Concordance for The family.

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1.   familyOOrich J% v/I^ <2t- ^/^ THE FAMILY, t^^ /^r^ BY <^>i?^^ REV. AUGUSTE RICHE
2. eiace, , , • . • « • s The Family, / 18 before Jesus Christ, • The Fami
3. / 18 before Jesus Christ, • The Family 21 Condition of the Family, ..... . . W
4. The Family 21 Condition of the Family, ..... . . Woman in the Pagan 33 Condit
5. ndition of the Child in the Pagan Family, . , 47 55 The The Christian Family, Ch
6. mily, . , 47 55 The The Christian Family, Christian Woman, Family, . 77 The Chil
7. hristian Family, Christian Woman, Family, . 77 The Child in the Christian 87 IO4
8. d in the Christian 87 IO4 132 The Family in Contemporary Society, Christianity,
9. porary Society, Christianity, The Family without PREFACE. HE in most widely spre
10. amily without PREFACE. HE in most widely spread obCatholicity it jection against
11. a manner so insidious that has actually become a conviction in very many minds.
12. to 6 Preface. this objection completely, first it answer is necessary, in the p
13. lace, to study Christianity historically, in its ; relations with society in pas
14. ce what society would, at least probably, become in the future without Christian
15. be he to a journey which made into Italy he made known the Holy Father the inten
16. h made into Italy he made known the Holy Father the intention he had of publishi
17. this and, his Holiness haying so, kindly encouraged him to do he went to work. P
18. faith. too real decline of Then, finally, he showed the ruin which the destructi
19. d on virginity civil — man, the family, society or the state, and reli- gious
20. reli- gious society or the Church. nally, too, Fi- studies on the religious orde
21. s, how ever, r to be re- gretted, namely, that this all work was were respects a
22. refore, decided on publishing separately, and at a very moderate price, the prin
23. k — amongst others, that of the family —and he did so with a all view to the
24. charity Ca- and of propagation. The Holy Father informed Abbe Riche by a Brief t
25. 1 Preface. tion of the beloved and holy Pontiff you made known Pius IX., to who
26. ve its raised, Reverend Sir, to our holy religion a fine monument, sublime which
27. es to all the wants of ; man, the family, and society its capital, in fine, in t
28. ank Him for so eloquent work of priestly Ferdinand Cardinal Donnet, "Archbishop
29. other letter, written to the author only a few days after the publication of his
30. re you f6 Preface. it but they have only treated tially par- and under limited a
31. ce. it but they have only treated tially par- and under limited aspects, it whil
32. ng, the secret of which you have happily discovered. Under I the various heading
33. ver, which have glanced you have clearly and soberly summed up trine, the princi
34. ave glanced you have clearly and soberly summed up trine, the principles of doc-
35. h Henry, *, Bishop of Nimes." THE FAMILY. O WEVER perfect he is supposed to be,
36. never- complete whilst he possesses only the qualities and the virtues of person
37. hold of life he finds himself the family, and that situation cret ates for less
38. of the In fact, dividual. it the family is, as were, the heart of the great soc
39. dy. that forms, maintains, 18 The Family. and vivifies ; 19 indi- each particula
40. esult greatness and strength. The family : is composed of three elements the fat
41. ions, first, was the state of the family in the ; ancient world secondly, what w
42. e family in the ; ancient world secondly, what was 20 The Family. the regenerati
43. t world secondly, what was 20 The Family. the regeneration produced by Jesus Chr
44. ation produced by Jesus Christ ; thirdly, what is the actual position of the fam
45. hat is the actual position of the family under the in- fluence of Christianity l
46. under the in- fluence of Christianity ly, ; and fourth- what it would inevitably
47. , ; and fourth- what it would inevitably become by in the destruction of Christi
48. the divinity of Jesus Christ. THE FAMILY BEFORE JESUS CHRIST, MARRIAGE IN PAGAN
49. m to ourselves a just idea of the family before Christianity, it is al- ways its
50. 2X two sorts of 22 marriages, The Family. the patrician and the plebeian marriag
51. an and the plebeian marriage. Originally the former was almost always made by co
52. the more common, and became subsequently almost the only mode by which spouses w
53. and became subsequently almost the only mode by which spouses were ed, legally
54. y mode by which spouses were ed, legally unit- was the marriage by coemption^ is
55. he husband bought the wife, who, legally speaking, be- came her his slave. She w
56. her, or guardian, in presence The Family. of five witnesses. this sale It is 23
57. s, ; real, since woman its sold was only an one of the but ef- smallest fects Ro
58. t to lend like a piece of her, precisely household furniture the use of which on
59. he man could make of them was But simply to repudiate his wife. in that case she
60. case she would not recover 24 The Family. liberty. her She only returned to her
61. ver 24 The Family. liberty. her She only returned to her fathers tutelage or tha
62. d, and, the legislator regarding it only as the transitory and fortui- tous coup
63. of animals, the fruit thereof naturally reverted to the master of their person.
