those who were not, r
778. t because they thought man just starting in life be a religious. little, Nichola
779. eligious. little, Nicholas told Flemming grumbled over that he " expected and Ho
780. happy together, except Wolfert Flemming, whose doubts and perplexities increase
781. ties increased instead of of diminishing ; and the more he pored over his old th
782. of Moravian doctrine, to seek a standing- place for his feet for —the deeper h
783. ound the clue yet, and he went stumbling on in the shadow of darkness, blindly g
784. the shadow of darkness, blindly groping for the keystone of the arch, which see
785. res, steamships, literary pri- vateering, and cheap dissemination of philosophy.
786. n had not written, and one heard nothing of " Symbolic Christs," of Christs," of
787. e been drawn into an insiduous, cheating ideas, and destructive maelstrom of mea
788. tations, his whole mind w as bent on ing to reconcile the glaring discrepancy be
789. as bent on ing to reconcile the glaring discrepancy between the literal words a
790. rac; tically or theoretically so finding that this per- petual study of what bec
791. y a deeper mystery to him, was beginning to make him morose and gloomy, he got i
792. oomy, he got into his cutter one morning, and went a day's journey up the countr
793. ng the pines, where his men were felling timber. Here, with axe in hand, he hewe
794. wed away at the great trees from morning until night, with such force in his sin
795. was ever brought down beWolfert Flemming's blood and he brought a good circulate
796. e he found mental occupation in settling- two or three quarrels among the rough
797. week he went back with a vague yearning and longing after an indefinable someth
798. t back with a vague yearning and longing after an indefinable something which co
799. d longing after an indefinable something which could settle the difficulties and
800. isturbed him, for therein Divine nothing. Truth If itself, which meant everythin
801. Truth If itself, which meant everything or they meant everything, ? why was he
802. eant everything or they meant everything, ? why was he in darkness or doubt all
803. kness or doubt all If they meant nothing, then If Christ religion was a lie. was
804. uth not, if He was And then^His teaching was an imposture. this proposition "Wol
805. this proposition "Wolfert upon Flemming's mental struggles hinged themselves. H
806. e strength of his will and understanding, that Christ was the Son of God, Redeem
807. the very he could walk without stumbling, and out contradictions and this law of
808. nd this law of Faith should be something divine and perfect, withpitfalls. It be
809. selves. How ful could a thorn tree bring forth his Bibfe one day, figs ? He open
810. th sent Me, I also send you and Flemming's mind, even in the ordinary it affairs
811. wers and withheld the means of executing them. He it, inferred, then, that this
812. he words were as meaningless as anything in Joe Smith's Bible. Had this power be
813. e. These were some of the doubts arising from his study of the Scriptures but th
814. study of the Scriptures but the crowning and most weighty one of in the sixth ch
815. he had always held as the only drifting farther and farther true rule of Faith,
816. rue rule of Faith, was now his stumbling block* Was he a hypocrite ? This though
817. hame but he feared that it was something like it to be outwardly holding with th
818. omething like it to be outwardly holding with the all shallow belief of his sect
819. shallow belief of his sect and doubting the time. What right had he to set up t
820. imes thought, "be my brain, or something corrupt in my THE FLEMMINGS. soul. 109
821. his soul ; mands and he went on plodding the life, routine of his everyday pract
822. tine of his everyday practical wrestling with the strong Angel in the darkness u
823. a snade more reticent, a fact resulting from his mental exercises, which he now
824. scussion by he should try to let telling fall him one day " that back into the o
825. ence his doubts, and serve God according to the lights he had;" which the old mi
826. t " sacramental Sabbaths" Elder Flemming was not in his usual place in "meeting.
827. g was not in his usual place in "meeting." that he He heard in the had gone up a
828. a brother so looked for the shortcoming up to by other their ; professors as a
829. other their ; professors as a " burning and shining light" and example on which
830. ; professors as a " burning and shining light" and example on which they sought
831. d all own lives, was no man but Flemming heard and only replied, ;" that he had
832. entirely satisfactory, was worth, coming from him, a hundred excuses of any othe
833. ings were, and heard them congratulating each other, with thankful hearts, for t
834. Of course we leave out Wolfert Flemming's mental disquiet, because his family h
835. nly over your head and flit like a thing of omen over the waving heads of the go
836. lit like a thing of omen over the waving heads of the golden grain, shadowing th
837. ing heads of the golden grain, shadowing the poppies the among the corn and the
838. nd the asters in meadow, and, on looking up, shading your it eyes with your hand
839. s in meadow, and, on looking up, shading your it eyes with your hand, seen that
840. hand, seen that was a hawk or sail- ing through the amber hued air? perstitious
841. ad no its su- dread of the hawk fleeting THE FLEMMINGS. shadow, but it Ill eerie
842. w drop out on your head, and go creeping and gliding over the beautiful things o
843. n your head, and go creeping and gliding over the beautiful things of earth arou
844. with him, among full of his outbuilding, the amiable endeavor to be useful, but
845. vor to be useful, but, as usual, getting himself in the planned things into pris
846. things into prise, for way and throwing well disorder, much to his own sur- he
847. oked chiefly at his motives and aspaying much attention to his pirations, withou
848. ut ability to execute; and Mrs. Flemming and Eva were employed in some household
849. a were employed in some household sewing in the family room, gossiping cheerily
850. old sewing in the family room, gossiping cheerily over the fairs of the little a
851. ittle afall neighborhood, but abstaining from malice or slander —that was one
852. both the women thought and Mrs. Flemming " they had never seen him so noble-look
853. they had never seen him so noble-looking and attractive. They shook hands " ; in
854. boot. mean any disrespect, Mrs. Flemming; but, except one or two, here and there
855. ome of his friends are forever preaching to me, that I get heartily sick of it."
856. ness his expense," said Mrs. at Flemming. is "Yes, my ; grandfather is a good ma
857. grandfather is a good man, Mrs. Flemming but he troubled with spiritual hypo- ch
858. f things ; in fact, I don't call a thing that rable, religion ; makes a man mise
859. these THE FLEMMINGS. days I'll 113 going away, to- try to, perhaps. I am morrow,
860. hands with everybody," he said, looking at Eva. " I guess we shall all miss you
861. e great city folk," said Mrs. Flem- ming. " No," he answered simply ; " I shall
862. orget like half " them. There is nothing in Boston that I so well as being here.
863. othing in Boston that I so well as being here. Where is everybody to-day ? " Fat
864. uben are among the stock, lookto see ing after some pigs that need currying. Nic
865. e ing after some pigs that need currying. Nick and Hope went up Huldah ; but I e
866. them back presently," said Mrs. Flemming. Then it seemed to occur last to her th
867. the moment, might wish to say something to Eva, and she rose up saying, "she wo
868. something to Eva, and she rose up saying, "she would go and see where father and
869. ee where father and Ruby were, and bring them in she knew they would be sorry to
870. would be sorry to hear that he was going away " ; and she gathered up her work,
871. ved you, and the hope of one day winning you for wife has been the incentive to
872. " Don't, Eva ; don't " he cried, putting forth his ; ! hand with a deprecatory g
873. on't tell me that all my patient waiting and love goes for nothing. I couldn't s
874. atient waiting and love goes for nothing. I couldn't stand that ; indeed I could
875. MMINGS. " No, there is 115 sort, nothing of that George ; on the contrary, I do
876. vantages, and I have a tho- rough liking and respect have my father and brothers
877. r person towards whom your little liking goes a farther than this dutiful kindre
878. d for a moment in her eyes. Then pitying him gently, for the breaking up of the
879. hen pitying him gently, for the breaking up of the hopes that had brightened his
880. come when you come, but letters. nothing more," she tone. said in a grave determ
881. e in, and there was a great hand-shaking, in the midst of 116 THE FLEMMINGS. whi
882. George was to Father Bay's to see going, and went up him ; but he was not at ho
883. e sorrow they all expressed at his g$ing away, it should have consoled him, but
884. e leave and go. CHAPTER IX. THE FLOATING SHADOW. " Don't forget old friends, Geo
885. Since I am sure may I hope for something more " ?'' You could not be too near to
886. o us, George," said the Elder, something at a loss how to answer him ; THE FLEMM
887. uth. " And for you, Mrs. wife," Flemming —you know Eva " my he blurted out. Yo
888. e shock of his strange, outspoken wooing, and the sudden fulfilment of her hopes
889. answer. all I told you that and knowing that you have no secrets tell from one
890. o very frank equally so ; in your wooing, I be and I positively decline, before
891. be too hasty, Eva !" said Mrs. Flemming, whose breath was almost taken away by
892. tter. life Besides, what is man throwing his backwards in such waste For myself
893. - tend to marry. the family." I am going to be the old maid of " "Well, good-by,
894. person should treat another, by telling you the truth. I have no idea of marryi
895. ou the truth. I have no idea of marrying. It does not seem to me that marry- ing
896. . It does not seem to me that marry- ing should be the sole end and aim of a wom
897. could not love you," she said, pittying the grief and disappoint- ment that she
898. nd disappoint- ment that she saw surging up " Yes, Eva, because I in his eyes. k
899. win your love," he said quickly, hoping that she would relent. "There has been
900. Eva, to whom and the scene was becoming more painful and embarrassing. left The
901. s becoming more painful and embarrassing. left Then she turned abruptly away Abo
902. off as if his the room, without throwing another word later she or look towards
903. k towards him. heard his horse galloping rider had dug the spurs pretty deeply i
904. and angry at his presumption in assuming the position he did after she had posit
905. ace in the presence of the family. being treated Eva Flemming could not brook li
906. f the family. being treated Eva Flemming could not brook like a capricious child
907. e stone pitcher of cider, slowly warming at ; on the other side the cat was curl
908. asleep feet, Reuben's as he sat reading. They talked but there was to each othe
909. lked but there was to each other, trying to be cheerful ; a restraint; and one a
910. they dropped into silence, which nothing interrupted except the crackling of the
911. nothing interrupted except the crackling of the fire, the rustle of paper, as th
912. as the Elder and Reuben —both reading —turned At the click pages of their b
913. s, and the sharp, rapid of Mrs. Flemming's knitting needles. last the Elder clos
914. sharp, rapid of Mrs. Flemming's knitting needles. last the Elder closed his book
915. t the Elder closed his book, and looking around at the serious faces, he said, "
916. s we whatever it is," said Mrs. Flemming, in her quick, sharp way. Nicholas thru
917. hands down into his pockets, and tilting THE FLEMMINGS. back his chair, looked u
918. ters 121 fes- tooned with sweet-smelling herbs overhead, and whistled to himself
919. er Boston ; told me that he had outlying lots in that it is when the fast city s
920. ity stretched out to them —which doing — George would be worth hundreds of o
921. think of that, now," said Mrs. Flemming, with a quick snap of her fine black ey
922. be sure yon would," said Hope, speaking for the first time, " and I should be a
923. Perhaps not. I think there is something bewill tween you and the old pictures t
924. ou and the old pictures that later bring sooner or you together, Ruby." " Don't
925. er ; eyes flashed with unshed tears ting too the strain was get- much for her. "
926. not expect to go about the world mooning and daubing, and doing nothing but read
927. o go about the world mooning and daubing, and doing nothing but read." Reuben si
928. the world mooning and daubing, and doing nothing but read." Reuben sighed, picke
929. d mooning and daubing, and doing nothing but read." Reuben sighed, picked up his
930. soon forgot the family discussion going on around His mother always " let such
931. ck and chill of it. to escape, shivering with And I think, Eva, since we have co
932. d I think, Eva, since we have come ining, after to talk of it," continued Mrs. F
933. k of it," continued Mrs. Flem- quenching Reuben, " that you have 124 THE FLEMMIN
934. e Merrill." ; clone a very foolish thing to reject "I am sorry, mother," she sai
935. changed their mind," said Mrs. Flemming. Prudence Rogers ; why, she and Sam ; h
936. Eva ; repentance different and changing one's mind are perhaps things," smile.
937. rhaps things," smile. said Mrs. Flemming, with a provoking " I shall never repen
938. le. said Mrs. Flemming, with a provoking " I shall never repent of this, mother,
939. other, rest asit. sured of I ask nothing better than to stay here with you and I
940. am ; disappointed there's no use denying with I should be glad to think I'd have
941. was at last touched. said Mrs. Flemming, whose mother-heart, always true and go
942. held sway long enough — it was pulsing to the right music over, now; and Eva w
943. went sat at her feet, lifted and drawing up a low cushion, and leaning upon her
944. nd drawing up a low cushion, and leaning upon her knees, angry with me, darling
945. g upon her knees, angry with me, darling ?" " her eyes appealare not ingly to he
946. eplied, while she laid down her knitting and smoothed the soft, golden brown hai
947. disappointed. I had counted so on seeing you a great lady down to Boston " "Wife
948. e. "I " It's no use," said Mrs. Flemming. mean 126 just THE FLEMMINGS. what 1 sa
949. EMMINGS. what 1 say. I counted on seeing her a fine lady in Boston, riding in he
950. seeing her a fine lady in Boston, riding in her dressed in rich that the silks,
951. rriage and laces and jewels, and showing hills are New Hampshire no way behind o
952. ace in her hands. Eva buried her burning felt humiliated to think that her been
953. humiliated to think that her been having such sordid own mother had thoughts abo
954. ak for several minutes, but kept walking up and down, while the knitting needles
955. walking up and down, while the knitting needles clicked with vim. his kindly, r
956. Hope, " I declare I feel as if snuffing the candle. we had ; been in a Scotch m
957. n a Scotch mist." And they tried " being as they were before " but the shadow ha
958. their life was broken. But Mrs. Flemming began to talk of farm matters and the c
959. n to talk of farm matters and the coming spring work, a subject always est to he
960. lk of farm matters and the coming spring work, a subject always est to her, full
961. nd asked, lot, " What are It's you going to do with that corner mire." father ?
962. ied ; " they are splendid winter feeding for stock, and will make your butter lo
963. llars if a barrel." " Yes, they'll bring about that, I can get them if into the
964. enough. late, But we have a soggy spring, how then ?" " It'll be a poor chance f
965. d hard to de- on people who have nothing but their crops pend on. Have you seen
966. ntered my head," exclaimed Mrs. Flemming. are "Why! what Deacon and else, you th
967. "Why! what Deacon and else, you thinking about? The idea of Sneathen throwing yo
968. ing about? The idea of Sneathen throwing you over for anybody just now, too, whe
969. ody just now, too, when you are clearing something on your outlay !" 128 " It do
970. ow, too, when you are clearing something on your outlay !" 128 " It does THE FLE
971. nonsense, even to think of such a thing," put in Nicholas, who had been it last
972. n Nicholas, who had been it last amusing himself " tickling the cat's ear with a
973. been it last amusing himself " tickling the cat's ear with a straw. The Deacon
974. ith a straw. The Deacon was only talking about if night, and seemed very anxious
975. . he?" remarked the Elder, still folding his hands behind him, while he "I walke
976. rofitable one." CHAPTEE X. MRS. FLEMMING HAS A GREAT SHOCK. The snow was beginni
977. AS A GREAT SHOCK. The snow was beginning ern slopes of the star-wort shot soft i
978. et, much much frost in the for ploughing, and frost in the air for the regular o
979. t. but there was no lack of work getting their The men were busy THE FLEMMINGS.
980. men were busy THE FLEMMINGS. 129 farming implements in order, burning brush, hau
981. 129 farming implements in order, burning brush, hauling manure, and mending fenc
982. lements in order, burning brush, hauling manure, and mending fences. The Elder -
983. rning brush, hauling manure, and mending fences. The Elder -was busy fencing sis
984. ding fences. The Elder -was busy fencing sisted in in a piece of poor land, whic
985. a piece of poor land, which per- growing nothing but wire grass, to turn his she
986. of poor land, which per- growing nothing but wire grass, to turn his sheep into
987. to turn his sheep into as soon as spring opened, and on rainy days in manufactur
988. ened, and on rainy days in manufacturing the framework of a hay-tedder, having b
989. ng the framework of a hay-tedder, having bought the metal teeth from a travellin
990. bought the metal teeth from a travelling agent of the inventor the preceding au-
991. ling agent of the inventor the preceding au- tumn. Hav-tedders were novelties th
992. f hands to get it in in time, and having seen a hay-tedder at work somewhere try
993. -great much mechanical genius, and being very interested in his experiment, had
994. is experiment, had suc- ceeded in making, from the diagram furnished by the agen
995. happy at last in the prospect of making himself useful he was to paint the wind
996. tead, a : plan about whiph Mrs. Flemming had serious misgivings, for she was " m
997. E FLEMMINGS. at would have faces staring out els, them from the panlike a circus
998. s were also busy she was to be preparing Hope's wedding outfit, for married in M
999. y she was to be preparing Hope's wedding outfit, for married in May to John Wild
1000.em no its af- time ; while Mrs. Flemming helped everybody, governed her househol
1001. reference to the comfort and well-being of all, and had, every day, two hours l
1002.y, two hours left for her carpet weaving. One letter had come read to Eva from i
1003.ve unopened to her it, father, declining altogether to who put away into a priva
1004.ubject and the work were too interesting by far for that, and their nimble tongu
1005.ongues and fin- gers, instead of showing signs of weariness, grew Mrs. Flem- mor
1006.ore voluble and busy every moment. niing and Miss Deborah were entertaining each
1007.niing and Miss Deborah were entertaining each other in their peculiar way, Mrs.
1008.their peculiar way, Mrs. wardly fretting to lose at the Flemming inover the two
1009. wardly fretting to lose at the Flemming inover the two hours she was obliged ;
1010.hours she was obliged ; loom but nothing loth, and with a pardonable motherly pr
1011.e was an anto take uncomfortable-looking person, and had a way of cocking up her
1012.looking person, and had a way of cocking up her nose and chin to some, square ai
1013.ddressed any one, which was embarrassing and al- most terrifying to such as had
1014.was embarrassing and al- most terrifying to such as had weak nerves. Slie had ne
1015. invested in that shape for safe keeping and not for ornament, she having a drea
1016.keeping and not for ornament, she having a dread of banks, and as little love fo
1017.ance practicable theories. So, according to Miss Debby, there was no cure for to
1018. age of reason and obtained the " saving evidence " of conversion ; and she and
1019.f it, which resulted in Huldah's setting everything that her aunt advocated at u
1020. resulted in Huldah's setting everything that her aunt advocated at utter defian
1021.d at utter defiance, and heartily hating everything that she liked. to So Huldah
1022.defiance, and heartily hating everything that she liked. to So Huldah loved "Sir
1023.Huldah loved "Sir Charles dance, to sing songs, to read Grandison," and " Evelin
1024.ver read the Bible at her aunt's bidding all, or at unless she felt like it ; in
1025.ight when the wintry storms were howling outside her windows, the thought of God
1026.e heavens and thrust her into the living and eternal flames of woe in, ; the God
1027. came like shadow into her heart, making her tremble and shrink even in the brig
1028.arted all influences, into pagan, flying from voluntary thoughts of this religio
1029. and, like an epicurean priestess trying to cover the skeleton with flowers. Onl
1030.skeleton with flowers. Only in one thing had she profited by her aunt's guardian
1031.st" ; young girl She liked house-keeping and having good that she taste and ambi
1032. girl She liked house-keeping and having good that she taste and ambition, she b
1033. Debby had already snubbed Mrs. Flemming — it was her way — and taken the gi
1034.e Elder came in from his fence- building, his face all aglow with ruddy health,
1035. ruddy health, and gave cordial greeting to his guests, whom he was glad to see
1036.e as neighbors, and because their coming seemed like a friendly indication of wh
1037.a renewal of the partnership, concerning which he had, somehow, without any tang
1038.airly seated, and they were .all waiting for dinner, Miss Debby stuck up her chi
1039.Miss Debby stuck up her chin, and taking sure aim at him with her eyes, said sha
1040. " Wal, now, Elder, I hear you're making one of things." them tedder THE FLEMMIN
1041. ; I have it nearly finished. good thing for harvesting hay." " It's a great sha
1042.arly finished. good thing for harvesting hay." " It's a great shame, to my think
1043.y." " It's a great shame, to my thinking. It's taking the bread from the poor. I
1044.great shame, to my thinking. It's taking the bread from the poor. I don't hold w
1045.in " still !" she snorted out, elevating her higher. ; Labor's hard to get somet
1046.d last looked like a grasshopper kicking It seems fooling with Providence, and l
1047.e a grasshopper kicking It seems fooling with Providence, and lads as lady as Vi
1048.quiet smile. " And I hear you're hauling fields ! pond muck to put ! on your Lan
1049.put ! on your Land sakes, Elder Flemming I think you must be getting a screw loo
1050.der Flemming I think you must be getting a screw looser in the head in your old
1051.t of books, I suppose ! " You Bookpoking farming's ruined more men than a few."
1052.ks, I suppose ! " You Bookpoking farming's ruined more men than a few." " I'm a
1053.ound west of your orchard, where nothing will grow but rag-weed." silent. ; Miss
1054.y about it. too. There must be something in chance." I wish Huldah had such a TH
1055.on one point, she flew and said, turning toward the Elder ain't it, : Next Sabba
1056. you nor hear your voice, either singing, nor yet praying. the Pines." " Yes," T
1057.r voice, either singing, nor yet praying. the Pines." " Yes," The Deacon says yo
1058.nd the whose especial pet without seeing her, tail cat running to meet Reuben, s
1059.pet without seeing her, tail cat running to meet Reuben, she was, he trod upon h
1060.rd with Miss Debby's full force, falling lap, just as he, with a beaming smile,
1061. falling lap, just as he, with a beaming smile, had stretched out his arm to sha
1062.shake hands with her, ; almost upsetting them and the chair together instinctive
1063.he chair together instinctively grasping at she something to save herself 138 TH
1064. instinctively grasping at she something to save herself 138 THE FLEMMINGS. fall
1065. save herself 138 THE FLEMMINGS. falling, seized from Reuben's long golden hair,
1066.es had a merry twinkle and Mrs. Flemming was so choked with laughter that she co
1067.ah and Hope, Miss bent over their sewing almost in convulsions. Debby gained her
1068.ral nettle. after a long it That evening Mrs. Flemming, thoughtful silence, said
1069.ter a long it That evening Mrs. Flemming, thoughtful silence, said : and " Fathe
1070.aid : and " Father, does seem to meeting strange to me that you have not been th
1071.ths of the Lord's Supper. I hope nothing will take you off next Sabbath." She ha
1072.or weeks about but had forborne speaking, under the impres- sion that her husban
1073.LEMMINGS. lieve 139 her mind by speaking out. ; not answer her at once his chair
1074.f the old Bible which he had been poring in a slow, deliberate voice : over. At
1075.ke me off. But I shall not Mrs. Flemming dropped her work and looked flickering
1076.g dropped her work and looked flickering look of terror, for the at him in speec
1077.and in her face there was a an appealing, It silent demand meaning of his words.
