Concordance for The fair maid of Connaught and other tales for catholic youth / by Kate Duval Hughes.

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1.   the InternetArchive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. • • «« e' * • Entered according to Act of Congress, Jan. 25, 1889, by K
3. in the dark blue cloak; the hood falling back from a head whose contour and feat
4. the healthy exercise she had been taking over the moors and the dark chestnut ha
5. howed some deep resolve — —something better, tlian the —purer—strong* ev
6. to leave her in bed, give her something to eat, and let her alone. Alas for hum
7. mes gather together in her room, smoking, without much reference gossiping, and
8. moking, without much reference gossiping, and laughing — to the poor sufferer
9. t much reference gossiping, and laughing — to the poor sufferer tiently who wa
10. ure; she read to her the most comforting and consoling passages of scripture, an
11. to her the most comforting and consoling passages of scripture, and on her knees
12. e old woman would often say in trembling voice, laying her withered hand on the
13. uld often say in trembling voice, laying her withered hand on the silken locks o
14. lt beside her, " May God's best blessing ever rest on ye." And the blessing of t
15. ssing ever rest on ye." And the blessing of the aged, crowned by the threefold b
16. aged, crowned by the threefold blessing of our dear Lord, passed with and ! ! "
17. shine in her face. The day was declining, and calling as she was resting against
18. face. The day was declining, and calling as she was resting against the door she
19. eclining, and calling as she was resting against the door she heard a sweet bird
20. here a young girl of sixteen was sitting on a low seat by an open window through
21. ar rose and honey-suckle were struggling to enter, as though to caress her. Kath
22. r. Kathleen advanced quickly and resting her hand lightly on her head said softl
23. ed to her sister with a tender confiding look one hand swept back a wealth of ha
24. n it in all their glory, gently bronzing it with the warmth; it fell down far be
25. thinks he'll be and the poor Uttle thing off to America" broke down completely,
26. erica" broke down completely, and laying her head on Kathleen's shoulder sobbed
27. head that was half buried in the falling '^Eily, why did you see him again," sai
28. tled." '*But he has never done any thing really wrong," pleaded Eily " and and h
29. o fond of the passive condition of heing loved^ that they very often look no far
30. wrecked on some barren rock with nothing left — — to them, but a wild waste.
31. ave Kathr — — — leen a questioning look. In Kathleen's face came that far-
32. as if in her day dreams she wa§ trying to catch a glimpse of some better land
33. the miserable world full of it in giving it up vanity and trouble full of selfis
34. intments that they often have must bring their own sharp sting." Try and be stro
35. en have must bring their own sharp sting." Try and be strong yourself dear Eily,
36. unworthy Believe that object, must bring its own reward. our dear father must kn
37. ears difference in their age, Eily being only six- Kathleen had just passed her
38. e, like some great oakfirm and unbending 'tis true, but sturdy and strong in his
39. and strong in his integrity and undying love for his two daughters. John Daly w
40. his way, without turnteen, while — ing to the right or left, or consulting any
41. ing to the right or left, or consulting anyone. His wife Eileen was very emotio
42. was all indeed wonderful, and gratifying to held it. Eileen Daly was always frai
43. came and the crocusses were just peeping out, she died suddenly one day, leaving
44. out, she died suddenly one day, leaving her two little girls to their father's
45. d to them, but stern He was and exacting; ing him. so they grew up —loving, bu
46. them, but stern He was and exacting; ing him. so they grew up —loving, but fea
47. ting; ing him. so they grew up —loving, but fear- 14 THE FAIK MAID OF CONNAUGH
48. allinasloe. It was a long, low, rambling house, with large rooms, and many doors
49. ns, and each member and possessor having found it perfectly comfortable within,
50. e walls were covered with the clustering rose. would have been quite as sweet by
51. riest cadences —Kathleen often joining in with her rich contralto, and the can
52. er rich contralto, and the canary trying always 16 to out-do THE FAIR MAID OF CO
53. e it was that in the hush of the evening, when the only sounds heard were the di
54. nt low of the cattle, and the twittering birds— they gathered the windows, ;
55. windows, ; — together for the evening prayer. Here John Daly offered up his n
56. s blessed his children before separating for the night. was a very large kitchen
57. les climbed up together, and interlacing, formed the most beautiful screen that
58. lier 17 age was very uncertain; judging from the first time that she came to tl
59. and in every word she uttered, the ring of the true coin. Although she could ne
60. he word, the tian; truest chris- bearing about her the visible impress of * word
61. Vv-as always " Glory be to God" throwing up her hands at the same time, as thoug
62. 's squabbles than uspaL-^Winny's working attir§ was peculig-r-a dark — 18 THE
63. the garden, and in fact all the jobbing work that was to be done. Tall, and wel
64. OF CONKAUCIHT. Yv^as liis 19 displaying moutli generally speaking, Y^lien lie s
65. 19 displaying moutli generally speaking, Y^lien lie smiled Ills nose, wliicli a
66. re in tlie human line face for bestowing, or taking away strong character of exp
67. human line face for bestowing, or taking away strong character of expression, st
68. aight forward. When any one was speaking to him, he would look most persistently
69. viatingly into one corner of the ceiling, as though trying to solve some geometr
70. corner of the ceiling, as though trying to solve some geometrical problem there
71. do so; but he did not believe in making a show to please the world. lie was con
72. t one conld possibly describe; lie thing, if —nerved him—brought him the ing
73. , if —nerved him—brought him the ing and kept him there something was achiev
74. him the ing and kept him there something was achieved— constantly making good
75. ething was achieved— constantly making good resolvesconstantly shifting from t
76. making good resolvesconstantly shifting from them— that he was carefully to s
77. one-third of his life passed in wavering and uncertain steps, that had led him n
78. particular, and liad gained him nothing. His love for Eily, if you could give i
79. kind-una.ble and at twenty-six unwilling to make the least sacrifice for her. Jo
80. ngle instant, of his innocent, confiding Eily, being ship- wrecked in this cruel
81. , of his innocent, confiding Eily, being ship- wrecked in this cruel manner upon
82. ernal influence, but authority, to bring her safely anchored in some port, where
83. ecured, and where he could, while living, watch over her with that vigilant eye
84. CONNAUGHT. 21 CHAPTER III. Tlie Parting. " One touch of nature makes the whole
85. ole worldTcinP was an "incense breathing morn" in tlie sweet and flowery month o
86. in all the abundance of wealth, rippling up here, and curling down there, until
87. of wealth, rippling up here, and curling down there, until the little one had to
88. determination each lock showed of going its own way. Now, it was to tie her hat
89. m. Finally as there seemed to be nothing It — — — more that could bo accom
90. the slie descended tlie stairs, stopping to caress her pet kitten, wlio looked w
91. affection lavished on her; then hovering over the canary's cage and trilling gen
92. ring over the canary's cage and trilling gently a soft lay, at which the canary
93. h the canary shrieked wildly, —hopping madly about from perch to perch, with h
94. side and then on the other; then meeting Winny, who had been following her all t
95. en meeting Winny, who had been following her all the morning with wistful eyes a
96. o had been following her all the morning with wistful eyes and anxious brow, she
97. y God direct you to said Winny following her " bless you, the best to the wean,"
98. efore she set out. What a lovely morning it was ! The air was redolent with swee
99. d to Eily to ask a mute, yet questioning ^^Well"? to which her heart could only
100. ll on she sped, her feet scarce touching the ground, her bloom deepening, and he
101. touching the ground, her bloom deepening, and her eye gathering more earnestwhen
102. r bloom deepening, and her eye gathering more earnestwhen a sudden turn in the r
103. nature seemed to have laid some cunning plan to ornament this spot of sylvan lo
104. disturbed by a little foot-path running through, while each side was bordered w
105. i glee Eilj could not resist stoj)- ping at intervals to gatlier these sweet Jlo
106. the enjoyment of the hour, while passing life —she stopped —gathered—ran d
107. pockets, arms and hands filled. Eunning on quickly, she saw before her, at the
108. n face —indolence in attitude shifting position uneasily—glancing Eily, who
109. de shifting position uneasily—glancing Eily, who ran towards him quickly—hol
110. y, who ran towards him quickly—holding out her hand frankly— exclaiming—wh
111. lding out her hand frankly— exclaiming—while a blush passed over her ingenuo
112. 'Do you?" the thought said Eily, looking away sadly flashed across her mind, tho
113. nderstood it herself is — so unwilling are we to believe that which disagreeab
114. d never made the himself, to do anything to win her, to make himself deserving o
115. ng to win her, to make himself deserving of her love, thoughts or the respect an
116. nd, as she stood there weak and wavering, and looking so utterly irresolute and
117. ood there weak and wavering, and looking so utterly irresolute and miserable. Ei
118. short space of time. "What are you going to do Eory ?" said Eily quietly. "I don
119. "I don't hardly know," said Eory looking with great uncertainty over the liedge,
120. iedge, as though he might find something in the space beyond. heart beat quickly
121. ve her no support, was not worth keeping and Possibly, she thought that a hand t
122. e thought she felt for him was and dying out to the last spark. Still if she had
123. it was her duty to stand by such a being, who was not able to be even a half of
124. s not able to be even a half of anything, she would have done so, flickering, I
125. hing, she would have done so, flickering, I 26 THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. she w
126. hen filial love and duty were struggling for the mastery, the temptation w^as be
127. he mastery, the temptation w^as becoming weaker and weaker. Kory felt painfully
128. ily gently — as though he were telling her something out of a book. knowledge
129. as though he were telling her something out of a book. knowledge did not extend
130. so far, and it seemed to her like going to some great wilderness. Her hat had f
131. emed to stoop through the slight opening in the trees to kiss the fair brow her
132. ue muslin dress fluttered in the morning breeze, and the sweet face upturned in
133. " It seems to me that you take my going very easy, and don't care how far off i
134. — stepped back several steps, putting her hands before her, as though to shut
135. Eory had sunk back hedge and was gazing at her in wild amazement. " I mean," sa
136. ed, to the end of the lane. Then resting against a tree, she quietly put on her
137. bright sunshiny days, and long lingering twilights, and great preparations were
138. ights, and great preparations were being liiade throughout the country for the g
139. for the great annual Ballinasloe during the first six fair, held in days of Oct
140. rs had been so successful in the raising of their stock. John Daly's cattle were
141. rrived and KatUeen and Eily were donning their best attire. Pat had been curryin
142. their best attire. Pat had been currying the horses, cleaning his boots, soaping
143. t had been currying the horses, cleaning his boots, soaping his face and brushin
144. the horses, cleaning his boots, soaping his face and brushing his hair since da
145. his boots, soaping his face and brushing his hair since day-light, interrupted o
146. boy! Shure you must think you are going to find somebody at the fair that ye li
147. d appearance. The drive, and the morning air brought the color into Eily's face,
148. o Eily's face, and she soon was chatting gaily; her white dress and blue ribbons
149. died tlie fair ground, and were mingling witli tlie gay tlirong wlio were fast a
150. ie gay tlirong wlio were fast assembling. Cordial greetings met tliem on every s
151. nd then the two men Lord Eversly staring boldly at tlie beauti" I say, Guy, who
152. et. By jove I think I never saw anything so grand even during:: a London season.
