Concordance for The fate of Father Sheehy.

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1.   is one of the darkest and most revolting pages in the annals of any nation, and 
2. us tion of their enemies and unrelenting oppressors, have long — been transfer
3. e rights of his poor, harassed, starving people his genuine, unostentatious piet
4. with yet greater strength when wreaking vengeance on the oppressors of his race
5. fish —warm, generous, — sympathizing — the Celtic — man most heart, and
6. erever found, and fearless in denouncing the oppressor ; the whole beautiful fra
7. me He was might be, reckless in exposing himself to danger guileless he was and
8. danger guileless he was and unsuspecting, and, therefore, incautiously regardles
9. question, we must conclude that nothing short of a miracle could have saved the
10. nt to France for his education, it being then a capital crime in those penal day
11. gentry, who alone had the means of doing so, were reduced to the necessity of se
12. were reduced to the necessity of sending their sons to Louvain or St. Omers, Sal
13. f that time well might Davis dolid. sing : <^ Oh weep ! those Ireland Oh weep th
14. oom of youth, his fine oval face beaming with the consciousness of that mental p
15. mental power which he was then devoting to the service of his Maker his young h
16. ice of his Maker his young heart glowing with the love of God, and with charity
17. would not have shrunk from contemplating his fate^^ —his martyrdom. was only a
18. torture to bestow on the poor, sufiering Catholics Of this the consolation of re
19. veral years after his ordination, during repeatedly that is to say, administerin
20. repeatedly that is to say, administering the sacraments, or saying Mass, or perc
21. administering the sacraments, or saying Mass, or perchance, instructing the act
22. r saying Mass, or perchance, instructing the act,^^ caught in the FATHER SHEEHY.
23. powerful influence over the surrounding peasantry. unfortunately for himself, t
24. ted Catholics excited in a corresponding degree the hatred of their oppressors,
25. ue for the avowed purpose of maintaining the Protestant ascendancy, and forcing
26. g the Protestant ascendancy, and forcing their unhappy tenants to pay the exorbi
27. nd, All these were wrung from a starving peasantry the Catholic gentry were awed
28. em neither law nor justice were starving trampled on and outraged in every possi
29. e very priests were accused of fomenting rebellion. They were hunted from place
30. d himself for the purpurpose of watching the Whiteboys.* On the very night after
31. re aware, from the fact of their wearing white shirts over their clothes in thei
32. expeditions. FATHER SHEEHY. 11 gathering in the neighbourhood of the village, ea
33. up and individual as they met exchanging the password of the night, and greeting
34. the password of the night, and greeting each other with the secret grasp of swo
35. ugh the gloom of night on every lowering brow ? Oh there was little need to ask,
36. ntly of the very lowest classes, judging by their language and deportThey alread
37. n, and still their number was increasing, little straggling parties of two and t
38. number was increasing, little straggling parties of two and three and four dropp
39. rties of two and three and four dropping in at every moment. In the fierce excit
40. hour, and 12 THE FATE OF the increasing consciousness of strength and power, me
41. assed through the crowd, notwithstanding the darkness. But I ask you again, what
42. ll turn, your reverence, but we're going to do a civil thing/' returned the man,
43. nce, but we're going to do a civil thing/' returned the man, persisted the pries
44. know you will not go against my bidding wlien I tell you to return quietly to y
45. nge has been wrought in you by suffering and oppression when you could deliberat
46. you could deliberately steal on sleeping ! though they were your greatest enemie
47. s, and your sternness of purpose, taking them, but then you moreover, unawares m
48. e country would be filled to overflowing with doomed wretches, and your enemies
49. our enemies would rejoice in your having criminated yourselves beyond forgivenes
50. , my poor fellows do not this foul thing Stain not your souls with this heinous
51. ! FATHER SHEEHY. SO far from 15 amending your condition, would but make it an hu
52. u will to your homes. rejoice for having obeyed of me !'' A murmur ! dissatisfac
53. hold of any feasible excuse for evading the obnoxious command ; ''ay! but you'r
54. Meanwhile the crowd had been thickening more and more, and, whether by accident
55. nearer the town. priest saw, and placing himself on the road right in front of t
56. arms towards the people, his back being turned towards the village. ''Once more
57. cried with I command you,'^ he thrilling adjure you by country and your religion
58. ER SHEEHY. heavily on you and yours ding, ^ ; 17 do ; my bid- and you will have
59. ; my bid- and you will have my blessing and the blessing of God T' A backward m
60. u will have my blessing and the blessing of God T' A backward motion of the crow
61. oposed by the priest, that of disobeying him and incurring For a moment there wa
62. st, that of disobeying him and incurring For a moment there was God's anger. a s
63. murmur of disapprobation then grumbling voices were heard reproaching the pries
64. grumbling voices were heard reproaching the priest with having come between the
65. heard reproaching the priest with having come between them and revenge. But Fath
66. ere seen through the darkness straggling over the common in all directions, and
67. and head bowed down, and tears streaming from his aged eyes. '' Thanks be to The
68. hen Father Doyle related the fore- going scene, his brother-priest raised " Well
69. t, if ever men were w^arranted in taking the law into their own hands, it would
70. A few days after, on a raw cold evening, as the rector of the parish, the Rev.
71. y-chair before his parlour fire, sipping occasionally the contents of a beautifu
72. nd, his burly form encased in a dressing-gown of rich brocade, and his round red
73. brocade, and his round red face glowing with the fumes of the generous wine and
74. ceal her face. ! 20 THE FATE OF Dropping a low curtsey, and a " sarvent, sir !"
75. " sarvent, sir !" she remained standing near the door, which the servant still
76. er regarded the intruder with a scowling At last he spoke, glance of inquiry. ''
77. usiness with your reverence.'' So saying, Lanty closed the door with a waggish l
78. have, but what of thaf?" " Why, nothing, plase your honor, only I thought you m
79. ook out for respectable evidence, seeing that many undoubted criminals do escape
80. ted criminals do escape in these Wanting witnesses !'' unhappy days for want of
81. ' you be/' inquired " who are so willing to run the rector, the risk of telling
82. g to run the rector, the risk of telling the truth, at a time scarcely find one
83. '^ Well, well !'' said Hewitson, cutting her self-laudation short, ''but against
84. y one you priest, sir, for —but seeing the rector frown, she quickly added —
85. The priest T cried the rector, starting from his chair, '' what priest ?" '' Ay
86. churchman in an eager tone, alternating ! — — between hope and *' fear. Why
87. witson grasped the bell with a trembling hand, and pulled it with nervous haste.
88. s haste. Lanty was not slow in appearing, when his master ordered him to have th
89. '' repeated Lanty, with a low, chuckling laugh ; *'oh, then, the devil a bone of
90. ent woman has her reasons for concealing her real name. Go and do what I told yo
91. — ! sidled out of the room, muttering, 24 THE FATE OF ''dacent woman! wisha,
92. against this plotAre you a papist V ting priest ? " Wisha, troth,'' was the answ
93. ess that was to be perpetrated a knowing wink with her left eye. *' But I suppos
94. d Lanty, who, under pretence of stirring up the fire, had again made his appeara
95. ou blackguard T cried Moll, as, throwing back her hood, she turned a pair of squ
96. hood, she turned a pair of squint^' ing eyes on Lanty. Haven't you the divil's
97. THE FATE OP or cursed her, or something that way, on account o' the bad life sh
98. oth, sir, she's no great shakes to bring up for a witness/' An' what would his r
99. work as that, I'm not good for anything. So give me no more o' your impidence,
100. ile I'm in it, for he's just talknothing in' that way for contradiction ** —
101. SHEEHY. Sir 27 Thomas soon after coming in, the good news was speedily communic
102. objection/' he added, ad'* — dressing the witness. '' Divil a hair / care whe
103. if she only gets the nourishment/' Being assured that she would have whatever sh
104. her up, while the two gentlemen, drawing their chairs near the fire, sat down to
105. e, sat down to discuss their brightening prospects over a fresh supply of claret
106. fresh supply of claret. On the following day a small de- 28 THE FATE OP tachment
107. unsuccessful. had said Mass that morning in his sister's house, but long before
108. there he was concealed in a neighbouring cottage, a quantity of straw being heap
109. uring cottage, a quantity of straw being heaped against the door of a sort of ce
110. us, grateful peasantry succeed in hiding their beloved pastor from the all-pierc
111. eir beloved pastor from the all-piercing eyes of his persecutors. They took it i
112. ery^ Sometimes he narrowly escaped being caught, for his haunts began to be know
113. HY. 29 many began to shrink from lodging the persecuted priest, while he himself
114. d priest, while he himself was unwilling to compromise their safety, so that he
115. hwood in the depth of a thicket stealing at night to some friendly homestead to
116. tead to procure refreshment. One evening he determined to make his way to the ho
117. he very extremity of his parish, joining that of Ardfinnan. Intelligence had rea
118. rged not to go, he declared that nothing should prevent him from doing his duty.
119. at nothing should prevent him from doing his duty. ^^No,'' said he to his brothe
120. now in her hour of need. God's blessing be with you, Thomas,'' and he wrung the
121. . Kitty, for I know she'd be only trying to persuade my see love, me not to go.
