Concordance for The fate of the Dane and other stories / by Anna Hanson Dorsey.

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. it has a vivid interest and fascinating reality that will hold the reader to th
3. Irish story of the first-class, teaching morals captivating way. and Cloth, $1.5
4. first-class, teaching morals captivating way. and Cloth, $1.50. religion in a mo
5. story of convent school life, describing a little world in is replete with fun,
6. child and who cannot tell by the evening fireside some wild legend of the Danes
7. will hear wild, poetical, and thrilling words concerning the rude marauders who
8. poetical, and thrilling words concerning the rude marauders who swept up like a
9. gray ruins of the Dan- and with kindling eye, tell you of Malachy, and Congoloch
10. them away from the memory of the living, if the Danish ruins, the old mounds wh
11. decay, where the wild rose and ivy cling together, and where grotesque old trees
12. ries are told of ghastly lights flitting here and THE FATE OF THE DANE. 3 there
13. phan- tom armies that are seen defiling through the crumbling arches which ages
14. are seen defiling through the crumbling arches which ages ago echoed with the d
15. n's choice between them. ; In the spring of 18 — a stranger, evidently a forei
16. n. The sky looked stormy and threatening. Red gleams of sunlight shot out betwee
17. n with a heavy, tumultuous sound, making a froth and din which sent the sea-bird
18. nd din which sent the sea-birds whirling and shrieking like mad around the cliff
19. ent the sea-birds whirling and shrieking like mad around the cliffs. Off seaward
20. ad on the sea, and up at the threatening sky. " I think I shall go, Owen," he sa
21. honor won't be there'll afther crossing to Inniscathy in such brieideagli as th
22. h weather, eh said the stranger, looking with an artist's eye at boatman, as he
23. arse black hair from his face, revealing an ample breadth of forehead, and a bol
24. misthe figure of the brawny chief-loving eye. " It's your honor that 'ud have ra
25. not thankful to anybody alive for being onaisy concerning me — it breeds ill
26. nybody alive for being onaisy concerning me — it breeds ill luck as I've much
27. been a safe I and fearless guide during my journey, and shall not fear to trust
28. Hould, sir," exclaimed the man, starting back with a terrified countenance, whil
29. see the I dare not go. " smoke " sailing up from the Druid's Tower?" a Pundit, a
30. the Druid's Tower?" a Pundit, according to Well, Owny, my un- derstanding of th
31. ording to Well, Owny, my un- derstanding of the word, is not the devil," laughed
32. he stranger, and unfastened her tackling. "Now, Owen," said the traveller, after
33. ranger to such exercise, "we are getting along finely and I wish to hear more of
34. s worth a man's life to do it, and being detected by the spies that was set on t
35. le that he got crazy. Some say one thing, some another, but it's not considered
36. on the sea." " His spells are beginning to work now," re; ; — plied the stran
37. enthusiastic mood companion, but bending to his oar, with his gaze fixed either
38. fixed either on the white smoke drifting away from the Druid's Tower, or the hug
39. or the huge billows which were tumbling and thundering landward, * Poor childre
40. llows which were tumbling and thundering landward, * Poor children. THE FATE OF
41. OF THE DANE. 7 he seemed to be counting odd chances and praying alternately. Af
42. d to be counting odd chances and praying alternately. After a wild, whirling dan
43. ying alternately. After a wild, whirling dance over the billows, their short but
44. e northeast, and sent the huge, frothing billows defiantOwen, with ly up beyond
45. gged shore frail cockle-shell of a thing would soon have been dashed to pieces o
46. ay. now, yer honor. It's neck or nothing stay or drown, with that divil of a Pun
47. e beside a nice fire, and I am shivering with cold and wet to the skin," said th
48. you, Owen," " ; the gentleman, grasping his hand, faithful friend you're a true
49. ce. said Nay, I insist on your remaining." go," watching the stranger as he boun
50. insist on your remaining." go," watching the stranger as he bounded over the bro
51. form was lost in the darkness not going to outwit me in that fashion, bedad. I
52. the fore, I'll be there, without wasting ball and powder, in time to lind a hand
53. , rank grass among the ruins, and saying a Pater or Ave at every step, found his
54. uide. and generous fellow in sacrificing his supersti- TPIE FATE OF THE DANE. Q
55. til ; the rain, shelter. now All falling heavily, drove him in for was dark and
56. ter excessive fatigue and a cold wetting. * C^Te*cr9i<*fc*n-- tower?/ ; io the d
57. supposed there must be a pathway leading to the Ruined Tower, but he concluded n
58. of daylight he had left his in searching for it, but to make a bold dash across
59. s, which only had the effect of spurring him on to greater exertions. And when a
60. d when at last he found himself standing alone under the low-vaulted stone arch
61. wer, with the shadows of night gathering thick over the scene, and not a living
62. g thick over the scene, and not a living being in sight, he jumped to the conclu
63. k over the scene, and not a living being in sight, he jumped to the conclusion t
64. been guilty of a decidedly foolish thing in venturing so far into the power of h
65. f a decidedly foolish thing in venturing so far into the power of he knew not wh
66. antiquarian investigations until morning but Mr. Wilmot possessed one of those f
67. m, calm natures, which, instead of being deterred by difficulties, are only inci
68. uld and tell them that so far from being an Excise man, or one of the Coastguard
69. bbonmen, you find really one who, having made over " Bethis soul to the devil, p
70. are the steps narrow, rugged and winding up whew what a tug, and how close and o
71. ! is there no end to this Thus muttering and stumbling, and, we must admit, swea
72. end to this Thus muttering and stumbling, and, we must admit, swearing a little,
73. stumbling, and, we must admit, swearing a little, Mr. Wilmot flight?" scaled th
74. usted, he saw a gleam of light " shining above him. Eureka ! " he exclaimed, cli
75. y and on the gloomy stairway, presenting a fine opportunity for Mr. Wilmot to ma
76. enchantment, gleam stole out ; revealing a ruinous-looking, stone-roofed aparta
77. stole out ; revealing a ruinous-looking, stone-roofed aparta ment, on the heart
78. o foot. He any kind, unless the kindling of his small, gray eyes, set far back i
79. a quiet way, and with a weak, quavering voice he showed no emotion of ; 3 THE F
80. come in good time. I have been expecting thee." " I noticed your signal," said M
81. ur signal," said Mr. Wilmot, not knowing what else to say. " Yes it has been lit
82. ar for a century past. have been waiting patiently for thee. Hitherto no one has
83. that he was confronted by the Wandering Jew " but I hope I am not too late." Th
84. ight say, he would at least sign nothing for he was addicted to some old superst
85. ten old now very old. centuries passing through the transmigrations plied Mr. ;
86. passed through every grade of huAs king I ruled the fair Province of * Metempsy
87. r, THE DRUID'S TOWER; but not OR, having administered impartial was condemned to
88. came mad yes, stranger of Fate, a raving — ! — madman — then a — a begga
89. fortunate old ; 1 man was mad and having once heard that it is way to address in
90. Pundit ?" " Thus," he replied, thrusting his hand in his bosom under the thick f
91. right, as the Pundit He jerked something* dark from his bosom. thought it might
92. rchment. " Ahem," said the Yankee taking his finger off of the trigger of his re
93. ealed it about my person, and journeying at midnight came to Inniscathy, and con
94. rial lookout," of a bat. directed. ; ing more searching for the silver cord, he
95. of a bat. directed. ; ing more searching for the silver cord, he thought he hear
96. cord, he thought he heard a low, mocking laugh, then the trailing of garments, a
97. a low, mocking laugh, then the trailing of garments, and the closing of a door
98. he trailing of garments, and the closing of a door he came ; rough stone project
99. ugh stone projections allowed him, being obliged to descend backward; and leapin
100. obliged to descend backward; and leaping from the last one, he glanced around an
101. l, while he was perched overhead looking for the silver cord? He could not tell.
102. into the belief that he had been holding converse with a creature of supernatura
103. him to the opinion that it was anything heavenly. Just then he heard a terrific
104. ous stairway, like an earthquake walking upstairs. This was followed by the soun
105. lowed by the sound of footsteps plunging upward, and in another moment Owen the
106. E. 1 dashed wildly into the room staring around him like a " wounded in owl. is
107. t all, yer honor? I'd like to be knowing myself," he replied, running his finger
108. be knowing myself," he replied, running his fingers through his hair in a distr
109. ad been kilt outright by that murthering villain of a ; ! " Pundit." "How? Have
110. see, left me beyant there at the fishing-house, didn't know what you might be ru
111. as standin' as quite as a lamb,* keeping guard below, when all at wonst there ca
112. at wonst there came a blaze and a spring down, and over I ; wint like a cricket
113. re came a on all, it, flash of lightning, and I seen him fly off wid a I all, wi
114. 't like the an' company was at at hoping I * Sound asleep. 18 THE DRUID'S TOWER;
115. en the wallet, and let us have something to cheer us in the shape of food and dr
116. een reduced by the unfortunate wrestling-match, between the Pundit and Owen, to
117. to the ridiculous look' ; ! ; ; ; ! ing feast, nor did the flask lie idle long
118. the flask lie idle long before fatiguing them. It inspired Owen, after his ventu
119. s venture, with a most luxurious feeling of repose. His voice gradually grew fai
120. nge events of the night, and not knowing how soon the insane old man might retur
121. ; OR, CHAPTER With his III. head leaning forward on his arm which rested on the
122. vious of all mundane things was sleeping soundMr. Wilmot trimmed the lamp replen
123. d ly. the fire, and examined the priming of his pistols, which he laid on the ta
124. the table before him. There was^ nothing else left for him to do, but wait patie
125. le he listened to the deep-toned snoring of Owen, and the wailing of the tempest
126. p-toned snoring of Owen, and the wailing of the tempest. A feeling of sadness an
127. nd the wailing of the tempest. A feeling of sadness and loneliness an oppression
128. ere the precursors of sleep. Not feeling sufficient confidence, however, in the
129. fluences, he roused himself, and drawing the Pundit's roll of parchment towards
130. ice, now," he said, slowly Ha! unrolling the last one •" this, or nothing. goo
131. lling the last one •" this, or nothing. good Latin The Fate of the Fairly writ
132. is called. This will do finely " saying which, he settled himself in a more com
133. ; — — struggle of a people battling for their sacred of their nationality,
134. but hopeless struggle from the beginning. In vain the best blood of Iran was pou
135. was billetted a Danish soldier. Nothing that the citizen or farmer possessed co
136. mities, after who were narrowly escaping the sword, quitted the country for Gaul
137. ducation proper for their state. Reading and every kind of Literary instruction
138. ers away from their proand love, leaving madness and broken tection hearts aroun
139. rent apathy a terrific storm was brewing, which was only heard in low, ground-sw
140. r wrath spread far and wide, smouldering and gathering strength, until a propiti
141. far and wide, smouldering and gathering strength, until a propitious hour dawne
142. f Tur- who, under pretence of consulting him, * Historic. 24 THE DRUID S TOWER ;
143. E DRUID S TOWER ; OR, in and associating him with himself the govern- ment of th
144. nclosed both. habita- One state, evening, Turgesius, weary of affairs of and dis
145. acious captains, and rumors of a growing discontent amongst his soldiery, sudden
146. and determined to visit the captive king, and indemnify himself for the mortific
147. the mortifications of the day, by gazing on his dejected and sorrowful face. The
148. is dejected and sorrowful face. The king was ber, a large sitting alone in his f
149. face. The king was ber, a large sitting alone in his favorite chamin irregular
150. windows and the view of the surrounding country distant sea was unobstructed. A
151. crimson and golden beams of the setting sun shot in a rich sheaf of radiance th
152. ase- ment it into that silent room, King Malachy roused himself from his dejecte
153. graceful forms of the red deer, bounding from the hill-sides tow- and gazed out.
154. ted his attention. Over lumi- the waning day shed an indescribable glory, softly
155. words that the phantom wailed out. King Malbut a haunting shade stalked — —
156. antom wailed out. King Malbut a haunting shade stalked — — ! achy would have
157. faster fell the bitter drops, and bowing his head on his breast, he wept like a
158. ilers would have mockecl, O captive king, and which would have been despised as
159. teps with an uncertain air but observing no one, was turning — ! ! ; 26 THE DR
160. in air but observing no one, was turning — ! ! ; 26 THE DRUID'S TOWER to leave
161. that mighty sorrow awed her; and folding her hands, she She approached noiseless
162. hed noiselessly, — awaited the passing away of the storm, that seemed to be re
163. of the storm, that seemed to be rending the heart of J:he king. A pale green tu
164. med to be rending the heart of J:he king. A pale green tunic of silk, over which
165. k, over which was thrown a loose flowing robe of the same color, bordered with p
166. ht as the mountain rill when the morning sunlight gleams on it, and was all gath
167. hat the woes of his people were crushing him while his own impotence to aid them
168. a victim and country." my peace-offering for my Was it the brightness of the fad
169. r my Was it the brightness of the fading sunlight on that beaute- ous and uplift
170. Then she crept silently towards the king, and winding her arms around him, reste
171. t silently towards the king, and winding her arms around him, rested her cheek a
172. u had'st never been born," said the king, caressing her beautiful face, and tend
173. ver been born," said the king, caressing her beautiful face, and tenderly kissin
174. her beautiful face, and tenderly kissing her broad white forehead. " My And ; fa
175. has been discovered," exclaimed the king, while a thousand fears took possession
176. ossession of his mind. " The Danish king, Turgesius comes " cried a herald, thro
177. rgesius comes " cried a herald, throwing open the door. In another moment, ere L
178. igure. His eyes were blue and glittering, his forehead was well moulded, but def
179. tened half-defiant, She to looked spring steps ; like a frightened at the young
180. d mockery, then bowed carelessly to King Malachy, and threw himself half reclini
181. alachy, and threw himself half reclining, on the cushions of a divan, which occu
182. upied the centre of the room. " So, King Malachy's solitude is cheered by the Tr
183. , the princess Leatha," replied the king with dignity. " " Thy daughter ! So ! T
184. er ! I am it glad thou hast so a curling gether, fair a comforter. How fares oth
185. to- my lord. Leatha, retire " said King Mal- achy. THE FATE OF THE DANE. " It i
186. , I knew not, on my honor, that anything so lovely, had e'er birth in this bleak
187. ws of this fortress," he replied, gazing rudely on Leatha. " Pardon me, sir, my
188. , my fealty is due to my father and king. I will no longer interrupt the intervi
189. ty, while her eyes involuntarily meaning of all she dared not say. Turgesius wou
190. her. He grasped at her hand, but folding them together over her bosom, she glide
191. t been like a miser with thy jewel, King Malachy. u By my sword, my eyes never r
192. Forum, to save her honor," said the king, lifting his gray head proudly up. " He
193. save her honor," said the king, lifting his gray head proudly up. " Henceforth
194. shot from his half closed eyes. The King was this silent. He well misery that th
195. this instance" thought the troubled king, " I must not be precipitate — — mu
196. his fair bird lodged ? evil will seeming trust postpone the in his intentions. I
197. . She is well lodged, and has everything befit- ting her state — except Freedo
198. l lodged, and has everything befit- ting her state — except Freedom " ! replie
199. — except Freedom " ! replied the king bitterly. " The fortunes of war are ine
200. 1 THE FATE OF THE DANE. 3 muttered King Malachy in a low tone. " It is true," h
201. hieftain went out, and when his receding footsteps sent back no echo, an oak pan
202. he wall slid noiselessly aside revealing an arched aperture which stood a man, i
203. nd dark brows, together with the falhing * drooping from his shoulder, and his f
204. ws, together with the falhing * drooping from his shoulder, and his folded arms,
205. e eyes glowed brighter and more flashing, and a crimson spot burned like coals o
206. osture. the slight rustle of his falhing startled the king, who, turning quickly
207. rustle of his falhing startled the king, who, turning quickly, uttered an expre
208. falhing startled the king, who, turning quickly, uttered an expresin — * Cloa
209. and cherished emotions. The captive king was his benefactor, A pirate's vessel h
210. st of his territory, and the only living creature that was found on the wreck wa
211. name was Ingomar, but could tell nothing more. Cherished and educated by the kin
212. more. Cherished and educated by the king, he enjoyed all the privilege of the co
213. ood, distantly and silently never hoping to win, yet still loving her in his lon
214. ly never hoping to win, yet still loving her in his loneliThe news which he now
215. ait first time silent ? " asked the king. " I dared I not speak —what should I
216. medy for a sudden he exclaimed, plucking a small arabesque sheath from his bosom
217. the dagger is poisoned with a something so subtle and deadly, that the slightes
218. ere is a flash of strange hope vibrating through my " being what meaneth it ? "
219. trange hope vibrating through my " being what meaneth it ? " Perchance one of th
220. t pursuit after me I heard the trampling of their horses' feet over my head, and
221. her I only beg the privilege of guarding and saving her then let the Chief of In
222. beg the privilege of guarding and saving her then let the Chief of Inveray see t
223. ied Ingomar — — — — — the King. THE FATE OF THE DANE. 35 CHAPTER Daily
224. thout hope since her childhood. The king occupied by half-formed schemes for the
225. the core the heart of Malachy, the king and father, who, shorn of his dignity a
226. s of Turgesius full, until the insulting proposals added the last drop J:o its b
227. us was satisfied, and thought everything was propitious except the maid's coldne
228. are they thwart his One he first evening, having sought Leatha and found in her
229. thwart his One he first evening, having sought Leatha and found in her with her
230. e was a ness and levity. new mood ruling his mind. Leatha's heart sank the soul
231. Leatha's heart sank the soul of the king, but preserving his calm exte- within h
232. ank the soul of the king, but preserving his calm exte- within her; a throb of f
233. usly and awaited in silence the bursting of the storm which he felt was coming.