64. public the citizens became so The Family. justed with it, 25 and the population
65. with it, 25 and the population seriously became thereby so perilled, imoi that a
66. r cause of the dissolution of the family in ancient times was divorce. In the th
67. egislators themselves marriage was* only considered as an association as long as
68. last agreed together. was 26 The Family. that, thought standing where a good i,
69. ng more than a disunion might be legally dissolved. These ideas had so prevailed
70. ideas had so prevailed divorce versally that and polygamy were uniauthorized th
71. Romans had carried divorce to The Family. 27 tne most shameful lengths of im- mo
72. n of the parties, who went 28 The Family. Qach their own way in consequence of t
73. great majority, annulment was extremely simple. the form of a sale, it Conclude
74. fe had been, as the juriscon- The Family. suits said, 29 is mancipated ; that to
75. slave whom it he no longer wanted. Only was those who had first sold her to who
76. bought her back; or, speak more exactly, she was given back to them as she had
77. ivorce was a serious act, it necessarily had, in the limits of the law, an irrev
78. he left He her, and no one 30 The Family. to call had a right him to account res
79. t, they were in those that were formally pleaded such separations. So much being
80. der the reign of the emperors The Family. there were families of say, 3 many wom
81. r a long journey, to find his house only the wife of anEvidently, as other. Mart
82. d his house only the wife of anEvidently, as other. Martial ob- served, the woma
83. married so many law. times and so easily was not : married she was an adulteress
84. eover, quite at their ease 32 The Family. regard was the conduct of the patricia
85. er grave personages, were sub- sequently seen to act in this man- ner with the s
86. , people thought themselves sufficiently authorized to walk in their footsteps.
87. teps. Hence the slightest motives really sufficed to bring about a separation be
88. llness, a passing infir- mity, or simply satiety, was enough The Family. to 33 c
89. or simply satiety, was enough The Family. to 33 cause divorce or repudiation* No
90. was no! more marriage, and consequently no more debauch. family. It was a unive
91. and consequently no more debauch. family. It was a universal CONDITION OF THE WO
92. NDITION OF THE WOMAN IN THE PAGAN FAMILY. What we may is have hitherto said of t
93. aditions, which blamed the 34 The Family. as the cause of the original it woman
94. her a degree of inferiority that is only explained by " a deeply-rooted contempt
95. ity that is only explained by " a deeply-rooted contempt. souls of The in men sh
96. man. in Before her marriage, the family, she was the property of her father, an
97. property of her father, and consequently un- The Family. 35 der a tutelage which
98. father, and consequently un- The Family. 35 der a tutelage which no majority de
99. atron, and then she was freed personally from her hus- band only by remaining un
100. freed personally from her hus- band only by remaining under the tutelage father
101. usband, latter and then not was the only her who became The wife tutor or guardi
102. , however, the title of mother of family, even children ; when she had no title
103. ; when she had no title but that merely signified that she was 36 the The Famil
104. signified that she was 36 the The Family. mother of the slaves of the In fact as
105. ion to In rela- her husband she had only the rank of a daughter, and when to she
106. when to she became a mother it was only remain the her sister, consemguhtea, of
107. property, or at least possessed it only in the way al- of a child ; for her goo
108. death the latter had a right The Family. to give his wife a tutor of his $7 own
109. o fell widow back again, quite naturally, under the guardianship of her father,
110. rdianship all she right and consequently her. was denied fine, life In the woman
111. perty of her father before 38 The Family. her marriage, the property of her husb
112. nto it with avidity. This was The Family. precisely 39 what happened. Luxury whe