122. aid Burke, entreatingly ; " it's wearing late, and !" you have a long road to tr
123. he house, he closed the door, and making the sign of the cross upon his forehead
124. n of the cross upon his forehead and ing: his breast, walked swiftly away throug
125. alked swiftly away through the deepening gloom of twilight. The roads were deser
126. night when the Whiteboys held a meeting, or went out on an — FATHER SHEEHY. 3
127. n a mile of the house, w^hen, forgetting his caution for a moment, he sprang ove
128. ere the shade was deepest. He was moving on, without appearing to notice them, w
129. est. He was moving on, without appearing to notice them, when one of them called
130. it 1 What's your hurry this fine evening T actual necessity. is : " It 32 THE FA
131. of me/' said the priest, still hastening on, but two of the men quickly seized h
132. her Sheehy aloud, '* what is the meaning of this 1 whither " Keally, would you t
133. relish. If you knew but all, we're going to pay you great respect entirely, for
134. of it an' sure that's no wonder anyking's officers. It's truth I tell — FATHE
135. ther Sheehy was silent he was meditating on the chances of escape, and looking e
136. ng on the chances of escape, and looking eagerly for an opportunity His captors
137. high road, and were rapidly approaching a ruinous building which had once been
138. e rapidly approaching a ruinous building which had once been a comfortable farm-
139. ery light shed a glory over the sleeping landscape, imparting a spectral look, h
140. y over the sleeping landscape, imparting a spectral look, however, to the shatte
141. e full in front of the ruins, the gaping doorway of which was dark as a churchya
142. loud noise was heard within the building a man in a white shirt stood in the dar
143. ung the priest from them, and exclaiming, " There he is, if !'' they ran off as
144. ehind they would have — A seen nothing to justify their fears, and the loud la
145. ow is this inquired the T priest, seeing that the man who had FATHER SHEEHY. 35
146. heehy had the happiness of administering to her the last solemn rites of religio
147. on of the outwitted captors when, coming FATHER SHEEHY. 37 back to the ruin a fe
148. was in those days a lone house standing close by the old churchyard of Shandrag
149. the contrary with '' its windows looking out into the lone place of tombs/' In F
150. secuted man, at the same time expressing a wish that he could do anything to ass
151. ressing a wish that he could do anything to assist him. His — — good disposi
152. peedily put to the test, for one evening, about an hour before sundown, as he sa
153. own, as he sat alone by the fire smoking his pipe, who should come in but the pr
154. slung over his shoulder. *' Good evening, Billy/' said the pretended beggar, as
155. he odds of me," said Grifiith, regarding the stranger with a quiet smile, *' but
156. now me, Billy f said the priest, sitting down by the fire, and spreading his han
157. sitting down by the fire, and spreading his hands to catch the '*Did you ever s
158. afl3.ed my pursuers that they're getting to be too sharp for me ; they don't lea
159. not to these vultures who are thirsting for my blood. If I can only conceal mys
160. they will not suspect you of harbouring me, Griffith will you afford me a shelt
161. s suffer on — — ! incapable of being tempted by the reward offered for my ap
162. sir, so you may/^ said Griffith, rising from his seat, and extending his hand t
163. ith, rising from his seat, and extending his hand to the priest, while the glow
164. he house did not afi'ord a single hiding-place, and the out-houses were not to b
165. e in the secret. They were then standing at a window, overlooking the churchyard
166. e then standing at a window, overlooking the churchyard, and the priest suddenly
167. vault yonder i^ the grave-yard belonging to some family now extinct ? I have hea
168. ouse at night, without your sons knowing anything of it T " The plan's a good on
169. ight, without your sons knowing anything of it T " The plan's a good one, sir !'
170. atural place to hide in. a fearful thing for the livin' to be shut up among the
171. er willingly or knowingly injured living man, I have no reason to shrink from ab
172. I have no reason to shrink from abiding a day or two in the dwelling of Better
173. rom abiding a day or two in the dwelling of Better there than in the the dead. h
174. here every night till you get something to eat an' drink, an' a few hours' comB
175. u please, till you a bit to eat." Having made a hasty meal of oaten cake, eggs,
176. u stare so and Don't you know mouldering dead are safer company for a doomed man
177. omed man like me than many of the living ? ha! har His laugh was wild and unnatu
178. eyard. the door, sir!" he said, pointing to a low, narrow door, which, being a l
179. ting to a low, narrow door, which, being a little lower than the surface of the
180. e steps with a single bound, and lifting 44 THE FATE OF the worm-eaten door asid
181. her Sheehy's breast shrank from entering there at that hour. *'Go," said he to G
182. ow in the dim light from any one passing the I road by keeping close to the wall
183. om any one passing the I road by keeping close to the wall, need not intrude on
184. ul slumbers of the dead till the morning light compels me, owl-like, to seek the
185. orthy friend, for I hear some one coming down the road.'' In this strange retrea
186. remained some four or five days, sitting all the day on a large stone which he f
187. which he found in the old vault, reading his Breviary, as well as he could, by t
188. de priest chinks of the door, meditating the while on the lives of the first Chr
189. ristians in the Catacombs, and combating his natural aversion to the place by th
190. ny volun- FATHER SHEEHY. tarily retiring to the baffle his spiritual 45 to tombs
191. ry place. prepare me for the approaching time when I shall be called upon to ent
192. ighed for a return to the busy, bustling world. But the aff^airs of men even —
193. — — — his own — were — moving on. He had written a letter to Mr. Secr
194. letter to Mr. Secretary Waite, ofi'ering to give himself up provided his trial m
195. al might take place in the Court of King's Bench, in Dublin, and not in Clonmel,
196. preme and despotic. An answer, accepting his proposal, came, addressed to his br
197. ther-in-law, who brought That it evening Father Sheehy ventured to go home with
198. ook an affectionate leave of his weeping sister, and set out achimself to Griffi
199. Callaghan, a magistrate of high standing and unblemished To him Father Sheehy re
200. f horse to escort him in safety, fearing to trust the Orange constables by whom
201. w voice, as he WTung his hand at parting "Your cousin, Martin O'Brien, is all :
202. Martin O'Brien, is all : him with going up to town to-day. He will re- — FATH
203. en raisthat may be in his power/^ '* ing his voice he added May the Lord bless y
204. between tw^o of the dragoons, and having exchanged a kind farewell with Mr. O'Ca
205. ow, and was speedily lost to surrounding objects, his thoughts being intent on t
206. surrounding objects, his thoughts being intent on the probable issue of his app
207. on the probable issue of his approaching trial. But his trust was in God, and ho
208. lved to regard the decision as com-* ing from the great Judge of all, the — 48
209. submission. It was early in the morning when the prisoner and his guard left Mr
210. use, and at eight o'clock in the evening they stopped before the arched gateway
211. but at the same time he made an offering of himself to God, saying " Lord ! do w
212. de an offering of himself to God, saying " Lord ! do with me what thou : wilt! T
213. ou knowest what is best for me r Leaving Father Sheehy immured in that prison wh
214. ong, let us go back some months to bring forward an occurrence too little known,
215. hole country was not plunged in mourning by the loss of many useful lives, it wa
216. s was ceedings fell to the ground* owing, in great measure, to the strict * Plow
217. e to show any sympathy for the suffering of the people, every trial of a politic
218. re, honourably acquitted, and they being, as may be supposed, the most respectab
219. er of his day." FATHER SHEEHY. rejoicing 61 over the country. The people were, i
220. ment or all was great death. was morning, a mild, fair morning, and the sun had
221. death. was morning, a mild, fair morning, and the sun had already ascended It ha
222. ht, when a carriage-and-four, containing Sir Eichard Acton and a barrister, who
223. ve seen of them, they are far from being the bloodset, wild-looking 62 THE FATE
224. ar from being the bloodset, wild-looking 62 THE FATE OP they are represented. !"
225. how they hate the law and all belonging to it, and it's short work they'll make
226. iage. As sure as your lordship's sitting there, they'll tear us limb from limb,
227. e barrister deemed it what the gathering meant. " With your permission, Sir Eich
228. they have any evil intention in awaiting us here, it must be you who stand in th
229. administrators, and I not this awaiting w." *' assemblage, evidently Nay,'' sai
230. r Richard, here they arel they're coming towards us, as Fm a They'll kill us all
231. rcely able to keep his seat on hear- ing this supposed confirmation of his He sa
232. rmation of his He sat pale and trembling worst fears. the box, the whip and the
233. y. Yes/' said the Chief Justice, putting his head out of the window, '' I am Sir
234. istrates, bad cess to them 'ud be making it out trayson if we raised our voices
235. t I did not tell you of this overflowing gratitude, for I could not possibly hav
236. possibly have anticipated any such thing." Turning again to the peasants who sto
237. ave anticipated any such thing." Turning again to the peasants who stood hat in
238. omewhat by surprise. I have done nothing that entitles me to such an expression
239. ge I have simply done my duty, favouring neither one side nor the other." **An*
240. !" cried one taller than the rest, being, indeed, our acquaintance. Darby Mullen
241. that matter T' Here some women, crushing their way through the excited multitude
242. e, held up their little children, crying, " There he is now look at him, alanna!