153. never saw anything so grand even during:: a London season." " I suppose not," s
154. OF CONNAUGHT. ! I should not mind having a flirtation with the damsel. tlia,t Sh
155. d not dare refuse, lest his deep feeling should be seen, and his motives judged
156. over; Guy's distressed face and pleading manner plainly saying, — Kathleen, I
157. face and pleading manner plainly saying, — Kathleen, I could not help this. L
158. and opened wide those dark gray meeting his impertinent gaze with calm astonish
159. hat lie had met at last a superior being; something THF FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT.
160. met at last a superior being; something THF FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. liiglier, 3
161. ier, 33 reach, purer, better; sometliing out of liis that lie could not j^enetra
162. n to the races. The same calm, wondering exThe same half-scornful pity pression
163. ound her mouth. Dignity alone forbidding the utterance of words, whose expressio
164. his were, in his nervous rage, and being so completely nonplussed in his vain ar
165. ne, came to his rescue. John Daly having properly introduced Mr. Thorn to his da
166. inest milch cows on the grounds." Bowing farewell to Kathleen and her sister, Lo
167. rted of cattle. farmer's pride, dwelling on each good point Yery good." said wit
168. y. Lord Eversly smilLord Eversly was ing grimly absently thinking of the woman w
169. Eversly was ing grimly absently thinking of the woman who had so fJiaken him on
170. and wandered about by himself, sticking his hands in his pockets, which is alwa
171. when in trouble of mind, or when making any calculaHis tions, or when discomfit
172. pockets. did not lihe the idea of being shaken on his jpedes-^ ^aZ—and he rem
173. nd he remembered Guy Dominick's scathing remark " You might as well try to pick
174. d then what made it more social standing ? humiliating still was that it did see
175. de it more social standing ? humiliating still was that it did seem as though he
176. seem as though he had met with something out of his reach. He wished now that he
177. at he had not wasted his time in running up from Dublin to this confounded fair,
178. could it be really was sadly mortifying. : — — possible that after so many
179. me out of his pockets, and began pulling the whiskers again. It was a problem; a
180. MAID OF CONNAUGHT. 37 CHAPTER Y. Leaving Lord Eversly to solve the problem that
181. er back, had always been farmers tilling their own land and enjoying modest and
182. mers tilling their own land and enjoying modest and independent competency crown
183. d fellowship and that strong and abiding law of 38 THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. "
184. farm, and vied with each other in being good to the old people, who were now in
185. he old people, who were now in declining years, and had given Erin's and adhered
186. fine manly specimens of young men, being nearly all six feet in height, and broa
187. ine beauty. His stature and fine bearing would have made him a splendid martial
188. wrinkled family. by any of the '^eating cares of life," and the deep, clear blu
189. h gracious kindness, and Eily's blushing shyness, only made her appear more love
190. me refreshments cordial and easy footing, as the two families had been old frien
191. e and travelled all tired than in coming. They were when they reached home, wher
192. and pleasant conversation before parting for the night. " Come over soon and see
193. UGHT. CHAPTER YI An old fashioned Wooing ^ Love is a little fragile flower That
194. r ca/re^ Until its perfume softly rising Tells that the flower is there. were so
195. roves: and only vanished with her waking, to her great disgust and disappointmen
196. her window to breathe the fresh morning air, and as the sweet roses brushed in
197. ; and that, perhaps, there was something very bright in store for her; and a gre
198. ind as she sat down in the early morning sunshine to brush out her lovely and lu
199. er thoughts. She found herself wondering how she couW possibly ever have tolerat
200. take a fancy to such a shy little thing as herself. With that possibility growi
201. s herself. With that possibility growing in her mind came such a train of glorio
202. and her father had evidently been having a close and earnest conversation, of wh
203. el these things and in had been speaking very seriously to Kathleen about his wi
204. ut his wishes on the subject, expressing very earnestly what a satisthis case it
205. ld not have kept you in the world pining so long for your rest, if I had not wis
206. "what I want you to go to are you going to do to-day ? the woods with me." "Wel
207. ly, they set out after breakfast, taking by chance, the road that led to the lan
208. Kathleen," said Eily. " there " growing pale as she spoke. " No matnot, colleen
209. ickly turnter," said Eily. " Not Why ing as she spoke, in an opposite direction.
210. ld they meet but Michael Thorn, standing before them, unmistakable joy shining i
211. ng before them, unmistakable joy shining in his honest face, when he saw the two
212. e, when he saw the two sisters advancing toward him. Cordial greetings passed, w
213. AUGPIT. n Ballinasloe, but Eily wearying a little of the high and expressing a d
214. ying a little of the high and expressing a desire for some beautiful wild flower
215. hand, Michael with tender care, clearing away every obstacle in her path. The we
216. ough the branches of the trees, throwing flickering rays across the path, and da
217. anches of the trees, throwing flickering rays across the path, and darting here
218. kering rays across the path, and darting here and there in on, They wandered —
219. there in on, They wandered — glancing glee. The birds sang their love songs a
220. love. their sweet odors for the passing hour, and this was indeed In such spots
221. deed In such spots Cupid is always lying in ambush with his quivers; and I have
222. n, he was at the top of some tree taking sure aim. Eily darted about with the sh
223. with the shy grace of a fawn, gathering flowers, mosses and ferns, as often re-
224. , mosses and ferns, as often re- turning with innocent confldence, and a rising
225. g with innocent confldence, and a rising blush, to place again her Michael's bro
226. nly was in the little mute grasp of ling that honest hand, a world of sparkfelt
227. hand, a world of sparkfelt and bestowing protection; and Eily a decided restful
228. tion; and Eily a decided restful feeling, bringing strength and THF FAIR MAID OF
229. Eily a decided restful feeling, bringing strength and THF FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT
230. ll they came to a cool, delicious spring which sprang from a rock, around which
231. tooped down in childish glee, and making cups out of the leaves, drank, and qukf
232. from one of her newly invented drinking cups. Michael never grew weary, and Eil
233. l never grew weary, and Eily's confiding happiness ever on the increase, knew no
234. the increase, knew no alloy. A babbling brook arose from the spring, and wander
235. . A babbling brook arose from the spring, and wandered along through the dark wo
236. ed along through the dark woods, curling and winding about in its silvery beauty
237. ough the dark woods, curling and winding about in its silvery beauty rippling on
238. ing about in its silvery beauty rippling on, and seeming to echo all their low a
239. silvery beauty rippling on, and seeming to echo all their low and tender words.
240. udden leap over some large rocks, making a — — — — tumbling doAvn in whi
241. rocks, making a — — — — tumbling doAvn in white foam, and then disappear
242. Avn in white foam, and then disappearing for awhile under a large moss-covered s
243. of the waters; Michael tenderly placing Eily on a seat of moss, under a sort of
244. a sort of small cascade, wide-spreading alder tree, seated himself beside her.