234. ng of the storm which he felt was coming. rior, THE FATE OF THE DANE. 37 " Fair
235. t Leatha he saw that it was not the king, and the word was too distinctly uttere
236. Lord Malachy?" said Turgesius, scowling darkly. " Age is cautious, my lord. My
237. on us, even for the honor of associating her with thee in thy power and riches,"
238. thy power and riches," said the old king, whose head was bowed on his breast, as
239. der away where'er thou wiliest a willing victim, but faithful to my vows and the
240. e as lofty as Methinks thou art dreaming. I cannot argue with one so filled with
241. of my virtuous daughter?" asked the king. " To-morrow I demand her!" was the inf
242. i; ; ble reply. consider," said the king, while every limb trembled, " there are
243. on thy honor, Turgesius," plead the king. " My honor shall not harm thee, old ma
244. ured," replied Turgesius with a scoffing laugh. To-morrow, be prepared." " We wi
245. implore one day's delay," said the king, who had sunk back exhausted in his sea
246. treaties, maiden, and thy : wishes, king, but on these conditions At this moment
247. earned shall blest captains, who, having achieved prodigies of valor in these wa
248. ; heap on be incomplete unless equalling I my charge thee, maidens as beautiful
249. her ladies of honor; thus, her atto King Malachy, provide fifteen tendants will
250. shall attend her. " Where is the hiding-place of thy spy," demanded the Dane of
251. e of thy spy," demanded the Dane of King Malachy. : ,, " too Thy own spy, hemmed
252. for a fierce sentinels to have a hiding-place left spy ; however, this one seem
253. friendly to thy ests," replied the king. inter- " True, true, " said Turgesius,
254. " True, true, " said Turgesius, turning toward His arm was outstretched to gath
255. as not there, she had flitted out during the panic which the strange interruptio
256. wilight. That night Ingomar and the king spent the hours in low and earnest conv
257. p was heard, and her sweet voice ringing in wild cadences through the vaulted pa
258. s through the vaulted passages. The king was neither ate restless and flushed he
259. who saw in them only signs of a willing submission to his power; yet cautious a
260. crease of military force. It was evening. In the apartments of the Danish chief
261. h hung gold -colored draperies, flashing with gems and embroidery. In groups of
262. e, the other Danish chiefs were standing or sitting in various parts of the spac
263. r Danish chiefs were standing or sitting in various parts of the spacious and lo
264. e spacious and lofty chamber, " fighting their battles o'er again," or telling o
265. ng their battles o'er again," or telling of events which had occurred in the qui
266. ts and villages they had sacked laughing vociferously, as demons might laugh, ov
267. an Egyptian, was frequently seen passing to and fro, from an near the turret —
268. wear them. But her task is and throwing open a wide-foldfinished at last ing do
269. ing open a wide-foldfinished at last ing door, a train of veiled and white-robed
270. w and stately steps advanced toward King Malachy. They were tall, The dark grace
271. flitted from one to another, whispering — some sharp, They were as ness of fi
272. t to the despair, or their fate The king started from his chair when he saw them
273. d, while he blessed " My father and king," murmured the them. dark woman, as the
274. Here the dark woman paused, and leading one of the veiled maidens to Turgesius,
275. the chaste daughter of our captive king, and mayest thou rue the day thou first
276. e a little spite, mother it their coming. : ; THE FATE OF THE DANE. 45 must be h
277. h from my eyes," said Turgesius, drawing aside the long fair face veil. But the
278. blushes, the long, bright curls, shining like gold over her cheeks and brow, hal
279. sius passed his arm around the shrinking form, and telling his companions to sel
280. m around the shrinking form, and telling his companions to select each a maiden
281. maiden without the ceremony of unveiling, to prevent jealously and rivalry, led
282. table was loaded. As they were preparing to seat them- was heard, a confusion an
283. he death-throe on their white, shivering lips.* And Leatha the young maidens whe
284. ; signal OR, The his was given, and King Malachy, with guards and soldiers, who
285. e of the Dane, sword in hand, and giving no quarter, Danish officers and soldier
286. s swift as light over the land, reviving the droop- ing hearts of the oppressed,
287. t over the land, reviving the droop- ing hearts of the oppressed, and inspiring
288. g hearts of the oppressed, and inspiring with strength dom. and every who had al
289. nny of the oppressor. The Danes, knowing that their chief was in irons, and many
290. tile ships along her coasts the swarming vessels of light ; draught that the sio
291. ens and caves where they had been hiding, and many who had fled to France return
292. rs to forcare eign sovereigns announcing the happy change in To Charles the Bold
293. Court of France, which he purposed doing." There was one joyous interruption to
294. rruption to all these grave and pressing affairs of State the nuptials of the pr
295. in the bondage of It was a brave wedding none so the Dane. splendid was ever rec
296. ed two years. Ingomar was there watching and waiting, his swarthy face pallid an
297. . Ingomar was there watching and waiting, his swarthy face pallid and the fierce
298. lid and the fierce light of his piercing eyes dimmed as by a mortal wound in som
299. appiness and calm her emotions by gazing from the deep embrasure of a window out
300. tole noiseless, approached, and kneeling before her raised the hem of her bridal
301. e Then came a terrible retribution. King Mal- achy proclaimed a triumphal proces
302. with heavy chains, whose harsh clanking heralded his approach, Turgesius, surro
303. HE DRUID'S TOWER; OR, and stood scowling at his judge while he upbraided him for
304. committed against an reign, unoffending people, the and violence of his which h
305. n " Lough Neagh, said Mr. Wilmot closing the manuscript, the same " Lough where
306. n strays the clear, cold eve's declining, When And sees the round towers of othe
307. her days In the wave beneath him shining." Moore. * Historic. THE FATE OF THE DA
308. might be. To his joy the sun was rising clear and the last angry vestiges of th
309. ngry vestiges of the storm were drifting away seaward. " I wouldn't have missed
310. , which will prove that I am not drawing on my imagination when I relate it," sa
311. en I relate it," said Mr. Wilmot, gazing down on the crisp, foaming waves, gilde
312. ilmot, gazing down on the crisp, foaming waves, gilded and crimsoned with the gl
313. crimsoned with the glory of the morning, as they rolled landward with a low, "
314. asleep, and it required a shake to bring him to his feet but not yet awake, he l
315. ildered gaze fully around him, wondering how he got there. " Come, rouse up, my
316. inland as quickly as possible? I'm going to Lough Neagh." Then Owen remembered*
317. Neagh." Then Owen remembered* everything, and his ly together, ; 52 first THE DR
318. say " ? it was Lough Neagh you are going to " Is very far from the place we're b
319. o eyes never looked forenent " I'm going to look for the city that seen under th
320. the chained skeleton of the Danish king by looking hard " ? "It might be, ,your
321. d skeleton of the Danish king by looking hard " ? "It might be, ,your divils ; h
322. ere's many ghosts of them Danes haunting the not safe to go anigh mounds and cai
323. ightfall, for 'em," said Owen, spreading the best breakfast he could, out of the
324. rom their midnight meal, which, whetting without satisfying their hunger. But th
325. meal, which, whetting without satisfying their hunger. But there was no help for
326. was no help for it, and Owny, pretending that his late supper had taken away his
327. ered Mr. Wilmot's traps together, making merry at the same time over their late
328. followed by his trusty squire, carrying knapsack and gun, to examine them. Mr.
329. he history of the land he was sojourning in he did not know — until then that
330. proud heart was broken, but not bending, under his fallen fortunes, and a rich
331. himself with roast beef and plum pudding, and while he quaffs ale and sings snat
332. untary penance on such a bright, bracing " meat day as this, and tomorrow Friday
333. e was booked for a seat in a stage going north, and had already sent on a fastin
334. north, and had already sent on a fasting during portion of his baggage. then was
335. and had already sent on a fasting during portion of his baggage. then was their
336. dismay when they arrived at the landing-place to find the boat gone ! " It has
337. ' thief that had no other way of getting to the mainland an' I'll tell your hono
338. tell your honor what," said Owen, taking off his hat and scratching his head, "
339. Owen, taking off his hat and scratching his head, " it's no use denying it, tha
340. ratching his head, " it's no use denying it, that devil of a Pundit's ; ; at the
341. it." "Of the boat, Owny?" said laughing at his comical looks, in mirth were pre
342. t, which rage and "No, I sir, of staling off the boat, if it had gone to with hi
343. gone to with him. But there's no getting off, sir, until some stray fisherman co
344. s far as that at any rate prefer waiting good chance to get off, rather than ris
345. t. " Bedad, sir, but what is that coming over toward us?' exclaimed Owen, after
346. claimed Owen, after a long pause, during which he had been gazing homeward " it'
347. g pause, during which he had been gazing homeward " it's a boat an' by this an*
348. d come to search for his body, believing firmly that he had been murdered by som
349. look there, sir," said the man pointing toward the coast. They turned, and saw
350. , and saw some fifteen or twenty fishing-boats coming toward them the oars pulle
351. e fifteen or twenty fishing-boats coming toward them the oars pulled by strong a
352. an. was all, a joyous and noisy greeting between them when they found the strang
353. ike a triumphal procession than anything else. Mr. rewarded them handsomely, eng
354. n but plentiful dinner, and was standing at the door of Owen's cottage when the
355. wen on the top, and Mr. Wilmot springing in, the horses started, and the lumberi
356. n, the horses started, and the lumbering coach dashed through the poor village w
357. s generosity had left a warm and lasting impression. Owen came to the United Sta
358. a few years he had succeeded in removing all his family thither, and if our read
359. rs in New York. Their children are being educated at the best schools and the tw
360. the two brothers are not only providing ease and luxury for their old age and f
361. is her own children that too often bring the scorn of the stranger on her, faith
362. her, faith of her saints, by forgetting the and being ashamed of the ould mothe
363. her saints, by forgetting the and being ashamed of the ould mother earth that t
364. ion may then hold up our heads rejoicing in her glory." THE STORY OF A BRAVE GIR
365. ILD. GOLDEN sunlight, beautiful flitting foliage glittering shadows of clouds ad
366. t, beautiful flitting foliage glittering shadows of clouds adown the distant slo
367. no less ruinous results of the tramping armies of Napoleon the First, along the
368. pon the air this peaceful Sunday morning, and groups of peasant women and their
369. e, might be seen in the distance wending their way to the early Masses, but the
370. iday aspect of happier times was wanting; and, had one been near enough, a dull
371. E GIRL. suggested, not only by observing their absence, but by the desolate aspe
372. ade of the great Emperor. Wide-branching trees hid the desolate-looking, half-ru
373. branching trees hid the desolate-looking, half-ruined antry, homes of the peas-
374. easy on their thrones. on Sunday morning, June 10, 1804, and while the village c
375. tance from the highway, and the warbling of innumerable birds from every leafy c
376. ad cause to tremble, for the whole thing had been ferreted out by the secret pol
377. he secret police, and arrests were being made right and left, which involved the
378. ith a loud clatter of hoofs and clanging of sabres, " some poor fellows that The
379. he school-master of the village nestling back there among the trees, and knew a
380. there among the trees, and knew a thing or two. The sans-culottes had given one
381. ; anguish waited sorrow for the turning of that mill which measures out God's j
382. h measures out God's justice, " grinding slowly but exceeding small." in dumb On
383. justice, " grinding slowly but exceeding small." in dumb On riage, rolled the cu
384. ourse towards a massive, gloomy building that was situated on a high elevation a
385. their THE PRISONER AND HER CHILD. being high-born, or, 5 as the sans-culottes c
386. companied the prisoners all never losing sight of them officer — the way from
387. nded a paper to the on duty, who, having examined it closely, gave orders for th
388. they swung to again with harsh, grating sounds resembling hoarse groans The pri
389. in with harsh, grating sounds resembling hoarse groans The prison court was crow
390. ; and similar purposes. He was wondering who the men might be who were brought h
391. ution came. But while he was speculating thus the command ? 6 THE STORY OF A BRA
392. oung girl, descended and stood trembling on the rough stones of the court. Their
393. ough stones of the court. Their clothing was rich but covered with dust, and it
394. er scum from the gutters of Paris during the " Reign of Terror. Come, must see t
395. 7 you over to our hospital con- obeying a whisper of her companion, lifted her
396. her pale, terrified face from its hiding-place, and shunning as swiftly as possi
397. face from its hiding-place, and shunning as swiftly as possible the rude gaze of
398. e the rude gaze of the repulsive-looking men around them, cast a glance upward a
399. sed the prison — at the black frowning building whose windows were all barred
400. rison — at the black frowning building whose windows were all barred with heav
401. h me, madame," said the jailer, touching her on the shoulder. Without a word the
402. ogether, jailer stopped them, and giving the young girl a slight push backward,
403. er and ! child," she exclaimed, bursting into a passion of tears. have no kinshi
404. m my mamma " cried the young girl, cling! ; ; ! " Impossible What nonsense We in
405. ; ; ! " Impossible What nonsense We ing to her mother. grasped the round white
406. nd I have enough to do without troubling myself with what don't concern me. You
407. n't ask my opinion " about assassinating the Emperor, did you ? " My mother is i
408. d that your father is guilty ; shivering agitated them to such a degree that the
409. hought the horrible news must be killing them. Come," said the jailer, a little
410. ith it, Chorion. My breakfast is waiting, and there's been nonsense enough," sai
411. ward to enforce the order. Marie, seeing the soldiers closing around them, clung
412. rder. Marie, seeing the soldiers closing around them, clung to her mother's brea
413. led her neck, and with a long, lingering look at of Christ's Blessed " THE PRISO
414. tear that wet his bronzed cheek, obeying a signal from his officer, said " This
415. come, come, let us end it," and seizing the slight form of the young girl in hi
416. in his brawny arms, tore her struggling and screaming ; from her mother's embra
417. arms, tore her struggling and screaming ; from her mother's embrace. " Mamma !
418. ess and opened her eyes, the first thing she thought of and looked for was her m
419. membered all that had passed, and rising from the stone bench on which the genda
420. rushed to the prison gate, and clinging to the heavy iron bars that guarded it,
421. s that guarded it, she made the air ring with her cries: " Mamma mamma Oh, give
422. I'm not afraid of them. I'm only calling my mother whom they have got shut ; ! !
423. licate hands were lacerated and bleeding from her efforts to shake the bars of t
424. these few words calmed Marie and turning quickly she saw a young girl about her
425. a young girl about her own age standing near her, who had on a coarse, brown se
426. own eyes from which tears were streaming one after another. " Are you, too, in t
427. you," answered the girl, with quivering lips. " Ah, you do not know how much I
428. I am to be pitied," said Marie, turning away from the prison gates and going to
429. ing away from the prison gates and going towards the friendly stranger. " Those
430. r. But that is not all there's something more horrible still that makes me almos
431. re- the very utterance of this crowning sorrow in distracted vived her anguish,
432. parents for whom her heart was breaking. The kind young stranger was so shocked
433. d can see them whenever you them morning and evening. you must be " ! embrace Oh
434. em whenever you them morning and evening. you must be " ! embrace Oh, how happy
435. Then he must ; see my mamma every bring I day ; he can speak to her he can tell
436. ner/ Susette hastened to explain, seeing Marie's frightened look. "And my mother
437. at she fort of food. she asked, dreading would be denied even the com! " Oh, do
438. ill offer my Aves for her this " evening/' whispered the kind Susette. But you h
439. kind Susette. But you have eaten nothing all day you look very pale and weak let
440. very pale and weak let me run and bring you some soup." " I am not hungry. Oh,
441. f soup/' " Eat " answered Marie, weeping passionately, " when my dear mamma is i
442. adful grief in my heart, even if I thing it is — There was a confused ringing
443. g it is — There was a confused ringing of horses' hoofs on the stone pavement
444. s on the stone pavement and the clanking of sain a few seconds the mounted guard
445. before, and the two girls ceased talking. The password and countersign were whis
446. ay, ; ; AN ANGEL WHISPER. and everything fell 1 into its usual leaden quiet, a f
447. e daily young lieutenant who was waiting Justice, report to take to the Bureau o
448. Minister of came out, and after hailing his comrade asked him what was the late
449. ris. One or two other officers belonging to the garrison at Bicetre, who were wa
450. he garrison at Bicetre, who were waiting orders to va- rious points in the city,
451. rious points in the city, after saluting each other now sauntered up, and and pa
452. other now sauntered up, and and passing some rough in Paris. camp if jokes whic
453. augh, they also asked there was anything " new going on is. Of course there all
454. lso asked there was anything " new going on is. Of course there all Something wo
455. ing on is. Of course there all Something wonderful has happened, and " " Paris t
456. happened, and " " Paris talks of nothing else." then?" This is the first chance
457. ou have given me/' he retorted, lighting his cigar in the most leiscan't Why you
458. s; in another minute we may be galloping to the four quarters of the world and m
459. " Jest yes. has happened jest in calling it news, when what is a miracle, " answ
460. cer, irritated "What " by their chaffing. has happened?" " Out ill-natured." wit
461. it," Come, don't be "We are perish- ing to hear the news." be that the Seine is
462. s on fire," they all clamored, gathering around him, as he stood leaning against
463. athering around him, as he stood leaning against a sentry- " It can't box calmly
464. a sentry- " It can't box calmly smoking. 2 8 1 THE STORY OF A BRAVE " If GIRL.
465. iet one minute I will tell you something that will surprise you for my own relie
466. lief, for I'm so full of it it's choking me. The Emperor has pardoned Polignac.
467. ou may well call " said they, forgetting everything in their eagerness to hear t
468. call " said they, forgetting everything in their eagerness to hear the particul
469. o hear the particulars of so start- ling an event. romance and miracle together,
470. her, and as I happened to see everything with my own eyes and hear everything wi
471. ing with my own eyes and hear everything with my own ears, you may take what I t
472. salt," said Lieutenant Prevost, seating himself on the stone bench near which M
473. ar which Marie and Susette were standing, while his comrades grouped themselves
474. ey could not get away without attracting attention, they unwillingly remained. U
475. portance of one who has someat St. thing of startling interest to impart, " that
476. ne who has someat St. thing of startling interest to impart, " that yes- terday
477. terday I was on guard Cloud ; and having AN ANGEL WHISPER. nothing to amuse I I9
478. d ; and having AN ANGEL WHISPER. nothing to amuse I I9 me in the little green pa
479. elf, the lattice-work to see if anything was passing I had smoked that would div
480. tice-work to see if anything was passing I had smoked that would divert my ennuL
481. pt on the Emperor's life, the same thing over and over again, as if every soul i
482. omrades, serves in the place of breaking somebody else's head sometimes, and the
483. I saw was- the Princess Louis * flitting about her mother's flower-garden wateri
484. bout her mother's flower-garden watering the plants. It was a sight worth seeing
485. the plants. It was a sight worth seeing she looked so beautiful in her white mu
486. d after I ; ; had gone into my ; falling in loose curls over her shoulders. Whil
487. over her shoulders. While I was watching her, thinking what a happy Prince man L
488. ders. While I was watching her, thinking what a happy Prince man Louis ought to
489. om a bunch of carnations she was bending over, and there stood the Emperor, who
490. e Emperor, who had entered without being announced, ; as usual. * Hortense, the
491. OF A BRAVE GIRL. What You are you doing sire,' here, Hortense ? * he inquired,
492. d sent a bloom, as she held the watering-pot, yet half full of water, towards hi
493. ater, towards him. " What are they doing in your mother's apartments ? the Emper
494. quick ! ' way. " ' They her are weeping there/ said Madame Louis, " i own beaut
495. e Louis, " i own beautiful eyes brimming over with tears. They are weeping ' ! r
496. imming over with tears. They are weeping ' ! repeated the Emperor ; without wait
497. ! repeated the Emperor ; without waiting to enquire the cause of what seemed to
498. was as curious as the Emperor, and being a member of the Empress' household whil
499. e on duty at St. Cloud, my duties giving me admittance to all parts of the palac
500. the palace, I was not slow in following him there, where, mixing with other peo
501. ow in following him there, where, mixing with other people who were passing up a
502. ixing with other people who were passing up and down, in and out, I arrived at t
503. the Emperor had entered, He was standing leaving it open behind him. near the ce
504. ror had entered, He was standing leaving it open behind him. near the centre of
505. tre of the room and a woman was kneeling at his feet, weeping bitterly and makin
506. woman was kneeling at his feet, weeping bitterly and making I " a vain effort t
507. at his feet, weeping bitterly and making I " a vain effort to articulate her gri
508. griefs. It wa^ Madame Polignac pleading for her husband, for who com- was sente
509. is famous, for he stood, — — looking down on the sorrowful face lifted to hi
510. rrowful face lifted to his and streaming with tears, just where she had thrown h
511. hile the other ladies present, including the Empress, leaned forward, their hand
512. in mute appeal, and their tears pleading for mercy towards the unfortunate woman
513. ord or two that I caught, she was trying to convince the Emperor that her husban
514. or that her husband, so far from knowing of anything connected with this conspir
515. husband, so far from knowing of anything connected with this conspiracy against
516. tunate woman's appeal, and the imploring faces around him that were in relaxatio
517. t last said the As your Emperor, raising her from his feet. husband did not wish
518. ssed, they had gone away, but everything she had heard seemed to be yet ringing
519. g she had heard seemed to be yet ringing in her ears. There were deep thoughts r
520. ears. There were deep thoughts revolving in her young heart, which formed themse
521. . " Susette," she said, suddenly rousing herself, " a little while ago you offer
522. said little you have some now if I bring it ? Susette, who had been wondering an
523. ing it ? Susette, who had been wondering and felt a will " frightened at her str
524. please." "And some meat, too. will bring you AN ANGEL WHISPER. 23 my dinner," sh
525. ho kept guard within, and Susette having disappeared, returned in a few minutes
526. eared, returned in a few minutes holding in one hand a bowl of smoking soup, and
527. es holding in one hand a bowl of smoking soup, and in the other a plate of bread
528. but ate the soup and drank the wine ing a thick slice of then tak- she wrapped
529. nif fortunate girl/' said Marie, feeling to see the valuable ornaments she gener
530. said Susette, her honest face crimsoning, " to give food to the hungry is not a
531. o give food to the hungry is not a thing that seeks reward." " "You are right,"
532. Marie, who had found a chased gold ring upon her finger, which " It is not she
533. r see any one in distress without trying, as you have done, to console them and
534. bless you, mon amie. Now take this ring to remember me by, and wear ; a few day
535. t the two girls were interrupted calling " Susette ! by a loud harsh voice ble,
536. that of ,! the con- cierge. "I am coming, who, " still father answered Susette,
537. still father answered Susette, refusing the ring, arose to go. Marie in tones s
538. ther answered Susette, refusing the ring, arose to go. Marie in tones so sad tha
539. t, not refuse it," said You might saying " I ; do not refuse it because it." I w
540. en as they were it was a different thing from this/' Again the voice of the conc
541. Again the voice of the concierge calling " Susette " was heard, this time more l
542. N ANGEL WHISPER. 25 tened away, throwing a kiss towards Marie as she disappeared
543. in the door of the Bicetre. The closing of the heavy door and the lock as the h
544. vy door and the lock as the huge grating of the key turned in its rusty wards sm
545. rt, and she sank down pale and trembling on the stone bench. Until this moment ;
546. kind- hearted Susette and her caressing voice kept up her courage but now that
547. stranger in a strange place, she losing her senses. felt as if she were But the
548. at there was no time to lose in carrying her plan into execution reanimated her
549. e the tenderest care and the most loving watchfulness had ever surrounded her, a
550. ss had ever surrounded her, anticipating every want since her earliest recollect
551. nd in her elegant home there was nothing left to be wished for. But now what a c
552. rds St. Cloud, I will tell you something about it as it was in ancient times, an
553. odoald, a grandson of Clovis, who having escaped when his St. is Cloud, which bu
554. in Duke of Orleans, who spared improving and adorning it. Lepaute, Gerard, and M
555. leans, who spared improving and adorning it. Lepaute, Gerard, and Mansard superi
556. ted for his skill in landscape gardening, was commissioned to lay out the park,
557. ently visited it accompanied by the king. It was Napoleon's favorite residence,
558. Napoleon's favorite residence, it being the scene of his first elevation. It wa
559. ures of the splendid salons, interesting from and that are most remarkable and i
560. the eldest son of Louis Bonaparte, king of Holland, and his wife Hortense, the
561. ile Josephine's noble heart was breaking at Malmaison. The lofty ceiling, decora
562. breaking at Malmaison. The lofty ceiling, decorated by Mignard in his best style
563. gns, while the profusion of rich gilding everywhere gives one an idea of the spl
564. and curious cabinets of tortoisepainting. shell and buhl, some unrivalled specim
565. elegant things, complete its furnishing. Spacious salons, and galeries en suite
566. the " petiis ap- partements of the king," which at the time my story opens were
567. ere richly furnished ace, only keep- ing with the magnificence of the rest of th
568. ine sculptures and paintings delineating sacred subjects, offered facilities for
569. in the twilight and in the early morning, when only the priest was at the altar
570. and drove her to seek help from the King of kings, for there used to come a shad
571. e by a fosse lined with masonry. Nothing could surpass the beautiful and diversi
572. On one of the finest and most commanding localities of the Pare Napoleon had cau
573. took great of Paris, ; delight in going there sometimes with his friends to enj
574. commanded the Seine, and the surrounding country there occasionally with an astr
575. escription goes, for the sun is dropping low in the west, trailing his golden ga
576. un is dropping low in the west, trailing his golden garments along the velvety s
577. rments along the velvety swards, leaving long shadows where he has passed, and t
578. hadows where he has passed, and touching every salient point with the glory of h
579. are fringed with gold, and the sparkling cascades and fountains are transmuted i
580. hly apparelled guests, are who returning to Paris in their fine equipages. Every
581. e the entrance a picked guard consisting of a number of the Emperor's own vetera
582. , the Emperor's magnanimity in pardoning Polignac had — — 34 THE STORY OF A
583. ed the Emperor and Empress. And thinking in their hearts that they had gone away
584. awed in spite of them- by the commanding manner of Napoleon, even while won by t
585. ess of Josephine. But they are all going — the handsome car- and glittering wi
586. ing — the handsome car- and glittering with diamonds, the wives and daughters
587. f the new nobility of the Empire dashing young officers, who won their spurs und
588. s, diplomats, and they were all hurrying distinguished citizens back to Paris an
589. re the guard marched up and down, hoping for the hour when they would be relieve
590. onspiracies still ! " said one, striking his flint to relight his pipe. " Bast !