113. avidity. This was The Family. precisely 39 what happened. Luxury when all it wa
114. l of history that hides 4Q so The Family. much corruption. in The heart heaves w
115. , women gave themselves up to The Family. 41 the most frantic excesses of luxury
116. slaves upon her. There were, especially, it cosmetists, whose business and appl
117. it cosmetists, whose business and apply perfumes was to prepare pastes, ointmen
118. i- tresses in their rich garments. nally, the patrician lady had at her command
119. o carry her, to follow and 42 The Family. and to run to precede her, any and eve
120. or her caprice. It was said proverbially that the Roman toilet. ladies were a ye
121. a year at their Hence they coquettishly adla- mitted their friends during the b
122. giddy or awkward not who did immediately their comply with the wishes of mistres
123. ard not who did immediately their comply with the wishes of mistress ! A all pro
124. of mistress ! A all prompt and instantly terrible punishment reminded them of th
125. t so far as to She throw her* The Family. self 43 them, upon them and her strike
126. ith long needles, wherewith they cruelly pricked their victims till the blood ca
127. d to the waist, so as to chastise easily. •so them the more Many as to even ca
128. or hung up by the hair and 44 The Family. that undet* their own eyes, and whilst
129. the most delicious perfumes. It was only when the executioner's fail strength be
130. in Rome and under the emperors, publicly without any one raising his voice to de
131. nfer that they considered them Con- only as mere exaggerations. The Family. scie
132. - only as mere exaggerations. The Family. science had nothing to do in 45 the ma
133. she strove to raise herself, exteriorly, by jewels of the greatest prtce. Patri
134. ell as their wrists, they 4.6 The Family. like wore golden bracelets fashioned s
135. NDITION OF THE CHILD IN THE PAGAN FAMILY. 5gj{Y the condition of the woit man is
136. n of the woit man is in the pagan family easy to imagine what fate must have bee
137. ave, over whom In the head of the family exerfull cised the right of ownership.
138. er civilization, every child immediately after its birth was 47 laid on the grou
139. athers feet. If the 48 latter The Family. took it up, it was understood and cons
140. public In the best conditions of family The Family. life 49 the child so remain
141. the best conditions of family The Family. life 49 the child so remained the pro-
142. may add that this absolute 50 The Family. father over his child to the in it pow
143. e in it power of the was not exclusively proper Romans. It was admitted all the
144. legislation of nations ; and was barely a few philosophers utterance tests, who
145. red the condition of children absolutely like to that of the slaves; and fa- the
146. e rigor of the ancient legis- The Family. lation 5 1 was softened by some laws r
147. trates fixed penalty. it To magis- only did belong to pro; nounce on grave crim
148. ith the ideas of the time, people easily shut their eyes, and so it was that pat
149. laws in favor of children 52 Thz Family. still the father had his the right to
150. ing rid of by exposing it in some lonely still place. What authority adds more t
151. hil- In fact, this all extended not only to dren born of an actual marriage, tog
152. rn of the marriage of sons or The Family, grandsons. It 53 reached even to daugh
153. gnize the authority of a son in a family over his wife and children, because, te
154. s, short, and that he was the pagan only a marriage union by therefore, which th
155. l liberty of divorce, this 54 The Family. union had no other security for stabil
156. is house. antiquity, Such was the family when Jesus Christ ap- peared on earth.
157. - peared on earth. TH£ CHRISTIAN FAMILY. CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE. HE dissolution of
158. N MARRIAGE. HE dissolution of the family as well as the servitude of the woman a
159. iples, which 55 He Himself 56 The Family. consecrated by His authority, namely,
160. ly. consecrated by His authority, namely, sanctity, unity, and indissolubility.