1078.a an appealing, It silent demand meaning of his words. had been laying heavy kep
1079.nd meaning of his words. had been laying heavy kept at her heart for three month
1080.three months, but she had silent, hoping that when the next " Sacrament Sabbath"
1081., would be there at his post the burning and shining light, the golden candlesti
1082.here at his post the burning and shining light, the golden candlestick of the sa
1083.Table of the Lord ?" asked Mrs. Flemming in a " low, excited voice. You did not
1084.tand me, mother," he : replied, speaking slowly " I shall not go." ! ! " it And
1085.atters as this," said the Elder, lifting his head and looking out of the great t
1086. the Elder, lifting his head and looking out of the great truthful eyes from one
1087.ed faces towards him. " I have something to say to you, wife and children, —a
1088.o you, wife and children, —a something which has troubled me for years, and ma
1089. my and chil- you may judge me as having been and be scandalized in me." "Wolfer
1090.y of hidden sin, " O "Wolfert ! Flemming ! what awful temptation has got possess
1091.sion of you ?" exclaimed ' Mrs. Flemming, from whose face every vestige of color
1092.were dilated and he said, sadly gleaming with excitement. ; " I don't know," " I
1093.may. THE FLEMMINGS. be 141 to am pulling the temple roof down my own ! de- struc
1094. die than be a "Father," said Eva, going round to him and standing by his side,
1095.aid Eva, going round to him and standing by his side, while she laid her derly a
1096.you to head to her breast are struggling with : " Tell us what not that difficul
1097.od, tvhy should you It must be something of great weight to move you from your f
1098.dations, for a child !" he said, folding her un- hand will moment in his own. ;
1099.." Dear father !" whispered Eva, leaning her cheek Mrs. Flemming could not to he
1100.red Eva, leaning her cheek Mrs. Flemming could not to her throat once or like a
1101.n breath, lips ; escaped her and folding her hands together in her lap, she turn
1102.LIGHT OUT OF DARKNESS. She sat listening to hear what he might if say, with a du
1103. might if say, with a dull dazed feeling in her head, as received a heavy blow s
1104.eavy blow she had all upon it, wondering the while if that strong energetic will
1105.he had been wont to look as to something higher and better than other men's, wer
1106.d better than other men's, were drifting into the eccentricities of coming madne
1107.ifting into the eccentricities of coming madness, so strange and terrible a thin
1108.madness, so strange and terrible a thing lips it was to her to hear from her hus
1109.'s words which meant Then, all something little short of apostasy. fall the cons
1110.bors and friends, and in- stead of being looked up to by all as a model of every
1111.n her thoughts, she a tightness grasping her throat, like the clutch of old Mass
1112.'s her. bony fingers, almost suffocating ; But she did not utter a word and with
1113. hands clasped tightly together, resting flick- upon her knees, and her handsome
1114.nees, and her handsome black eyes dering ering with the fever of her heart, she
1115.and her handsome black eyes dering ering with the fever of her heart, she waited
1116.sons not to wait long ; such backsliding. She had bent for the Elder, after glan
1117.e had bent for the Elder, after glancing with all grave but tender looks on the
1118. of to you, my conclusions, I am willing to explain my wife and children, the ca
1119.wledge in which I was bred mind, forcing but from a constant study of the Script
1120.re full of error " and de- Mrs. Flemming gasped for breath, and a spot of crimso
1121.posed to of its divine the plain meaning Founder. To make myself listen attentiv
1122.ter understood, I wish you to not losing a word, while I read chapter of St. to
1123.impressively, the chapter from beginning to —Eva still standing with her arm r
1124. from beginning to —Eva still standing with her arm resting upon fixed his sho
1125.Eva still standing with her arm resting upon fixed his shoulder, and her eyes i
1126. well quiet. But as knew he was bringing grief and diswe said before, the Flemmi
1127. said before, the Flemmings were nothing obstruct the working out people of a wh
1128.mmings were nothing obstruct the working out people of a who let principle which
1129.went bravely on. be noticed in The thing," this chapter, the account of the grea
1130.ld have Him by force and made Him a king, had He ? not fled from them, concealin
1131. had He ? not fled from them, concealing Himself from their sight ; but they dis
1132.ity of His power or the symbolic meaning of the miraculous feast, and cared than
1133.mined to follow Him the next day, hoping to witness greater miracles." " In the
1134.point there is a hidden and holy meaning to me, which seems separate from the gr
1135.an the appearance of the Saviour walking on the stormy waves of the midnight sea
1136.les had sought for Him and ; not finding him, probably thought over to Capharnau
1137.the dark- when a storm arose, and coming out ness of the night, walking upon the
1138.nd coming out ness of the night, walking upon the rough waves of the sea, they b
1139.of the sea, they beheld a form advancing towards their ship, and they were terri
1140.hip, and they were terrified, : thinking that it was a spirit, until He spoke '
1141.nd enforces the necessity of ' believing in Him,' as a condition to inlife herit
1142.tion to inlife herit eternal — meaning clearly, from what fol- lows, a belief
1143.reat and mysterious one of the partaking of His body and blood.* " The next day,
1144.of Tiberias to sought for Jesus shipping' and but not finding him, came across t
1145. for Jesus shipping' and but not finding him, came across the sea Capharnaum, wh
1146.gue. earnest They ? said to Him teaching in Him Kabbi, when : Thou hither "Then
1147.u hither "Then Jesus rebuked them saying : Amen, amen, I say unto you, you seek
1148.e, * and the writer is only transferring them from a regularly-kept journal to h
1149.l he hath given Me, I shall lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the la
1150.believeth in Him, * may have everlasting life, and I will raise him up on the la
1151. day." " Then the Jews" still discerning nothing beyond their carnal ideas murmu
1152. Then the Jews" still discerning nothing beyond their carnal ideas murmured at H
1153.her, but because He said I am the living bread which came down from Heaven. ''An
1154. : : : : "Now," said the Elder, looking out of liis grave all, gentle eyes with
1155.on them as they sat reverently listening, "we hear how declares, over ' sol- emn
1156.cally He and of His divinity, in calling Himself the Son the Father,' ' who had
1157.on and how He insists on their believing in to their Him as a primary and absolu
1158.rimary and absolute condition inheriting eternal life. Do we believe Him to be t
1159.the Son of the Father, or do * Receiving f we not?" Him in the Blessed Sacrament
1160.rament. Not by compulsion, nor by laying the free-will under any necessity, but
1161.ckly. " doubt that?" said Mrs. believing that Flemming Son us. And He is the of
1162.that?" said Mrs. believing that Flemming Son us. And He is the of God, and our R
1163.to me, from what follows, that something more is than a personal and historical
1164.ore He must to have had a deeper meaning in exhorting them believe in Him than i
1165.o have had a deeper meaning in exhorting them believe in Him than is now apparen
1166.he power of my soul that He was teaching a substan- tial truth, hence I am no lo
1167.e. any man eat of it he may I am the ing bread which came down from heaven. he s
1168.they strove amongst themselves, thinking in a carnal sense, He meant ?' His : fl
1169.or Jesus to have ex- plained His meaning if He spoke a parable, or meant His wor
1170.e that it for He knew of He was speaking through them to all time, and would hav
1171.is words this, but, so far if from doing He declared in plainer terms of possibl
1172.hadow of prevarication or hidden meaning, in was Jesus Christ ? simple, straight
1173.ful words : Who ' He that eateth lasting My life flesh : and drinketh will raise
1174.ideth in Me, and I in him. As the living Father hath sent Me, and I live by the
1175.n tlie midnight sea had seen Him walking upon the stormy waters it —who, were
1176.irit, : consoled by His voice whispering afraid/ It is I and toot Him into their
1177.h joy doubted Him more. now, and turning back walked with Him no ' But He did no
1178.been taught of God, but profited nothing. in "We believe Him as the Eternal Trut
1179.nger make a mockery of them by partaking of symbols. There must be somewhere amo
1180. The truth cannot perish. ; know nothing beyond Congregational opinions and they
1181.here, or I how, to seek this life-giving bread. My ship is tossed on waters of s
1182.not who holds the divine and life-giving legacy He has bequeathed me, the great
1183.read that in : exclaimed Mrs. Flemming standing beside him, and pointing to a
1184.at in : exclaimed Mrs. Flemming standing beside him, and pointing to a verse whi
1185.emming standing beside him, and pointing to a verse which she read a triumphant
1186.t quickeneth the flesh profiteth nothing. The words life.' I have spoken to you
1187. His flesh, would indeed 'profit nothing. That is what He meant. In proposing th
1188.ing. That is what He meant. In proposing the feast of it His body and blood, don
1189.stows and life, inasmuch as in partaking of for He abides in us and it we in Him
1190.e abides in us and it we in Him, marking us this His own, worthy by of inheritin
1191.us this His own, worthy by of inheriting eternal life ? Paul says that whosoever
1192.HE FLEMMINGS. to himself, not discerning the ment body of the Lord.'*" " Wolfert
1193.dy of the Lord.'*" " Wolfert of Flemming ! you are wresting the word ! God to yo
1194." Wolfert of Flemming ! you are wresting the word ! God to your own ruin if I fe
1195.ot crazy," exclaimed broad Mrs. Flemming, laying her hand on his forehead and lo
1196.," exclaimed broad Mrs. Flemming, laying her hand on his forehead and looking in
1197.ing her hand on his forehead and looking into his calm gray eyes, which regarded
1198.ut, father, consider cried Mrs. Flemming, distress. her voice tremulous with exc
1199.d and the faith, and what a hurt falling will be to souls to see you away from i
1200.to your and the disgrace dear will bring upon your family — Oh, me ! I never h
1201.! I never heard of such a dreadful thing in my life. And the girls if —I'm sur
1202. Him who commands me ; Him. I am groping for the truth, which must be somewhere
1203. " Oh, dear me !" bewailed Mrs. Flemming, " what will that will righteous man, F
1204.y life. Why, Elder !" she cried, growing irate " You must Flemming the : swrely
1205.cried, growing irate " You must Flemming the : swrely be bewitched." " No, mothe
1206.es ; it's a good sign, Elder Flem- ining, it have something pain your conscience
1207.gn, Elder Flem- ining, it have something pain your conscience; ' shows that you
1208.at, but given over.' I've felt something coming for weeks and weeks. I didn't it
1209. given over.' I've felt something coming for weeks and weeks. I didn't it know a
1210.McCue would not have got off with flying but would probably have got a " rise in
1211.d has punished us I was a for sheltering an idolater." : " Mother, do you rememb
1212.t there were no in those days, wandering Irish papists going about destroying th
1213.hose days, wandering Irish papists going about destroying the peace of christian
1214.ing Irish papists going about destroying the peace of christian families." Then
1215.ian families." Then to her Mrs. Elemming, out of breath, and half beside herself
1216.y were not pre- pared for any such thing, and the sudden breaking down of accust
1217. any such thing, and the sudden breaking down of accustomed lines, or the uproot
1218.wn of accustomed lines, or the uprooting of THE FLEMMINGS. lifetime traditions,
1219.ot his book, and regarded with something akin to a speechless terror what appear
1220., and walked up and soft, Elder Flemming ; down the room his firm footfall, and
1221.room his firm footfall, and the creaking of a plank here of the old floor as and
1222.re he stepped upon it, and the sparkling of the fire caused by the falling apart
1223.rkling of the fire caused by the falling apart of a great blazing log, were the
1224. by the falling apart of a great blazing log, were the only sounds, except the l
1225.ught, and it seemed to them that a being driven. curtain had been suddenly rent
1226.ed in his moseat, before them, revealing a chaos into which they were At last th
1227.e At last the notonous march, and taking his accustomed said: "We will have fami
1228.misereatnr." 158 THE FLEMMINGS. Flemming lit Reuben's candle, and sent him off t
1229.n candlestick, and went round inspecting the fastenings of doors and windows, an
1230.if the old beaufet, with ; its sparkling was safely locked and finding that the
1231. sparkling was safely locked and finding that the Elder did not moye she fidgete
1232.d not moye she fidgeted around, jingling her key-basket a " litte while longer,
1233.the fire carefully if you are not coming, but don't stay up too late, father; yo
1234.ep." But he did not " feel like sleeping, after she went away he took the light
1235. so tempest-tost that he could not bring to go to thoughts to anything like orde
1236. not bring to go to thoughts to anything like order, and he determined work on t
1237.accounts " of " Sneathen and he Flemming ship, and prepare the new terms of part
1238.w terms of partner; the old one expiring ten days hence it all, would go over fi
1239.algebra for a troubled mind. So thinking, he went and had in turning over and as
1240. So thinking, he went and had in turning over and assorting his accounts he and
1241.nt and had in turning over and assorting his accounts he and it, picked up Patri
1242.: and his eye it upon " First, supposing possible that Jesus Christ had deceived
1243. apostles in the very act of instituting it ? and when He was on the point when
1244.was on the point when He was bequeathing ." The to them the legacy of His love?*
1245.ul trembled as he read "What was leaving them ? in short, . . . ! this, it and w
1246. ! this, it and whence, so aptly fitting his needs ? C®uld be that help was at
1247.could be answered it ; by and forgetting time and rest, he stood at his desk lea
1248.e and rest, he stood at his desk leaning upon his elbows, devouring tents, its c
1249. desk leaning upon his elbows, devouring tents, its con- so full and satisfying
1250.g tents, its con- so full and satisfying to his mind, until with a sudden upflir
1251.his mind, until with a sudden upflirting of light, the candle, burnt down to onl
1252.ne flash of light and ex- pired, leaving for him in darkness. Exterior darkness
1253.oul was alight, its shadows were fleeing before the divine illumina- * " Millner
1254.must lit more ; so fire and the swinging lamp over his and drawing it, great lea
1255.d the swinging lamp over his and drawing it, great leather- backed chair book. t
1256.e sat down and resumed the Mrs. Flemming had passed a niglft. restless, feverish
1257.ozed from utter wearire- ness, wondering what was the matter with her, membered,
1258.o see if he had come to bed; but finding it empty, turned away with a sigh half
1259. the clear window pane, she and hurrying on her clothes, trembling in every limb
1260.e and hurrying on her clothes, trembling in every limb, ran down to the old sitt
1261. every limb, ran down to the old sitting- room where she had tne first —her he
1262. a sick fear at her heart of not finding him there, she softly opened the door
1263. the door— and there, his head leaning back on his chair, he was sound asleep,
1264.ss on his countenance that Mrs. Flemming stop- ped half way, wondering if it cou
1265.. Flemming stop- ped half way, wondering if it could be the red and golden light
1266.he red and golden light from the morning sun that brightened up her husband's gr
1267.t the moment floor, and the book falling from his hand to the awoke hiin.* CHAPT
1268. CHAPTEE XII. THE NEW DAY. Mrs. Flemming felt thankful, so thankful that she cou
1269.ut then she got a little angry at having been made so uneasy without rhyme or re
1270. commenced two years ago. Elder Elemming's conversion, from reading Milner's End
1271.lder Elemming's conversion, from reading Milner's End of Controversy, occurred m
1272.xplanation, le&t some might think making use of "Gropings after the Truth," by D
1273.hreatened trouble enough —he was going to adopt way of it new habits, and upse
1274.ts, and upset their regular godly living, she would try to nip in the bud, so sh
1275.stian man ! to spend the night, sleeping in a chair in a cold room without even
1276.t sleep even in of my bed, for wondering what had become is you " !" ; but that
1277.h I opened, and got so interested in ing. how the time was passreally don't know
1278.h here and there a dash of gold gleaming through, and streaks of blue, like grea
1279.treaks of blue, like great veins pulsing with light, showing dark and beautiful
1280. great veins pulsing with light, showing dark and beautiful between the splendor
1281.ressed his emotions —his wife standing there, look"The new day I never saw so
1282.ok"The new day I never saw so fair a ing so coldly and reproachfully at him, wou
1283.ly said: very beautiful, mother. morning." " Yes," she said, shortly; "it's a go
1284.hope the sound doctrine of it will bring things right. Better put out that You'l
1285.t that You'll find your clean sputtering lamp overhead. things on the chair it's
1286.he day to change slick —when you going to your room to " for the day." Thank y
1287.ine ; risen upon his life ; as —having page buffetted and tossed by contrary w
1288.ed forgot how the dis- night was passing ; he only knew that he had covered that
1289. for, cannot be the author of dif- being the Eternal Truth, ; He cannot reveal c
1290.contradictory doctrines at the and being same time the Eternal Wisdom and the Go
1291.st itself.* The result of this reasoning was, its that consequently to be worthy
1292. fraught with deep and connected meaning, while perusing the pages of his old Lu
1293.ep and connected meaning, while perusing the pages of his old Lutheran Bible ; a
1294.for instance, when the Saviour, speaking of Himself in the char- acter of the go
1295. tlieni also 165 shall hear must I bring, and they My voice and there shall be O
1296.all herd.* To the same effect addressing His heavenly Father, in He says : "I pr
1297.In like manner St. : Paul, in- culcating the unity of the Church, writes We bein
1298.the unity of the Church, writes We being : many, are One Body in Chkist, and eve
1299.u are called in one hope of your calling: One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism.ll Th
1300.settled convictions of "Wolfret Flemming's mind, from a study of the Bible alone
1301.angled wilderness ! He had been drifting alone upon midnight ! seas, with- out h
1302.out helm or compass, when lo the morning dawned, of the it and he found himself
1303.ic, ; and universal ; a sheepfold having One Shepherd Christ is a Creed acknowle
1304.Shepherd Christ is a Creed acknowledging and confessing one Lord, one Faith, one
1305. is a Creed acknowledging and confessing one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism ; a Bo
1306. a great, holy, divine truth, containing and all covering truth ; a Church endow
1307.ivine truth, containing and all covering truth ; a Church endowed with all the i
1308.ll ; upon whose altars He time, offering Himself from the " rising of the sun un
1309.time, offering Himself from the " rising of the sun unto the going down of ;" th
1310.m the " rising of the sun unto the going down of ;" the same, a perpetual sacrif
1311. life" which is a guerdon of everlasting salvation to it all who It eat worthily
1312.the book he exclaimed " If this is being a Eoman Catholic, then, my God, ; THE F
1313. one —heart and soul. There is nothing left If the Catholic relifor me but thi
1314. ; in the depths of my soul, it stirring to new life my reason responds to it. m
1315.world's progress read of their exceeding and exultant you have joy, of the sense
1316.ed or crazed them ? But this was nothing, aye, less 168 THE FLEMMINGS. than noug
1317.h flowed in and pervaded the whole being of the man who sat there in his little
1318.t there in his little workshop read- ing through the long dark hours of night, f
1319.gh the long dark hours of night, finding, as he read, the solution of his soul's
1320.tisfied, he again opened and was reading and re-reading certain portions, when
1321.in opened and was reading and re-reading certain portions, when —throwing
1322.ading certain portions, when —throwing — back his head to think Luther had s
1323.tacy he fell asleep. When Elder Flemming came into glorified family room, bright
1324.nd by the splendor of sunshine streaming just through the windows, he found his
1325.dows, he found his slippers and dressing-gown by the fire, where his wife had fo
1326.last thirty been in the habit of placing them years ; there was his table, with
1327. ; upon it there stood his chair waiting for him its ; the breakfast table in sp
1328.er around it ; there felt at was nothing that changed except himself, and he suc
1329. prepared in for every crucial is seeing that the kingdom of God not of this for
1330.rfare, and sacrifice his ; ; whole being, intellectual and its spiritual, slough
1331.. But we have forgotten Wolfert Flemming standpeace and high earnest resolve, in
1332.standpeace and high earnest resolve, ing there in the cheerful glow and warmth o
1333.warmth of his fireside, full of counting the cost as nothing when compared with
1334.de, full of counting the cost as nothing when compared with the certainty of ete
1335.rtainty of eternal gain ; for this thing was for him a question of eternal impor
1336.h their pleasant smiles and good morning kiss, and, shortly after, ; Mrs. Flemmi
1337.iss, and, shortly after, ; Mrs. Flemming and Eeuben backed, beaded chair she in
1338.he close upon a lower one. Mrs. Flemming said nothing but her soul had been sore
1339. a lower one. Mrs. Flemming said nothing but her soul had been sorely exercised.
1340.. " come, time Don't keep father waiting." Her mind was soon placed at ease by s
1341.r mind was soon placed at ease by seeing her husband go towards his table and se
1342.and seat himself as usual and everything seemed so natural that she wondered if
1343.at she wondered if she had been dreaming ; she almost imagined she had, and her
1344.ed he had sat up it God, without knowing all it, for what, that never doubting b
1345.ng all it, for what, that never doubting but that was set a doctrinal work of th
1346.om dearly loved and reverenced, standing with such a blithe happy smile upon her
1347.able, as they gathered around, ; waiting for their father to offer thanks when t
1348.inity, after which he asked the blessing. Mrs. Flemming started and turned very
1349.ich he asked the blessing. Mrs. Flemming started and turned very white Irish ped
1350.white Irish pedler It was the very thing that the at this very table. I" '• ha
1351.aid sharply, " what do you mean by doing that ?" " I mean, mother, that as the c
1352.. But that is popery. It is like : being a papist — a am a papist, my Roman Ca
1353. mercy on me ; !" wailed Mrs. Flem- ming and she would have fallen from her chai
1354.as when her healthy, happy The the dying Indian squaw, Massasquoi, throttled her
1355.oi, throttled her and now when something ten thousand times more terrible to her
1356.arms and laid her upon the sofa, chafing her hands, while Hope opened It a windo
1357.roach, It of pity, en- and burst nothing into sobs and tears. was something new
1358.thing into sobs and tears. was something new ; in this peaceful household, like
1359.en down a way. " Mother," said Fleniming, smoothing her cheek tenderly with his
1360.ay. " Mother," said Fleniming, smoothing her cheek tenderly with his broad hand,
1361.ome and able joy. miserable over a thing that me with unspeakdis- At least be pa
1362.at I am prepared to sacrifice everything life itself on the face of the earth
1363.go back a hair's breadth from the saving faith I have found." There was nothing
1364.g faith I have found." There was nothing to be said after this Mrs. Flemming kne
1365.hing to be said after this Mrs. Flemming knew her husband too ful, well to argue
1366.There was but talk, every fin- one being full of his own thoughts the Elder ishe
1367.girls to theirs in the and Mrs. Flemming and the household. They were all very q
1368.: filled the hearts of "Wolfort Flemming's daugh- ters, as of an unseen presence
1369.tion, same scrupulous its and everything was arranged in accustomed order. The o
1370.conof song, no blithe snatches no loving lit- romp with each It other, flitting
1371.g lit- romp with each It other, flitting here and there like sunbeams through th
1372. they asked each other over their sewing. how did it happen ?" again, when seate
1373. "It was the pedler," said Mrs. Flemming. knew and felt all along that something
1374.. knew and felt all along that something dreadful would follow having him here.
1375.t something dreadful would follow having him here. He contaminated a christian h
1376.tand by them just for the sake of making a point." " I used to think so," sighed
1377. used to think so," sighed Mrs. Flemming. " If father has changed his religion,
1378.epend upon he has good reasons for doing so," said Eva : " and I hope that he wi
1379.know of such things," said Mrs. Flemming. " No, it is ; true, mother, I don't kn
1380.ration, whenever I have thought of being religious, was to be like him," replied
1381.ord Himself said it all. of that, seeing that Christ it I believe as He said mea
1382.er did you churn, inquired Mrs. Flemming. " Ten, mother," she answered looking u
1383.ng. " Ten, mother," she answered looking up quickly at her mother's flushed, unq
1384.fell "Of course." Then they ; to talking about other domestic matters Elder, bef
1385.hen he returned ianks, and Mrs. Flemming was thoroughly miserable. all " After t
1386.e is And it only those who know anything at all of the pu- ritan sentiment forty
1387.nderstand the magnitude of Mrs. Flemming's 'rial. To have declared iever, would
1388.ople, who served God earnestly according to their lights, were so bitterly preju
1389.such, to suit their own purposes, taking good care that they should not be undec
1390.EMMINGS. 177 CHAPTEE XIII. MKS. FLEMMING AT BAY. Mrs. Flemming was really sincer
1391.III. MKS. FLEMMING AT BAY. Mrs. Flemming was really sincere in her the doctrines
1392.within reason ; human " above that being a dead letter, about which she gave her
1393.timonious ; way and was not too exacting in its demands for God for while they c
1394.r conscience of the land and all growing out of their daily was healed by the un
1395. she knew of outlines of —Mrs. Fleming clung to the meagre ; what she called h
1396.men and women, faithful to their calling, stern in their opposition to everythin
1397. stern in their opposition to everything that even savored of Popery, and fore-
1398. looked up to with respect and something nearly akin to affection indeed, as the
1399.ort time back, " There was truly nothing for full them to wish for ; their c bas
1400.basket and stove was her and overflowing with blessings this dreadful thing ; in
1401.owing with blessings this dreadful thing ; in every shape." ; But now apostatize
1402. and poverty. in her room, Then, leaving loom and everything shut herself up els
1403. room, Then, leaving loom and everything shut herself up else to take care of th
1404.NGS. the quaint fire-lighted old sitting-room ; 179 there was an attempt at conv
1405. at conversation ; and the girls, trying to their rally- be cheerful, talked now
1406., talked now to their mother, but seeing that ing it father, now to began was no
1407.now to their mother, but seeing that ing it father, now to began was no use, Deb
1408.yes back to the visions he was beholding amidst the glowing coals, the Sinai whe
1409.ions he was beholding amidst the glowing coals, the Sinai where, veiled by smoke
1410.ancy last At had many high Mrs. Flemming said : "I should think you'd be sitting
1411. said : "I should think you'd be sitting up all night." " I expect I shall sleep
1412.what you like. There's no book belonging to this house, thank God, that can't 18
1413.family. be read to a " Is there anything it about Luther and Romanism in ?" Much
1414. mother. which is But there is something I want to read, a sequel to what we wer
1415., a sequel to what we were still talking it over last night." Mrs. Flemming, thi
1416.lking it over last night." Mrs. Flemming, thinking was one of the old volumes fr
1417.ver last night." Mrs. Flemming, thinking was one of the old volumes from their o
1418.le the Elder, sprang his mine^ —hoping almost against hope that she would hear
1419.ainst hope that she would hear something that would upset completely the destruc
1420.ess and repeated declarations concerning the nature of the sacrament which He pr
1421.hich He promised them, thereby preparing their minds for the sublime simplicity
1422.e simplicity of His words in instituting it —words it which sealed His meaning
1423. it —words it which sealed His meaning in the most l solemn manner. For whilst
1424. ye and is My Body. of this And ; taking the cup, is He saidf Drink ye all for t
1425., 26, 27, 28. " Yes," said Mrs. Flemming, " THE FLEMMINGS. go to the table of th
1426.cept that in ; 181 but they mean nothing and wine we are to partake of the bread
1427.ch had been bread: My Body. Then, taking the cup, He gave as it thanks and gave
1428.ve as it thanks and gave to them, saying ' : Drink ye all of this, for this is M
1429.on of the Son of God, without ac- cusing Him not only of prevarication but of im
1430.on but of impos- ture ? thereby bringing Him to naught. It was a solemn moment;
1431. He was to pay for the and He was giving into their the legacy of His body and b
1432. all who partook worthily of everlasting life. an assurance ing in Can we —bel
1433.ly of everlasting life. an assurance ing in Can we —believfor Him as the Etern
1434.is be His Body; and mere wine, declaring Blood?" it to " I couldn't believe such
1435.ine to save life," my said Mrs. Flemming excitedly, " nor do I see how any enlig
1436.erson can." it. " I can't help believing Bible,'' said It is all there in the Ho
1437.er hard they may be to our understanding. And is yet, father," she said, it sudd
1438., father," she said, it suddenly turning to him, " harder to believe this than t
1439.ords, repeated without variation, adding to, or taking from, by each of the evan
1440. without variation, adding to, or taking from, by each of the evangelists, who w
1441.S. " 183 Did you say there was something about Luthei book?" asked Mrs. Flemming
1442. about Luthei book?" asked Mrs. Flemming is in that fidgeting. like " This discu
1443.asked Mrs. Flemming is in that fidgeting. like " This discussion disagreeable, a
1444.if you don't object —to hear something that I can understand." " Here is somet
1445.t I can understand." " Here is something, mother, about Luther, but c I don't in
1446.self caught, without any way of escaping for the text of the gospel is too plain
1447. denied the corporal presence, employing for this purpose sometimes the of his c
1448.. are not Lutherans," said Mrs. Flemming is " No, not exactly ; but you know tha
1449. ; but you know that Luther the rallying cry of the Protestant world. They re- g
1450.s. ten to this/' said the Elder, turning back the pages of the book : " c No soo
1451.d modern, than his disciples, proceeding on his principle, undertook to prove fr
1452.nd that the Reformation wanted reforming. itself Carlostad,* Zuinglius,t GEco- l
1453.ost virulence, w each of them professing to ground his doctrine and conduct on t
1454. who, wicked : belonged to them, quoting the second beatitude " Blessed are the
1455. scandalous as to overwhelm the thinking part of them with " grief and confusion
1456.to be a curious sort tell Elder Flemming, me where you he ' got said Mrs. Flemmi
1457.me where you he ' got said Mrs. Flemming, with indignation too big " This book,"
1458.s book," " for words. answered, speaking slowly, which has been * t as a 274. la
1459.rsy, p. 36. ; 186 THE FLEMMINGS. showing one the way, as one making the crookfed
1460.INGS. showing one the way, as one making the crookfed paths straight, was pedler
1461.y desk by the Irish I McCue, the morning he went away. into the desk, determined
1462.tle it it threw it back to him, dreaming what a treasure it was, or that in I sh
1463.lightenment, until last night in turning over my papers I came first across it a
1464. and I words I all read arrested reading it ; my attention, sat up night and the
1465. up night and the result of this reading is that from that hour.I am a Catholic
1466.a Roman Catholic." : Again Mrs. Flemming felt that tightening around her throat;
1467.Again Mrs. Flemming felt that tightening around her throat; she could only gasp
1468.sh Papist was at the of Wolfert Flemming, I know that you are a hard- headed man
1469.ce you have made up your mind to a thing there's ; no power on earth can so, cha
1470.igent investiga- tion, earnestly praying the while to be enlightened." !" " Enli
1471. !" " Enlightened repeated Mrs. Flemming with sarcastic emphasis, " As it regard
1472.sis, " As it regards all else concerning earthly pros- perity and the like, I ha
1473.lose my own soul," said Wolfert Flemming emphatically. ; "But why need you "Acco
1474.atically. ; "But why need you "According to the serve lose your soul ?" she aske
1475.you have always been a good man, serving God." light I had, felt for mother, I t
1476.ve years past that there ; was something wanting. I was not satisfied and now th
1477. past that there ; was something wanting. I was not satisfied and now that I hav
1478. have discovered a true, soul-satisfying faith, one which every faculty of to as
1479.if —nay, I do embrace for it. counting things nought I should try to It is the
1480.glad to of a religion all know something and sublime that for the sake of which
1481. so vital things are counted but nothing it. May I read that book ?" "And " I to
1482.f his daughters turned with it confiding love towards him, " I will read aloud a
1483.lieve." " I suppose," said Mrs. Flemming, " you won't to see forget that you are
1484.s." "No, indeed. I shall have everything ready, will all be fixed by Monday nigh
1485.ed by Monday night shall sometime during the week, I have to go up to the Pines.