591. to relight his pipe. " Bast ! they bring happiness to our Emperor, these conspir
592. piracies," replied his neighbor, puffing out great clouds of smoke. foil' answer
593. d another soldier who had been listening to the u However, comrade, two ; " the
594. ORY OF A BRAVE GIRL. what has been going on in your absence," replied Brugaud go
595. but as a good comrade should, I'm going to tell you a thing or two. Understand
596. de should, I'm going to tell you a thing or two. Understand then that Pichegru,
597. e," said an old scarred veteran, resting on his musket. " And " ! to think he pa
598. r of facilitate Riviere to their getting access to the strictly Emperor, althoug
599. with an air the day before. I of burning indignation : to wish to assassinate Th
600. sob, half Bru- gaud's words, and turning quickly the direc- from which the sound
601. arms were reddened by the sun, standing a little way off, her pale face wearpre
602. her pale face wearpretty child ?" he ing an expression of grief and sadness. "Wh
603. ne of the soldiers thought of addressing a light word to her. "You are on the ro
604. your tears, my wishes. It is a bad thing to see a young child pretty girl crying
605. to see a young child pretty girl crying,'' added the scarred soldier, looking a
606. ng,'' added the scarred soldier, looking after the stranger, who, after thanking
607. after the stranger, who, after thanking him with a look only, for her heart was
608. ds the place he had described. Following the directions of the old soldier, Mari
609. e knocked timidly. opened by an imposing-looking functionary, whose large person
610. d timidly. opened by an imposing-looking functionary, whose large person was clo
611. t. your business ?" he inquired, lifting his eyebrows in astonishment, when he s
612. ad she been older and come there looking so, he would have given her in charge o
613. " she asked, with v/ith diffi- an aching heart, restraining her tears culty. But
614. /ith diffi- an aching heart, restraining her tears culty. But without bestowing
615. g her tears culty. But without bestowing any further notice on her, the liveried
616. cial turned his back and was about going in but before closing the inner door of
617. nd was about going in but before closing the inner door of the vestibule he turn
618. r of the vestibule he turned, and seeing that she was still there he told her to
619. the court would be crowded from morning until night so you must go, and quickly
620. her courage gave way at the humiliating idea of being driven away, when she saw
621. ave way at the humiliating idea of being driven away, when she saw an usher of t
622. n she saw an usher of the palace passing by —and, made sieur ! desperate by th
623. her voice so expressive of the suffering that wrung her poor young heart touched
624. r to give " !" he said, scarcely knowing what her. ST. CLOUD. 41 So you see now/
625. Madame Louis," pleaded Marie, recalling to mind the praises she had heard accor
626. ven her so, almost those long ; clinging to his skirts, she kept as possible. ne
627. y touched the ground the almost fainting look of weariness that had pervaded her
628. as if some one had just left off playing, ; 42 MADAME LOUIS AND THE EMPRESS. 43
629. es and lovely but Marie pictures hanging against the walls her attention noticed
630. bent over a basket full of rare, glowing, fragrant flowers that had just been br
631. e kind to you even if she can do nothing." After the usher withdrew, leaving Mar
632. hing." After the usher withdrew, leaving Marie just within the door of the green
633. fe was her's alternate waves of parching heat and icy coldness swept over her wh
634. resence. Hortense still remained bending over the flowers and inhaling their per
635. ed bending over the flowers and inhaling their perfume with childish delight her
636. moments flowers, elapsed, when, finding that the Princess remained absorbed in
637. of her Marie, desperate by the fleeting of so much " precious time which might
638. d to say. At the sound of this trembling, plaintive voice lifted Hortense her be
639. Hortense her beautiful head, and turning around, was surprised beyond measure to
640. to see a young " girl in tears standing there. she gently inquired. in What do
641. d. in What do you want?" : But receiving no answer, she asked " tones " Who are
642. rie, with a convulsive sob. The charming evinced the liveliest Hortense instantl
643. or child/' said the Princess endeavoring to soften, by the kindness of her manne
644. only knew how I have suffered in trying to reach you you would pity me, and not
645. by her agitation and fatigue, and taking her hand with a friendly pressure, seat
646. this conspiracy and was accused of being mixed up in it. No, you cannot realize
647. dreadful day sole. we were just dressing for dinner mamma was curling my hair ar
648. st dressing for dinner mamma was curling my hair around her fingers when a great
649. ther ! ! ! my — ! — — ; : ' tening to a word, without giving us time to ge
650. ; : ' tening to a word, without giving us time to get our hats or gloves, they
651. , get into and drove with never stopping ! 46 until it ! THE STORY OF A BRAVE re
652. left me I thought the grief of it lying on a stone bench. all would kill me, ma
653. art felt frozen like ice, and everything was I thought at first that it must dar
654. always succorsthe unhappy but something happened that caused me, instead of pra
655. pened that caused me, instead of praying any consciousness. I ! ! ; ! ; ; longer
656. ain her tears at the simple and touching recital of the sorrows of a child so in
657. ocent and lovely as Marie, and smoothing back the disordered golden — — MADA
658. MPRESS. curls 47 soft from her throbbing temples with her : cool hand, she said
659. en you left your mother?" " This morning, 61 madame." And, doubtless, you have e
660. " And, doubtless, you have eaten nothing?*' " Yes, madame, a plate of soup that
661. ads. '' Mamma ! " said Hortense, running toward the Empress, and leading her tow
662. running toward the Empress, and leading her towards Marie, who had also risen,
663. ponsible, mamma?" said Hortense, putting her arm around the neck of the Empress
664. ck of the Empress and tenderly embracing her. " If ! you only knew how much she
665. so young! " said the Empress approaching Marie with an expression of growing int
666. hing Marie with an expression of growing interest in her lovely, regular feature
667. eflected a moment, —she then observing the anxiety that wrung the lines of Mar
668. her gentle, womanly heart busy devising plans for the relief of the young girl,
669. partments, where she arranged everything for her concealment, and not only broug
670. rrow combined, and she could take During the night nothing, although she tried.
671. she could take During the night nothing, although she tried. Hortense heard unc
672. ough she tried. Hortense heard unceasing sighs from Marie's apartment, which ope
673. nt to lie down, but while I was kneeling there the thought that the day which wo
674. y on Marie's head, and, stoop: ! * ; ing over, kissed her forehead. " Remain her
675. said, after a short pause, " I am going to my mother to find out if she has MAD
676. the aspect of a martyr when the crowning moment is at hand. ; 'W^^TS^^ ~ ku^'s
677. was extensive and spacious. The ceiling was lofty, and galerie that the painted
678. richly tinted delineations, symbolizing the virtues of Truth, Justice and Mercy
679. each side, those on the right commanding a noble view of the picturesque grounds
680. groups of officers and people belonging to the imperial 52 pardon, sire! househ
681. mply there on the qui vive for something new. — some of whom officers Two youn
682. of the windows about galerie, conversing midway the gayly about the opera of the
683. ra of the previous night, and discussing the merits of a new prima donna. They c
684. ld not agree in their opinions regarding the new singer, and their arguments beg
685. ttle personal, when a lady of commanding presence, holding the hand of a young g
686. n a lady of commanding presence, holding the hand of a young girl who accompanie
687. rly opposite to where they were standing. This incident interrupted their conver
688. ou a hundred francs that it is something about people implicated with Cadoudal a
689. Notice, De Sainville, there is something on that ! ! — — ! — — very sing
690. and I don't believe ! she sees anything around her. " Does it not strike you so
691. d is very pretty, and there is something odd, above the common, in her appearanc
692. ome dramatic little trick in waitThe ing for the Emperor when he appears! ; pard
693. on, sire! Empress is 55 always springing a mine under his " and, mafoi! doesn't
694. t, so young. But Madame Louis is looking towards us," added Lavalette, as both h
695. or of the council chamber with a burning gaze that seemed as if it peror's prese
696. peared as if all the powers of her being and mind were concentrated in her motio
697. in favor of General Lajolais the evening before, and commanded her, under pain o
698. erious displeasure, not to again, adding " It is true that Madame name the subje
699. e had made great sacrifices in complying with the Emperor's desire for her to ma
700. e sacrifices there might be such a thing as going too far with him, as he had al
701. ces there might be such a thing as going too far with him, as he had already pla
702. ontrary to his better judgment in having yielded to their entreaties for the par
703. e, and would not be cajoled into showing clemency to another one of the traitors
704. phine had told ; ; Hortense that morning when the latter left Marie to seek her
705. er left Marie to seek her mother, hoping to hear something that would give the p
706. eek her mother, hoping to hear something that would give the poor child a hope.
707. oman, " Gen. Bonaparte owes me something for marrying his brother, and he will n
708. Bonaparte owes me something for marrying his brother, and he will not, at least,
709. ! shall 57 make a grand toilette a thing or two and go with the poor child to th
710. u, good mamma " said Hortense, embracing her mother and pressing her lips upon !
711. tense, embracing her mother and pressing her lips upon ! her cheek. " It " You g
712. e some weighty that keeps Louis standing so long," whispered Lieutenant de Sainv
713. " time people had grown weary of waiting, and having time to look into the face
714. e had grown weary of waiting, and having time to look into the face of affairs a
715. d no one felt in the least like speaking the low buzz of conversation died away,
716. ous bosom. Finally, struck ; the folding doors of the council chamber were throw
717. quickly, for the Emperor was approaching them. Marie waited to hear no more she
718. on in the crowd around her, and, darting from the side of Hor; tense, seized the
719. he threw herself at his feet, exclaiming in tones of " Pardon pardon " the most
720. s of " Pardon pardon " the most piercing entreaty At this unexpected scene the E
721. n an angry voice as he turned a frowning, stern " I have said that I countenance
722. more such scenes as this " Then, folding his arms, he tried to pass on. " Oh, si
723. ught of her father's peril with a daring and energy beyond her years, " I conjur
724. in child ! who Sire, asks for ! nothing but the " pity! pardon ! life of her fa
725. ve me or shall die." There was something so heart-rending in the sound of this c
726. e." There was something so heart-rending in the sound of this childish voice ple
727. he sound of this childish voice pleading for the life of a father that the Emper
728. bare shoulders her dimpled hand, burning with fever, again seized the Emperor's,
729. k from its feverish heat. Still kneeling, her face bathed in tears, she raised h
730. t he was touched and no longer resisting the impulses of mercy, he leaned over h
731. arise comforted. now," he added, lifting her from her knees then, with a look of
732. SIRE household, " ! 6l who was standing quite near, caught her in his arms befo
733. background and felt happy in not having been Thanks, ; seen by the Emperor —a
734. Emperor —as she thought. That evening when Hortense met the Emperor with a li
735. which she offered him with a bewitching smile, he pinched her ing " ear, say- Y
736. h a bewitching smile, he pinched her ing " ear, say- You thought ! I did not see
737. nement in the Bicetre," she said, daring all. forbid " The it." "Let her stay th
738. y and walked towards the private sitting-room of Josephine. answered the he thre
739. rom the surly officials told her nothing ex- cept that she was free to go, by or
740. of Lajolais, was there, pale, trembling and afraid. " Have they come? " she ask
741. hey not with you?" he answered, bursting into tears when he saw they were not th
742. but walked from room to room, listening and starting at the sound of her own fo
743. rom room to room, listening and starting at the sound of her own footsteps she c
744. suddenly there was a bustle an unclosing and closing of doors, the sound of voic
745. re was a bustle an unclosing and closing of doors, the sound of voices and foots
746. s clasped in their arms, almost swooning with joy. After the first transports, o
747. id Madame Lajolais, gracefully extending her hand " but you see what those two ;
748. 64 THE STORY OF A BRAVE GIRL. witnessing the family, joy of your reunion with yo
749. our reunion with your of and ask nothing but a continuance your friendship/' he
750. itter fast, they returned to the drawing-room, which was cheerfully lighted with
751. ioned by her parents, related everything that had passed after she left the Bice
752. sed after she left the Bicetre, omitting nothing that she could remember until h
753. r she left the Bicetre, omitting nothing that she could remember until her first
754. strange faces and tears, with a burning pain in her heart, all through. After s
755. the Emperor's dis; pleasure in assisting her in her labor of love and finally de
756. r tears, thanked heaven for the blessing of a child so brave and good. The brave
757. de his reluctant adieus the next morning, having orders to return to St. Cloud a
758. eluctant adieus the next morning, having orders to return to St. Cloud and repor
759. and report to the Empress if everything had turned out successfully but ere he
760. d him to come to Strasburg, as something of a relation nearer than that of a fri
761. n from her mother, she was laid fainting and unconscious on the stone bench outs
762. n, and Susette is now a comely, blooming girl of nineteen, who, full of life and
763. erful spirits, has to bewail daily being obliged to live in so gloomy a place, w
764. s much more than was ant. She is sitting with her in assisting mother busily eng
765. nt. She is sitting with her in assisting mother busily engaged her to cut out an
766. E STORY OF A BRAVE GIRL. winter clothing for the family. a sensible " Susette be
767. nt to me, mamma you admit she was saying, " and yet they are much," ; locked up,
768. hem," and she snipped the am was cutting with her scissors in a way that proved
769. uld be ruined should she be seen wearing things above her station. if it And the
770. at way, then," answered Susette, tossing her head. " I don't see what harm there
771. aristocrats wear — What now, a-wanting " ? "There's some fine quality outside
772. out to see who might be there inquiring for her. She saw a low open carriage, i
773. to Susette, who came forward, wondering why they should offer her their hands a
774. ith me a moment," said the lady, seating herself on the stone bench near the " s
775. " said the lady, who had been ; watching the varied expressions flitting over he
776. watching the varied expressions flitting over her countenance, and understood he
777. ress her joy. " I heard about your going to the Emperor it was in everybody's mo
778. ee you long ago, only we went travelling; then when we got back to Strasburg I w
779. care of, and I thought you'd be willing to come and help me, seeing how good yo
780. d be willing to come and help me, seeing how good you were to me once before." "
781. know what you mean, Susette, remembering how proud you were about taking little
782. embering how proud you were about taking little I — something strikes me — I
783. were about taking little I — something strikes me — I Was the poor ring offe
784. thing strikes me — I Was the poor ring offered you here on with this very spot
785. lived faithful and contented, receiving from her grateful employers more the co
786. Louis, until she went away to be claring that she could not be Queen interested
787. d happy unless her marriage. The wedding — ; he loved on earth to his ambition
788. ul servants. _ sacrificed the only being -re?er?fa~/7»^ Cc wiser?* 4ZZ=a-2jV 7?
789. OF MANUEL. CHAPTER I. What woman having ten groats, if she lose one groat doth
790. ether her friends*, and neighbors saying : Rejoice with me because I have found
791. seems like a century ago when something befell me which withered my youth in a
792. ke myself, find the consolation of being guided to a knowledge of the true faith
793. d that some weary, sorrowful, despairing heart may be rescued at the very last,
794. count of whose health we were travelling, was stronger and betWe had ter than I
795. breezes from the sea. There was nothing wanting to we were in accord with the o
796. from the sea. There was nothing wanting to we were in accord with the our happi
797. e exquisite village ; transport of being en rapport with nature. We were surely
798. ends dead," but spoke of them as "having lived. " It was a sweet, pagan, sensuou
799. us sea! THE STORY OF MANUEL. One evening my mother and I 3 walked down to the be
800. lled slowly about on the sands, watching in the distance for the first gleam of
801. gone out early that bright balmy morning, when all nature was so full of brightn
802. dance along the edge of the surf, waving my handkerchief to them as they sailed
803. the horizon. I saw the fishermen hauling their boats higher up on the sands, and
804. ats higher up on the sands, and standing in little groups together, talking and
805. nding in little groups together, talking and pointing seaward. But these signs h
806. le groups together, talking and pointing seaward. But these signs had no signifi
807. rance. There she came at last, careering over the slightly-roughened waves, tack
808. er the slightly-roughened waves, tacking about to catch the wind, her tiny wing
809. g about to catch the wind, her tiny wing and wing, the evenand I reing sun gleam
810. o catch the wind, her tiny wing and wing, the evenand I reing sun gleaming gold
811. tiny wing and wing, the evenand I reing sun gleaming gold upon them member laug
812. d wing, the evenand I reing sun gleaming gold upon them member laughing as she d
813. gleaming gold upon them member laughing as she dipped and courtesied, sails ; l
814. ; like a lady in her ball-dress dancing a minuet in now and of half fair hidden
815. of half fair hidden the foam, now rising stately I upon the crest of a tall wave
816. ave. them, I thought it was Paul sitting taffrail, hauling hard at the ropes it
817. ht it was Paul sitting taffrail, hauling hard at the ropes it ; like I him to th
818. OF MANUEL. there was a sudden whistling and screaming sound out of the violet m
819. ere was a sudden whistling and screaming sound out of the violet mists along the
820. ong the horizon — there was a scudding of spray, a heavy rolling of waves, and
821. was a scudding of spray, a heavy rolling of waves, and the skiff was capsized be
822. pursued them to ; where they were flying for shelter I threw myself on my knees
823. go out to the assistance of the drowning men. But they dared their huts, not, th
824. would have launched out into the boiling waves without oar or help, but they Mad
825. her dear head to 5 my breast, and trying to be brave, gave her hope. * * * * The
826. ack speck that we could just see beating up and down on the white capped waves.
