Concordance for The fair maid of Connaught and other tales for catholic youth / by Kate Duval Hughes.

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1.   l picture she doorway. the tall, A truly beautistrong, yet lithe made form, drap
2. d whose contour and features were purely classical in their beauty. The limpid w
3. cracy of blue blood,was almost unearthly in purity; while the carnation its bloo
4. wn from beneath the hood like the lovely tendrils of some vine. The repose ; of
5. r—strong* every day struggle —merely higher to live. She had just returned f
6. e our neighbor as our- selves; her daily a poor old bed-ridden whose friends all
7. aughing — to the poor sufferer tiently who was stretched out pa- and quietly o
8. ly who was stretched out pa- and quietly on the bed, from which she was never to
9. s it in all its cadences. ''It is IjEily where is my father? I want to — speak
10. ow Mc Gleg's to see about the cow," Eily replied, Mavonrneen," she continued, "
11. to caress her. Kathleen advanced quickly and resting her hand lightly on her hea
12. ced quickly and resting her hand lightly on her head said softly "Eily what is i
13. her hand lightly on her head said softly "Eily what is it ? any trouble ? The ch
14. nd lightly on her head said softly "Eily what is it ? any trouble ? The childish
15. d set upon it in all their glory, gently bronzing it with the warmth; it fell do
16. fell down far below her waist in lovely waves and soft curls; the deep blue eye
17. ng off to America" broke down completely, and laying her head on Kathleen's shou
18. er sobbed aloud. Kathleen looked gravely down on the bright childish head that w
19. at was half buried in the falling '^Eily, why did you see him again," said tress
20. '*But he has never done any thing really wrong," pleaded Eily " and and he loves
21. ne any thing really wrong," pleaded Eily " and and he loves rae so sucli hair it
22. t — — — — — — — — dearly "-she sobbed. —Alas for Eily's simple
23. dearly "-she sobbed. —Alas for Eily's simple ! cas- uistry, by which she tr
24. OF CONNAUGHT. If — H women would only first find out the worth of the subject
25. t be so many failures. But unfortunately, women are so fond of the passive condi
26. often look no farther and so, frequently, wake from their dream of happiness, to
27. are so strong Kathleen," continued Eily, "I am not like you I know that you wil
28. g." Try and be strong yourself dear Eily, and give up Eory," said Kathleen ''The
29. four years difference in their age, Eily being only six- Kathleen had just passe
30. difference in their age, Eily being only six- Kathleen had just passed her twent
31. ng love for his two daughters. John Daly was made of that stuff that never bent
32. ife Eileen was very emotional, like Eily, but even more dependent she clung to h
33. , and gratifying to held it. Eileen Daly was always frail who be- and delicate,
34. but one winter she declined more rapidly, and when March came and the crocusses
35. were just peeping out, she died suddenly one day, leaving her two little girls t
36. girls to their father's care. faithfully devoted to them, but stern He was and e
37. I / knew by the smoke that so gracefully curled elms, that Around the green The
38. nd many doors and windows, not certainly of the most modern construction, but it
39. struction, but it had been in the family for many generations, and each member a
40. and possessor having found it perfectly comfortable within, and adapted to all
41. exterior. It had descended to John Daly from his grand-parents he was not a man
42. s not a man to spend any money foolishly, and as the most thorough comfort alway
43. ttage,"from the abundance of that lovely flower with which the garden was filled
44. weet by any other name, for it was truly the abode of peace and happiness, and t
45. ioned furniture and the walls literally covered with pictures worked in wool al
46. ^jects and executed by Kathleen and Eily while with the Sisters in Ballinasloe a
47. fashioned piano treasured most carefully. stood in one corner, for both the girl
48. he girls were fond of music and not only played well, but posfirst The room —
49. room was the life and sunshine Here Eily trilled her sweetest, of the house. mer
50. n the hush of the evening, when the only sounds heard were the distant low of th
51. r for the evening prayer. Here John Daly offered up his nightly supplication for
52. r. Here John Daly offered up his nightly supplication for himself and his childr
53. that could be imagined. Winny, the only female servant, who had lived with the
54. e servant, who had lived with the family over forty years, was generally engaged
55. e family over forty years, was generally engaged in the back-ground with the cul
56. eatness and skill, which were peculiarly this again Beyond her own. Winifred Wal
57. he first time that she came to tlie Daly family —she was must have been to be
58. t time that she came to tlie Daly family —she was must have been to be so old.
59. s she called them, and Kathleen and Eily had fewer children's squabbles than usp
60. oes adorned her feet, and a scrupulously white 'ker- pinned across her bosom. Sh
61. e knot behind it was brown hair slightly silvered with gray-and was her hands to
62. had done much hard work in her John Daly life, were quite slender and shapely. c
63. aly life, were quite slender and shapely. cliief ; — always said of the kernel
64. ef ; — always said of the kernel truly good, is Winny — the sweet" — and w
65. as much cherished aad beloved the family, and was looked upon not so lis:lit muc
66. rget to introduce one other of John Daly's retainer s, and these two constituted
67. v^as liis 19 displaying moutli generally speaking, Y^lien lie smiled Ills nose,
68. nd I cannot describe it more graphically than to say, that if his course through
69. by his nose, that it would be thoroughly straight forward. When any one was spea
70. to him, he would look most persistently and undestrai^T^ht viatingly into one c
71. ersistently and undestrai^T^ht viatingly into one corner of the ceiling, as thou
72. was honest, true and faithful. John Daly could have lived in much better style h
73. d gained over the heart of innocent Eily, and he had strictly forheart troubled
74. rt of innocent Eily, and he had strictly forheart troubled at the present time,
75. liiin bidden to visit tlie farm, or Eily to see him. Rory O'llare was one irreso
76. of tlie weakest, most one conld possibly describe; lie thing, if —nerved him
77. ere something was achieved— constantly making good resolvesconstantly shifting
78. onstantly making good resolvesconstantly shifting from them— that he was caref
79. fting from them— that he was carefully to start- would have liked to have been
80. - would have liked to have been someonly some one could have watched him until p
81. hed him until point, as so he could only look back upon more than one-third of h
82. ad gained him nothing. His love for Eily, if you could give it that name, was of
83. e the least sacrifice for her. John Daly, with sweet little his strong good sens
84. instant, of his innocent, confiding Eily, being ship- wrecked in this cruel mann
85. cksand as this Eory O'Hare; and he fully resolved to use not only his paternal i
86. e; and he fully resolved to use not only his paternal influence, but authority,
87. ence, but authority, to bring her safely anchored in some port, where her comfor
88. t vigilant eye of tender care, that only a fond parent can exercise. THE FAIK MA
89. eet and flowery month of June wlien Eily prepared for a walk after breakfast. Th
90. t was to tie her hat ribbons more neatly and coquettishly under her little fat c
91. hat ribbons more neatly and coquettishly under her little fat chin now, to smoot
92. r skirt and arrange her scarf-and lastly, to fasten a few choice rose-buds in he
93. w choice rose-buds in her bosom. Finally as there seemed to be nothing It —
94. her pet kitten, wlio looked wonderingly nnnsual amount of affection lavished on
95. er the canary's cage and trilling gently a soft lay, at which the canary shrieke
96. lay, at which the canary shrieked wildly, —hopping madly about from perch to p
97. canary shrieked wildly, —hopping madly about from perch to perch, with his hea
98. s arms before she set out. What a lovely morning it was ! The air was redolent w
99. s — healthfulness of the country. Eily tripped along lightly with all the buoy
100. the country. Eily tripped along lightly with all the buoyan- cy of youth, with
101. tremulous flowers and all seemed to Eily to ask a mute, yet questioning ^^Well"?