1486.here " is he, Hope?" asked Mrs. Flemming. to Boston, mother, to for a He went ca
1487.ck week or two," answered Hope, blushing. "I should this !" of all know what he'
1488.hink of all " Popery, said Mrs, Flemming to herself. things in the world, to com
1489. me." Hope and Eeuben went at to meeting with their mother on the following Sabb
1490.eting with their mother on the following Sabbath. Eva remained engrossed his hom
1491.w also claimed her deepest Mrs. Flemming carried a heavy heart old Congregationa
1492.a heavy heart old Congregational meeting- with her into the THE FLEMMINGS. house
1493.e THE FLEMMINGS. house that day. arising 189 of the grief She already felt some
1494.could she face the congregation, knowing of that she did? knowing too that the m
1495.gation, knowing of that she did? knowing too that the most them —her neighbors
1496.o see his old friend up and down, hoping where ; some- Miss Debby deliberately m
1497.supercilious expression on Mrs. Flemming. I am sorry to say that Keum who notice
1498.nister who in tremulous tones was giving out the hymn. 190 THE FLEMMINGS. Father
1499.when he discovered that Wolfert Flemming than felt —whom he loved as David lov
1500.delivered in the place of of backsliding a startling discourse on the perils and
1501. the place of of backsliding a startling discourse on the perils and apostasy, w
1502.postasy, which he wound up by describing with quaint eloquence the wretched plig
1503.those disciples friends who after having been the and companions of Jesus, —wh
1504.hought," said the old He was staid going to give ; They man, he meant that them
1505.d ire felt and pathos, and Mrs. Renaming like a every word blow as she sat there
1506.ery word blow as she sat there listening to her hus; band's condemnation sensiti
1507.tood the whole But, drift of his meaning. when the time came, she went up with t
1508.- the minister presented the cup, saying, " Drink ye all of this, for this is my
1509.t then she remembered was really nothing but common bread and ; wine, simply set
1510.was left over, after the rite, was being given to the sexton's wife to make toas
1511.and season her it puddings. Then, trying to think that symbolized and commemorat
1512.as dismissed, and they were all standing outside waiting for their chaises to an
1513.d they were all standing outside waiting for their chaises to and wagonettes be
1514. was he?" — "Why was he not at meeting?" — "It was the fourth Sacrament day
1515.tle ; what could it mean?" Mrs. Flemming stood her ground bravely, saying as she
1516.lemming stood her ground bravely, saying as she could, consistent with the truth
1517.s of the case. ill," No ; Elder Flemming was not is she said to one is is " he i
1518." at home." " He did not come to meeting," she said to a third, "because he pref
1519.o a third, "because he preferred staying at home ;" but to the last query, stiff
1520.y broke down, soul but the brave, loving that to little was determined —no mat
1521. with vertigo, which sent him staggering against the horse-block Miss Debby ; co
1522.everal persons ran towards her, thinking she was strangling ; meanwhile Mrs. Fle
1523.towards her, thinking she was strangling ; meanwhile Mrs. Flemming and Hope step
1524.was strangling ; meanwhile Mrs. Flemming and Hope stepped briskly off. into the
1525.d child there knew that Elder Flem- ming was a backslider. If Mrs. Flemming had
1526. ming was a backslider. If Mrs. Flemming had told at a loss to them risen. that
1527.ve CHAPTER XIV. SACRIFICE. I was sitting one built summer evening in a pavilion
1528.. I was sitting one built summer evening in a pavilion upon a bluff overhanging
1529.g in a pavilion upon a bluff overhanging the sea, watching the long lines of sur
1530.on a bluff overhanging the sea, watching the long lines of surf, as the strong s
1531.t shoreward over the bars, and listening with mingled awe and delight to their r
1532.d awe and delight to their reverberating thunders as they burst in creamy whiten
1533.hiteness upon the shingly beach, roaring and raving with impotent fury at the fa
1534.on the shingly beach, roaring and raving with impotent fury at the failure of th
1535.et song of a its bird which was brooding on nest under some It carved wood -work
1536.pex of the roof. sang, or seemed to sing, in ecstasy of peace, gaz- ing out the
1537.d to sing, in ecstasy of peace, gaz- ing out the while at the rose-tinted clouds
1538.uds, the turbulent ocean and the rocking ships; and the sounds fell upon my hear
1539.m; but preof the surf sently the booming and bursting flute-like below drowned t
1540.the surf sently the booming and bursting flute-like below drowned the symphonies
1541. billows were again dragged back moaning and sobbing, I distinguished through th
1542.e again dragged back moaning and sobbing, I distinguished through the din a fain
1543.n as they receded still farther, leaving a short interval of quiet, the wild won
1544.shed, but that the bird had been singing on as heedless of the thunders of the s
1545. the land. The *made little bird singing there on the edge of the noisy turbulen
1546.ts abode in the soul of Wolfert Flemming. Disturbing elements clamored around hi
1547.the soul of Wolfert Flemming. Disturbing elements clamored around him, and there
1548.S. though the sweet 195 singer, brooding in the depths of his soul, never ceased
1549.not hear them, but when the dismnrmuring blissful life cords of and nature cease
1550.rilled through every avenue of his being, consoling him with the sublime conscio
1551.ugh every avenue of his being, consoling him with the sublime consciousness that
1552." possess his soul in patience," knowing that how- ever tempestuously the waves
1553.r and no farther; and his great trusting heart looked up, and was glad. After th
1554.t a light one —he thought that nothing could pain or disturb him to the same d
1555.Old Father Ray came down see him, losing no time. He came on Monday morning, and
1556.osing no time. He came on Monday morning, and with a countenance in which severi
1557.conceal, he entered the house, returning the welcome greeting he received saluta
1558.he house, returning the welcome greeting he received salutations, " I by cold, c
1559.here on the farm," replied Hope, folding ; 196 TEE FLEMMINGS. up her work. And s
1560.. up her work. And she went out, leaving him alone with her mother. "And you, Ma
1561.th her mother. "And you, Martha Flemming, how is it with you in these times of f
1562.faithlessness ?" he asked in quaver- ing tones. " There is no change in me. I am
1563. of thoughts stiffly then a came surging through her mind, of anguish, she ! and
1564.o collect his scattered wits, and making an Flemming's he began to utter some fo
1565.s scattered wits, and making an Flemming's he began to utter some foot- consolat
1566.- the room before he entered it. No ming one was present at this interview. lea
1567.and sometimes sunk into hoarse trembling whispers, for throughout the interview
1568.th this of the utter futility of arguing man who assured all, —had —grave, c
1569.e, old Father Eay loved Wolfert Flemming as a father loves his first —and full
1570. the contest and of left him remembering the doom to his idols, Ephriam, who was
1571. joined he " let him alone," and shaking his feet he the dust of his house from
1572.ust of his house from went out, refusing Flemming's offered hand, and mounting h
1573.s house from went out, refusing Flemming's offered hand, and mounting his horse
1574.ng Flemming's offered hand, and mounting his horse rode slowly away, feeling as
1575.ting his horse rode slowly away, feeling as if a gulf had suddenly opened and sw
1576. lowed the last earthly tie destroy- ing the one mortal others he had held most
1577.s come of it all," said Mrs. Flemat ming bitterly, as she and Eva and Hope stood
1578.od 198 the THE FLEMMINGS. window looking after the old minister. She saw him ref
1579.ined that the words she saw him uttering, but could not distinguish, were curses
1580., were curses, for there was no blessing in the look he cast back to the house,
1581. he cast back to the house, no relenting in his hard pinched features, which the
1582.s were compressed, and that his lowering, eyes, over which his heavy brows hung
1583.cool water which it come from the spring, and drank every drop then stood a few
1584.stood a few moments, his elbow lean- ing against the window frame, looking out t
1585.n- ing against the window frame, looking out through the budding vines, at the d
1586.w frame, looking out through the budding vines, at the distant mountain ridges e
1587.ather Bay; indeed he did not was leaving the room, he speak at all, until, as he
1588.pped for an instant beside Mrs. Flemming's chair, and laying " Mother, I in the
1589.beside Mrs. Flemming's chair, and laying " Mother, I in the oats his hand tender
1590. hand tenderly upon her head, said going down with the : am ; men to harrow for
1591.years. will be a most unreasonable thing in the Deacon to break off his connecti
1592." Where is Reuben !" asked Mrs. Flemming, sharply, to change the conversation, f
1593.breakfast time. ; I hope he is not going to have a sick turn white this morning.
1594.g to have a sick turn white this morning." " I thought he looked very So he did
1595. have seen him," tell said Mrs. Flemming so ailing anxiously, " I can't what mak
1596. him," tell said Mrs. Flemming so ailing anxiously, " I can't what makes Ruby al
1597.ll up to the of rally Then Mrs. Flemming went weaving room and sat down to think
1598.of rally Then Mrs. Flemming went weaving room and sat down to think not the time
1599.ent from heaven to punish her for having been too proud of her husband, and for
1600.too proud of her husband, and for having loved him too entirely. But Reuben coul
1601.till seen him since early in the morning, and each one began to feel seriously h
1602.assed, and he did rot come. Mr. Flemming and his men came in at sunset, but ther
1603.d by her anxious fears, they were making preparations to go in search of him, wh
1604.hless, and ex- hausted. They to sponging his face with vinegar, rubbing his hand
1605. sponging his face with vinegar, rubbing his hands, and feeding him with elderbe
1606. vinegar, rubbing his hands, and feeding him with elderberry wine, which revived
1607.till and confusion he burst out laughing, although he was too weak to answer the
1608.l 20 right now, Ruby," said Eva, kissing Lis forehead. 1 But where in ! the worl
1609.o tell To give me such a fright Flemming, sitting down and folding her hands on
1610. give me such a fright Flemming, sitting down and folding her hands on her lap w
1611.right Flemming, sitting down and folding her hands on her lap while she looked a
1612.indeed I didn't," he answered, disarming her anger at once by the tender, sweet
1613.displeased with him. " I went straggling around, digging and poking the thorn bu
1614.him. " I went straggling around, digging and poking the thorn bushes, and turnin
1615.nt straggling around, digging and poking the thorn bushes, and turning over big
1616.and poking the thorn bushes, and turning over big among rocks searching for some
1617.d turning over big among rocks searching for something I wanted, until I got so
1618. big among rocks searching for something I wanted, until I got so far from home
1619.at ? in the land's name were you hunting up, !" child I never did see the like o
1620.f you in my life exclaimed Mrs. Flemming. " Gold, I guess," said Hope, laughing.
1621.g. " Gold, I guess," said Hope, laughing. "No," said the boy, gravely, "I was se
1622. said the boy, gravely, "I was searching for soft stone." " Now do tell ! "Why !
1623.o tell ! "Why !" exclaimed Mrs. Flemming, " I quite exasperated at what she cons
1624. to find it, and I shall keep on looking for fallen, too," answered Keuben, a li
1625.y tired eyes, so he leaned back, closing his all and seemed to doze, she watchin
1626.his all and seemed to doze, she watching him while. Then she lifted up his long
1627.le. Then she lifted up his long tapering hand, as fair and white as a woman's, a
1628. fair and white as a woman's, and laying it across it, her own, sat looking thou
1629.aying it across it, her own, sat looking thoughtfully at and like one speaking i
1630.ng thoughtfully at and like one speaking in her sleep, said : " It is exactly li
1631.her heart with an indescribable yearning for this gifted, half helpless, and bes
1632., up and put his arms about : and waning his head upon her shoulder, said >? " I
1633.t, little mammy. I want it for something great." "Have you from his face. eaten
1634. "Have you from his face. eaten anything to-day, Ruby?" she asked, while she smo
1635." row " for the time, the And forgetting her great sorlittle busy woman began th
1636. the time I ever heard the proud-looking old lady's name. never mentioned it, Mo
1637.ady Pendarvis ! grand said Eva, laughing. ' ' " It is just like mother's old nev
1638. blood royal." Then they fell to talking of the old portrait, and Hope remembere
1639.disinherited her only child for marrying one ; and that the picture had not been
1640.tiful. " And " —whispered Eva, looking towards Reuben, who was now really Well
1641.y Well ! asleep — " Ruby is the living image of her. for being a little little
1642.by is the living image of her. for being a little little mother has good reason
1643.der it portrait should have been hanging all against the walls of a Puritan hous
1644.or him of come now, and Wolfret Flemming's face wore an expression anxiety and g
1645. from unexpected quarters were beginning to gather around him. Mrs. Flemming tri
1646.ning to gather around him. Mrs. Flemming tried to think that something had happe
1647.. Flemming tried to think that something had happened to prevent the Deacon's ke
1648.happened to prevent the Deacon's keeping his engagement ; but she had her THE FL
1649.e cheerful, efforts refrain from uniting in when she saw the look of care on her
1650.what boded. That night Wolfert Flernming began to read aloud " Milner's End of C
1651.nd Eva, with closer to him, their sewing, brought their chairs and listened with
1652.epest interest. off to his Mrs. Flemming hurried Reuben room to bathe his feet a
1653.o bathe his feet and go to bed, he being feverish after his day's tramp, and she
1654.news to spread, and if "Wolfert Flemming's old friends and neighbeen moro bors h
1655.HE FLEMMINGS. not a pleasant word, being a term of reproac always used by our se
1656.nderhad been educated ; stood as meaning to dread that they and despise in relig
1657.tic region since the old Indian scalping times, and the old Puritan witch-burnin
1658.times, and the old Puritan witch-burning and ear-cropping days ! Some souls, bel
1659.d Puritan witch-burning and ear-cropping days ! Some souls, believed the report
1660.scandalize the weak and tl.em to running after novelties ; others deplored becau
1661. i and could not bear j idea of severing their intercourse with him, a thing whi
1662.ring their intercourse with him, a thing which, under the circumstances, they wo
1663.rative restrain All me from de- scribing the excitement. who knew anything at al
1664.ribing the excitement. who knew anything at all about the sentiment of the New E
1665.s stormy interview with Wolfert Flemming : had stopped on his w *y down some to
1666.of told for the minister, still smarting under occasion, all that had passed on
1667.fc hat he could not follow L was talking about ; until by dint of questioning h^
1668.ing about ; until by dint of questioning h^m at every few words the facts of the
1669.egan to dawn upon his dull understanding, when the most fanatical wrath and enmi
1670.took possession of him. There's a spying that " it takes a ! 208 THE FLEMMINGS.
1671.e motive power stood it all of his being. He under- now. His old friend and form
1672.rthwith be- gan to spin. The first thing he did, when there was nothing more and
1673.rst thing he did, when there was nothing more and himself on the of r to be said
1674.ubject, was to go home instead ; keeping on down to the Flemmings' to his next w
1675.e got to the " there, and, after locking himself in, sit down heavy task of indi
1676.self in, sit down heavy task of inditing and writing a letter. Joe as Gargery's"
1677. down heavy task of inditing and writing a letter. Joe as Gargery's" efforts wer
1678.. Joe as Gargery's" efforts were nothing to if r his. He felt he w ould burst, a
1679.s. right. He was Papist ! Elder Flemming the Puritan, and Elder Flemming the Eld
1680.Flemming the Puritan, and Elder Flemming the Elder Flemming the burning and shin
1681.n, and Elder Flemming the Elder Flemming the burning and shining light of their
1682. Flemming the Elder Flemming the burning and shining light of their congregation
1683.e Elder Flemming the burning and shining light of their congregation, and Flemmi
1684.ight of their congregation, and Flemming given over to Antichrist ! Elder Flemmi
1685.iven over to Antichrist ! Elder Flemming his friend and partner, and the Flemmin
1686.his friend and partner, and the Flemming that he intended to : THE FLEMMINGS. th
1687.oun- dered. He spoilt nearly two humming dozen sheets of paper. felt He broke ou
1688.ed a the wall, took down a dusty-looking bottle, and fall of clear, poured out a
1689.ith his eyes rolled up if to the ceiling as he were praying ; then hastily resto
1690. up if to the ceiling as he were praying ; then hastily restoring the things to
1691.he were praying ; then hastily restoring the things to their receptacle, he lock
1692.," he sat down and wrote the fol- lowing Elm Cottage, March 28th. Sence I herd t
1693.ranks of Antichrist, I dont feel willing to renoo the pardnership. If you will g
1694.e in the house of the Lord, I am willing to let the bisness goon as it wor, whic
1695. I will take into% pardnership a Bosting man with a big capitol, that will put u
1696. command, Shadkach Sneathen. W. Flemming : Sir, This was the ridiculous missive
1697. felt it word scratched proud of meeting ; out, very it, and would like to have
1698.racticable, and his vanity was hungering and thirsting to display his epistolary
1699.d his vanity was hungering and thirsting to display his epistolary talent to som
1700.n where his pies, and Huldah were making doughnuts, for the stomach, and other c
1701.s, for the stomach, and other comforting things after telling and them the news
1702.nd other comforting things after telling and them the news he unfolded the flour
1703. her chin in the air and her whole being thrilled with a delightful excitement,
1704.with a delightful excitement, exclaiming " Du tell neow in her !" It was all tha
1705. of volubility of of Huldah was standing with a spoonfull stewed pumpkin in her
1706.nd so she stood motionthe color mounting in with surprise and grief, crimson flu
1707.d grief, crimson flushes to her flashing " fire, face, and her handsome eyes his
1708. such a letter as that to Elder Flemming!" she exclaimed, when with it. a flouri
1709.flourish of his hand he finished reading " Wal, neow !" he said, looking amazed,
1710. reading " Wal, neow !" he said, looking amazed, " how dare you speak so to " me
1711. am ashamed you !" she repeated, rapping the large spoon upon the table until th
1712.that, to such a man if as Elder Flemming, and throw he's him over because he he'
1713.s taken Popery ; can't be so bad a thing, it is, if up and whatever to a I think
1714.ligion, which you go and do such a thing too." good man, and your old friend " I
1715.ll other battles that you over, training clays make such spread-eagles and if an
1716.of conscience, to keep people from being hung and quartered, they happen not to
1717. got was " to meddle with Elder Flemming, even he to turn Pagan or Jew, so long
1718. you hear that?" he exclaimed, loosening his neckcloth. " Yes, father, I hear yo
1719.ldy Sneathen !" said Miss Debby, holding up her dough-fringed hands, " I wonder
1720. To talk so to your father, who is doing nothing but a righteous act." " If the
1721. so to your father, who is doing nothing but a righteous act." " If the bears ev
1722.ith rage. " Father," said Huldah, laying down the spoon, " don't send and speaki
1723.own the spoon, " don't send and speaking more gently and gravely, THE HAMMINGS.
1724. HAMMINGS. that letter to Elder Flemming. saucily to 213 I am sorry I spoke ; yo
1725.. Huldy," answered the Deacon, refolding the " It's to go." " Huldy Sneathen, yo
1726.ebby. " It will wasn't for Nick Flemming you wouldn't be so dretfully cut up," a
1727.ns depend upon that. marry Nick Flemming exclaimed, her " if he was the Pope him
1728.f he was the Pope himself," she flashing with anger. handsome eyes And I tell yo
1729.e ashamed of yourself to do such a thing as you are going to do." Then she turne
1730.self to do such a thing as you are going to do." Then she turned her back on the
1731.ed her back on them, her heart throbbing passionately and tears blinding her as
1732.hrobbing passionately and tears blinding her as she pretended to busy herself ov
1733.her pies. Miss Debby whispered something to the Deacon as he went towards the do
1734.r for a moment, then said don't be going : " I say, Huldy, I down to Flemming' s
1735.ing : " I say, Huldy, I down to Flemming' s any more. won't allow it." The quite
1736.THE FLEMMINGS. are not to go to Flemming's any "I say you more," " lie repeated.
1737.repeated. !" Father she replied, looking straight into his eyes, while her thin
1738.—any of you," answered Huldah, turning The Deacon, almost suffocated her back
1739. began a severe put a stop to by telling her lecture, if which Huldah she did no
1740. she long stare at the girl, if standing there with such a determined look as on
1741.h such a determined look as only waiting for the slightest provocation to do as
1742.aid : THE ELEMMINGS. "It is i5l5 wasting ;" breath to talk to you, Huldy Sueatli
1743.behave at a model young- lady in defying her father, and threatening her aunt as
1744.y in defying her father, and threatening her aunt as she did ; but her nature ha
1745.ng conflict with an injudicious training, which instead of crushing had develope
1746.ious training, which instead of crushing had developed the spontaneity of her im
1747.t that she would marry Nicholas Flemming thousand times Catholic. if he were ten
1748.ived the reply to his letter : following April 10th. Shadrach Sneathen, Sir Your
1749.rach Sneathen, Sir Your letter informing me of your decision in relation to The
1750.to The the partnership hitherto existing between us is received. accounts of Sne
1751.eceived. accounts of Sneathen & Flemming are all balanced and can be closed at o
1752.rn. Respectfully yours, Wolfert Flemming. " He's jined to his felt idols," mutte
1753.duty." ! 216 THE FLEMMINGS. far Flemming's religion was too above all sordid- ne
1754. is the loss of which, true, would bring upon him a crowd of cares and anxieties
1755.he thought post-office, it someof thing worth the risk and asking the blessing
1756.t someof thing worth the risk and asking the blessing Almighty God on his intent
1757.g worth the risk and asking the blessing Almighty God on his intention, he rode
1758.ention, he rode over to "VVier's Landing, the nearest letter. where he mailed hi
1759.s Then he wrote to Nicholas, in- forming him of the events and changes that had
1760. a day of surprises to Nicholas Flemming, let- who had never ters in his life, r
1761. ; one from his Deacon Sneathen, telling him that he withdrew any more. consent
1762.the Deacon would have made Nick Flemming laugh if terrible things it it had not
1763.ot been for the and the and meant, being nothing less than the his best earthly
1764.for the and the and meant, being nothing less than the his best earthly hopes de
1765.st earthly hopes destruction of wrecking of a career just begun. The third lette
1766.xactly what shes after, for been nagging me about over ; it ever since it Eva do
1767.'t although she has succeeded in talking father over to her plans. Not all the G
1768.fectionately "Huidah." Nicholas Flemming had never in perienced such an exciteme
1769.inch convinces me that I am not dreaming. I suppose there's trouble enough at ho
1770. * * Whew !" Then Nicholas Flemdone ming doubled up one fist, and holding the De
1771.ne ming doubled up one fist, and holding the Deacon's letter in the palm of his
1772.in some other Protestant it sect holding different doctrines, is only necessary
1773.t means contempt. meekness, the coddling of his It means false accusations. It m
1774.false accusations. It means the standing It aloof of friends It and neighbors. T
1775.the demagogue, and the favorite sounding phrase of the pulpit— anathema. For w
1776.be prepared for ties the painful rending of old one pleasant. many which made th
1777.ect, in the soul, and over the and being of its children it, —which being in h
1778.being of its children it, —which being in holy. sweet subjection to become ele
1779.s full of a deep and significant meaning, which can be explained in no other way
1780.which is the Holy Catholic Church, being not all of this world, the thousand con
1781.phy more than half-pagan phifor learning "Why and said is it that when a man emi
1782.sm." less repute Of other converts going over to they declare them "Always to ha
1783.- able said : army " is of the suffering poor, of will whom our Lord The poor ye
1784. the Catholic religion than this undying, ceaseless persecution against it, spir
1785.warfare with the faithful soul, enabling to exclaim : in the ; end " I have foug
1786., surroundings; some sincerely believing they do God a service" when they persec
1787. never been born ? felt Wolfert Flemming that he was getting all into deep water
1788.elt Wolfert Flemming that he was getting all into deep waters standing ; but a p
1789.as getting all into deep waters standing ; but a peace passing inner life human
1790.ep waters standing ; but a peace passing inner life human under- filled his and
1791.here was a The out-look was not cheering. mortgage on part of his property, whic
1792.e no it mode of relief except by selling, went severely against his heart he had
1793. ready money the year before in building the large addi- tion to his house, in e
1794.rge addi- tion to his house, in erecting a. new stone barn and other outhouses,
1795.rn and other outhouses, and in enriching and fencing in his lands. in It is true
1796. outhouses, and in enriching and fencing in his lands. in It is true that he had
1797.ty, the light there was his wife growing thin; had THE FLEMMINGS. 223 faded out
1798.faded out of her eyes, the cheerful ring was gone from her voice, and she was mi
1799. day feverish excitement, he of drooping, at other times glowing and brilliant w
1800., he of drooping, at other times glowing and brilliant with was an enigma which
1801.t alone. He was too fragile for bleeding and physicking, and in the must be as m
1802. too fragile for bleeding and physicking, and in the must be as much as possible
1803.f inertia, or, what was worse, softening his liberty, of the brain." all Ruby ha
1804. found out that the boy was of something, it making a mystery her heart to her u
1805.that the boy was of something, it making a mystery her heart to her un- happines
1806.ered with a dull ache at if he was going daft ? She had never got over the talk
1807.alk about the " soft stone," and nothing could have convinced her that of mental
1808.er that of mental hallucination in thing. it was not a feature him to imagine su
1809.avely enough, he had Huldah's ; cheering letter as an offset to it but his fathe
1810.orted him as best they could, " speaking of endearment, where words of consolati
1811.estead was grave. ; But Wolfert Flemming had counted the cost and come weal or w
1812.roversy" went on regularly every evening herself. —Mrs. Flemming now habituall
1813. every evening herself. —Mrs. Flemming now habitually absenting Her quaint hig
1814.Mrs. Flemming now habitually absenting Her quaint high-backed empty ; chair lo
1815.sat, seemed to understand that something was finally wrong, and the chair where
1816.re she until her mistress sadly blinking at the fire came in to prayers, then sp
1817.the fire came in to prayers, then spring- ing lightly to the floor she met her h
1818.ire came in to prayers, then spring- ing lightly to the floor she met her half-w
1819.octrine of Purgatory, so unlike anything they had ever heard of or conceived, wa
1820.to the Bible and then to Milner, linking the proofs together by his own strong n
1821.ragged into the mire human understanding, but 226 THE FLEMMINGS. it were to be r
1822. any of new dogmas they had been hearing to accept ; about, and which they desir
1823.they its had necessary to fathom meaning, or even troubled themselves for a sing
1824.ad many talks together over their sewing in the daytime, when their mother was n
1825.ubject of the previous ; night's reading grave, quiet conversations, indi- catin
1826.grave, quiet conversations, indi- cating not only an appreciation of new and str
1827.s, but the dawn and awaksupreme will ing of a spiritual life which already inspi
1828.how and why the Church venerated weeping at the Cross. ; her and sought her inte
1829. Jesus which she was interiorly striving to fashion her own life. She was the si
1830. was the new Eve who had brought healing and did the first salvation to her prog
1831.perverseness, intercedes without ceasing for us, for suffered a whom supreme mar
1832.truths which were gradually illuminating her spirit, and ask with timid yearning
1833. her spirit, and ask with timid yearning love the intercession of the Mother of
1834.wliere for be found when she was missing, Eva was she now of her often took her
1835.was she now of her often took her sewing with her, of content and sat there full
1836.t and sat there full and peace, thinking and thinking all sweet Virgin Mother un
1837.re full and peace, thinking and thinking all sweet Virgin Mother until lost sigh
1838. there. One day her mother Mrs. Flemming stood on the : surprised her threshold
1839.bove all, draperies chair, ; Eva sitting there on a her hands lightly clasped ov
1840. clasped over her knee, uplifted, gazing with a rapt fair likeness of and her fa
1841.oked round. Not worshipgesture with ping the image, mother," she answered quickl
1842.d quickly, as she rose and stood, making a little her hand towards the statue. "
1843.other life of Jesus ; and I was thinking of her holy and exalted virtues, and wi
1844.er holy and exalted virtues, and wishing that I might even in a feeble and imper
1845.e was converted," * said . Mrs. Flemming ; " but you ought to be ashamed of your
1846.o practice such idolatry as to be paying her honors which are due only to God, *
1847.ou who have been the gospel so " sitting under the teachings of many years," in
1848.d to ask the aid of your prayers? giving to a creature the worship which is it d
1849.o do this?" It " It is a different thing entirely. makes me such false reasoning
1850. entirely. makes me such false reasoning," she replied, nervously. if it is " De
1851.d with an unearthly brightness. "It ming. is all foolishness!" exclaimed Mrs. Fl
1852. room and threw herself upon the weeping in the bitterness of her soul and wonde
1853.the bitterness of her soul and wondering no longer that the Jews, in their time
1854.themselves in sackcloth; some such thing would \iave been a 230 THE FLEMMINGS. g
1855.er. "Eva," said her father, that evening, of "your mother tells me that you spen
1856.oom. Be careful, for I think the ceiling is unsound. There has been a leak in th
1857.hould have been mended." "Is the ceiling cracked, father? I did not no- tice !"