245. K MAID OF CONNAUGHT. tlie menced playing with laughing merrily. " white foam of
246. AUGHT. tlie menced playing with laughing merrily. " white foam of the brook, let
247. rily. " white foam of the brook, letting the water pass through her fingers Are
248. ichael. " Are you ? " said Eily, looking trustingly into his face. ''Yes, I am,
249. ness sure for "How?" said Eily, stopping her play water. " By asking you one sim
250. ly, stopping her play water. " By asking you one simple question." that?" said "
251. at?" said "What "It is she said, looking at him his wonderingly. is this," he ta
252. him his wonderingly. is this," he taking her little hand in own, and holding it
253. king her little hand in own, and holding it fast. " Will you he ray own " true w
254. nation to the church and be was carrying her home, a bride, his own. He sprang t
255. . He sprang to his feet and 1)6 catching her quickly —" by the hands, raised h
256. d back again by the side of the babbling brook but this time the music of the wa
257. a sweet low song of satisfied, trusting hearts of There love and peaceful conte
258. tentment and home. seemed to be a spring in the ground upon which to ; ; Then wi
259. er little arm and her little feet trying Never fear, hand resting on colleen." h
260. tle feet trying Never fear, hand resting on colleen." his strong — they trod ;
261. the secret of which was that two loving souls had melted into one and had found
262. e could gain no insight; and was groping helplessly about by herself in the dark
263. e heard some of the neighbors. gossiping; and not much of that; and it seemed to
264. whole paramount duty to tell the Having nerved and braced herself Mm up to the
265. soon found an opportunity of unburdening her mind and usual, heart. One evening
266. g her mind and usual, heart. One evening Michael had bid one lingered longer tha
267. he hand-in-hand, and Michael was telling her that he would be over earlier the n
268. be only two weeks now before the wedding. " That will be the happiest day of sai
269. ell — ^but Michael —I have something to or to ask you." you before you go—
270. e. "I did," said Michael —"not — ing — ^there was nothing in him." — 50
271. l —"not — ing — ^there was nothing in him." — 50 " — THE FAIR MAID OF
272. it " Oh, yes I heard that he was hanging about was to see you. "Why prettiest la
273. to poor Eily; the twilight was deepening Michael had one hand upon the gate-latc
274. sly with her apron. She had been looking up at him, but now her glance wandered
275. ter, Eily? What are you — — thinking of ? " The blushes rose over her brow a
276. d throat, but the twilight was deepening and at last Michael did not see them. T
277. IR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. 51 lump was rising in her throat and her voice trembled. "
278. jred for Rory ? Michael had been looking down into her eyes, trying to read her
279. been looking down into her eyes, trying to read her thoughts. " No," said Micha
280. id not think you would waste your liking, on such a worthless — fellow." "What
281. ever cared "Would you mind had quivering like —"would you mind I told you I hi
282. d that means that we must go on trusting till the end of life.'' have told that
283. F CONNArGHT. 53 CHAPTER VIIL THE WEDDING. The home was alive, and astir with the
284. nd Pat was nproarions, elbows in wedding cake. and seemed disposed to turn somer
285. . Kathleen stitched away with unwearying hands on frills and laces and all sorts
286. Daly was much occupied too, in examining his stock, and arranging everything in
287. o, in examining his stock, and arranging everything in order, for it had been ag
288. ning his stock, and arranging everything in order, for it had been agreed that M
289. rm, and live parations for the Yv^edding, for only a with them. The parish churc
290. he farm; was a rather low stone building covered with ivy; with a low door, and
291. in unclouded splendor hood. The morning — it - —instead of laughing merrily
292. morning — it - —instead of laughing merrily, of subdued gladness do —a sh
293. as unbroken, save by occasional floating, light fleecy clouds, that passed over
294. looked like lace work and while looking, you might almost fancy them some more
295. no long faces no tears she was not going away she was only going to church to co
296. he was not going away she was only going to church to come back to them the wife
297. e great duties and obligations belonging to them no doubt filled her mind, and e
298. ofter and sweeter more gentle and loving. Soon arrayed by Kathleen's hands in th
299. ect innocence and beauty, and descending she presented herself for inspection be
300. lessed wean, and showered every blessing on her head. Pat declared she was the '
301. hole County Galway; " while Eily smiling gently as she passed from one to the ot
302. could little desire. May every blessing fall on your young head this day.'^ The
303. your young head this day.'^ Then taking her over to Michael Thorn, he added: "H
304. downcast eyes, and a soft blush mantling her cheek walked slowly down the aisle,
305. ek walked slowly down the aisle, leaning on Michael's arm, and followed by the r
306. he family Winny and Pat — — bringing up the rear. children The little Sunday
307. , and all gave their heart-felt blessing to the young and innocent one who had j
308. was Father Blake ^his white hair flowing down over his shoulders, and supporting
309. down over his shoulders, and supporting himself with his " Til be with you," sa
310. id he to strong oaken stick. the wedding party and he jumped into the car to acc
311. o the car to accompany them home. Having arrived there of marriage. The last —
312. ed in and they passed a pleasant evening some merry music a dance and refreshmen
313. ID OF CONNAUGHT. CHAPTER ** rX. fleeting : Art u long^ and time is And our heart
314. ave Still like muffled drums are beating Funeral marches to the graved passed qu
315. speech is duly venerated by the growing household. Winny is in her element amon
316. allow that her childher ever do anything wrong, commit any misdemeanor whatever,
317. ty and mercy. She never wearied in doing good. The aged and infirm little childr
318. aled in vain, and all went away carrying with them, each their own particular co
319. wn particular consolation, and showering bles- and the black robed her queenly f
320. many wants and miseries— and untiring zeal in her mission who worked with wit
321. y a spirit from that land whose peopling is of angels. As she passed her people
322. e's a look of Heaven about her something not of earth she don't belong here, any
323. nable to go on the rounds of ministering grace The cuckoo had scarcely sung his
324. uckoo had scarcely sung his first spring note, when it was announced that Sister
325. reat was the gloom among the neighboring poor. and mercy. Mothers spoke in whisp
326. lately, to see the sweet Sister pluming her wings for the last lessons and advi
327. , was chastened and subdued. One morning they were sent for in haste she had jus
328. t of the bed. Eilj worn out with weeping knelt at the side. The stern old father
329. ngels." The children approached, holding by one another, they drew nearer and ki
330. very poorly, passed her time in reading fairy tales or plays instead of studyin
331. fairy tales or plays instead of studying. The evening before the day geography,
332. r plays instead of studying. The evening before the day geography, " for the les
333. ozel said to her daughter: you are going to draw to-day the map of Europe. I am
334. f some of the northern countries. Having need of a pair of compasses, she went t
335. ad only the first chapter, but, allowing herself to be carried away by the inter
336. she continued to read, not- withstanding the voice of her conscience, which repr
337. ence, which reproached her for deceiving her mother and breaking her word that s
338. er for deceiving her mother and breaking her word that she had given her. to res
339. ce herself again at her work. In passing before the clock, she glanced up, and s
340. d not the courage to confess, on hearing her mother approach, Adrienne threw her
341. el entered, she was frightened on seeing the distorted face of her '' little gir
342. with confusion pain in ; "I am suffering horribly with my right foot and leg." M
343. dipped in laudanum, to be admin- morning and evening. 64 THE LAME FOOT. the inva
344. udanum, to be admin- morning and evening. 64 THE LAME FOOT. the invalid to bed,
345. obinson," that he had bought the evening before, to give her if she had attained
346. This comedy lasted for five days, during which time Madame Durozel did all in he
347. ite of the terrible accident, was pining to be with her young companions in thes
348. to their hearts content, and forgetting the part ^lie was acting, she became ve
349. and forgetting the part ^lie was acting, she became very richest fiowers, uneas
350. ho observed her, and who was be- ginning to doubt the reality of the lameness of
351. th. — THE LAME FOOT. 65 In the evening, at the regular hour, she prepared the
352. regular hour, she prepared the dressing; Adrienne was so much absorbed in readi
353. Adrienne was so much absorbed in reading the " Fairy of the Clouds," and the nur
354. foot. The doctor, who came every morning to see how this singular case was progr
355. e how this singular case was progressing, was stupefied with amazement when he s
356. with amazement when he saw the dressing was going to exclaim, when he raised hi
357. ement when he saw the dressing was going to exclaim, when he raised his eyes, an
358. aughter's right foot, without succeeding, whilst Briggitta, by " ; 66 THE LAME F
359. ; 66 THE LAME FOOT. left-foot, applying the dressing to the has perfear that fo
360. E FOOT. left-foot, applying the dressing to the has perfear that formed an evil
361. h will demand all your care." And taking his hat, he went out, casting a cold gl
362. And taking his hat, he went out, casting a cold glance on Adrienne, who perceive
363. Has your conscience remained mute during the six days that you have passed in yo
364. dear mamma," replied Adrienne, ; sobbing, " truly I was ashamed to extricate mys
365. st grief that I have ever felt for lying is a thing so base and so degrading, th
366. at I have ever felt for lying is a thing so base and so degrading, that it alway
367. ying is a thing so base and so degrading, that it always leaves upon the soul a
368. well merited it your confidence nothing shall cost me too much put me to the pr
369. elf of the matchless happiness of giving ; then she gave her- between her good h
370. al contest ! neighborhood, and was dying of a decline: the little girl went to s
371. her every day. The doc- tors, not being able to save her, permitted them to gra
372. to her ea- when she wished for something that for this she was compelled to buy,
373. asy you seem you; it "My silly." darling, I dare not tell is too " Yes ! ; tell
374. taste a melon, and I cannot help crying because I cannot well, I " Ah gratify t
375. it would cost too much for poor working people to buy them. Nevertheless, in va
376. that; I cannot console myself for being deprived of ing melons this year." " Co
377. console myself for being deprived of ing melons this year." " Console yourself d
378. s poor I woman wept Eulalie: in speaking thus. Her on returning Home she asked h
379. alie: in speaking thus. Her on returning Home she asked her mother if there were
380. . all Her heart beat quickly on touching silver, these small pieces of she arran
381. e box. She finished at last by replacing them, and only Sighing, she then did sh
382. last by replacing them, and only Sighing, she then did she think of her nurse. t
383. h; but at the moment, when about closing the box, she thought she would not take
384. are very beautiful," said she, thanking " but as for me, poor darling, I wish f
385. , thanking " but as for me, poor darling, I wish for ; nothing but melon I have
386. r me, poor darling, I wish for ; nothing but melon I have dreamt of it all night
387. taste ? Must I die, then, without having had one Struck with these words, Eulali
388. " and she cast upon Eulalie a beseeching look which seemed to say little much. g
389. pocket, to have the pleasure of feeling the three pieces; later still, she said
390. lie this was inconsolable for not having given her last jpleasure^ for evidently
391. had taken so of the sick The beseeching look much care. woman followed her ever
392. e. " Id tJpiest ox. One beautiful spring morning the carriage of Madame Lemaire
393. tJpiest ox. One beautiful spring morning the carriage of Madame Lemaire stopped
394. de- and they had not finished unloading the carriage, when she had already plun
395. her mother; scends first; then escaping again, she ran to the Priest's house, t
396. who had baptized her, and who was going to prepare her for her first communion.