102. g ^^Well"? to which her heart could only answer still farewell on she sped, her
103. uch above. The soft, rich grass was only disturbed by a little foot-path running
104. ulled her sweets until she was literally laden with a wreath of nature's choices
105. rms and hands filled. Eunning on quickly, she saw before her, at the end of the
106. e There he stood ^liis hat pulled partly again, ! — —an expression half plea
107. e in attitude shifting position uneasily—glancing Eily, who ran towards him qu
108. ifting position uneasily—glancing Eily, who ran towards him quickly—holding
109. ancing Eily, who ran towards him quickly—holding out her hand frankly— excla
110. m quickly—holding out her hand frankly— exclaiming—while a blush passed ov
111. es his his his at ! it added sorrowfully. He grasped her hand feebly, and held i
112. sorrowfully. He grasped her hand feebly, and held it in his ''Why must it be th
113. his ''Why must it be the last time Eily ? I care more for you than any girl in
114. world." ''Do you?" the thought said Eily, looking away sadly flashed across her
115. he thought said Eily, looking away sadly flashed across her mind, though she sca
116. hed across her mind, though she scarcely the last time," she — understood it h
117. self; THE FAIK MAID OF CONNAUGHT. really did look like it. 25 He slightest exert
118. —a great many crowded together rapidly in her mind, as she stood there weak an
119. eak and wavering, and looking so utterly irresolute and miserable. Eily was very
120. o utterly irresolute and miserable. Eily was very young and guileless, but she s
121. ileless, but she seemed to grow suddenly many years older in a very short space
122. at are you going to do Eory ?" said Eily quietly. "I don't hardly know," said Eo
123. ou going to do Eory ?" said Eily quietly. "I don't hardly know," said Eory looki
124. ry ?" said Eily quietly. "I don't hardly know," said Eory looking with great unc
125. in the space beyond. heart beat quickly Eily was silent scarcely —she ; —he
126. he space beyond. heart beat quickly Eily was silent scarcely —she ; —her she
127. rt beat quickly Eily was silent scarcely —she ; —her she thought ought to be
128. ere, as she was now although it was only to say good-bye and it must come to an
129. d-bye and it must come to an end quickly. She stood there sadly she had let the
130. to an end quickly. She stood there sadly she had let the flowers fall to the gro
131. port, was not worth keeping and Possibly, she thought that a hand that — the d
132. back from what she could do consistently and rightly to save anyone but the comm
133. at she could do consistently and rightly to save anyone but the commandments ; e
134. her father in all his integrity and Eily's heart, were ever in goodness-his fait
135. g weaker and weaker. Kory felt painfully Eily's silence, and w^ished to make one
136. ker and weaker. Kory felt painfully Eily's silence, and w^ished to make one more
137. people don't do what is right by me Eily" said he, "and sometimes I think should
138. — not that very far off ? said Eily gently — as though he were telling he
139. not that very far off ? said Eily gently — as though he were telling her somet
140. lie caught it by the ribbons. Her lovely hair fell over her face, and around her
141. pturned in its childish wonderment, Eily's geographical — — — ' " « THE F
142. " I mind me of girls," said Eory boldly, " who would go with a fellow." Had a r
143. d. " Do you mean that^Eory ? " said Eily in almost a whisper " Do you mean Here
144. put out her hands before her helplessly. " Is that the way you say good-bye to
145. FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. and said softly " Good-bye Eory/' turned slowly round a
146. d softly " Good-bye Eory/' turned slowly round and tottered rather than walked,
147. Then resting against a tree, she quietly put on her hat and stepped out on to th
148. APTER IV. The summer passed uneventfully, quietly and pleasantly; Eily drooped a
149. The summer passed uneventfully, quietly and pleasantly; Eily drooped a little s
150. sed uneventfully, quietly and pleasantly; Eily drooped a little sometimes, but w
151. eventfully, quietly and pleasantly; Eily drooped a little sometimes, but was sus
152. in the raising of their stock. John Daly's cattle were always considered some of
153. of October arrived and KatUeen and Eily were donning their best attire. Pat had
154. ince day-light, interrupted occasionally by "Winny's quiet remark "Why Pat boy!
155. er than yerself," at which playful sally, Pat w^ould grin, and then scrub away.
156. band and a bunch of shamrock. John Daly stern and still, handed his lovely daug
157. Daly stern and still, handed his lovely daughters into the Pat touched car, and
158. d, and all seemed happy and bright. Eily, it is true, looked slightly pensive an
159. right. Eily, it is true, looked slightly pensive and pale, and kept her — —
160. lk and white hat with a long plume, only served to enhance a beauty so particula
161. rved to enhance a beauty so particularly rare and uncommon, while her simple ele
162. morning air brought the color into Eily's face, and she soon was chatting gaily
163. 's face, and she soon was chatting gaily; her white dress and blue ribbons flutt
164. ther looked satisfled and smiled gravely. Kathleen appeared even on the ear, as
165. liis day she seemed to look more queenly tlian ever. Soon tliey readied tlie fai
166. and beloved tlirougli tlie country. Eily's face sparkled with happy and innocent
167. n's earnest face and grave dignity, only served as a grand 'contrast "Kathleen,"
168. said her father, "there is Lord Eversly with Grny Dominick. Don't you rer membe
169. Just and then the two men Lord Eversly staring boldly at tlie beauti" I say, G
170. the two men Lord Eversly staring boldly at tlie beauti" I say, Guy, who is that
171. I suppose not," said Guy. "Kathleen Daly would stand alone in her peerless grace
172. truck." " Perhaps so," said Guy, quietly deeper indeed ! ; than anyone knew. —
173. msel. tlia,t She looks like a calla lily with white hat and plume. I think I cou
174. nd win her, and spend mj time pleasantly." '^Tou" said Guy between his teeth, ''
175. t of the heavens as to win Kathleen Daly, much less trifle wdth her." " I have w
176. e shot at higher marks, and said Eversly. bagged my game. I say, Guy, you must i
177. e crowd until they ap]3roached the^ Daly's and the introduction was over; Guy's
178. tressed face and pleading manner plainly saying, — Kathleen, I could not help
179. een, I could not help this. Lord Eversly bowed and addressed Kathleen with that
180. , easy assurance, that marked so plainly what his success had been, among Ids ow
181. turned his bow, in her eyes, own stately manner, and quiet grace, and opened wid
182. peak of the weather, and gaze admiringly in her face. In yain did he criticise t
183. e of words, whose expression was plainly on her lips. ISTeyer were whiskers and
184. rcithe slightest impression upon. lessly pulled, as his were, in his nervous rag
185. is nervous rage, and being so completely nonplussed in his vain arrogance and co
186. ht response from the places. "Calla Lily.'' She turned her white throat, bowed a
187. wonder. But in the midst of Lord Eversly's helpless Mr. Daly, with young Thorn,
188. idst of Lord Eversly's helpless Mr. Daly, with young Thorn, from Athlone, came t
189. m Athlone, came to his rescue. John Daly having properly introduced Mr. Thorn to
190. to his rescue. John Daly having properly introduced Mr. Thorn to his daughters,
191. to his daughters, turned to Lord Eversly to ask him what he thought of the fair.
192. THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. Lord Eversly nervously, '' I am quite pleased. By-th
193. AID OF CONNAUGHT. Lord Eversly nervously, '' I am quite pleased. By-the-by, Mr.
194. I am quite pleased. By-the-by, Mr. Daly, I understand that you have some very f
195. them to me i '' pleasure," said Mr. Daly, proud to display what he prized next t
196. daughters. " Come this way. Lord Eversly, and I will show you the finest milch c
197. to Kathleen and her sister, Lord Eversly wandered about with John Daly until the
198. rd Eversly wandered about with John Daly until they found the spot set apart for
199. t up by the sheep, which were remarkably fine this year. " I'll warrant a good m
200. mutton this year, eh " said John ! Daly. Lord Eversly smilLord Eversly was ing
201. ear, eh " said John ! Daly. Lord Eversly smilLord Eversly was ing grimly absentl
202. hn ! Daly. Lord Eversly smilLord Eversly was ing grimly absently thinking of the
203. Eversly smilLord Eversly was ing grimly absently thinking of the woman who had
204. smilLord Eversly was ing grimly absently thinking of the woman who had so fJiake
205. lf. He slipped off at last from Mr. Daly, and wandered about by himself, stickin
206. such a defeat. It How could it be really was sadly mortifying. : — — possibl
207. eat. It How could it be really was sadly mortifying. : — — possible that aft
208. e him for a son-in-law; for Lord Eversly's estates were unincumbered, and his ti
209. HE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. was decidedly airisli, and confoundedly stupid, and l
210. was decidedly airisli, and confoundedly stupid, and lie ''had been shaken on hi
211. gain. It was a problem; and Lord Eversly did not possess sufficient mathematical
212. UGHT. 37 CHAPTER Y. Leaving Lord Eversly to solve the problem that had so shaken
213. , Kin " nowhere to, as in so beautifully illustra- Green Isle, and her own faith
214. to their children. They were fine manly specimens of young men, being nearly al
215. nly specimens of young men, being nearly all six feet in height, and broad shoul
216. and in his in- genuous face you saw only the desire for honest labor and daily b
217. ly the desire for honest labor and daily bread, a good wife and happy The smooth
218. smooth fair brow was not wrinkled family. by any of the '^eating cares of life,"
219. and the deep, clear blue eye spoke only of strict integrity and honest worth. H
220. and honest worth. His vigorous and manly beauty bore ample testimony to the puri
221. tion 39 had been limited, yet he clearly understood all he knew. Kathleen had re
222. . Kathleen had received him with stately though gracious kindness, and Eily's bl
223. ately though gracious kindness, and Eily's blushing shyness, only made her appea
224. dness, and Eily's blushing shyness, only made her appear more lovely in his eyes
225. hyness, only made her appear more lovely in his eyes. They wandered all on the m
226. friends for many years. At last Mr. Daly joined them; and after Mr. Thorn had ta
227. them; and after Mr. Thorn had taken Eily to look at a very beautiful pony, Pat w
228. er soon and see us. Thorn" said Mr. Daly " , " we are always glad to see you." I
229. ought or ca/re^ Until its perfume softly rising Tells that the flower is there.
230. somewhat disturbed by a vision of manly grace and beauty that iiourished about
231. alks, and in woods, and groves: and only vanished with her waking, to her great
232. lips, and shook off the dew drops, Eily's slumbers that night THE FAIR MAID OF
233. her; and a great many visions of earthly happiness and comfort, ease and prosper
234. on her mind as she sat down in the early morning sunshine to brush out her lovel
235. morning sunshine to brush out her lovely and luxuriant hair. She brushed energet
236. uxuriant hair. She brushed energetically, and the exercise and friction seemed t
237. herself wondering how she couW possibly ever have tolerated Rory, and whether i
238. t. Kathleen and her father had evidently been having a close and earnest convers
239. and earnest conversation, of which Eily felt, that she had been the subject. It
240. and in had been speaking very seriously to Kathleen about his wishes on the sub
241. n the subject, expressing very earnestly what a satisthis case it Mr Daly — 42
242. rnestly what a satisthis case it Mr Daly — 42 faction THE FAIK MAID OF CONNAUG
243. ancy to his sweet little motherless Eily, and as she entered, the conversation r
244. d has so here, then," continued Mr. Daly, "Thorn many sons at home that Michael
245. at home that Michael could live and Eily need never leave her own old home. I'm
246. hleen, "that would be nice for dear Eily and a pleLsant comfort to you, dear fat
247. ur rest, if I had not wished to see Eily settled first. You know you have always
248. You will do so," said her father gravely. sadly. "The first fresh bloom has neve
249. l do so," said her father gravely. sadly. "The first fresh bloom has never been
250. fresh bloom has never been brushed Truly Kathleen off by contact with the world.
251. — — THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. Eily's appearance at this 43 radiant moment,
252. the conversation. "Kathleen/' said Eily, after a while, "what I want you to go
253. n, we'll go," said Kathleen. Accordingly, they set out after breakfast, taking b
254. ad that led to the lane, down which Eily had bidden farewell to her worthless lo
255. over. ; "Not there, Kathleen," said Eily. " there " growing pale as she spoke. "
256. tnot, colleen ? " said Kathleen, gravely. " Come this way," quickly turnter," sa
257. leen, gravely. " Come this way," quickly turnter," said Eily. " Not Why ing as s
258. e this way," quickly turnter," said Eily. " Not Why ing as she spoke, in an oppo
259. een exclaimed: " If you don't mind, Eily, I will turn as I round and go on to Ba
260. on the contrary, they seemed so entirely absorbed in each other, much to all Kat
261. D OF CONNAUGPIT. n Ballinasloe, but Eily wearying a little of the high and expre
262. e top of some tree taking sure aim. Eily darted about with the shy grace of a fa
263. road palm. white hand in There certainly was in the little mute grasp of ling th
264. kfelt and bestowing protection; and Eily a decided restful feeling, bringing str
265. alm to her young lieart, that had lately been troubled by' emotions of a most un
266. d lichens seemed of a richer green. Eily stooped down in childish glee, and maki
267. water made Michael from one of her newly invented drinking cups. Michael never g
268. cups. Michael never grew weary, and Eily's confiding happiness ever on the incre
269. new no fatigue Michael selected a lovely spot for Eily to rest awhile; here the
270. Michael selected a lovely spot for Eily to rest awhile; here the brook took a s
271. he music of the waters; Michael tenderly placing Eily on a seat of moss, under a
272. he waters; Michael tenderly placing Eily on a seat of moss, under a sort of smal
273. lie menced playing with laughing merrily. " white foam of the brook, letting the
274. s through her fingers Are you tired Eily ?" asked Michael. "No," replied Eily, "
275. ily ?" asked Michael. "No," replied Eily, "I should like to stay here all day, b
276. ." "I am always very happy with you Eily," said Michael. " Are you ? " said Eily
277. ," said Michael. " Are you ? " said Eily, looking trustingly into his face. ''Ye
278. re you ? " said Eily, looking trustingly into his face. ''Yes, I am, and I shoul
279. the happiness sure for "How?" said Eily, stopping her play water. " By asking y
280. she said, looking at him his wonderingly. is this," he taking her little hand in
281. " Will you he ray own " true wife^ Eily f The blush rose and covered her face a
282. eyes to meet his tender gaze, and reply to his repeated question, they were fil
283. lled with tears, and she answered softly '' I would nice to le^ Michael." " Woul
284. to his feet and 1)6 catching her quickly —" by the hands, raised her gently, y
285. kly —" by the hands, raised her gently, yet Say that again, dear Eily, say tha
286. er gently, yet Say that again, dear Eily, say that once said it more." "I have !
