Concordance for Fabiola, or, The church of the catacombs.

Use the features on this page to analyze and evaluate the text.

View: catalog record
Display words beginning with
Display most frequently used words
Display most frequent word phrases
Search: Show map
Display letters around search term
Sort results by the word on the

Specialized searches: colors; adverbs; gerunds; "big names"; "great ideas"

1.   ould have been anciently called. Passing through the porch, on the pavement of w
2. , with pleasure, in Mosaic, the greeting SALVE, or WELCOME, we find ourselves in
3. and is about two hours from his setting the day is cloudless, and its heat has
4. s cooled, so that multitudes are issuing from their houses, and making their way
5. re issuing from their houses, and making their way towards gardens on one side,
6. t's on the other, to enjoy their evening walk, and learn the news of the day. Bu
7. ly it became occupied by private joining baths. IT > ; i-' In the centre of the
8. of the marble pavement a softly warbling jet brought by the Claudian aqueduct fr
9. flows in downy waves and before reaching its lower and wider recipient, scatters
10. tables ; ; ; of oriental woods, bearing candelabra, lamps, and other household
11. former period, still, however, retaining all their brightness of color and fresh
12. the imperial residence and its adjoining Circus Maximus. The Es; separated by ni
13. ted by niches with statues, representing, indeed, like the pictures, mythologica
14. subjects ; but we cannot help observing, that nothing meets the eye which could
15. t we cannot help observing, that nothing meets the eye which could offend the mo
16. re an empty niche, or a covered painting, proves that this is not the result of
17. ite, the Emperor Dioclesian was covering the ; sufficient for many lordly dwelli
18. the Campus Martius, surrounded boarding, and divided into pens, in which the Co
19. in which the Comitia, or votes. meeting of the tribes of the people, were held,
20. bes of the people, were held, for giving their This was called the Septa, or Ovi
21. y the Doria and Verospi palaces (running thus along the present Corso), the Roma
22. in a letter to Atticus,t of transforming this homely contrivance into a magnific
23. te, east side of this edifice, including in its area, the present church of St.
24. tympanum or triangular cornice, resting on two half columns " artiste of " Usin
25. on two half columns " artiste of " Using our privilege aa fiction, of invisible
26. . 16. As outside the columns, the coving roof leaves a large square opening in t
27. oving roof leaves a large square opening in the centre, called the impluvium, th
28. marbles, and adorned with bright gilding. The veil of the opening above, which,
29. bright gilding. The veil of the opening above, which, however, here is closed w
30. bright but softened ray from the evening sun on to the place, where we see, for
31. s, noble yet mild, show traces of having passed through sorrow at some earlier p
32. be seen updn her person. The only thing approaching to this is a slight gold co
33. n her person. The only thing approaching to this is a slight gold cord or chain
34. our v to oomo : ... ! M&, hith. morning houra lardis. ; and ; i yon 1 will Che
35. of my school-f nil, ho has not noticing these clam..; his mother - ghe hour ,.
36. en never had I consciously done anything that could givi to him or any of my sch
37. ncratius's last question only by kissing his gl Aud as to what yen claiming supe
38. ssing his gl Aud as to what yen claiming superiority over them. propose,' I adde
39. ge in personal combats, which, beginning in a cool trial of skill, end in an ang
40. How much less could I think of entering on them now, when you avow that you are
41. ly a maternal emotion that was agitating her bosom; it was not even the happy mo
42. as not even the happy mother who, having trained her child to certain \wAi and d
43. stand it. Neither was it the joy having for her son one, in brow. It i <>!' tho
44. ther's memory," said the mother, placing her hand " upon her son's head, conceal
45. d " upon her son's head, conceal nothing from me. I shall never have rest if you
46. ined purpose to be revenged !' So saying ' ' ; ' ; her estimation, so heroically
47. eeper, or Khali we say, sublimer feeling. It was a period looked forward to anxi
48. ar; and has watched eagerly each growing inclination, and tried gently to bend t
49. hat moment! how my heart seemed bursting within me ; and a voice appeared to whi
50. felt that I was strong enough my rising and prayed for strength. She felt as th
51. it could be gained. And what was passing in that boy's mind, as he too remained
52. l "And what did you do, then, my darling boy?" gasped forth the trembling matron
53. darling boy?" gasped forth the trembling matron. He replied, " My good angel con
54. sly on the cheek, yet meek and forgiving. Could I wish to be otherwise ? f I str
55. came up at that moment, cast him gasping awaiting him. No vision of a venerable
56. t that moment, cast him gasping awaiting him. No vision of a venerable Basilica,
57. quary and the devout pilgrim, and giving his name, which it shall bear, to the n
58. o anticipation of a church in his boring gate of Home. honor to rise in faithful
59. and eagerly sought as their last resting-place, by hearts faithful No forethough
60. l to his dear Home, t clborium, weighing 287 Ibs., to be placed over the porphyr
61. st him. Thames, which, even ! ! ; having seen dispersed. all I from a distance,
62. lined. HI. THE DEDICATION. the foregoing conversation was held, the day had fast
63. they met his mother's countenance gazing anew upon hinij radiant with a majesty
64. d changed his position, and was kneeling before her and well he might; for was s
65. might he not well see in her the living saint whose virtues had been his model
66. * ll:iv Hood, with ami ti J 1 faltering lut i hav. :\- \> from show Mir, .ound,
67. hissed it fervently and her And gushing tears fell upon it, and moistened it on
68. re empurpled with to her son's quivering lips, and raised of th-. sou. This d:iy
69. ung it round the neck of her son, saying: "When " How dost thou next it is moist
70. ven thought thy d.rlamation this morning," which gushes from a weak woman's eyes
71. d uorth it He venerated the, sanctifying touch. sacred relic with the deepest em
72. g patrician blood to stand, the stinging Ignominy of a disgraceful blow, and the
73. low, and the scornful eg of an unpitying multitude. Nay more; thou I THE HEATHEN
74. summit. Thou hast proved thyself taking place, a very different ono presented i
75. e hills. order, whose family, by farming the revenues of Asiatic prov- the genui
76. sweetest mother !" broke out the panting yonth ; "could I be his genuine son, an
77. mmense apartments and besides possessing many treasures of European art, it abou
78. es, was a true specimen of an easy-going Roman, who was inces, ; i ; se: may be
79. his life. dreamt of any other. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping, as a matte
80. reamt of any other. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping, as a matter of course
81. r. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping, as a matter of course, on all proper o
82. liirh yet remains I know ho must flowing in my veins, and in like what he held i
83. alents of clubs. KHUS, There he gambling-houses, tennis-courts, and gymnasiums.