397. ll well, tlie dear gentleman," assisting the gardener's wife, who was Madame Lem
398. fe, who was Madame Lemaire, in arranging some flowers. "During the severe winter
399. aire, in arranging some flowers. "During the severe winter that has just passed,
400. atoes were frozen. priest bled on seeing all of this misery; then he went to sle
401. aced a stove that was lit in the evening; every one came to warm themselves at t
402. eryone had their porringer full, morning and evening. Now all his wood is gone,
403. heir porringer full, morning and evening. Now all his wood is gone, and he has f
404. is gone, and he has finished by selling his wine stand. Although he had made su
405. ch bark instead.'^ i has sold everything, the good man, even his three spoons an
406. sh." The good priest came in the evening, to pay a visit to Madame Lemaire. She
407. d placed her purse in his hands, begging him to distribute the contents as alms,
408. much better than she did. In the evening, when Sarah kissed her mother good nigh
409. her mother good night, she said, gazing at her with a most beseeching look: "Ah
410. id, gazing at her with a most beseeching look: "Ah! Mamma, '^ if you would permi
411. d before which he said his first morning prayer. Embrace me, my dear one I am mo
412. ust set out very early to-morrow morning, in order to return in time for dinner
413. was awake before day; the hope of giving pleasure to the venerable and the fear
414. the venerable and the fear of not being able to find again the snuff box, agita
415. nuff box, agitated her so much. Arriving in the city, Madame Lemaire easily foun
416. a true masterpiece of art. On returning home, Sarah and her mother found the go
417. her mother found the good priest reading his breviary, and waiting for them. The
418. priest reading his breviary, and waiting for them. They told the maid to replace
419. him. At dinner, whilst very busy telling of a family who had just been ruined by
420. ed, THE GOOD OLD witliont his perceiving it, PRIEST. 71 the silver hox for that
421. took it mechanically, whilst continuing to speak; but feeling the coldness of t
422. whilst continuing to speak; but feeling the coldness of the metal, he stopped a
423. box as long as she lived." Then " seeing the radiant face of the fixed her tearf
424. r, had above all, much troable in making them understand how displeasing lying w
425. n making them understand how displeasing lying was to Almighty God, and how much
426. ng them understand how displeasing lying was to Almighty God, and how much produ
427. , is my ; child, because you say nothing that speech that and, benefit not true
428. we may deceive. You may lie by omitting to speak the truth when a lie might ; y
429. served tliat she never told a ly. wiping her mouth very frequentsister On observ
430. r mouth very frequentsister On observing her very closely, the perceived that, e
431. d to wipe her mouth, she notwithstanding that class. slyly slipped in a cherry,
432. om her desk. "Marinette, you ! are lying at this moment " " I, Sister " replied
433. cherry that she had in her said nothing! " '' mouth — '' But I That is very t
434. ave not spoken; but you have been eating cherries by stealth, all the while pret
435. ies by stealth, all the while pretending to wipe your mouth. Ah well, my dauglit
436. he benches. A little later, in unfolding her work, little it. Sop.hie lost her n
437. and one would think that she was sewing with zeal. " Sophie," said the Sister,
438. eal. " Sophie," said the Sister, " bring me your work." The little girl obeyed w
439. h ance of theless, when you have working with so much zeal, well, Sophie, is the
440. hie, is the appearand, never- do nothing, not that a lie, although you do not sa
441. ion but, as her neighbors to were making Sister great efforts keep from laughing
442. Sister great efforts keep from laughing, they could not deceive Anne Joseph, wh
443. studiousness of the blonde, and, passing softly behind her, took her book, and s
444. she, " goodness all the rest is nothing." that, for The Sister had remarked one
445. s, never arrived in time for the opening morning class. and ! LIES IN ACTION AND
446. arrived in time for the opening morning class. and ! LIES IN ACTION AND BY OMIS
447. mid, wept, Sister without Joseph, giving the least excuse. Anne all very much as
448. uld, did still more. w^ent every morning to wash the linen for a sick neighbor,
449. ew this well After class, in the evening, the Sister said to them: " Tou heard m
450. em: " Tou heard me every day reproaching Marie Louise for her w^ant of punctuali
451. you would have done much good by making it known. Recollect well, my children,
452. u never must be silent when, by speaking, you may be useful or agreeable to your
453. ry worldly She passed her time in making visits, person. and in entertainments o
454. nds, completely occupied with displaying her elegant dresses and Every morning s
455. ng her elegant dresses and Every morning she passed an beautiful jewels. endless
456. utiful jewels. endless time in arranging her hair, polishing her and perfuming h
457. ss time in arranging her hair, polishing her and perfuming her whole person. She
458. ng her hair, polishing her and perfuming her whole person. She took particular c
459. ves even at night, while nails, sleeping. She did not pass any time even with he
460. k of the poor; for she spent every thing to satisfy her vanity; she did not even
461. ntly spoke to her on this subject, using the most forcible and eloquent language
462. the affection that she felt One m.orning he attack. ror; she called on her to ma
463. seated before a large mir- was arranging her hair in different styles, trying on
464. ing her hair in different styles, trying on head-dresses, and regarding herself
465. s, trying on head-dresses, and regarding herself in the most smiling and admirin
466. nd regarding herself in the most smiling and admiring manner. The worthy priest
467. herself in the most smiling and admiring manner. The worthy priest was struck, f
468. you to fulfil: it is, that every morning you say three words only." " My dear un
469. of them, indeed," replied Julia, looking at her hands with complacency; "every m
470. r hands with complacency; "every morning I rub them with almond paste, and then
471. water or vervain." " well, every morning, after having rubbed Ah ! and perfumed
472. in." " well, every morning, after having rubbed Ah ! and perfumed your hands, yo
473. med your hands, you must say, on looking at them and turning them three times Ha
474. must say, on looking at them and turning them three times Hands, you wiU decay H
475. ell " VANITY. 85 The next day, on making her in tlie toilet, morning Madame Berc
476. y, on making her in tlie toilet, morning Madame Bercy, did not fail to turn her
477. eautiful hands three times, after having carefully washed and perfumed them, and
478. al days in succession, without attaching much while importance to it. One mornin
479. much while importance to it. One morning, however, cay " ! she listened pronounc
480. owever, cay " ! she listened pronouncing three times, " Hands, you will de- My u
481. was right," men thought she, "in saying ! that old often have strange ideas ''
482. ften have strange ideas '' The following day, after having said the three words,
483. ideas '' The following day, after having said the three words, she looked at her
484. hands with a kind of compassion, saying: " It would be a great pity, truly, tha
485. be able to say I have done ? And passing over her entire life in her memory, she
486. ot the slightest duty fulfilled: nothing, in short, that she could lay at the fe
487. tainment that was given the same evening. On casting a last glance at her mirror
488. t was given the same evening. On casting a last glance at her mirror, she found
489. rself less beautiful than usual: looking down upon an in- her arms adorned with
490. n arose from every corner of the drawing-room, and she experienced one When Mada
491. moment of lively pleasure, in observing that, in the midst of these new and ele
492. est and the most brilliant. after having looked around, and examined every one,
493. amined every one, she commenced thinking that these gay men and these silly wome
494. d to pleasure, would soon become nothing more than dust, VANITY. 87 and that all
495. e. Then the beauty of all this sparkling youth disappeared before her eyes; she
496. and her heart was troubled. Not finding any pleasure in this entertainment, she
497. entertainment, she left it. On returning home, she went into the nursery, which
498. care of strangers. of them " In thinking of these two little angels, tucked in s
499. how many little children had no covering? for their beds, no fire to warm them,
500. that she had made, came in this morning to see her, by chance. He found her com
501. see her, by chance. He found her combing the fair hair of her little girl. The g
502. her little girl. The good priest, going toward her with his heart full of holy
503. present happiness that she was deriving from the faithful discharge of all her
504. imposed upon me the obligation of saying every morning: "Hands, you shall decay!