243. ed a stentorian voice, and a space being cleared, the horses were in a twinkling
244. cleared, the horses were in a twinkling taken from the carriage, and, notwith-
245. rom the carriage, and, notwith- standing Sir Richard's earnest remonstrance, the
246. and drew the vehicle along with amazing swiftness, while the hills around re-ec
247. drink my health this raw, chilly morning.'' man what your lordship, not a rap we
248. we could see that, but you know nothing at all about us, or you wouldn't. You'r
249. arewell, then/' said Sir Eicbard, taking off his hat, and bowing courteously to
250. Eicbard, taking off his hat, and bowing courteously to the crowd as the carriag
251. rriage rolled through, the people gazing after it as long as it remained in sigh
252. as long as it remained in sight, pouring out fervent blessings on its owner. **
253. u,'' said the Chief Justice, as, sinking back on his seat, he drew a long breath
254. augh heartily. '' that rather a puzzling question even for a judge How on earth
255. n seated the carriage, after "stretching their limbs" by a short walk while the
256. been arrested for Whiteboyism, and being known to all the country round as a sim
257. able of either 62 THE FATE OF conceiving or execnting a malicious proHe repeated
258. r 62 THE FATE OF conceiving or execnting a malicious proHe repeatedly denied jec
259. iteboys, but his denial went for nothing, as the magistrates had determined that
260. poor creature, under pretence of making him tell the truth, till they finally s
261. , till they finally succeeded in forcing him to swear against certain individual
262. rejoice that Bridge was not forthcoming, '' for,'' said they to each other, " i
263. n. " God knows I'd be sorry for anything bad to happen him, for he was ever an a
264. e himself a-purpose for fear o' swearing what he knew wasn't the truth % Myself
265. and reached his pipe to Paddy, inviting him to " take a dhraw'' in a tone which
266. ty for his appearance at the approaching trial. " I will never believe,'^ said t
267. unate Lord Edward Fitzgerald. A striking verification, surely, of the old prover
268. ace. So FU be his security for appearing when called on let him out on my — Bu
269. was brought up for trial, the case being put back 66 THE FATE OF from time to ti
270. me under one pretence or another. During all that long period, Father Sheehy had
271. he had the comfort, moreover, of seeing from time to time, and especially his f
272. ed for comes at last,^ as the old saying goes/' Do you see that, my boy V — '
273. ust not " How," said the priest, turning sternly on his cousin, " how is it you,
274. appear, in God's holy name, and leaving to Him the issue." " But I have just go
275. ason, they can still retain you as being accessory to the murder, whether real o
276. he changed the conversation by inquiring after his sister s health. But O'Brien
277. O'Brien renewed his request, and during the time which intervened before the tr
278. le it was yet in his power, representing to him, and with some show of justice,
279. ly means that remained to him of eluding the vengeful pursuit of his remorseless
280. hed informers swear against you as being cognizant of the murder. As to the amou
281. at the malice of those who are thirsting for your blood/' "I cannot do it, O'Bri
282. ot the present indictment. If they bring such a charge as that against you, and
283. oul, for I know they're fit for anything, and will carry their point by fair —
284. of events- be it done unto me according to His will !" And he reverently raised
285. and looked upwards through the shifting clouds to the blue sky/' O'Brien sighed
286. but Father Sheehy looked with a smiling eye on the imposing array of white-wigg
287. ooked with a smiling eye on the imposing array of white-wigged lawyers ; the ear
288. ite-wigged lawyers ; the earnest-looking occupants of the jury-box, as they crow
289. tnesses, and very often, as some glaring inconsistency was discovered in the evi
290. the Tipperary dignitaries with something very like contempt, to the fair to but
291. nd when, at seven o'clock in the evening. Chief Justice Gore rose to address the
292. hat the Court was unanimous in believing Mr. Sheehy innocent of the The jury cha
293. change of countenance, but stood leaning against the railing of the dock, with f
294. e, but stood leaning against the railing of the dock, with folded arms and head
295. htly raised, in the atitude of listening. But the drama was not yet concluded th
296. rial, and he saw on his face an exulting smile which boded him no good. His eye
297. e was convinced that there was something more to come, for the face of the judge
298. pected, — — FATHER SHEEHY. involving quences/' the !75 most serious conse- p
299. you to prison you are charged with being accessory to the wilful and deliberate
300. med, though a tear was evidently forcing its way. After a moment's pale, He was
301. rom whom it comes, and their persevering enmity towards me, I had every reason t
302. cept this grievous humiliation as coming from His paternal hand, and will only p
303. accusation — said at terrible Knowing ! I am thankpersecute me. ful to this w
304. by those who have not shrunk from doing justice to an oppressed and persecuted
305. se who FATHER SHEETIY. 77 ways declaring that if John Bridge were indeed murdere
306. are that this declaration avails nothing before a Court of Justice, but ledge of
307. more painful duty than that of remanding you to prison. Mr. Sheriff,'^ he added,
308. son. Mr. Sheriff,'^ he added, addressing that functionary, " you will take the p
309. itude within and without the build*' ing. plot a plot!'' was the general cry, an
310. E FATE OF and lie left the dock, warning gesture with his hand. made a Speech wa
311. ll of Clogheen ! — -the priest-hunting, bloodthirsty magistrates goes one of t
312. pe to his carriage which was in w^aiting, while his black heart overflowed with
313. uld never get fast enough out of hearing. " But we'll have our revenge for this/
314. our revenge for this/^ was his consoling reflection ! *' ; By the King William b
315. consoling reflection ! *' ; By the King William but well have our day, and a bl
316. te-livered Gore, if he was again sitting in judgment but he shan't, for we'll lo
317. ave him broug;ht to Clonmel. This trying the fellow in Dublin will never do, and
318. heehy, his enemies did succeed in having him brought to Clonmel for trial ; and
319. icy hand of death were already grasping him, and that the warm, living world wa
320. grasping him, and that the warm, living world was shut out for ever. Bat his de
321. anctify them by conCourage, my secrating them to Him. soul heaven lies beyond th
322. the few who lived on the hope of seeing the Catholic party entirely prostrated,
323. une, for it was the policy of the ruling party to get rid of the most influentia
324. the priest ous opportunity for involving many of 82 til THE FATE OF in one em co
325. dward Meighan, who was accused of having for given the fatal blow, acting on the
326. having for given the fatal blow, acting on the orders of the priest. lea The wi
327. where he was confined for horse stealing) for the express purpose of giving info
328. aling) for the express purpose of giving information against Father Sheehy and E
329. il before his trial camic on, and during that time he bore his sufi'erings with
330. ime he bore his sufi'erings with amazing fortitude and even cheerfulness. He was
331. the jail while the prisoners were taking their daily walk, and saw the unfortuna
332. , and saw the unfortunate priest sitting on a lone bench against the wall, being
333. on a lone bench against the wall, being unable to walk. Being there on busi-
334. st the wall, being unable to walk. Being there on busi- — FATHER SHEEHY. ness
335. hat, sir he said, with a smile, pointing to the bandages by which they were enve
336. one here — — see it you sympathizing with a would be the ruin of you, priest
337. r, sweet tones of his fine voice singing, or rather humming, seemed to ring in t
338. is fine voice singing, or rather humming, seemed to ring in the ear of him parte
339. nging, or rather humming, seemed to ring in the ear of him parted from him, and
340. found to undertake his defence, fearing to incur the wrath of his persecutors.
341. and he urged the necessity of summoning all the witnesses whose evicould be rel
342. d " Why, what need is there of troubling so many will not two or three respectab
343. te sufficient ? There I have Mr. Keating, of Turbrid, to prove that I slept at h
344. to that of a gentleman of high standing and unblemished character ? And I have
345. pendent and where is the use of exposing these poor, warm-hearted people who are
346. , warm-hearted people who are so willing to brave danger on my account, when tel
347. ores of my parishioners able and willing to prove me ^' innocent *' And not only
348. murder was ever committed, Bridge having taken leave of them, for the purpose of
349. leave of them, for the purpose of going abroad somewhere/^ ^^Welir said Father
350. o establish the fact that I knew nothing of the murder ; and the fewer witnesses
351. comes of terly, — do not regret having then awaited my trial— it was my duty
352. and we must never be deterred from doing our duty." O'Brien was here abruptly in
353. ssity to the hatred and malice unwilling, as of his —being own persecutors ; b
354. and malice unwilling, as of his —being own persecutors ; but still we cannot h
355. utors ; but still we cannot help wishing that he had listened to reason, and per
356. it is now matter of history that, during the whole time of his trial, the court-
357. e Oraiige magistrates themselves lodging-houses and taverns were kept under the
358. oohy cracked his jokes over his steaming whiskey-punch, furnished from a neighbo
359. key-punch, furnished from a neighbouring tavern, and the vagabond Lonergan grinn
360. Moll Dunlea was in her element, romping and carousing amongst the soldiers. She
361. as in her element, romping and carousing amongst the soldiers. She had taken up
362. ular, whose name was Brady, and he being a nominal Catholic, either felt or affe
363. n the fate of Father Sheehy. One evening when they were all assem- — — FATHE
364. in the 89 guard-room it was the evening all but one before the trial Brady sudd
365. t feel a little squeamish about swearing against the priest. *' Squeamish/' crie
366. est. *' Squeamish/' cried Moll, snapping her fingers contemptuously, '' the devi
367. " '' Who says so 1" cried Moll, starting to her feet, and shaking her clenched f
368. Moll, starting to her feet, and shaking her clenched fist at the soldier, while
369. oll V* inquired the soldier in a coaxing tone, being desirous of reaching the bo
370. red the soldier in a coaxing tone, being desirous of reaching the bottom of the
371. coaxing tone, being desirous of reaching the bottom of the secret, though his mo
372. curiosity. '' Harm '^ said Toohy, taking up the word before Moll could speak, ''
373. ll cut short the conversation by calling for *' another glass." Where's the use
374. another glass." Where's the use talking ? " said she, "it makes a body divilish
375. d hang the lives of men of high standing and unblemished honour. What a state of
376. sed the attention of all. On the morning of the trial Sir Thomas Maude and the t
377. eated in the parlour of an inn adjoining the courthouse, engaged in conversation
378. reserve in his presence. " Good morning, gentlemen," said the new-comer, '' wha
379. all, sir,'' replied John Bagwell, making room for him beside himself. '' We are
380. e himself. '' We are little just talking over some matters of importance/' ** Wh
381. od ; these rascally papists are becoming quite savage on Don't you think so ? "W
382. more of it than did any of us. The thing is absurd, improbable, and if I am not
383. hose who employed — them, for blushing is out of the question with them ?" An
384. as on the cheek of Maude, and a taunting reply on his thin lip, when a person en
385. to announce that the judge was entering the courthouse. You^U soon see what you
386. han on the '' staircase. "The unhlushing witnesses may do as well as 'the intima
387. l game they made of it That very morning, about three hours before the trial com
388. Meighan we have shrunk from : — doing it all along, for the fellow has the na
389. ng, for the fellow has the name of being a good Catholic that is to say, a staun
390. o the deed. We might offer him something handsome." '* I tell you it^s no use,"
391. nform you that we of them over, standing." ** have succeeded in getting one —a
392. standing." ** have succeeded in getting one —a farmer of tolerable 1" And his
393. or,^' cried Maude, in a glow of exulting joy. ''The FATHER SHEEHY. 97 gaining ov
394. ing joy. ''The FATHER SHEEHY. 97 gaining over of that man is the making T know h
395. 7 gaining over of that man is the making T know him very well of us all. he call
396. t, but I believe he is neither one thing nor the other, a sort of amphibious ani
397. price '' Of) 5 life, my friend, nothing less/' " Why, how is that 1 I heard not
398. s/' " Why, how is that 1 I heard nothing of his being in jeopardy " Oh but it wa
399. w is that 1 I heard nothing of his being in jeopardy " Oh but it was easy to put
400. witnesses. The fear of death will bring a man to reason when His V ! money will
401. osed. So, give up the notion of sounding Meighan, for it would only ruin all he'
402. de a handle of — hereafter if anything came against us.'' ; 98 THE FATE OP ''A
403. Herbert. But let us be off, it's getting near the I think there's little doubt b
404. n than Gore on the bench. The only thing Tm afraid of is Keating's evidence ; ho
405. . The only thing Tm afraid of is Keating's evidence ; how is that to be got over
406. is that to be got over % You see Keating stands very high, d 1 take the fellow A
407. eady I see the dragoons clearCome in ing the way for the judge. ' here to the Sp
408. we put our heads together, as the saying is. Perhaps it may not be so bad after
409. "take sweet counser' together on Keating's evidence, and the result of their del
410. ations will be seen hereafter. On coming out of the hotel, the first they met in
411. ne of Father Sheehy^ Mrs. Green, leaning on her husband's arm, for she seemed sc
412. veiled but her whole frame was trembling with agitation. " Mr. Hewitson !'' said
413. '' said Mr. Green unexpectedly accosting that portly gentleman, ''The soldiers h
414. apt to make too much noise, if anything excites their feelings. Good morning."