84. to hear some orator speakocnte pleading, or into one of the many public ing, or
85. ding, or into one of the many public ing, or ionable world of return- ing with a
86. lic ing, or ionable world of return- ing with a holy hood, He obeyed, and put aw
87. most he dreaded, so long as every thing waa comfortable, handsome, itnd well-se
88. pre- though no daughter, who, according to Roman usage, bears the father's name
89. which extends a suite of rooms, opening upon a terrace, refreshed and adorned b
90. d foreign art. A refined taste directing ample longer imitated? Ho, 110 doubt, i
91. 0 doubt, it was with the housesbelonging to the old and wealthy families of Rome
92. f Rome. We find, then, Fabiola reclining on her couch, holding in her left hand
93. Fabiola reclining on her couch, holding in her left hand a silver mirror with a
94. ely carved ivory handle, and a gold ring, to hold it by. This was the favorite w
95. ed their passion on them, upon suffering the least annoyance, or when irritated
96. oment, and we disthe hour of the evening repast is approaching cover the mistres
97. our of the evening repast is approaching cover the mistress of this dainty abode
98. f this dainty abode engaged in preparing herself, to appear with becoming splend
99. eparing herself, to appear with becoming splendor. She is reclining on a couch o
100. with becoming splendor. She is reclining on a couch of Athenian workmanship, inl
101. a room of Cyzicene form that is, having glass windows to the ground, and so ope
102. ss windows to the ground, and so opening on to the flowery terrace. Against the
103. , sufficient to reflect a whole standing figure a porphyry-table beside it is a
104. in herbs, and their cosmetic and healing properties, perhaps also in more danger
105. in more dangerous uses in com- pounding ; known by her and possibly poisons. Sh
106. therefore, content ourselves with saying, that Fabiola, now at the age of twenty
107. ke great pretence about any little thing they do. Every moment they address the
108. only be in the triclinium* this evening as you enter in, to observe the brillia
109. d obtain it so perfect I am sure nothing like it has been mother had died in giv
110. ke it has been mother had died in giving her birth, she had been nursed and ever
111. st remittance of gold from Asia. Nothing can equal its beauty ; nor, I may Havin
112. can equal its beauty ; nor, I may Having been left so much to herself, she had r
113. Borne. Of Christianity she knew nothing, except that she understood it to be so
114. t that she understood it to be something very low, material, and vulgar. She des
115. in fact, too much to think of inquiring into it. And as to paganism, with its g
116. wed it. In fact, she believed in nothing beyond the present life, and thought of
117. the present life, and thought of nothing except its refined enjoyment. But her s
118. hat have you to praise of your own doing ?" " Nothing to desire, noble lady, but
119. to praise of your own doing ?" " Nothing to desire, noble lady, but that you may
120. , but that you may be ever happy nothing to praise of my own doing, for I am not
121. happy nothing to praise of my own doing, for I am not conscious of having done
122. doing, for I am not conscious of having done more than my duty," was the modest
123. from your mouth. wo If at the beginning we seem to indulge in long descriptions
124. , do ; by you, ejolidB, with The (lining-hall. t Black antimony atwlied on the l
125. ser" but I mean that inward vant, living consciousness within me, which makes me
126. slave, who holds an unqi; >f possessing within her a spiritual and living intel
127. essing within her a spiritual and living intelligence, whose "True," replied lif
128. fe "my > t measure of existence dwelling is above the Di'ity, immortality, whose
129. mselves, or have been at the unflinching handmaid. Syra instinetively put forwar
130. go," she said to Syra, who wns stanching the blood with her handkerchief, " go t
131. some compensation." Then, after turning over her trinkets on the table, she con
132. ts on the table, she con" Take this ring ; and you need not return here again ti
133. t return here again tinued, this evening." scourged to death, to be burnt in one
134. it, you mil survive as a conscious being, and have still a life of joy *nd freed
135. y but which He who watched, with beaming eye, the almsmodestly, but with a ferve
136. e is a power that will call to reckoning the four winds of heaven, and make each
137. joyful, THE VISIT. and glorious, loving forever and beloved. This certain hope
138. and beloved. This certain hope is DURING the latter part of the dialogue just re
139. of an eastern fancy are these, unfitting catastrophe which closed it, there took
140. eek or Latin author." " In one belonging to my own land, a school in which there
141. en Greek or barbarian, especially during such an excited scene as had just taken
142. the deep crimson lady, "without waiting even for that future ideal existence in
143. even for that future ideal existence ing standing, death ; already, even now, yo
144. that future ideal existence ing standing, death ; already, even now, you presume
145. ome, tell me at once, and without daring to equivocate or distwelve or thirteen
146. ntensity of pure and power, and learning, and genius, and in all that enriches a
147. hat enriches as though they were looking beyond nil surrounding in every grace o
148. they were looking beyond nil surrounding in every grace of form and lineament, a
149. menial dependant.. And on the following Sunday, in the titlet of St. Pastor, no
150. or the po< found a valuable emerald ring, which the good priest Polycarp thought
151. carp thought must have been the offering of some very rich Roman ; , : 1 ; Acts
152. ression . est cousin, I will ouo feeling to tin her es her warm and tender heart
153. . hand, and reverently kissed it, saying; "I h:'\ me in the small chamber near t
154. s almost admire her. It hi a new feeling in me towards one in her station." " Bu
155. dear Agnes yon have the power of making and as Fabiola saw her, a crimson blush
156. ouse is always We have said that smiling, and cheerfully anxious to discharge hi
157. ms to be no one who thinks of commanding. Come, cise. One of these was her old n
158. Home. you make everybody and everything love you. Another was her young visitor
159. only jok" This is said the softened ing. Mnd of dear She then advanced ; ; ; re
160. fore her, nay, as if she heard speaking to her, some one people I could have th
161. u were every day a bride. be celebrating one eternal espousal. But, good heavens
162. ens what proach me while that poor thing would hardly leave me, but Or are you a
163. rously ment I mean to we;,r this evening. though I cannot make out what The othe
164. n she does with what I give her. nothing put by, and she certainly spends nothin
165. put by, and she certainly spends nothing on heryour veins or mine." self. Nay, I
166. seen all and humbled almost to sickening, she said somewhat daily allowance of f
167. hastiness of temper, in over-chastising a forward slave ?" Name your price, and
168. hat are tli f take her home this evening." from a slave, ourselves, endowed with
169. "Human beings as much as tin reason, ing, "Well, be it so, you most irresistible
170. now, this great piece of business being settled between us, let us go down to o
171. ; " CHAPTER VL THE BANQtTET. their being allowed to move, to act, to think, or t
172. to- THEY to share, found, on descending, It all the guests assembled in a hall
173. wledge, that ,,,-t which they were going but the usual meal of a rich house, whe
174. therefore content ourselves with saying that everything was elegant and exquisi
175. nt ourselves with saying that everything was elegant and exquisite in arrangemen
176. ght upon our story. natured and obliging, his he. had y of manners, lint apparen
177. exedra or hall, Fabius, after " saluting his daughter, exclaimed Why, my child,
178. she now thought a silly way of punishing herself for it. Agnes stepped in to the
179. s to keep me in counten. 1 to his having been seen at the imperial court, and li
180. to the fascination of his manner, owing partly : ; : ; ance by the simplicity o
181. o as you please. But, seriously speaking, I must say that, even with you, this m
182. ss attractive. But you are not attending to me. come, I dare say you have some o
183. some one already in view." Come, During most of this address, which was meant t
184. la called them, transfixed, in a smiling ecstasy, as if attending to some one el
185. d, in a smiling ecstasy, as if attending to some one else, but never losing the
186. nding to some one else, but never losing the thread of the discourse, nor saying
187. the thread of the discourse, nor saying anything out of place. She therefore at
188. ad of the discourse, nor saying anything out of place. She therefore at once ans
189. pledged me to him by his betrothal-ring, and has adorned me with immense jewels
190. arhowever, would soon notice a wandering restlessness of and an eagerness of lis
191. essness of and an eagerness of listening attention for all sights and sounds aro
192. under his knit brows, from his flashing eyes, and a curling of the upper lip, w
193. s, from his flashing eyes, and a curling of the upper lip, which inspired a feel
194. the upper lip, which inspired a feeling of mistrust, and gave an idea that his
195. , while men ; reclined on couches during the repast, Fabioln nnd Agnes were toge
196. ir position about three parts of a being round table OIK unencumbered by the sty
197. ma,* or semi-circular a look of glowing earnestness, and in tones of artless si
198. th couch, for the convenience of serving. And we may ob in passing, that a table
199. nce of serving. And we may ob in passing, that a table-cloth, a luxury unknown i
200. k after such trifles." "Very interesting news indeed," answered Proculus. "It se
201. iola, and enter with her into the dining-room. It was well she had not overheard
202. ave been hurt to the quick, at tliinking that Agnes had concealed the most impor
203. have considered it, from her most loving friend. But while Agnes was defending h
204. ng friend. But while Agnes was defending her, she had turned away from her fathe
205. attendOne was a heavy, thick-necked ing to the other guests. : "What news " I l
206. f heavy work to be done, such as carving marbles and shaping columns." Boman sop
207. one, such as carving marbles and shaping columns." Boman sophist, or dealer in u
208. at the house. Two more remain, deserving further notice. The them, evidently a f
209. some in person; and though most engaging in conversation, he manifestly scorned
210. ly," said Fulvius, with his most winning " I can it but the fact is so. A hardly
211. elve wan the age for marriage, according to the Roman law. I have seen young che
212. rs had never borne a weight, yet working hard, ami ;is happy, \r> :ill appearanc
213. sked Fulvius, with :i bland but taunting tone. "If you do," the soldier replied,
214. n is right," exclaimed F&biola, clapping her hands, " and I close the discussion
215. alpurnius, thus challenged, and thinking himself highly "The Christians," compli
216. s had been quite abstracted, speculating upon his conversahe wanted to make chir
217. o anthe second of these brothers, seeing the other's victims give swer. The gift
218. ely to possess them and was hung by King Mardochaeus of Macedon, upon a gibbet s
219. eus of Macedon, upon a gibbet sauntering, as he did, every day into the great sh
220. order had Peter However, and Paul coming, as I said, to Koine, the former was di
221. minious death as the best means of being like their teachers and, as they fancy,
222. ir teachers and, as they fancy, of going to them in a place somewhere among the
223. no doubt she fore winter." Then turning round sharp to his neighbors, he " " A
224. erself obliged to strike. sa.id, bending a keen eye upon his countenance " No di
225. ion of pity. But immediately recognizing in it the work of Fabiola, she was divi
226. e was divided between two con"Poor thing !" she said, as she went on first tendi
227. " she said, as she went on first tending feelings. washing, then closing and dre
228. went on first tending feelings. washing, then closing and dressing, the gash "
229. tending feelings. washing, then closing and dressing, the gash " it is a dreadf
230. ings. washing, then closing and dressing, the gash " it is a dreadful cut What d
231. my poor girl It is a savage wormd, bring it upon yourself yet inflicted by 1 ; !