161. of His and ot His flesh, His The Family. bones. 57 For this cause shall a man l
162. by is sacramental union and it not only the man who it is elevated by the grace
163. Ephes. shares v. 25. in an 58 The Family. Doubtless the the is equal measure. ma
164. the body no more belongs apostle quickly adds that the hus- band is in this resp
165. phes. v. 23. t 1 Cor. vii. 4. The Family. the Church self. is 59 to Jesus Christ
166. d principle which flowed quite naturally from the sanctity of the sacrament and
167. man example of bigamy that historically The first we know certainly it was give
168. historically The first we know certainly it was given by Lamech. deluge After th
169. ution in this respect. The 60 The Family. reasons which had previously justified
170. The Family. reasons which had previously justified simultaneous It polygamy no l
171. was thenceforth yet there were into only to be found in barbarism and in corrupt
172. the beginning made them male The Family. and female ? cause, shall : 6 And He s
173. , this condemnation of simultaneous poly- gamy was over, in too well justified
174. . 4, and following verses. 62 The Family. if least understood, not respected in
175. ore God hath joined together, The Family. let 63 " no man put asunder." Pharisee
176. 3, r,nd following verses. 64 The Family. This doctrine was clear and posi> tive
177. 0, Luke xvi. 18. t 1 Cor. n : The Family. 65 formal declarations* no answer coul
178. imate separation. Now, the 66 The Family. The theory was easy, we shall it be a
179. tless it be for fornication," part, only to the ; first to which it naturally re
180. nly to the ; first to which it naturally refers as though Christ had said : "Who
181. Whence may be drawn is this con- namely, that the husband his wife is allowed t
182. he forbidden to marry another The Family 6y Has provoked more than objections. I
183. wrath, and fury. Human passions not only- rebelled against the yoke imposed it o
184. with the wife This text is is perfectly St. in accordance of Paul the ; quoted
185. ol. p. 671, No. 1,065. 68 all The Family. the force of his authority, and in the
186. and it has given to married persons ally to in their union, and especi- the wife
187. h they had been the V object. The Family 69 The unity of marriage prevailed like
188. the Western the nations, and especially In fine, in it Roman Empire. gained suc
189. e whole Christian world that it not only destroyed simultaneous di- polygamy, bu
190. ndissolubility of marriage yo The Family. barrier that was the most restrained t
191. sus they have often attacked it fiercely, and many a desperate effort they have
192. , should Jesus Christ and His The Family. Church be more severe spect than all ?
193. ility, on the law of and they insolently de- manded erful its abrogation. The po
194. n. The pow- of the earth, and especially at the preten- princes, waxed wroth sio
195. e instincts some sa- J2 tisfaction nally, in The Family. ought to be given. Fi-
196. e sa- J2 tisfaction nally, in The Family. ought to be given. Fi- modern times, s
197. ages become general, one can The Family, J$ understand that those churches did
198. that those churches did nothing abruptly, and only made use of their authority w
199. churches did nothing abruptly, and only made use of their authority with the It
200. t, or that it afterwards unit reasonably prohibited what ginally permitted. had
201. unit reasonably prohibited what ginally permitted. had ori- No, the Church has
202. ed in this respect. The prudent steadily attacks. but firm guar- dian of her unc
203. on this 74 question, at these The Family. we arrive incontestably : three conclu
204. hese The Family. we arrive incontestably : three conclusions legislation First C
205. In the Middle Ages the Church constantly main- tained the law of indissolubility
206. right of separation. Third is : Finally, in modern times, it still the Church t
207. till the Church that has ener- getically lity defended the indissolubiagainst th
208. e which existed in the begin- The Family. ning, 75 re- and which Jesus Christ es
209. Christianity done nothing for the family than to give for bases to marriage the
210. that tion was a restoraall which morally transformed . society. fact, By these p