1858.s. Then came a day when Woifert Flemming was summoned before his Church to answe
1859.answer for his contumacy and backsliding. him he would not have sought His famil
1860.it, still and although less was he going to avoid the opportunity that it gave h
1861. he signified his intention of appearing before them on the following Sunday aft
1862.f appearing before them on the following Sunday afternoon. Never was the old mee
1863.day afternoon. Never was the old meeting-house so crowded. People came from far
1864. the last curiosity, many of them hoping to moment he would had fallen recant th
1865.enance and frank honest eyes confronting them calmly and breaihless. fearlessly,
1866.the conviction that the man was speaking the " words of truth and soberness." He
1867.over the whole ground rience, describing in simple of his religious expe- and gr
1868. doubts were first awakened by observing the contradictory doctrines of the vari
1869.doctrines of the various sects composing the Protestant world still ; how he bec
1870.in far still more disquieted by studying the scriptures difficulties, search of
1871. solution of his which so from silencing his doubts, plunged him into greater ;
1872.im into greater ; he spared them nothing of the mental ex- 232 ercises THE FLEMM
1873.ered with his hands, never once trusting himself to look towards him. Deacon Sne
1874. threatened apoplexy, from the beginning to the end of hat, it gazed intently in
1875.unpleasant expression than Mrs. Flemming, who, in a spirit of Puritan and Sparta
1876.ide with him, could not forbear thinking, as she listened to arguments which she
1877.oudly, Eva and Hope held up their gazing at him with fond affection, while belie
1878.him with fond affection, while believing as he believed, and lips. rejoicing in
1879.ving as he believed, and lips. rejoicing in every word that shown no fell from h
1880.y he was not ; there. Huldah was sitting near her aunt, and nodded and smiled in
1881.ction of Puritan decorum, to say nothing of the disapprobation they felt at her
1882.disapprobation they felt at her noticing people of public opinion. who were actu
1883.t was high noon when ; "Wolfert Flemming began beams up, to speak when he finish
1884.finished, the last golden of the setting sun shone through the old hemlocks arou
1885.e formula which severed Wolfert Flemming from religious all communion with them
1886.a most senseless voluntarily with- thing, as he had sometime before to confess d
1887.of "When the people all left the meeting-house, some few came up out fearful of
1888.shook off as hands with Wolfert Flemming, then hurried if —but the others stoo
1889.the others stood aloof, neither speaking or shaking hands, or by even a nod reco
1890.stood aloof, neither speaking or shaking hands, or by even a nod recognizing him
1891.king hands, or by even a nod recognizing him, except Huldah Sneathen, who fore l
1892.less you child." Then she stood chatting with Hope, ; THE FLEMMINGS. 235 Eva and
1893.GS. 235 Eva and right Nicholas, throwing defiant glances to the left and it abou
1894.r another instant, came up, and grasping her by the arm exclaimed admire to see
1895.long, and don't keep your father waiting " I'm coming to spend the afternoon wit
1896.'t keep your father waiting " I'm coming to spend the afternoon with you in her
1897.she turned to Miss Debby, and in hearing of every one said : " I declare ! I tho
1898.e bears and the Deborah her overpowering, and rendered quite speechless. CHAPTEK
1899.d been away nearly four weeks, including his journey thither, and it would be al
1900.d of the South, and in others to nothing better than old Indian trails, disin- u
1901.ned He ; was not a man given to building castles in Spain but he often found him
1902. sturdy team crept slowly along dragging the great creaking wagons loaded with o
1903.slowly along dragging the great creaking wagons loaded with of his household goo
1904.ed with of his household goods, thinking how his home would look when Hope Flemm
1905.w his home would look when Hope Flemming —soon to be his wife—brightened and
1906.ul face again, and watch the brightening of her eyes and the soft blushes mantli
1907.f her eyes and the soft blushes mantling her cheeks as he discussed their future
1908.y broken upon by the unexpected bursting of a mountain storm, which threatened,
1909.r ; the flurry was over, that everything was safe for he was very proud of his p
1910.was very proud of his purchases, knowing that Hope would like them The real maho
1911.e them The real mahogany table, standing —he knew her tastes so sofa ; well. a
1912.em, ? and give taste It was a rare thing hill in those days for a young bride, u
1913.ere in the country to go to housekeeping in such nice style, but then Hope, he t
1914. time Then all life, he went on dreaming when her home should be the stateliest
1915.Then he thought really of Hope presiding over the refined and cultivated society
1916. cultivated society there— and gracing with sweet dignity the high position he
1917.pon the flanks of his horses, dispersing his day dreams, and giving ; ; THE FLEM
1918.s, dispersing his day dreams, and giving ; ; THE FLEMMINGS. 239 of actual troubl
1919.MMINGS. 239 of actual trouble in getting things to rights once more. So we see t
1920.s in ; but it for her. It is astonishing what capacity difference be- there ple,
1921. rose and a thistle, for castle building ! and how happy they are in the beautif
1922.rung into existence by virtue of rubbing the lamp they carry about, hidden in th
1923. their imaginations in idle day-dreaming. Far from They must have, as John Wilde
1924.tlooks to build upon fancy, then nothing seems impossible to their nothing too h
1925.othing seems impossible to their nothing too high or noble for their aspirations
1926.d ; Hope had learned together in singing class he looked over his broad rich acr
1927.rightened at the thought of all endowing her with these and if other of his worl
1928.d he would have it thought worth nothing unshared by her ! Mrs. Wilde heard the
1929.Mrs. Wilde heard the wagon bells far ing around the moutain and crossing the nes
1930. far ing around the moutain and crossing the nestling between the hills, off, wi
1931.nd the moutain and crossing the nestling between the hills, off, windvalley litt
1932.at John 240 THE FLEMMINGS. ; was nearing home dreamed to of that he was coming s
1933.ng home dreamed to of that he was coming straight trial under a cloud to meet a
1934.s sick, when he did not see her standing as usual on the vine-clad porch, waving
1935. as usual on the vine-clad porch, waving her handkerchief to him, as she always
1936.ut his, uneasiness merged into something like anger, when must he got in and fou
1937.t he got in and found her quietly moving around, setting the tea-table ! He knew
1938.found her quietly moving around, setting the tea-table ! He knew that she have h
1939.ke the first heavy rain-drop of a coming with a sudden of ; storm, before the bl
1940. and it fell chill into the warm, loving nature the man. But he had enough sulki
1941.ature the man. But he had enough sulking, to do outside left so, instead of stay
1942.o do outside left so, instead of staying there still he Mrs. "Wilde full potteri
1943.here still he Mrs. "Wilde full pottering about the table, her heart so that she
1944.lightest provocation to burst out crying, and went to assist the men in unloadin
1945. and went to assist the men in unloading his treasures you, these were things fr
1946.ithout "scratch or scaur." After stowing believe them away carefully — as you
1947.where not a speck was to be seen sitting- he locked the door and went back to th
1948.d went back to the room, the old sitting-room with its low blue ceiling and blac
1949.d sitting-room with its low blue ceiling and black-walnut chair-boarding, which
1950. ceiling and black-walnut chair-boarding, which he remembered from his earliest
1951.t of the old tracks she had been walking in for nearly forty years;" adding: "It
1952.lking in for nearly forty years;" adding: "It for is better, young married folks
1953. to one another without anybody meddling. hard time with kin, my ; mother-in-law
1954.w and other step- who came nigh breaking my happiness and and I determined then
1955.e would you be ?" Mrs. Wilde was sitting at the head of the table, ready to pour
1956.re you sick, mother ?" he asked, looking fix- edly at her. "No, indeed. I What p
1957. Well, seems like there's like something the matter. this before. You never met
1958. the thought of my wife " is not getting disagreeable to you. !" I have heard of
1959.n that score, John. Should Hope Flemming ever be your wife, there'll be no jealo
1960.nd upon ever that." Should Hope Flemming ! be my wife What nonsense when we week
1961.other ? " Is There seems to be something of a mystery," he said, feeling scared
1962.omething of a mystery," he said, feeling scared as he went on. Hope well? Is the
1963.went on. Hope well? Is there ?" anything the matter at Elder Flemmings' "Finish
1964.d we'll tea, have a Mrs. Wilde, stirring her and look- ing down if into her cup.
1965.a Mrs. Wilde, stirring her and look- ing down if into her cup. She would have bu
1966.her cup. She would have burst out crying " she had met his eyes. Are they all we
1967.ith some people all to think that eating is a panacea for troubles, and that oth
1968.he pushed his plate and cup back, saying he had supper; then it reverently retur
1969.had supper; then it reverently returning thanks for blessings which was not the
1970.up and told his mother that he was going to saddle his horse and ride down to El
1971.is horse and ride down to Elder Flemming's to see what all this was about." stay
1972.t." stay ; Then she bade him and, taking his hand tenderly in hers, she led him
1973.estead while he was away. Elder Flemming — no longer Elder —had become a reg
1974.ut Papist, 244 THE FLEMMINGS. of meeting ; and had been turned out and Eva and H
1975.ad been turned out and Eva and Hope ming —yes, Hope ! too —professed pitied
1976.Reuben— he such a good convinced thing in it stuck by his mother. But Nicholas
1977." the fact of man as his father becoming a Catholic Mm that that the Catholic fa
1978.worth inquiry it and he intended reading and examining into ginning to end ; fro
1979.it and he intended reading and examining into ginning to end ; from be- and if i
1980.ended reading and examining into ginning to end ; from be- and if it come up It
1981.d go with them at the risk of everything. was the first religion he had heard he
1982.of," he said, " that cost a man anything, and that a man was ready it to lose al
1983.se all for ; therefore must be something more than sing- ing and praying and pre
1984.erefore must be something more than sing- ing and praying and preaching once a w
1985.re must be something more than sing- ing and praying and preaching once a week."
1986.omething more than sing- ing and praying and preaching once a week." "He said al
1987.than sing- ing and praying and preaching once a week." "He said all that, John,
1988.ew the partnership with Elder Flem- ming, and they say has broken off the match
1989.lde was a conscientious Puritan, serving God according to his lights, and believ
1990.cientious Puritan, serving God according to his lights, and believing himself to
1991.d according to his lights, and believing himself to be walk- a ! THE FLEMMINGS.
1992.mself to be walk- a ! THE FLEMMINGS. ing in the laws of the gospel, and to it 24
1993.ther said this to him and too, repeating his him that expressed the same told di
1994.rly all after breakfast the next morning. like had come upon him It an earthquak
1995.come upon him It an earthquake, tumbling life down bear. the fair fabric of his
1996.d floor all His mother heard him walking his ; night and when, towards daylight,
1997.ht and when, towards daylight, not being able any longer, she laid to bear these
1998.ry and comfort him, he his tired, aching head upon her shoulder, and, like unman
1999. when she finds there's danger of losing you." it " Not if she thinks right, mot
2000.ht, mother. You don't know Hope Flemming. ciple she She's like her father. She'd
2001.ngs to Mrs. Wilde. believe it up a thing, and be the right thing, you might as w
2002.ve it up a thing, and be the right thing, you might as well attempt to move the
2003.t will will come you and Hope Flem! ming I've not be man and wife I tell you, Jo
2004.out; and when I heard the wagon tinkling 'way off there on the mountain, and kne
2005. there on the mountain, and knew running away to hide to tell you were coming, I
2006.ing away to hide to tell you were coming, I rowful news. It's felt like myself,
2007.lt like myself, I dreaded so much having you sor- hard on me too, for I've been
2008.- hard on me too, for I've been counting so surely on ending my days here with f
2009.r I've been counting so surely on ending my days here with fit you and Hope, and
2010.osom as she stood beside him, he sitting on the bedside, and pressed her wet che
2011.and-point, a desire that Hope Flem- ming would cast aside the errors in it entan
2012. of hope and John Wilde, like a drowning man grasping bility that things at floa
2013.John Wilde, like a drowning man grasping bility that things at float- ing seawee
2014.rasping bility that things at float- ing seaweed, at last began to lay hold of t
2015.l does that in the snow. rolled Anything better than giving up Hope. It is stran
2016.snow. rolled Anything better than giving up Hope. It is strange that it He will
2017.t she, on her part, might not be willing compromise her happiness — as well as
2018. her happiness — as well as he knowing how widely their beliefs differed. The
2019.their beliefs differed. The next morning early he drove down little to the Old H
2020.down little to the Old Homestead, taking with him some presents he had brought f
2021. in the un- was an indefinable something, originating possibly in his having hea
2022.as an indefinable something, originating possibly in his having heard all that h
2023.hing, originating possibly in his having heard all that he had and in, pleasant
2024. always sounded to him like the warbling of a bird. Mrs. Flemming's face wore a
2025.ke the warbling of a bird. Mrs. Flemming's face wore a look of care, which he no
2026.re, which he noticed more particurly ing ; she had lost flesh when she was not s
2027. religious culties, which, like a rising flood, were sweeping her near and dear
2028.hich, like a rising flood, were sweeping her near and dear ones away from her to
2029. destruction. cheerful, "Wolfert Hemming and Eva were more cheerful than he had
2030.almost forgot his terested in describing the wonders of the city some of the per
2031.ay to their various occupations, leaving him alone with Hope, and he realized hi
2032.his position with such a sick feelit ing at his heart that almost blinded him. H
2033. —a brooch and a plain heavy gold ring —in her hands. She opened the morocco
2034. case and looked as if at them, admiring them, then laid it quietly on the works
2035. the workstand beside her without saying a word. " I thought perhaps you would l
2036.y are beautiful," thank you for thinking of me." both silent ; Then they were sh
2037.th silent ; Then they were she stitching away on a linen waist- / 250 THE FLEMMI
2038.S. for her father band "I —he watching her, full of a great love and sorrow. h
2039.me, Hope It is the most remarkable thing I ever —and, to me, the most painful,
2040.he most painful," he ex- And Hope giving that told him how it had all come to pa
2041.ently, she made her reasons for becoming a Catholic clear to his mind, but not t
2042.sk this of her. But so far from yielding in the slightest degree to anything he
2043.ding in the slightest degree to anything he said, she told him plainly, while he
2044.on far ; and that so rest from relapsing into the darkness and errors her union
2045. faith." " I have no thought of changing, Hope. I God all all forbid. am satisfi
2046.fellow " but I couldn't believe anything more than I do, 252 THE FLEMMINGS. if o
2047.le will be for us to marry, entertaining religious beliefs so widely differing.
2048.ng religious beliefs so widely differing. The case seems, no doubt, is peculiarl
2049.se seems, no doubt, is peculiarly trying ; but this newly-found faith so essenti
2050.t could induce relinquish it. me Knowing this, the best that I can faith, do is
2051.bitter case," said John "Wilde, bringing his clenched hand heavily ; down on it
2052.it seems to me that you take of wrecking coolly, Hope, and think no more my happ
2053.r, John, that you have to lose something, I also sacrifice somewhat that was dea
2054. or in " Hope," he said at last, raiding his head from "you ha\e never earnestly
2055.of the will to the grace of God, placing itself under subjection to Religion His
2056.ty, from very rudiments, grace assisting our will. First the all, seed, then the
2057.ient progression.' is I feel that having essential, that I found the right path,
2058.only advance a step at a time, stumbling and often falling back at that, that I
2059.p at a time, stumbling and often falling back at that, that I must be engaged in
2060.I must feel sure To be that I am running not against, but according to the I mus
2061. I am running not against, but according to the I must be satisfied that the Chu
2062., holy, true and immutable and —having one Lord, one reason. Faith, and one Ba
2063.ason. Faith, and one Baptism. Everything must be clear to All this I have found
2064.- do not know experimentally, not having to receive the Sacraments." had the hap
2065.l to me after all these years of looking forward to the time when you would be m
2066.p " Don't like a wife to find everything !" sudden shipwreck see, he exclaimed.
2067.e exclaimed. you John," she said, laying her if hand upon peril his arm, " that
2068.eril his arm, " that I were even willing to my faith and happiness by marrying y
2069.ng to my faith and happiness by marrying you THE FLEMMINGS. which. I 255 it am n
2070.how impossible would be for you, holding the opinions that you do, to marry a Ca
2071.woso, man's equally the difference being that hers spirit of sacrifice for was c
2072. change. I can do no more." have nothing else to offer, John. "I A religious cha
2073.ttle But some arrangement, some yielding on both sides, may be possible !" he sa
2074.des, may be possible !" he said standing before her. said quickly, while a sudde
2075.er face, succeeded by a crimson flushing, showed how the crucial tests were hurt
2076.howed how the crucial tests were hurting her nature. " I can yield nothing, not
2077.urting her nature. " I can yield nothing, not to the smallest iota of my faith,
2078.t." "I Do not hope for hop© for nothing now," he said wearily, as he lingered n
2079.arily, as he lingered near her. and ring which lay in the sunshine, for Then poi
2080.h lay in the sunshine, for Then pointing to the brooch upon her work-stand glist
2081.he brooch upon her work-stand glistening : he added " Keep these at least, my sa
2082.ese at least, my sake it ;" and wringing her hand, almost he went away, but her
2083.that he would to read with her. crushing in the grasp of his, came back a moment
2084.t after to tell come again the following evening CHAPTER XVIII. PATRICK M'CUE AN
2085.to tell come again the following evening CHAPTER XVIII. PATRICK M'CUE AND HIS LE
2086.rowd which, extended from the dejostling livery-window clear out to the sidewalk
2087.ear out to the sidewalk, and shouldering each other get nearer and be the first
2088.here were faces dread — others beaming crisis in anxiety ; some with hope life
2089.st and wreck- and now they stood waiting, hoping against hope, for tidings which
2090.reck- and now they stood waiting, hoping against hope, for tidings which would e
2091. " golden fleece ;" but weeks stretching into months had passed since they were
2092.rd had come up from — 258 THE FLEMMING&. the " deep " concerning them. They fo
2093.8 THE FLEMMING&. the " deep " concerning them. They for if also hoped less to he
2094.d sunk it ; they had foun- meant nothing more or than utter ruin to them. There
2095. ruin to them. There were others waiting travelling abroad, whose near and dear
2096.em. There were others waiting travelling abroad, whose near and dear ones were b
2097.d, whose near and dear ones were bearing with them in search of health the fadin
2098.with them in search of health the fading, perishing darling of the household —
2099.n search of health the fading, perishing darling of the household —who now sto
2100. of health the fading, perishing darling of the household —who now stood and a
2101.d bated breath, until the crowd thinning out a little, thankful for the delay be
2102. and cheeks that were There were growing thinner and whiter every day. hard-face
2103.ere in Canton, and the Brazils, jostling against editors impatient for their for
2104. hope relatives, friends, all of hearing good news from distant husbands, brothe
2105.ost dead with homesickness and hungering for letters from over the sea as they h
2106.im no advantage whatever, unless looking like a lighthouse amidst that surging s
2107.ng like a lighthouse amidst that surging sea of faces could be called one. geniu
2108.around him. At last, by dint of watching his opportunity and edging his way an i
2109.t of watching his opportunity and edging his way an inch at a time, he got to th
2110. window, and asked the tired, perspiring clerk if there was a letter for him. "
2111." " No, faith ! the letter I'm expecting ; is from the dear ould soul not to get
2112.appinted off his replied the man, taking hat to mop his face. ! 260 THE FLEMMING
2113.ho it is from !" said the clerk, handing him a letter, but not the out. one he e
2114.get out, for the stream of people coming in was steadily increasing ; so, litera
2115.people coming in was steadily increasing ; so, literally wedging himself back in
2116.adily increasing ; so, literally wedging himself back in an angle of the wall, a
2117.k in an angle of the wall, and thrusting his basket down between his feet, he, a
2118.run his eye over the strange handwriting, then read its contents. . struggled to
2119.ssed Virgin from his lips, and snatching up his basket, which he hoisted to the
2120. honor, I'll be round for " this evening !" he shouted back. Converted ! THE FLE
2121.tin' the sight of the cross, and calling me names, and talking to me as if I had
2122.cross, and calling me names, and talking to me as if I had just come up through
2123. them books." Patrick McCue was thinking aloud said, and everybody around him he
2124.some it weeks before by Wolfert Flemming. contained The news it overpowered him;
2125.it overpowered him; seemed house nothing short of miraculous. He had left heard
2126.aculous. He had left heard noththeir ing of the Flemmings since he months ago, a
2127.and although he had never ceased praying for their conversion, the recollection
2128.he grave, stern Puritan himself, telling Faith, him and " that " he there was co
2129.as good hope said Patrick ; for thinking his entire household would before long
2130.ly got clear of the post-office building and found himself standing in for a the
2131.fice building and found himself standing in for a the street. Here he rested mom
2132.ame to a church, the door of which being open, he marched reverently up the towa
2133. towards the rich altar, and prostrating himself before the Blessed Sacrament, o
2134.or the conversion of his Then and rising he crossed over to a thanking lat- eral
2135.and rising he crossed over to a thanking lat- eral altar, the altar of the Bless
2136.or whom he had been so long left praying. "When he the church there were ! THE F
2137.HE FLEMMINGS. 263 great drops glistening on Lis grizzly beard which looked stran
2138.od !" said Patrick still McCue, standing at the church door, in his holding his
2139.nding at the church door, in his holding his hat hand and looking undecidedly up
2140. in his holding his hat hand and looking undecidedly up and down is the street;
2141."it out, I ever the wondherfullest thing, out an' across, came and I'm most at m
2142.s' end." Then he surely fell to thinking, and presently ex: claimed, with a radi
2143.the right kind of books, rale convincing tunderin' books, that'll knock the last
2144.f the still soul, Patrick McCue, lugging his basket and holding the unfolded let
2145.ck McCue, lugging his basket and holding the unfolded letter to his breast, went
2146. worth its weight in gold even according to worldly valuation, and there from' t
2147. Who is it, Dan ?" he would say, looking up peris it ?" haps from his polyglot,
2148. then fetch some coals in, and if I ring my bell bring in some bread and at and
2149.me coals in, and if I ring my bell bring in some bread and at and meat," replied
2150.keepin' him stript of money, and wearing old clothes not fit for a scarecrow. An
2151.mate ready, for that bell's sure to ring." This was the Bishop's way, and this w
2152. the Bishop's presence, his face beaming with delight as he knelt to get his ble
2153. delight as he knelt to get his blessing and kiss the consecrated ring upon the
2154.s blessing and kiss the consecrated ring upon the good "I sit prelate's finger.
2155.come about better nor " if I was sitting." Very good, my friend ; but I think if
2156.l me a crick in it if 1 sit here looking up at you —why, man, you must be de-
2157.he cathedral," replied Patrick, dropping into the chair, confused and em- barras
2158.confused and em- barrassed, and blushing all over his face and head. ; The good
2159.ve made me very comfortable by ; sitting down when you are bid tell me what I ca
2160.en Patrick McCue handed Wolfert Flemming's letter to the Bishop, and with many d
2161.. The Bishop listened patiently, picking out the kernel of the nut Patrick was s
2162.he nut Patrick was so awkwardly cracking, until he fully understood the pith of
2163.ed the letter it and read from beginning to end. Then he said : is good news, ex
2164.y, don't you see, your Grace, that being an ignoramus, with nothing to boast of
2165.e, that being an ignoramus, with nothing to boast of except Faith and my — abo
2166.." ' You made a very good hit in leaving End of Controversy' with your Puritan B
2167.d has honored you it greatly in allowing you as will were to become the instrume
2168.. J not forget them, or you, in offering the Holy Sacrifice." And the Bishop dip
2169.e to Patrick McCue, who had sat watching him, and wishing that he might floor th
2170.e, who had sat watching him, and wishing that he might floor that the throw hims
2171. Irish full heart was so and overflowing with those filial sentiments of reveren
2172.understood among Ca- " Is there anything else I can do for you, my child?" Yes.
2173.my child?" Yes. yet, There was sjmething on Patrick's mind little and waxing a b
2174.hing on Patrick's mind little and waxing a bold under the gracious and simple ki
2175.to the fat," " said the Bishop, laughing. secret. Now I'll tell you a I have not
2176.sh " brings to ; and —said the cunning Patrick I'd my remimbrance something if
2177.ing Patrick I'd my remimbrance something if be glad to be insensed* about, take
2178.d to be insensed* about, take the asking of it your reverence won't for impidinc
2179.sk whatever you please." McCue, assuming a most conhe screwed his courage up tho
2180.p fever ?" The Bishop burst out laughing. bered it He rememup the all : his frig
2181.e of. Made THE FLEMMINGS. steep creaking ladder, wondering after lie 269 got up
2182.MMINGS. steep creaking ladder, wondering after lie 269 got up how he should get
2183.ved by his ministrations, whose pressing needs had made all perils to his own li
2184. McCue, reverence, "But that was nothing, your to the way you got down into the
2185.the just was a tough job though, getting down fellow, poor mangled after little
2186.little who died in ; my ' arms receiving the Holy Viaticum and I was a out of th
2187.sistance " !" !" God forbid such a thing happening said the good Bishop, diverte
2188. !" !" God forbid such a thing happening said the good Bishop, diverted beyond m
2189. legs and picked up his basket, standing before the good who said : "I should li
2190.rom them, come and let me know and thing more of these converts, ; don't forget
2191.child." And Bishop gave him his blessing as he knelt before him, then he went hi
2192.efore him, then he went his ways feeling happier and more elated than he had eve
2193.er been life. in his whole Without going home to rest, Patrick McCue trudged on
2194.lic bookstore in Boston, and, presenting the list written by the Bishop, was THE
2195. was THE FLEMMINGS. fortunate in getting all 271 of the books he had recom- mend
2196.mmy Moore " for ; also a book containing illustrations from the this was Reuben,
2197.his respects." fied little Then, feeling better satis- with himself, he wended h
2198.dler's pack, out of which he was coining honest profits ; and then over ? he pac
2199. many til nails in the top of by putting twice as the box and hammering was nece
2200.y putting twice as the box and hammering was necessary, unit upon them just twic
2201. upon them just twice as long as finding there was danger of splitting to pieces
2202.as finding there was danger of splitting to pieces he threw down his hammer and
2203. every letter lid as if meant a blessing. Then when he closed his shop and shoul
2204.shouldered the box, and could do nothing more to it, he locked up, strode down i
2205. be Then Patrick gave distance, watching it in, and stood off at a safe with jea
2206.kets and went homefife, wards, whistling " The Blackbird " like a and thinking h
2207.ng " The Blackbird " like a and thinking he would be glad to get his dinner, hav
2208. would be glad to get his dinner, having eaten nothing since six o'clock that mo
2209. to get his dinner, having eaten nothing since six o'clock that morning it — a
2210.n nothing since six o'clock that morning it — and it's was then four. " Bedad
2211.ould mother, God bless her, that's lying waitin' for office." me at the post- An
2212.S. As he had promised most every evening her, John Wilde came al- to read " Miln
2213.ly had grave talks with Wolfert Flemming himself on the subject to ; but as yet
2214.ect to ; but as yet he had found nothing in feel it all make him even for a mome
2215.t all make him even for a moment willing to abandon his own religious principles
2216.argued— "to ; " of what use be running after novelties in faith, which already
2217.the marriage of himself and Hope. Seeing the daily life Flemmings, life, and not
2218.e daily life Flemmings, life, and noting their righteous, cheerful way of and ho
2219.t and word and thought ligion, —making their re- without any self-assertion on
2220.en, just to trust to Providence, leaving ligious discussions out of the question
2221. out of the question, re- and yield- ing everything to her except his lief. own
2222. question, re- and yield- ing everything to her except his lief. own individual
2223. pub- THE FLEMMINGS. lie ; 275 his being so much with the Flemmings was in itsel
2224.n it got to be known that he was reading their Popish books and spend- ing hours
2225.eading their Popish books and spend- ing hours at a time in religious conversati
2226.tened roundly to turn him out of meeting if he did not speedily spirit mend his
2227.ration ; Catholic but if Hope Flem- ming would marry him, not all the world shou
2228.rospect now or henceforth of ever having any other belief, and with that they mu
2229.n twice or had to sit in the old meeting-house and hear sermons preached at him,
2230. beside himself, he was tempted to fling his hat on his head and march out from
2231.de own house faithful realized something of Job's trials in having his friends s
2232.ized something of Job's trials in having his friends stirred and kinsmen and tho
2233.nd those of his up against him, treating him like a sinner and backslider, when
2234.lieve as the than at that time. Flemming's do," he said one day hotly to his mot
2235.down to the " Old Homestead," and asking to see Hope alone, proposed to her to m
2236.er delay. But she, who had been thinking long and prayerfully purpose, he went s
2237. went straight over the matter, weighing all that was for and THE FLEMMINGS. aga
2238.nd so she told him, her cheeks blanching whiter and whiter, and her eyes overflo
2239.ter and whiter, and her eyes overflowing with tears she keep back as she spoke.