232. gods! who ever before of a slave arguing with a noble mistress, and Mich a learn
233. t and defenceless." Fulvius was starting up, luit Sebastian placed his strong ha
234. ted, as not to know that she was hurting yon. But tills must be concealed it mus
235. ice veil that v.-e could throw disputing ; round the arm, as if for ornament? Al
236. Syra's c.apsa or box, and after turning over in vain its scanty contents, she d
237. step came It was that of a girl of ting across the room to meet her. about sixt
238. an, to , to his lodgings. and staggering, he went into his chamber, . re- pulsin
239. he went into his chamber, . re- pulsing roughly the ivanees of his si . I only
240. him to bar the door. A lamp was burning bi by the table, on which Fulvius threw
241. ns of blood. Tliat dark man said nothing; but his swarthy countenance was blanch
242. ra, with a most affectionate and leading her to a seat ; " to-day I have brought
243. " Why, truth, greater you enjoy anything than to enjoy it myself." Xo, dear Syra
244. is will. I could no more think of eating the food than I could of wearing the dr
245. eating the food than I could of wearing the dress, of the rich, so long us I ca
246. j you give me tha consolation of feeling that I am, before God, still only a poo
247. efore God, still only a poor blind thing. I think ,.11 love me better thus, than
248. .11 love me better thus, than if feeding on luxurious I would rather be with Laz
249. . Did anyone see thee pick the the thing up ?" " No one, I am sure." " Then we a
250. ough to be surprise them. d of appearing before her comrades with the rich scarf
251. ne, and, with a mortified look, crossing towards the door, and she stepped behin
252. through it. Upon it is a galley weighing anchor, with a figure on deck waving to
253. ing anchor, with a figure on deck waving towards him, in fareThe scene changes ;
254. ed scarf. the midst of the sea, battling with a furious storm, while ou the summ
255. a torch in her hand, and black flapping wings, flies by, snatches it from the s
256. lind friend. to river of crystal flowing him than she stood i^.iinst b for a mom
257. 3 iag ' , if by a sudden effort, waiting patiently the slave's return. Syra then
258. have thought it was a parent ministering to h: r daughter, rather than a slave s
259. r daughter, rather than a slave serving a beggar. And this ; re was upon him i
260. st ; At but dre he hi i and that .aching, he gar too looked so happy, spoke so c
261. pointed interview, and Fubiola 'ipanying her to the door. i on But when Agnes an
262. s, "i" all ; "And do "It ; snob a thing as disinterested lovt; on fween strange
263. rt, Agnes entered the room, ind laughing, said, " Thin is So, Csecilia, I have f
264. it is I: ution is said to be approaching, mid perhaps disdain such humble victim
265. , falling on her knees ami Agnes's hand with tear
266. d girl v of opportunities for exercising charity but a poor iu lady)," said Agne
267. that she has said one very wicked thing, and told laugh i , .in helpless, like
268. helpless, like st. only do so by finding some some one still poorer and That tho
269. ar the me. " a great story, this evening." " and I am not " sorry to Well, you a
270. u present, to hear the good news I bring to Syra. Fabiola has allowed me to beco
271. clapped her hands with joy, and throwing her arms How happy round Syra's neck, e
272. ply troubled, and replied with faltering " Oh voice, good and gentle lady, you h
273. e free, Cuecilia cause I declined eating some trumpery delicacy, which would hav
274. the same." "No, no," said Syra, smiling, "that will never do. Our great 'Servan
275. to the froward. "t I am far from saying that my mistress is one of these; but y
276. before safety at all hours ; re-entering, to inquire the day's adventures, turvy
277. ves, with lamps and torches, are running for something or other that is every di
278. s and torches, are running for something or other that is every direction, looki
279. r other that is every direction, looking Euphrosyno every possible and impossibl
280. he scarf which had re-dressed, according to orders, and was no longer there. She
281. ld have '!e her owji soul. of purloining Then Syra's i conversation, and all tha
282. knew could not bear Syra, hud been using some For she believed the Moor to be op
283. to be opened annoy the poor girl. being oi'ten again through her mind it was pa
284. to her, yet she could not help dwelling on it; and she felt ns if that day were
285. ue at night, under pretence of gathering herbs at full inoon for if plucked at a
286. alone, that on niore coolly recollecting the incidents of the day, she remeinl i
287. bat tinged with a rich carnation, rising from the bedside if a ing slave (prayer
288. nation, rising from the bedside if a ing slave (prayer and willing sacrifice of
289. dside if a ing slave (prayer and willing sacrifice of life breathed upwards toge
290. spot as in a delicious garden, tressing dream. richly illuminated by a light li
291. it was now impossible. After attempting to speculate on the possiin his possess
292. quences of this misadventure, end coming to no satisv conclusion, she determined
293. der balmy and sweet. Fabiola, on parting with Agnes, retired to her apartment; a
294. en, to her disgust, she discovered lying on it the style with which she had woun
295. self had often with scorn, but designing, cunning glances, such as she it betray
296. often with scorn, but designing, cunning glances, such as she it betrayed some s
297. it seemed to her that they were enjoying some felicity which she had never known
298. re flowed, though so deep, yet sparkling and brilliant, and most refreshing. Oh,
299. kling and brilliant, and most refreshing. Oh, for courage to plunge into this st
300. her side and still they beckoned, urging her on to try it. But as she was standi
301. er on to try it. But as she was standing on the brink, clasping her hands in des
302. she was standing on the brink, clasping her hands in despair, Calpurnius seemed
303. hideous chimeras, most curiously running into, and underwoveii with, each other;
304. stian, and whom she had noticed standing sorrowful at a distance, now approach h
305. distance, now approach her, and, smiling on her, fan her i to face with his gold
306. s gold and purple a calm, and refreshing sleep. whig ; when she lost her vision
307. IX. and then bl.imed herself for having brought one so young into which of-en m
308. she now found that her motives for doing BO had ir, \v:is Ifis).. OP all the Kom
309. ectation <>' IMS manner, and the cunning us, destroyed the neighborhood by lire,
310. . 1 > . : , of hi, 'Uiould noth'-ip ing different him with the frank tended i M
311. he imperial residence to the neighboring Esquiline, the two hills taking in the
312. ghboring Esquiline, the two hills taking in the whole space now occupied bv the
313. time i|>al they hud reached 8 of keeping you would enter into sets of chambers,
314. e door was a wimiu-A open to and leading It consisted of a few rooms, a soldier
315. household was limited to a the building. The night looked BO bright through it
316. e moon was high in the heavens, swimming in; Italian moon does; a round, full af
317. i to i the azure sky. care in recruiting It new soldiers. was just such an eveni
318. t new soldiers. was just such an evening as, years after, Monand Augustine enjoy
319. osed to bear towards an sea-wave gliding down a slanting rock, came soothingly o
320. ards an sea-wave gliding down a slanting rock, came soothingly on lie older and
321. r. On the other side, the lofty building called the SoptizonBut it was not as to
322. on of ium of Severus, in front, towering above the Ccelian, then sumpChrist, tha
323. But nil in such a gentle, simple bearing, and were accompanied by massive monume
324. nd said, ha a softer tone, " I was going to dangers to which his youthful warmth
325. imes restrain him. As they were entering the palace, that part of which Sebas- t
326. ight hand of the ! means of establishing ?" ' perfect." graceful thought, Pancra
327. family of one of the Augusti, as showing a slight germ of better thoughts I mean
328. ews which damp our energies that lurking thought that mil, and ; - " That was a
329. ark!" continued Pancratius, not noticing the inter".These are the trumpet notes
330. me." is this "What groat affair, smiling, "upon which you wish youths, or women,
331. side, while the last sentence of beating to with bullet-laden scourges was being
332. to with bullet-laden scourges was being exc< to sleep calmly after such scenes,
333. ," pro"Well, t' d Pnncrntius, hesitating and blushing at every word. "You are aw
334. t' d Pnncrntius, hesitating and blushing at every word. "You are aware I have a
335. ber, you know, incur plain way of living; and my dear motln hing I can say, won'
336. in way of living; and my dear motln hing I can say, won't wear the lots of old>n
337. ots of old>ned trinkets, which are lying locked up, and of no use to anybody. I
338. theirs ? And if a persecution is coming, why run the risk of confiscation seizi
339. why run the risk of confiscation seizing them, or of plundering lictors stealing
340. fiscation seizing them, or of plundering lictors stealing them, whenever our liv
341. them, or of plundering lictors stealing them, whenever our lives are wanted, to
342. ful ; father's feet, thoroughly enjoying the cruel spectacles I him, and angry w
343. dissolute and Without taste for anything dissipated character. ability for any l
344. ated character. ability for any learning, he united in himself a pertain amount
345. measure of was half heirs ?" low cunning. He had never experienced ia hiiuself a
346. hiiuself a, generous No one hod feeling, and he had never curbed an evil passio
347. equally odious to hinn. ness, " offering a Paucratius," said Sebastian, "I have
348. wished you to ill the merit of uttering it yourself. Now, just tell me, makes y
349. e would be sure to imagine was something grand or generous while I assure you, d
350. ou, dear Sebastian, it is no such tiling. For I shall not miss these things a bi
351. oor, especially in the hard times coming." " Of course Lucina consents?" " I wou
352. e means little felicity. ; of gratifying his desires, was synonymous -with him t
353. quire gold-dust without her even wishing it. I should never be able to nee is pr
354. nient hour. What news have you for " ing known that I presumed to do auything co
355. ing known that I presumed to do auything consid- me ?" ered out of the way, espe
356. een ; them i and a man. -/lit, ir seeing After the speakers, evidently a utes th
357. he Appian ier my simples, without I'oing properly rewarded ? But how do you mean
358. be separated that is irretJUble." thing which you may bring with you black art.