415. ing excites their feelings. Good morning." ** Oh, my brother my doomed — ! bro
416. some bitter words !" cried were hovering on his solutely lips, but he for re- re
417. s, who desired no better than for taking to get a plausible excuse s friends int
418. FATHER SHEEHY. 101 " Don't say anything to them, Mary dear," he whispered to hi
419. leave them in the hands of God, darling, and let Him judge them. But Tm afraid
420. . Look, look, Mary !" he added, pointing down the street, " see, there are the c
421. see, there are the crown witnesses going to the court-house. See, they have them
422. e tears fell fast and thick, as, leaning heavily on her husband s arm, she moved
423. er wore a satisfied and even an exulting smile, and there was a triumph in the g
424. e son of toil had that very very morning of trampled on the glittering bait held
425. ry morning of trampled on the glittering bait held out to him by the tempter, an
426. y the tempter, and spurned the degrading ofier of pardon, involving as it did th
427. the degrading ofier of pardon, involving as it did the sacrifice of principle. T
428. magistrates whom we have seen discussing the question of attempting to bribe Mei
429. en discussing the question of attempting to bribe Meighan knew not that one of t
430. course of the day. Early in the morning, as Meighan — 104 THE FATE OF sat alo
431. F sat alone in his dreary cell, thinking of his approaching trial, with the sad
432. dreary cell, thinking of his approaching trial, with the sad fore- bodino^s so n
433. other returned, after carefully closing the door. ''Meighan!" said the gentlema
434. d Meighan, could I think of sich a thing once in here!" and he looked around " O
435. eturned the and visitor, slowly speaking distinctly. "It is in your power— the
436. are not bound to ward off the impending —ay V put it ! danger *' I don't know
437. ou have to say, then, without any coming round about it." There was an angry flu
438. , but he chose to " This is bold talking, assume a smile. Meighan,'* he said, "
439. — — V ! 106 THE FATE OI" had nothing to do with this murder, even if the dee
440. no hope," said the visitor, not seeming to notice his *' well last words here I
441. en and the aged father who are depending on you for support/' Meighan's eye glis
442. — ! on my freedom '' V^ Only turn king's evidence, confess yourself guilty, an
443. . " 107 forth like rain, notwithstanding all his them. Then I suppose you reject
444. h, then. Father Sheehy he added clasping his hands together, '* did any one ever
445. r, '* did any one ever hear sich a thing as them to ask Ned Meighan to turn info
446. rown in their faces that I done anything for them to be ashamed of an* that Id b
447. it, both you and the priest shall swing for it." '' An' if we do, too, we're no
448. se he recognized his aged father leaning on his stick. glance of mournful meanin
449. on his stick. glance of mournful meaning was exchanged between them, and then th
450. ight of the 24th of October, by striking him on the head with a bill-hook, at a
451. followed Lonergan, appearance. who being no more than sixteen, and small in stat
452. s equipped in a long blue coat, reaching to his heels, with a view to make him !
453. od character, and furnished overwhelming proof that Edward Meighan did not leave
454. nor even molested on that night, having been seen by more than one individual s
455. t to leave the country for fear of being taken by the soldiers. Such a body of c
456. As for Meighan himself, he was thinking that moment of the priest, and knowing
457. g that moment of the priest, and knowing that the two cases were so he too thank
458. ected, — unsatisfactory, and deserving of little or no attention. A faintness
459. nd he leaned heavily against the railing of the dock, but in a moment FATHER SHE
460. he poor old man was still there, leaning on his stick his thin, white hair throw
461. the jurybox was empty, probably fearing that the sight might draw from him some
462. servation, and be the cause of his being expelled from the court-house. After a
463. use, and poor old Meighan was seen lying pale and motionless in the arms of a by
464. tander. The unhappy prisoner, forgetting even the awful words he had just heard,
465. e. I suppose there's no use in me saying anything more, even if I was allowed fo
466. ose there's no use in me saying anything more, even if I was allowed for what co
467. a loud, authoritative voice, **and bring in Nicholas Sheehy.'' low murmur of ind
468. n ran through the court, notwithstanding that scarcely any of the friends of the
469. The sound rose higher and higher during the time that inter- — — — —
470. various parts of the court-house crying out : the Lord deliver you from your en
471. rfectly silent. From how any human being and relate could imagine such barefaced
472. ess on his cheek which denoted a failing spirit, but still he bore it bravely, c
473. ut still he bore it bravely, considering his recent imprisonment, and the announ
474. Meighan to give Bridge his dose (meaning to strike him with his weapon). Father
475. FATHER SHEEHY. 117 mony, notwithstanding his having abundant proof of being enti
476. HY. 117 mony, notwithstanding his having abundant proof of being entirely innoce
477. nding his having abundant proof of being entirely innocent, yet still did Father
478. the ground had he not caught the railing of the dock. '' Why,'' he said in a low
479. ' Why,'' he said in a low voice, leaning over to his lawyer, " why this was one
480. r Whiteboyism, if he persisted in giving his testimony for the priest ; and the
481. priest ; and the crown lawyers, fearing that the pri! '* ! 118 THE FATE OF sone
482. character, and now when he was swearing in direct opposition to his conscience,
483. testimony was not very important, being indeed rather of a negative than a posi
484. and Herbert went on, though his varying ' ' ! colour and faltering voice showed
485. h his varying ' ' ! colour and faltering voice showed how deeply he felt the app
486. ameful business in hand, scarcely making his replies in- ; FATHER SHEEHY. tellig
487. low, indistinct tones As he was quitting in which he spoke. the the table, the f
488. of the crime laid to his charge. nothing very Still important had been gained fo
489. n degree of impatience, when Mr. Keating, of Turbrid, was called, and instantly
490. ascended the witness table. Mr. Keating was a man in the prime of life, with a
491. he man of education and of good standing in society from the ephemeral fops who,
492. iety from the ephemeral fops who, having little rich but else to all recommend t
493. s to the one great business of "dressing fashionably/' When Mr. Keating had bowe
494. "dressing fashionably/' When Mr. Keating had bowed to the Court, he turned and s
495. t as he returned the salute, and, moving a step forward, A he seemed to await wh
496. rd, A he seemed to await what was coming with renewed hope. He glanced to- wards
497. he could see that they regarded Keating with a "Of scowl of suspicion and disli
498. ust be conclusive ** for in establishing my innocence. But he FATHER SHEEHY. can
499. n bless him and his place of Mr. Keating : their V The testimony this effect was
500. not possibly have left the house during the night slept at his house Being aske
501. uring the night slept at his house Being asked without his knowledge. could he t
502. id not leave it again till the following morning was somewhat advanced.'' *^ Tha
503. eave it again till the following morning was somewhat advanced.'' *^ Thanks be t
504. out of gladness, that made the roof ring ; many voices, too, were heard calling
505. g ; many voices, too, were heard calling out '' : Long — 122 life THE FATE OF
506. you that can Success to you, Mr. Keating Many s the good turn your honor done be
507. n' sure I could sw^ear to the same thing I was talkin' to him that evenin' on th
508. the truth. — and soforth. Mr. Keating was cross-examined according to the mos
509. Mr. Keating was cross-examined according to the most conclusive method of making
510. to the most conclusive method of making a witness perjure himself, but not a pa
511. to be embar- — rassed by the quibbling, or quirking, Seeor punning of a crown
512. — rassed by the quibbling, or quirking, Seeor punning of a crown lawyer. ing t
513. he quibbling, or quirking, Seeor punning of a crown lawyer. ing that his inquisi
514. ng, Seeor punning of a crown lawyer. ing that his inquisitor had paused, and man
515. and manifested no intention of renewing his examination, the witness said : pre
516. ss said : presume, sir, you have nothing more to ask of me may I be allowed to g
517. tson, and his rubicund face was bursting with importance. "Is not this/' said he
518. "Is not this/' said he, '^ James Keating, commonly called, of Tubberett or Turbr
519. d '' the name of my residence,'* Keating, with I should think the evident surpri
520. tablished church, deliberately unfolding a written document, and glancing over i
521. folding a written document, and glancing over its contents, " such being the cas
522. glancing over its contents, " such being the case, I have to inform this worship
523. ul replied Court that said James Keating is on my list of disaffected and danger
524. erous persons.'* " ** I !" cried Keating in list ? I on your — that is sacred,
525. ol, sir," said Hewitson, with a sneering smile '' you are down here in black and
526. are down here in black and white (laying his finger on the paper in his hand) as
527. nger on the paper in his hand) as having been accessary to the murder of a serge
528. almost aloud, at the same time covering his it away.'' He — FATHER SHEEHY. 12
529. sobs were heard around, and Mr. Keating spoke, but he spoke not ment there for
530. —thought to not of himself. : Turning towards the prisoner he said " Father S
531. witson. quickly for the prisoner Keating '^ And instantly two constables advance
532. Stand back yet a moment !*' said Keating, waving his hand with an air of dignity
533. ck yet a moment !*' said Keating, waving his hand with an air of dignity that aw
534. the men; ''I must say a word at parting. My lord," this new plan — ! ! he sai
535. this new plan — ! ! he said, '' bowing I address respectfully to the judge, my
536. ame on his list, with him I have nothing to do, but to your lordship, — 126 TH
537. y days/' " My lord,'' said Maude, rising from his seat behind the judge, for Hew
538. d, is not this man's insolence deserving of punishment — ; ; — ! V FATHER SH