505. e the obligation of saying every morning: "Hands, you shall decay! Hands, Hands,
506. ts, was entirely ruined, notwithstanding his great goodness. He was a widower, a
507. odness. He was a widower, and not having married until he was fifty-two years of
508. father deprived himself of every tiling, in order to pro- vide for the wants of
509. n. turn at the end of six months. During the journey, which was a very happy one
510. happy one, he often wept Notwithstanding his grief, the wagoner sang. Bourgingno
511. ngnon did not lose an occasion of making himself useful. Perched upon the large
512. d his agility and he finished by gaining his ; ; ; affection completely. At last
513. fection completely. At last, on arriving at Paris, Bourgingnon was much surprise
514. than Clermont. 91 The wagoner, according same day, to the to promise, presented
515. ourt-yard besides, he gave him something to eat and after the next day, he spoke
516. much of Paris. practice. Notwithstanding his provincial jargon, he made himself
517. but he had formed the project of putting aside for him some child ; for not only
518. s own work. " I shall have at when dying," he said, " the consolation of leaving
519. ," he said, " the consolation of leaving him a good little sum for an inheritanc
520. great courage to Furcy, notwitlistanding the exhaustion of his physical strength
521. on of his physical strength. One morning, in the month of December, he was retur
522. the month of December, he was returning on foot slowly toward home, when, yield
523. foot slowly toward home, when, yielding to his lassitude, he was obliged to sto
524. of Pinon."^ ''Alas!" said Furcy raising his eyes toward the mountain. " If I co
525. n and all the surroundingfields, forming a sort of little republic, having their
526. orming a sort of little republic, having their own particular laws, and of whom
527. " However, the unfortunate Furcy, making an effort, and leaning strongly on his
528. ate Furcy, making an effort, and leaning strongly on his stick, tried to take so
529. have had a dangerous fall; then, losing all hope, he thought of his child, and
530. ould not restrain his tears; but calling to his aid Him who always hears us, he
531. ked Him to bless his son; then resigning himself to his fate, and trusting in Di
532. igning himself to his fate, and trusting in Divine Providence, he crossed his ar
533. ssed his arms on his breast, and closing his eyes, fainted A few moments after,
534. s after, tlie a young Pinon, return- ing to the mountain in his pleasure car, pe
535. eived old man; he approached, and seeing that he had lost consciousness, he took
536. n his car, and continued his way. During the trip Furcy recovered his senses. Th
537. on, he believed that he saw a liberating angel. Arrived at the dwelling of the P
538. iberating angel. Arrived at the dwelling of the Pinon s, they made him enter the
539. TY. as a which served the family. dining-room and parlor for all remarked, on en
540. and parlor for all remarked, on entering, fifteen or sixteen young girls, clothe
541. ed uniformly in brown stuff, and wearing on their heads long old The man white v
542. ils; this modest ornament distinguishing them from the married women. Each one h
543. ith the wheel. little This in- teresting reunion, which offered the contrast of
544. pressed a desire to receive the blessing of the pious and venerable clergyman. T
545. nced a joy, mingled with hope, on seeing an old man who was twentyfour years old
546. sed him such delight, that the following night, through a tranquil sleep, he bel
547. ral days on the mountain. In the morning of the next day he went very early to s
548. TY. Marchioness of —who was travelling with some other persons, and who did no
549. ot wish to leave Anvergne without having visited the celebrated commnnity of the
550. ated commnnity of the Pinon. On entering the hall, the marchioness approached th
551. rm her- the master of the house, turning toward " Madame, I canher, said, showin
552. toward " Madame, I canher, said, showing her Furcy: when not offer you the place
553. ch had the quality of quickly petrifying the vegetable or animal substances that
554. ances that were plunged in it, receiving from them a sediment which acquired, wi
555. tlie marchioness left lier hosts, taking away with her from this mountain and th
556. in. While the good old man was employing failing strength to increase the all hi
557. e the good old man was employing failing strength to increase the all his sum th
558. latter, on his part, was always thinking of his father, and working with an inde
559. ways thinking of his father, and working with an indefatigable zeal. He continue
560. clothed and fed, could, without wanting anything, put aside all the money that
561. and fed, could, without wanting anything, put aside all the money that he earned
562. d deposited secretly in a bag containing old savings, which he had concealed in
563. ith pleasure ; ; ; into this interesting society : this will be adopting you amo
564. eresting society : this will be adopting you among the number of my children." G
565. s joy. At the moment when he was leaving, the good Abbe detained him, to attach
566. ocked and concealed the money, promising inwardl}^ not to spend a cent of it. 10
567. ted that it was useless. Notwithstanding all the most tender cares, the old man
568. , the old man declined sensibly. Feeling it himself, he one morning called his s
569. ibly. Feeling it himself, he one morning called his son, and, drawing from his m
570. one morning called his son, and, drawing from his mattress a linen bao: that he
571. e of this money: it may be the beginning of your fortune. Receive it with the mo
572. rgingnon make a good use of it." sobbing, "I 'will After uttering these words, h
573. of it." sobbing, "I 'will After uttering these words, he threw himself on his kn
574. key on one of the drawers. Then falling back on his straw bed, the good old man
575. ance, charg- senger to Clermont to bring back a physician. He gave his courier G
576. — II I . ^» I I ^,». .ii,,,i M m ing him to fly. Furcy received the sacramen
577. foot of his bed, prayed with a touching fervor. After having fulfilled his reli
578. yed with a touching fervor. After having fulfilled his religious duties with an
579. ed his religious duties with an edifying piety, the old man had still time to em
580. the best nurse in the villiage, showing him the thousand francs, all his fortun
581. will cost a great deal." " Spare nothing," said Bourgingnon to the doctor, ^'dis
582. " In short, Bourgingnon rented a bathing place, and sent to Clermont for all the
583. ndition; it liis same son spared nothing to relieve him: was necessary to bny sh
584. vain; the poor invalid, at last falling into the agonies of death, expired in t
585. francs; but he consoled himself, saying, " At least the a little." money has pr
586. onduct, and he was contented with saying that he had had the misfortune to lose
587. , which they gave him without explaining the true motive of their liberality, fo
588. their liberality, for fear of re- newing horting his grief. him to They were sat
589. berality, for fear of re- newing horting his grief. him to They were satisfied w
590. nd at sixteen or seventeen years, having more than doubled his funds, he found h
591. s and the same good luck, without losing a single patron, and always encouraged
592. of thirty- eight years, in accumulating a sum of four thoustill sand francs, wh
593. s unfortunate countrymen. Heaven wishing, without doubt, to reward an industriou
594. ittle attention to this accident, taking no precautions. An abscess formed on hi
595. eclared that there was no hope of saving him; then, after having fulfilled all h
596. o hope of saving him; then, after having fulfilled all his religious duties, he
597. tated to him a will, in which, declaring that he had neither brother, nor sister
598. of four thousand francs in the following manner; five hundred francs to the char
599. des Bernardines. few hours after having made and signed his will, he received a
600. ry day. Chassin was frightened at seeing him so weak: A GKATITUDE AND INTEGRITY.
601. NTEGRITY. judge of his grief on learning that it 105 was a hopeless case. At las
602. memories, expired sweetly on the evening of that day. Judge of the surprise of C
603. had bequeathed to him. After reflecting a short time, "ISTo," said he, ''I will
604. he had in that country, without knowing it, some poor relation, and it is of th
605. de in Auvergne, this generous proceeding was generally known in the house. The m
606. who would not let him want for anything, and who surely would take care of him
607. lve hundred francs. M. Marmontel finding, with reason, that Chassin was worthy o
608. much astonished when he saw one morning some deputies from the French academy e
609. eputies from the French academy entering his lodging, among whom was M. Marmonte
610. the French academy entering his lodging, among whom was M. Marmontel ; they ann
611. his virtue. this Chassin, understanding nothing of homage, asked an explanation
612. tue. this Chassin, understanding nothing of homage, asked an explanation of it;
613. "Wlien James II, pelled to abandon King of England, was com- kingdom, lie took
614. es. de Varonne, whose history I am going to relate to you, was of an Irish famil
615. lived in easy circumstances; but having become a widow and Madame finding herse
616. having become a widow and Madame finding herself without protection, without rel
617. ars passed, without the eyes of the King. slightest prospect of her hopes being
618. g. slightest prospect of her hopes being realized. THE FAITHFUL SERVANT. 109 she
619. UL SERVANT. 109 she re- At last, liaving renewed her ; solicitatioii, ceived a f
620. ds, without hope, denuded of every thing, plunged into frightful misery, and, to
621. prayed to God with confidence; on rising, she was no longer dislieartened she fe
622. slieartened she felt a sweet calm spring up in her soul, and she looked with fir
623. re painful, because I liave noth? my ing left to regret upon earth No, without d
624. tle impossible to die without regretting ?" But remember that Madame do ; Varonn
625. had a solid piety. As she was reflecting on her sad destiny Am- brose, her serva
626. ad served Madame de Yaronne. Not knowing how to read or write, abrupt, silent, I
627. ler, he liad always the air of despising and looking down on and of sulking with
628. always the air of despising and looking down on and of sulking with his masters
629. ising and looking down on and of sulking with his masters his countenance wore a
630. , to be regarded as an excel- lent being, and a very valuable servant. They reco
631. ues under an exterior, almost forbidding, he concealed the most tender and eleva
632. brought in a log of wood, and was going to put it on the fire, wheii Madame de
633. ced these words, struck Ambrose. Besting his log of wood on the at '' and lookin
634. his log of wood on the at '' and looking said he, his mistress : " My God ! Mada
635. I owe the ? cook " You owe him ; nothing, last Madame, nor month." : myself, nor
636. ion and you have not the means of paying your people, send away the others immed
637. ce, and submit to them without murmuring, my good Ambrose. However, in my misfor
638. reat consolation : cannot be." " Nothing it is that of feeling perfectly resigne
639. not be." " Nothing it is that of feeling perfectly resigned, while so many being
640. not abuse it now. This is all am waiting for: it is that you should go and rent
641. immovable before his mistress, regarding her in silence; when she had finished s
642. silence; when she had finished speaking, he fell at her feet. good mistress," c
643. good God to accomplish it." In finishing these words, Ambrose, in tears, rose an
644. se and went ont hastily, without waiting for a reply. jndge easily with w^hat li
645. in his hand a little bag of shin. Laying it upon the Mantel, he said: " Thanhs t
646. rose, ought to console me for everything. But to see you sufier for me " Suffer
647. you sufier for me " Suffer when working when you labor, you become useful, such
648. the best." Madame de Yaronne, not being able to find words with which to testif
649. rm-chair, a little table, with a writing-desk, and some paper, above which her b
650. at madame wished to give for her lodging. There is only one room; but the servan
651. e; that I was in need, and asked nothing better than work. Nicault, who is rich,
652. , and give me twenty cents a day. Living is cheap at St. Germain; so, with twent
653. uzanna, your new servant. Now I am going to look for her." Ambrose went out imme
654. and returned in a moment after, holding by the hand a pretty little girl, whom
655. ame will do a very good action in taking this one in her service.'' After this p
656. the unfortunate one that he is assisting. The day after that upon which Madame d
657. was at work; but he came in the evening for one moment, and begged Madame de Va
658. cents, wrapped up in paper, and placing them upon the table, said, " Behold the
659. THFUL SERVANT. 119 Then, without waiting for a reply, he called Suzanna, and ret
660. ed to the house of Nicault. After making such a use of his day's work, how peace
661. For this is what we experience in doing a good action. Let us judge, therefore,
662. as was necessary to pay for his washing; and what he spent on Sunday for some b
663. e de Yaronne afflicted with thus robbing the generous Ambrose, wished to persuad
664. orced to be silent. In hopes of inducing Ambrose to procure for himself a little
665. devoted herself, almost without ceasing, to needle work, Suzanna aided her, and
666. E FAITHFUL SERVANT. lier she was reaping from ''So else. work, lie replied simpl
667. much the better" and spoke of something in his conduct; Time produced no change
668. e produced no change from last it during four entire years he was never seen to
669. was to experience the most heartrending grief. One evening, while waiting for A
670. the most heartrending grief. One evening, while waiting for Ambrose, as usual, s
671. ending grief. One evening, while waiting for Ambrose, as usual, she saw the serv
672. hysician. Madame de Varonne, on arriving at the house of Nicault, caused much su
673. me there." " But, Madame, risk breaking still you, you will your neck; and then
674. n her de Varonne could and again begging Nicault to guide her, she came to the f
675. a garret, where she found Ambrose lying on a straw-bed. " My dear Ambrose," cri
676. " My dear Ambrose," cried she, on seeing him, "in what a condition do I find you
677. ind you ? And you said that your lodging pleased you, and that you were comforta
678. s. this, last, de Yaronne, on perceiving gave herself up entirely to her grief.