359. s irretJUble." thing which you may bring with you black art." " Then let " p let
360. , iimlloo " Fool to think that am g .ing to try experiments for yon on a person
361. ck home as his wife but I have something bet- had entered the apartment, they fo
362. ain. the same line." Sebastian, enjoying the unbounded confidence of th " But I
363. mployed all his influence in propagating ti: to punish them." spiracies, though
364. ?" " The Christians. Is there not going to be a persecution of to save their li
365. dvice. Do not tire yourself with hunting and he entered into their gloomy prison
366. ison like an am; them down, and catching, after all, but menu prey keep your It
367. t to that officer and here Tranqr trying to conceal themselves share of their co
368. , she would not tell a lie for any thing, and gets us all into dreadful scrapes
369. rd truthful" unfortunate youthti weeping over tliem, allure them from their thre
370. ! or gifts ; and so prevents our having them offered." " Better !" " And, moreo
371. eet a caravan of your countryfolk coming in but you beat them all!" " Indeed I"
372. w much the The room wmi id a briquet ing-hnll, but consec|i entered only, as y i
373. f, as he looked upon the two vacillating confessors. It was some moments before
374. ed tones. Some hung upon his arms tering upon the confines of lite. " Holy and v
375. nd ask your prayers, instead of standing before you deed moved, but by no means
376. ve heard, that while angels were putting the last before Sebastian with a beseec
377. last before Sebastian with a beseeching look and outstretched arms, flower to y
378. sho spoke not a word. thought of telling them to unweave them, and scatter their
379. the threshold of paradise, are thinking not but admire the sincerity of belief,
380. belief, and the generosity of of drawing them back, to tread once more the valle
381. e His angels ? When, instead of standing manfully before Him, like good and fait
382. e to come into His presence after having crawled through a few of infamy, disown
383. and, what is worse, gnawed by an undying worm, and victims of a sleepless remors
384. rs," replied the other, with a faltering voice, "her once eloquent tongue has be
385. of our Lord Jesus Christ, the beginning of "Wait in patience, my good old man,"
386. ictorious Cross, as that right in saying that for his sake and your mother's you
387. hy, so wield the sword been deliberating whether you should not prefer them to H
388. e you make them Christians by abandoning Christianity ? Will sign of the cross,
389. tianity ? Will sign of the cross, saying "Zoe, speak dost thou believe ?" " I be
390. them soldiers of the Cross by deserting its standard ? Will you teach them that
391. uttered, as he threw life, by preferring life to them ? Do you want to gain for
392. ll liberty of his house. tune in putting them under the care of the holy priest
393. lment, and the times were so threatening, and all new irritations had so much to
394. ed night and day; so that ; ', embracing their parents, "No," replied the father
395. wonder. Trnnquilliuus, who was suffering severely from tho gout, was restored to
396. d. ; Tin ' v or Tin: i, 17 after bidding affectionate farewell to his friends, A
397. d of i-ked, "Sebastian, I do not leaving the room, the lal like that Torquatus.
398. ave personal experience of this -healing I certainly will not resist its evidenc
399. ism withtrue, and if ont faith preceding, as an experiment of its healing virtue
400. eceding, as an experiment of its healing virtue, would have been a superstition.
401. aughter and occasional yells, proceeding from the adjoining yard, in wl were the
402. nal yells, proceeding from the adjoining yard, in wl were the quarters of the .\
403. :in archers. A fire seemed to be blazing in the midst of it, for the smoke and s
404. ke and sparks rose above the surrounding porticoes. Sebastian accosted the senti
405. were, and asked: "Friend, what is going on there among our the father cf the ho
406. et us now come down again to the evening, in which Sebastian and Pancratius met
407. d, to decide upon some plan for securing the completer instruction of the conver
408. ion of the converts, and for withdrawing from observation so many persons, whose
409. ytes should join him there, and, forming one household, should go on with religi
410. untry, and the emperor himself was going to the coast of Naples, and thence woul
411. ent for Indeed the Pope, we are carrying out the preconcerted plan. told, on the
412. rted plan. told, on the Sunday following this conversion, celebrated the divine
413. t the Christians meet by night, and sing detestable songs, and commit all sorts
414. ild murdered what might seem to be going on here." for the purpose* just night,
415. astian; and then exclaimed, were issuing from the vestibule, " Is it not strange
416. ious that we worship the only One living God in spirit and "Good as they truth,
417. ' " So long," said Pain rat. us, pausing on the steps outside the vestibule, and
418. steps outside the vestibule, and looking at the now-declining moon, "so long as
419. tibule, and looking at the now-declining moon, "so long as we shall continue to
420. l me, whence do you best At this meeting all details were arranged ; different p
421. to start, in the course of the following days, by various " The most lovely sunr
422. l question, "was soldier, as if humoring his companion's ethers round by Tibur a
423. e water, then the shore with its dancing waves ; with the directions given him,
424. o go into the Forum on the morrow, ering pinnacles, basked in the effulgence of
425. could not have been wi.nessed Everything was said and done to soothe, and even t
426. Pancratius; How beautiful will it going his own way. this benighted country. fu
427. ed then be to behold the shades retiring, and each mowho should head the little
428. love between the holy our till starting into light, worship holy faith and each
429. ght, worship holy faith and each wishing to remain in the priest Polycarp and Se
430. that you and I will look ; : ; not, ing confessors, and p, toouey; and the meet
431. nfessors, and p, toouey; and the meeting broke up with a prayer of thanksgiving.
432. g broke up with a prayer of thanksgiving. It in n. -t ?! le, from where alone it
433. n paid " Sebastian, yon :;:iid something this evening, which I sLould much like
434. stian, yon :;:iid something this evening, which I sLould much like to have expla
435. What was it ?" 'When yon were contending with Polycarp, about going into Campani
436. re contending with Polycarp, about going into Campania, or remaining in Kome, yo
437. about going into Campania, or remaining in Kome, you promised that if you staye
438. nd merciful. Yet, though he your longing ardor to give your life for Christ." pu
439. anner, before the Emperor Septimus S ing, sending out its inhabitants to the nei
440. fore the Emperor Septimus S ing, sending out its inhabitants to the neighboring
441. g out its inhabitants to the neighboring hills, or to the whole line of sea-coas
442. um, for amuse- published his persecuting edicts, many Christians had sufV. Such
443. the Acts of whose martyrdom, containing the d written, and purpose in your mind
444. her death, form one of the most touching and exquisitely beautiful documents pre
445. ame all through the empire, there during the first three centusuffering uurespit
446. re during the first three centusuffering uurespited, under active persecuthat th
447. aithful worshipped in fear and trembling, and tion that bare existence, with alm
448. sort has secured for us most interesting information, connected with our sub; Wh
449. nged it in his province with unrelenting cruelty. among others, Mavilus of Adrum
450. o him, in which he bids him take warning from this visitation, and repent of whe
451. a severe illness. his crimes ; reminding him of many judgments which had fallen
452. ly men, tha: him they were i-y! offering up earnest prayers for their enemy's re
453. very well fu! duties without practising cruelty, by acting as other m-.i. had d
454. es without practising cruelty, by acting as other m-.i. had done. For instance,
455. f governors and judges, in the enforcing even of imperial odiel:s of persecution
456. the main part of the Church was enjoying peace. But Borne was undoubtedly the pl
457. as the privilege of its pontiffs, during the first three centuries, to bear the
458. be elected Pope was equivalent to being promoted to martyrdom. Nay, oases occur
459. No lie, no it with Christian dissembling, no iie'ii morality or Christum truth,
460. orified by many noble martyrdoms. During such and anti-social. Hence the hatred
461. d even with splendor. The city as having an interest opposed to the extension an
462. into districts or parishes, each having its title, or of the empire, and as obe
463. title, or of the empire, and as obeying an unseen and spiritual power. church,
464. ogue or fanatic could succeed in feeling title and collections were made for the
465. e for these purposes, and others rousing this, neither their denial of the charg
466. s of It is recorded, that in 250, during the pontificate tality. civilized life,
467. hence. Families were startled at finding a son or daughter to hare embraced this
468. mble in these places, without attracting attention,' and Fulvius's wit and cleve
469. called a levee to be held every morning by the rich, attended force, and unfeel
470. the rich, attended force, and unfeeling recklessness, might be valuable auxilia
471. It was about ten days after the meeting last described, that go in and out of a
472. be entertained, that persons were moving in the religion from her husband. Yet T
473. ound, for he compares them to "threshing-floors," which were necessarily exposed
474. mitted all her other slaves but, feeling it wrong to turn so dangerous a charact
475. world, ; highest society, were occupying conspicuous public situations, were nea
476. E. H. 1. uncommon. For, home, according ehai! lib. ii cornmunie.'stim; her-e!f
477. ely adorned them. Fulvius, and made ring about, Corwii.i tip to him. ' What do y
478. s to* . "Do you '. yon, without, looking right or is not the blind "Wluit can yo
479. me, " that " you and go boldly in, doing as they do." This, Fulvius," and he whi
480. se." Fulvius was staggered then rallying, paid, right "I am sure not, for severa
481. she is better known than they, as being a her parents who are you ?" to : . i ;
482. ones, "No more here I see friends coming. Meet me (ho Patrician Street,* unlisgu
483. s, iis hood over his face. "Good morning, comrade I fear I have kept you waiting
484. , comrade I fear I have kept you waiting in ; ' He said, therefore, to panion, H
485. ance." "Do you know what I am " thinking, Fulvius?" ; Something very bright, no
486. t I am " thinking, Fulvius?" ; Something very bright, no doubt." " That when you
487. two chances." " What are ?" they morning air, especially as you are thinly clad.