539. de bowed and smiled, and resumed Keating was quickly handhis seat. cuffed, and c
540. r him and his — family. " The blessing of God, and my blessing, be about you a
541. . " The blessing of God, and my blessing, be about you and yours, best and trues
542. ct voice ; '' but, fear not, Mr. Keating, something tells me that God will not g
543. '' but, fear not, Mr. Keating, something tells me that God will not give you ove
544. the Lord, you so from him V^ Mr. Keating could only smile and repeat the word, "
545. e prisoner bowed in silence, and folding his arms on his breast, stood calmly re
546. ms on his breast, stood calmly regarding the scene as calmly as though he were n
547. vel method taken to do away with Keating's evidence had an eflfect which probabl
548. t have foreseen, viz., that of deterring others who had it in their power to giv
549. ive evidence for the defence from coming forward. Whispered dialogues might have
550. er Sheehy that very night in Mr, Keating's parlour beyant-—when- — ^ FATHER
551. n't you see how they handled Mr. Keating himself, that's so high up in the world
552. but you see, they're detarmined to bring him in guilty, an' all the evidence tha
553. hether he had any more evidence to bring forward, he answered in the negative, a
554. , and begged to know whether Mr. Keating s evidence might not be allowed to stan
555. e spoke for a considerable time dwelling particularly on the well-known characte
556. der of Bridge, and described it as being of the most atrocious kind. It had been
557. gle witness to prove him notwithstanding his wellinnocent, known and, indeed, ba
558. ure you will decide justly and according to the evidence before you. The obsequi
559. nk and file from their box with becoming dignity of mien, to decide the fate of
560. f John Bridge^ that is to say, as having aided and abetted Edward Meighan therei
561. therein. Again was the voice of wailing, loud and deep, heard echoing through t
562. of wailing, loud and deep, heard echoing through the building sighs and loud gro
563. deep, heard echoing through the building sighs and loud groans, and ; ochone ! o
564. d, to be brought He was up the following day for sentence. No sooner was the tri
565. here and there through the town shaking hands in open exultation. '' Ha V said
566. » W ^ Jk M, W Meanwhile a heart-rending scene was going forward in that darksom
567. eanwhile a heart-rending scene was going forward in that darksome cell which con
568. spoke at once more embraced when having he took Sure I was his wife, hold of hi
569. divil himself that brought such a thing against you '^ Well, you needn't wondhe
570. " But Ned dear," said his father, wiping away the tears with the back of his han
571. to you and Father Sheehy, if they bring ^' Father Oh, then, him in guilty too '
572. es here with me this very mornin wanting me to turn king's evidence, an' swear a
573. this very mornin wanting me to turn king's evidence, an' swear against Am, an if
574. r in the same breath, and with startling earnestness, leaving it doubtful whethe
575. and with startling earnestness, leaving it doubtful whether they approved of th
576. ou consented to do sich a shameful thing you'd — FATHER SHEEHY. 137 be the dea
577. n a moment daughter-in-law without being allowed to B^jfaretveU! the old man and
578. AaEDY* At an early hour on the following day the prisoners were brought up to re
579. ed the sentence of death with surprising fortitude, considering him as a man wit
580. h with surprising fortitude, considering him as a man without education. But tho
581. though wholly ignorant of book-learning, he was a Catholic, and well instructed
582. ic, and well instructed in the elevating doctrines of the Christian faith, and s
583. gh for support ; one deep, heartbreaking groan from the old man, and a single ex
584. towards the door leadIt opened, and ing from the jail. He Father Sheehy w^as br
585. ep to the front of the dock, and placing his two hands on the railing, made a lo
586. and placing his two hands on the railing, made a low bow to the judge, and then
587. ould recognize as kindly eye was beaming on him many more were filled with tears
588. tisfaction flitted over his face. Having returned the salute of those who ventur
589. estion is a mere form, and that anything I can or could say Would have no effect
590. at this very John Bridge is still living, for we have' the clearest evidence tha
591. nd commanded silent, under pain of being exTo the from the courthouse. " This is
592. pelled : levant. bears Have you nothing to say that upon your own individual ca
593. never was committed by any one. Knowing, or at least believing this to be the c
594. any one. Knowing, or at least believing this to be the case, I protest against
595. on, I must declare that, notwithstanding all this, I heat these unhappy men who
596. them in the hands of a just God, knowing that He will deal with them according t
597. ng that He will deal with them according to their deserts That is all I have to
598. word uttered when he arose, and putting up his right hand he drew down his ghas
599. n his ghastly cap over his brows, saying in a " Then it becomes deep, guttural v
600. re to be considered as still unrepenting. You shall be hanged, drawn, and quarte
601. thority of the judge to restore anything like order. In the midst of the tumult
602. e Court adjourned — till the following day. During the short interval between
603. urned — till the following day. During the short interval between the sentence
604. n the sentence and its execution nothing could equal the excitement of the publi
605. d outraged every sense of justice, being the very climax of shameless corruption
606. s to keep into Clonmel them from pouring attacking the jail. and ardent attachme
607. into Clonmel them from pouring attacking the jail. and ardent attachment to Fath
608. destruc- without even a chance of saving of religious intolerpolitical hatred. t
609. e, some of Lord Drogheda's troops having been brought from Cloglieen to reinforc
610. e as his spiritual director. calm during all and he even succeeded in cheering a
611. ng all and he even succeeded in cheering and consoling his afflicted relatives b
612. even succeeded in cheering and consoling his afflicted relatives by his glowing
613. g his afflicted relatives by his glowing descriptions of the joy which awaits th
614. ^ in that world whither he was hastening. He studiously diverted their minds fro
615. HEEHY. 145 and dwelt on the joy of being released from the miseries of this life
616. eries of this life, the bliss of shaking ojff " this mortal coil/' and putting o
617. ng ojff " this mortal coil/' and putting on the robes of immortality. " And then
618. ould not ask to see him on the following day, *' for,'' said he, " as I am to-mo
619. ivine Master lives to welcome our coming 1 Only keep your last end continually i
620. will venture to predict a happy meeting for us all, knowing that the God whom w
621. dict a happy meeting for us all, knowing that the God whom we serve delights in
622. he God whom we serve delights in showing mercy to the contrite sinner. Farewell,
623. for me when I am gone hence !" So saying he took the hand of each sister in his
624. raised to heaven, he invoked a blessing on — their heads, again exhorted them
625. the elder, *' there's no use in telling us that, when we have to-morrow before
626. it seems as if my poor brain was turning f' By this time the afflicted sisters h
627. , and went off together to their lodging-house, fortheir husbands had remained b
628. ions which would have been too harrowing for them to hear. came in, Martin O'Bri
629. eme penalty of the law'' said he, laying a strong emphasis on the last word, "yo
630. lay my remains, but I bespoke my lodging there some months ago. You will make my
631. as to reach there, and that my blessing rests and shall rest upon him large old
632. his this little ivory crucifix/' drawing forth one which he wore on his neck. FA
633. an, and my deign to accept the oflfering. Not a word now not a word !" he said,
634. a word now not a word !" he said, seeing that some of his listeners were about t
635. d little thought of this when discussing the matter on Arran-quay, as we walked
636. Arran-quay, as we walked along, looking down, on the black, muddy Liffey. I kno
637. Truly/' interupted Martin, endeavouring to speak in a cheerful tone, "truly 1 m
638. olas, that I have always had a misgiving on my mind, ever since I heard the repo
639. ced to the active part I took in getting the church-rates knocked off in a paris
640. ey ought never to have been paid, seeing that it contained not a single Protesta
641. Protestant, and, then, in my encouraging the people to resist that novel and mos
642. other. My only grief is for poor Keating God knows what is to become of him— F
643. ain support/' With regard to Mr. Keating/' interposed Bourke, "I hear he has bee
644. goodness even in this life by delivering him from the hands You, Martin O'Brien,
645. ies.* * It was fortunate for Mr. Keating that he was tried in Kilkenny rather th
646. the evidence brought against him, being chiefly the same miscreants who had pro
647. ull liberty to attend to ' the one thing needful/ my Father final preparation fo
648. Doyle promised to come back this evening, and I hope to receive the ador- able s
649. e ador- able sacrament to-morrow morning for dear viaticum. So now, my my friend
650. t. — wind of March wild, was careering over the — by tor, his faithful frien
651. e loud, long shout of sorrowful greeting — far more dejection than arose from
652. ich alone salvation is to be and raising his right ! obtained. I need scarcely t
653. multitude below, loud and heart-piercing as it was, rolled away, unheard by him^
654. go the remainder of the sentence hanging was not enough for the brutal spirit of
655. quartered; and while the task was being accomplished, Edward Meighan was brough
656. he body was cut down — up an affecting prayer for those who had sworn away his
657. ll — all, at least, save a low moaning sound that arose from under a neighbour
658. und that arose from under a neighbouring gateway, where old Atty Meighan and his
659. gathered around them, and were bestowing upon them such conso- A lation as they
660. e linen cap that was their only covering, for the hood of her blue cloak had fal
661. had fallen on the earth, and a crushing Poor, lonely weight on their hearts.