2240.de his grace to the man's hopes, putting an end to torture of uncertainty and co
2241.ty and conflict with himself. or nothing Angry and grieved, thinking but little
2242.. or nothing Angry and grieved, thinking but little of her sacrifice, only knowi
2243.ut little of her sacrifice, only knowing how earnestly she he got up to leave he
2244.riendly word or a clasp of the hand. ing before her for an instant, his hat crus
2245.d You have ruined my life, Hope Flemming, unless God helps me. I have done all w
2246.ak ; and he went away. The Hope Flemming heard of her lover, he was on his way t
2247.us neither fictions of nature, its sting; it from cross or but it loss, or the c
2248.ss, or the cruci- has a sweet distilling balm for the faithful soul who seeks st
2249.trength and resig- nation in it, leading her through the fiery ordeals unscathed
2250.rue end baptized with fire. of his being " It is," writes one,* "the law of our
2251., that we be perfected through suffering ; and he who has not dis- cerned the di
2252.ss of sorrow, and the pro- found meaning which to learn is concealed in pain, ha
2253.ife, alone interprets it." Hope Flemming's heart was sorely tried, as faith, we
2254. her it was neither it light or fleeting; paled her cheeks, took the brightness
2255.om her step for many a long day, leaving the peace of her soul undisturbed grets
2256.ntention. Of course this sudden breaking up of Hope's prospects added much to th
2257.added much to the cup of Mrs. Flem- ming's bitterness, and she said words that h
2258.se, unmotherly words, girl that thinking them over almost made the troubles. be-
2259.ery tender with the poor mother, bearing all that she said and did with sweet pa
2260.aid and did with sweet patience, knowing how honestly she thought they were wron
2261.ic her life, tasks as she had been doing the never omitting the slightest minuti
2262.as she had been doing the never omitting the slightest minutiae, and attending w
2263.ng the slightest minutiae, and attending with scrupulous care to individual comf
2264. each one of her household, and ordering : — THE FLEMMINGS. 280 all things wit
2265.on and they missed the old cheerful ring of her voice singing over her work, and
2266.e old cheerful ring of her voice singing over her work, and her quiet, decisive
2267.f them except Nicholas, who was growling one day over his dinner when Mrs. Flemm
2268.e day over his dinner when Mrs. Flemming broke out with " We are too poor now, N
2269.If people could only in luxurious living. fied be satis- without running after n
2270.s living. fied be satis- without running after newfangled notions, much trouble
2271. woman had said and Nicholas not knowing exactly make, took a stick, what answer
2272. pocket, and began to whittle, whistling under his breath at the same time. If T
2273. finished his dinner he tried everything before 281 fallen to would have and him
2274.his mother, and would have done anything to restore her peace of sturdy, awkward
2275.but he was quite at a loss for something to say which would not make matters wor
2276.atters worse, but could think of nothing, and whittled and whistled table in a l
2277.ybilant undertone until the left sitting in was cleared away, and he was little
2278.v- which his mother was about sweep- ing into a dust-pan, stooping over with the
2279.out sweep- ing into a dust-pan, stooping over with the veins in her forehead swo
2280.d vanished out of the side Mrs. Flemming's impulse was to box Nicholas, her next
2281.ed with to call him. the rough caressing of her " bear," as she sometimes in the
2282.east " It's a comfort that has something to look forward to," thought his mother
2283.forward to," thought his mother, looking after him " but as he disappeared it's
2284.ared it's all down the garden path owing to Huldah's indifference to gos- pel tr
2285.termination to marry spite of everything. him in And Huldah will be very rich wh
2286.ow but she and Nick ; don't mind waiting, for they'll have it all some day." And
2287.h the clouds of a stormy sky, comforting and somewhat consoling the poor little
2288.y sky, comforting and somewhat consoling the poor little woman. Mrs. Flemming we
2289.ing the poor little woman. Mrs. Flemming went to meeting every Sabbath, the chai
2290.tle woman. Mrs. Flemming went to meeting every Sabbath, the chaise driven by Reu
2291. the religious exercises that were going on, and trying in this her hour of tria
2292.exercises that were going on, and trying in this her hour of trial to quench her
2293.sterns that held no water, and receiving stones instead of bread, for which the
2294., for which the hungry soul was starving Reuben, indifferent to all around him,
2295.ndifferent to all around him, not caring a straw, in fact, where he went on Sabb
2296.Sabbath, so that he could go on dreaming out his dream unmo- THE FLEMMINGS. lest
2297.HE FLEMMINGS. lested 283 —and behaving so strangely, standing up knelt, when h
2298.3 —and behaving so strangely, standing up knelt, when he should have should ha
2299.ave should have notes that sat, kneeling when he and breaking out in shrill fals
2300. that sat, kneeling when he and breaking out in shrill falsetto when he should h
2301.nd these were only the symptoms cropping out of the mystery of his life, about w
2302.of his life, about which he was dreaming and thinking all the time. to pass that
2303.about which he was dreaming and thinking all the time. to pass that while all th
2304.ere banned and morally outlawed, Hemming got to be looked upon as a suffer- ing
2305.g got to be looked upon as a suffer- ing saint, and her old friends and neighbor
2306.lways collected around her after meeting to show by their sympathetic greetings
2307.robed of and tortured instead comforting her, that whatever they might feel towa
2308.en seemed to resent Father Ray's praying publicly for her as one under ; 284 THE
2309.ned estate, and shake hands over knowing all it all with those who did it, the t
2310.tand that she came constantly to meeting, not to keep in favor with them, but be
2311. her Puritan descendant, Martha Flemming, and when her guests went away she did
2312. to come again. ; She preferred fighting out her battle alone with the instincts
2313.f a wild animal she hid herself, wishing none to see her wounds. Soon Merill aft
2314.ng lar account of all that letter giving him a particu- had happened at the " Ol
2315. poral and social, of the family, hoping that would put to son might his wife. f
2316.thought his grand- still have of seeking Eva Flemming for fellow, But he did not
2317.rand- still have of seeking Eva Flemming for fellow, But he did not know the you
2318.t he did not know the young who, leaving his constant devotion for Eva out of th
2319.of the question, the " had become during his residence at Hub " a something that
2320.uring his residence at Hub " a something that was half Pagan, half strange tenet
2321.e did not care a twig for Eva's it being a Catholic; but he did care, and took s
2322.ars of the social interdict friends, ing laid letter, all on his old and how nea
2323. of the trap father and aunt were laying him; "but the cun- ning old souls might
2324.aunt were laying him; "but the cun- ning old souls might as well save their time
2325.ht as well save their time for something better ; for were not engaged to you kn
2326.ou know, George, even if I Nick Flemming, whose very marry you to save footprint
2327. life." George Merill burst out laughing; of his city clothes then he thought of
2328.gs and swore a little, ended by pitching some 286 into a valise THE FLEMMINGS. a
2329.nto a valise THE FLEMMINGS. and starting right off for the hill country, where h
2330.here he arrived about dusk the following day, and swinging his valise in his to
2331.out dusk the following day, and swinging his valise in his to the " hand walked
2332.ad." Near the house he met Mrs. Flemming, " help," who had been to see her old S
2333.sy of the head from the shock of hearing suddenly that Elder Flemming and his ch
2334. of hearing suddenly that Elder Flemming and his children had turned Papists, an
2335.ned Papists, and spent her time relating her as- tounding dreams, which she call
2336.spent her time relating her as- tounding dreams, which she called " visions," an
2337.which she called " visions," and telling of " death-watches " and mysterious tap
2338.signs and won- she declared — " rising out of the dretful doings down yonder,"
2339.the dretful doings down yonder," meaning the Old Homestead. "When Mrs. Flemming
2340.g the Old Homestead. "When Mrs. Flemming saw George Merill, a sudof her den hope
2341.htened over her pale, ; warm glow making her look ten years younger little but t
2342.s younger little but there was quivering of her lips as she held : out her hand
2343.d am very glad to see you, Mrs. Flemming," he "I grasping her hand warmly. to wa
2344. see you, Mrs. Flemming," he "I grasping her hand warmly. to was just on my way
2345.tle while ago, you see," he added, swing- ing his valise round. ! THE FLEMMINGS.
2346.hile ago, you see," he added, swing- ing his valise round. ! THE FLEMMINGS. " 28
2347.en I do wonder ?" answered Mrs. Flemming. " No. My grandfather and I are sure to
2348.-to up there. How are they Mrs. Flemming " And ?" " All well —in health," she
2349.l is at home." You see, of Mrs, Flemming," said the young fellow, his generous,
2350.w, his generous, unselfish love, holding her hand in his, " I have heard all abo
2351.to the Elder, and I left if ; everything to come I and ask Eva once more she wil
2352.o go back to-morrow I have a case coming shall up in court in a few days and hav
2353.re in time." " I can promise you nothing, George," answered " ; Mrs. Flemming. a
2354.ing, George," answered " ; Mrs. Flemming. against itself in, You know I our hous
2355.f Eva don't lic." to you. mind her being a Pa am sure, a Roman you Catho- " I sh
2356.8 THE FLEMMINGS. could never be anything but Eva to me," he replied, as they ent
2357.l send Eva in," re- peated Mrs. Flemming, as she went into the old part of the h
2358.h of Eva, who was in her bedroom tacking up the tains " clean, snowy window-cur-
2359.windowsis in Some one the parlor wishing to see you, Eva," said Mrs. Flemming, j
2360.ing to see you, Eva," said Mrs. Flemming, just putting her head into the door, t
2361., Eva," said Mrs. Flemming, just putting her head into the door, then going feel
2362.tting her head into the door, then going feeling directly first away — almost
2363.r head into the door, then going feeling directly first away — almost mean, fo
2364.back the curtains, and hastily smoothing back her curling hair silk and tying on
2365., and hastily smoothing back her curling hair silk and tying on a nice black sta
2366.ing back her curling hair silk and tying on a nice black stairs, apron, ran down
2367.er im- pulse was to draw back and go ing ; the smile faded out of away without s
2368.d around her, Eva hesitated in answering spirit of the little a moment him —he
2369.ause she for all that shrunk from giving only pain in return he offered ; then i
2370.ly : way put an end to his hopes, saying pain, as I "I am is sorry to inflict am
2371.ppened up here know what has your having become I Roman Catholics, all of you, a
2372., all of you, and there may be something in your mind on that score. But let no
2373.hould be a it Roman Catholic as anything else little, in fact would take but I t
2374.in fact would take but I think, to bring me over; but whether I am brought over
2375.my fortune should go towards if building and decorating churches of your faith,
2376.ld go towards if building and decorating churches of your faith, it would make y
2377.rewarded tenfold. I thank you for coming in this the —yes, thank you for comin
2378.in this the —yes, thank you for coming hour of our trial, when other friends a
2379.d neighbors stand aloof it — and doing that which, while But let convinces me
2380.fishness and true constancy, would bring only blame and derision upon yourself.
2381.here was a strange, bright calm brooding over the girl's beautiful face as she h
2382.ned over and kissed her forehead, saying : " Just this once, Eva ; it is the sea
2383.e to smooth away the remembrance parting. of this —to ; me —bitter I cannot
2384.ood- by — it is useless to defer going," he said, holding out his hand. " Good
2385.seless to defer going," he said, holding out his hand. " Good-by, my friend and
2386.Merill gone, Eva?" inquired Mrs. Hemming, an hour " Yes, mother. or so later. We
2387. so later. We parted as friends, nothing more," she answered. Boston." " "He has
2388.e to repent " it," replied Mrs. Flemming. nice You and Hope have made a it, mess
2389.ds to protect know their them and Haying little own roof to shelter them. I don'
2390.ught fire to solace herself with reading a chapter out of " Fox's Book of the Ma
2391.of it slow torture she had been enduring for months. That night the stage books
2392.he stage books at left "Wolfert Flemming's door, and he opened its wa3 and taken
2393. rest, it spent half the night examining joicing contents, re- over the treasure
2394.t spent half the night examining joicing contents, re- over the treasures it con
2395. true fold of Christ, moment when, being made inwardly a member of the had been
2396.e "Bread of Life" for which his soul ing. And how in this strangely ! had Provid
2397.- times like a most haphazard proceeding to have written and sent a money-letter
2398.. try ; Wolfert his wife 293 if Flemming felt at such moments as it, was justifi
2399.oments as it, was justifiable in calling with some sharp remarks, not only "a fo
2400. remarks, not only "a foolish proceeding," but " a sinful throwing away of money
2401.ish proceeding," but " a sinful throwing away of money." But, as we know, Patric
2402. bill and receipt, and the Mrs. Flemming knew that the books had come, from seei
2403.new that the books had come, from seeing Reuben unwrapping and examining those s
2404. had come, from seeing Reuben unwrapping and examining those sent him by the ped
2405.m seeing Reuben unwrapping and examining those sent him by the pedler, who would
2406.t her such ? Was he to be forever coming up in some shape or other to torment he
2407. She began to think so. The next morning Mrs. Flemming up and putting things ser
2408.think so. The next morning Mrs. Flemming up and putting things served for hersel
2409.ext morning Mrs. Flemming up and putting things served for herself, and to in br
2410.s served for herself, and to in brushing rights in the "work- room," a labor of
2411.the books had been packed, and was going to throw felt it into the wood-box for
2412.od-box for kindlings, when she something smooth and hard strike against her hand
2413. hard strike against her hand, something heavier than the straw and shav- 294 TH
2414.MINGS. ings she held, and upon examining she discovered that it was a small leat
2415.ked and dently dropped —to say nothing about it, having satisfied her curiosit
2416.opped —to say nothing about it, having satisfied her curiosity, she would lay
2417.y it among her husband's papers, leaving him cover it the best way he could. to
2418.ld. to dis- CHAPTER XX. WOLFERT ELEMMING's BIRTHDAY Mrs. Flemming read the littl
2419.OLFERT ELEMMING's BIRTHDAY Mrs. Flemming read the little book she had ; found am
2420. her hus- band and children were reading the books sent by Patrick McCue, readin
2421.the books sent by Patrick McCue, reading them as thirsty travellers in the deser
2422.neath tlie 295 shadow of broad-spreading palms. Up there alone, like " a sparrow
2423.presents the Catholic religion according to Protestant ideas, there represents a
2424.l pendulum side, kept her mind vibrating from side to ing if, after all, the Cat
2425.kept her mind vibrating from side to ing if, after all, the Catholic version of
2426.stand out against the patient and loving forbearance of her husband and children
2427.LEMMINGS. with jealous eye for something on their part which would bring a scand
2428.omething on their part which would bring a scandal on offer their new ; professi
2429. her feel very often that she was making herself miserable with- out just cause.
2430.st cause. Never before had Mrs. Flemming never seen religion more beautifully ex
2431.ruits of a true spiritual life, ripening in the eternal sunshine of a true faith
2432.e could earth were Papists. find nothing to sweeten the bitter fact that the bei
2433., without the remotest idea of following their example, she felt with the deepes
2434.think to herself, after mentally summing up her grievances, " that they had comm
2435.that book kept her constantly drift- ing out among doubts and fears which fevere
2436.reader to suppose that "Wolfert Flemming and his daughters lived in a state of e
2437.es which had gathered and were gathering about them felt still — for they were
2438.; savory with garlick and sweet-smelling herbs their faith but was strong ; it w
2439.rophet of old, when they were faint- ing with thirst, threw in immortal leaves w
2440.eaves which sweetened the waters, giving them strength and refreshment. And they
2441.ld up each other's hands, never allowing a despondent to word escape their lips,
2442.faces. And the weeks passed on, bringing and worries. beguiled by The season, ne
2443.seductive warmth, sown, and were rubbing their hands together with delight over
2444.nicest morsels, died, and she was crying over it, thinking no one saw her when h
2445.ed, and she was crying over it, thinking no one saw her when her Aunt Debby's sh
2446.rrupted THE FLEMMINGS. her tears, saying : 299 ! " I admire to see you, Huldy cr
2447.ve the Lord has down yonder" —pointing towards the " Old Homestead." "Go face
2448.y, and let me be," said Huldah, flashing round her flushed, tear-stained upon th
2449. the spinster ; " and don't go on making brought a such a fool of yourself. curs
2450.urself. curse on the land, c If anything's it's the treatment you pharisees ;' h
2451.bby sniffed it and went her way, knowing by exsay anything perience that more, o
2452. went her way, knowing by exsay anything perience that more, or stay looking on
2453.hing perience that more, or stay looking on but she would have relished above al
2454.ld have relished above all things giving Huldah a sound ; box on her ears before
2455.t of it make she could. Wolfert Flemming did not lose more than his neighbors ;
2456.han his neighbors ; but the debt hanging over him and the unexpected breaking up
2457.ing over him and the unexpected breaking up of his business losses bear made his
2458.ready money and gone into debt in making the improve; ments about his place and
2459.mprove; ments about his place and adding to his lands but he never dreamed of su
2460.its of his business, steadily increasing, would extricate him certainly all in t
2461.by his own, and would give up everything rather than wrong any man. Some months
2462.persecute him on account of his changing his religion, which he had good reason
2463.every exertion to stave off the breaking up of their old home ; but they must pr
2464. do, to submit to the will of was trying to God, how- ever the affair might resu
2465.the firm of Sneathen of the old Flemming, which he had enough left in & Adam him
2466.arthly prosperity in which Mrs. Flemming had gloried a few months past was crumb
2467. gloried a few months past was crumbling and fading around her ; how swiftly, li
2468.few months past was crumbling and fading around her ; how swiftly, like a meteor
2469.d had turned Catholics, friendly feeling left for infidels, them if but they had
2470.taunch Purithat tans was the culminating point of all famous and dreadful ; henc
2471.Almighty would be satisfied with nothing short of their destruction. Nicholas Fl
2472. of their destruction. Nicholas Flemming had applied for the District School, th
2473. the District School, the teacher having died six months before, any one to Nick
2474.to Nick might as and the Committee being unable supply his place well ; to get !
2475.HE FLEMMINGS you?" said Wolfert Flemming, spite of himself at the insult. k 303
2476. of himself at the insult. k 303 feeling strong in " I only wish you possessed f
2477.," replied Nicholas. certain : one thing if I can't believe enough to become a I
2478.ey'd burn ; Catholic, I shall be nothing. us all at the stake, if they could I r
2479. they're your friends," after for saying it. said Nicholas, sorry the " moment a
2480.for money, or wouldn't push him, knowing he's in a tight place himself." " Yes,
2481.t I don't think there's any use in going for he's had no work for six sheriff mo
2482.E FLEMMINGS. " I don't see Mrs. Flemming. why you should be distressed for anoth
2483. be distressed for another's shortcoming." " He ; will pay me " if he can, mothe
2484. " if he can, mother," answered Flemming, gently. He's an industrious, honest al
2485.should we be in the same case, the sting of remorse be added to our sorrows." "
2486. his own family " But I ex- pect nothing but trouble now." Let us be patient, mo
2487.; let us be patient," he replied, laying his broad hand tenderly on her first he
2488. significance. " all How can all killing I be patient," she cried, " when I see
2489.prospects of your children." " According to the world, mother," he answered, THE
2490.. in his 305 low even tones, " according to the world, just, mother, your reproa
2491. are served ; and well de- but according to the divine law, things wear a differ
2492.ey must love Him before and above giving up not their nearest and dearest — ay
2493.s just." " You have a prospect of having your principles ; well tested," she rep
2494.rly stairs, then she went up and locking herself in her room, " Fox's had a good
2495. able " Mill " farm empty-handed, saying that Wilbur would see his father the ne
2496. resort since she was a little, toddling girl, and used to seek refuge there of
2497. cry her over the long strips of hemming and for a task in endless seams of fell
2498.d for a task in endless seams of felling given her for certain punishment misdem
2499.nes," on business, and Miss ; was taking tea with a neighbor Debby and Huldah co
2500.the old hemlocks, with God's sky bending over them and the if lis- stars glisten
2501.er them and the if lis- stars glistening through the dark foliage as tening to t
2502.ening through the dark foliage as tening to the whispers of the that fell little
2503.d, their fists in the face of the making light of their difficulties — and, so
2504. of each other's constancy, best. hoping for the " rather liked it, Huldah often
2505.in the garret." in. the But this evening, Nicholas, sobered by his still father'
2506.les to an unusually gravity, and feeling the smart of the insult he had received
2507.he School Committee, told her everything, and explained the misfortunes impendin
2508. and explained the misfortunes impending over family ; his and the warm-hearted,
2509.sorbed by her brain, she felt too giving it ; strange power, and clearer, keener
2510.e upon them her and said some such thing : —which roused her, and she said Tou
2511. that don't, in "Don't Nick. are talking like a teapot. You know your heart, bel
2512.eart, believe a word that you are saying. I don't. But I tell you, Nick, I'm sor
2513.as, im" You know that you can do nothing for ; and I won't have you asking favor
2514.othing for ; and I won't have you asking favors Sit my family, or bringing yours
2515.asking favors Sit my family, or bringing yourself into trouble on their account.
2516.o away, then," replied Nicholas, letting go her ' hand. " It is easy to say Go '
2517.o the unfortunate ;" and he was striding angrily away when Huldah said " Nichola
2518.way when Huldah said " Nicholas Flemming love ! how dare you say such a thing to
2519.ing love ! how dare you say such a thing to me who you so ?" "Forgive me, Huldah
2520.urs are tional ; "These irrathis, making me suspicious and ' but where's the use
2521.cious and ' but where's the use of going away like when " I see you so seldom ?
2522.gain me now, you respect for are wanting in confidence in me and me." " Very w e
2523.t I can make out : Depend upon one thing telling to ' I shall need no second go,
2524.make out : Depend upon one thing telling to ' I shall need no second go,' if I h
2525.t her hand, which he grasped and holding up her sweet, truthful face, kissed him
2526.poor Wilbur came up support him, looking so to the Old Homestead, his trembling
2527.g so to the Old Homestead, his trembling limbs scarcely able to wan and heart-wo
2528. wan and heart-worn while he was telling of his misfortunes and sorrows that ; M
2529.ortunes and sorrows that ; Mrs. Flemming's heart was touched ting her and, forge
2530.; Mrs. Flemming's heart was touched ting her and, forget- own trials, she slippe
2531.out garments of the family and selecting the knew would be useful to this strick
2532.mong the hands, while she said : placing if it in his " Let me know I can do , a
2533.in his " Let me know I can do , anything for you all. You know that the El my hu
2534. welcome to." "I know it, Miss' Flemming. I know it," swered the man, astonished
2535. all abuse it. Thank you, Miss' Flemming, for we've nothing but rags like these,
2536.k you, Miss' Flemming, for we've nothing but rags like these," said tered coat
2537.coat —" to cover us." Wilbur —taking t/ hold of his tat- " There's a bottle
2538. the bun- your wife," said Mrs. Flemming. " Lord bless you, ma'am, the Elder giv
2539.'am, the Elder give me bread too, seeing and wine him such heaps of how weak mon
2540.w weak money that ; I am — and I owing I couldn't hold up my head, I was that
2541.r my "I won't have you stand let talking " now," answered Mrs. Flemming. Good-by
2542.t talking " now," answered Mrs. Flemming. Good-by, and me know if I can do anyth
2543.ood-by, and me know if I can do anything to help you." ; THE FLEMMINGS. 311 And
2544.ll heroic sacrifice, all generous giving and profuse alms " are Mrs. as nothing.