827. kiff that went out so gayly that morning with the sunlight gleaming on her white
828. that morning with the sunlight gleaming on her white sails, bearing such a frei
829. ght gleaming on her white sails, bearing such a freight of life, hope and love,
830. two joyous, noble spirits, w ent sailing out to the jocund sound of laughter and
831. r, swift " Sea Bird," but a sodden thing empty of life. There was nothing lost o
832. n thing empty of life. There was nothing lost of spars or rigging even the gay l
833. ere was nothing lost of spars or rigging even the gay little silken flags of Fra
834. shine from her topmast there was nothing r ; ; lost of senseless planks, or canv
835. vass, was safe — except — everything all the two dear lives worth the treasu
836. oked on, sunk in sight of land, drowning in their young, healthful manhood, powe
837. F MANUEL. propped up by pillows watching the sea where the two perished and one
838. nd one night, with the full moon shining upon her wan face and silvering over th
839. shining upon her wan face and silvering over the ; quiet smiling sea, she died
840. e and silvering over the ; quiet smiling sea, she died without sign or sound. I
841. eaceful upon her weary heart, and hoping much from it, for she was my only, my n
842. window I started up, the sun was shining brightly, and I wondered if my mother s
843. ept. I turned round very gently, fearing to awaken her. Her head leaned back aga
844. shine lay athwart her white face, making it very radiant, and there was such a r
845. th can give, and I knew without touching her marble fingers or frozen brow that
846. like had life and motion, but everything else seemed dead. My hair, since that d
847. uried my mother in the Strangers' living. Cemetery, which lay upon a hillside ov
848. y, which lay upon a hillside overlooking the sea. I was careful in selecting her
849. king the sea. I was careful in selecting her burialplace where the evening sun m
850. ecting her burialplace where the evening sun might shed his last like ; one an a
851. t, 7 place. shadow of the marble bearing her name and age, upon her resting I kn
852. aring her name and age, upon her resting I knew that she would have chosen a and
853. ut on the air whose silvery bell morning and evening ; and the sound of hymns an
854. r whose silvery bell morning and evening ; and the sound of hymns and litanies,
855. anies, accompanied by the soft, swelling music of the organ, stole through the o
856. acred sounds, and I felt as if something holy had her dust in its keeping when I
857. mething holy had her dust in its keeping when I came away. I gathered up the sad
858. lse, started homewards, only remembering that I had no home. People were very ki
859. tre of — but my grief was the my being, no exterior influences- could it, nor
860. ts wounds, it had become the sole living instinct of my being to be alone with m
861. ome the sole living instinct of my being to be alone with my sorrows, to veil th
862. th my sorrows, to veil them as something too sacred to be spoken of. reach — 8
863. made an unusually quick voyage, arriving two or three days in advance of her usu
864. orry, for I had a great dread of meeting friends and relatives who would, by rig
865. d earth under my feet again and ordering ; my trunks to be sent to the hause of
866. was like a new sensation to me, I having a desire to do anything; and walking br
867. to me, I having a desire to do anything; and walking briskly with the fresh lan
868. ing a desire to do anything; and walking briskly with the fresh land breeze gent
869. ith the fresh land breeze gently fanning my dead face, I felt something like lif
870. y fanning my dead face, I felt something like life stirring in my veins, but not
871. ace, I felt something like life stirring in my veins, but not my heart that was
872. d huge, grotesque and vulgar. Everything looked dreadfully new until my eye rest
873. the old trees to rest but it was growing late besides, no one knew me there, and
874. ne saw me a white-haired stranger making so free, they might think me crazy, or
875. I walked on. A red glow from the setting sun burnished everything around me the
876. rom the setting sun burnished everything around me the gilded crosses upon the s
877. rywhere the sound of quick feet hurrying homewards, and beautiful faces and form
878. esolate I felt All that I loved sleeping far off beneath the waves and vines of
879. here near them? I seemed to be awakening out of a dull dream, and stopped in the
880. ; ; — — ; ; ; ! ! ! ! ; : 10 setting sun THE STORY OF MANUEL. was a life-siz
881. an anguish, an abandonment far exceeding mine, all borne for me, the guilty I wa
882. el them I was not aware of the deepening shadows I had found a refuge at last, a
883. uched me on ; ; ; ; the shoulder, saying with slightly foreign accent " My child
884. " Let me sfay, sir," I pleaded anything/' ; will not hurt " Impossible," said t
885. d?" he asked pityingly. No. I am nothing. know nothing of ; THE STORY OF MANUEL.
886. ityingly. No. I am nothing. know nothing of ; THE STORY OF MANUEL. creeds. I II
887. ORY OF MANUEL. creeds. I II care nothing. My ; griefs I feel me an outcast from
888. through the open door this broad pitying Humanity inviting to the refuge which H
889. oor this broad pitying Humanity inviting to the refuge which His sufLet me stay.
890. me. Then the good priest fell to talking with me and, strange to say, with my ar
891. , strange to say, with my arms embracing the despair; wounded JESUS, he won all
892. e I had never referred to it in speaking or writing I left feet of ; ; the sad t
893. er referred to it in speaking or writing I left feet of ; ; the sad task to othe
894. without reserve, and it was like letting the sunlight and air into a long-closed
895. my tears. Then I saw that it was growing dark; and when the good Father told me
896. row, I went away. This was the beginning of my Catholic life. It was truly a res
897. when in repose or when he was listening to the story of the childhood of Jesus.
898. relate the circumstances without telling how it was that I came to be so intimat
899. ps that some sorrow-stricken, despairing soul might be led by ; then I my experi
900. er The ; rich autumnal flowers bordering the walks the long, arched trellises wh
901. colored grapes the golden light flashing upon the glass of the conservatory, fro
902. t, delicious odors! How quiet everything of dowa- was ! Not a sound except the d
903. wa- was ! Not a sound except the droning ger bees around the Chinese honeysuckle
904. round the Chinese honeysuckle, gossiping over the latest news from their hives ;
905. - the hum of countless flies luxuriating on the grance and the sweet nectar of t
906. ment, a plump, comely negro woman sewing, her ebon face wearing that unmistakabl
907. egro woman sewing, her ebon face wearing that unmistakable expression of pride a
908. arranged tastefully on her head, leaving a glossy — — wool puffed carefully
909. MANUEL. just IS enough to show a string of large goldcolored beads flashing upo
910. ring of large goldcolored beads flashing upon her dark bosom a flowered chintz d
911. ot rain, she sallied out with her sewing or knitting to her seat under the apric
912. sallied out with her sewing or knitting to her seat under the apricot tree. It
913. e usual hour, for they knew that nothing but wet weather ever kept her away unle
914. e silver and gold. Then a great whirring overhead made her look up. The pigeons
915. ade her look up. The pigeons were coming home with a loud frou-frou of wings the
916. aristocratic farm pigeons, with nothing to distinguish them except their doveli
917. eir dovelike forms and the ever-shifting prismatic ; Now l6 lights THE STORY OF
918. ad, and said as she watched them pushing, crowding, and flut" Outlandish and goo
919. id as she watched them pushing, crowding, and flut" Outlandish and goodtering in
920. ing, and flut" Outlandish and goodtering into their cotes for-nuthin' 'cept to e
921. r wa'nt so soft-hearted " Then something else caught her eye something that she
922. something else caught her eye something that she ever loved her young mistress,
923. flitted down the garden walk, gathering white and crimson chrysanthemums and ge
924. rysanthemums and geranium leaves. Having gathered enough, she hastened back to t
925. full diaphanous folds, slightly bending over her task, placing here a white flo
926. slightly bending over her task, placing here a white flower beside the red grap
927. y. The clear golden lights of the waning day shone about her, flickering through
928. e waning day shone about her, flickering through the vine leaves, lighting her t
929. kering through the vine leaves, lighting her thoughtful face and warming the whi
930. lighting her thoughtful face and warming the whiteness of her delicate features
931. the fruit and flowers, and was thinking of the pleasfallen leaf, so fragile fai
932. go into the kiss her. — ; — drawing-room to wait for him, when she heard a
933. ick little footstep, then a voice saying " Come somewhere here. I'll find her."
934. er." Then she saw her boy Manuel leading by the hand a strange, foreign-looking
935. g by the hand a strange, foreign-looking person, up in ; my mamma is the garden-
936. towards the house. It was all in keeping with the rest of the picture, the beaut
937. , blue and white striped trousers ending at the knee, and peaked hat, the Neapol
938. s! Here, mamma!" cried the boy, throwing himself down, all heated and tired, " 8
939. d, " 8 ; 1 THE STORY OF MANUEL. flinging off his cap, while upon the door-mat, a
940. r-mat, and the strange man stood looking at the lady, who wondered where Manuel
941. clear olive She could not help observing the of his cheeks. remarkable beauty of
942. his straight, chiseled nose, his flowing brown is hair and beard. like " His fac
943. d up " mamma/' her said the boy, looking ; lovingly into face " he's hungry, I r
944. t air, then ran back into — the dining-room. Mrs. H placed a bountiful supply
945. gave it to the child, which he, walking slowly for fear of upsetting something,
946. he, walking slowly for fear of upsetting something, carried to the man, who sat
947. g slowly for fear of upsetting something, carried to the man, who sat looking ar
948. ing, carried to the man, who sat looking around him at the beautiful THE STORY O
949. ich red and golden lights of the setting sun, with a sad far-away expression upo
950. the apricot tree, who had been watching him, nodding her head towards him and s
951. tree, who had been watching him, nodding her head towards him and shaking her fi
952. nodding her head towards him and shaking her fist at him ever since she saw him
953. d you're just horrid. / hear you shooing them out sometimes, just like chickens
954. beggars, if we cant give them " anything. There now "You g'long, Mannel. I aint
955. Nannie, you are just a horrid old thing, and you won't go to heaven because you
956. Italy. eye, stood at the window enjoying the whole scene the now red and golden
957. , the vines, offered to wayfarers during the , ; the fruit, the flowers, the bea
958. thankfulness to Almighty God for having ! — — ; implanted in her child's na
959. mane traits 21 which she was endeavoring earnestly to direct aright. She watched
960. pity and tears filled her eyes, thinking of the world and its rough places over
961. eep capacity for enjoyment and suffering, one of those ductile minds easily infl
962. led astray by the semblance of anything noble or good. She was growing sad over
963. anything noble or good. She was growing sad over her thoughts when the stranger
964. it it was written in Italian but having some knowledge of Latin, she makes out
965. a humble obeisance turns away, stopping Then just to kiss Manuel on his head an
966. conducted him to the gate, and returning, stood watching the beautiful rose-tint
967. the gate, and returning, stood watching the beautiful rose-tinted clouds, and t
968. -tinted clouds, and the pigeons whirling round and round in the effulgent light
969. thoughts were beyond what he was gazing at. " Manuel, my child " she said gentl
970. himself ; in her open arms, and looking into her eyes with a deep, earnest look
971. his mother, and surrounded by everything that was beautiful in religion and art.
972. religion and art. Pictures representing some of the joyful and some of the sorr
973. , and stood upon brackets in the drawing-room, in the oratory and the library. W
974. Wherever the child went he saw something of this sort to arrest his attention th
975. and told him all about it from beginning to end. From his earliest infancy he wa
976. iet as when in his mother's arms looking at the pictures of hef ; ; — — THE
977. RY OF MANUEL. prayer-book, 23 or hearing her talk of the white- winged angels wh
978. he grew dull and silent without knowing why, and he frequently asked questions
979. ranged spangles. Bethlehem, representing a cave in which the scene of the Nativi
980. round the Virgin and Child, illuminating the grotto as if the light emanated fro
981. Of course he had hunforgot to his dying day. dreds of questions to ask he talke
982. talked about it for a year, and nothing could exceed his joy when the following
983. could exceed his joy when the following Christmas he saw conspicuous under He h
984. to understand, the true merit of giving alms to the poor, and thenceforward it
985. urse, because he knew that it was giving to the dear Son of Mary. Mrs. H was pro
986. r us, and why ; and often, while talking the sorrowful story over there with the
987. s always on the look-out to do something for Him. If a lame or blind man or a di
988. to "Mamma"; when on the pavement playing about the front door, he would leave ev
989. he front door, he would leave everything to lead in a hungry, ragged beggar to b
990. and impatient he rebelled against taking the prescribed remedies, he would grow
991. gentle as soon as his mother, whispering, bade him remember the bitter suffering
992. round about by her watchful would spring the soul which 26 care ; THE STORY OF M
993. her labor of love did not go for nothing. CHAPTER III. NOT THY WILL, BUT MINE. A
994. hanged. whirled in short the sun tinting burnishing with throats. nothing apThe
995. rled in short the sun tinting burnishing with throats. nothing apThe pigeons sti
996. tinting burnishing with throats. nothing apThe pigeons still crooned and fantast
997. h red, or purple and gold their swelling ; September evening autumnal flowers th
998. gold their swelling ; September evening autumnal flowers throwing out their spi
999. tember evening autumnal flowers throwing out their spicy odors on the evening ai
1000.ing out their spicy odors on the evening air there were the purple clusters of l
1001.rple clusters of luscious grapes hanging heavily upon the vines and pervading al
1002.ing heavily upon the vines and pervading all was the indescribable fragrance fro
1003.opical plants in the conservatory. thing was strangely silent Except the pigeons
1004.n. It was a silence that boded something the sort of silence that has stolen som
1005. the kitchen, and came forward, treading very softly on the gravel, to see who s
1006.ed and scowled angrily at it and resting a hand upon each hip, with her elbows a
1007. poorer were rampant within her; nothing would have pleased her better than to h
1008.er rags dropped from her and — tossing her head, she said : "You ; wait dar! I
1009.you off empty, nuther will I." So saying she trudged into the kitchen and began
1010.half little through, memories of the ing boy who lay dy- — as they all thought
1011. sat and she burst into a fit of weeping and down, still holding on to the bread
1012.a fit of weeping and down, still holding on to the bread and knife, slice. while
1013.fe, slice. while the great tears rolling over her black cheeks Sobbing and cryin
1014.rs rolling over her black cheeks Sobbing and crying, and rocking herself to and
1015.over her black cheeks Sobbing and crying, and rocking herself to and fro as is t
1016.k cheeks Sobbing and crying, and rocking herself to and fro as is the custom of
1017.persistent beggar, until a loud knocking roused her ; then she off wiped her eye
1018.ild's wallet then she went back, walking slowly, stopped at the kitchen door and
1019.r, shook her head, went in, and throwing her apron over her head sat down and ag
1020.nd again wept bitterly. Manuel was dying. The afternoon It was so. of the day be
1021.to rest herself. She had been preserving; and, not being very strong, was so ove
1022. She had been preserving; and, not being very strong, was so overcome with fatig
1023.was afraid that in his restless skipping about whenever he came near her, he mig
1024. he might trip and fall into the boiling syrup, and she had sent him away over a
1025.p on the bed where she lay, and nestling beside hef very gently he drew one of h
1026.eep. When she awoke, late in the evening, he was still in a deep sleep, breathin
1027. he was still in a deep sleep, breathing heavily, and she saw that he was very w
1028.t the boy's pulse, and examined flashing the " his eyes by lifting the lids and
1029.mined flashing the " his eyes by lifting the lids and light of all a candle in t
1030.nd light of all a candle in them, asking quiet questions the time. Congestion of
1031.irely despairbest to give her like a ing of his safety, he thought hope. marble
1032.ndicate life ex cept the heavy breathing and the motion of his thin, dilated nos
1033.I can't— I can't!" she cried, throwing herself down beside the child's couch a
1034.wn beside the child's couch and pressing her cheek upon the motionwhich she embr
1035. the good old priest, hers. now mingling always been a great pet with Father Reg
1036. him when he came to see me, by offering him fruit or bon-bons, which he : alway
1037.hich he : always refused, though longing for them, saying I must ask mamma first
1038.refused, though longing for them, saying I must ask mamma first.' It was only th
1039.er. My heart was deeply touched, and ing, my grew so full of his lovely traits t
1040.e venerable white-haired priest, holding her cold hands and smoothing them with
1041.st, holding her cold hands and smoothing them with a very great pity little " Yo
1042.el, cruel Father Regis could say nothing to comfort her she was simply wild with
1043.nd how, helpless and humbled and longing for heavenly consolations, the poor wea
1044.ere alone they were to be found so going to the benitier, he dipped his fingers
1045. his benediction together over the dying child and stricken mother, and stooping
1046. child and stricken mother, and stooping over he kissed the boy's fair forehead,
1047. kissed the boy's fair forehead, signing it with the sign of the cross, then wen
1048. his fair alabaster hands in her burning clasp they were deathly cold, and with
1049.d. "Yes," she said slowly, " he is dying, and I can neither help or go with him.
1050. the bed with the table-spoon containing the medicine in side the child ; — !
1051.e boy good-by," said Mrs. calmly kissing the ice-cold lips again. H " I did not
1052. into another room and lay down, feeling, as she afterwards told me, as " ; , if
1053.heart were frozen. and out to her during the night, reporting no change but to c
1054.d out to her during the night, reporting no change but to comfort her by the new
1055., except the watchman's * cry announcing " Four o'clock and a star-light morn- *
1056.6 THE STORY OF MANUEL. There was nothing to do in the child's room but to watch
1057. until his little life, like the morning star, faded into a " brighter dawn than
1058.ved. Mr. H was in the next room, sitting near his wife, his head leaning upon hi
1059. sitting near his wife, his head leaning upon his hand, full of a stern grief wh
1060.full of a stern grief which he was doing his best to bear with resignaing!" ; ti
1061.s doing his best to bear with resignaing!" ; tion. Mamma suddenly rang out the v
1062.r instant she was beside him, whispering " : Manuel, my precious one, do you " k
1063.thought still that death was approaching had seen this sudden awakening and flic
1064.proaching had seen this sudden awakening and flickering^ then the dying out of l
1065.een this sudden awakening and flickering^ then the dying out of life's flame bef
1066.awakening and flickering^ then the dying out of life's flame before. But she kne
1067.hanked me for my perseverance in obeying his directions, and said the medicine h
1068. had received a severe shock, and during the six or seven weeks of his convalesc
1069.the toy-strewed floor with him, building up miniature houses and towers holding
1070.g up miniature houses and towers holding him in her arms, singing the sweet litt
1071. towers holding him in her arms, singing the sweet little songs he loved lying b
1072.ng the sweet little songs he loved lying beside him on the bed when he was tired
1073.er left him and when it was safe, during the delicious Indian Summer, to take hi
1074.ny moment. One day, Nannie— not daring to do otherwise in his presence receive
1075. actually wore the sem; — and thinking to please Manuel, she called the boy "
1076.ootprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er A solemn main, forlorn and shipwre
1077.n and shipwrecked brother, life's Seeing, shall take heart again." —Longfellow
1078.ly his tender pity for the destitute ing, and suffer- and his devotion to the Bl
1079. forth in a thousand simple and touching ways. This sentiment was not an artific
1080. formula with the child, but a something which had grown to be an integral part
1081.rown to be an integral part of his being, which kept the thought of his Blessed
1082.urse with his playfel- lows — sleeping or w aking, a sense of whether she were
1083.is playfel- lows — sleeping or w aking, a sense of whether she were pleased or
1084.ased was never absent. Every surrounding of his young life tended to foster his
1085.ly was he guarded from all contaminating dormant evils inherent in his nature we
1086.e for it seemed impossible that anything should ever have the power to tarnish t
1087. and into whose heads the idea of losing him had never entered but it was inevit
1088. was too effeminate and shy, and growing unfit for the work-day world into whose
1089.ly wear the fine edge from his shrinking, It was done and his sensitive temperam
1090.ted to an ordeal whose evil inA training in fluences marred his entire life. to
1091.aded, a false conscience, which, leaving all other ill results out of the questi
1092.essened in a great degree discriminating between good and All this evil principl
1093.THE STORY OF MANUEL. bitter on, bringing their mixture of their tears, their cro
1094.a before us may be crowned with dazzling brightness, but we are marching all the
1095.dazzling brightness, but we are marching all the same towards the black shadows,
1096.from under their feet. There was nothing left of found ? ! was lost there was no
1097. of found ? ! was lost there was nothing for them to rest upon or cling to, save
1098.s nothing for them to rest upon or cling to, save the heavy cross of their adver
1099. There were many anxious and embittering cares there were struggles, difficultie
1100.all an easy prey to many of the Anything wearing the fallacies of the times. gui
1101.asy prey to many of the Anything wearing the fallacies of the times. guise of be
1102.benevolence or liberality, or professing a humane purpose, touched the key-note
1103.rpose, touched the key-note of his being, and led him to overlook underlying pri
1104.eing, and led him to overlook underlying principles, which, more frequently than
1105.o him a good cause, without compromising the integrity of his faith. For some ti
1106.is conversations, that our boy was being led astray by false principles embodied
1107.ly ended in senseless heat, he declaring that we true criterions of superiority.