662. mourners that frail, old man, tottering on the verge of the grave, and that you
663. ed with his friends around him, kneeling in prayer, and closed his eyes in peace
664. mfort in the remembrance of his " having had the priest." *' Sure he died a good
665. oul, Ned Meighan.*' Such was the winding up of many a conversation amongst the f
666. town were again quiet and lonely-looking, and their silence was the silence of d
667. ocent victims of unj ust law. Everything wore an aspect of mourning, borrowed in
668. w. Everything wore an aspect of mourning, borrowed in part from the cold, cheerl
669. onmel when, on that inauspicious evening, about an hour before sunset, a strange
670. scores of hearts inClonmel that evening that exulted in the *' day's work done/
671. through the town there was merry-making and carousing, for the Orangemen held '
672. own there was merry-making and carousing, for the Orangemen held '^ high holiday
673. leaders pledged each other iii' foaming tankards to the further success of the
674. who were not ashamed to boast of having *^ sent Sheehy to, where he ought to be
675. ple, and swallowed his potation, nothing loth, then laid down the capacious meas
676. eighan before all was over, have Keating fast enough/' would they say, '* and th
677. other Catholics of respectable standing were arrested on the same charge, two o
678. ed on the same charge, two of them being ; relatives of Father Sheehy. these, On
679. hile after However, God saw fit to bring him unharmed out of the hands of his en
680. the head of Father Sheehy was bleaching over the porch of Clonmel jail harrowin
681. over the porch of Clonmel jail harrowing the hearts and souls of Many applicatio
682. eyeand the fearful associations clinging around it memories of vile injustice, a
683. me to mention ; one in a state of raving madness, biting and gnawing his own fle
684. one in a state of raving madness, biting and gnawing his own flesh ; another kil
685. te of raving madness, biting and gnawing his own flesh ; another killed by a fal
686. etched Moll Dunlea was killed by falling into a cellar in the city of Cork, whil
687. d of his life was cut short the avenging hand of God. •% 4k 4k ^ 4k w^ 4E: ^vr
688. person with whom he had been transacting some business, and they went in to have
689. ore they parted. While they were sitting at a table, chatting over the bargain j
690. e they were sitting at a table, chatting over the bargain just concluded, and »
691. o just then came into the shop. Starting from his seat, he darted forward and ca
692. , indeed I am,'' said the other, looking askance at his assailant, and endeavour
693. kance at his assailant, and endeavouring, at the same time, to are shake • - o
694. still sisted Peter Crowly. fast, holding him and looking into his very eyes. " I
695. er Crowly. fast, holding him and looking into his very eyes. " Is it in Clogheen
696. wly, with a sort of convulsive trembling that indicated the deepest emotion. ''
697. n your face!" shouted Peter, as, letting go his hold, he dropped heavily on his
698. hered eagerly round to learn the meaning of his strange conin utter duct. ** Wha
699. you leave home V inquired Crowly, making an effort to collect his thoughts. Och,
700. n't I run away to Cork for fear o' being taken an' put in again for what you kno
701. d Bridge, his round bullet eyes dilating with intense curiosity ; " how did that
702. ' listen here, John," he added, lowering his voice almost to a whisper, '' liste
703. back against the wall, literally gasping for breath. an no less ^ Hanged! five m
704. little Brien, the dancin master, living stilll" inquired Bridge, when he had a
705. ' strange tidings. Sure if he's a living man, couldn't he clear every one o' the
706. ky Lonergan's. there's no use in talking, but Gods that's above, an' sees all th
707. ll, I guess you wouldn't catch me taking up my quarters in such a country as tha
708. , so they do, but only They're beginning to try of late days. an' get justice fo
709. , an these night meetings an' everything o' that kind. The poor Catholics see pl
710. cs see plain enough that there's nothing for them but the worst o' thratement, a
711. ridge withdrew into a corner, blubbering and crying lil^e a child, and wiping aw
712. rew into a corner, blubbering and crying lil^e a child, and wiping away his fast
713. ing and crying lil^e a child, and wiping away his fast falling tears with an old
714. child, and wiping away his fast falling tears with an old blue handkerchief Eve
715. hat. now and then he was heard muttering ''An' they hanged Father Sheehy, this s
716. '^ for you, John," said Crowly, catching up his last words, '' the old boy himse
717. eland, on account of the place belonging to the king so every one tells me ; and
718. count of the place belonging to the king so every one tells me ; and if they kne
719. danger of you bein' taken?" but nothing he could say would induce Bridge to con
720. . Burke at length succeeded in obtaining possession of her brother's head, or ra
721. TE OF melancholy errand, and a box being prepared for th,e purpose, the head was
722. seen, with its white tombstone, bearing the following inscription " Here lieth
723. s white tombstone, bearing the following inscription " Here lieth the remains of
724. e this melancholy sketch than by quoting the words *' of Drc Madden Beside the r
725. eople. The inscriptions on the adjoining tombs are effaced by the footsteps of t
726. — — Eighty Years Ago. The following * stanzas, translated from This was wri
727. en kindly sent us from Worcester, Hoping Massachusetts. that they may not be uni
728. etts. that they may not be uninteresting to those who have been following '' The
729. resting to those who have been following '' The Fate of Father Sheehy'^ in our c
730. most bereft of reason, had been watching twenty years the mouldering head of her
731. een watching twenty years the mouldering head of her martyred brother, which sto
732. the devoted sister succeeded in stealing the head by night, whilst a raging stor
733. aling the head by night, whilst a raging storm kept the sentries in the shelter
734. heir doom, some died in madness, yelling * quartered corpse, of heirs dark dwell
735. quartered corpse, of heirs dark dwelling; And some, oh, righteous God impious an
736. ous God impious and I Of Sheehy's daring, Pour'd forth their curs'd lives and di
737. h their curs'd lives and died despairing. * Maude, of Dundrum, and oue of the Ba
738. s. True, Ireland was then only beginning to break some of the links of that bloo
739. r upwards of a censhe was only beginning to acquire tury strength for those hero
740. on the true wealth of has been depleting her more and more, intermittently, by t
741. d more, intermittently, by the appalling process of deaths by starvation, caused
742. Joseph to provide the means of averting the awful scourge and perennially, by t
743. e, which advance the material well-being of other nations, work For example, the
744. e popular will has advanced this burning question; if not to the stage of a fina
745. the golden opportunity pass, frittering away its time—-one of the two great E
746. of the two great English parties trying how little would satisfy the people, an
747. d, history is in some respects repeating itself In June, 1881, as in March, 1776
748. of the oppressive Land Laws was stirring the stormy passions of Ireland, and now
749. lm he may not aspire to, however willing e might be to emulate the Fate of Fathe
750. eople turned adrift had no manufacturing districts to fly to for the means of su
751. isery were tress exerted in representing their condition as the result of their
752. resented their advocates as well-meaning " but giddy and officious men." priest
753. rishioners, and was suspected of holding seditious opinions with respect to the
754. great • He had succeeded in abolishing them in the parish of Newcastle, and fr
755. al, which, though repealed the following session, marks the spirit of punishment
756. e time he wrote, 1777: "Instead of being in a progressive state of improvement,
757. ressive state of improvement, as verging to depopulation ; the inhabitants are e
758. ion ; the inhabitants are either Baoping under the sullen gloom of inactive indi
759. inactive indigence, or blindly asserting the rights of nature in nocturnal insur
760. l errors some^ where ? " After detailing the causes of Whiteboyism, he adds: "Wh
761. What measures have been taken for laying this spirit ? None that I hear of, but
762. one that I hear of, but that of offering rewards for apprehensions and discoveri
763. should conspire to run the risk of being hauged and gibbeted for the mere pleasu
764. gibbeted for the mere pleasure of doing mischief to their neighbours, would arg
765. py tenants from the only means of making their bargains tolerable. The law, inde
766. , the remainder is three hundred working days, the wages for which is a hundred
767. t of their cabin. What is left ? Nothing. And out of this nothing, they are to b
768. left ? Nothing. And out of this nothing, they are to buy seed for their garden,
769. n I have mentioned three hundred working days, though it is known, from th^ APPE
770. cattle. Here the incumbent gets nothing, and the cottier's garden becomes his p
771. man of birth, perhaps piety and learning, is brought to the disagreeable necessi
772. he disagreeable necessity of chaflFering with a set of poor wretches for twopenc
773. ly more rapacious than humane, squeezing out the very vitals of the people, and
774. m the little which the landlord and king had left them^' If the landlords of Ire
775. nce with France, and bent upon promoting its views in the former country, by ren
776. iews in the former country, by rendering the people more discontented, they coul
777. olicy than they thus effected by driving the people to desperation. These were t
778. ree of misery. The revenue, the unerring baro^ their condition, plainly indicate
779. den or partial it had gone on increasing for the past five years. The House of C
780. address to his Excellency, on referring to this subject, and to the want of cor
781. e. embraced the opportunity of promoting their own temporary interests by turnin
782. their own temporary interests by turning the tilled lands of vast districts into
783. ricts into pasturage, and even enclosing the commons where their impoverished te
784. orbitant de-^ to mands. When a famishing peasantry ceases to look upon the lords
785. and heedless of the consequences arising from the destruction of property and so
786. antages. Lord Northumberland, addressing the Parliament in 1763, in speaking of
787. sing the Parliament in 1763, in speaking of the disorders in the south, intimate
788. tholic of the latter. people were crying out for bread, the Commons were proposi
789. ut for bread, the Commons were proposing Prdtestant schools for the starving chi
790. sing Prdtestant schools for the starving children of a Roman Catholic population
791. to the artful contrivances of designing men, who, from selfish and interested v