287. " "I have ! once and forever," said Eily, " and 'tis true." " Ah and you will be
288. ose words, be good and true to you, Eily." that. "I know I feel it, I believe it
289. I'll settle it. keep pace with his manly strides, they wandered back again by th
290. er lay the flowers bloomed more brightly ; the secret of which was that two lovi
291. TEEYIL bnt one shadow hoYerlng over Eily's brightened pathway, and that was the
292. nfidence; so that she might know exactly where she stood, and fear no shipwreck.
293. n no insight; and was groping helplessly about by herself in the dark. She felt
294. ear it from her own lips. lie could only have heard some of the neighbors. gossi
295. e point of confidential disclosure, Eily soon found an opportunity of unburdenin
296. red longer than to the gate, to and Eily had followed him more farewell, when ma
297. the next day, and that it would be only two weeks now before the wedding. " Tha
298. e," hope it will be the same to you Eily." " I hope so," said Eily,"I feel so te
299. me to you Eily." " I hope so," said Eily,"I feel so tell — ^but Michael —I h
300. e was a worthless fellow, and the family were glad to see if he would betto send
301. HT. "No—I " suppose not" — said Eily dreamily " I heard that he had gone awa
302. I " suppose not" — said Eily dreamily " I heard that he had gone away." Then
303. m the house." " That is true/' said Eily, quite relieved to find that Michael kn
304. to be done, and she An ominous scarcely knew how to word it. neither spoke for
305. nts, which seemed very long to poor Eily; the twilight was deepening Michael had
306. ined closed; the other hand clasped Eily's hand, while she played nervously with
307. Eily's hand, while she played nervously with her apron. She had been looking up
308. empty space. ""What is the matter, Eily? What are you — — thinking of ? " T
309. her thoughts. " No," said Michael firmly, in his deep voice —"I — never thou
310. w ? "What could she say ? If he had only thought that she had liked him, and tha
311. — — some other words, and poor Eily was pressed, sore oplittle still and in
312. pulled it, at her apron more I nervously. ever cared "Would you mind had quiveri
313. you mind I told you I him—once?" Eily did waited exclaimed answer. —"I "No,
314. No," not mind Michael should more firmly — would not hurt me in the you may ha
315. l, if you thought for Eory ? " said Eily, her lips if breathlessly for his still
316. ? " said Eily, her lips if breathlessly for his still it it least ; fancies in
317. me your wJiole hearty have you not, Eily ? and we have pledged and plighted our
318. —^Tou me The tears that stood in Eily's eyes ran her cheeks, but they were co
319. joy. The was over she rested trustfully and confidingly on that great manly hea
320. er she rested trustfully and confidingly on that great manly heart that knew no
321. ully and confidingly on that great manly heart that knew no fear, no doubt. The
322. ces and all sorts of pretty things. Eily was busy too, but seemed in a sort of d
323. imed a great deal of her time. John Daly was much occupied too, in examining his
324. ve parations for the Yv^edding, for only a with them. The parish church was abou
325. liappy to tie the knot for Michael Eily, as he had known them from early childr
326. el Eily, as he had known them from early childrose in unclouded splendor hood. T
327. — it - —instead of laughing merrily, of subdued gladness do —a she was wo
328. hung over her—she seemed smiled gently as was rather warm, but a sweet balmy a
329. a sweet balmy atmosphere, and the lovely blue of the sky was unbroken, save by o
330. ears she was not going away she was only going to church to come back to them th
331. f Michael Thorn, and the same httle Eily at home the sunshine of the house. Ther
332. shed brightness and happiness about Eily she walked quietly, and spoke more soft
333. happiness about Eily she walked quietly, and spoke more softly she — — —
334. he walked quietly, and spoke more softly she — — — — — — — — —
335. and engrossed her thoughts; but she only grew softer and sweeter more gentle and
336. in the whole County Galway; " while Eily smiling gently as she passed from one t
337. unty Galway; " while Eily smiling gently as she passed from one to the other cro
338. r child," exclaimed fervor, as John Daly with he clasped the " You are, indeed,
339. d may you see bright days." — — Eily placed her ael's little strong arm —o
340. thleen and a young lady hand confidingly on Mich- acted as best man, from Ballin
341. sive manner by the good old father. Eily with downcast eyes, and a soft blush ma
342. t blush mantling her cheek walked slowly down the aisle, leaning on Michael's ar
343. , and followed by the rest of the family Winny and Pat — — bringing up the r
344. ral marches to the graved passed quietly by. Tears have healthy, Eily is the gen
345. sed quietly by. Tears have healthy, Eily is the gentle, pretty matron, surrounde
346. f Michael has managed the farm, entirely to the satisfaction of John Daly, who h
347. ntirely to the satisfaction of John Daly, who has quietly settled down into gran
348. tisfaction of John Daly, who has quietly settled down into grandpa whose special
349. dren. — wise, or pretty speech is duly venerated by the growing household. Win
350. FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. Soon after Eily's marriage, Kathleen entered the conven
351. ul hair was cut habit, cap and veil only seemed to make her look more beautiful
352. ng bles- and the black robed her queenly form, and off, — — — — — —
353. seen flitted perhaps in that unearthly purity of complexion. She gradually dec
354. thly purity of complexion. She gradually declined, and soon she appeared a ghost
355. y self, and as she about on her heavenly missions of love and —her slight form
356. iritual beauty and though she were truly a spirit from that land whose peopling
357. inistering grace The cuckoo had scarcely sung his first spring note, when it was
358. shared every httle sorrow and joy. Eily and her father had paid many visits to
359. d paid many visits to Ballinasloe lately, to see the sweet Sister pluming her wi
360. for the last lessons and advice to Eily were full of the beauty of holiness and
361. eathed her last. They reached there only in time to see that lovely face calm in
362. ed there only in time to see that lovely face calm in the repose of the last sle
363. death. There she lay in all her heavenly beauty, which the dark who was flight.