1108.to be American citizens,'' and I telling him that he was nothing better than a J
1109.'' and I telling him that he was nothing better than a Jacobin" neither of us co
1110.ough. ought to enjoy life without making beasts of themselves, and so these fool
1111. practices of his faith ; and, fall- ing into modern progress, railed openly aga
1112.ntly without result, for he was drifting along with a resistless current which i
1113.o stay or turn, and she could do nothing but tell him the truth without compromi
1114.em whenever he could do so without being offensively rude, so that humanly speak
1115.fensively rude, so that humanly speaking nothing could be done to check his dang
1116.y rude, so that humanly speaking nothing could be done to check his dangerous ca
1117. he strayed from the safe fold, staining his soul with sin, and plunging into ne
1118.staining his soul with sin, and plunging into new — ; 46 THE STORY OF MANUEL.
1119.nfinite, withthe destitute and suffering. out misapplying the term because it is
1120.destitute and suffering. out misapplying the term because it is a divine quality
1121.an character disappeared, ; — : saying a " ' Hail Mary.' quite. " And yet, Man
1122.at. You someI should hear I me defending my religion always do that, mother, wha
1123. to be a Catholic heathen is a bad thing, my child experiment a human it is the
1124.t a human it is the most dangerous being can attempt," she answered gravely. The
1125.kiss her, and hurry away to some meeting or association, or perhaps some wild re
1126.' 47 he was subject to the most alarming attacks of illness, which for days toge
1127. and relief to our to his faith ? aching hearts whenever he showed signs of reco
1128.ut this time Mr. H ment in a neighboring city, to which he removed The change wa
1129. to all of his family. us, and something like the old happy days came back to us
1130.ert him from his erratic way of thinking and living, and gradually give him- mor
1131.m his erratic way of thinking and living, and gradually give him- more true and
1132.ctations were fully answered. But having mastered the routine of his official du
1133.led him still farther from any lingering desire he might His mother, overhave to
1134.Mr. H was taken ill, and after suffering a few weeks, died in hope, fortified by
1135.ments and prayers of the Church, leaving an example of patience, resignation and
1136. of patience, resignation and holy dying which formed others, congenial in taste
1137.ove for his mother was deep and trusting, and in a manner her influence over him
1138. order, as he advanced them, by applying to them the tests of the Catholic faith
1139.hours, would after night tenderly aiding up night without friends. deter him fro
1140.nor of his life. creature some suffering, forlorn Nothing could ever He often we
1141.creature some suffering, forlorn Nothing could ever He often went himself to bri
1142.ould ever He often went himself to bring a priest to some forlorn, destitute suf
1143.may seem, he thought it a dreadful thing for one to die without spiritual assist
1144.eered to go fetch him. Father R speaking of Manuel's peculiarities, said one day
1145.good and acceptable to Heaven underlying all that makes you so unhappy Almighty
1146.," Sometimes we heard of of his carrying an armful wood at night to some freezin
1147.an armful wood at night to some freezing family ; a bundle of half-worn but comf
1148.sometimes he would collect money, adding his own last penny, to pay the rent for
1149.hreatened by a cruel landlord with being turned out homeless in the bitter, incl
1150.less it was settled to the last farthing. I have known ; beg supplies of all sor
1151.iends some who were ready and so willing to contribute towards satisfied. good a
1152.pisodes of his erratic life, alternating with his reckless and often perilous en
1153.mother's anxieties the fear of his dying suddenly and without : preparation haun
1154.ated himself from the Church by "joining the Masonic order. He told us what he h
1155.orbear. It would have been an evil thing to have snapped the tie that bound him
1156.ich he might fall drunkenness and gaming did not enter on his list of sins he st
1157.e still loved his family with a clinging and deep ; ; ; ; 52 affection, THE STOR
1158. we loved him, and bore with him, hoping all the time and trusting that a day wo
1159.th him, hoping all the time and trusting that a day would come — as it did of
1160.ut definite results then. " It is making me a better *man, mother," he would say
1161. measure, " pressed together and running over/ " But Masonry has such a grand sy
1162.t may tend, as a secret and monopolizing organibut for a Catholic to zation, to
1163.nship become a Mason is a terrible thing, for it cuts him entirely off from his
1164.time room, her eyes fixed on the looking. fire, These discussions, in he left th
1165. he left the pale and wearywhich nothing see then, seemed fairly to be gained as
1166.ivine Son." And so we talked, comforting — each other in our sorrow until late
1167.d the alarm-bell was that before morning he would be brought home mangled or dea
1168.OF MANUEL. 55 "I am constantly expecting something dreadful, fire. Manuel. Promi
1169. 55 "I am constantly expecting something dreadful, fire. Manuel. Promise me not
1170. I say. He used to laugh at her ' saying : " Don't never go near a burning build
1171.saying : " Don't never go near a burning building without saying a Hail Mary.' S
1172." Don't never go near a burning building without saying a Hail Mary.' So when be
1173.o near a burning building without saying a Hail Mary.' So when be uneasy, mother
1174.other, you hear the and think I am going to be buried under a tumbling wall, com
1175.I am going to be buried under a tumbling wall, comfort yourself. fire-bell Good
1176.self. fire-bell Good night." One evening he spent an hour or two with us, a rare
1177.ent an hour or two with us, a rare thing for him to do nowadays, and the contowa
1178., Will Carey, to-day, and he's preparing for the priesthood but what in the worl
1179.tion drifted ; : — ; him?" " Something good, I'm very sure." I " Well, don't k
1180.idered before that time comes. Hes going to be a great and shin" " Well, don't i
1181.o be a great and shin" " Well, don't ing light in the Church though, whatever be
1182.. now that he says," said Manuel, fixing his beautiful black eyes, the fire. ful
1183. a like a douche of ice into her glowing heart moment she had forgotten the lion
1184.ad anillness, worse than any pre- ceding it. In his short intervals of conscious
1185.enderly and solemnly to him about seeing a priest, but it threw him into such a
1186.spite of all, and never cease commending him to the sweet care of Mary. — ! We
1187. received an appointment in an exploring exTerritories pedition to the beyond th
1188.his sinless childhood ! ' after escaping the Manuel returned safe treacherous am
1189.gain, " * * * Oh this fearful desolating Could it not pass us, who have had such
1190.such war heavy sorrows, without wounding and scathing us p * # * Manuel has give
1191.y sorrows, without wounding and scathing us p * # * Manuel has given up his offi
1192.r ago, but he was dissuaded from joining the army on account of his feeble healt
1193.eek, when it was too late to do anything, for the regiment was marching when the
1194. anything, for the regiment was marching when the news came, and we could do not
1195.n the news came, and we could do nothing but try to still the anguished sorrow o
1196.weary, weary hearts. "The laws governing the perils and chances of war are inevi
1197.nder the rebel ramparts there is nothing to turn ' : ' given him a ; ! ' ; ; asi
1198.given him a ; ! ' ; ; aside the hurtling, death-dealing missiles ; — noth- THE
1199. ' ; ; aside the hurtling, death-dealing missiles ; — noth- THE STORY OF MANUE
1200.les ; — noth- THE STORY OF MANUEL, ing but the protecting care of 59 Him who s
1201. STORY OF MANUEL, ing but the protecting care of 59 Him who seeth the sparrow fa
1202. we ceased even the kind fraud of trying to com- — — — , — — Oh, these
1203.ghts of suspense that winter of freezing cold Oh, the constant brooding thought
1204. freezing cold Oh, the constant brooding thought of sudden death, and fort each
1205.th, and fort each other. ! ! everlasting loss to one! * * -* He our erring but d
1206.asting loss to one! * * -* He our erring but dearly loved still wears his medal
1207.ts or habits. But he was a strange being, reticent of ! ; ; everything except hi
1208.ange being, reticent of ! ; ; everything except his faults his ; sedulous to con
1209.ne and then we went on as usual. Looking back and weighing one thing after anoth
1210.t on as usual. Looking back and weighing one thing after another, I almost belie
1211.ual. Looking back and weighing one thing after another, I almost believe that Ma
1212.the lamp of her love when one is missing, and looks for it, never giving over th
1213. missing, and looks for it, never giving over the search until it is found infin
1214.Y FOR THE LOST GROAT/' Mrs noon, looking from her window is "THIS lovely !" said
1215. of Manuel, and a great dread of * dying suddenly, haunt her continually. " I wi
1216.never saw a more cosy spot. left nothing unthought of for his comfort. The last
1217.ought of for his comfort. The last thing they did was to get a statue of our Ble
1218.quite near, just as they finished laying a new bright spread on his bed. He ' 61
1219.me, Manuel ' ' ! said the girls, kissing him. ?' Isn't it a jolly den for an old
1220.. it. I don't deserve " But they, seeing how he felt, chatted away like two magp
1221. to talk over some pictures he was going to have framed to decorate the walls of
1222.o come out often to see us for one thing and I do not see the use, Miriam, in yo
1223.not see the use, Miriam, in your looking backwards, and sighing, and anticipatin
1224., in your looking backwards, and sighing, and anticipating all manner of evil as
1225.backwards, and sighing, and anticipating all manner of evil as you do. I ; prote
1226.a change in Manuel ? " she said, looking ; — — ; ; — — eager for a confi
1227. his odd affectations. Why, he's getting THE STORY OF MANUEL. fastidious, I tell
1228. is well delicate I think. well, looking so " she said but he cannot be I " have
1229.cy's re- sake don't be forever borrowing trouble! "Man- was never in better heal
1230.ill take comfort* Bettine. yesterday ing You know General S was here and made me
1231.ll of his little difficulties by turning over so much of his salary to his broth
1232.as I ever did in his life again. looking fair and innocent and lovely, just as h
1233.t as he used to. 1 was very happy living that old time over, but when I awoke th
1234. somehow." " It's a sign that he's going to become what he was then. I tell you,
1235.her assistance." Then we fell to talking of other things. We were spending the w
1236.alking of other things. We were spending the winter in the country with Miriam's
1237.amily council to was decided stay during the winter. Everyone was enthusiastic o
1238.was the thought but Mr. R whose untiring of Manuel help did so much for our good
1239.e that brought him out ; , every evening. Yes, a change had certainly come over
1240. from heavy blows, when often forgetting himself he broke out in language terrib
1241., and said he could not help it excusing it, I believe the habit of swearing had
1242.sing it, I believe the habit of swearing had so grown upon him that he was unawa
1243. matter, and I went. I found him sitting up, but looking pallid and ended in pai
1244.ent. I found him sitting up, but looking pallid and ended in pain ; ; — ; ;
1245.was all up How's mother ?" it he shaking hands and trying to be cheerful. badly
1246.mother ?" it he shaking hands and trying to be cheerful. badly with neuralgia, a
1247.ouldn't let her come." said, " Suffering 5 66 THE STORY OF MANUEL. " That's righ
1248. is " Enough of that," he said, flushing angrily. " Don't worry me with talk now
1249.and you know it." " I know no such thing. The grace of God, and her pleading," I
1250.hing. The grace of God, and her pleading," I said, pointing to the fair image of
1251.God, and her pleading," I said, pointing to the fair image of Our Lady on the ma
1252.s the doctor don't. I never had anything like it before. Two doctors were ; with
1253.t. Look at my feet, Bettine," uncovering his feet, over which a shawl was thrown
1254.mortal " I pain here," he said, pointing to his heart. THE STORY OF MANUEL. neve
1255. OF MANUEL. never all 67 I felt anything like it; but I believe am now. I believ
1256.is pulled me through," he added, drawing out his medal, which was suspended by a
1257.s medal, which was suspended by a string around his neck. " Hold on to it, Manue
1258.t forget to I was afraid to say anything more ask her help." than that. Then I a
1259.s long practice. He thought Manuel dying wlien he got there, and was unable to d
1260. coldness of death upon him, and gasping for breath, he stood leaning against th
1261.and gasping for breath, he stood leaning against the mantle-piece —close by th
1262.end for a priest, but he declined seeing one. I told still him that he was in da
1263.anger of death ; but he declined, saying that a priest could do noth- ing for hi
1264. saying that a priest could do noth- ing for him. and I said Church stands ten o
1265.e was a Mason, no more about it, knowing how the in that matter. I left him abou
1266.think there's a possibility of his being a well man He had I better be with his
1267.E STORY OF MANUEL. scarcely " 69 knowing what to " ever go back should I Moss-Hi
1268.elf near the parish church, and, obeying a sudden about impulse, went in to spea
1269.n to speak to Father T He was just going into the confesManuel. sional, but kind
1270.told him and promised to go that evening and pay Manuel He knew our poor boy, an
1271. poverty and by the bedside of the dying, and felt a deep interest in his singul
1272.ent back to Manuel, whom I found sitting before a bright fire, laughing and talk
1273.d sitting before a bright fire, laughing and talking with an^acquaintance who ha
1274.fore a bright fire, laughing and talking with an^acquaintance who had happened i
1275.o come I in to-morrow," he said, holding I out his hand. so often ; was deceived
1276.emed not the smallest hope of his living on how could I believe, seeing him ill
1277.is living on how could I believe, seeing him ill ; sitting there, his eyes brigh
1278.ould I believe, seeing him ill ; sitting there, his eyes bright and his voice st
1279.at illness, this was more than a passing the worst already over? My spirits rose
1280.I made none of them miserable by telling all that had happened. I told Miriam an
1281.was better, and sent all kinds of loving messages. I told them of what I had don
1282.ove. He w as no worse, but was unwilling to go into the country. Some of us were
1283.him every day, and brought back cheering accounts to his mother, who was too , ;
1284.elf. Oh, our dear, noble-hearted, erring boy how very near he grew to us in thos
1285.al " I know," he said, "that it is owing illusions. I have read to the condition
1286.t he didn't mind that, and he's " coming to see me again." * * * He says the nex
1287.hat he will ever be He concealed nothing restored to his Church. from me he expr
1288.ic ; nay, swore that he would be willing ; and as for his devotion to the Holy M
1289.e Holy Mother of God, there is something remarkable in it. But, my child, all th
1290.on, to renounce and put aside everything that hindered his salvation Father but
1291.it was useless to go again. I am praying for him all the to die for the faith '
1292.hough Manuel appeared to be convalescing, there was something all " Oh yes, , :
1293. to be convalescing, there was something all " Oh yes, , : — THE STORY OF MANU
1294.THE STORY OF MANUEL. the time whispering I : ' 73 "The end is near." And prayed
1295.ensers, swung lazily to and fro, sending forth a fragrance like frankincense and
1296.d myrrh. There was a low murmur soughing through the pines, which sounded like t
1297.ir, as they darted to and fro, rejoicing in the warmth and brightness the old oa
1298.rustled their gay leaves like whispering oracles the hum of insects made a drows
1299.de a drowsy monotone; and far stretching around us lay the ; — ; ; the beautif
1300.nd loveliness of the scene was something indescribable, and I think it all over
1301.ad had good news from Manuel the evening before he wrote that he was better, and
1302.d Christmas with us so there was nothing to shadow our enjoyment of the balmy we
1303. about, us, like a tempest; and, looking for the cause, we saw thousands of crow
1304.cause, we saw thousands of crows, flying in two long processions, all shouting a
1305.ng in two long processions, all shouting and cawing for dear life, as they pitch
1306.ong processions, all shouting and cawing for dear life, as they pitched and tumb
1307.wards with an angry shout and clattering of It was a grotesque wings, darkening
1308.g of It was a grotesque wings, darkening the air. sight to watch them crowding b
1309.ng the air. sight to watch them crowding back, scuffling and fighting to secure
1310.t to watch them crowding back, scuffling and fighting to secure a place on the c
1311.em crowding back, scuffling and fighting to secure a place on the cedar boughs,
1312. a place on the cedar boughs, and flying to and fro over the whole pine belt, as
1313.le pine belt, as The din was if carrying and bringing the news. so noisy that we
1314. as The din was if carrying and bringing the news. so noisy that we stopped talk
1315.e news. so noisy that we stopped talking, confounded by ; ; ; the strange uproar
1316. mean, Bettine " ? asked Miriam, looking amused. The old negro leaves, who was r
1317.ed. The old negro leaves, who was raking away the dead deliberately stopped his
1318.iberately stopped his work, and, leaning upon the handle of his rake, stood watc
1319.n the handle of his rake, stood watching the crows THE STORY OF MANUEL. with an
1320.ncle Jeff. I'm afraid they intend moving their colony to Moss-Hill," said Miriam
1321.ugh when de rime's done froze everything up dey can't get nothin' den. I 'speck
1322." said miriam anxiously she was thinking of her an' wild grapes, an* ; ; boy. to
1323.wed and passed on, in his arms ; nodding to the crows he said " We're going to S
1324.dding to the crows he said " We're going to Snow likely. have falling weather, I
1325.We're going to Snow likely. have falling weather, I reckon. There's no more cert
1326.h the two little ones, who were laughing and shouting at the crows, She is an Ol
1327.tle ones, who were laughing and shouting at the crows, She is an Olddelighted at
1328.t from the kitchen," said Mrs. R joining us; u and Aunt Prue says there's going
1329.g us; u and Aunt Prue says there's going to be an awful snow-storm, and sent me
1330.nd Bettine had better drive in and bring Manuel If it storms to-morrow he can't
1331.the found Manuel up and dressed, sitting at He was rejoiced to see his table wri
1332.He was rejoiced to see his table writing letters. us, and expressed his readines
1333./' he said, " I want you to do something for me, Bettine. IVe got Christmas in m
1334.s but never mind that. Get her a blazing bright dress and I want two boxes of to
1335.has grown colder," said Mrs. " R drawing her shawl up Hadn't you better pull the
1336.very decidedly, and Manuel was shivering. His mother did not hear the carriage;
1337., she went to meet him, and put" My ting her arms tenderly about him said child,
1338.nd drew his head to her bosom, smoothing his rich, brown hair tenderly. They wer
1339. it need and quiet," she said, believing that he needed, as we all did. " I hope
1340.ly. the safest plan," she said, stooping over to try," kiss his pale cheeks. " I
1341.ourse you do, Manuel," she said, drawing her .chair close to him ; your feet ; a
1342.l go around and see everybody, including I suppose the children the cook and the
1343.ORY OF MANUEL. to be a general unpacking with closed and fancy that I'm a boy ag
1344. two, that she was sure it was something of it all ; ; doors to-night." " I shal
1345. so He became so cheermuch better during the assured he was convalescrest evenin
1346.the assured he was convalescrest evening, that ing, we felt and needed only and
1347.d he was convalescrest evening, that ing, we felt and needed only and time to re
1348.He enjoyed it all like a child, laughing over the quaint things and admiring the
1349.hing over the quaint things and admiring the pretty ones as he helped to assort
1350.me figures and busied himself in forming them into groups upon the end of the pi
1351.d the Virgin Mother and presently having got them arranged to suit, he " See her
1352.ld : see the tears that his eyes, saying shall am getting childish, believe, and
1353.s that his eyes, saying shall am getting childish, believe, and go to bed. I fee
1354.r surprise told us that snow was falling heavily. So the crows were wise, and kn
1355.gined. All night I heard Manuel coughing a short, hard, dry, ominous cough. I we
1356.t in to him early, and found him sitting in a large cushioned chair, his bed unH
1357.fusion takes place ? " I ask with aching heart. But I hope better things. I've s
1358.en a jackstraw for his chances of living, and yet he has recould not live, " He
1359.course. covered 6 in spite of everything, so I don't despair. ! 82 I it THE STOR
1360.NUEL. don't like that dropsical swelling in his feet, but may disappear as the r
1361.indeed believed that he was convalescing. He spent Christmas day with the family
1362.oved. whom he He was evidently suffering, but would not admit it. Over our cheer
1363.w, an anxious, uneasy dread of something sorrowful mother a few days later, and
1364.mother a few days later, and after being silent some time, suddenly asked her: "
1365.nly asked her: " Mother, should anything happen to " me, where will you bury me
1366.nswer could she make him ? If " anything happened," and he not be restored to hi
1367. wrung her heart there seemed to sitting with his ; Manuel was come with the que
1368.el was come with the question a crushing, oppressive ; weight of fears for his f
1369.d to the window, where he stood watching " Such a storm " he said, the falling s
1370.ng " Such a storm " he said, the falling snow. speaking to himself " the roads m
1371.rm " he said, the falling snow. speaking to himself " the roads must be blocked
1372. and grieve over him, wonder His bad ing all the time what we should do. symptom
1373.oms increased and his mother, perceiving his danger, wrote to Father Carey, begg
1374.s danger, wrote to Father Carey, begging him " I'm to come out to see and talk w
1375.annot " He loves stand by and do nothing," she said. and respects Father Carey,
1376.ch depended on his visit we were willing to risk and brave everything. We were t
1377.ere willing to risk and brave everything. We were to let him suppose that Father
1378.uld for Manuel was touched by his coming his soul. through the inclement weather
1379.ccor. Alas selves to the feet of nothing but the old results followed. Father Ca
1380.which was the only obstacle to his being restored to his " He assured me," added
1381.h he seems to be fully aware but nothing moves him from his determination. I am
1382.o see me, but I very much excited during our conversation. will offer the Holy S
1383.n he Manuel was not so well that evening. visit, He ; spoke of Father Carey's to
1384. deal. to see him again, Man- You Seeing him excited me a good know, mother, I d
1385.ourse be glad to see but as for anything I'll else, it is out of the question."