488. t puzzled, by what I have been observing." -;ld "The fold." fox's and the wolf's
489. rob a long, I suspect, before my coming, there have been arriving here from eve
490. fore my coming, there have been arriving here from every side, and entering into
491. iving here from every side, and entering into that house, by the back door in th
492. y of a different class." "Whose dwelling is it, do you know ? It looks " house,
493. that isfxnent a rcjy feeble man, .aching, supported by a young and cheerful girl
494. rted him. ! spiritual inside. mode doing and find ourselves at once The parents
495. of blood forth for Christ, accompanying the waving branches of the never been h
496. orth for Christ, accompanying the waving branches of the never been hewn down, b
497. eated storms. This may appear surprising when we reflect how many a soldier goes
498. i ; all ; this is only my way of showing selfishness." " How do you mean ?" Th V
499. ia the neighborhood of Brne for whining and importunate beggari Tin: campaign o
500. e been like to Gomorrha."* by preserving iu it, which it WUR t situated, and it
501. down to the lowest servant. Yet nothing seemed to spoil, or warp, the compact v
502. jewels among the poor, without its being known to whom they belonged. He had not
503. fittest for this purpose. On the morning which we ha scribed, the distribution h
504. al visitor, though Agues preferred going to see her at her house ; and she often
505. xpressed to her young friend her longing for the day, when, meeting with a suita
506. d her longing for the day, when, meeting with a suitable match, she would re-emb
507. llish and open all the splendid dwelling. For, notwithstanding the :an law "on t
508. splendid dwelling. For, notwithstanding the :an law "on the inheritance of wome
509. hese were few. ; A GEOtrp of poor coming opportunely towards the door enabled Co
510. lth, the miserly parents must be putting by ; and concluded, that all beyond the
511. o decay and ruin. It Catholics for using it, on the ground that it was not a sal
512. atus, and his exorcist Secuudus, sisting of a large court, : Following the other
513. s, sisting of a large court, : Following the others closely, and copying their m
514. ollowing the others closely, and copying their manners and gestures, he found hi
515. Two silver and gold smiths were weighing and valuing most conscientiously and be
516. nd gold smiths were weighing and valuing most conscientiously and beside them wa
517. years before, had divided the committing each region to one of the city for this
518. ially ; Kooms were set apart for lodging strangers who came from a distance, rec
519. ic, instead of the toga, a close-fitting is, having over had her cell, though sh
520. of the toga, a close-fitting is, having over had her cell, though she refused t
521. ous heart. He would have given anytliing to get it all, and almost thought of ma
522. get it all, and almost thought of making a dash at something, and running out. B
523. st thought of making a dash at something, and running out. But he saw at once th
524. making a dash at something, and running out. But he saw at once the and resolve
525. ether present position. While and moving about, he remained unnoticed. But he so
526. culiarly gentle manners, but active, ing the business of this charitable establi
527. charitable establishment, and preserving all local documents, such as the acts o
528. n that region, poor. went on marshalling the attendants, each evidently knowing
529. g the attendants, each evidently knowing those of his own district, and conducti
530. hose of his own district, and conducting them to a peculiar spot within the port
531. r into the innermost parts house, haying entered by a cheat, dressed like a begg
532. t least L-ds the nnhuvfiil, p meditating uu escape luit lie saw it guarded by an
533. , though they only showed it by scowling looks and repressive biting of their li
534. by scowling looks and repressive biting of their lips. He saw that he was a sub
535. magined that even the blind were staring at him, and the decrepi; to wield their
536. e hoped to frame some excuse for getting out of the sciv At length the Deacon Ke
537. g. do, indeed," replied Lve in a whining tone. " to mortal soul Never, as long a
538. ush arm and walk with me. " Then turning to the others, ! I my ; tinned take." :
539. ake." : "I know this person ; his coming here is quite a mis- The ; : Friend, yo
540. door of communication with the dwelling-house. Keparatus looked in the same dir
541. Pancratius, just entered, and gathering some hasty information from Secundus. C
542. upon his rival. Corvinus help observing the graceful development and manly bear
543. e graceful development and manly bearing, which a few weeks hod given his late s
544. icted under similar circumstances. " ing Corvinus, we are now quits; only, take
545. y the front door, He found it, according to Koman custom, unlocked ; and, indeed
546. d the possibility of a stranger entering at such an hour. Instead of a porter, h
547. . Instead of a porter, he found guarding the door only a simple-looking girl abo
548. guarding the door only a simple-looking girl about twelve or thirteen years of
549. application for relief, joined in crying out, you will not send him away fasting
550. out, you will not send him away fasting and unsuccored ?" "Leave that tome," wa
551. tius, who led Corvinus, still protending to limp, into the street, and dismissed
552. sent for the orphan daughter, intending to have her instructed and baptized. Sh
553. awkwardly situated as a crowd was making Corvinus. He thought of retreating, but
554. aking Corvinus. He thought of retreating, but this would have destroyed all his
555. ave destroyed all his hopes he was going to advance, when he reflected that he m
556. critical jnn< whom should he see coming lightly across the court but the him fe
557. foot, clothed as a slave, counterfeiting a cripple, into the Forum before his tr
558. h what every Koman would resent, forcing your way into the " heart of a patricia
559. stress of the house, all joy, all spring, and sunshine. As soon as she saw him,
560. use." " Our house," she replied, smiling, "boasts of no clients, nor do we seek
561. effort, over the heart as a most willing subject." Incapable of imagining that s
562. willing subject." Incapable of imagining that such words could allude to herself
563. /'m. uppor part of the ymriual, leading He whose beauty sun and moon in their l
564. ot and sealed his down; till, despairing of KIII-CCHS in this way, he del h'ps,
565. HS in this way, he del h'ps, tdU feeling that he was losing the most favorable o
566. del h'ps, tdU feeling that he was losing the most favorable opportun- from his g
567. ni;j ity he could ever expect of opening his mind (affection it could finished S
568. ld finished Syrian make, and was raising it i>\ not be called) to her, he boldly
569. lt it wrenciied in a Irire. from his ing; and I entreat you to believe my expres
570. stian to liis eenluriou, who was coining up at that moment to join his fellow-Ch
571. of most Hercuand turned away her burning countenance. Fulvius started iu au inst
572. dly assault," reof her absence, striding forwards towards him, with an air plied
573. e by some of Corvinus, no longer limping, but running as fast as his legs uninte
574. Corvinus, no longer limping, but running as fast as his legs unintentional mista
575. met afterwards, neither ever alluded ing this, she withdrew. Each knew that the
576. , now ad- to their feats of that morning. " dressed the intruder, who quailed be
577. least in Borne, which " that " I having either fox or wolf would assail in vain
578. n vain. suppose," answered he, regaining corn-age, met the lady of the house at
579. rsons may be on a very different footing in a house. Yet bution of greater alms,
580. he world.* Indeed we would naturally ing towards the young mistress of this hous
581. earts and houses for action, by removing There is nothing like hav- phrase, othe
582. for action, by removing There is nothing like hav- phrase, other of Home's riche
583. th, and betwo strings to one's bow." ing come the spoil of the impious soldier,
584. f the impious soldier, instead of having been This coarse and bitter sarcasm wou
585. inheritance of the poor, t best feeling'! to the quick and had he not long befo
586. great principles be forgotten, of making the ciplined himself to Qiristiau meekn
587. e of cl executor ot her command." Saying this, he took the unbidden consoled the
588. en ho had put him outside, still holding him fast, And yet the " Go blessings an
589. accl eternal usury. I hold this morning's insolence over your head, as a securi
590. he court, the intended interview nothing, and to whom he hs thus addressed the a
591. o have compassion on his poorer mantling, and worthy in v : ; Jesto have a np.'r
592. n the days of tribulation, whi preparing for us. And as the only return which is
593. those who give, or do, us good." During' this brief address, poor Pancratius kn
594. s, and in am', steal, rialpurp! changing opal hue, scan- iy al. to it, through a
595. compassionately stood before him, making himself as large as possible. And his e
596. did all the rich chestnut, the reddening orchard, the adust stubble, but betray
597. ed eyes, and fervent tone, East towering above the box, and the arbutus, and of
598. bona faci- plain, with fountains leaping up, and cascades gliding down, Amen."*
599. untains leaping up, and cascades gliding down, Amen."* porticoes of glittering m
600. ng down, Amen."* porticoes of glittering marble, statues of bronze and stone^ en
601. raw cheerful banquet closed the edifying scene. It was yet early indeed many par
602. between, the brilliant web of uustirring vine-leaves displays a yellower or brow
603. , from tho d:irk :he duller ilex, boring titular church. calmer beauties of the
604. approached, villas were seen upon seeing her poor old cripple safe home, and upo
605. old cripple safe home, and upon carrying for him his heavy open to let in air an
606. nd innumerable slaves were busy, dusting canvas purse and chatted so cheerfully
607. erfully to him, that he was and scouring, trimming the hedges into fantastic sha
608. him, that he was and scouring, trimming the hedges into fantastic shapes, clear
609. nto fantastic shapes, clear his poor ing the canals for the artificial brooklets