2545.g and profuse alms " are Mrs. as nothing." Hemming " looked on " works ; as supe
2546.use alms " are Mrs. as nothing." Hemming " looked on " works ; as superrogatory
2547.vent her, as we have seen, from giv- ing freely and from pure benevolence the su
2548. lives the love had become the animating of and the sweet incentive to works of
2549.consciousness they ministered to knowing that Him under these poor disguises of
2550. under these poor disguises of suffering humanity. Now that they knew the at rea
2551.tand in the to assist them. way of doing all in their power ;" " Silver and gold
2552.ed, negat their lected children. Denying themselves meals, and frequently going
2553.g themselves meals, and frequently going without their supper, Hope and Eva mana
2554.almost forgotten the taste of nourishing food. They saved, with zealous care, th
2555.cleansed the poor abode until everything in their it —from the floors, to the
2556.ilbur and read some of the soul-touching devotions for the sick from the Catholi
2557.ot from their daily — home to Flemming would have objected that— from their
2558.d reward for their self-denial in seeing the pale cheeks of the Wilburs filling
2559.g the pale cheeks of the Wilburs filling out, and strength returning added to th
2560.burs filling out, and strength returning added to their wasted limbs. This, to t
2561.s, to the sweet conscious- ness of doing good, gave them a piness such as they n
2562.tch water enough from the all far spring to last the poor family through the suc
2563.t the poor family through the succeeding day, chop their wood pile it and up at
2564.er—who used to disappear every evening about dusk, for an hour or two, and alw
2565.at it seemed to brighten up every- thing around him. the people at " Mill indeed
2566.urn their gratitude took, thereby giving the good Flemmings a ence of life, and
2567. Flemmings a ence of life, and affording new experiMrs. Flemming an opit is port
2568.e, and affording new experiMrs. Flemming an opit is portunity to say with unctio
2569.re busy New-Englanders affairs of sewing in the old sitting, or " living room,"
2570.ers affairs of sewing in the old sitting, or " living room," as say. The outlook
2571.f sewing in the old sitting, or " living room," as say. The outlook of the famil
2572.es over the windows, and fell glittering silver and quivering buffet. among brig
2573.and fell glittering silver and quivering buffet. among bright there the old litt
2574.or had been frost already. Mrs. Flemming was in the adjoining room — seated la
2575.eady. Mrs. Flemming was in the adjoining room — seated laid on the very lounge
2576.brought in out of the storm — knitting as for life, a stitch and a tear very o
2577.p all to .give whoever wore the stocking the cramp Suddenly Wolfert Flemming cam
2578.king the cramp Suddenly Wolfert Flemming came their days. in, pranked " " off in
2579.med Eva, as she looked up. are you going fear. anywhere ?" asked Hope, with a su
2580.rhaps had unsettled I his mind. am going to be very happy at home " to-day !" he
2581. heard good news ?" said Hope, look- ing up eagerly. THE FLEMMINGS. " In one sen
2582.d Eva. " I have just found out something. You have heard me say, since our conve
2583. across any prophecy or passage alluding to the Blessed Mother of Jesus. I spoke
2584.ic it reverence for her, without knowing what or being able to define its signif
2585.e for her, without knowing what or being able to define its significance. meant
2586.e True Faith, it is all plain, consoling, and blessed, and I have come to believ
2587.have come to believe that she was caring for soul in those days my and leading m
2588.ng for soul in those days my and leading me through the darkness to her Son. thi
2589.it of September; and I only this morning covered, in looking over the calendar,
2590. I only this morning covered, in looking over the calendar, that also the birthd
2591. birthday of is Mary— and I am ; going to hold high festival in her honor to-d
2592.s and Queen !* Put all aside your sewing, daughters, and * thoughts of Which lie
2593.are go out and gather flowers, and bring them up have to old Missisquoi's room o
2594.ually." " Dear father said Hope, kissing his broad it brown hand, and folding br
2595.ing his broad it brown hand, and folding breast, " I congratulate in both of her
2596. last "And heaven " — " added Flemming, his whole countenance beaming with hap
2597. Flemming, his whole countenance beaming with happiness. And heaven, at last," r
2598.hrine of the Virgin. As to Mrs. Flemming — she had dropped her sort of knittin
2599.— she had dropped her sort of knitting, and sat motionless, listening in a dum
2600. knitting, and sat motionless, listening in a dumb amaze, hearing distinctly eve
2601.less, listening in a dumb amaze, hearing distinctly every word uttered ; THE FLE
2602.They are all crazy together, to be going on with such nonsense when ruin is star
2603. with such nonsense when ruin is staring us in the face. Festival ! I'd like to
2604.stive part comes in?" Poor Mrs. Flemming could not understand where the " festiv
2605. to " curse these usages and, smart- ing under the cross, she was sometimes almo
2606. for they were to her feet a " stumbling-block, to her mind foolishness." But th
2607.loud the happiness of the group kneeling so devoutly at the foot of Mary in the
2608. in the little room up stairs, call- ing in the simplicity of their faith on the
2609.ers. 318 THE FLEMMINGS. Wolfert Flemming said that night he was just one year ol
2610. in Eternity, CHAPTER MRS. XXI. FLEMMING IS GLAD OF SOMETHING AT LAST. In the me
2611. MRS. XXI. FLEMMING IS GLAD OF SOMETHING AT LAST. In the meanwhile Huldah Sneath
2612. snappish and absentis minded, reversing the order of things, as the way with ab
2613.n made them all uncomfortable by putting salt into things that required sugar, a
2614.things that required sugar, and sugaring things that should have been salted ; s
2615.e had got into Plymouth the next morninghaving dressed by candle-light to th
2616.into Plymouth the next morninghaving dressed by candle-light to the fact —
2617.se began to grow dainty about her eating, and did very sat little more than peck
2618.the Deacon that she had heard her crying and walking about the floor when she sh
2619.hat she had heard her crying and walking about the floor when she should have be
2620.plaint, that nobody thought was anything worse than indolence, until one day she
2621.k in her chair and died. "She's fretting —that's all; fretting about Nick Flem
2622. "She's fretting —that's all; fretting about Nick Flemming,'' said the Deacon,
2623.that's all; fretting about Nick Flemming,'' said the Deacon, rubbing his head vi
2624.ick Flemming,'' said the Deacon, rubbing his head violently with his yellow silk
2625.con for she sees know neow Nick Flemming every day or so. She's clipper ; enough
2626.st fur as that goes. it is." She's going to turn —that's what " Don't be a foo
2627. tell won't have her worrit into getting sick," answered the Deacon, growing pur
2628.ting sick," answered the Deacon, growing purple in the face. " Lands sakes ! Dea
2629.S. want to see my child's property going mother's relait back to them ungodly pe
2630.y people tions. —her They're hungering and thirsting for are. them Barkers you
2631.. —her They're hungering and thirsting for are. them Barkers you may let So I
2632. have her worrit, and to," Nick Flemming know that he can come answered the Deac
2633.ed the Deacon, whenever he wants looking benign. " Suz ! " exclaimed Miss Debby,
2634. couldn't afford that Nick Yes, Flemming has got some hand in it, and he'd bette
2635. three times by Huldah since the evening they met under the hemlock trees, when
2636.she little kept it to herself in a "ring of fire" that scorched her sometimes un
2637.er ; for she " knew that he was thinking meanly of her, misconstruing and misund
2638.as thinking meanly of her, misconstruing and misunderstanding her; but he : THE
2639. her, misconstruing and misunderstanding her; but he : THE FLEMMINGS. 321 her tr
2640.e to mount his high horse and go putting on airs to her — why, it let him do s
2641.t and fastened with a gay ribcurls, sing- bon bow, then stuck another among her
2642.on bow, then stuck another among her ing snatches of song, and saying now and th
2643.ong her ing snatches of song, and saying now and then sure it "It will come to-m
2644.shall be so happy ! be here this evening. I don't care, though, he don't." Her h
2645. don't." Her hope that Nicholas Flemming would come, was the secret of her grand
2646. taken out of the get- loom the day ting a before, to sell. She counted on for i
2647.e had taken uncommon pains for in curing it market ; besides this, were two barr
2648.y until for quick sales was out ; hoping and high prices then went back to her s
2649.ack to her sad thoughts and her spinning-wheel, for she was busy making her fine
2650. spinning-wheel, for she was busy making her fine yarn, almost as fine as the ya
2651. she always got a high price. Everything was going on as usual in the Old Homest
2652.s got a high price. Everything was going on as usual in the Old Homestead and ar
2653. and around it. The golden sun spreading beeches around tered like diamonds as i
2654.ordered the broad gravelled walk running through the middle of their garden and
2655.ocorua, with stripes of crimson breaking the dark monotony of THE FLEMMINGS. the
2656.hts, flashes of orange and like flitting plumes. All around, the ledges hills an
2657.ds among the and the sweetbriar clinging about everyfull of thing was fragrance
2658.tbriar clinging about everyfull of thing was fragrance and thickly hung with sca
2659.sses towards the beautiful lake. Nothing was changed outwardly. nestled there am
2660.house the early autumnal beauty, looking as it did a century before, —looking
2661.g as it did a century before, —looking it as it did when the oldest man and wo
2662.when the oldest man and woman it; living in those parts first remembered in the
2663.ts first remembered in the land, looking as of did one short year before, when t
2664. before, when the very name its Flemming was a power and every one in the little
2665.f Heaven" is not of world ; and, knowing this, had entered all into its portals,
2666.ad entered all into its portals, willing to be stripped of things rather than re
2667.nk you it know all this, so good a thing that bears repetition. One day Wolfert
2668.ars repetition. One day Wolfert Flemming came home from a journey he had taken t
2669. and bought other property. After caring for — his tired horse —for he had a
2670.elief when he felt found the old sitting-room empty; he for a wife's moment that
2671.s, eager eyes, to tell her and he having nothing better Indeed there seemed to s
2672. eyes, to tell her and he having nothing better Indeed there seemed to silent th
2673.ad. be no one in the house —everything was so and he thought it would be a goo
2674.nce of the " Help of Christians." Laying his hat down in the passage, he wiped t
2675.opened the door. Eva was there, kneeling, with eyes closed ! THE FLEMMINGS. soft
2676. closed ! THE FLEMMINGS. softly uttering the beautiful devotion of the 325 Rosar
2677.rs. The last crimson rays of the setting sun shone through the window upon the w
2678.ite statue of Maky and her Son, clothing them as with a garment, throwing out in
2679.lothing them as with a garment, throwing out in strong feet. relief the crucifix
2680. her father's enof trance, and, greeting him with a sweet smile to welcome, move
2681.e dual struggle and warfare of his being —the strugsoul gle of nature for peri
2682.ine 326 will, THE FLEMMINGS. while doing all that justice to his family dein man
2683.fered all things for them. Thus reposing on the will of God, without a single vi
2684.ather, but I can't despond. been praying constantly to our Blessed Mother to hel
2685."What is strange, father ?" "That having studied the Scriptures from THE FLEMMIN
2686.c, and have read the Church con- cerning her, that I understand allusions to her
2687.denied His Humanity her." " It —having yes, it ;" lost sight of might have bee
2688.r thought of that before father, looking far away into the glowing depths of lig
2689.ather, looking far away into the glowing depths of light now softly fading in th
2690.lowing depths of light now softly fading in the west. tell " And I can't you, fa
2691.d tones. '• And no ; " for in thinking of the Divine Motherhood, who can forge
2692.t the Di? vine Humanity In contemplating Him, is it pos- sible to divest the min
2693.Talk on, dear father," said Eva, folding her hands together on her knees, while
2694.eternal death to : Eve fell, ; entailing sin on her offspring to hers, by giving
2695.e fell, ; entailing sin on her offspring to hers, by giving birth Mary brought t
2696. sin on her offspring to hers, by giving birth Mary brought the Saviour who re-
2697. who re- deemed them, and ties suffering with Him all the penal- of guilt, that
2698.e Scriptures are full of her. Everything foreshadowed her. built of the purest a
2699.rush the serpent's head. She the burning bush of Moses which was yet uncon- sume
2700.led could enter or taint ; which nothing ' she the sealed fountain' the waters o
2701.ed fountain' the waters of which nothing ; can pollute she is the ' eastern gate
2702.liant is dawn' which precedes the rising Sun the true sign of the conciliation s
2703. the garden, to the light of the morning, to the source of the waters of life wh
2704.ong with the glories of Mary brightening up fall to night of gloom from the the
2705.n titles these names and without knowing to fell whom they applied until the sca
2706.exclaims : ' Behold ! a Virgin and bring forth a Son whose name In another place
2707.ut of his root.' Jeremias declares thing on earth, a ' : The Lord hath created a
2708.GS, 331 And here," said Wolfert Flemming, taking a small it book from his breast
2709.And here," said Wolfert Flemming, taking a small it book from his breast and hol
2710.mall it book from his breast and holding the light, close to catch now almost fa
2711. St. Jerome, St. Bernard, interpret- ing these words, exclaim This woman ; is Ma
2712.ist, the Son truly/ " he went on reading, in almost exultant tones, " a creature
2713. our first parents ; at the beginto ning of the world a creature who was have pa
2714.prophets, could not be an ordinary being. She must have had prerogatives above n
2715.must have had prerogatives above nothing those of common humanity ! No is ! ther
2716.Saviour, was not. am sorry it is growing so dark ! This has been so lovely, dear
2717.here was a rustle of garments retreating down the long dark passage out she ; an
2718.a went thought it could discover nothing, and might have been the rustling of th
2719.othing, and might have been the rustling of the branches of the huge old trees a
2720. what an eerie sound they made, scraping she said, as they and tapping on the gl
2721., scraping she said, as they and tapping on the glass. " I forgot to tell you, f
2722.l. He ! fainted dead away ; this morning." My poor lad Where is he I'll go strai
2723.light in the boy's room. window, looking drearily out on the He saw gathering th
2724.ing drearily out on the He saw gathering the dim outline of his wife, standing a
2725.ng the dim outline of his wife, standing against the shadows " —and he spoke c
2726.adows " —and he spoke cheerily, saying see I : You am back, mother. How is the
2727.ak —that's she replied without turning her head. it She would never admit " wa
2728. it She would never admit " was anything but weakness when Eeuben of his attacks
2729.e open air for several days, been moping around, doing nothing, and agree with h
2730. several days, been moping around, doing nothing, and agree with him." don't Wol
2731. days, been moping around, doing nothing, and agree with him." don't Wolfert Fle
2732. agree with him." don't Wolfert Flemming groped his way to the bed, and stooping
2733. groped his way to the bed, and stooping down face to kiss the ; boy found that
2734.cheek upon to the a woman. Mrs. Flemming was watching accus- tomed gloom of the
2735. the a woman. Mrs. Flemming was watching accus- tomed gloom of the room, she saw
2736.r; her heart was full almost to bursting Puritan pride with tenderness and pity
2737.ish to go down." " Yes, I have something to attend to. But tell me, before I go,
2738. you made any bargain with said, turning Deacon Flynt about the farm?" she to go
2739.ht one nearer home." " I thought nothing would come with a sigh. " I shall of it
2740.for you, ' little mammy,' in the morning," said Reuben, while he folded his fath
2741.ll be glad to ' have you notwithstanding you make drakes' of ducks and left- my
2742. the room. " It is so good to be resting here on your breast," " ; said Eenben.
2743.t," " ; said Eenben. " No, Did you bring me a shall letter, father?" my lad ; do
2744.it comes." "Very well. It can be nothing wrong, if you are willrng that I should
2745.think is wrong —what I have been doing. Maybe it is foolish," answered Reuben
2746.r the best." " I never hope for anything else, father. it. Why, These I feel bet
2747.e I feel better already— just thinking about sugs that I have are nothing. a I
2748.nking about sugs that I have are nothing. a I just run Connecticut clock — and
2749. like wound up again, ready for anything; and has done put me his lots of good t
2750.s about his father's neck, and, clinging close to him, fell into a deep refreshi
2751.lose to him, fell into a deep refreshing sleep, with a pleasant lips. smile part
2752.eep, with a pleasant lips. smile parting his Wolfert Flemming laid him gently do
2753.lips. smile parting his Wolfert Flemming laid him gently down upon down the pill
2754.andle in which some one had come looking the Benjamin of his flock and lit — a
2755.features of this — at the wild curling hair that shone like a golden aureole a
2756.his fore- head, and at the long tapering hand, so small and shapely, for cestres
2757.s of his an: Lady Pendarvis then, laying his hand his lightly upon his head, ble
2758.to find out how the Wilburs were getting on. They had not been being no need—f
2759.were getting on. They had not been being no need—for there for several days
2760.e to give the poor family up so, putting a fresh loaf of brown bread from the mo
2761.esh loaf of brown bread from the morning baking, some doughnuts and a pound of s
2762.f of brown bread from the morning baking, some doughnuts and a pound of sweet bu
2763. they had flitted ;" said Hope, laughing " only I am sure they would not do such
2764.I am sure they would not do such a thing without letting us know." " No, I guess
2765.ould not do such a thing without letting us know." " No, I guess not. little The
2766.ed Eva. Just then they, heard a rustling in the myrtle bushes near them, and loo
2767.the myrtle bushes near them, and looking round they saw little Ned among the Wil
2768.d among the Wilbur's white head sticking up from purple furze that grew knee-hig
2769.uts. THE FLEMMINGS. 337 "Why, Neddy, ing. is that you?" said Hope, laugh- "Yes'm
2770.oughnut for you, Neddy." The boy winking sprang out from his covert, and snatchi
2771.prang out from his covert, and snatching the doughnut from her hand, began to hi
2772.n to his eyes his wild eat, and smacking his little lips with delight, while hea
2773.ell !" there for ?" he replied, munching. Ned, and I'll me this minute, give you
2774.u another doughnut," said Hope. inviting, The bait was too and Neddy began to ni
2775.ist- 5 —he —and " For what all going ?" said Neddy with ening eyes fixed on
2776. what all going ?" said Neddy with ening eyes fixed on the doughnut in Hope's ha
2777.ver, heard alternate whacks and sounding from and while they were wondering what
2778.nding from and while they were wondering what the legs, his face looking hubbub
2779.ondering what the legs, his face looking hubbub meant, Neddy came rushing toward
2780.looking hubbub meant, Neddy came rushing towards them rubbing his shoulders and
2781. Neddy came rushing towards them rubbing his shoulders and . like a harlequin's,
2782.the redness of his freckled skin showing in " bars across his cheeks—while he
2783.want you come anighst Father Ray's going to send us to school, and give us a hou
2784.and give that ungrateful woman a blowing-up." ; "No, don't," answered Eva " don'
2785.t's all the THE FLEMMINGS. same, darling, if 339 you will only remember for whos
2786.m." " After our self-denial, and working it for them like negroes tell ! I decla
2787.grateful family," answered Hope grasping Neddy's ragged sleeve. "No! no! dont'ee
2788.t me so," — — cried the boy, dancing with fright. "I have a mind " to," said
2789.I have a mind " to," said Hope, laughing. Here —here's your doughnut, Neddy, a
2790. needed off as fast as no second bidding, but scampered his legs could carry him
2791.rry him. " It's as funny as exasperating !" exclaimed Hope. " I'm glad we had a
2792.n ? It is true that men are past finding out." "You don't mean half that you say
2793. you say, " Tes, I " the ways of darling?" do ; every word." ? What did you send
2794.m just for the sat- isfaction of sending that message about the coals creatures
2795.The ungrateful re- plied Hope. strolling Then they turned and walked away, until
2796.n to watch the and shadows ever flitting from the clouds above over the summer r
2797. the* giant feet of the Ossipee. talking, While they sat there and drinking in t
2798.lking, While they sat there and drinking in the loveliness of the scene, evi- th
2799. hand, with which he went about cracking pieces of rock off the boulders that pr
2800.lighty. This idea and the it lengthening shadows together, warned them that was
2801.ost dark when they got back, and sitting father and mother — and Reuben, who w
2802."Wilbur has found work." " It is nothing more than I expected," said Mrs. while
2803.er handsome eyes snapped fires. Flemming, " drily, sparkles of their old Well !
2804.follow their worldly interests —having of no higher aim, and knowing nothing b
2805. —having of no higher aim, and knowing nothing better," said Wolfert friends F
2806.ng of no higher aim, and knowing nothing better," said Wolfert friends Flemming.
2807.g better," said Wolfert friends Flemming. " is it The fanaticism more to their a
2808.know why Father Ray did not do something for them when they were sick and starvi
2809.or them when they were sick and starving; and so I shall tell him," said Mrs. Fl
2810. I shall tell him," said Mrs. Flem- ming. 342 " Let it rest, THE FLEMMXNGS. moth
2811.ust listen, all of you !" And, listening, true enough they heard the musical jin
2812.sical jingle of the horses' bells coming nearer and nearer, then uprose a cheery
2813.holas was almost there. Wolfert Flemming arose from the table and went out, foll
2814.r for the hungry traveller, well knowing that Nick always came home from a journ
2815.with the appetite of a kite —wondering all the while if he had returned with a
2816. wagon and a wallet full —half fearing (she was always expecting the and broug
2817.half fearing (she was always expecting the and brought them back. Before long
2818.s then sat down supper, I'll tell saying: "I'm awfully hungry. about business pr
2819. pie, Whew " like said Nicholas, cutting into a cranberry " I don't know when I
2820. when I shall go, though ! I don t being played fast-and-loose with." "Pshaw, Ni
2821.w, Nick! where's ?'"' the use in minding Deacon Sneathen said Hope. " I don't,"
2822.an I do an old turkey-cock." "Then going." don't hurt Huldah's feelings by not R
2823.that wagon empty, Nick," sold everything if said his father. " Yes, sir ! had sp
2824.t do you think he Mrs. inquired Flemming it." sharply. " There's nothing the the
2825.Flemming it." sharply. " There's nothing the there's not " it matter with the ca
2826. Mrs. Hash, Nick!" want to hear Flemming," I don't said. what the Deacon What di
2827.ur father, Nicholas," said Mrs. Flemming, a bright light in her eyes and a flush
2828. time comes to use said "Wolfert Hemming, lifting his heavy brows and looking at
2829.es to use said "Wolfert Hemming, lifting his heavy brows and looking at her with
2830.ing, lifting his heavy brows and looking at her with a heavenly tenderness in hi
2831.ed and talked together, Nicholas telling them all that he had seen in Plymouth a
2832. would go there betimes the next morning of course and thrash the whole family i
2833.ily it which the he had no idea of doing, but did young fellow good it. to say i
2834.at he should like to do Wolfert Flemming sat up late that night talking over his
2835. Flemming sat up late that night talking over his plans with Nicholas. raise the
2836. Ohio, —he could not bear even selling his house — and move his family r whe
2837. balance due me from Sneathen & Flemming— I hope to raise balance of three hun
2838.llars. the money," said the man, lifting up his head and drawing a long breath ;
2839.the man, lifting up his head and drawing a long breath ; and his upward look and
2840.. " I'm not tired, sir. I'd like nothing better than to-morrow," said Nick, glad
2841.t to go near Huldah while he was longing in to start — his very heart to see h
2842.eir interviews which " rendered anything but pleasant. Very well ; thank you, mo
2843.pleasant. Very well ; thank you, morning. father," my said lad. Be ready to star
2844.t, the young man. Then, instead of going to bed as he should have done, he put o
2845. he could see afar off the light shining ; and there he stood —foolish fellow
2846.re he stood —foolish fellow—watching flitting and imagining forth, he saw he
2847.od —foolish fellow—watching flitting and imagining forth, he saw her shadow
2848.fellow—watching flitting and imagining forth, he saw her shadow back and when
2849.ather — if there's not trouble brewing there, my name's I let not Nicholas. Th
2850.d that you'll believe hesn't put nothing into the business, it drawed me, five t
2851.clown that he believed things were going to smash ; and said it was awful, the p
2852.ts, and make them come to prayer-meeting; and those who and drink a little, and
2853.ily glad he is," snap- ped Mrs. Flemming, from her corner, where she sat reeling
2854., from her corner, where she sat reeling her fine yarn into hanks. — 348 " THE
2855.EMMINGS. Mother !" said Wolfert Flemming, looking up and in surprise. "I it am h
2856.Mother !" said Wolfert Flemming, looking up and in surprise. "I it am heartily g
2857.and square, " them was " that everything went on fair of and there was no muss i
2858.no muss in a ' any sort ; but everything dratted tangle and confusion.' " Serves
2859.ves him right !" exclaimed Mrs. Flemming. at And he didn't know which end to beg
2860.didn't know which end to begin put- ting things to rights," continued Nicholas.
2861. I'm glad of it," repeated Mrs. Flemming, mak; ing her reel fly round " I never
2862.of it," repeated Mrs. Flemming, mak; ing her reel fly round " I never was so gla
2863. round " I never was so glad of anything in " my life." Let us pray for our enem
2864.or our enemies, and bless those Flemming, his great, forgiv- who despitefully us
2865. in his grave, sonorous tones —for ing heart was really pained to learn sociat
2866.ate's affairs how his old as- were going to the bad. it, " You can do ' father ;
2867.glad to hear all," replied Mrs. Flemming. CBAPTEB THE MAN WITH THE HAMMER XXII.
2868.amilies and stock vests of the on during the coming winter; they had expected. i
2869. stock vests of the on during the coming winter; they had expected. it was more
2870.xpected. it was more than of the Looking down from one Hill, peaks of Prospect t
2871.ter- green ; it was so gay with flashing waters, so span- gled with peaks of gli
2872., so span- gled with peaks of glittering quartz, so beautified by mountain range
2873.o beautified by mountain ranges, melting off into the distance in exquisite shad
2874.blue and purple ! Apple-parings, singing-classes and quilting bees, with all the
2875.le-parings, singing-classes and quilting bees, with all the other gatherings in
2876.u know, morally outlawed home, receiving no their —remained invitations, affai
2877.ey all felt ; the mortification of being so utterly neglected they would have be
2878.e than not; but, human had they thinking over the cause, they were straightway c
2879.nst ; this magnificent promise ? Nothing and in their souls they w ere T glad an
2880.eacon Sneathen had sent Wolfert Flemming a check for the three hundred dollars,
2881.EMMINGS. could imagine. 351 discouraging. The outlook was " Mill No one seemed t
2882.rce, Farm ;" this was the except selling out altogether. But they did not make e
2883. make each other miserable by desponding and worrying over the situation, and we
2884.her miserable by desponding and worrying over the situation, and went on exactly
2885.exactly as grave thoughts, it if nothing had happened true, — full of it is an
2886.e, — full of it is and often wondering how to bear each would end, but trying
2887.g how to bear each would end, but trying cheerfully other's burdens. Nicholas wa
2888.h! her had been proIf ductive of nothing but trouble to her. her it little myste
2889.he letter she had been so long expecting had not come yet, and "never would," sh
2890.'s come. But the two letters had nothing to do with each other. Things were in t
2891.ere in this way, when one bright morning as Reuben was creeping slowly along in
2892.ne bright morning as Reuben was creeping slowly along in the sunshine towards th
2893.unshine towards the Old Mill, everything looked so lovely that he sat down on a
2894.of ; 352 THE FLEMMINGS. the big brawling stream that used to turn the great mill
2895.turn the great mill-wheel —was dancing and flashing over the pebbles at his fe
2896.t mill-wheel —was dancing and flashing over the pebbles at his feet, making a
2897.ing over the pebbles at his feet, making a low murmur as sweet as the tinkling o
2898.ng a low murmur as sweet as the tinkling of silver bells. Reuben was soothed thr
2899.elf that he to his dreams, and believing was alone with nature, yielded himself
2900. some- where over him the ; and starting round, Reuben saw " man with the hammer
2901.." "Yes, sir," replied the lad, touching his hat. all The blood had stranger, go
2902.of the and as swiftly returned, flushing his cheeks like roses. "I beg your pard
2903., you see, and any stranger little thing makes me jump. Are you a up here ?" THE
2904. " if sir? You'll lose a you miss seeing the winter up here." I'm writing a book
2905. seeing the winter up here." I'm writing a book, a his- No ; I can't stay. tory
2906.n bluff, with the scarlet sumachs waving from crevices, looks with the sunlight
2907.revices, looks with the sunlight shining upon its bald brow " ! "What do you Cho
2908.often wandered among the terrible hiding- places of nature and while his voice w
2909.spleased her who had father by rejecting some splendid offers of marriage for th
2910.e nerved with giant strength but growing up in savage freedom, dark, fierce, it
2911.governable passions. There was something lips ; fearful in the quiet haughtiness
2912.ness of his like it seemed so slumbering power —too proud again. to be lightly
2913.* affections, and he beof their dwelling ; came almost an inmate and belife, ing
2914. ; came almost an inmate and belife, ing unrestrained by the courtesies of civil
2915.of civilized he would inspect everything and taste everything which came in his
2916. inspect everything and taste everything which came in his way. One day he disco
2917.s Campbell bright, One his balmy morning in June, Still Campbell left dwelling f
2918.ng in June, Still Campbell left dwelling for the fields. a lover, though ten yea
2919.ast look was towards his wife, answering her parting smile ; his last act a kiss
2920. towards his wife, answering her parting smile ; his last act a kiss for each of
2921.to him like the death-grapple drown- ing man, sinking death. him down # into dar
2922.he death-grapple drown- ing man, sinking death. him down # into darkness and The
2923.- geance for the anguish that was eating into his THE FLEMMINGS. " 357 At the ti
2924.rua' s brethren were absent on a hunting expedition, and those who watched his m
2925.hich after- wards took his name, looking out probably return. for their Here Cam
2926.d to his lair. a wild beast "The morning sun had fogs, scarce cleared startled a
2927.e from beneath the precipice, commanding him to throw himself into the abyss bel
2928.ific he recovered himself ; and, raising himself on his hand, he shouted in a vo
2929. stays with the white man.' But uttering inaudible curses, he died, his bones to
2930.n the sun. rested on those settlers. ing-knife were The tomahawk and scalp; busy
2931.ell Camp- became a hermit, seldom seeing his fellow-men, after and two years he
2932., and the peo- ple believe " it is owing to Chocorua's dying curse." Muriate of
2933.elieve " it is owing to Chocorua's dying curse." Muriate of lime, I guess, in th
2934.id the stranger, as Reuben ended telling the legend. " "What you have been me is
2935.hat you have been me is very interesting. see, I it have been making notes, you
2936. interesting. see, I it have been making notes, you into and shall put my book.
2937.where to look at a the stranger, picking up his hammer and carpet- bag, as he ro
2938.y bank upon which he had been half lying. They crossed the brook and entered the
2939.e brook and entered the ruinous building, and climbed up the crazy, dilapidated
2940.iastic, as well he might be, for nothing could surpass the grandeur of the view
2941.f the view — Chocorua and the towering in the midst, like a steel-hooded giant
2942.l-hooded giant At last there was nothing more to be seen, stranger turned away f
2943.away from the windows and stood scanning the black rafters overhead — then, lo
2944.black rafters overhead — then, looking up and down, walked quietly towards a r
2945.udely-hewn blocks of stone and something covered with a coarse cloth. "I shall h
2946.inished. There was a wistful, despairing ex- pression in the face, a sorrowful a
2947.the ap- pearance of an antique. Uttering an exclamation of surprise, the strange
2948.nd what sir, meant ?" ex- "I had nothing little to do, and I have been perimenti
2949.ittle to do, and I have been perimenting a lad, modestly. with the chisel," answ
2950.he "I spend my mornings here, readis ing and chipping; and that a face I tried t
2951.y mornings here, readis ing and chipping; and that a face I tried to make " like
2952. " like Hagar's when her child was dying of thirst." And you have succeeded But
2953. you get stone?" asked the man, cracking a fragment off one of the blocks with h
2954.he blocks with his hammer, and examining it closely through a magnifying glass.
2955.xamining it closely through a magnifying glass. "I found Reuben. " Is it it it a
2956. land to be ?" My father— Mr. Flemming." "Ah! stone, I —does mean." there mu
2957.t by accident, while I was lookIt is ing for something that I could work easily.
2958. while I was lookIt is ing for something that I could work easily. very soft and
2959.lot " What does your father intend doing with it ?" inquired the man, looking ke
2960.ing with it ?" inquired the man, looking keenly at Eeuben. " I don't think least
2961. " I don't think least he knows anything about sell it. At he wants to the place
2962. seen this?" said the stranger, pointing to Hagar. " No. They don't know how I s
2963.it," 862 THE FLEMMINGS. Reuben, standing up bravely for the reputation of the la
2964.e like is he to be found ?" " I am going home now, and sir," if you he you can c
2965.a long- interview with "Wolfert Elemming, who received and treated him ; with ki
2966.llars cash for This was girls ; Flemming and the and they all praised Eeuben, an
2967.ir father's troubles seemed to be coming so like the old times nearly to an end
2968.ome — " and," said Wolfert of breaking up and leaving us, their dear " since w
2969. said Wolfert of breaking up and leaving us, their dear " since will Flemming, A
2970.ing us, their dear " since will Flemming, Almighty God has been so good to to Bo
2971. earnestly. To think of really receiving those august Sa! craments Oh, my God!"