792. " In 1766, the unfortunate people having paid the penalty of " their crimes and
793. and their pretended grievances," having been dealt with according to law, the c
794. ances," having been dealt with according to law, the country was restored to tha
795. designs of the quelled rioters, to bring all those Roman Catholic gentry to an a
796. al, and were without the means of making any defence, except what they obtained
797. e party accused, was sufficient to bring the loyalty of every such person into q
798. ife in peril. The turpitude of involving men in the crimes of those they succour
799. ct of contribution towards the defraying the expense incurred for the defence of
800. ly employed in the old mode of pacifying the country, and some of the gentlemen
801. ome of the gentlemen in the neighbouring districts were in the habit of scouring
802. districts were in the habit of scouring the country at the head of armed partie
803. iod of Irish history, and in the getting up of the prosecutions by a minister of
804. county. the name of John Bridge, having been arrested on a charge of Whiteboyis
805. st several respectable persons of having been amongst the rioters who had assemb
806. ered to go at large on the understanding that he was to appear if further eviden
807. rary published an advertisement, setting forth, " That whereas the said John Bri
808. whereas the said John Bridge was missing since October preceding, and was suppos
809. idge was missing since October preceding, and was supposed to he murtheredy they
810. , and therefore to be suspected of being privy to his murder. The magistrates an
811. the judge who presided at the preceding trials of the rioters. One of the few i
812. with men, women, and children, thanking him for the justice and the fairness of
813. n the discharge of his duty, and pouring blessings on him as a just and impartia
814. spectacle in Ireland: it was a touching exhibition, and * Plowden's '* one, it
815. t comprehend or tolerate Before entering upon the further proceedings against th
816. ary to show the state of publix) feeling, not only in the disturbed district in
817. of Bridge's disappearance and the spring of 1764, Mr. Sheehy was constantly mena
818. rote to Mr. Secretary Waite, acquainting him " that he would save the government
819. ent the reward offered justice, offering a 198 for taking APPENDIX. him, by surr
820. fered justice, offering a 198 for taking APPENDIX. him, by surrendering himself
821. or taking APPENDIX. him, by surrendering himself out of hand to be tried for any
822. t for justice), but in the Court of King's Bench in Dublin f and accordingly he
823. e grand-nephew. Several of the preceding details are to be found in a pamphlet c
824. tten in the month of May, 1766. Speaking of this pamphlet, the venerable Charles
825. ehy, a Popish priest, charged with being concerned in several treasonable practi
826. on in this kingdom, for the apprehending of whom government offered a reward of
827. l the 10th of February, in the following year, that he was brought to trial in t
828. as brought to trial in the Court of King's Bench. The Lord Chief Justice of the
829. ench. The Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, then, was the Right Honourable
830. ictment charged the prisoner with acting as a leader in a treasonable conspiracy
831. in a treasonable conspiracy, exercising men under arms, swearing them to allegi
832. acy, exercising men under arms, swearing them to allegiance to the French king,
833. ng them to allegiance to the French king, and inciting them to rebellion. The wi
834. egiance to the French king, and inciting them to rebellion. The witnesses produc
835. kenny gaol on a charge of horse-stealing, a month previously to his examination
836. nth previously to his examination having been given in against the prisoner; a w
837. in these proceedings, without referring to the circumstances which rendered She
838. who had the good fortune to escape being similarly implicated. The enclosing of
839. eing similarly implicated. The enclosing of commonage in the neighbourhood of Cl
840. to ascertain, but the fact of its having been preferred and levied admits of no
841. ion of church cess in a parish adjoining his, where there was no congregation, w
842. rs assembled for the purpose of devising some means of protection against the ex
843. enmity. He was courageous and confiding, chivalrous in defence of the poor and
844. dictments show plainly enough, differing, as they do, in the most material parti
845. ost material particulars, yet concurring in one point, the influence of Sheehy o
846. prosecutors . 202 APPENDIX. were casting about them at random for evidence of an
847. nder, he had been in concealment, flying from house to house, of such of his par
848. of his own persuasion, without wondering at the extent and the successfulness of
849. ant, of the name of Grifiiths, adjoining the churchyard of Shandrahan, where his
850. was concealed for three days, hid during the day in a vault in the latter place,
851. a vault in the latter place, and during the night in the house, when it was nec
852. rom the place that was indeed his living tomb. The house is still standing, and
853. living tomb. The house is still standing, and inhabited by the grandson of his f
854. ar that he would never discover anything to the prejudice of the Whiteboys, etc.
855. these agrarian disturbances by enclosing commonage adjoining their lands at Drom
856. rbances by enclosing commonage adjoining their lands at Dromlemmon The custom of
857. mlemmon The custom of first " presenting" a Popish priest in those times, and th
858. priest in those times, and then trumping up charges of sedition, and encourageme
859. January, in the fourth year of the king's reign, at Shanbally, did assault John
860. and Mr. Justice Tennison, the following bills found at the former assizes were
861. s who bailed the prisoners are deserving of notice ; for it will be found, that
862. t their persecutors. I doubt if anything more terribly iniquitous than the proce
863. of any similar conspiracy The preceding details sufficiently explain the views
864. of February, 1766, in the Court of King's Bench, was impartially conducted the
865. ome proof appointment by strongly urging him, a few days previously to his trial
866. r Sheehy nob to lose a moment in getting out of the kingdom, and urgently presse
867. gitive named Mahony, when about quitting the kingdom, had made the revelation to
868. , and while this gentleman was condoling with him on his unfortunate condition,
869. ial as Mrs. Mary Brady, the latter being the name of a soldier of the light hors
870. ehy was indicted on the charge of having been present at, and aiding and abettin
871. ge of having been present at, and aiding and abetting Edmund Meighan in the murd
872. been present at, and aiding and abetting Edmund Meighan in the murder of John Br
873. of Clogheen and at this place, according to the evidence, the murder of Bridge,
874. to secrecy, fidelity to the French king, and the commission of the proposed mur
875. count is to be taken as one, the leaning of which was certainly towards the pros
876. osecutors, and in support of the finding of the jury.* ^ ** Gentleman's and Lond
877. Peter Magrath, and John Bridge, playing cards at English's house went a small w
878. ed the corpse to a got a field belonging to Connor's son, or Ross, at The same B
879. t two miles from the place of committing the murder. An oath was then tendered b
880. d that night, and to be true to the king of France and Shaun Meskill and childre
881. was wrote by Nicholas Sheehy. of burying the corpse in the field, a little boy w
882. the field, a little boy was found hiding in the ditch, At the time and put up be
883. uried, but could see the people carrying the body. Cross-examined. Came from Kil
884. mmittal was committed for horse stealing; believes the 28th of October, 17G4, wa
885. ed were present says there is a dwelling-house in the field where Bridge was bur
886. of burial ; knew the prisoners by seeing them at several meetings of the Whitebo
887. saw them he slipped into a trench, being afraid of his life was discovered in th
888. not go all the way on account of hearing the crowd, ; ; some way on foot and som
889. unday night, because he saw people going to mass knows not how long it was befor
890. , and by the prisoner she saw them bring the corpse in the same way as before fr
891. October, 1763, when he said he was going to Jamaica often saw him when in the co
892. e would have seen him. ; ; Henby Keating, sworn. Michael Kearney in Jamaica, the
893. ichael Kearney in Jamaica, the beginning of March, 1764; saw him first there in
894. health ; then did not think of returning witness returned in August, 1764 ; left
895. ed letters from London the May following he is sure Kearney did not return after
896. ld not be out of bed without her knowing of it knows not whether Mary Brady be m
897. ney; does not remember his ever spending an hour in her house it was usual with
898. ner s house, to Avhich he went, as being his friend prisoner keeps ; Knows Edwar
899. e to his house about five in the evening of the 28th; prisoner was at home befor
900. m, and remained with him all the evening; they went to bed about eight or nine o
901. hour, and spoke to Meighan about working did not go to sleep before ten, at whic
902. ck to Ologheen about five in the evening, where he found the prisoner, his wife,
903. a journeyman, and maid; prisoner sitting in the kitchen with man and maid; witii
904. re at work when he got up in the morning witness, after the fair, lay with the p
905. to give his evidence; heard the morning of the fair that John Bridge fled out o
906. t night till four o'clock in the morning on Sunday; was drinking all the time in
907. k in the morning on Sunday; was drinking all the time in the company knows not w
908. sworn. Lives at Shan bally; is a dancing-master Bridge; believes him alive; neve
909. e told him secret, for that he was going out of the kingdom, and that if he retu
910. Clogheen; was surprised at his knocking at his door three hours before day he s
911. ee hours before day he said he was going to sea to avoid the light horse went wi
912. l five or six o'clock 'on Monday morning began to work about six on Sunday eveni
913. egan to work about six on Sunday evening did not go to bed or to sleep all night
914. swore. Meighan, on this evidence, being convicted, the same testimony was produ
915. e former but Father Sheehy, well knowing they trial would incur the vengeance of
916. engeance of his prosecutors, and relying mainly on the testimony of two witnesse
917. timony of two witnesses, Messrs. Keating and Herbert, — ; ; whose characters h
918. e feared, prevented Dr. Egan from coming forward on behalf of a person who had t
919. on who had the character of an agitating priest, one who was inimical to titlie
920. itnesses by one he produced, Mr. Keating, a Catholic gentleman of respectability
921. words of Mr. O'Connor, formed a striking contrast with that of his prosecutors.