679. with a physician. The Madame on entering the miserable lodging of Ambrose, was s
680. Madame on entering the miserable lodging of Ambrose, was strangely surprised to
681. and I wished to prevent him from working; but he would have his own way. He has
682. He has only remained in bed this morning, and still we had much trouble in persu
683. still we had much trouble in persuading him to do so. To enter our house, he bu
684. he has killed himself with over- working.'' was a mortal wound for the unhappy M
685. brose, the physician and Nicault placing him softly upon it; then Madame de Varo
686. tears. About four o'clock in the morning his curiosity having prescribed for the
687. lock in the morning his curiosity having prescribed for the sick man and promise
688. t hours at his pillow, without receiving the physician left, after from the phys
689. e found him better, and the same evening he declared that he thought Ambrose wou
690. delight, of Madame de Varonne on seeing Ambrose out of danger. She wished to wa
691. wished to watch him again the following night, but Ambrose, who had now recover
692. vered his consciousness, was not willing to consent. She returned home, worn out
693. adame de Yaronne could not help replying to his questions. She satisfied his cur
694. ry. Three days after the doctor, leaving . this confidential conversation, St. w
695. lled him to work, at the risk of falling ill again. I ' 124 THE FAITHFUL SERVANT
696. re- proached herself bitterly for having accepted the assistance of the generous
697. hment to for him an honest and I, living; his me him has destroyed his his life;
698. e may it cost — to without liquidating the debt. possible for Kepay it! And ev
699. spose events be possible forme according to my will, it ? would it ever to liqui
700. mpense a virtue so sublime." One evening when Madame de Yaronne was deeply absor
701. ent tliey heard some one softly knocking at the door. Madame de Varonne rose wit
702. o her, "to announce to you that the king has just at last been informed of your
703. me de Yaronne, them with an ex- clasping her hands, and raising pression of the
704. h an ex- clasping her hands, and raising pression of the most lively gratitude.
705. her, is Madame de " Yaronne, and taking her hands affectionately: "Come, Madame
706. ion. Madame, I have a ! new "Ah! lodging that prepared for you." benefactor; pra
707. to stranger, " In the fear of fatiguing you, I do not ask to ac- company you gr
708. of her newly recovered fortune. Arriving at the house of Nicault she quickly asc
709. ascended the steps to Ambrose's sleeping room, ' where she found him still in a
710. hen related to repair all your suffering." him the good fortune of the king havi
711. ering." him the good fortune of the king having bestowed the pension upon her at
712. him the good fortune of the king having bestowed the pension upon her at last,
713. y good and faithful servant." Descending the diiHcult steps once more, she asked
714. d been sent as a messenger from the king to take Madame Varonne to her new home.
715. Madame Varonne to her new home. The king had bestowed upon her a pension of THE
716. le family, whom she loved dearly, seeing only her relations and friends. Each da
717. he could only establish her by obtaining for her an advan, suitable husband offe
718. her an advan, suitable husband offering tageous position. affairs, ; A PAMELA.
719. r education, often Camilla, a ill. being unfinished, remains imperfect. short ti
720. or herself a house, so that, on arriving at Bristol, Felicia she could find only
721. e could find only a disagreeable lodging, separa- ted merely by a partition from
722. that this unhappy Englishwoman was dying of consumption. She was a widow her hus
723. by his parents for ; 130 PAMELA. having made an improper marriage, and at his d
724. a circumstance rendered more afflicting for this unfortunate lady, as she had a
725. ssured Felicia This that a more charming child did not exist. story interested F
726. most lively manner and the whole evening she conversed with Natalie about their
727. time after they had retired was sleeping soundly and Felicia was beginning to do
728. eeping soundly and Felicia was beginning to doze, when a most extraordinary nois
729. m of the Englishwoman. Then recollecting that the sick woman had only the waitin
730. e Natalie. She passed through a dressing-room where her maid slept in passing, s
731. ing-room where her maid slept in passing, she told her not to leave The sick wom
732. " PAMELA. 131 was open. Felicia, hearing some words, broken by sobs, advanced tr
733. ords, broken by sobs, advanced trembling. Suddenly a waiting-maid, in tears, cam
734. , advanced trembling. Suddenly a waiting-maid, in tears, came out of the room, c
735. , in tears, came out of the room, crying " It is over slie is no more : ! ! " O,
736. re tender-heart- ed See, she is sleeping sweetly near her ! mother, who has just
737. d from a place so sorrowful. " In saying these words, Felicia hastened toward th
738. l implore the mercy of the Supreme Being for her mother." In finishing these wor
739. reme Being for her mother." In finishing these words, Felicia rose and approache
740. n concealed the child. "With a trembling hand she drew it aside softly, and disc
741. n, whose beauty and angelic and touching face she contemplated with delight. The
742. ted with delight. The child was sleeping soundly at the side of the bed of her u
743. ncy of her complexion, formed a striking contrast to her situation. liave ! must
744. AMELA. 133 continued Felicia, addressing herself to the waiting inaid;"help me t
745. licia, addressing herself to the waiting inaid;"help me to take this cradle into
746. th joy, and the child, without awakening, was carried softly upon her little bed
747. said to her " approach, Natalie I bring you a second sister; come, see her, and
748. ed to the child. Natalie wept on hearing this sad story she looked at the little
749. d at the little Pamela tenderly, calling her sister she wished it was already th
750. ? ieprives us of At seven in the morning the maid entered Felicia's chamber. chi
751. , Pamela awoke. dle. The ; on perceiving her, appeared prised she looked at her
752. her," said Felicia, " with this touching affliction. I wish to : see her tears f
753. and you will experience the same feeling." "When Pamela was dressed, she knelt d
754. rayers aloud. Felicia started on hearing her say to health!" : "My God, please r
755. amela repeated this prayer with touching fervor. Then turning toward Felicia, an
756. rayer with touching fervor. Then turning toward Felicia, and regarding her with
757. en turning toward Felicia, and regarding her with a timid and ingenuous air " Le
758. ant join me the favor of soon permitting me to mamma." In finishing these words,
759. on permitting me to mamma." In finishing these words, she perceived that the eye
760. e and threw herself on her neck, weeping. At this moment they came to tell Felic
761. the end of fifteen days and not wishing to return again to her first lodging, s
762. ing to return again to her first lodging, she rented another house there. Each d
763. r her a sweet : recompense. After having passed three months at Bristol, Felicia
764. was impossible to see her without being interested in her, or to know her witho
765. ed in her, or to know her without loving her. "When she had reach- ed her sevent
766. all that gratitude and the most touching tenderness inspired. Pamela pos; 136 PA
767. od. One might relate a thousand charming traits of her many line and delicate an
768. e answers, a crowd of happy and touching words, that the heart alone can inspire
769. see Pamela many times before perceiving if her features were regular, or if she
770. One was only struck with her interesting and ingenuous physiognomy, and with the
771. black eye lashes. One could say nothing of her eyes they only spoke She had all
772. ingenuity she was gay and tenderobliging, sincere, as well as artless. ; In hear
773. t at 137 of impatience movement anything that might occur, but which gave her a
774. er thoughtlessness, lost without ceasing, all that ried farther. was given to he
775. off her hat, better, run and, returning to the house, always running, she would
776. , returning to the house, always running, she would leave her hat upon After hav
777. he would leave her hat upon After having worked, the eagerness to go and play wo
778. e rose quickly, the always open, falling to ing over all, and disappearing in th
779. quickly, the always open, falling to ing over all, and disappearing in the twink
780. alling to ing over all, and disappearing in the twinkling of an eye. work bag, t
781. r all, and disappearing in the twinkling of an eye. work bag, the ground, Pamela
782. tle this excess of Felicia every morning demanded an account of what she should
783. . ; " " " 138 PAMELA. Felicia, following tins custom, One morning examined Pamel
784. icia, following tins custom, One morning examined Pamela's pockets, and did not
785. have you left them " there ? Mamma, ing my was in this little room, I was wipno
786. s little room, I was wipnose; in drawing out my handkerchief, I my scissors fell
787. I ran immediately " What Without taking time to pick ! — this moment up your
788. ly of you, and of the pleasure of seeing you." In pronouncing these words, Pamel
789. pleasure of seeing you." In pronouncing these words, Pamela had tears Felicia l
790. a blushed still more. This deep blushing, and the apparent untruthfulness of the
791. withher hands, and fell at out replying." Pamela, in Felicia tears, clasped the
792. ped the knees of Felicia, without saying a single word. only saw in this supplia
793. med her with reproaches. Pamela, obeying the order that she had received, kept s
794. t to go to church, and instead of taking Pamela, as usual, she told the maid to
795. The poor child wept with joy, on taking her place by the side of her adopted mo
796. '' Good Pamela '' cried Felicia, taking her in her arms ^' and you let me accus
797. ou, and treat you so ill, without saying anything in your justi; fication ? " My
798. reat you so ill, without saying anything in your justi; fication ? " My dear mam
799. owed such sweetness, and such a touching submission? At seven years of age, Pame
800. made her always her room. Pamela, seeing the uneasiness of Felicia, sought to co
801. her in her arms, and gave her something to drink. Pamela never received any of
802. y of these little cares without shedding tears of tenderness and gratitude. She
803. s me good. When I know by your breathing that you are asleep, I suffer a thousan
804. less." There was no good or fine feeling that was a stranger to Pamela's heart,
805. was eight years old, Felicia was writing, and Pamela playing quietly near her. T
806. Felicia was writing, and Pamela playing quietly near her. There was then war wi
807. s a victory over the English." On saying these words, her eyes fell on Pamela, a