2972., my God!" exclaimed "Wolfert Flem- ming, folding his hands together and looking
2973." exclaimed "Wolfert Flem- ming, folding his hands together and looking up with
2974., folding his hands together and looking up with an expression none had ever see
2975.re, " it is like the thought of entering into of Thy the very presence." None th
2976.ich thrilled their hearts, almost making them still. Mrs. Flemming grew very whi
2977. almost making them still. Mrs. Flemming grew very white, and her hands dropped
2978.into her lap while she tion of something, sat as if in expecta- —but nothing m
2979.ng, sat as if in expecta- —but nothing more happened left her husband got up q
2980.up quietly and them, ai^d Eva, listening to his retreating footsteps, knew that
2981.m, ai^d Eva, listening to his retreating footsteps, knew that he had gone up out
2982. but were disappointed. Wolfert Flemming could not account for his silence; he h
2983.the rocks, ; He he was always scrambling among fallen —perhaps he had and brok
2984.aps he had and broken his This surmising neck ; perhaps he had been waylaid and
2985. monej^ he had about him ! and expecting was a weary and unprofitable business,
2986.d and ; at last they gave it up, feeling blind and but knowing well whose right
2987.ave it up, feeling blind and but knowing well whose right hand was all leading t
2988.ng well whose right hand was all leading them, and having done that humanly spea
2989.ht hand was all leading them, and having done that humanly speaking they could d
2990.m, and having done that humanly speaking they could do, they gravely awaited His
2991., they gravely awaited His will, praying for be. submission to it whatever it mi
2992.spects were clouded and Wolfert Flemming resigned himself to strait the worst. I
2993.elf to strait the worst. In this evening a strange thing happened. One ap- late,
2994.e worst. In this evening a strange thing happened. One ap- late, as he was comin
2995.happened. One ap- late, as he was coming from the stables still with the lantern
2996.hurried away even get a without speaking, before he could it glimpse of his face
2997.e could it glimpse of his face. Thinking was a strange proand his ceeding, he ho
2998.hinking was a strange proand his ceeding, he however set the lantern on a barrel
2999.ter and read it, heavy eyebrows lowering and every vestige of color fading out o
3000.wering and every vestige of color fading out of his face as he read. It ran. THE
3001.n. THE FLEMMINGS. " 365 WOLFERT FLEMMING," " I know that the waters are rising a
3002.NG," " I know that the waters are rising around you, and that certain ruin threa
3003.to the house, straight Wolf ert Flemming strode to his work-room, and placing th
3004.ing strode to his work-room, and placing the stable lantern : upon his desk, he
3005.lest you fall into the error of thinking that I give your offer one moment's it,
3006.all my God me to to witness that nothing which this world contains of riches, ho
3007.rs in Chrisian Charity, Wolfert Flemming." Having folded and directed the letter
3008.isian Charity, Wolfert Flemming." Having folded and directed the letter, he took
3009.where he saddled his horse, and mounting him he galloped out into the road, neve
3010.alloped out into the road, never drawing rein until he got to Father Ray's door,
3011.at to the minister ; !" he said, handing her the letter " and lose no time." Eld
3012.tter " and lose no time." Elder Flemming !" "Land sakes!" she almost screamed, p
3013.and sakes!" she almost screamed, peering ; oyer her spectacles " if it ain't But
3014.gain, and was and the woman stood gaping out into the tramp of the horse's hoofs
3015.of the horse's hoofs if night, listening to the with as frightened a look as evi
3016.n him in the likeness of the backsliding Elder. "Why! where Flemming as her have
3017. backsliding Elder. "Why! where Flemming as her have you been?" inquired Mrs. hu
3018.uired Mrs. husband came into the sitting- room, where they were waiting supper f
3019.e sitting- room, where they were waiting supper for him. "I had a speak to littl
3020.still any of you," he answered, speaking ruffled slowly and gently, for his spir
3021. need to restrain himself under crowning, humiliating insult. this To seek to ta
3022.rain himself under crowning, humiliating insult. this To seek to take ad- vantag
3023.ard from that man ?" asked Mrs. Flemming eagerly, hoping that the business was c
3024.n ?" asked Mrs. Flemming eagerly, hoping that the business was connected with th
3025.ink we may give up expectation of seeing or hearing anything of replied. Mr. Cut
3026.give up expectation of seeing or hearing anything of replied. Mr. Cutter again,"
3027.xpectation of seeing or hearing anything of replied. Mr. Cutter again," he " It
3028.tenderness towards her. Wolfert Flemming said nothing about the old minister's l
3029.wards her. Wolfert Flemming said nothing about the old minister's letter, and no
3030.s were from home but as asked concerning the business which had taken him away t
3031.h its treasures of silver all glittering and crinkling and first flashing just a
3032.s of silver all glittering and crinkling and first flashing just as they did the
3033.ttering and crinkling and first flashing just as they did the time we saw their
3034. his plans with It them about most going to Ohio. seemed so certain now that it
3035.d wise and kind to repress any lingering hope they might entertain of remaining,
3036.g hope they might entertain of remaining, by speaking unreservedly of their futu
3037.ight entertain of remaining, by speaking unreservedly of their future, so as to
3038.ccustom the thought of their approaching trial. them to A grave, chastened sadne
3039. very idea of 368 THE FLEMMINGS. leaving the spot so dear to them was like teari
3040.he spot so dear to them was like tearing something away which had taken root in
3041. dear to them was like tearing something away which had taken root in their hear
3042.n God's universe," said Wolfert Flemming, " let us console ourselves with the as
3043. wife and is depend upon it that working out if His own designs for our salvatio
3044. submissively to His providence, looking beyond this transitory life to the exce
3045.nd this transitory life to the exceeding if great and eternal reward that awaits
3046.ramental power upon their souls, calming, consoling and strengthening words he u
3047.wer upon their souls, calming, consoling and strengthening words he uttered. the
3048.ls, calming, consoling and strengthening words he uttered. them with the simple,
3049.le, hopeful THE FLEMMINGS. Mrs. Flemming, contrary to her usual habit of did not
3050.mily prayer came, but remained listening patiently to the evening devotions —w
3051.ained listening patiently to the evening devotions —which her husband read wit
3052.er Puritan ears. No one what was passing in her soul as she lis- tened but she w
3053. summer. in her pious occupation, saying a While engaged " Hail " Mary " for eve
3054.and there among the mother came trailing vines, to the door to ask some question
3055.s anxious to get out, the weather having cold. "Yes, mother, they are in the red
3056.ne I didn't open," replied Mrs. Flemming, as she lingered a moment to ad- mire t
3057.ffo- suddenly there was a crash ; cating cloud filled the room, and she could se
3058.lled the room, and she could see nothing. With a loud shriek which ran through t
3059.hich ran through the house, and thinking only of Eva's safety, she rushed blindl
3060.blindly in to seek her. Wolfert Flemming, who happened to be in his work-room at
3061.he threshold the door! The whole ceiling was down, he suffocating judged from th
3062.e whole ceiling was down, he suffocating judged from the crash, but he could dis
3063. crash, but he could distinguish nothing through the thick cloud of dust ; he co
3064.st ; he could only hear his wife calling wildly on of, Eva, and with a terrible
3065.e ^vent in, he scarcely knew and groping ; his way to the win- dow threw an outl
3066.t, it wide open and as the dust, finding began to float swiftly out, he saw Eva
3067.o float swiftly out, he saw Eva kneeling with her arms thrown around the image o
3068.s if to pro- them —her if head resting on her arm, her eyes and a sweet smile
3069.e, her lips, as she were asleep dreaming pleasant THE FLEMMINGS. dreams. 371 in
3070. Her mother stood over her woe, wringing her hands. Flemming stooped to lift his
3071.er her woe, wringing her hands. Flemming stooped to lift his child in his arms,
3072. to lift his child in his arms, thinking she was dead, when a gentle sigh "Wolfe
3073.evived her she said " : —and ! lifting up her hand, " Mother, I ! am not hurt.
3074.you were dead to exclaimed Mrs. Flemming, kneeling down her. embrace "I " fainte
3075.ead to exclaimed Mrs. Flemming, kneeling down her. embrace "I " fainted, I belie
3076.- my ; child," said her father, kneeling beside them fallen " let us thank her."
3077.able remained spotless ments! Everything was in the same beautiful it, order upo
3078.pon just as it it was when Mrs. Flemming stood admiring at the moment of the acc
3079.it was when Mrs. Flemming stood admiring at the moment of the accident. The ceil
3080. the moment of the accident. The ceiling must have parted in the middle, just ;
3081. 372 THE FLEMMINGS. it were very willing to ascribe tection of her to the gracio
3082.laced in order once more —Mrs. Hemming, who had scarcely much flushed, since,
3083., suddenly staggered as she was crossing the room, and cried out Help me ! — h
3084.l ! Father ! I can't see. " and fainting in Hope's arms. ; When told she recover
3085.n told she recovered she was in a raving delirium and when the doctor, who was q
3086.he trials which of late had come surging around them —the loss of — THE ELEM
3087., the contempt of the world, the rending asunder of strong the ties, the prospec
3088. strong the ties, the prospect of giving up home all that they loved with an ind
3089.indescribable exile affection, and going into this. amongst strangers the rest t
3090.trangers the rest there was were nothing to In all something human to grapple wi
3091.ere was were nothing to In all something human to grapple with, while they strov
3092.hey could only watch each quick, panting breath, en- deavor to soothe the wild o
3093.were Then, as she seemed to the " hiding His face from them. to draw nearer and
3094.," and hopes of her recovery were fading and going out in their hearts, the cry
3095.es of her recovery were fading and going out in their hearts, the cry of their s
3096. ! 374 THE FLEMMINGS. Slie Mrs. Flemming was very near unto death. lay day after
3097.times she would that start up, shrieking, " I see ! a woman Not woman terrible i
3098.er eyes luminous with fever, and staring out before her —" She saved ! Eva are
3099.o use "What to waste your breath talking, Father Ray. I see I believe Tou ! all
3100.! all a set of hard-hearted all, canting Pharisees I've been watching ye his, an
3101.ll, canting Pharisees I've been watching ye his, and comparing your ways with al
3102.I've been watching ye his, and comparing your ways with alike is ; and they are
3103.ashed sepulchres that ye are ! Tear- ing, tearing like vultures at the tender fl
3104.ulchres that ye are ! Tear- ing, tearing like vultures at the tender flesh of th
3105. flesh of the pure in heart life nagging, like bloodhounds, at the ! and limbs s
3106.e ' May May Flower' sure enough, rolling against and breaking up Plymouth Rock O
3107.ure enough, rolling against and breaking up Plymouth Rock Oh, I'm afraid to go t
3108.sometimes horrible dreams were torturing her and they could do nothing but weep
3109. torturing her and they could do nothing but weep and lave the burning forehead
3110.do nothing but weep and lave the burning forehead and hands, and look THE FLEMMI
3111.f their presence, and kiss the quivering lips upon which the short breath flutte
3112.ch silentlv in for Wolfert out, Flemming, who walked and and watched be- side he
3113.the long nights, upon his knees, holding her thin burning hand in his while he b
3114.upon his knees, holding her thin burning hand in his while he be- sought Almight
3115.while he be- sought Almighty ever adding : God to pity them and spare to say ' h
3116.be done,' for of myself I can do nothing." illness The news abroad daily ; of Mr
3117.The news abroad daily ; of Mrs. Flemming's had gone and many and kind were the i
3118.ice. was their they thought, " she being one of them- and out fallen of human pi
3119.ily, they which had upon the backsliding sincerely wished to do something kind a
3120.sliding sincerely wished to do something kind and neighone of borly, although th
3121.apostacy," and looked upon Mrs. Flemming as the victim of their sin. Mrs. Wilde
3122. to stay several days rode over, braving the visit, even the old minister all th
3123.d endeavor to console this 376 suffering THE FLEMMINGS. member of his flock. But
3124.all wrath in his heart. Wolfert Flemming thanked : who came, but added " There i
3125. homewards, their heads, " if w ondering, while they shook were going to help?"
3126. w ondering, while they shook were going to help?" let they the woman die withou
3127.there every day quietly, with — coming in so such a sorrowful look in her face
3128.sorrowful look in her face, and speaking so gently, that forted by her presence
3129. the girl to anticipate what was wanting and go and do it without a fuss. the ne
3130. neglected dairy under her charge, doing every- thing there just as she like to
3131.iry under her charge, doing every- thing there just as she like to knew Mrs. Fle
3132.e just as she like to knew Mrs. Flemming would and, moving quietly to and all :
3133. to knew Mrs. Flemming would and, moving quietly to and all : have it done ; fro
3134. perfect order and cleanliness, thinking " If she gets well, she shall have no w
3135.d if the illness is pro- longed, nothing more forlorn than the look of neglect t
3136.lthough there under his roof, and facing with him the great sorrow which wrung h
3137.ely exchanged a word with each other ing, indeed, except at the table, —seldom
3138.upied with the subject spoken Flem- ming's illness that nothing else was thought
3139.spoken Flem- ming's illness that nothing else was thought or of. Once he found h
3140.of. Once he found her in the old sitting-room, look- ing out into the twilight v
3141.d her in the old sitting-room, look- ing out into the twilight very quiet and ve
3142.the window-pane, upon which the drifting first snow-flakes of the season were tr
3143.snow-flakes of the season were trickling and melting, down like tears. He watche
3144.of the season were trickling and melting, down like tears. He watched her for a
3145.ed over and stood beside her, and laying his hand upon her shoulder, said : " Ha
3146. her shoulder, said : " Have you nothing to say to me, Huldah?" "Nothing," she a
3147. nothing to say to me, Huldah?" "Nothing," she answered, starting round frighten
3148.ldah?" "Nothing," she answered, starting round frightened, for she did not half
3149." sake of "Not asked. " for the my dying mother?" he For her sake —no," she re
3150. sake —no," she replied with quivering lips. " I shall never ask you again," h
3151." and he strode out of the room, leaving her where she stood weeping silently. !
3152.oom, leaving her where she stood weeping silently. ! 378 THE FLEMMINGS. at last
3153.ared his more quietly. "Wolfert Flemming and boys had been out about the place m
3154.out the place much of the day, attending to some matters which could be no longe
3155.he had the crisis." result of increasing weakness ; the fever was abating, but h
3156.reasing weakness ; the fever was abating, but he vitality had not the slightest
3157.doctor, and renewed their patient loving watch, noting every breath and counting
3158.newed their patient loving watch, noting every breath and counting every flutter
3159. watch, noting every breath and counting every flutter of the weary pulse of the
3160.the weary pulse of their mother, feeling that their yearning hearts and firm fai
3161.heir mother, feeling that their yearning hearts and firm faith must bring her ba
3162.earning hearts and firm faith must bring her back to them, must stay her feet on
3163. incredible but what I am I have ; going to relate causes, developed is simply t
3164. of those 379 sacrifice who were willing to every earthly thing for conscience s
3165. who were willing to every earthly thing for conscience sake. ing out of the ord
3166.y earthly thing for conscience sake. ing out of the order of is The workGod's pr
3167.arts recognize His Almighty hand nothing doubting — and give all glory to Him
3168.gnize His Almighty hand nothing doubting — and give all glory to Him " who lat
3169."Wolfert hath so loved us." That evening, Flemming left his wife's bedside, his
3170.ath so loved us." That evening, Flemming left his wife's bedside, his heart lift
3171.f sleep, alone in the quaint old sitting-room, dozing —for in truth he was wor
3172.e in the quaint old sitting-room, dozing —for in truth he was worn out for and
3173.ld due. it And how all then he was going over again, when there came a quick rap
3174.ame a quick rap it at the door. Thinking that might be some and an one to inquir
3175.carpet-bag hand like and all — smiling and holding out old friend assured of a
3176.and like and all — smiling and holding out old friend assured of a warm welcom
3177.o " to each other, and Wolfert Flemniing invited him in tion — an invita- he w
3178. gone off for good and all, Mr. Flemming but I had some ." trouble to scrape tha
3179.night. Then he Some other time membering how much depended on 6 — stopped, re-
3180. as any other time." "Well, Mr. Flemming, I sympathize heartily with you. I had
3181. through her of those prolonged piercing shrieks, which his wife had uttered fro
3182.he silent house — and Wolfert Flemming started THE FLEMMINGS. up, saying : 381
3183.emming started THE FLEMMINGS. up, saying : 381 it " I can do nothing about to-ni
3184.. up, saying : 381 it " I can do nothing about to-night, Mr. Cutter. I must go t
3185.st go to my wife. Come up in the morning, about ten o'clock, and we'll have the
3186.led." " is, Yery if ; well, Mr. Flemming. That will do ; that there's no one ahe
3187.no one ahead of like to me see, offering you I've more in which case I'd know. F
3188.," and won't be ferret he added, looking keenly out of his eyes into the pale ho
3189.e pale honest face of Wolfert Flem- ming. "I have no other bid for the farm, Mr.
3190.p here at sharp," said Mr. Cutter, going away with a his for- well-satisfied loo
3191.ntually make tune —that is, if nothing happened to interrupt his plans. "When
3192.d to interrupt his plans. "When Flemming entered the sick room, his wife was com
3193.oom, his wife was composed, and sleeping father !" quietly again. " Oh, if whisp
3194.indeed !" Later on, while he sat reading the Book of books, in the silence stair
3195.2 THE FLEMMINGS. naturally. was sleeping and breathing lie Once more at once. we
3196.S. naturally. was sleeping and breathing lie Once more at once. went rip, and st
3197.nt rip, and stood at the bedside looking at her. There was a change scarlet flus
3198.nge scarlet flush —he saw that The ing ly, had faded out ; of her face, leav-
3199. strong the man gave way —and covering his face with his hand, he turned and n
3200.and noiselessly left the room, and going into Eva's oratory knelt before the ima
3201.ir gracious assistance. moon was shining through the lighted leafless vines that
3202.ich this scene was only the type, soling him. fell upon his soul, resting over,
3203. soling him. fell upon his soul, resting over, it, and con- His devotions softly
3204.oftly he went to the window, and opening he stood gazing up into the " limitless
3205. the window, and opening he stood gazing up into the " limitless realms of the a
3206. " limitless realms of the air," knowing that abode somewhere less in the blue s
3207.spangled distance its noiseof the living, the waves laved the land saints ; of G
3208.tood upon the glorious shores, listening to the far-off anthems of the blest. He
3209.ndow, As he stood a moment after closing the he was startled by the sound of a m
3210. on the flagged walk below ; and looking down he behind the trunk of purpose of
3211. trunk of purpose of con- saw a stooping cealment. figure crouched if one of the
3212. down — and noiselessly softly opening the side door, treading and " lightly,
3213.y softly opening the side door, treading and " lightly, he stepped out upon the
3214.e stepped out upon the flags and walking said : swiftly towards the crouching ob
3215.ing said : swiftly towards the crouching object, Who are you, and what do you wa
3216.Wal, are you?" inquired Wolfert Flemming, you see, my name's ; in great confusio
3217.my friend ? Speak quickly. I do anything for you?" "Nothin', Elder, nobhing but
3218.thing for you?" "Nothin', Elder, nobhing but to hear what I come to replied Wilb
3219.at I come to replied Wilbur in quivering tones, — 384 for Wolfert THE FLEMMING
3220. 384 for Wolfert THE FLEMMINGS. Flemming's kindness of manner touched him " to t
3221.e quick. Of course I to say am ; willing to hear whatever let you may wish distu
3222. it ?" Elder title, said Wilbur, calling him by old with an idea that was respec
3223. ?" "Yes; why?" answered "Wilbur, coming so close to him that and their faces al
3224.their faces almost touched, and speaking in a sharp whisper, " 'cause he's a big
3225.efore I started. I knowed Miss' Elemming was sick, and knowed that some of the L
3226.d I thought I'd run my chance of getting speech with — THE FLEMMINGS. . 385 la
3227.work, yon better, How's Miss' Flem- ming?" " A little we hope," replied Wolfert
3228.tle we hope," replied Wolfert Flem- ming, who began to think that the man was fe
3229.hinks they've got the ; world in a sling but when God begins to fight agin' 'em
3230.s sold Wilbur," he answered, won- dering more and more at the man's manner. " Fo
3231.dollars." Gosh Look here, Elder Flemming, that 'ere place down yonder is worth t
3232. cent !" said "Wilbur, emphati- Thinking more and more that the man was either c
3233. either crazy or drunk, Wolfert Flemming determined to get rid of " Wilbur, him
3234.nd here no longer. Thank you for risking so much to come : 386 THE FLEMMINGS. to
3235.lbur " Just bed ;" and was about leaving him, laid his hand upon I arm to detain
3236. it is : them two smart Boston listening to every fellows didn't said. I word th
3237.laid there in the furze, my how watching which way the turkey-hen went, I heard
3238.an with the hammer found was from seeing out of a piece suthin' out your boy Reu
3239.s where that tells — and, not thinking anything wrong, With that he — oh, he
3240.hat tells — and, not thinking anything wrong, With that he — oh, he's him th
3241.at you've heard P still Wolfert Flemming's heart almost stood listened to the ma
3242.the farm, what a risk he all down losing had run of the advantages which a merci
3243.d there with his great eyebrows lowering over his eyes while Wilbur, who was if
3244. eyes while Wilbur, who was if shivering with cold, watched him, wondering to le
3245.vering with cold, watched him, wondering to let that for he was going to be so s
3246., wondering to let that for he was going to be so stupid as man with the hammer
3247.Good night, friend. You hear some- thing from me to-morrow.'' sit- When Wolfert
3248. to-morrow.'' sit- When Wolfert Flemming went back to the ting-room he found Nic
3249.n Wolfert Flemming went back to the ting-room he found Nicholas there, ready to
3250.till They him that their mother sleeping, and had This was not started once sinc
3251.ood news pened. ; then, instead of going to bed, he sat told down with them and
3252.emember how my mammy laughed was hunting I've at me, and scolded when I told her
3253.ft stone ? But I found and been chipping away down yonder at the Old Mill these
3254. the Old Mill these three months, making things out of it ; and didn't tell anyb
3255.use I it was afraid you'd say for idling it was nonsense, and be worried with me
3256.the brook me to tell and he began asking questions about the scenery, story of a
3257.'round, and went and uncovered something I was making, and asked right off where
3258.ent and uncovered something I was making, and asked right off where I got that s
3259.0 THE FLEMMINGS. and thought I was doing great things," said Reuben, his arms fo
3260.by the ruddy did, fire, uplifted beaming. " And so you Ruby, as it turns out," a
3261.s out," an- swered his father, smoothing back the golden tangles from the boy's
3262.nd kissed six o'clock, it ; and, telling Nicholas to call lie him at went into t
3263. began to then sturdy Nick said, looking with wideat him, as if open eyes he dis
3264. as if open eyes he discovered something It's about him he'd never seen before,
3265.d never seen before, " a funny all thing altogether, Ruby, that you, idling arou
3266.thing altogether, Ruby, that you, idling around the time, should be of more use
3267.low ! I never was so to glad of anything in again, until I see my life, and neve
3268.life, and never expect be mother sitting there in her old 'May-Flower chair,' kn
3269. in her old 'May-Flower chair,' knitting stockings." Hero THE FLEMMINGS. 391 the
3270.dkerI tell is "And if you what I'm going to do, Euby, mother better to-morrow."
3271.rrow." "What?" asked Eeuben. " I'm going to punch Cutter's head against the bigg
3272.lock of soapstone I can find, for trying to come such a swindle over think of it
3273.ittle cheated and ruined, and everything gone smash !" " She'll be so glad — p
3274.poor And mammy ! —to ! find everything straight again when I she's better," mu
3275.'ll make them stare who have been trying to grind my father to powder —because
3276.ew !" old said Nicholas, little snapping his fingers while he indulged in a pard
3277.is tongue "What nonsense you are talking, Nick. Lie 392 THE FLEMMINGS. there on
3278.tburst, human and is ; so natural adding, " you know little. have to go with qua
3279.other'U have a good time now, stuff- ing her pillows with soft stone —won't sh
3280.a qiiiet little laugh, as he sat looking down into the glowing coals. Mrs. Flemm
3281. as he sat looking down into the glowing coals. Mrs. Flemming's condition grew n
3282.wn into the glowing coals. Mrs. Flemming's condition grew no worse, and towards
3283.e streamed in upon her, Wolfert Flemming started back, forgetting for an instant
3284.olfert Flemming started back, forgetting for an instant what had brought him ben
3285.!" have looked so when Ishmael was dying of thirst " " And Not this is your litt
3286.ather ! father ! I shall ask for nothing !'' more or better on earth , exclaimed
3287.on earth , exclaimed the boy, clasp- ing his hands. Then, almost beside himself
3288. that many a time he had fallen fainting to the earth while he worked and "Wolfe
3289.while he worked and "Wolfert to Flemming, on examining them, found steatite of t
3290.d and "Wolfert to Flemming, on examining them, found steatite of them be genuine
3291.enuine out, the finest quality. Hurrying they walked swiftly down to the quarry,
3292.ection. full the valuable stone cropping out amongst the furze and under- growth
3293.isfied-— more —his heart overflowing with grati- tude to Almighty God and ad
3294. grati- tude to Almighty God and adoring the ways of His providence, as he walke
3295.idence, as he walked homewards, thinking of her, ever of her, and the great happ
3296. happiness that pros- perity would bring her, after the sharp, sudden re- verses
3297.egard himself as his steward and nothing more, and labor suffering ; poor and so
3298.rd and nothing more, and labor suffering ; poor and so that when the end came, h
3299.s feet until reached his own door. Going in, he found Hope busy preparing fresh
3300.. Going in, he found Hope busy preparing fresh nourishment for her mother, and l
3301.d peacefully. By-and-by, Martha Flemming awoke once more to life and consciousne
3302. more to life and consciousness, knowing the dear faces ; bending over her but s
3303.usness, knowing the dear faces ; bending over her but so weak —oh, fever so we
3304.y from one to an- other without speaking. The She is was gone. " But," said the
3305. gone. " But," said the doctor, croaking like an old raven, " the worst is to co
3306.ndy quiet and she well." keep everything may —mind! so ; I don't say she will
3307.swer to their fervent prayers, was going to ; spare her to them trouble what the
3308.h full of they only thought of following out his sensible rections. lessly as Ho
3309.is sensible rections. lessly as Hovering around their mother as noisesun-bright
3310.s adminislife- tered the warm nourishing beef tea and the giving stimulant. She
3311. warm nourishing beef tea and the giving stimulant. She was too weak and conscio
3312. up their hearts arid were glad. Nothing should trouble them now. joyfully bear
3313.d. at the Ethan Cutter came that morning pointed — with a confident, beaming,
3314.ng pointed — with a confident, beaming, and satisfied expression of countenanc
3315.bills, papers made out ready for signing, and jubilant over the near termination
3316.ned than described when Wolfert Flemming told him in grave, firm tones, and few
3317.uld not sell it.' He insisted on knowing the reasons, in a voice of ; suppressed
3318.d in the least of know, Wolfert Flemming, in his quiet level tones, his grave it
3319.es, his dreams of wealth, his glittering castles in the air, were suddenly crumb
3320.led, and came like the burnt, ; tumbling about his ears sticks blackened of bril
3321.nd crop out of the house, never relaxing his hold until he had run like a him th
3322. gave him a kick which sent him whirling down the steep his face hill at a speed
3323.to his mother, and the fellow was making himself heard over the house —and tha
3324.stood there caught a streak of lightning and tied bow-knot. it and in heard his
3325.Not that he don't deserve you for trying to swindle — then coming Jehosaphat !