211. rice she resumed her place in the family with the dignity ? which became her; an
212. the education of the au- h /6 The Family. Nevertheless, thors of their being. Je
213. of sex or condition. This was evidently going to the root of the evil, its and
214. the slavery of woman. But, independently of that general doctrine, the 11 Redeem
215. doctrine, the 11 Redeemer yS The Family. all, of the world chose, amongst a wom
216. inting to Mary — O men ! who have only considered woman is as the slave of you
217. ce ; by the Son of God and it The Family. found that in giving- to the 79 Mother
218. His public He allowed wo- 8o The Family. to follow men Him in His journey- ing
219. He had in view. was not that . \ merely the innocent woman He wished to raise u
220. ed her, He gave marks of very The Family. special 8 the sinful predilection it t
221. rvice vii. of the Luke 47. 82 The Family. followed them. women who went so They
222. hen they began grow* they had especially the honor of seconding the priests in h
223. er, became common despised sex and daily left that were manifested acts of heroi
224. nted and deeds Greeks Romans. The Family. 83 seen Then were Christian wives gain
225. ng maidens give to live in the up family joys honor of virginity and in the serv
226. ignity of their character and the- truly super- natural virtues they practised-
227. ethe had to grant to woman 84 The Family. which paganism her. It legal emancipat
228. emancipation had always denied was only an act of justice and of reparation. He
229. of woman, " says M. Laboulaye, evidently ences. It " is due to Christian influ-
230. volved no such consequences. The Family, was by an inversion of that Christian
231. ounts for the existence of 86 The Family. laws even in Roman are our own days. T
232. All that was of pagan Rome has gradually pe- rished or withered away. living bra
233. withered away. living branches The only shall have come to us from Christianity
234. . vii. THE CHILD IN THE CHRISTIAN FAMILY. 5 €Sf: HE one wife to was not the on
235. 5 €Sf: HE one wife to was not the only be reinstated Beside her in the 8 %M fa
236. reinstated Beside her in the 8 %M family. and with her there was the child, that
237. trines, but they have 88 not, The Family. perhaps, traced as they ought its that
238. nity and a character of spect which only required time to develop itself in orde
239. th these keeps. them near Him The Family. sweet 89 the little words : " Suffer c
240. t. it w ere Markx. 14. 90 for The Family. him that a mill-stone his should be ha
241. who is in heaven."* first was assuredly the time that the child was heard in sp
242. said by the philo- sophers most friendly to humanity. It was therefore, as it we
243. att, xviii. 2, and following. The Family. But what strengthened trine in practic
244. of the Church sacrament was not commonly conferred on infants, as it is in it ou
245. g it before the age of reason, gradually became general. Now, when the sacra- me
246. nd of His Church, creature 92 The Family. ransomed by the blood of Jesus Christ,
247. of Jesus Christ, an heir of the heavenly kingdom, he became a Christian. He was
248. re, an that angel of God. frail Not only was creature no longer despised, not on
249. as creature no longer despised, not only was there no longer the horrible though
250. east veneration, a tabernacle The Family. consecrated by the 93 grace of the sac
251. rist, when they had adored 94 The Family. in His Saviour fancy ; the graces of i
252. d by marriage, and became the The Family. dependent head of a not family. 95 He
253. e Family. dependent head of a not family. 95 He only exercised the authority a h
254. pendent head of a not family. 95 He only exercised the authority a husband, but
255. thority default; him it the and was only death, —after replace his for stance
256. thenceforth the case. The 96 The Family. union of serfs and the daughten of col
257. ication in legislain tion very naturally resulted ex- tinguishing serfdom and tr
258. onfine itself to attacking it indirectly by the The Family. respect, ligious 97
259. ttacking it indirectly by the The Family. respect, ligious 97 reit . the dignity
260. nvested in general condemned by directly and very tolic particularly its apos-!