1386.But the cramped half I illegible writing on the pages I turn tells faith- fully
1387.midnight, and restlessly hear my darling coughing, and moving is full about his
1388. and restlessly hear my darling coughing, and moving is full about his room. My
1389.sly hear my darling coughing, and moving is full about his room. My heart and it
1390.ot down at night whatever happens during the day. I go to his door and ask if he
1391.is door and ask if he will have anything. Nothing/ he answers; 'go to bed, Betti
1392.nd ask if he will have anything. Nothing/ he answers; 'go to bed, Bettine.' If h
1393. will have no one." Friday. This morning Manuel came down, of him, ' ! dressed,
1394.n-law, town with his brother- who having great influence over him dis- ! 86 THE
1395.E STORY OF MANUEL. suaded him from going, thinking him too ill. His disappointme
1396. MANUEL. suaded him from going, thinking him too ill. His disappointment excited
1397.fer those dreadful paroxysms of coughing and pain to hear his wild expressions o
1398.ost more than we can bear. Oh, God bring peace to our darling We cease, his moth
1399.bear. Oh, God bring peace to our darling We cease, his mother and I, to think of
1400.to think of his body in our overwhelming anxiety for his soul. So far the powers
1401.annot, oh she will not cease interceding for one who, whatever else his sins, ha
1402.r else his sins, has never ceased loving her and asking her aid Saturday. We pre
1403., has never ceased loving her and asking her aid Saturday. We prevailed on Manue
1404. After breakfast his mother was. sitting by him. — THE STORY OF MANUEL. 8? He
1405.. — THE STORY OF MANUEL. 8? He was ing out near the window, talking to her, an
1406. He was ing out near the window, talking to her, and look- now and then. The sun
1407.d then. The sun shone brightly, flooding the room with cheerful light. He was te
1408.room with cheerful light. He was telling her of certain troubled him, " curious
1409.oo much attach any superstitious meaning child, my to them " said his I ; mother
1410.deed. Do Now, mother," he I said, fixing his beautiful I eyes on a distant part
1411.le, a curls, see you —a child standing little creature with golden and rose-co
1412.ars before and moved the things standing upon it, then passed her arms to and fr
1413.ve so fair a visitant/' she said smiling, as he got up and came towards her, as
1414.enly stopped, leaned forward, and fixing his eyes with a keen concentrated gaze
1415.ngel visitant had come to us thismorning/ " But say "I don't think that," he sai
1416.y "I don't think that," he said. nothing to Mabel about it it might make her unh
1417. which we afterwards knew were thronging about him to defend and shield his soul
1418.nt powers of evil that were now pressing closer and nearer around him, until the
1419.equisitions of the Divine Law. Something happened very soon, which makes me love
1420.t / & Q ^A FIND- CONCLUSION. "AND HAVING SEARCHED DILIGENTLY SHE ETH THE GROAT A
1421.om pain. The doctor thinks him improving, and hopes now that he will get over th
1422.over this attack. But there is something I cannot define ever haunting me a some
1423. something I cannot define ever haunting me a something like a voice, only I can
1424.nnot define ever haunting me a something like a voice, only I cannot hear it, al
1425.ysterious way, that he is surely passing away, and my soul is filled with a tend
1426.er desire, poor soul! safety; everything else this is for her child's eternal in
1427. eternal in seems swallowed up absorbing thought. Father Carey drove out to see
1428. OF MANUEL. ; : who replied had anything to say to him " Nothing more than 1 hav
1429.ied had anything to say to him " Nothing more than 1 have already said." "Then I
1430.en I must go. My classes will be waiting if you want me at Good-by, Manuel for m
1431.slight agitation of manner. Then shaking hands they parted. Manuel and his mothe
1432.h, for the future. But no he was talking over his temporal affairs and certain h
1433.usual that night when we were conversing about all, for the occurrences of the d
1434.oment and at night, when she was leaving him, he kissed her with such tenderness
1435.ep then we both ; ; we stood — fearing to breathe lest we should rouse him how
1436.t we should rouse him how he was failing, by the saw, as — pallor of his face,
1437. bloodless tongue, which ! short panting breath trembled with every We feared th
1438.il the paroxysm passed off, then lifting his sad eyes looked through the window
1439.ndow towards the east, which was pulsing with veins of red and glowing with pale
1440.as pulsing with veins of red and glowing with pale flashes of gold, with an expr
1441.e that I shall never forget, as uttering a deep sigh he said: " Another day!' Oh
1442.ok! I thought I understood their meaning then but since, how eloquent, how plain
1443.ow plain they became to my understanding! He felt that another day had been spar
1444.evived him. possibilities of his getting back to town in a day or two, and made
1445. made some quaint remarks about hobbling around his office on crutches, for his
1446.ever. made light of his pains, declaring that he was not nearly so sick as he ha
1447.ifty times before; and talked of getting well, and what he would do when he got
1448. The day passed much as others preceding it.* Manuel's room was the family rende
1449.very one came solicitous to do something to cheer or comfort him, and full of te
1450.aned against his feeble knees, listening to the marvellous stories he told them;
1451.es he told them; or about him. imparting to him the the terriers ; last or how ;
1452.. were always full of it, 93 and nothing delighted him more than to sit and list
1453., and gone and the wintry day was fading like a wraith. Twilight was creeping on
1454.ing like a wraith. Twilight was creeping on, and an easterly wind drove sheets o
1455. gathered around the young life fleeting away, and the ; heart of the patient, s
1456.dran-ma's hour." And now she was sitting alone with Manuel in the twilight, litt
1457. Manuel in the twilight, little dreaming how swiftly it was to be ; : consecrate
1458. was to be ; : consecrated by the rising of hope's fair ! star, and the fulfilme
1459.e fire she was near the window, watching the gray mists drifting by, assuming st
1460.window, watching the gray mists drifting by, assuming strange, weird shapes as t
1461.ing the gray mists drifting by, assuming strange, weird shapes as the wind blew
1462.y looked like sorrowful spirits hurrying along on errands of woe. The firelight
1463.ht flickered on the wall, and everything was still. Her heart was overwhelmed wi
1464. beat- some forebodings which almost ing; Manuel, with his eyes closed, leaned b
1465., while she waited with quick, throbbing heart, (i ' " Mother," ! wondering to w
1466.bbing heart, (i ' " Mother," ! wondering to what lead ; would but he made no fur
1467. which the night gloom was fast stealing, and was almost lost in sad reverie whe
1468. his soul he cried for aid, and trusting in God she said "It is an easy thing, M
1469.ing in God she said "It is an easy thing, Manuel, to relinquish MaI have read in
1470.they the lodges. but by quietly dropping off To renounce Masonry does its not ne
1471.an- "I only know this, my swered drawing near and sitting down by him "I only kn
1472.this, my swered drawing near and sitting down by him "I only know that Masonry i
1473. sea-shore crumble beneath the advancing tides, There is leaving you without she
1474.th the advancing tides, There is leaving you without shelter or hope. nothing in
1475.ing you without shelter or hope. nothing in it to lean upon in that dread hour,
1476.to lean upon in that dread hour, nothing that can go with you beyond the grave t
1477.e, Manuel, to approach these soulhealing, life-giving sacraments when Father Car
1478. approach these soulhealing, life-giving sacraments when Father Carey " comes ag
1479.rse don't — but wont there's something, feel as if know what, that me I should
1480.orgive me ? " he said, almost whispering. " A thousand times, yes, my darling an
1481.ing. " A thousand times, yes, my darling and if I, motherly duty, have been some
1482.one, they ; One by conversation bubbling around him. tening, Mabel. I " I all am
1483.conversation bubbling around him. tening, Mabel. I " I all am talk, lis- like to
1484. sensations, and new and books, thinking was interested, amused, never dreaming
1485.g was interested, amused, never dreaming of the supernatural hope that had but a
1486.e vestibule of heaven. "I think, leaving my Miriam lie if said, just before him
1487. in bright and early," she said, kissing him. afterin to- " Bettine," wards, " h
1488. open, and another minute he was sitting in front of the bright wood fire, his h
1489.ly he enjoyed the change and to be lying there once more in her bed, his head re
1490.e once more in her bed, his head resting upon her pillow, brought back to both o
1491.etter; ; ; tranquil mood ; so commending her cause to Al- mighty God, she took u
1492.mighty God, she took up a book, thinking to read, as Manuel, now quiet, seemed d
1493.l, now quiet, seemed disposed to Opening the book at random, her eyes sleep. fel
1494. her eyes sleep. fell upon the following verses : " — But God gives patience,
1495.e more glorious, This mother her sobbing breath, Renouncing yet victorious." THE
1496.is mother her sobbing breath, Renouncing yet victorious." THE STORY OF MANUEL. "
1497.r?'' asked Manuel, who had been watching her. " It's a book of Elizabeth Brownin
1498.her. " It's a book of Elizabeth Browning's poetry. " Shall I read some of it alo
1499.in of the page. The words kept repeating themselves in her head all night, and s
1500.es, Manuel passed a miserable, suffering night, and his extremities are more tha
1501.Virgin of it Mount : Carmel, and holding child, will up, said to him " My " " If
1502. OF MANUEL. She fixed it on, and missing his medal, asked where it was. " I must
1503.room with a dejected countenance. Noting her anxious, eager look, he took her ha
1504.ell you, Mrs H is -, that can do nothing for Manuel. to his He absolutely the on
1505.nounce Masonry, which obstacle receiving ; the sacraments. plead, prayed and hav
1506.." " Oh, Father Carey, you are not going to give up my poor boy in this way ? "
1507.into account ? " she exclaimed, wringing her poor hands. " Yes," said Father Car
1508.Lady," continued the good priest, taking a medal from his side-pocket and blessi
1509. medal from his side-pocket and blessing it " get Manuel to put this on. I will
1510.nd strung the medal upon it, he watching every movement then she " Here is a med
1511.her love it for Him, to succor her dying son, she put about his neck. was she sp
1512.w of the Her heart was full of a longing, silent land irrepressible desire to sa
1513.nd irrepressible desire to say something of such force and power as would decide
1514. creation but what could she do, knowing his peculiar temperament and idiosyncra
1515.e did ? She stood at the window, looking listlessly out at the deso; —which la
1516.er heart throbbed almost its to bursting with child's safety. prisoned yearnings
1517.uel, my child," she said at last, daring all sol- her anxiety, and speaking tend
1518.aring all sol- her anxiety, and speaking tenderly and as she went towards him: "
1519.let Father Carey go away without hearing your confession. I have had many bitter
1520.I have suffered. ; emnly He said nothing, only closed his large beautiful weary
1521. weary expression. God's angel, standing by, drew nearer the struggling soul dre
1522. standing by, drew nearer the struggling soul drew nearer to the rescue and his
1523. sit seized with difficulty of breathing, and the old suffocating cough, which e
1524.ty of breathing, and the old suffocating cough, which erect on his bedside until
1525.ff. His mother on a low cushion, holding his purple, swollen feet in her lap, as
1526.a tender embrace. She felt like dropping her face upon them, to kiss them and wa
1527.end ; scene but they both hated anything like a both mother and son had an almos
1528.ld/* she replied, while his eyes trating glance. " I held hers in that keen, pen
1529.y life would say. He w assure of hearing the from on what truth, whatever it mig
1530.other/' he persisted. Manuel, my darling, I shall have to account to Almighty Go
1531.re, He gives them the far more exceeding great reward of eternal life." Just at
1532.iriam, then went to Manuel, and, leaning over, spoke to him in a low tone. She l
1533.ream she stood an instant without seeing me, then fell upon her knees and agoniz
1534.d's soul. to kneel I where 1 was sitting, except and recite the Sorstir in- did
1535.her two hours She rose up, and, crossing the hall, looked into the room communic
1536.hall, looked into the room communicating with Manuel's. The midShe flew back, sa
1537.h Manuel's. The midShe flew back, saying: dle door was closed. "Oh, Bettine, are
1538.her Carey opened the door, and, crossing the hall to my room, said " Rejoice Man
1539. has made his confession, and I am going to give him Extreme Unction, and the Ho
1540. their loved ones, poor mother's waiting, weary heart with such a supreme joy, a
1541.had she not been in the habit of keeping a strict discipline over her emotions s
1542.ve thought that a bridal was about being celebrated, so filled was every- heart
1543.ns. But Manuel never could bear anything like scenes, and we were very quiet and
1544.ence. We knew that he would prefer being alone during the solemn rites, so I onl
1545. that he would prefer being alone during the solemn rites, so I only went in and
1546.les, and assist Father Carey. My darling lay with his hand shading his face, but
1547.ey. My darling lay with his hand shading his face, but I saw that a ceaseless st
1548.at a ceaseless stream in of was dripping over his white cheeks, sweet balms givi
1549.ver his white cheeks, sweet balms giving refreshment and strength to tears : 106
1550.6 his soul, THE STORY OF MANUEL. washing it purer of its earthly stains. near th
1551.on and thankfulness in the soul-touching rites. rest knelt outside, It The was i
1552.re, his mother went " My " I and kissing him tenderly, whispered " little boy on
1553. thousand times over," she said, folding " But his hand in both of hers to her b
1554.without the slightest hope of prevailing w ith him and when I asked him, as I th
1555.en I thought perhaps that he was jesting, or something of that sort, and asked h
1556.erhaps that he was jesting, or something of that sort, and asked him if he was i
1557.nest. Again he said yes/ Are you willing to renounce Masonry ? I if ' ' THE STOR
1558.ked, and almost lost, a safe and abiding He' did not speak of what had passed he
1559.x above his bed, and, although shivering with agony, murmur no complaint. That n
1560.erings. It was past midnight. Everything was silent except the shrill whistling
1561.g was silent except the shrill whistling of the wind through the ice-covered tre
1562.m foot-bath might relieve your breathing, Manuel," said his mother, no longer ab
1563. able to bear the sight of his suffering in silence. " I'll go down and get Uncl
1564.e a great work today," she said, folding his hand in a closer clasp. " Yes, and
1565.d under her special protection and being perish lost how could she let you the w
1566. have done to-day, God helpoffice. , ing me." This was his confession of the fai
1567.ear of death, but as one ; who of living to enter into the " fight the good figh
1568. him the perils of defeat, by shortening the term of his exile, and taking him t
1569.tening the term of his exile, and taking him to* Himself when his soul was " whi
1570.s snow " and crowned with the glistening diadem of contrition. Three days longer
1571. Three days longer he lingered, uttering no murmur, he approached his end, so to
1572.e recollectedness and humility befitting one about entering into the presence of
1573.nd humility befitting one about entering into the presence of his Lord and Judge
1574. accepted with gratitude all that loving hands and hearts did for his comfort. F
1575. for the hour of death. At this ; making no complaint time, a pious Holy Face of
1576.purple, the beautiful features suffering dis- and covered with beaded drops of c
1577.tender pity on him who bore in his dying face the suffering image of her Son, *
1578.who bore in his dying face the suffering image of her Son, * * * The sun was slo
1579.er Son, * * * The sun was slowly sinking, and threw beams of tremulous effulgenc
1580.the walls ; MARY above where our darling lay the crucifix was surrounded by a co
1581.passion of the young life slowly sinking into the unseen, relentless tide Father
1582.his su- His mother, preme moment, having been told that he was THE STORY OF MANU
1583.t swiftly back to her room, and flinging herself upon her knees, prayed for him
1584.w of death and still prayed, not knowing in, how it was, when Father Carey came
1585.med the last sad offices for our darling. They composed his limbs, and folded hi
1586. folded his hands his delicate, tapering hands the fingers interlaced around a c
1587.flowers around him, I never saw anything half so fair and beautiful. The disfigu
1588.iful. The disfigurement of his suffering was gone forever. His classic head, —
1589.eatures, the long, black lashes sweeping the marble cheeks, the soft brown beard
1590.le cheeks, the soft brown beard, flowing in waves around his still, smiling mout
1591.owing in waves around his still, smiling mouth, made an image more perfect and b
1592. He giveth child, sleep to His bedarling, loved/ Good night, my my good night."
1593.OF MANUEL. when it is of those perishing cold nights, almost painful to breathe
1594. "dwell- and we were startled by hearing the most mournful sounds outside the ho
1595.sounds outside the house that I ever ing ; listened to, a succession of plaintiv
1596.ust outside the window where our darling lay, a dove, driven by the weather from
1597.nor of her Son, and rememberall when ing the infinite price souls, is He paid fo
1598.d surroundings, and the perhaps wearying outline of the devious ways by which ou
1599.e iniscences and homely sketches darling was brought back to God, would never ha
1600.DI. near sunset as two men stand talking on one of the lower terraces of the pub
1601.e meadows and shadowy solitudes, lending brightness to the scene and musical ech
1602.a twilight mantle over the white shining mists that like bridal veils crown thei
1603.rise in sweet breaths of incense, making the air drowsy with fragrance, and the
1604. floats out on the hushed air, repeating to heaven and earth the oft-told story
1605.cis Assisi, strike in, the air trembling and pulsing with their notes the as Ang
1606.strike in, the air trembling and pulsing with their notes the as Angelas sweeps
1607. the gardens, upon the groups chattering and laughing around the fountains upon
1608. upon the groups chattering and laughing around the fountains upon little childr
1609.to ascend the broad marble steps leading to the gardens. They are near the top ;
1610.ern Italy. spent his life in endeavoring to master the science of the stars astr
1611.as it was called in those days, spending his days in deep calculations, and his
1612.ep calculations, and his nights watching the heavens, grudging to his body both
1613.is nights watching the heavens, grudging to his body both sleep and food, and re
1614. body both sleep and food, and regarding all indulgence as base, compared with t
1615.nthusiastic studies. panion was, judging from his dress, a Florentine, and was a
1616.s, a Florentine, and was already pluming his poet-wings for sublime flights whic
1617.th stand silent, the astrologer thinking of the hour which would triumphantly
1618.rify his calculations, the poet steeping his soul glowing loveliness outspread b
1619.ions, the poet steeping his soul glowing loveliness outspread before him, when s
1620.wildly hither and thither, as if seeking safety some, flying in such blind haste
1621.ither, as if seeking safety some, flying in such blind haste that they get too n
1622. edge of the terrace, lose their footing and roll, spinning over and over, to th
1623.e, lose their footing and roll, spinning over and over, to the bottom but there
1624.about his neck, his longdark hair flying backwards on the wind, trying in vain t
1625.air flying backwards on the wind, trying in vain to curb them. *His companion a
1626.ith white agonized face clings shrieking to his arm, imped- ing his efforts to r
1627. clings shrieking to his arm, imped- ing his efforts to rein in the frightened a
1628.ow. bor- ders of a precipice overlooking the valley a hun- With one impulse the
1629. With one impulse the and friends spring forward, horses, at the risk of their l
1630.with foam, then he their limbs trembling and convulsed passes his long soft hand
1631.nd gently over their faces, : ; speaking caressingly to the frightened creatures
1632. of assistance, and the gentleman having descended from the chariot and led his
1633.MAD PENITENT OF to his stables, throwing TODI. 5 them several broad gold pieces
1634.ept the town generally in a fever Having seen that his horses step of excitement
1635.ff quietly, led slowly by the men having them in charge, —he he turns — not
1636.ght- ened woman, who reclines, trembling and sobbing hysterically, on the spot t
1637.man, who reclines, trembling and sobbing hysterically, on the spot to which he h
1638.and thank his preservers, who are moving away from the spot and are just turning
1639. away from the spot and are just turning into a shaded alley which leads by a sh
1640.ded alley which leads by a short Walking swiftly forward, he cut to the street.