808. and her surprise was extreme, on seeing her face grow pale, then blush, and cas
809. er was served. Pamela appeared trembling and troubled, Felicia, to her: wishing
810. g and troubled, Felicia, to her: wishing to look into the depths of her soul, sa
811. a cannonI flatter myself yet that ading. we have beaten the English." Scarcely
812. ished these words, than Pamela, bursting into feet. tears, threw herself at her
813. I was born in Eng- This singular feeling for one of her age touched Felicia deep
814. deeply. "My child," said she "a touching and sublime instinct inspires you bette
815. u better than reason could! In believing you have committed a fault, you have fu
816. rated her with joy, and the same evening, before retiring, she added to her pray
817. y, and the same evening, before retiring, she added to her prayers tliis one: "
818. never committed any fault without asking His pardon with the most touching tears
819. asking His pardon with the most touching tears of the truest repentance. But bef
820. truest repentance. But before imploring this pardon, she accused herself to Fel
821. pardon me," said she, '4f I was wanting a confidence in mamma ? Besides, a faul
822. ce me a thousand times; and this evening on retiring, when give is I shall have
823. sand times; and this evening on retiring, when give is I shall have asked for he
824. e is I shall have asked for her blessing, she will it with still more tenderness
825. er candor and her affection. Not wishing to be separated from her bene- above ev
826. bove every other pleasure, that of being with her, even without speaking to fact
827. of being with her, even without speaking to factress, preferring, her ; establis
828. without speaking to factress, preferring, her ; established in her room, whilst
829. lence noise. PAMELA. and witliout making to time, however, Felicia, tlie least F
830. e she would rise softly, and approaching embrace her, and then return to her pla
831. r, and then return to her place. leaving her playthings More than once, suddenly
832. enly, she came and threw herself weeping into the arms of Felicia: '^Instead of
833. he arms of Felicia: '^Instead of playing," said she, " I was thinking of you, ma
834. of playing," said she, " I was thinking of you, mamma, and of your kindness." I
835. amma, and of your kindness." In speaking thus, Pamela fell at the feet of her be
836. xpression, and all the energy of feeling and gratitude, she would recall all tha
837. that she owed to her. child, so engaging, so Such an extraordinary loving, neces
838. ngaging, so Such an extraordinary loving, necessarily could not be an ordinary p
839. eeall She was w^ell which is so becoming to a woman. There w^as no kind of needl
840. eacher of the harp. Pamela loved reading, especially natural history and botany.
841. d the graces of her childhood, caressing manners, a frank and communicative spri
842. hildhood had been to exercise in running and jumping, the consequence was that s
843. been to exercise in running and jumping, the consequence was that she enjoyed e
844. tness light, she It had, notwithstanding, astonishing was impossible to exceed h
845. she It had, notwithstanding, astonishing was impossible to exceed her in running
846. was impossible to exceed her in running; no one walked better, or danced with m
847. was the delight of her family. Suffering for six months with a debility which at
848. experienced the double sorrow of seeing her mother set out with Alexandrine. Th
849. tigue of a sad journey and the suffering of a long absence, to follow a daughter
850. she carried away with her some consoling hopes, but soon lost them, never to ret
851. 7 such as hers has been, could not bring out the sublime virtues that she pos- f
852. fectly well aware of it; even on setting out from Paris, she confided it to her
853. was necessary to prevent him from being alarmed; then she fell into a deep reve
854. r that I had written to you this morning. At these words she appeared to wish to
855. he appeared to wish to confide something to me and I perceived that she was unde
856. ided. I pressed her hand in mine, asking her if she desired to send you some mes
857. xt day, 148 PAMELA. misfortune of losing my motlier; tliey placed me to then in
858. me her that life, my had mother, during the two last years of supported her. em
859. embraced this unfortunate Woman, weeping; from that time I took care of I her my
860. exandrine hand with a most heart-rending expression. At this moment the little d
861. ch traits. all, At the moment of leaving us, to ! think of years, to forget noth
862. , to ! think of years, to forget nothing At twenty-four happy, enjoying the grea
863. t nothing At twenty-four happy, enjoying the greatest consideration, about to be
864. a husband most beloved, from a charming child, from a cherished aunt, who was a
865. ELA. » ' 149 < At last, in consummating the saddest sacrifice, to preserve a li
866. ice, to preserve a limnanity so touching; to be occupied with a virtuous care of
867. ccupied with a virtuous care of assuring herself of the fate of the unfortunate
868. . To see and take care of her will bring you a sweet consolation." As soon as Fe
869. elicia and Pamela experienced, on seeing her, and listening to her, was only equ
870. xperienced, on seeing her, and listening to her, was only equal to the pity with
871. served all her faculties. She was lying in a large a clergyman, room, neatly ar
872. ated at the side of her bed. on entering, made herself knowm as the sister-in-la
873. ! ! eleven years she has supplied thing. with every If you knew, madame, what c
874. nvent, I was taken three times a grating, in order to be nearer to week to her p
875. nored me PAMELA. 151 slie bj saw calling me motlierj and "wislied ! tliat I slio
876. s dear child could not con- would spring to her eyes, and she would immediately
877. ince her marriage ? A young and charming lady, as she is, to come every two or t
878. she sings. One day I begged her to sing for me. " I only know the ugly, worldly
879. our or five days after, she came to sing for me several Christmas hymns In truth
880. that I never pass a week without having the most terrible convultain herself th
881. on," interrupted Felicia quick! shedding tears freely; "speak " Ah, well madame,
882. there could cut my nails without causing me very great done with great dexterity
883. hed the feet of a poor, infirm suffering, at least unless woman." The woman was
884. ed the poor woman if she wanted anything. The woman thanked her, and the young g
885. ors of Madame Bnsca work are as obliging. One comes to for her, another arranges
886. om, a third charges herseK with bringing her light, and light- ing her fire; in
887. with bringing her light, and light- ing her fire; in short, madame, the spirit
888. sentiments. If ! ! : without shuddering." "Ah! the unfortunate one!" cried Feli
889. - mirable, that she never finds anything to complain of." ^^Canitbe?" " Yes, mad
890. . What gratitude I owe to God for having placed me in a situation where I can ha
891. ual merit in His eyes: that of suifering without complaint: in a situation where
892. complaint: in a situation where nothing can distract me from Him; where everyth
893. n distract me from Him; where everything invites me to occupy myself only with e
894. it orders me to submit without murmuring; it promises me the price of an immorta
895. liant fate in the universe." In speaking thus, this woman expressed herself with
896. herself with as much strength as feeling; the sound of her voice no longer annou
897. he most fright- ful despair. Cruel being see my fortitude, the calmness of my pa
898. tion, and left the poor woman, promising faithfully to " 156 PAMELA. return to s
899. pires us to do good, instead of admiring ourselves, we say: "I do not merit any
900. least enable those who care, are wanting in it to conceal their pride with and n
901. ion, Felicia re- ceived the overwhelming news of the death of had always loved h
902. e the sorrowful conher, and of listening to the sorrowful praises of the one who
903. hed to take the place of the interesting and virtuous Alexandrine, near the poor
904. a year she had fulfilled these touching duties, when one morning, whilst she wa
905. these touching duties, when one morning, whilst she was washing the feet of the
906. when one morning, whilst she was washing the feet of the holy ject of weeping wi
907. ing the feet of the holy ject of weeping with woman, the door of the room opened
908. years of age, with a noble and imposing face, appeared; after having taken some
909. nd imposing face, appeared; after having taken some steps, Pamela was on her kne
910. and he stopped. " 158 PAMELA. was wiping tliem. In this attitude, she held her h
911. ad bent down; and her long hair, falling over her face, concealed it partly. Hea
912. r her face, concealed it partly. Hearing the noise that the stranger made, she r
913. rendered her still lish more interesting. Turning toward an Engmaid who accompan
914. her still lish more interesting. Turning toward an Engmaid who accompanied her,
915. r, she scolded her in English for having forgotten to bolt a little the door. Im
916. e stranger approach, take a before going, the stranger did not cease gazing was
917. going, the stranger did not cease gazing was so much absorbed in his reverie, th
918. bade adieu to the old woman, and passing before the stranger and bowing, she wen
919. d passing before the stranger and bowing, she went out hastily. Some days after
920. tions about the her up. The same evening Fehcia these words: received a letter t
921. not to return to England without finding out the generous person who has been pl
922. to enjoy the happiness of contemplating her virtue. I am fifty years old; so, m
923. impression upon my heart. knees, washing The charming Pamela, on her be effaced
924. on my heart. knees, washing The charming Pamela, on her be effaced from ognize h
925. you, mamma," cried Pamela, after having read this letter, " not to see this Eng
926. see this Englishman. You are every thing to me do not seek to force the recognit
927. belong to you what, then, is want; : ing for my happiness "But, my child," ? rep
928. , my Pamela gives the desire of becoming acquaintto appreciate He knows how to m
929. " said Mr. Aresley," " the oppor- making myself useful to her." " ; PAMELA. " At
930. oked at Pamela with emotion, and turning toward Felicia '^ I set out," said he,
931. ey, who was and Pamela troubled. looking at Felicia, remarked her surprise and a
932. if Mrs. Selwin had the pleasure of being acquainted with her. "I am acquainted w
933. s- " " ; 162 sess PAMELA. without taking the name of the family. I have been a w
934. daughter I formed the project of looking The woman for this child, and adopting
935. g The woman for this child, and adopting her. who took care of her had just died
936. ild was no longer alive." On pronouncing these words, Mr. Aresley per- : PAMELA.