261. by directly and very tolic particularly its apos-! constitutions, its its by it
262. ather, and that the 98 latter The Family. should be for ever deprived of paterna
263. which compelled every father of a family to support his children, un- der pain o
264. tine successors restrained by The Family. 99 law the excessive power of fathers
265. heir natural Thus the head of the family was always honored and respected by his
266. cient given to him. the had Consequently, not only were by chil- new laws, dren
267. n to him. the had Consequently, not only were by chil- new laws, dren entitled t
268. er it they pleased, it. and even Finally, to dispose of a last amelioration of t
269. aws under the action of ioo v The Family. was that Christianity made in re- gard
270. to regulate their position in the family and in society, and, to that end, their
271. dren were placed under a canopy in Holy Church. legitimate^ They thus heto came
272. tion which made natural chil- The Family. dren legitimate by placing juridically
273. . dren legitimate by placing juridically 101 them under the authority and of the
274. er, the and, under His influence, family was soon found to be its regenerated. H
275. within certain limits, which are ; only those of nature but her weak- ness was
276. as no longer abused. As a 102 The Family. daughter, she was respected by her par
277. f her husband ; and, when she generously preferred to domestic joys the virginit
278. protection of the Child- God The Family. 10 And thus it was that Christianity c
279. mutual relations, and placed the family on a new basis. THE FAMILY IN CONTEMPOR
280. ed the family on a new basis. THE FAMILY IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY. FTER eighteen
281. r the action of Christianity, the family ought nificent now to present a if magh
282. s march towards is perfection. Unhappily, such In this field not the the case. o
283. n this field not the the case. of family, with all the good seed sown his by Jes
284. has been sown Men, jealous of The Family. the 105 good effected by the Gospel, s
285. lutions which even now blight the family in the Christian And the yet, notwithst
286. spirit of evil against Christian family, the head of that family, the father, h
287. hristian family, the head of that family, the father, has remained in what Chris
288. world people do not even 106 The Family. of dream recurring to them it by avowe
289. must be said ceasing to walk practically in tianity, the ways of Chris- the husb
290. and absolute power which he in formerly had the family, the Gospel had given hi
291. ower which he in formerly had the family, the Gospel had given him an authority
292. hority as strong as as it it was as holy, as gentle was grave, gracious as it wa
293. of the the day on which the head family laid down of his own accord The Family.
294. y laid down of his own accord The Family. that sceptre 107 which Jesus Christ ha
295. —from rule the day when he would only and by reason by nature fell —then he
296. he outrageous abuses of the pagan family were no longer allowed -him, and he los
297. m, and he lost at the same time the only authority possible to now him —-Chris
298. t his Chris- tian rights over his family, he who ought to be its head endeavors
299. cts of nature. He struggles, 108 finally, The Family. by all human means But aga
300. e. He struggles, 108 finally, The Family. by all human means But against the rev
301. that the then, is the result? the family head of as he becomes as pagan can in t
302. uses of ancient times. tice of that Only, as the prac- despotic authority can in
303. tic authority can in no longer be openly exhibited modern times, to and as keep
304. rivacy of home, a day sure to The Family. « 109 come when succeed their in the
305. ucceed their in the slaves of the family breaking the chain of it bondage; and t
306. , the despotism of authority, inevitably succeeds a complete anarchy. In this ne
307. this new its state the pilot as a family is directed by bark with- out a helm. t
308. r and without subordination. That family is no longer is a body of which the hus
309. ; were, paralyzed and the no The Family. to limbs refuse obey. The hus- band ha
310. ghts than those which the law externally secures to him. ternally there is In- n
311. law externally secures to him. ternally there is In- no more law, no more princ
312. whose exercise respected. The in family then resembles one of those little stat
313. s whose subjects are revolt, acting only by . their own authority, and yet keepi
314. way ! How many who that seem, outwardly, to enjoy uninter- rupted harmony, and
315. oy uninter- rupted harmony, and inwardly The Family. in writhe in the desperate
316. rupted harmony, and inwardly The Family. in writhe in the desperate convulsions
317. pate special of faith, ceased in largely and in It a very manner tianity. the be
318. of Chris- would seem that r 1 The Family. the lightness of her education, the se
319. d and, even undergo in pri- X The Family. vate humiliations bitter 113 that woul
320. her life, she would re- ceive outwardly those marks of consideration which cann
321. re the religion of Jesus 1 14 The Family. ; Christ had placed her and it is by h
322. body. realized the type of Then is truly woman as por- trayed by the Wise Man, u
323. o and stretched out her hands The Family. poor. 1 15 Strength and beauty are her
324. itful, and beauty the woman shall cially that feareth the Lord, she be praised."