364. k who was flight. Her — — habit only enhanced; the slender white fingers —
365. er to Thee long ago." Two or three curly-headed children opened the door and pee
366. ent, study fatigued her. was very rarely that she obtained a high place in class
367. was not watched, she lessons very poorly, passed her time in reading fairy tales
368. ged to go out, which annoys me extremely; you must, my dear one, child, My give
369. work, in order to and hand sufficiently well practised, so that you will be abl
370. the table four little volumes, entirely new. She took the first and opened it,
371. he engravings: it was the ''Swiss Family Eobinson." The child wished to read onl
372. Eobinson." The child wished to read only the first chapter, but, allowing hersel
373. er enter. She quick- " THE LAME FOOT. ly put 63 back the book in the place from
374. d up, and saw with confusion that nearly three hours had passed since Madame Dur
375. usion pain in ; "I am suffering horribly with my right foot and leg." Madame Dur
376. ht the four volumes of the "Swiss Family Robinson," that he had bought the eveni
377. eries in Paris, and which is beautifully laid out in parterres of the and where
378. ith her young companions in these lovely gardens where rich and poor, young and
379. d the nurse dressed her foot so tenderly, that the inva- — lid forgot to utter
380. customed groans. Briggitta most adroitly placed the bella-donna poultice on the
381. replied the little one, with a perfectly composed air. " And the other foot, how
382. her foot, how is that ? ^ " Oh perfectly well see " and she performed ! : ! vari
383. with her right foot. " Come here quickly, Madame," cried the doctor to Madame Du
384. a," replied Adrienne, ; sobbing, " truly I was ashamed to extricate myself but I
385. rom the position which I had so stupidly placed myself." And she related to her
386. nd the peace and happiness of the family, troubled for a time by this incident,
387. are now But the poor child can entirely reestablished. never look in the face o
388. d many. " " " — 69 EULALIE. When gerly; but Eulalie found at Home it that whic
389. it woman, who she loved, had so tenderly nursed her, and whom nevertheless, so O
390. r, "that easy you seem you; it "My silly." darling, I dare not tell is too " Yes
391. s Oh ! the doctor forbidden it no, truly he has not." then, can ? you not have s
392. ny melons in the house; and as the reply was in the negative, she went up-stairs
393. She opened it, and regarded complacently key. moved the little treasure that it
394. it contained. all Her heart beat quickly on touching silver, these small pieces
395. eau, counted them, and was so completely absorbed and delighted with tliis work,
396. ith tliis work, that she forgot entirely for what purpose she had taken them fro
397. shed at last by replacing them, and only Sighing, she then did she think of her
398. ok from the table a plate of very highly flavored strawberries; she sugared them
399. lie looked at her nurse more attentively, and was singularly struck with her cha
400. rse more attentively, and was singularly struck with her changed appearance. She
401. e than to be a ! burden upon your family. If I had only one mouthful of melon, t
402. ! burden upon your family. If I had only one mouthful of melon, to restore my ap
403. derstood it and returned home, perfectly resolved, this time, to give a last sat
404. of put them in her pocket and went daily duties. down to attend to her From time
405. given her last jpleasure^ for evidently she expected it from 72 the child of EU
406. s, which rested in the midst of a lovely garden, like a nest of nightingales in
407. and for more than six months he has only drank water." " Oh ! dear, dear ! why i
408. n he bade me good-bye." " Yes, certainly, my child; I will permit you to buy bac
409. he same idea. We must set out very early to-morrow morning, in order to return i
410. iving in the city, Madame Lemaire easily found the silversmith who had bought th
411. ed to give it up to Madame Lemaire, only upon the condition that he should retur
412. e old man who took snuff very frequently, had his snuff box almost always near h
413. er, whilst very busy telling of a family who had just been ruined by fire, Sarah
414. he bark. The priest took it mechanically, whilst continuing to speak; but feelin
415. oked at it; then he lifted flowed slowly it to his lips, while large tears his c
416. our neigh- Sister Anne Joseph was a holy woman, who She kept a charity school in
417. said observed tliat she never told a ly. wiping her mouth very frequentsister O
418. uentsister On observing her very closely, the perceived that, every time that sh
419. h, she notwithstanding that class. slyly slipped in a cherry, it was forbidden t
420. d ! the child, whose speech was slightly affected by the cherry that she had in
421. uld not deceive Anne Joseph, whom easily, very suspected the studiousness of the
422. sness of the blonde, and, passing softly behind her, took her book, and saw that
423. ur companions, and you forget too easily that you, too, commit faults. Such cond
424. less, her remon- strances were perfectly part of the made some inquiry little in
425. iful and very intelligent, but extremely frivolous, and was entirely occupied wi
426. ut extremely frivolous, and was entirely occupied with the She was what they cal
427. une mondaine^ which means a very worldly She passed her time in making visits, p
428. entertainments of all kinds, completely occupied with displaying her elegant dr
429. her children, but gave them up entirely to the care of : VANITY. their nurse; s
430. care of : VANITY. their nurse; scarcely did their 83 mother very kiss them, she
431. as an excellent clergyman; he frequently spoke to her on this subject, using the
432. t every morning you say three words only." " My dear uncle, Julia, I am entirely
433. ." " My dear uncle, Julia, I am entirely disposed to sat- isfy you." " But you m
434. you." " But you must promise me solemnly not to fail to do so." " I promise you
435. fail to do so." " I promise you solemnly, my dear uncle." "It- is only necessary
436. u solemnly, my dear uncle." "It- is only necessary to see your hands, to underst
437. ands three times, after having carefully washed and perfumed them, and repeated
438. aying: " It would be a great pity, truly, that they should decay, they are so be
439. rienced one When Madame moment of lively pleasure, in observing that, in the mid
440. nking that these gay men and these silly women, devoted to pleasure, would soon
441. into the nursery, which she very rarely visited. The children slept sweetly and
442. rely visited. The children slept sweetly and softly together, and they appeared
443. d. The children slept sweetly and softly together, and they appeared to her so b
444. e two little angels, tucked in so warmly under their eider-down coverlet, she th
445. g toward her with his heart full of holy joy, took her beantifnl hand, which he
446. me the most devoted mother of her family, whom the poor and unfortunate blessed
447. r who, by divers accidents, was entirely ruined, notwithstanding his great goodn
448. he was already an old man when his only son had reached the age of ten years. T
449. day, and lit- his modest salary scarcely sufficed for his subsistence and that o
450. and that of little Bourgingnon, his only child; however, he kept a goat, destine
451. ; however, he kept a goat, destined only for the nourishment of Bourgingnon. The
452. y gaining his ; ; ; affection completely. At last, on arriving at Paris, Bourgin
453. rgingnon acquired this knowledge quickly, thanks to the advice and information o
454. on, he made himself understood perfectly he was so ; and so faitliful, that they
455. aside for him some child ; for not only did he not wish to profit little saving
456. ecember, he was returning on foot slowly toward home, when, yielding to his lass
457. was inhabited by the respectable family of Pinon."^ ''Alas!" said Furcy raising