610. r the artificial brooklets, and plucking up the surprised when he found they had
611. cus or country steward but clean lodging. His blind guide then thrust his purse
612. m the gravel-walks. his hand, and giving him a hurried good day, tripped away su
613. of vehicle, from the huge wain carrying furu At the first opportunity, he slowl
614. en, to the light chariot or gig, dashing on tried again, and still it was so. ma
615. oi: outright, as if she had been playing running as lightly as if she had nothin
616. ight, as if she had been playing running as lightly as if she had nothing heavy
617. running as lightly as if she had nothing heavy about her, he squabbling filled t
618. d nothing heavy about her, he squabbling filled the public ways. Nor was there a
619. t not his Splendor; he is less scorching, but not less bright. As he rises in th
620. less bright. As he rises in the morning, he dashes sparks of radiance over awak
621. dashes sparks of radiance over awakening nature, a Mrecenas or a Horace might re
622. th Bajse, and other fashionable watering-places round Vesuvius, a street of nobl
623. sky, royal largess. And after careering through when he reaches his goal, and f
624. aly, "as Pliny calls its because forming its truest beauty, that Fabiol; hastene
625. es, like a from the world ho is visiting and pearing, radiant messengers mirror
626. rom the world ho is visiting and pearing, radiant messengers mirror in HU emboss
627. soon come back, and gladden us cheering, to remind us he white sun-lit sails of
628. rtainly again. of which rose the roaring laagh of fishing-skiffs; from some It h
629. which rose the roaring laagh of fishing-skiffs; from some It has taken months t
630. . has been It villas,! ; ; upon entering his presence-chamber, ing cities only,
631. upon entering his presence-chamber, ing cities only, still less from wanderers
632. mi a by the gusli, from nn oiit-cTopping fora moment in a nan 1 r< <.:;, of in a
633. down babbled sad fretted, till, rushing over it if murmuring and chattering, in
634. tted, till, rushing over it if murmuring and chattering, in the most good-nature
635. hing over it if murmuring and chattering, in the most good-natured way imaginabl
636. and and doctrines which she was reading nor,, !y new to her. But there seemed t
637. tuned chord, which vibrated in unfailing was just and right, but jnpgled in uiss
638. ;< kept at the villa, chiefly containing work:? on agriculture or of a Win*' loc
639. was brought every year from Rome, thing she had before witnessed. She was not y
640. r in spiritual home. Most of her morning hours were spent in the cherished wisdo
641. Precursor. It was on a delicious morning in October, that, which she selected fi
642. lume and then another. But any reclining bj the spring, the mistress and slave w
643. another. But any reclining bj the spring, the mistress and slave were occupied i
644. d slave were occupied in visitor calling upcm her this year would have been surp
645. ear would have been surprised to reading when the former, wearied by the heavine
646. as when the day follow- ed for something lighter and newer and drawing out a man
647. something lighter and newer and drawing out a manua dinner at her house, Agnes
648. rom her casket, said " Here is something, I declined leaving her service, though
649. " Here is something, I declined leaving her service, though tempted by a bribe
650. stupid book down. am told, very amusing, and only just come out. It will Still
651. till more astonished was she at learning that the liberty. " to both of us. reas
652. title of the ble consciousness of having earned this affection by any acts of Sh
653. n:. niind. while every Christian writing was supfidelity and devotedness in slav
654. nduct any airs, any symptoms of thinking she had done a thought, of such a thing
655. she had done a thought, of such a thing as restraint put upon In grand thing, a
656. ing as restraint put upon In grand thing, and that her mistress must feel it. No
657. nd never betrayed any signs of believing herself less a From Horace to Ausonius,
658. e of virtue could have made that reading this. slave than before. Fabiola's hear
659. d could give that there wax such a thing in the world as disinterested love, her
660. isfied her that she had received smiling. " I have no doubt, there are plenty of
661. had And, in the meantime, it is amusing to read young slaves highly educated to
662. er, she never seemed to think of turning action, to have any existei: "True, my
663. ed later, seldom paid more than a flying visit for a couple of days to this vill
664. the fountain, OB though she were testing the truth of Syra's v "And they sound l
665. s disappointed. some down so is striking principle, to into what she much as she
666. family ? Do you think they have anything to do with our affairs ?" "Par indeed f
667. on. Terrible thought, that one is living, if you say true, under the steady gaze
668. oul It is enough to make one any evening commit self-destruction, to get rid of
669. destruction, to get rid of the torturing watchfulness Yet it sounds so true !''
670. intellect struggled against the writhing p: "And what do you call Him, Syra, in
671. t describes not His and talons, subduing the quailing foe. Afte^ a struggle, -vi
672. ot His and talons, subduing the quailing foe. Afte^ a struggle, -visi; nature, H
673. ry- indivisible, undeniable, penetrating yet diffusive, ubi- us and unlimited. H
674. . He existed before there was any ending has ceased. Power, and unerring judgmen
675. y ending has ceased. Power, and unerring judgment belong to Him by His nature, a
676. eate, He alone can preserve, and He uing; exist after all >rn, He will love, jus
677. . Syra, with a calm intensity of feeling, silently watched the workings of her m
678. r lips, as if these were but the opening ; i pupil's religious progress was invo
679. land of poetry or encourage us a feeling that, were we shut up for ever in solit
680. "But, Syra, can you think, that a Being such plcs, in guiding us, and could not
681. hink, that a Being such plcs, in guiding us, and could not leave us such, if I u
682. , even with an ivith constantly watching the actions, lions of creatures?" outwa
683. e. men, a consciousness of a controlling, an approving, and a re(Syra expressed
684. ciousness of a controlling, an approving, and a re(Syra expressed approwarding P
685. ng, and a re(Syra expressed approwarding Power too am I right ?" bation,) "stand
686. wer too am I right ?" bation,) "standing by. us when no other eye can : il ii, i
687. her eye can : il ii, ir, 1 1 1 ; > I'ing things, that is, which Keek for to hide
688. ., inspareut < .id hold t: from throwing " It was my noble lady ; though ; Tin:
689. much wasted splendor V The next morning had been fixed for one of those visits
690. s long and tender. Her heart was getting above her intellect and this can only b
691. tellect and this can only be by itsi ing softness. At length she grew calm and a
692. lla Campania, . i : a number " One thing more, Syra dare one address, by worship
693. dom, we live and move and have our being. Hence, one may address Him, not as far
694. splendor of ; freed all ferred remaining with his country slaves, but that many
695. the conversation seemed to be trenching " " pleasing duty of courtesy to a most
696. tion seemed to be trenching " " pleasing duty of courtesy to a most kind f hood
697. general affirmative. ded with glistening gems the garlands of vine which boi " A
698. a Victim rels, relieved by tall tapering cypresses, amidst which shon not, noble
699. romatius, whom she had last seen limping with gout. hale old man, courteously re
700. hands, and then after her father, asking if the report were true that he w:i loo
701. the report were true that he w:i looking up earnestly into Syra's face, said to
702. nestly into Syra's face, said to her ing shortly to Asia. At this Fabiola seemed
703. ieved auu m I am sure that, after having so clearly described to me the ne d f r
704. as well as act, you have a real meaning in this awful say- stroll about the gro
705. beautiful plants; but still much m; ing, though I understand you not. As surely
706. surface. herself no longer, and, turning to Chroraatius, she said my mind has ne
707. "Why, what on earth have you been doing, Chromatius, to send away all your stat
708. conversation Fabiola retired and during the tell me, what have you done with th
709. ion she felt as if she had made anything abont it ? You discovery of a great the
710. fingers, perhaps I iek up such a tiling for you. But I cannot promise you i.r a
711. the Rome, to encourge and assist coming persecution, which his connection with
712. e do. niui ble him to ! tence, by adding, see, as I have grown older, I have gro
713. t all sorts of strange reports are going round the country, of them.' " and I, t
714. hat you have a quantity of people living with you, " Because they had been set u
715. te a philosophical sort of life, forming a pretences; and us you would turn out
716. ith a smile and bow. tors, but belonging to quite another family, so did I these
717. ither could I run a risk, of their being bought for the con- keep most unfashion
718. that we pay our " j to continue calling your villa Ad Statuaa, after not a way?
719. y, do they, that statue is left standing in it ?" we have a long score run up at
720. ess, Oh, no !" replied Fabiola, laughing. " ami " How kind of them !" will see t
721. d with as much loose talk, deep drinking, occasional sallies of thought of the h
722. freaks in the Etiirhborhood, a training-school, in which many were being prepar
723. raining-school, in which many were being prepared, as as others I beg your pardo
724. as others I beg your pardon for alluding to suck tilings but, 'ITS or gladiators
725. about their motives and manner of living. Is not this a matic " 'n ?" ! become,
726. out by baptism, Chromatius, after making every inquiry u th of the fact, sent fo
727. it; a Christian, as a means of obtaining a cure of the same ''d not be; and anot
728. ous agriculturists. We meet at dill sing beautiful songs together, all breathing
729. beautiful songs together, all breathing virtue and purity, and read most improv
730. rtue and purity, and read most improving books, and re. from eloquent teachers.
731. ian and Polycarp thrown into a lila/.ing furnace not perhaps so diffi- which he
732. y you was quite are turned i . Something has been * M i . But * it rnus'. \ 11.