1641.he street. overtakes them, and, saluting them courteously, holds out his hand to
1642.anks them in earnest language for saving his companion and himself from a certai
1643. that they deserve no thanks for obeying a humane impulse. Evidently chagrined a
1644.he young cavalier, with the blood rising hotly to his face, hands them his card,
1645.to his face, hands them his card, saying " If I can in any manner ever requite t
1646.r send this to my address " then turning on his heel, with — : ; " 6 THE MAD P
1647.t profligate of the age ; he is breaking his old father's heart by his wasteful
1648.d to pieces." " " If God, the All-seeing, were not over all said Alighieri, maki
1649.were not over all said Alighieri, making the Sign of the Cross. " The future, wh
1650. Don't undersaid the older man, laughing. stand, because I am incredulous, that
1651. I am incredulous, that I am not willing that it should be so for the Church hat
1652.l, if , " saints his " , whose beginning was no whit better than but such things
1653.ges in life, were not ashamed of talking religion entered into their daily it ;
1654.e so blessed " said the Maestro, lifting his velvet cap, and glancing upwards fo
1655.ro, lifting his velvet cap, and glancing upwards for an instant but in that one
1656., Alighieri, but the stars are beginning to come out, and I must be vigilant les
1657.first appearance of the new planet." ing star just risen " Thou hast yet faith "
1658.ens fall," said the astrologer, throwing back his head and fixing a look of rapt
1659.loger, throwing back his head and fixing a look of rapt belief on the blue depth
1660.t the best years of his life in studying the movements of the heavenly bodies, a
1661.siast, others as a magician, but nothing of all this disturbed him he pursued th
1662.observations he was sure was approaching, and would be visible ere long, to crow
1663.action for me," said Alighieri, thinking of his gentle Beatrice away in Florence
1664.hee to a festa at his house this evening; but had forgotten it until thou didst
1665. to heaven," the good monk said, folding his hands with a smile of complacency "
1666. as he saw her an hour afterwards moving in among her guests with winning smiles
1667. moving in among her guests with winning smiles and graceful mien, clothed the r
1668. mien, clothed the rich attire befitting her station, and decorated with the old
1669.the cloister. The even then had a saying that " a beautiful woman is the thought
1670.e a bright particular ; star, be willing to let her light shine before men, migh
1671.ividly, that in later He years, clothing Beatrice in her beauty, the world saw h
1672.the cloister. do, which in the beginning made Father Giovanni vow never again to
1673.e days longer Cimabue and Todi, studying the marvellous paintings and sculptures
1674. Guido of Sienna, of Giotto, and seeking out in the monastery and convent chapel
1675.icated in his honor. And here, wandering among the delicious scenery, the young
1676.naventura's his " Leg- Francis," feeling heart moved with strange emotion by the
1677.e darkness, though the night was falling when St. he breathed filling his last,
1678.was falling when St. he breathed filling his last, came in a great multitude, th
1679. scenes. Several times after the evening spent at her house, Alighieri saw the b
1680. the early Masses sometimes when, coming from Holy Francis find ; Communion —
1681.peace as the world cannot give, unseeing * In Catholic countres during Mass, it
1682., unseeing * In Catholic countres during Mass, it is a custom for ladies to ungl
1683.THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. and unthinking of all except the heavenly Guest who ab
1684.nature, but her loveliness was something set apart, and as far above all earthly
1685.s in Todi, Alighieri met, either driving in his gilded chariot on the promenade,
1686. grace. same careless, reckless, winning The poet's heart was strangely drawn to
1687.e seek to analyze the sentiment, knowing how impossible of growth a friendship w
1688.lked on as if unobservant, acknowledging by no look or sign ; THE MAD PENITENT O
1689.et appeared, and whose heart was growing faint with deferred hope, but whose fai
1690.e spent an hour in the Cathedral, gazing upon the last creation of Cimabue snatc
1691.and borne them away, then with lingering steps he turned his face towards Floren
1692.tranger that he felt assured was rolling through space towards him for had not a
1693.ilacs and roses and other sweet-smelling blooms, which, wafted sometimes singly
1694.spers and Nones as of old, while morning and evening they reminded the faithful
1695.nes as of old, while morning and evening they reminded the faithful on mountain
1696.n the silent, shadowy churches, kneeling before shrines, altars and were always
1697.HE MAD PENITENT OF souls TODI. 1 holding communion with Heaven. Now and then the
1698.s the centre of at; traction, some going to gaze delightedly on the wrestling an
1699.ing to gaze delightedly on the wrestling and chariot-races, tests ; other feats
1700.eats of the athletes, the and the daring gladiatorial con- others to hear the re
1701.iatorial con- others to hear the reading of ; new com- edies of still others to
1702.yptian girls. The games over, everything would settle down once more to the dull
1703.everyday life. every one was complaining of the dullness, and wishing for someth
1704.complaining of the dullness, and wishing for something to amuse them; even Jacqu
1705. the dullness, and wishing for something to amuse them; even Jacques dei Benedet
1706.e, and one day when all Todi was growing weary to death of the condition of affa
1707. and prodigal exas travagance, by gaming and other expensive vices, and that the
1708.ensive vices, and that there was nothing left of their former prosperity except
1709.rtly after grandfather. ruin One morning, their was made public, the older Bened
1710.he silent anguish of the old man hurting him more than the most violent reproach
1711. hastily obeyed the summons, not knowing what to expect for the servant who call
1712., walked towards his father, and lifting his eyes he saw what it was he stood st
1713.s if turned to stone. His eyes, starting almost from his head, gazed upon the gl
1714.his head, gazed upon the glazed, staring eyes of the dead his glazed eyes. — ;
1715.e upon whose wide-open eyes the expiring lamp sent strange, fitful gleams, impar
1716.p sent strange, fitful gleams, imparting to them a lifelike expression of wrath
1717.imself upon his stiff knees, and lifting up the cold, to his burning forehead, h
1718. and lifting up the cold, to his burning forehead, hand, pressed and registered
1719.but in what spirit we shall see. placing the hand whence he had lifted it, he st
1720.life. He secluded own apartment, leaving to good monks of St. Francis, to whom h
1721.e body was deposited in its last resting-place. The and monks chanted the solemn
1722., " or he is dead to all natural feeling." But they did not know in fact we are
1723.here when His grand designs are ripening slowly but surely, through human means.
1724.n have whispered sympathy but that being impossible, ; THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI.
1725.w earnestly she prayed for him, offering her very life, if need be, And why ? Sh
1726.gal son as time And, without ever seeing him on, passed she prayed, she besieged
1727.d that awful day-dawn while ; ; kneeling at the feet of his dead father, and thi
1728. from his it pagan, that name, believing, like a would appease his spirit and wi
1729.ept at Mass, or sometimes in the evening wandering alone in the more retired par
1730.s, or sometimes in the evening wandering alone in the more retired parts of the
1731.and companIndeed loss of ionship keeping aloof his former friends. we fear that
1732. grieved over the her gay sinner, loving citizens who used so much to to afford
1733.ions, good investments, and his untiring attentions to his affairs, he had nearl
1734.d offered her Communions for him. Living so long apart from social intercourse,
1735. THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. again seeking her, drawn by an irresistible impulse,
1736. the fact that holier it was the dawning of the first virtuous love he had ever
1737. dei Benetopic of the day in Todi having, after a few more visits to Julia's det
1738. been the only way he knew, and, finding it pleasant, had run therein until his
1739. him from his mad career and now, having fulfilled the vow he then made to resto
1740. his daughter's happiness to his keeping, and consented to her receiving his add
1741. keeping, and consented to her receiving his addresses, saying: " Thy cause must
1742.d to her receiving his addresses, saying: " Thy cause must stand upon I thy own
1743.e other, proudly " I must have a willing bride or none. ; ; Julia shall is my fi
1744.rn loves me I be the happiest man living. Good-night." Julia did not reject her
1745.rd forms of religion, he was a worldling, proud, ambitious, and had a will of ir
1746.ood or evil would it not then be risking her earthly happiness, perhaps her very
1747., to whom she confided all and he, being a discreet and, helpless to decide for
1748. to whose life morality and to was going had been a his native an earthquake to
1749.a, and feared that she was about rushing to the destruction of her earthly happi
1750.ITENT OF evil TODI. the danger and being upon be averted from of innocent as a v
1751. of an unprincipled man, notwithstanding which they prayed ardently for his conv
1752. ever needed such prayers and the saving grace of God, Jacques dei Benedetti did
1753.and nuptial Mass went on, amidst rolling music and clouds of in; ; THE MAD PENIT
1754.sip and talk that day, there was nothing came so near the truth as the saying of
1755.ing came so near the truth as the saying of that toothless old woman, whose head
1756.he contrary, a III. was, notwithstanding all predic- happy one. Jacques dei Bene
1757.t was his pride to think that everything belonging to him was the best of its ki
1758.pride to think that everything belonging to him was the best of its kind the sim
1759. have been too perfect but for one thing. It was not in his devotion his long be
1760.gnity conferred upon him by the reigning prince in reward for some successful ac
1761.ersia and eries Lyons ; the most cunning embroid- from India, the most rare and
1762.se to their charities and his ungrudging alms to the poor. If a new altar was to
1763.ewhere, or to be new mosaics needed wing added to the monastery of St. Francis,
1764. abbot's memorial, his was the unsparing hand that responded to every appeal, pa
1765.was by nature lavish, and fond of giving and he was blessed and prayed for as no
1766.filled with the deepest humility, giving place to no emotion of vainglory or pri
1767.HE MAD PENITENT OF TODL fer 3! something, and so long as he gave freely, and all
1768.generous alms on the needy and suffering, why should she not accept her gilded b
1769.r, the old Count Gondolfo, died, leaving his daughhe blessed his. children, for
1770.own son, and besought him with his dying breath, to watch over and then, fortifi
1771.emain unbroken. But ; ; Benedetti gazing sadly, it is true, upon the white, draw
1772.d be merry Faugh the thought of becoming a carcass sickens me " and he left the
1773. air of his garden, his only grief being the tears which he knew that her loss w
1774.y when in an atmosphere of gay, stirring life, and surrounded by everything that
1775.rring life, and surrounded by everything that could charm the senses or delight
1776. observances, and the period of mourning, were inevitable he would be obliged to
1777.here joyous times to the music. fretting ; in Todi, and talk over the old in or
1778.and talk over the old in or in strolling harm through the gardens, and there cou
1779.s, and there could be no that, listening And while he was thus inwardly under th
1780.or her, she spent the season of mourning in seclusion and quiet, in tranquil dev
1781.and the conversion of In simple mourning robes, the her husband. gauds, splendor
1782.pathy and companionship of the one being whom she best loved, Julia was almost h
1783.orld. A few friends were admitted during. these days of mourning, whose aims and
1784. admitted during. these days of mourning, whose aims and aspirations, being like
1785.rning, whose aims and aspirations, being like her own, cheered and consoled her
1786.ed swiftly and happily by. Every morning found ; her humbly kneeling before the
1787.very morning found ; her humbly kneeling before the altar of St. Stephen the Mar
1788.ltar of St. Stephen the Martyr, offering her Communion and devotions as ever for
1789.. Nor were her poor forgotten in seeking to alleviate their sufferings, visiting
1790. to alleviate their sufferings, visiting them in their poor hovels, and : supply
1791.em in their poor hovels, and : supplying their needs, in literal accordance with
1792.ys passed on, Benedetti, who had nothing to console him, beyond the perishable B
1793. he longed to see the sunshine streaming through the windows again, and flowers,
1794.the sounds of music, revelry and dancing which formerly echoed through his halls
1795.self from home, frequently not returning until far in the night, and sometimes n
1796. was evi; ; ; ; dent that he was seeking pleasures outside his own home, pleasur
1797.e would hurry from her presence, leaving her lonely, slight and saddened by even
1798.r lonely, slight and saddened by evening he came in thick, and his gait fond, ma
1799.eddened face, his speech unsteady, doing his best in a to conceal his real condi
1800.eal condition. With a frightened, aching heart she : take no notice of anything
1801.g heart she : take no notice of anything unusual seemed to she had never given h
1802.that she dreaded him. might not be going well with She was very pale, and was ge
1803.y and when, under pretext of not feeling well, he retired, she was thankful. She
1804. hours of that sorrowful night in taking counsel with herself, questioning her o
1805.taking counsel with herself, questioning her own heart severely, and praying ear
1806.ning her own heart severely, and praying earnestly for guidance. " I have been s
1807. from solitude and devotion as something fit only for priests and This is no way
1808.it was not to sleep, but to lie watching with wide open eyes and listening for t
1809.tching with wide open eyes and listening for the slightest movement from the nex
1810.er husband's stertorous, heavy breathing filled her with alarm. in all Never her
1811.nce of flowers their ! of music stealing through He hastily entered ; : the welc
1812. : the welcomed him the sight of glowing hues, grouped with dark greens, and hea
1813. of white and pale rosecolor, decorating the vases, and garlanded about the pill
1814.o one, and ran up to his wife's dressing-room, where he found her in rich attire
1815.cked with his favorite gems, and looking more beautiful than ever, as she came f
1816.hy penance is ended," he said, embracing her. " How beautiful thou art, bella sp
1817.rt, bella sposa ! and what an enchanting Ah," he said, surprise thou hast prepar
1818.AD PENITENT OF TODI. 37 suitfast- gazing fondly upon her, " how much more able t
1819.e able to thy years than so much praying, and ing and penance." " Penance! dear
1820. thy years than so much praying, and ing and penance." " Penance! dear Jacques,
1821.e ? " she asked, with a smile, smoothing the hand which still clasped hers. " Th
1822.y father's death gave me penance a thing. enough for a lifetime," he said, with
1823.s a great sorrow," she said, raisit. ing his hand and leaning her fair cheek " I
1824.e said, raisit. ing his hand and leaning her fair cheek " It was, upon remorse.
1825.emorse. the heart " Dear for thee. dying day, a bitter What more penance wouldst
1826.to my will accept it." he said, laughing, an 1 kissing her hand as he folded her
1827.ept it." he said, laughing, an 1 kissing her hand as he folded her to his breast
1828.her tender flesh, moment under reminding her every moment of the aim she had in
1829.e said sweetly, as she left the dressing room. "Company to dinner!" he exclaimed
1830.s heart, for she was gentle and yielding and did they not love each other entire
1831.rely ? There seemed to him to be nothing to cloud his felicity. He had retrieved
1832.eniently of his former life, and smiling said to each other "Aha! our Jurisconsu
1833.ver ready to assist young and struggling ! ; THE MAD PENITENT OF artists ; TODI.
1834. 39 and he had the honor of entertaining Alighieri, whose acquaintance he had ma
1835.de in Florence, and who was then writing his " Divine Comedy," in the bastard La
1836. rudely repulsed his thanks after having saved his life. The old star-gaze/ had
1837.w he could never behold it he was living in poverty and actual want, with; out a
1838.aimed Benedetti, u to think I am rolling in wealth and luxury while the man who
1839.elf to do me a favor," he said, grasping the poet's hand. " If I may, most gladl
1840.Thou mayest if thou wilt ; I ask nothing that could hurt the most sensitive scru
1841.les of a saint, said Benedetti, flushing. "What " I wouldst thou have, friend ?