458. father or the grandfather of the family was the chief. Their dress, their piety
459. , making an effort, and leaning strongly on his stick, tried to take some stej)s
460. INTEGRITY. as a which served the family. dining-room and parlor for all remarke
461. r sixteen young girls, clothed uniformly in brown stuff, and wearing on their he
462. eration, some young member of the family entered the seminary, and became a prie
463. GRITY. ercise the functions of tlie holy ministry, 95 he was received with vener
464. sweet consolation when he heard his holy exhortations, and received from his han
465. ep, he believed that he heard a heavenly concert of angels. all was understood t
466. rning of the next day he went very early to say his prayers in the oratory, and
467. ite a long walk. The chief of the family led Furcy back to the house, and seated
468. d those which had the quality of quickly petrifying the vegetable or animal subs
469. GKATITUDE AND INTEGRITY. 97 Immediately after dinner tlie marchioness left lier
470. ssin felt a true friendship for entirely; for all him: he fed him almost the err
471. e errands of the house he was generously paid. The proprietor, M. de Yilliers, g
472. mnriediatelj, his and deposited secretly in a bag containing old savings, which
473. as pure, his life as active, as formerly. to give Oue day, one of his patrons ca
474. Abbe de Fenelon and took it immediately to his master. At the end of a few minu
475. qualities. Bourgingnon returned quickly to the Hotel des Bernardines, to thank
476. d man bowed his head, and did not re ply; but he locked and concealed the money,
477. der cares, the old man declined sensibly. Feeling it himself, he one morning cal
478. part of this sum, which belongs entirely to you. Although you are only in your t
479. s entirely to you. Although you are only in your thirteenth year, you will make,
480. on his straw bed, the good old man ately for a priest. ordered his son to go imm
481. ^» I I ^,». .ii,,,i M m ing him to fly. Furcy received the sacraments, while h
482. in the arms of his son, who spent nearly all that he had left to bury him. These
483. d all the expenses paid, there were only left for Bourgingnon about one hundred
484. hree very rich persons came successively to lodge in this hotel; Chassin recomme
485. an industrious to virtue, life, entirely consecrated to work and most unexpected
486. sickness, had come to see him regularly every day. Chassin was frightened at se
487. most virtuous memories, expired sweetly on the evening of that day. Judge of th
488. not keep this money: my friend w^as only twelve years old when he left Auvergne;
489. hat I wish to inform myself." Completely occupied with this idea, Chassin wrote
490. ith this idea, Chassin wrote immediately to Auvergne, to procure the most detail
491. in did not hesitate, he sent immediately the thousand crowns to this man. He did
492. , this generous proceeding was generally known in the house. The master 106 of C
493. ND INTEGRITY. M. de Yilliers, was deeply touclied by and as lie sliowed his admi
494. et him want for anything, and who surely would take care of him in his old days.
495. I do not merit such a reward, for I only acted for my own to you, "I am much obl
496. e." The sublime simplicity of this reply fully proved how much Chassin was worth
497. e sublime simplicity of this reply fully proved how much Chassin was worthy of t
498. of the French academy. Providence truly rewarded Chassin. This human glory did
499. of — — his long life, was perfectly happy* CFDanl, "Wlien James II, pelled
500. to relate to you, was of an Irish family, who had followed James II. into exile.
501. er to live, to silver sell, successively, her and her furniture, piece by piece;
502. aloof from society, and particuShe larly so since the death of her husband. foun
503. ke. Abandoned by every one, I shall only think of ; Him who rules to receive the
504. ways caused liini good conduct generally, to be regarded as an excel- lent being
505. They recognized in and,besides, him only the essential qualities, he possessed s
506. tached to her service, and retained only a cook, a maid, and Ambrose. At last sh
507. people, send away the others immediately; but for myself, I have not merited to
508. ." " But, Ambrose, I am ruined, entirely ruined. sold, All that I possess I have
509. Nothing it is that of feeling perfectly resigned, while so many beings upon ear
510. ANT. repair tliem, be snre of it; I only ask length of days from the good God to
511. ose, in tears, rose and went ont hastily, without waiting for a reply. jndge eas
512. ont hastily, without waiting for a reply. jndge easily with w^hat lively and dee
513. ithout waiting for a reply. jndge easily with w^hat lively and deep gratitude th
514. a reply. jndge easily with w^hat lively and deep gratitude the heart of Madame
515. onger, I return it to you; money is only good for that. I know well that this li
516. aised her eyes to heaven, and could only reply with tears. The next day the cook
517. her eyes to heaven, and could only reply with tears. The next day the cook and t
518. d to give for her lodging. There is only one room; but the servant will sleep on
519. cost you ! — much ; : she will is only a child of thirteen years of age you TH
520. , lets me sleep in his house; it is only two steps from here; he will feed me, a
521. day, madame will be able to live easily, as she will have some provisions and a
522. k for her." Ambrose went out immediately, and returned in a moment after, holdin
523. ce he became her benefactor, he was only more grateful; he united to the most co
524. mpose upon us, and that one is not truly generous if he humiliates, or even if h
525. T. 119 Then, without waiting for a reply, he called Suzanna, and returned to the
526. er the reward of his day's work. He only reserved, at the end of each month, as
527. from ''So else. work, lie replied simply, much the better" and spoke of somethin
528. d Suzan- servant to lead her immediately to the house of Nicault, and at the na
529. ose's room, it is built in sucli an ugly hole." At these words Madame tears; sca
530. ." At these words Madame tears; scarcely restrain her de Varonne could and again
531. able Ambrose was not in a state to reply to Madame de Yaronne; for almost an hou
532. , on perceiving gave herself up entirely to her grief. At Suzanna returned with
533. erable lodging of Ambrose, was strangely surprised to see, near the straw-bed of
534. d the sick man, examined him attentively, and said that they had sent for him wh
535. t he would have his own way. He has only remained in bed this morning, and still
536. ty; besides was excited in a most lively manner. He promised to pass a part of t
537. physician and Nicault placing him softly upon it; then Madame de Varonne threw h
538. d to return to Paris; he set out hastily, Ambrose in a convalescent state. herse
539. ation, and re- proached herself bitterly for having accepted the assistance of t
540. vening when Madame de Yaronne was deeply absorbed in these sorrowful reflections
541. ed to see her. " She is mistaken, surely," replied Madame de : Yaronne. " JN'o,
542. tliis moment tliey heard some one softly knocking at the door. Madame de Varonne
543. me emotion, to go and open it. perfectly beautiful lady presented herself, with
544. and raising pression of the most lively gratitude. At this exclamation, tears;
545. nne, and taking her hands affectionately: "Come, Madame" the come to Madame," in
546. our new lodgings. Madame Varonne hastily prepared herself to make the visit to A
547. t to Ambrose, to inform him of her newly recovered fortune. Arriving at the hous
548. ving at the house of Nicault she quickly ascended the steps to Ambrose's sleepin
549. f)ctppy J^option. Felicia, occupied only with tlie education of her two daughter
550. lived in the bosom of her amiable family, whom she loved dearly, seeing only her
551. er amiable family, whom she loved dearly, seeing only her relations and friends.