733. stem," remarked Fabioliv, with n knowing look. "Hu you cunning thing!" answered
734. iv, with n knowing look. "Hu you cunning thing!" answered the judge; "so you rea
735. th n knowing look. "Hu you cunning thing!" answered the judge; "so you really th
736. u really think that this may be a saving plan after all ? But it won't be, for w
737. s that?" asked the young lady. " Nothing less than this. We are determined that
738. ned that there shall not be such a thing as a poor person within our reach ; thi
739. thin nf the vellum, HIM! After partaking of some slight IXtd l.i mil go for this
740. if it were possible ; but ; Mug touching! v t. should never 'it; but it very dii
741. never 'it; but it very diilerent feeling it is not." offended if I tell you; but
742. ovel on in the slime of bitter j feeling and every thought in t'e: finest fibres
743. "Let me ask you one question. of reading ness, of his words ; but was startled,
744. ould not have patience to learn anything about them. I ex-prefect. " but are " P
745. " that it should reach my f sanctioning every abominable crime, ever to give my
746. wretched people for Fabiola, hesitating, said ; ; 1 Have you taken the trouble
747. she said " I have said to him, something very thoughtless, I fe;ir, or stirred u
748. Chromatius, and let us talk of something else. journey ?" " " By no means," answ
749. but for an ample recompens. with smiling readiness, and disappeared by a side al
750. was, to ask if you knew of anyone going immediately to Rome. I have heard, from
751. eat what he did before go without taking leave of me, to spare me j " " there is
752. " replied Chromatius, young man starting Come into the library, and write early
753. brary, and write early to-morrow morning. your letter the bearer is probably the
754. oom a young man was seated, transcribing a large ; in his manner which made a d
755. keness to Judas, in that eager clutching of would the purse. Fabiola, however, w
756. ce for all, any obligation was something 1 . contracted by making him her messen
757. n was something 1 . contracted by making him her messenger. Hh" to destroy it r.
758. t. Only volume aside. ; which, on seeing a stranger enter, he closed and put the
759. em, first time she perused the following words from a book unto her : : known To
760. Torquatus," said Chromatius, addressing him, "this lady desires to send a lette
761. th .',ch an exprc-BB or tind na wishing eoruc- to send letters Ixad to opportun
762. ? hat looked that dis!.u:o. No Does ing and ! like lloei.s of bright-p;:: flutt
763. ! like lloei.s of bright-p;:: fluttering on a lake. :-'s ler'ti. '.V' her very i
764. of a new thoughts amidst these shifting uuse him? :. will trouble myself no mor
765. which moody but eager gai: were casting their knuckle-bone dice; mid lie felt a
766. , and discourse, uugir, inebriety, going round with the cup; when the repri tena
767. eem placed op; . VEST early next morning a mule and guide came to the door of Ch
768. me whispered a kind, soft word exhorting him to be faithful to the graces he had
769. ch of either. He was, iu fact, returning only to the innocent enjoyn> the imperi
770. nificence, its beauty. ones to a living and panting mass of hui.; whose passion
771. its beauty. ones to a living and panting mass of hui.; whose passions they enkin
772. rely, promised he would. Others, knowing his poverty, put a little into his hand
773. ich had manifested itself in his bearing, ivate more all Christian virtues. Torq
774. good priest's and obtained his blessing; then received from him letters .dation
775. suddenly he found himself at its opening, with an inlet of the him, and in it on
776. there was a bold young fisherman living on the coast of southern Italy. One nig
777. 1 -i. the house, Chromatins was standing at the door, \\ith a moist eye, after h
778. such lather kept fixed on his departing sou. . every remonstrance, to go alone
779. ss the country crew of which were crying waving their hands to inpedal conveyanc
780. country crew of which were crying waving their hands to inpedal conveyance to Fu
781. t h:> v iirney. to find that the fishing-boat, toward which he had turn; in that
782. was on, the opposite siu had been making a circle; but s rithin Viil:' no\v he w
783. in Viil:' no\v he was wiilli d with ning, in a spiral commencing an and a narrow
784. illi d with ning, in a spiral commencing an and a narrower one. A horrible :d: t
785. ce. He looked round, and ', , I shouting ; : i i . , ;i 1 i , - ; t i ,;' snow 1
786. hich he could see ; , ni ] foamn ,,j ing water. Then, in despair, he threw hav s
787. Then, in despair, he threw hav standing, he flung up his arms ! fran! ie'illy;
788. " to B till lie felt the waters gurgling above him, and ho was whirled down into
789. Fundi!" exclaimed the muleteer, pointing to a town before them; and presently th
790. them; and presently the mule was sliding along the broad >, id Nicnmetli;, ; ,nl
791. as paid handsomely, and retired swearing and be sure, as my any wit in them, wmi
792. as they do ' "To oe not > l,y grumbling quired the He then inat the niggardline
793. but to come to the purpose. meal, during which he learned the master's history.
794. proved eminently successful. But finding a persecu- fair division. We will aid o
795. us. In a fellow-Christian he saw nothing but a not so ?" cipal inhabitants. "Exa
796. elieve" (the gentleman alliii pretending to have some business in the town, he w
797. . Here he rested, changed his travelling suit, and relied with hhv; ? Or did you
798. ia! empire. black witch has been playing no tricks w>ih you I But, com. ily she
799. truck b, CHAPTEB XIX. charm that evening. I have my eyes open I s;nv how heart w
800. ld temples in public instead of skulking used to do, 1 for gain some notoriety,
801. ies, and accepted, without much pressing, an invitation to supper that evening.
802. ng, an invitation to supper that evening. He then went to seek a respectable lod
803. then went to seek a respectable lodging, suited to the present state of his pur
804. had no love for green fields or running brooks ; t.is tastes were for the gossi
805. gossip aad free society of Koine. During the year, his daughter's presence was a
806. p But Fabiohi again. I \. stands nothing of such mr.tters. give up her books, an
807. give up her books, and think of settling h. I'.u: of preventing others. that ' m
808. think of settling h. I'.u: of preventing others. that ' me ; much possible? lio\
809. ch. Jou. i . i late hours, with gambling ami loose conversation, generally In- f
810. ous eutert i am ins sure you.'' ; Having search of guests to meet him. '.auts, i
811. who were ess for invitations. loitering about his But as he was known hanlay fo
812. y old gentleman was evidently hesitating, whether he should not knock down Homeb
813. d Fulvius. "And in his trap in a morning Here was a man ready to hand, to Oorvin
814. er has had the opportunity of witnessing the expression the :;;n st. ;<>t, more
815. n. The destruc- every stroke of its wing, and studies how it can best throw tion
816. beral found reasons for Christians being ex- and depressed, when Fulvius, who ha
817. bear Corvinus, went upto him, and taking him by the hand said courcepted from al
818. ear, I spoke inconsiderately, in drawing out gress this man thought them opposed
819. another their practice infamous. During all this debate, if it could be so call
820. e same conclusion, Fulvius, after having glanced from one to the other of the a,
821. he bit his lip. At one time he crumbling the bread between his fingers at anothe
822. we can talk quietly together." So saying, he led him into an elegant room, where
823. ne to be brought, for such as, according to Roman fashion, liked to enjoy viiius
824. ion, liked to enjoy viiius, " my nothing," replied Torquatus, again colors to th
825. s infinitely worse is, their maintaining such antisocial doctrines, conniving at
826. ing such antisocial doctrines, conniving at such frightful excesses, and deang t
827. , and deang themselves to the disgusting worship of an ass's head," Torquatus no
828. Torquatus now fairly writhed and rising, arm, when Fulvius, with a cool calcula
829. e every goblet and beaker dance and ring, as, in a choked voice, Tor. "It is a l
830. But only Cora, oommissatio, or drinking-bout. engaged by Fulvius, followed. On
831. d table were dice. Fulvius, after plying Torquatus with more liquor, negligently
832. , and threw them playfully down, talking in the mean time on " Dear me !" he " w
833. at indifferent subjects. kept exclaiming, It is well I am not playing with any o
834. exclaiming, It is well I am not playing with any one, or I should throws " have
835. before, had been the ruin of TorGambling, quatus for a transaction arising out o
836. mbling, quatus for a transaction arising out of it he was in prison, when Sebast
837. no intention, as he thought, of playing, Fulvius watched him, as a lynx might i
838. ed in all this, coupled with the poising of his hand, the knowing cast of the wr
839. ith the poising of his hand, the knowing cast of the wrist, and the sharp eye to
840. hance, low." if you will stake something very ; est tone, and look. '," answered
841. creation for I " have renounced gambling. Once, indeed but no matter. " " Come s
842. Calpurnius puffed himself out, by having a guest br" posed to know more about Ch
843. more about Chrit- for the most trifling stakes, and Torquatus generally won. Fu
844. " he sn.id at length, as if recollecting " was not that the narae that Cassianus
845. ho struck that nico Christian boy Pauing up to Corviuus, work by a look. They be
846. t. Corvinus was on the point of bursting into a rage vius checked him by a gestu
847. rquatus's interest hi the game deepening. sufficient skill to make his antagonis
848. ion), and to-morrow you will be standing before his father's tribunal to die for
849. es, and saw it was only Corvinus staring at him. All his skill was now put forth
850. tus, "only neither of those was wavering grace had already departed. of covetous
851. ide him and said, in a soft and soothing come back, and brought with him seven s
852. lay with, if you will only do my bidding." "And what is that?" wine, into a phre
853. ed among your friends; act as if nothing had happened; but Each answer all my qu
854. er all my questions, tell me every thing." the money, and placed opposite an equ
855. ilent till Fulvius aroused him by asking, "Well, have you made your choice; eith
856. t will you do?" asked Fulvius, mastering him with one of his falcon glances. ' ;
857. death by inches, I hear Corvinus pacing impatiently up and down the court. Quic
858. t to be ?" "Not death! Oh, no! any thing but that! " Fulvius went out, and found
859. us went out, and found his friend fuming with rage and wine; he had hard work to
860. . hopeless," continued the voice; Having sent Corvinus sulky and fretting home,
861. Having sent Corvinus sulky and fretting home, he returned your religion, and yo
862. e might "No, no," groaned the despairing wretch. "Yes; in your drunkenness you h
863. m his chair, and endeavoured, by walking" you have betrayed." up and down, to st
864. But it was in vain his head was swimming from his inebriety, " " and his subsequ
865. must beg too, and his heart was beating almost audibly. Shame, reyour bread. Yo
866. for it; yet you will not be wor- coming hi turn uppermost. shipped by them as o
867. ken couch, crite, Torquatus, and nothing more." and buried his burning brow in h
868. nd nothing more." and buried his burning brow in his icy hands, and groaned. " "
869. and round hJTn and a constant tormenting me ? looked up. Fulvius was standing wi
870. ing me ? looked up. Fulvius was standing with folded arms at his side. moaning s
871. ng with folded arms at his side. moaning sounded in his ears. "And if all this b
872. DET DE BIANOBA/ The other son was making a rough design, in which could be riire
873. evidently for a more permanent painting elsewhere. Further, it was clear, that
874. the door, old Diogenes was busy fitting a new handle to an old These varied occ
875. ns have considered the fonsor as forming a lesser ecclesiastical order in the pr
876. she earnestly begins to arm her- meeting self, we date the second period of our
877. The uniform system pursued in excavating, arauthority. ranging and filling up of
878. sued in excavating, arauthority. ranging and filling up of the numerous cemeteri
879. vating, arauthority. ranging and filling up of the numerous cemeteries round Bor
880. tem, too, so complete from the beginning, as not to leave positive signs of impr
881. any, which made a speculation of burying the dead, but rather a pious and recogn
882. for the purpose. A series of interesting inscriptions, found in the cemetery of
883. s; grandfather, father, and sons, having carried it on in the same place, t We c
884. nd rather chill, might be seen threading his way through the narrow alleys of th
885. uble. He looked for the neatest dwelling in the street; and being particularly s
886. eatest dwelling in the street; and being particularly struck with the cleanlines
887. ere with him. The first was busy carving, or scratching rather, a rude epitaph m
888. he first was busy carving, or scratching rather, a rude epitaph mi an old slab o
889. itill cemeteries. Capitol: The following inscription is preserved in the EMPTV L
890. " Oh, no," answered the artist, looking up and smiling, them for poor people, w
891. wered the artist, looking up and smiling, them for poor people, who cannot affor
892. ous thought struck me as " I was carving her epitaph. " Let me hear it, Majlis."