1842.id Alighieri, a divine smile brightening his countenance. would settle an annuit
1843.ss romance thou mayest about it, keeping in view that the annuity is in payment
1844.t due his family. be suspected of having a hand in it if he found it out he'd th
1845.and destitute," the Florentine, grasping the other's hand. " It is a debt, remem
1846.no power to relieve, his own means being the necessaries of leave barely suffici
1847.ttle luxury he might crave and all owing to the noble generosity of a man he had
1848. earth, earthy but a day was approaching when the incense from the golden vials
1849.n his behalf, whose good works now being without faith were as dead as the fruit
1850.w over Sodom and Gomorrah. vide clothing and ; ; CHAPTER One bright IV. hour whe
1851.ally spent her mornings, fully expecting to find her there. The light air he was
1852. her there. The light air he was humming died upon his lips, as, looking around,
1853. humming died upon his lips, as, looking around, he saw no signs of her except h
1854. that her fair hands had been fashioning for one day, at an rarely there, Benede
1855.rely there, Benedetti of her poor, lying " upon it. Where is your lady ? maid, w
1856.tian. fiend fly off with so much praying " he " Are you sure it is the Caexclaim
1857.ere?" " I some chance then of my finding her think so, signor." Chafing with imp
1858.y finding her think so, signor." Chafing with impatience Benedetti rushed off to
1859.athedral, where, just as he was crossing the marble pavement of the wide portico
1860. say : " Here ! head he saw her standing beside him, wondering with deep emotion
1861.e saw her standing beside him, wondering with deep emotion if he had come thilhe
1862. for some his we turn back?" and turning pious purpose. "Aha, runaway! Not for t
1863.I it thou? Turn back? only came to bring thee have great news for thee, bella sp
1864.TODI. fragrant blossoms and clus- tering leaves excluded the warm glare of the s
1865.eat news indeed " he exclaimed, throwing himself upon the pillow of an ivory cou
1866. I ! Now am stood near her ; '"something which myself out to obtain, and I the s
1867.ou knowest, bella sposa, that will bring me. have worn don't know which is I Tod
1868. honor of the birth of a son to the king. He is so devout, and keeps so many mon
1869. have not had games ficulty in obtaining his consent, for he is per- suaded that
1870.enam determined answered, with a sinking heart. have ordered a new gallery to be
1871., and I shall be so occupied in planning the other arrangements for days to come
1872.lla sposa," he said fondly, " Aha toying with a tress of her soft silky hair. ho
1873. pains me ! " she said, ! with quivering " Pains thee How ? can I help being pro
1874.ring " Pains thee How ? can I help being proud of of possess- thee, sweet love T
1875.s- thee, sweet love The very thought ing such a treasure arch, if such as no mon
1876.reasure — makes me supremely happy ing her hand to his heart. " for he replied
1877.! art not like that " " she said, laying her long " ! fair hand upon his head. B
1878.ly. judge righteously," she use of being pious ? " If the devil don't get old Sa
1879.chi, what is the Here am I always giving to love to give. I the poor and to the
1880.ever happier than nature. when am giving. It is my Have ; I not just sent a piec
1881.ne the love of Him," she said, smoothing back the hair from his forehead, and sm
1882. the hair from his forehead, and smiling brightly. " Yes, thou art good, my love
1883." Yes, thou art good, my love, according to thy mind way." ; by and by our Lord
1884.re " Yes, as will be comedies, wrestling, dancing, music, comic races, recitatio
1885. as will be comedies, wrestling, dancing, music, comic races, recitations, chari
1886.est woman on earth, were simply wearying and irksome trials for his sake she suf
1887. for his sake she suffered them, bearing them as cheerfully as she might any oth
1888.er gentle reproofs, to chide with loving words his worldliness, and try to lead
1889.en only so ; long as he appeared willing to listen the moment an ex- shadow dark
1890.e would change the subject for something more congenial with his gay temperament
1891.hearts even when she talked with glowing cheeks and brightened eyes of poetry, a
1892.pose was to win him, and not, by harping with sad countenance, on themes which h
1893.drive him yet further away from a saving practice of his Faith, for she was pers
1894.as persuaded he was only putKeen in ting it off to a more convenient season. his
1895.s perceptions, the proud pleasure-loving man was not slow to notice this exercis
1896., like winged seeds, dropped into taking root, but showing no vitality his heart
1897.s, dropped into taking root, but showing no vitality his heart — ; — ; — T
1898.life upShe always met him with springing within him. smiles ; and, banishing eve
1899.ging within him. smiles ; and, banishing every appearance of sad- ness from thei
1900. he, in turn, was careful never to bring within its sacred precincts anything, e
1901.ing within its sacred precincts anything, either in or books, that painting, scu
1902.thing, either in or books, that painting, sculpture would shock her virtuous ins
1903.d Diana, of Bacchus and Apollo, reviving in their verses all the sensu- ous trad
1904.all the sensu- ous traditions concerning them, which had better have perished wh
1905.m that only the voice of God could bring out of its sealed sepulchre. Todi was f
1906.thers to take part in the games. Nothing else was thought of, nothing else was t
1907.es. Nothing else was thought of, nothing else was talked of in short, every one
1908.ENT OF own TODI. pleased notwithstanding, because each one cherished and stood o
1909.y made themselves happy this, by betting on that or the other, while there were
1910.rtain repairs at the amphitheatre having been made too hastily for safety; among
1911. original one, which had been blackening there in the sun and rains of a century
1912.le have a natural faculty for predicting misfortunes and accidents, and take a g
1913.ake a ghoulish sort of pleasure in doing it then, if something dreadful does hap
1914. pleasure in doing it then, if something dreadful does happen, their " I told yo
1915.ppen, their " I told you so " has a ring of triumph in it, and they feel thai: e
1916.s under the new gallery, which was being painted and gilded by artists from Rome
1917. mists still lingered jets of glittering light shot up towards the violet-tinted
1918.he sunshine would make ! was the opening day of the games. The croakers had pred
1919.but now all was propitious, only waiting for every one to waken up to enjoy it.
1920.ide door of a lofty and elegant dwelling, beautiful in architecture and rich in
1921.iful in architecture and rich in carving and sculpture, a lady closely wrapped i
1922. the street, and she was the only living thing to be seen in the long narrow vis
1923.treet, and she was the only living thing to be seen in the long narrow vista bet
1924.dei Benedetti, and those who saw morning, even the celebrant himself, when she r
1925.y might have been pardoned for believing that light from the half-opened portals
1926.d portals of her that heaven was shining upon her. The Jurisconsult wished his b
1927.tiful wife to appear on this the opening day of the games in her most magnificen
1928. of fire like an imprisoned soul glowing in its depths, gleamed in her hair, aro
1929.nedetti presently ran up to her dressing"-room to speak to her, she happened to
1930.peak to her, she happened to be standing just costly silk of pale delicate color
1931. of sunshine slanted over her, imparting to her appearance an ethereal effect. H
1932.me, he clasped it a moment, then bending his knee kissed it, saying " Nay hast t
1933. then bending his knee kissed it, saying " Nay hast thou just stepped out of Par
1934.he answered, with a little laugh, making him rise. " I am only I all these beaut
1935.ount Pelchioni, and his wife, are coming presently "Ah! I am go with thee." sorr
1936.nt those who have no right from crowding upon our party, for at a time like this
1937.heir way wherever they can find standing room. Farewell, sweet one, until we mee
1938.d her as if carven image of a saint, ing look hurried away. It he had been kissi
1939.ook hurried away. It he had been kissing the and after one fond linger- was a gl
1940.ous day, clear and balmy, and the awning which formed the temporary roof of the
1941.e arena to the roof. It was one wavering, beautiful mass of color, from which sh
1942. forgotten, and every heart paid willing homage to one who wore her honors and b
1943.subsided when troupe of Egyptian dancing-girls floated out to perform a measure
1944.d he was evidently detained by something imperative, for the royal seats were al
1945.eyes, which had been restlessly watching for him, caught a glimpse of him forcin
1946.for him, caught a glimpse of him forcing his way through the surging crowd towar
1947. him forcing his way through the surging crowd towards her. There was a proud sm
1948.dings became her. But just as he, having caught her eye, lifted his jewelled cap
1949.his head, there came a sudden, crackling sound, shrieks filled the air, and that
1950.rena. He saw it all, and with a piercing cry, ; ; $6 THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. a
1951. on the edge of the mutilated, shrieking heap, some of whom were quite dead, oth
1952.ho was all the world to him, and lifting her tenderly he conveyed her to a place
1953.r to a place of safety, the crowd making way and giving what She was not dead sh
1954. safety, the crowd making way and giving what She was not dead she assistance th
1955.e they could. ; breathed, and, unclosing her eyes, fixed a tender gaze upon his
1956.e laid her down, her head still reposing upon his breast, and began to cut open
1957.ay further from the crowd. Again raising her in his arms, which cradled her as t
1958. might her new-born babe, and forbidding any to follow him, he bore her to a gre
1959.mphitheatre could reach them, and laying her upon the grass and flowers that spa
1960.and linen of her under garments, tearing them open that her heart might have no
1961.t ; mysteries which were already dawning upon her there was a tremulous movement
1962.a tremulous movement of her white, dying lips, and bending down his ear, he hear
1963.nt of her white, dying lips, and bending down his ear, he heard her whisper " It
1964.ment was worn, and that by the suffering of her tender flesh she had hoped to wi
1965.but he motioned them away, and gathering the dead form to his bosom, he bore her
1966.mighty Hand of God, he watched, shedding no tear, uttering no moan, until those
1967., he watched, shedding no tear, uttering no moan, until those who were to perfor
1968.inger, as he stood for an instant gazing down upon the matchless beauty " Leave
1969.e apartment, where the sunshine stealing in through the fragrant jessamine, and
1970.t jessamine, and the wild sweet warbling of birds out- and follies this : 58 sid
1971.he darkness of despair, or the beginning of a new life ? Sympathy, condolence, a
1972.d the bones and the marrow " and looking back upon earthly ; ; he beheld all the
1973. solemn whisper of a new life struggling with his half-awakened conscience, or w
1974.s grief and the memory of the pure being he had lost that stood out above all el
1975. captive once more but nature was giving place ; " an to a new-born, supernatura
1976.imply uttered a stern " No," and closing his door flung himself prostrate and li
1977.olemn grand Requiem Mass, or the wailing music of Palestrina's Requiem, the soul
1978.Palestrina's Requiem, the soul-thrilling Dies Irce, and the prayers for the repo
1979.se of the saintly dead ? — The blazing flowers splendor of waxlights altar, am
1980.tar, among the fra- upon the the curling clouds of grant incense that rolled up
1981. almost veiled the holy place, reminding one of the angel in John's vision, who
1982.sion, who stood before the altar, having a golden censer, to whom was given much
1983.et pall and was laid in its last resting-place amidst chanting which mingled wit
1984.n its last resting-place amidst chanting which mingled with the sound of weeping
1985. which mingled with the sound of weeping, and how at the last Asperges the bless
1986.en the world, weary of a week's mourning and seclusion and even the priests, wor
1987.worn out with their long vigils, fasting, and the wearying ceremonies which had
1988.r long vigils, fasting, and the wearying ceremonies which had occupied them so m
1989.ir way, and the last sound of retreating footsteps made a dismal echo under the
1990.ad father. After ; this no more grieving here they would separate until the judg
1991.y earthly hope and desire, of everything that could hold his and thus stripped o
1992., he was always left, present, assisting with devout attention, looking head bow
1993.assisting with devout attention, looking head bowed upon his breast, and floods
1994.is breast, and floods of tears streaming from his He walked the streets barehead
1995.ragged, and his bare feet often bleeding from the flints neither to the right no
1996. man of Todi withheld them from anything outspoken. Some of them thought he woul
1997.pened but for his foolishness in putting up that gallery on rotten beams but wha
1998.beams but what was the use of his making an ass of himself? Thus they talked, an
1999.erisive shouts but he, as if not hearing, went his way in silence, unheeding the
2000.ring, went his way in silence, unheeding their insults. One day, like the prophe
2001.ut his neck, a symbol of her approaching captivity, the poor penitent showed him
2002.a saddle and bridle on his back, walking on his hands and knees like a beast of
2003.' said a holy man who knew ; he is doing penance." No, he was not mad, but so ov
2004.nce of his past life that he was willing to be as a fool and abject before men,
2005.men, here in this city where, forgetting God, and setting holy things aside, he
2006. city where, forgetting God, and setting holy things aside, he had sinned where
2007.estitute how he went poor in the uplying hovels above offices for the town, mini
2008. above offices for the town, ministering to their necessities and performing the
2009.ring to their necessities and performing the meanest them, none knowing under th
2010.erforming the meanest them, none knowing under the cowl he wore pulled down over
2011. who he was, some of them even believing that the dear Lord none knew of his nig
2012.at Rome, but when those were sent having authority three men of holy lives — t
2013.and question him, his answers, breathing a spirit of deep humility and penitence
2014.Jacopone " showed no signs of recovering from his blessed insanity ; A his auste
2015.n by his townspeople as the very Nothing moved him, either refuse of the earth.
2016. or derision ; rejoiced in them, feeling that for his sins and the time wasted i
2017.e deserved porter of it all. One morning the the Franciscan Monastery approached
2018.porter went Prior away to do his bidding, and thought " Our Abbot does strange :
2019.eport things sometimes he may his coming, and evil. I may our Blessed in Lady of
2020.n, at Montserrat, and come near dragging his soul to hell " ! By this time the P
2021.o the Abbot's seated at a table, writing in door, where he rapped, and was bid t
2022.nfinished sentence, his glance inquiring why he was interrupted " One is at unwo
2023.e," answered the Prior. " Jacopone Bring him hither, my good Prior. Jacopone mus
2024.ior. Jacopone must never be kept waiting on the roadside he comes so rarely that
2025.no reply, and withdrew to do the bidding of his Superior, believing in his inmos
2026.o the bidding of his Superior, believing in his inmost heart that he was placing
2027. in his inmost heart that he was placing himself on dangerous ground in granting
2028. himself on dangerous ground in granting an interview with a man of whose eccent
2029. arose from his chair, and stood waiting, while strange emotions agitated his he
2030.endor and triumph, followed by a hooting crowd, accoutred and moving upon his ha
2031.by a hooting crowd, accoutred and moving upon his hands and feet like a beast of
2032.now, since the beginance. ; — — ning of his penitential days, astery. come t
2033. astery. come to the monWhat could bring him now? opened, The door and " Jacopon
2034.ilt, I will remain so it is more fitting, as I have come to beg a great boon at
2035.on ; but what God's holy name?" " Having fulfilled a vow, I now wish to enter th
2036.servant," he 'said humbly, never raising his eyes. The Abbot did not reply immed
2037.at here, under holy obedience, and doing penance for my sins, I may work out my
2038.ead upon his breast, and without raising his eyes left the room. Wrapping his ta
2039.raising his eyes left the room. Wrapping his tattered cloak about him, and pulli
2040.is tattered cloak about him, and pulling the cowl over his head, he followed a m
2041. his sins which When daylight was fading had caused them. out of the sky he was
2042.who had care of the sacred spot touching him upon the shoulder and telling him t
2043.uching him upon the shoulder and telling him that he must go away, as he was abo
2044. intuitive certainty he felt regard- ing the supernatural character of Jacopone'
2045. How mistaken, ties how terrible a thing it would be to bring one into the Order
2046.ow terrible a thing it would be to bring one into the Order of devotion, who by
2047.egularity of the commuIn nity, and bring scandal perhaps upon it offering the Di
2048.d bring scandal perhaps upon it offering the Divine Sacrifice he besought enligh
2049.I. of J$ whom he had a special deknowing the tenderness of her compassion for pe
2050.rofessed monks to meet him, before going to the refectory, in the chapter-room a
2051.mission to the Order, and the case being a peculiar one he desired to hear what
2052., but solely for the good and well-being of the community and as he was a man wh
2053. piety and austerities made him a living example Then to them all, his words had
2054.D PENITENT OF TODI. any unanimity having been arrived at, an aged monk who had r
2055.n his hands and feet, arose, and leaning on his staff for support, asked Every b
2056., asked Every breath was hushed, fearing to be heard. to lose a word that the fe
2057.them. " Brethren," he said, in quivering tones, " be- ware how ye drive back fro
2058.at he was mad ? Beware, I say, of giving this penitent man a stone when in all h
2059.d by a rope around his neck, to the king's stables, where he lived among the bea
2060. the beasts of the stall, never uttering a word to make known his founder, of !
2061.of ! ' ; whom men ; state, but accepting his sins, until it it all with dumb ! h
2062.d monk dropped into his chair, trembling and exhausted with the effort he had ma
2063.words had fallen lently, rarely speaking upon every heart present almost as if t
2064.l. no one moved, until the Abbot, rising from his chair said " It is the holy wi
2065. the brethren, peace." On Monday morning, first early Mass, Jacopone, kneeling n
2066.ng, first early Mass, Jacopone, kneeling near the altar of Our Lady of Sorrows,
2067.touch him upon the shoulder, and turning he saw one of the servants of the monas
2068. placed a letter in his hand, whispering, " From the Abbot," and withdrew. and f
2069.n broke the seal the Abbot's handwriting a confirm; He he was to enter on his no
2070.n his novitiAfter a fervent thanksgiving ate that very day. he arose, and drawin
2071.ate that very day. he arose, and drawing his cloak about him he proation of his
2072. hands knelt before him, meekly awaiting his blessing, the good monk could but t
2073.before him, meekly awaiting his blessing, the good monk could but think: " So ou
2074. for that of his He blessed the kneeling penitent, then Order. in his usual cold
2075.n, after which he would submit to having his beard shaved. "Oh, " you is livery
2076.ent from the Prior's presence, following the monk as directed, he looked after "
2077.ill not look so crazy when him, thinking with joy." : he gets on the habit, and
2078. the third century, which he was copying. Ah, good Prior! hadst thou known of th
2079.years^ and listened to the soul-touching prayers that had breathed through it, t
2080.ly in life, that life if his and willing if need be to give brother might be ser
2081.as time went on he, without self-seeking, won from the brotherhood a strange, re
2082.of his unworthiness, he shrank trembling from so great an honor, and made his vo
2083.is vows as a brother-servant, performing the most laborious and servile offices
2084.is choice elected. But there was nothing known with certainty the air was full o
2085., and Masses to be offered every morning to obtain the blessing of God upon the
2086.red every morning to obtain the blessing of God upon the deliberations of the Co
2087.embers thereof to a choice well pleasing to Christendom and the The visible head
2088.at a Pope was elected, the choice having fallen upon a cenobite who was called f
2089.ted him, he obeyed the call, and leaving his beloved solitude was crowned Pope w
2090.estine V., with great pomp and rejoicing, "for," said the people, " so holy a ma
2091. Jacopone kept his own counsel, striving with himself to overcome this strange s
2092.ail ; anxiety that so beset him, praying the more, and performing greater acts o
2093.et him, praying the more, and performing greater acts of humiliation and penance
2094. that end. But all in vain until, having written a letter in secret, he prevaile
2095.d on the messenger whom he served during the few days he remained at the monaste
2096. his usual calm was restored but fearing, after a little "while, that he had tra
2097. poor monk of St. Francis, to be writing to his Holiness? Where is thy humility?
2098. moved to " ; this ill-advised act bring upon them? Then re- membering Jacopone'
2099. act bring upon them? Then re- membering Jacopone's holy life, he bethought him
2100. the matter in the hands of God, praying that no would come of it. Pope Celestin
2101.ell The pomp, the ceremonial surrounding him, the crowds of petitioners that bes
2102.es of the temporal power, the perplexing questions of the spiritual, the corrupt
2103.Church, who were affairs, already moving against hoping to prevail by their wick
2104.e affairs, already moving against hoping to prevail by their wicked intrigues, a
2105.me, and TODI. 83 in eloquent and burning words it "reminded him of the terrible
2106.terrible exchange he had made in leaving the holy and contemplative seclusion of
2107.fend thyself against them thou wilt sing a . . . . . when word, / there . sorry
2108.as this the sign he had asked? Wrestling in prayer, with his crucifix pressed to
2109.magnitude of the dangers fly threatening his soul, he determined to without bet-
2110.determined to without bet- Rome, leaving the Fisherman's Ring, the tiara and the
2111. bet- Rome, leaving the Fisherman's Ring, the tiara and the Chair of Peter to so
2112.him far from Rome, burdened with nothing except the crucifix which he had brough
2113. desert, and without a companion, having left his confessor to make known and ex
2114.minious others called him a " drivelling " idiot those who, having discerned his
2115.a " drivelling " idiot those who, having discerned his weakness, 'hoped to preva
2116. ; ; the Church great troubles by laying down a bur- den which he was too weak t
2117.e rumors of a mysterious and threatening letter he had received, but none could
2118.ere at his the the monastery of to bring Francis near Todi. " See," said the Abb
2119.restores peace to Christendom by sending us a head after His own heart; and reme
2120.ce joyfully, but not for grief in having penned that letter, which, it was said,
2121.bsided view of the necessity of electing another Pope, and after the usual preli
2122.election, and drew up a deed sum- moning him to appear at the bar of the Univers
2123.his soul to bear, and although hungering and thirsting for the Divine Sacraments
2124.ar, and although hungering and thirsting for the Divine Sacraments which the sen
2125.prived him of, imprisoned, and suffering all the miseries of a dungeon, the zeal
2126. accepted the situation bravely, willing to bear all, even death itself, submiss
2127.the holy will of God, and even accepting with joy his His imprisonment conpains
2128.olors of Mary, and in bitterly bewailing the sins of his past life, he found suc
2129. mortifications and humility, meditating, and writing many quaint poems full of
2130.ns and humility, meditating, and writing many quaint poems full of a burning lov
2131.ting many quaint poems full of a burning love of God and a tender, compassionate
2132.ted such resent- ment against the daring tined to expiate exile, or it satirist
2133. STABAT Mater, which had he done nothing else worthy of note in his long career
2134. that reads it does not feel the burning love and indeand it scribable penitence
2135.rt of whose life was spent in meditating upon them? Who, until the end of time,
2136.ibe a period when the Church was passing war with the through Pope, the age fier

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/