922. his prosecutors. But the most astounding act of wickedness that had been yet pra
923. ntage which the testimony of Mr. Keating must have been to him, had that testimo
924. allowed to go unimpeached. The following account of the extraordinary proceeding
925. account of the extraordinary proceeding of his persecutors to effect their man
926. taken from the Candid Inquiry *^ During his trial, Mr. Keatof Dr. Curry ing, a
927. ring his trial, Mr. Keatof Dr. Curry ing, a person of known property aad credit
928. tood up, and, the Rev. Mr. after looking at a paper that he held in his had, inf
929. formed the Court that he had Mr. Keating s navie on his list as one of those who
930. al at New Market, upon which Mr. Keating was immediately hurried away to Kilkenn
931. nd loathsome dungeon. By this proceeding not only his evidence was rendered usel
932. : ; similarly dealt with, the same thing, but who came to testify to who instant
933. estify to who instantly withdrew meeting with the laid to the themselves, for fe
934. nt.*' As the crime charge of Mr. Keating w^as committed in another county, foiti
935. Sheehy observation. produced Mr. Keating, of Tubberett (Tubrid), as evidence in
936. stice's order, taken into custody, being charged with the murder of a sergeant a
937. and quarday. tered, on Saturday morning." " Herbert," we are told by Curry, " w
938. e, the A : 228 APPENDIX. fear of hanging, or the hopes of a reward," is left by
939. of horse surrounded the court, admitting and excluding whom they thought proper
940. unded the court, admitting and excluding whom they thought proper while " On ; o
941. streets in a formidable manner, forcing their way into inns and private lodging
942. rivate lodgings in the town; challenging and questioning all new comers; menacin
943. in the town; challenging and questioning all new comers; menacing his friends, a
944. and questioning all new comers; menacing his friends, and encouraging his enemie
945. s; menacing his friends, and encouraging his enemies. Even after sentence of dea
946. eople. The inscriptions on the adjoining tombs are effaced by the footsteps of t
947. ticed. Father Sheehy is in the following terms *' Here lieth the remains of the
948. men, but those of almost all the leading Roman Catholic gentry of the county, se
949. : John Toohy, a horse-stealer, was lying in 230 APPENDIX. Kilkenny gaol, under a
950. n due time transmitted to Dublin. Having done his work there, he was sent back t
951. is letter to Mr. Toler, speaks of seeing him at this period, " in an elegant sui
952. n of Roger Sheehy, iu the year following, 1708, Toohy was again brought forward
953. toriety of her ill conduct, when esiding in the parish of Shandraghan. caused Fa
954. kes of Ruske, and several others. During the trials, she was kept at the barrack
955. as kept at the barracks, her table being furnished from one of the principal hot
956. ney and Terence Begley, for ** tampering wiih the said M. Brady, and dissuading
957. g wiih the said M. Brady, and dissuading her from giving evidence.'* Another tru
958. M. Brady, and dissuading her from giving evidence.'* Another true bill was found
959. her own name, for " unlawfully reviling said M. Brady, for giving evidence agai
960. fully reviling said M. Brady, for giving evidence against Nicholas Slieehy." Jer
961. miah Magrath, of Clogheen, the surviving relative of one of her victims, saw her
962. she met with an untimely end by falling down a cellar. Griffith states that she
963. notorious in the country for his During the trials, he was likedepravity. When
964. a good-natured poor fellow, who, having no friend or relatives, had some claim
965. ears to have been misinformed respecting his character. APPENDIX. 233 head-quart
966. em in confidence, that he was then going to quit the kingdom, and took a formal
967. nd took a formal leave of them, desiring them to keep his departure secret, and
968. keep his departure secret, and promising that, if he should ever see them again,
969. appearance, Bridge was said to be living in Newfoundland The reader, I of all be
970. sertion o-enethat John Bridge was living in Newfoundland many years subsequently
971. ade of it in his account of these Having obtained a copy of proceedings. this le
972. y in the parish of Clogheen (Mr. Keating), to Mr. Flannery, another ecclesiastic
973. ubt of its authenticity. Every surviving relative of either of a letter ; the Sh
974. ity in its style and tone. The following is a literal copy of this dolastly, I c
975. arch 14, 1766. " Clonmel, Friday Morning, "Dear " To-morrow I am to be executed,
976. n; ! Speaker, and the Judges of the King's Recommend Bench may God bless them al
977. nd that the Koman Catholics of this king- who dom will be countenanced by the Go
978. lias Casey, and John Toohy, never having spoken to or seen either of them, to th
979. my memory, before I saw them in the King's Bench last February. May God forgive
980. fession as " no new method of entrapping credulous priests/* and that it was ado
981. and the inability expressed of availing himself of the knowledge given him "for
982. the probability of this disclosure being made subsequently to the trial. Curry t
983. n purThe purposes to be served by having poses. recourse to the infamous proceed
984. ses. recourse to the infamous proceeding of deceiving the unwary priest, and of
985. to the infamous proceeding of deceiving the unwary priest, and of making the fu
986. ceiving the unwary priest, and of making the functions of his sacred office subs
987. his enemies, could only be the following; if resorted to previously to trial, by
988. ged murder to deter Sheehy from adducing evidence of the man's existence or, if
989. ir wickedness, when we fiad them holding out offers of pardon to their three nex
990. ext victims on condition of their making a declaration that "the priest," in his
991. 's intention to go abroad, and of having gone to certain persons to take leave o
992. y he was seen That fact is within living, is unquestionable. the knowledge of pe
993. ch prevented Father Sheehy from availing himself on his trial of the knowledge c
994. ed to him, may have precluded his giving any specific information to those witne
995. d, of their own knowledge, knew anything of that event. The whole frightful cata
996. ed to the barbarous custom of inflicting torture for the purpose of extorting co
997. ing torture for the purpose of extorting confessions of guilt and disclosures, o
998. supreme authority to a party simulating loyalty, and exercising lawless power,
999. party simulating loyalty, and exercising lawless power, and which, in our times,
1000.e, and even recently, with signal daring, has been advocated in the The which li
1001.ity of the good old times, the scourging of suspected persons, which its modern
1002.the methods of paci- APPENDIX. 241 fying the disturbed districts of Manster in 1
1003.us: ''It was in resentment of a whipping which was inflicted on John Bridge with
1004.e lost his life." The object of singling out a poor, simple creature, who was in
1005.reature, who was in the habit of roaming about that part of the country, and wel
1006. and farmers of the locality, of putring him " to the question," through the ins
1007.of the cat-o'-iiiDe-tails, and of making the triangles subservient to the intere
1008.he sim- the creature tortured, bordering, as it did, on weakness of intellect; h
1009.get rid of his testimony, by implicating him in felony. The church-plate, chalic
1010.eper of the name of Sherlock,* adjoining the chapel, was stolen, or said to be s
1011.ore, and the importance of their bearing on the character of these proceedings,
1012.of the grounds there were, for attaching credit to them before coming to a deter
1013.r attaching credit to them before coming to a determination to give them publici
1014.lonmel. who had opportunities of knowing the paities best qualified to give info
1015.ormation on this subject, and of forming an opinion of the inquiries which were
1016.he statement of one main fact respecting the faith of Bridge, coincides with the
1017.ides with the opinion of every surviving friend and relative of the Sheehys, and
1018.rumour of the stolen church plate having been circulated in the country, Bridge
1019. circulated in the country, Bridge being in the habit of frequenting Sherlock's
1020.Bridge being in the habit of frequenting Sherlock's house, was pointed out as th
1021.ted out as thepers(m suspected of having stolen it. The double infamy now attach
1022. attached to Bridge's character of being an infoi^mer and a sacrilegious person.
1023. Francis Bier, for the purpose of taking leave of him. It was known that he inte
1024.m. It was known that he intended calling on another of his acquaintances, named
1025.s murdered by them. No other human being had act or part in this foul deed. Maho
1026.ignorant of any communication respecting the murder made by Father Sheehy to Maj
1027.cwith respect to two persons only having been engaged in the commission of — A
1028.of them to believe he knew In concluding this part of the subject, not. I have o
1029.ve, that if any doubt remains respecting the fate of Bridge, hone whatever can b
1030.justice, but for the purpose of striking terror into a portion of a community or
1031.of barbarity to be reIf the day is going, or gone by, for called ? the perpetrat
1032.y had been frequently tried for " acting as a Popish priest," an offence then pu
1033.transportation, WarSy ; as the following references will show By the 9th of Will
1034. and any person so transported returning again into the kingdom, shall be adjudg
1035.lty of high treason.* This act not being thought sufficiently stringent, in 1703
1036.s, in the second year of Anne, enjoining increased diligence in apprehending Pop
1037.ning increased diligence in apprehending Popish priests returning into the kingd
1038.in apprehending Popish priests returning into the kingdom. In 1709, previous to
1039.ool, or shall instruct youth in learning in any private house within this realm.
1040.her in any Protestant school, not having subscribed the oath of abjuration, the
1041.o exist Popish ;" in the realm, " having been duly registerevl but if such paris
1042.. The 28th clause provides for rewarding informers for discovering and convictin
1043. for rewarding informers for discovering and convicting Fifty pounds for every P
1044.informers for discovering and convicting Fifty pounds for every Popish clergy. a
1045.shop, bishop, or other person exercising ecclesiastical jurisdiction, twenty for
1046.f his Majesty's subjects, for not having countenanced such measures with respect
1047. did his boldness stop here; for, naming a certain day in said advertisement, wh
1048.n said advertisement, when the following persons of credit and substance, this o
1049.'"* With such arrangements for inflaming the public mind, for influencing the ju
1050.flaming the public mind, for influencing the jury, lor intimidating the judges,
1051.r influencing the jury, lor intimidating the judges, the — * * ** A Candid Inq
1052.ous concomitants in these cases, drawing and quartering, was pronounced upon him
1053.s in these cases, drawing and quartering, was pronounced upon him. His wife was
1054.on to give bail to appear at the ensuing assizes, to answer to other ; charges o
1055.d earnest solicitations "Notwithstanding," Curry states, by several persons of q
1056. the favour of the prisoners, who, being persuaded of APPENDIX. 251 their innoce
1057.that resignation, serenity, and pleasing hope which appeared so strikingly in al
1058.s, furnished me by some of the surviving their friends of these unfortunate gent
1059.pon the prisoners early in the morn- ing of the 3rd instant, so as to leave the
1060.about twelve o'clock, the distance being about eleven miles. ; APPENDIX. '' 253
1061.nder the gallows, where, after remaining some time, they were tied up, and in th
1062.trepid behaviour, set off by an engaging person, attracted much pity and compass
1063.ife pregThey were all buried the evening of nant. that day, as particularly requ
1064.by themwhere, we hope, they rest, having made atonement for their crimes and let

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/