325. e be praised."* the That of is espetruly woman ages the Christian the — the Go
326. , and following verses. i ; 6 The Family. strong cross at become Christ's the fo
327. ut force meet in our much the too rarely. that Moral distin- —the character tr
328. n — has and to grown weaker. gradually It weaker has almost entirely given pla
329. gradually It weaker has almost entirely given place disappeared, and and effemi
330. s and customs of life. is Here certainly what characterizes the woman of our day
331. ill try to justify this femi- The Family. nine indolence of 117 and inactivity b
332. by and be feebleness constitution bodily debility; but we should the much more i
333. ithin her, and shrinking 1 18 The Family. sacrifice. from any sort of that is Bu
334. character is debased ; and there of only remains that an abridgement creature wh
335. s the mind and heart of Behold her daily tions ; that woman idle- cares, her occ
336. ness and the uselessness her The Family. life, 1 19 if she be a woman of the wo
337. ought. too late. After care- some lessly lip-formula, repeated and by routine, s
338. to begin again as on the 1 20 The Family. day previous. day, So passes day week,
339. e transient enjoyments. After The Family, that she has no other wants. 121 And s
340. loved. Yes no ; but they are undoubtedly in longer esteemed proportion to the lo
341. of age, there no longer a 122 The Family. crown on the head of these women. It T
342. too, in partakes of their benefits only so far as Christianity has influenced t
343. s Christianity has influenced the family. Christian To-day, as ages, in the firs
344. y, as ages, in the first when the family remains child is faithful to Jesus Chri
345. s cherished. The But when the is Fam ily. 123 light of the Gospel obscured in is
346. n is the home —-when Christianity only there in theory —-then life it is the
347. h breaking in on the Christian harfamily. mony child of the falls, Either the in
348. hild of the falls, Either the internally, under the des- potism of an unprincipl
349. , all it the more brutal that externally is legally restricted; or, on the crea-
350. e more brutal that externally is legally restricted; or, on the crea-* idol, con
351. ure is made a species of flattering only to the vanity and of its caprice parent
352. ormer case, the by weak- 1 24 The Family. becomes the victim of force in ness, a
353. it not still ? the victim of that family idolatry You make a ridiculous of your
354. idol. You your dress it it coquettishly, and, producing in thus at your walks,
355. nstincts of little it velop more quickly vanity and sions all its its other pas-
356. , a world with The theatres, its Fam ily. its 125 banquets, matinees ; a world t
357. n ridicu- you have, perhaps, made lously pretentious its —you take de- light i
358. n you find that nothing 1 26 The Fam ily. As an inevi- longer satisfy them. tabl
359. ot that what we see every day The Family. around those us ? 127 And whence come
360. on the actual condi- tions of the family in general, medi- tating on the superio
361. s over the its it still re- pagan family, and on decline, also, when compared wi
362. when compared with ages, that the family of more Christian all we have often tho
363. e have often thought that 128 The Family. all good and that evil are equally exi
364. mily. all good and that evil are equally exit plained by marriage, as tised in o
365. our days. is prac of the The evil family — that is to say, the abuse, or aband
366. e, from the way in which marriage rially contracted mateMaterially, and is spiri
367. arriage rially contracted mateMaterially, and is spiritually? what all, sought b
368. acted mateMaterially, and is spiritually? what all, sought before is and above p
369. her, of no importance. Spiri- The Family. tually, 129 is marriage, as a sacramen
370. no importance. Spiri- The Family. tually, 129 is marriage, as a sacrament, no lo
371. th a ticket of confession, which is only a mockery of the Sacrament of Penance.