3326.ou for trying to swindle — then coming Jehosaphat !" up here putting my mother
3327.hen coming Jehosaphat !" up here putting my mother's life ! in danger, and insul
3328.mother's life ! in danger, and insulting you before your children " Let us forge
3329.ess and violence," said Wolfert Flemming, in that grave musical undertone of his
3330.cause of it. life, feel sorry for having been the Presently he began to ask his
3331. his father some questions about working the quarry. full of Sanguine and expect
3332.not possess ; and I can think of nothing now, Nick, except that note which will
3333.n a fresh mort; gage, or even by selling an interest in the quarry but I don't k
3334.e quarry but I don't know! I and, having done divine will, all am in God's holy
3335.ivine will, all am in God's holy keeping; that I can, I shall await His to the e
3336.hall await His to the end." all trusting Him Nicholas had not thought of this
3337. and it c^me down upon his warm, glowing visions, and 398 THE FLEMMINGS. proud,
3338." that with all this untold wealth lying in the earth at their very feet, his fa
3339.l, it that however great and humiliating the would have to wait and bear it when
3340.ear it when came. Then Nicholas Flemming wished in his soul that he was a Christ
3341. never ; been baptized, and know nothing about try to bear if but ; I'll it like
3342. at time — mind People who are getting over a low fever never know when they h
3343.ve enough," said the doctor, one morning as he was going away. " I'll feed her l
3344. the doctor, one morning as he was going away. " I'll feed her like a motherless
3345.tor, I to 3 ' answered so Hope, laughing. am happy and thankful I don't know wha
3346.nd / did 400 THE FLEMMINGS. feel nothing but come and look at her, and for her p
3347.and refresh And remember she's not thing at all. Good day." It to be excited abo
3348.armly through the white curtains, making arabesque shadows of the old elms leafl
3349.LEMMINGS. mother 401 —his head resting against the lounge, his hers, hand clas
3350.inst the lounge, his hers, hand clasping full of which every now and then he sup
3351. supremely happy. softly kissed, looking Her eyes patient love followed her dear
3352.o moved and fro about the room, watching their incomings and outgoings— glad w
3353.ings— glad when they came, and looking after them with wistful, tender glances
3354.olded on her breast, and her lips moving as if in prayer. There had been no hour
3355.onversion to the True Faith. One evening Wolfert Flemming sat alone with The nig
3356.True Faith. One evening Wolfert Flemming sat alone with The night shadows had cr
3357. the wall in grotesque forms, flickering up and down like the figures of an elfi
3358.elfin dance. He thought she was sleeping she lay so quiet; but when he closed hi
3359.towards her, he observed her lips moving ; 402 THE FLEMMINOxS. in and her hands
3360.sently she opened her eyes —and seeing him standing there, smiled and held out
3361.ened her eyes —and seeing him standing there, smiled and held out her hand. "
3362.it was evident that a struggle was going on in her mind ; " no, I am going to te
3363. going on in her mind ; " no, I am going to tell you something that until will s
3364.; " no, I am going to tell you something that until will surprise you." "Had you
3365.ll never get stronger with this weighing me as it does," she replied. may be abl
3366.know it now," replied Mrs. Flem" It ming with quivering suffering of lips. cause
3367.eplied Mrs. Flem" It ming with quivering suffering of lips. caused me such mind
3368.. Flem" It ming with quivering suffering of lips. caused me such mind as I had n
3369. Catholics, with the fierce, unrelenting, persecuting spirit of the people it al
3370.ith the fierce, unrelenting, persecuting spirit of the people it all of my own s
3371.led about our Saviour's words concerning the Bread of Life. I tried to stop thin
3372. Bread of Life. I tried to stop thinking about it—but could not. Having got th
3373.hinking about it—but could not. Having got thus far, I began to read your Cath
3374.used to think sometimes that I was going stark crazy. past that Then one night w
3375.razy. past that Then one night was going room — Eva's room — and heard you,
3376.— and heard you, as I thought, praying. I stood at the door and listened, and
3377.never left me an instant, but kept going on, and on, and on> 404 in THE FLEMMING
3378.E FLEMMINGS. mind, day and night, waking and sleeping. my I had been more than u
3379.mind, day and night, waking and sleeping. my I had been more than usually exerci
3380.an usually exercised the day the ceiling You know I was at the door, speaking to
3381.ing You know I was at the door, speaking to Eva, when it gave way; and as it cam
3382.hen it gave way; and as it came crashing down I thought I saw the image fell. su
3383.its arms to save her. But that was owing, I guess, to the excited state of rible
3384.o of her —and I kept on dreamEva : ing and dreaming constantly about her. It s
3385.nd I kept on dreamEva : ing and dreaming constantly about her. It seemed me that
3386.told me that me. she was always standing by me, and she had promised afraid of h
3387., and pray me," said Mrs. Flenitell ming. I have been wishing to you, but was to
3388.Mrs. Flenitell ming. I have been wishing to you, but was too weak." " Truly are
3389.full of !" ex- claimed Wolfert Fleinming, tion in a profound emo- which adoratio
3390.nd emo- which adoration and thanksgiving were so it. blended that earthly langua
3391. you to imagine the joy of Mrs. Flemming's children when their father related to
3392.ls in heaven over a rescued soul One ing, day before the note fell due, Nicholas
3393.ore the note fell due, Nicholas Flemming came home from Wier's Land- where he ha
3394.er Hope and Huldah Sneathen were sitting together, talking and sewing by the bri
3395. Sneathen were sitting together, talking and sewing by the bright firelight; Wol
3396.ere sitting together, talking and sewing by the bright firelight; Wolfert Flemmi
3397.y the bright firelight; Wolfert Flemming was reading in his old one for Reuben.
3398. firelight; Wolfert Flemming was reading in his old one for Reuben. ; : 406 THE
3399.d, while Reuben, at his side, was poring over the Moore." less exalted strains o
3400.ot at ; Nick's grimness she was watching Wolfert Flemletter over, held it ming a
3401.ng Wolfert Flemletter over, held it ming as he turned the finally up to the cand
3402.t. broke the seal and unfolded Something, several somethings, slipped out and ;
3403.; fluttered down upon the pages printing over of the old Bible very crisp and cl
3404.they were, with a great deal of figuring and them ; but he did not heed them, le
3405.er to the end, while and went on reading the trembled as he held " a strange pal
3406.ud " Dear Friend : " I have been wishing to write to you for the last THE FLEMMI
3407.weeks, 407 but had to wait for something I wanted to send. dollars, Yesterday I
3408.of Boston has paid of land they're going to build the new State House on ; and I
3409. send shall it back, because are reading this I be half way to Europe, in having
3410. this I be half way to Europe, in having a I intend to throw away the balance ab
3411. ! tell her I thank her for the having written, and didn't answer her same rea
3412.affection and respect, dear Mr. Flemming. "I am sincerely your friend, George Me
3413.et, Huldah ?" asked Nicholas, whispering over her shoulder. " Yes," she replied
3414. in a mo- ment, while Hope was gathering up the five bank ; 408 bills, THE FLEMM
3415.on the is floor, and the cat was playing with " " It really true, then," said Wo
3416.eally true, then," said Wolfert Flemming, to rousing himself as from a dream. Th
3417.then," said Wolfert Flemming, to rousing himself as from a dream. Thanks be God!
3418." !" George Merill said Hope, laugh- ing and crying. " Here's more," said Eeuben
3419. Merill said Hope, laugh- ing and crying. " Here's more," said Eeuben, holding u
3420.ng. " Here's more," said Eeuben, holding up two bank you out ; bills towards his
3421. was true. " dis- consolate Peri waiting at heaven's gate designed it and sculpt
3422.only sold but wrote the most distracting things that had been said about it ; an
3423. he knew now that he had not been idling his 409 life away, but had been blindly
3424. life away, but had been blindly working out his vocation, and making much of th
3425.dly working out his vocation, and making much of the talent Almighty God had giv
3426.d this favor of George myself but coming in this way, it, through you and him, I
3427.o you. Tell her ," and "Wolfert Flemming left the room, his heart very full. Hul
3428.heart very full. Hul- — dah was crying and his softly, her head on Nick's shou
3429.ver ready to thump his ; own head having doubted her but before herself they sep
3430.tter that night to ; and write a gushing Merill to George "it come home and marr
3431.t come home and marry her was ;" nothing more," he said " than she ought to do b
3432.e little Sanctuary of and went up giving and Our Lady, where she spent half the
3433.t thanks- communious with her ; offering herself, soul and body, as her handmaid
3434. Divine Son. That night Wolfert Flemming read the Psalm Conjitemini Domino* at p
3435.ini Domino* at prayer time all ; nothing could felt ; have expressed better that
3436. have expressed better that he ; nothing could have been more appropriate and th
3437.eep musical tones, each heart responding to them in humble thanksgiving. " Hope,
3438.esponding to them in humble thanksgiving. " Hope,'' said Nicholas that night, as
3439.hey lin- gered in the quaint old sitting-room, after the others had gone to bed
3440.those things in the just see are dancing a jig; fire how the light from the as i
3441. the as if darts around them. Everything looks I rainbows were hanging about the
3442.Everything looks I rainbows were hanging about the room. never was so happy in m
3443.en about John Wilde," said Nick, kissing her. *Psalm THE FLEMMINGS. 411 " I have
3444.. I am content. It is a very sweet thing to it live for others." And did, indeed
3445.ticipate the The next day, Mrs. Flemming, freshly dressed and looking illness, m
3446.s. Flemming, freshly dressed and looking illness, much was better than she had d
3447.an she had done since her in her sitting propped up by pillows bed, trying to kn
3448.itting propped up by pillows bed, trying to knit —her fingers not much larger
3449. threw the fine yarn over the glittering needles —when " her husband came, and
3450. feel as chipper as that robin whistling out there by the window," she answered,
3451.December!" he upon her replied, watching* effects of her keenly, for he almost d
3452.em ungrateful ready very soon hesitating a blithely. to fret and repine, us. sin
3453.to go to Ohio," she added, then speaking more little first, " I c on't think rep
3454.e land's-sake !" she exclaimed, dropping her hands upon the coverlid, and fixing
3455. her hands upon the coverlid, and fixing her eyes upon him with an eager I feel
3456.deed! ; 413 to Tour boy took sculpturing soft images and while looking round for
3457.culpturing soft images and while looking round for some of stone to kind work in
3458.And ! to think him that day, when he ing for soft stone " Well, told how provoke
3459.razy." it, he found its but said nothing, as he was ; ignorant of great value an
3460. and I told him to come the next morning for I knew knew how much depended on my
3461.new knew how much depended on my getting the money for it." " And you didn't let
3462. about " Wilbur " repeated Mrs. Flemming, as scarcely comprehending how, by any
3463.Mrs. Flemming, as scarcely comprehending how, by any chance upon earth, that shi
3464. in their affairs. Then Wolfert Flemming 414 sat THE FLEMMINGS. down by her lett
3465.n by her letter side and told everything that visit to had happened, from Wilbur
3466.ed her of Reuben's success, not omitting the smallest detail as he went on. she
3467.rciful." God He has been so And kneeling down beside ; he lifted up his voice an
3468.to him and his household, and for giving new spiritually and corporally, to her
3469.d soft, and composed Mrs. tears Flemming and the happy she shed seemed brightene
3470.he said, as she gathered up her knitting ; once more gone." "I'll " and send Hul
3471. that, mother," it he answered, thinking how natural the cautious, thrifty natur
3472.of the was to hear little woman cropping out once more. best his took it as one
3473.lthy recovery, and went on way rejoicing. Long and sweet was the interview betwe
3474.t was the interview between Mrs. Hemming and Huldah Sneathen not that there ; wa
3475.neglected but for her, did Mrs. Flemming's 416 THE FLEMMINGS. and brought her ma
3476.As I has turned out, it was a good thing that you ! wrote to George Merill— po
3477.d have felt a sort of pride about asking such a favor even of our own kin, if we
3478.e got on without you." And Mrs. Flemming drew Huldah' s fresh young face down to
3479.resh young face down to her, and placing her hands upon each of the girl's derly
3480.pon each of the girl's derly. " blooming cheeks she kissed her tento me, child,
3481.she kissed her tento me, child, in bring- God has been good ing me out of the da
3482., child, in bring- God has been good ing me out of the darkness of error into th
3483.S. 417 when we will talk over everything." And when Huldah lifted up her face fr
3484.ittle \ Truly, indeed, was Mrs. Flemming a excitement ; worn aut by all this but
3485.there in her bright, quiet room, knowing that everything was going on well and h
3486.ght, quiet room, knowing that everything was going on well and happily, and put
3487. room, knowing that everything was going on well and happily, and put a new thin
3488.ty amongst strangers. And yet everything appeared to have happened in the natura
3489.tural order of things— even the coming of Patrick McCue on the night of the st
3490.e on the night of the storm, his leaving that book as a testimonial of his grati
3491.s simple and natural ; there was nothing miraculous, and yet how wonderfully had
3492.good them who love and serve Him nothing of it Mrs. Flemming could make all, hum
3493.nd serve Him nothing of it Mrs. Flemming could make all, humanly speaking, but u
3494.lemming could make all, humanly speaking, but utter to feel a sweet, humble, dep
3495.and mercy. ;" it was like " deep calling unto deep a life full was truly a new b
3496.irth in her They were very happy sitting around her, each one relating his or he
3497.py sitting around her, each one relating his or her personal experience during t
3498.ng his or her personal experience during the dark sorrowful days just past ; in
3499.ard, turned round towards them, exposing to view a spirited charcoal sketch of N
3500.spirited charcoal sketch of Nick running off all the-man-with-the- hammer, which
3501.will have to be planed to get that thing off," said Mrs. Flemming. it, little I'
3502. get that thing off," said Mrs. Flemming. it, little I'll scrub mammy, as white
3503.t strong enough soft stone for I'm going to fetch up loads of that you to stuff
3504.your pillows with !" he answered, giving it. his sketch a few additional touches
3505.kissed his mother, who had been watching him fondly, and set the board upon her
3506.stand Ruby," said Mrs. after 419 Hemming to he went out will u ; he is a perfect
3507.e as long as he But I admire him looking so bright and well. I shouldn't wonder
3508.ldn't wonder if it was the cool, bracing weather that has made him bracing stron
3509.racing weather that has made him bracing strong again." that It was not the cold
3510.enius edged and approved cided upon ning, ; ; was de- that he had made a success
3511.ugh his veins, and strength to his being. imparted new and Mrs. Flemming did not
3512.is being. imparted new and Mrs. Flemming did not in her nature to under- compreh
3513. enough as ever Mrs. to travel, Flemming was strong the Old Homestead was closed
3514.rs, man who his sister, had been working there many and who took charge lishment
3515. the dairy and other affairs be- longing to the feminine department of the estab
3516.y went to Boston. Wolto Patrick Flemming had written and the first McCue of his
3517.ront of the office was the gaunt beaming with a carriage figure of the delight,
3518.welcome them and help them down. waiting for them, and it He had when they were
3519. and conduct- ed them to a nice boarding-house near the cathedral, where he had
3520.d rooms for them istroduced ; and having them to the lady, and seen them comstag
3521.ck to the His joy and delight at meeting it with his friends defies description,
3522.ll of which were so deep earnest feeling, of ; THE FLEMMINGS. and devotion and p
3523.e was with them betimes the next morning, to show them the way to the cathedral
3524.he good Bishop received Wolfert Flemming and his family with friendly welcome an
3525.n"Wolfert baptized ; —that it Flemming and his rite, wife their children never
3526.s rite, wife their children never having received the now received in all its sa
3527.nd yet how strange this actual beginning of the chief business of their To place
3528.nothingness. was the immortal grasp- ing the eternal ; their initiation into Chr
3529.al ; their initiation into Christ's king- dom ; the beginning of the means by wh
3530. into Christ's king- dom ; the beginning of the means by which they were to work
3531.gnificance of that which they were doing, in all its broad spiritual meaning. Th
3532.oing, in all its broad spiritual meaning. Their ; reason was satisfied ing of fa
3533.eaning. Their ; reason was satisfied ing of faith in their sity of they comprehe
3534.tion with fear work out ;" and trembling and placing themselves under the pro- t
3535.ar work out ;" and trembling and placing themselves under the pro- tection of th
3536.measure, pressed together and to running over." desire, There was nothing left f
3537.running over." desire, There was nothing left for them nothing incomplete, nothi
3538. There was nothing left for them nothing incomplete, nothing imperfect or meanin
3539.eft for them nothing incomplete, nothing imperfect or meaningless in this holy r
3540.ever one could be placed, with twinkling lights ! Fair image of peace and holine
3541. might thy children, with simple, loving hearts, decorate thy shrine with all th
3542.upon them blessings and graces exceeding their timid requests ever swift to obta
3543.und inflicted by Eve upon man- by giving birth ! to the Saviour, God's only-be-
3544. in the stable at Bethlehem, by offering their hearts in which to cradle thy Div
3545.hy Divine thee, as thy Son ; by offering their service to all handmaids and serv
3546. to all handmaids and servants, by doing then, now that they would have done wit
3547.! O it sinless Mother and and in looking upon by this spectacle so long faithful
3548.ed for its salvation and, half believing, turns away with softened Nazareth! hea
3549.out number, brings the sinful and erring in loved, humble penitence to the feet
3550.ront of the sanctuary knelt the Flemming's, their souls clothed in the newness a
3551.ll in loud sonorous tones, as ; inviting the world to listen then followed the O
3552.face, in- 426 THE FLEMMINGS. it creasing in power and sweetness until all of its
3553.longer bread, but the true, real, living Body, Humanity all and Divinity with li
3554.s do, and knelt at the sanctuary railing sons together. —father, mother, daugh
3555. greatest assistance to Wolfert Flemming, in making inquiries, and finding out a
3556.ssistance to Wolfert Flemming, in making inquiries, and finding out and introduc
3557.emming, in making inquiries, and finding out and introducing to give him to pers
3558.quiries, and finding out and introducing to give him to persons who were able of
3559.nformation as to the best method working his quarry. He hired laborers and bough
3560.itement, which brought "Wolfert Flemming into personal intercourse with a rich c
3561.into partnership, which continued during mutual satisfaction. Every morning foun
3562.uring mutual satisfaction. Every morning found the Flemmings shop's at the Bi- M
3563.ted to seeof interest to intelligent ing all ; was minds like theirs sunset foun
3564.und them again in the cathedral, resting their souls in sweet contemplation and
3565.s and sorrows, as the traveller standing 428 THE FLEMMINGS. of upon the verdant
3566.—the desert where the sirocco fleeting blasts, false, mirage deludes the unwar
3567. and sunset on the Pincian young men ing hill. Two differ- —Americans—are wa
3568.Two differ- —Americans—are wandering— in ent directions — about the beau
3569. now ; listen- to the music, now pausing to watch the dancers, now following a p
3570.sing to watch the dancers, now following a picturesque group of con- tadina one
3571. the golden, rose-tinted haze of evening ; the other paused upon the terrace whi
3572.ian, beyond the pearl-white mists rising from the Tiber, towards the golden West
3573.West. About the same moment they Walking both started to leave the gardens. The
3574.e the gardens. The gay crowds were going; why should they remain? quickly from o
3575.such impetus that they were near falling to the ground. " " THE FLEMMINGS. 4< 42
3576. !" Hilloa exclaimed the other, emerging from the cloud of dust their collision
3577.illoa, too !" shouted the first, holding out both hands, which his companion gra
3578.e, last six months I have been exploring the riddle the sick of this it ; and tr
3579. riddle the sick of this it ; and trying my best sign, to un- Sphynx but she mad
3580.tle Eome to rest. I arrived only morning, expecting to find an old friend before
3581. rest. I arrived only morning, expecting to find an old friend before night." Th
3582.before night." Then they fell to talking over their travels and adventures; and
3583.e in the west- ern world came fluttering into their hearts like doves flying hom
3584.ring into their hearts like doves flying home to their cotes; and they questione
3585.om my mohis voice ; John Wilde, dropping all " a let- ter full of strange news a
3586.er which my agent sent me. I got nothing but papers from writes to home from. ;
3587. little while ; busy memo- were crowding into their minds, fraught with full of
3588.er wrote to me word that Hope Flem- ming had gone last. be a nun," said John Wil
3589.ister " George, are of Charity, or thing of that sort," answered George Merill.
3590.ster Monica. There's no mistake in being Eva. I should re- you know, John, how I
3591.now, John, how I loved Eva it's Elemming, and not likely that I should forget an
3592.not likely that I should forget anything concerning her," replied George Merill
3593.that I should forget anything concerning her," replied George Merill sadly. " "W
3594.ered John Wilde, whose heart was beating quickly and It joyfully. was growing da
3595.ing quickly and It joyfully. was growing dark, and the young men rose to Arm-in-
3596.owly down the if go. steep road, talking as to live. they had not another day Cr
3597. live. they had not another day Crossing the Piazza del Popolo, they strolled on
3598.polo, they strolled on, scarcely knowing or caring whither, when little they sud
3599. strolled on, scarcely knowing or caring whither, when little they suddenly hear
3600.they suddenly heard the musical tinkling of a bell, and saw a procession bearing
3601. of a bell, and saw a procession bearing lighted candles coming towards them. Fr
3602.rocession bearing lighted candles coming towards them. From every window on —
3603.hted candle those who held them kneeling devoutly. all On the sidewalks, air aro
3604.n ?" he inquired. The priest is carrying the Holy Viaticum ; to a dying person,"
3605. carrying the Holy Viaticum ; to a dying person," replied John Wilde excuse me,
3606.ngs." tell "John, tholic ?" me one thing ; Eoman Ca- asked George Merill, standi
3607. Eoman Ca- asked George Merill, standing before his fixedly at him. friend "I an
3608.is fixedly at him. friend "I and looking am, thank God," was the reply. ! " Well
3609.ly. ! " Well I suppose it's a good thing, old fellow. else, I'd as lief be a Cat
3610.e, I'd as lief be a Catholic as anything I guess ; but I don't much believe in a
3611.s ; but I don't much believe in anything, except my And actual existence. I'm at
3612.ll, light-hearted, careless, and looking dogma, upon all religions, irrespective
3613.the moral condition of way for bettering mankind, made a detour and his lodgings
3614.it while John "Wilde, hastily purchasing a wax candle from a shop near by, light
3615.o the house of the soul which, trembling on the borders of time, was only waitin
3616.on the borders of time, was only waiting to be it strengthened with the " life-g
3617.e it strengthened with the " life-giving Bread/' as passed through the shadow of
3618.ey both sat in the balcony overlook- ing the old deserted piazza, talking, and s
3619.ok- ing the old deserted piazza, talking, and smoking cigars of so choice a bran
3620.ld deserted piazza, talking, and smoking cigars of so choice a brand that the ai
3621.zed Wilde felt no compunction in sharing. expect to hear " Don't anything marvel
3622.sharing. expect to hear " Don't anything marvellous, George. My conversion was a
3623. to find out Hope's reasons for becoming a Catholic. ; I was impressed more than
3624.est for the happiness of both, differing so widely in religious belief as we did
3625.st on the very eve I tell of our wedding day. you, George, ; it came near ruinin
3626.day. you, George, ; it came near ruining me, body and soul it was the ; bitter-
3627.; my emotions simply died out —nothing more ; and as a books sort of calm succ
3628.e service of ; and God. I knew no- thing of his history then that I but it happe
3629.minded intellect r me of Eeuben Flemming. His was highly cultivated, his natural
3630.ubject, and at last we talked of nothing else. : We ally. journeyed to Rome toge
3631.was I got as near him as I could, hoping to ex; change a few words with him on o
3632. in my first Communion, it was something very like heaven 'to see the angelic sm
3633. angelic smile that irradiated his dying countenance as he watched me ; to feel
3634.e watched me ; to feel the faint, loving clasp of his cold fingers, and ! hear h
3635.he news about there seemed to be nothing to after Hope Flemming take me home and
3636.med to be nothing to after Hope Flemming take me home and ; my conversion I had
3637.re no obstacle now to prevent fulfilling her engagement with me, unless she has
3638.r of religion, which with ; a good thing to begin and you will go back and more
3639.ge. I am not so sure about Hope Flemming but I shall go back and see what awaits
3640.awaits me," answered John "Wilde, rising to go. " ; Then they to parted, with a
3641.parted, with a warm, friendly grasp- ing of the hands, kind, brave words, and pr
3642.ch other frequently; John Wilde thanking God in his heart of hearts for the fair
3643.rowful and lonely, and ft half believing in Fate. * * * little ft ft ft ft I hav
3644.you remember the last time Nick Flemming came back from "The Pines," he told his
3645. his father that "he believed everything was going to smash up there, through th
3646.r that "he believed everything was going to smash up there, through the mismanag
3647.he Deacon's partner and too much praying." ; He was not mis- taken in his predic
3648.ed at his petty tyrannies and disgusting hypocrisy, furious at their leges, an e
3649.pon him one night and gave him a beating which bruised every bone in his body. T
3650.every bone in his body. The next morning he had vanished— gone off with the De
3651.e to time under the 438 pretext of using THE FLEMMINGS. it to buy machinery and
3652.wo feet above the foundation. Everything was found to be in a terrible snarl at
3653.hom the Flemmings were honored in having for their guest. The young man —just
3654.epted the invitation of Wolfert Flemming, who was Boston at the time, to return
3655.m spend the summer months in the bracing, life-restoring air of the New Hampshir
3656.er months in the bracing, life-restoring air of the New Hampshire in the old The
3657.the New Hampshire in the old The wedding was a very quiet one, and the young cou
3658.d the young couple went to house-keeping brown cottage She bewhich shed under th
3659.ure happiness throughout her whole being that she was more cheerful and blithe t
3660. herself disgraced and demeaned by being Nothing softened obliged to live with P
3661. disgraced and demeaned by being Nothing softened obliged to live with Papists."
3662.retted and end of the chapter, affording found fault to the daily, Huldah " and
3663.s at The Pines," under Nicholas Flemming's manage- ment, became gradually more p
3664.ed beimaginings, and never ceased giving yond all their thanks to Almighty God,
3665.ays arrival that after his Hope Flemming had occasion to un- lock the old cedar
3666.her bridal trousseau, her tears dropping heavily upon the white, transparent,
3667.at happiness and soon a Catholic wedding in the Old Homestead. Do you remember t
3668.righteous amen " uttered, when " hanging" or "branding," was determined on. Now
3669. " uttered, when " hanging" or "branding," was determined on. Now of behold ! At
3670.d ; the family — and guest it —being present also the Wilburs, seen. who tho
3671.atrick McCue partook fair summer morning with John "Wilde and his bride, a holy
3672.rsion, and she deindeed, it clined being present at the wedding ; was more than
3673., it clined being present at the wedding ; was more than a year before she conse
3674., and ashamed One day John was unpacking a box which George Merill had sent him
3675.class, and lie and Hope were ex- amining it, when Mrs. Wild came in with her chu
3676.s. Mrs. Wilde, now very old, and waiting any hour for the coming of death, is pr
3677.old, and waiting any hour for the coming of death, is prepared with the best dis
3678.ston, arrives. Soon after Hope's wedding, she noticed one day that the portrait
3679.rait of old Lady Pendarvis was hang- ing in the "best room," with a wreath of ev
3680.!" the atelier of the said Hope, looking dreamily the picture, while her thought
3681.I try to be content," said Mrs. Flemming, brushing a tear from cheeks. The Wilbu
3682.e content," said Mrs. Flemming, brushing a tear from cheeks. The Wilburs is stai
3683.l farm ; and Wilbur now Wolfert Flemming's factor, and one of the The Flemthrivi
3684. factor, and one of the The Flemthriving men of the neighborhood. mings live amo
3685. but it is more feeble, and slowly dying out in staunch, brave New England and i
3686.ow in some parts hard by * it is growing and flourishing, " like a tree living w
3687. hard by * it is growing and flourishing, " like a tree living waters." Father B
3688.ng and flourishing, " like a tree living waters." Father Bapst, S. J. THE END. '
3689. be returned at 8 A. M. the next morning. Failure to return a Reserve 5. book on

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/