937. ands in hers, and pressed this trembling hand tenderly. Suddenly Pamela, quite d
938. a, quite distracted, rose, and advancing with a trembling step toward Mr. Aresle
939. ed, rose, and advancing with a trembling step toward Mr. Aresley " Yes," said sh
940. her of my father." ! Heavens " springing toward her^ " Great exclaimed Mr. Aresl
941. ht to me, you will kill me. In finishing these words, Pamela allowed her head to
942. , a tender father, incapable of exacting from you the slightIf truly est sacrifi
943. erly Pamela. remitted to Felicia. having received then some presents from Felici
944. d the death of the young Selwin, feeling sure that this child would never appear
945. ar again in England. Mr. Aresley, seeing his wishes all consummated, on finding
946. g his wishes all consummated, on finding that his niece was the same young perso
947. re well-dressed, gay people were driving, laughing and talking, where the trees
948. essed, gay people were driving, laughing and talking, where the trees were grand
949. eople were driving, laughing and talking, where the trees were grand, and the fl
950. and the flowers beautiful and everything most charming. Antoinette, or Nettie as
951. s beautiful and everything most charming. Antoinette, or Nettie as they called h
952. called her at home, was a very engaging little girl of thirteen bright, and spa
953. e girl of thirteen bright, and sparkling, studious when she was not playamiable
954. iable and affectionate, generous and ing, graceful; what more could she possess,
955. 167 have been more intellif>:ent looking, if she had not been compelled to wear
956. lways looked as though they were looking out from a thicket. Antoinette had in m
957. ays tardy, always behind, Always running after time, instead of taking it by the
958. ys running after time, instead of taking it by the " forelock." such a ; ; Unfor
959. as Mausual for Madame Lavalle's morning drive. dame never went to dress, until
960. y was there the horses were kept waiting and became restive and the coachman gru
961. uch a lovely I will not wait." ! morning for a drive. will be dressed in Next ti
962. the unclouded blue The day was charming, and she soon found herself in the Cham
963. d herself in the Champs Elysees, playing with the children. Her uncle, Col. Xavi
964. cle, Col. Xavier Leblanc, again. amusing himself with a quiet stroll through the
965. are also who was not with mamma driving ? PUNCTUALITY. " I 1 G9 was too late,"
966. Nettie. I fear you even on your wedding day." " Eh bien, so goes the world I th
967. re so careless. Here is my sister, bring- ing up this child with no regard for t
968. careless. Here is my sister, bring- ing up this child with no regard for time.
969. or no one, that is a time for everything, etc.," and he repeatall the old saying
970. hought certainly, on this bright morning " and he took out his gold snuff-box se
971. took two or three pinches, then settling his eye glasses firmly on his prominent
972. firmly on his prominent nose and taking his gold-headed cane, proceeded on his
973. ld-headed cane, proceeded on his morning promenade. Ah walk on, Col. ; ! Xavier
974. hovers over us and is the world receding? We should not be too then all ; we sho
975. geon^'^ as she called her little darling and said, that if she wished to go to t
976. loomy ? why," sweet and lovelv listening to her *; am never tired when I am and
977. he tells me so many lovely ways of doing and being good, that I am ! sure I shal
978. e so many lovely ways of doing and being good, that I am ! sure I shall learn to
979. le." " Ah you Julie, " only —one thing— ; are good now^ my pet," said old ^y
980. rged and if I were not up in the morning the moment the clock struck six I would
981. du Sacre Cseur, an immense and imposing looking building, Julie rang the bell a
982. e Cseur, an immense and imposing looking building, Julie rang the bell and a sis
983. an immense and imposing looking building, Julie rang the bell and a sister openi
984. Julie rang the bell and a sister opening the door, led An- " " ; 1Y2 PTTNCTUALIT
985. ce thou wert here ? " I know it, darling Tanta, out no one had time to bring me.
986. ling Tanta, out no one had time to bring me. You know how much I desire to be wi
987. t imperfection with that fault following you everywhere, you it will prevent wil
988. l prevent will never accomplish anything ; you from ever making one step forward
989. complish anything ; you from ever making one step forward in progress, because,
990. ress, because, you will always be taking one step backward every time, " Try to
991. ut punctuality, you will ever be running after lost time, to try and make it up.
992. And at the end of life, you have nothing to look back upon, but a series of miso
993. y indolent to make it. You do is nothing the right time, consequently there much
994. unctual, you are not gen- and from being inaccurate, in even the most minute mat
995. ctuality, you will not succeed in making a happy, well-regulated home." " Darlin
996. a happy, well-regulated home." " Darling Tanta," cried Nettie, "every word that
997. to heart and let us hope they will bring forth soms and fruit." " Try, dear litt
998. los- one," said Madame da Costa, kissing Nettie on both cheeks, " to overcome th
999. ie, her, with who jogged along grumbling, for her ^eUt pigeon generally amused h
1000. her prattle ; but Nettie was treasuring had fallen and she was pondering on all
1001.asuring had fallen and she was pondering on all these refiections in her heart a
1002.hese refiections in her heart and making many good resolutions. " To-morrow I wi
1003.eet lips of her saintly aunt "What thing, is that?" said JuHe, and wanted to tal
1004.to talk. to do to-morrow ? *' I am going to rise at six, as you do, Julie, and t
1005.y." ! who heard some" What are you going ; PUNCTUALITY. 175 ^^No, no, I will not
1006.ou under what good spell are you resting, that such a reformation has taken real
1007.e has said such lovely things now, going to try and overcome thnt you hatefid fa
1008. thnt you hatefid fault, of always being behind time I really : am shall see mam
1009.d, Nettie was up at six the next morning. When dressed, she roamed through for g
1010.the matter ? what leaf.^^ is are turning over a new found a great satisfaction i
1011. new found a great satisfaction in being praised, and in pleasing others, and fi
1012.action in being praised, and in pleasing others, and finally felt Nettie very mu
1013. though we enjoy them for the time being, yet we put oif putting them into pract
1014.r the time being, yet we put oif putting them into practice, until the next day,
1015.ay, and then, until a and then a feeling of more convenient season indolence com
1016. over us, and we do not feel like making any exertion, and put it off still fart
1017.dolent natiirerf, such [)r()crastinating souls, that so ofu^n a prey to his wile
1018. to accompany her mother, and in driving through the Bonlevard, they met Col. Xa
1019.ll !" new and I have ''I hopes of having a most exemplary daughter." day Nettie,
1020.t you would not be ready on your wedding-day; but now, I say, that if you overco
1021.ss, that I will give you on your wedding-day, promise.^' fifty thousand Louis d\
1022. that is a Nettie smiled her, ; working now in Her visits to her dear overcome
1023.r efforts, which —she was were nothing to a good cause, to — 178 PUNCTUALITY
1024.thdrawn at 8 M. must be returned morning. Failure to book on time subjects the b

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/