372. y of the Sacrament of Penance. Evidently, it is not to bless in that God must th
373. to own weakness, behold, then, the newly-married pair cast into the vicissitudes
374. cast into the vicissitudes of the family, with the 130 The Family. of their inex
375. s of the family, with the 130 The Family. of their inexperithat, only resources
376. The Family. of their inexperithat, only resources ence. that, Is it surprising
377. iage we must ority of the present family over the family of pagan ages. all, Yes
378. ty of the present family over the family of pagan ages. all, Yes ; for, notwiths
379. icent in- fluence over the entire family. Not which only has the controls tion,
380. e over the entire family. Not which only has the controls tion, it civil legisla
381. ts in regard to the woman and The Family. the child; but there in still *3l circ
382. r known to the ancient world. THE FAMILY WITHOUT CHRISTIANITY. : F impiety succe
383. foresee what would become of the family, and it needs no great its clearness of
384. ision to prophesy dissolution. Assuredly, people would not go back in to the con
385. o the conditions itself which the family found pre- vious to the coming of Chris
386. eat Christian current 132 has The Family. lowed in society a to channel too fill
387. hich into has the passed sympathetically life, usages of and which must be indes
388. , what be rav- age and ruin would family, still in the were the principal basis
389. ny other whereby a couple would mutually 134 The Family. in bind themselves fami
390. y a couple would mutually 134 The Family. in bind themselves family, the bonds o
391. 34 The Family. in bind themselves family, the bonds of the conditions under as i
392. conditions under as in certain precisely though they bound themselves tion. It w
393. ocia- perhaps, be said that this in only practised certain indivi- dual cases, a
394. marriage is, ception, a marriage humanly bad, exist and that the family can neve
395. e humanly bad, exist and that the family can never therein in natural and perman
396. l and legal in marriage; were The Family. religion banished from it 135 and God
397. and God it no longer there, undoubtedly would soon be seen that unity and indis
398. nity, what other ceremony 136 The Family. could be found that would not be ridic
399. that would not be ridiculous, or simply absurd ? We do not suppose that people
400. ns, see what would become, in the family, The Family. of those 137 : who are wea
401. would become, in the family, The Family. of those 137 : who are weakest First,
402. nd children. the Deprived the internally of the dignity, strength, and the sanct
403. would have no other guarantee, outwardly, than decorum, law, and policy. Mary be
404. esus would it be to woman 138 The Family, all Christ honored her, Mis life, in t
405. ction or what communication could really exist between that wo- man and humanity
406. stian woman has found her re- The Family. 139 instatement and her glorification
407. nd deception of a dignity, 140 with only The Family. its charms of a day, and we
408. n of a dignity, 140 with only The Family. its charms of a day, and weakness, wit
409. ation that woman would occupy The Family. 141 by the denial of the divinity of C
410. es which have denied tions it, or merely faith amongst na- whose has grown weak.
411. of the genera! we may form an infallibly fall, degradation into which she would
412. o longer clothed, by bap- 142 The Family. tism, with the angelic robe of inno- c
413. ine bread of the Eucharist, and the holy oil of Confirmation; when he would for
414. feguard of his weakness when, would only remain, to protect him against the abus
415. the he might yet take refuge The Family. arms of heart ! 143 his father or on h
416. e death might be decreed, 144 The Family. anger and impatience, by the sole deci
417. of intemperance and debauchery, scarcely fed or clothed, who are and who are emp
418. fate of the child cannot rest clusively natural affection of the fa- ther and m
419. rist, when Jesus would be no The Foimily. 145 infer, longer found there, we may
420. ent, that child- hood would be unhappily exposed, in the family, to all sorts ra
421. ould be unhappily exposed, in the family, to all sorts ral of unnatu- barbarity.
422. rmidable the more their flight violently see- had been repressed, ing that there
423. insubordination and re- I4;6 The Family. youth when in it bellion of lives no l
424. of nations ? its evil It would certainly outdo the excesses of pagan youth ; for
425. ible for certain minds to de- Ike Family. lude After 147 this themselves that, o
426. the ruin they would bring on the family by denying the divinity of Jesus Christ
427. newal. 2. Books may be renewed week only. 3. for one lose Students who damage or

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/