552. mily, whom she loved dearly, seeing only her relations and friends. Each day she
553. dhood. Camilla, the eldest, had scarcely reached her fifteenth year when her mot
554. o fortune to leave to her she could only establish her by obtaining for her an a
555. cia did not dare to hesi- no less keenly how sad it was to be obliged to marry h
556. ime after her marriage, fell dangerously Anxiety, joined to watchings and sleepl
557. at Bristol, Felicia she could find only a disagreeable lodging, separa- ted mer
558. disagreeable lodging, separa- ted merely by a partition from another room sick,
559. months. who understood English perfectly, learned from her landlady that this un
560. marriage, and at his deatli he had only been able to leave to his wife a small
561. tory interested Felicia in a most lively manner and the whole evening she conver
562. er they had retired was sleeping soundly and Felicia was beginning to doze, when
563. xtraordinary noise awakened her suddenly. She lent an attentive ear, and disting
564. ecollecting that the sick woman had only the waitingmaid and nurse to attend to
565. e would be of some use. She rose quickly, took her night-lamp, and went out soft
566. took her night-lamp, and went out softly, so that she might not wake Natalie. Sh
567. en by sobs, advanced trembling. Suddenly a waiting-maid, in tears, came out of t
568. Where Felicia. is her daughter?" quickly interrupted not old "Alas! Madame, the
569. enough to appreciate her misfortune. ly is knows what death child. is. She scar
570. r-heart- ed See, she is sleeping sweetly near her ! mother, who has just breathe
571. proached the cradle with the most lively emotion. curtain concealed the child. "
572. trembling hand she drew it aside softly, and discovered the innocent little orp
573. delight. The child was sleeping soundly at the side of the bed of her unhappy d
574. unhappy dead mother, she tasted sweetly the charms of repose. The serenity of h
575. d, without awakening, was carried softly upon her little bed into Felicia's room
576. she looked at the little Pamela tenderly, calling her sister she wished it was a
577. peared prised she looked at her steadily, then she smiled Felicia pressed her in
578. mother affected Felicia in a most lively manner " Your mamma," said she, '' is n
579. d and returned to France. All her family congratulated her on the adoption of th
580. that the heart alone can inspire. lively, yet This deep sensibility shed an inex
581. egular, or if she was beautiful, or only pretty. One was only struck with her in
582. beautiful, or only pretty. One was only struck with her interesting and ingenuo
583. nuous physiognomy, and with the heavenly expression of her face. You could neith
584. could say nothing of her eyes they only spoke She had all the desire to please
585. ways given to one so studious, naturally good; she was generous, short, one foun
586. . ; In hearted ; mild, yet withal lively. defects that The only Pamela possessed
587. yet withal lively. defects that The only Pamela possessed arose from this extrem
588. rass. to lock them up : she rose quickly, the always open, falling to ing over a
589. atest desire to obey, forgot continually this prohibition fell ; she regularly t
590. ly this prohibition fell ; she regularly two or three times a day, and left at a
591. , and pun- ishments, she lost insensibly a little this excess of Felicia every m
592. ckets and in her work-bag and this daily examination conduced to render Pamela l
593. at I heard your bell, I ran immediately " What Without taking time to pick !
594. ot think of that; I thought "Mamma, only of you, and of the pleasure of seeing y
595. t her in her eyes, and blushed. steadily, with a severe air; Pamela blushed stil
596. icia, without saying a single word. only saw in this suppliant action the avowal
597. she had received, kept silence, and only gave expression to her grief by sobs an
598. d the maid to take her, and left hastily. Arrived at the chapel, Felicia had, in
599. l; the poor little one knelt down humbly on Mie steps of the stairway. The maid
600. njust." " No; my benefactress, am surely my tender mother, can never be so with
601. entreat Felicia to return to bed quickly. " Sleep, mamma," she would say;^^your
602. f reflection and education. She scarcely remembered England; she loved Felicia t
603. ed England; she loved Felicia too dearly not to love France; but she never forgo
604. was writing, and Pamela playing quietly near her. There was then war with Engla
605. here was then war with England; suddenly Felicia heard the sound of cannon; she
606. g. we have beaten the English." Scarcely had Felicia finished these words, than
607. or one of her age touched Felicia deeply. "My child," said she "a touching and s
608. esides, a fault weighs much more heavily, when mamma is ignorant of it; and then
609. ie least From time she would rise softly, and approaching embrace her, and then
610. her playthings More than once, suddenly, she came and threw herself weeping int
611. uch an extraordinary loving, necessarily could not be an ordinary per- son; also
612. also, Pamela, at seventeen years, fully justified all the hopes that her childh
613. she drew well, painted flowers perfectly, and played on the harp in a most super
614. precious for her, as she owed it solely to her mother, who had been her only te
615. ely to her mother, who had been her only teacher of the harp. Pamela loved readi
616. e harp. Pamela loved reading, especially natural history and botany. She wrote w
617. well, and as to her style, they scarcely had to form it; for with so able talent
618. r talents, was the delight of her family. Suffering for six months with a debili
619. them, never to return. The journey only increased the sufferings of Alexandrine
620. about to will ! What lose, we have only known imperfectly. A tran- PAMELA. quil
621. hat lose, we have only known imperfectly. A tran- PAMELA. quil and fortunate lif
622. ition. I was in error, she was perfectly well aware of it; even on setting out f
623. ister." this charge, as a " I could only reply with tears —Alexandrine hand wi
624. " this charge, as a " I could only reply with tears —Alexandrine hand with a m
625. y daughter I send — ! ! ! you the only consolation that I can offer you at thi
626. by The astonishment the name of the holy woman. that Felicia and Pamela experien
627. eing her, and listening to her, was only equal to the pity with which she inspir
628. aralytic had her feet and hands entirely withered and shrivelled. Her fingers, h
629. ed and shrivelled. Her fingers, horribly elongated, appeared dislocated, and had
630. st all human shape. Her face showed only a hideous for her carriage, and, accomp
631. iage, and, accompanied mass, frightfully emaciated and of a deathlike " " 150 j)
632. ing in a large a clergyman, room, neatly arranged; Felicia, with a venerable fac
633. g to her eyes, and she would immediately go and ask pardon of her nurse. You wee
634. often read to me a chapter from the holy scriptures. You know, madame, how divin
635. riptures. You know, madame, how divinely she sings. One day I begged her to sing
636. ay I begged her to sing for me. " I only know the ugly, worldly songs which woul
637. r to sing for me. " I only know the ugly, worldly songs which would not please m
638. for me. " I only know the ugly, worldly songs which would not please my mother,
639. more, that all my limbs are frightfully deformed, and that I never pass a week
640. dare to enter into such details." "Ah ly, ! speak, go on," interrupted Felicia q
641. ted Felicia quick! shedding tears freely; "speak " Ah, well madame," replied the
642. he care with which she charged herSurely, madame, you must have self regularly.
643. ly, madame, you must have self regularly. remarked how white and delicate were h
644. . " Madame," said he, "will learn surely with in- " PAMELA. ^ 11 I I 153 — w
645. madame," replied the woman ! ''not only do I accept these misfortunes with resi
646. rything invites me to occupy myself only with eternity ! Oh ! how dear my misfor
647. ings; her eyes opened and shone brightly at this moment, with an extraordinary f
648. The make proselytes, what could he reply to this woman, when she would say to hi
649. You wish to snatch away from me the only seeks to consolation that remains for m
650. eft the poor woman, promising faithfully to " 156 PAMELA. return to see her as o
651. f the day about Alexandrine and the holy woman. duties " How can it be," said Pa
652. any inspirations of praise; I have only followed the my heart." Have make you e
653. miliar with good deeds, and consequently how much vanity he draws from them. Ind
654. hy action, since a different course only reveals the smallness of their soul, an
655. e death of had always loved her tenderly, and the details related by the holy wo
656. rly, and the details related by the holy woman had rendered her still more dear.
657. experienced a deep grief. find the holy solation of woman, to taste the sorrowf
658. and visited her twice a week. For nearly a year she had fulfilled these touching
659. lst she was washing the feet of the holy ject of weeping with woman, the door of
660. an, the door of the room opened suddenly. A man of fifty years of age, with a no
661. lling over her face, concealed it partly. Hearing the noise that the stranger ma
662. n to bolt a little the door. Immediately the stranger, with delight, exclaimed i
663. more, when she and seat himself gravely opposite to her. Whilst she hastened to
664. tranger and bowing, she went out hastily. Some days after this adventure, Pamela
665. that the stranger had remained steadily at Pamela. He PAMELA. 159 afterward for
666. ame, not to inspire with the most lively Interest an Englishman who was not unwo
667. life to you what ; more could I possibly desire said Felicia, ? '' " Let me," "
668. he name of Pamela's his offers to family. Felicia confessed frankly to him that
669. ers to family. Felicia confessed frankly to him that Pamela herself was opposed
670. he care of Mrs. Selwin, they will surely reach me." At the name of Selwin, Felic
671. A. without taking the name of the family. I have been a widower for ten years^ a
672. unfortunate father followed him quickly to the tomb. I was absent then a new se
673. ced me to prolong my journey, and I only returned to England at the end of four
674. elieved that the unfortunate orphan only survived her mother a few months. This
675. and pressed this trembling hand tenderly. Suddenly Pamela, quite distracted, ros
676. d this trembling hand tenderly. Suddenly Pamela, quite distracted, rose, and adv
677. toward her^ " Great exclaimed Mr. Aresly, Pamela, seized with a fear that she co
678. g a time deplored as lost, you will only find in me a friend, a tender father, i
679. of exacting from you the slightIf truly est sacrifice." arms of Felicia she exp
680. ers that Mrs. Selwin's maid had formerly Pamela. remitted to Felicia. having rec
681. some presents from Felicia, they easily supposed that, in order not to share th
682. ties, was always to render her perfectly happy. ; Punctualitu, Antoinette and he
683. gene, were two pretty, bright, sprightly children, who with their Lavalle and he
684. indows they looked out upon these lovely grounds, where well-dressed, gay people
685. to wear her hair banged, which entirely hid her forehead, that most intelligent
686. r eyes, which were excess, is remarkably silly. pretty brown eyes, always looked
687. , which were excess, is remarkably silly. pretty brown eyes, always looked as th
688. ble fault it is true the world generally fault, is very lenient with and scarcel
689. fault, is very lenient with and scarcely considers it an imperShe was never punc
690. he " forelock." such a ; ; Unfortunately for Nettie, her set mamma did not very
691. hat ISTettie was allowed I to carelessly fall into this bad habit, am which is s
692. dress, until she saw the carconsequently was there the horses were kept waiting
693. bad " exclaimed Nettie, " such a lovely I will not wait." ! morning for a drive
694. will be dressed in Next time I certainly time." But a child's disapsorskies, poi
695. nd their rows are little like April only overcast for a appears while, when the
696. rd," said her uncle, "always late. Truly thou dost think that time will wait for
697. ell, that is a said almost unconsciously, " ah ed over, ! gruesome thought certa
698. ah ed over, ! gruesome thought certainly, on this bright morning " and he took o
699. es, then settling his eye glasses firmly on his prominent nose and taking his go
700. s a very saintParis a Madame da Costa ly religieuse and did an immense amount of
701. their labyrinth of loved to visit folly. Antoinette her dear Tanta as she calle
702. lle's own maid seldom had time generally fell to to attend to Nettie, so that it
703. n I am and her eyes shine so beautifully, like the sanctuary lamp, that they see
704. ued Nettie, "she tells me so many lovely ways of doing and being good, that I am
705. ^ after a while." " Ah you Julie, " only —one thing— ; are good now^ my pet,
706. y," said Antoinette, "that time was only made for slaves and servIf old Sebastia
707. f her ? chiL dren, and Nettie especially. " art thou, dear one How It has been m
708. is nothing the right time, consequently there much un- done. Il you ; are not p
709. nute matters, you are very apt to erally exact become untruthful. This is perhap
710. e called upon to be the head of a family, and unless you then possess order, sys
711. e this and to practise punctuality daily. Believe me, it is one of the great sec
712. e on her way defect, home ; she scarcely spoke to old Julie, her, with who jogge
713. grumbling, for her ^eUt pigeon generally amused her prattle ; but Nettie was tre
714. that from the sweet lips of her saintly aunt "What thing, is that?" said JuHe,
715. ights were lighted the table beautifully decorated with flowers and as Madame La
716. that such a reformation has taken really in time for dinner place ?" ^^Oh ! dear
717. with Tanta, and she has said such lovely things now, going to try and overcome t
718. lt, of always being behind time I really : am shall see mamma, 1 will be in time
719. through for garden, and gathered lovely bouquets, mamma, papa, and Eugene, and
720. beside their plates. Papa came an early pleased, in, pinched her ear, and said
721. sed, and in pleasing others, and finally felt Nettie very much pleased witli her
722. rt to overcome this fault, and be really good, it was such a healthy moral exerc
723. tiful for future exertion. Nettie really We so often have the most beauthat they
724. ve ever had a good intentions; so lovely, ; intention. PUNCTUALITY 177 His fall
725. 77 His fall Satanic majesty Icves dearly such indolent natiirerf, such [)r()cras
726. cible defense. some good end, are really the most armor that we can put on, in s
727. on, in self was in earnest she was fully aware and most determined to conquer. !
728. Lel)lanc, who accosted them yes/^ gaily. "Why, ?^^ little one, were you really
729. y. "Why, ?^^ little one, were you really ready to drive to-day ^'Oh ! replied Ma
730. ar overcome nature and self. Tanta, only served to renew her efforts, which —s
731. control, and who remeinhered the snintly advice of her dear annt. ''Live by rule
732. ewal. 2. Books may be renewed weeks only. 3. for two lose Students who damage th

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/