893. es. But what is your reason for thinking thus?" How differently one would wish t
894. use I would sooner commit to the beeping of memory of the pious poor than that o
895. ts simplicity is worth much fine writing. that slab against the wall ?" " Ah, th
896. now quite cheerful. 'That is not saying much for yourself, father," rejoined hi
897. ather," rejoined his son no less smiling; "but here is the copy of the inscripti
898. tion which you wrote," he added, drawing out a parchment from a number of sheets
899. t, perfectly," said Pancratius, glancing over go to the cemetery at the Lady Agn
900. ook a light to it, and is to and reading it as follows, correcting the errors in
901. to and reading it as follows, correcting the errors in orthography, but not thos
902. comrade younger than As we were closing the tomb himseif lying in the same bed.
903. s we were closing the tomb himseif lying in the same bed. of Bestitutus, the bod
904. d, and saw the old man vigorously trying to cut off the end of a little wedge wh
905. his vision, which he removed by drawing the back of his " What is the brawny ha
906. cf lime have been found in tombs forming exact moulds of different parts of the
907. and sweet. It is a very different thing, and requires a heart as " hardened as
908. to wrap them hurriedly in their winding sheet, then fold them into another shee
909. tomb was discovered unvlolated. On being the bones, white, bright, and polished
910. lished asivory were found, corresponding to the framework of a youth of eighteen
911. with you, who know them so well. Nothing would give me greater pleasure." answer
912. l ,r , an;,,M,,,.,,uH.tenes,forourcoming rouble Our holy Pope w i,l be t,u,,, ,i
913. Paucratius ?" " One public scene, taking part in general affairs. Her house, bes
914. eneral affairs. Her house, besides being, or rather containing, a title or paroc
915. use, besides being, or rather containing, a title or parochial church, was now h
916. rochial church, was now honored by being the residence of the supreme Pontiff. T
917. which affords little scope for appearing on a or acter n seems to Diogenes rebuk
918. n seems to Diogenes rebuked him, saying, "That he comes to us in company is sec
919. rnest. What makes them ordinary dwelling, securer asylum. For this purpose Lucin
920. her great delight, in that the following pontificate, when the wild beasts were
921. nly a trifle, indeed. But as I was going early to the cemetery this morning, I t
922. going early to the cemetery this morning, I turned into the Baths of Antoninus."
923. "What!" interrupted Pancratius, laughing, "do you fre- quent such fashionable re
924. sick and poor of her own sex, the making, and keeping in order of sacred vestmen
925. of her own sex, the making, and keeping in order of sacred vestments and linen
926. f children and female converts preparing for baptism, as well as the attending t
927. ng for baptism, as well as the attending them at that sacred rite, belonged to t
928. them next?" and moreover they are making a tomb for Its main object themselves i
929. ch over is," said the latter, exhibiting it, as follows him, and pray for him, w
930. ANTONINIANAS. * in the epitaph building, then," Severus, not a little surprised
931. t the blunders " but we are " forgetting Torquatus. " I was entered the said ; e
932. said ; employment. Early in the morning of the appointed day, the meeting menti
933. orning of the appointed day, the meeting mentioned in our last chapter took plac
934. l instructions were given for increasing the collection of alms, to be employed
935. ion of alms, to be employed in enlarging the cemeteries and burying the dead, in
936. in enlarging the cemeteries and burying the dead, in succoring those driven to
937. eries and burying the dead, in succoring those driven to concealment by persecun
938. iven to concealment by persecunourishing prisoners, and obtaining access to them
939. rsecunourishing prisoners, and obtaining access to them, ransoming or rescuing t
940. and obtaining access to them, ransoming or rescuing the bodies of martyrs. A no
941. ng access to them, ransoming or rescuing the bodies of martyrs. A notary was nam
942. , or titular priests, record interesting events. ceived instructions about the a
943. rticularly of the Holy Eucharist, during the persecution ; and to each was intru
944. Severus," returned Pancratius, blushing deeply as yet in the faith, and is youn
945. name, one easily slurred in pronouncing it. tutatai t Silly was the f "11 age,
946. CATACOMBS. otherwise, under the exciting forebodings of a cution. No commanding
947. g forebodings of a cution. No commanding officer of << . coming perse>n The man
948. on. No commanding officer of << . coming perse>n The man who wishes keep his exc
949. was and the supply of what he is seeking. And all this we find in own house, the
950. own house, the arenaria still abounding around Homo, lint the assembly. The sha
951. y contrary to all at his these. pointing to mid-day, as he issued from it with h
952. with his sons, and found already waiting the three young men. They walked in par
953. * they entered by various ways (slipping round different tombs that lined the ro
954. terns, and the instruments for procuring light. Severus proposed that, as the gu
955. esides, they will wish to know something of the subsequent history of those wond
956. would imply, merely to lead to something else. They are themselves the catacomb
957. easure, that probable the body was lying by the side of the grave, while this wa
958. side of the grave, while this was being dug. When the corpse, wrapped up, as we
959. vided into three porfrom their beginning to the period of our narrative, or a ti
960. reason to hope that a new epoch is being commenced. We have generally avoided us
961. mmenced. We have generally avoided using the name of catacombs, because it might
962. them that of Ad Catacumbaa,^ The meaning of this word is completely unknown thou
963. the relics of S8. Peter and Paul having been for a time Hermes, &c. ; catacombs
964. is no evidence of the Christians having ever buried buried there, in a crypt te
965. came the name generalized, till existing near the cemetery. This of that particu
966. st century, a subject of controFollowing two or three vague and equivocal passag
967. , made to extract sand, for the building of the city. These sand-pits were calle
968. arly made by the and speaks of our being buried with Him in baptism, it was natu
969. to be ready to rise with Him. This lying in wait for resurrection was the second
970. onnected with them alluded to the rising The again. word to in peace," " the dep
971. or again, as a pledge, or precious thing, intrusted to but faithful, bury is unk
972. wros, Ad Sexlum Phil- temporary, keeping. The very name of cemetery suggests tha
973. many lie, as in a dormitory, slumbering for a while, till dawn come, and Hie tr
974. loculus. cement. much prized for making 38 ideas, catacombs, w< FABIOLA; which
975. IOLA; which are combined in the planning <>f <>!' These two the lastly, but must
976. ly, but must have been custom of burning the dead inspired abhorrence of the pag
977. n its earlier times. They for expressing a prayer for the refreshment of the fil
978. ll up the pen-lions of the words wanting, from departed. the falling out of part
979. ords wanting, from departed. the falling out of part of the plaster. Wo Christia
980. es The style of paintings, yet remaining, of their early origin. Their symbols,
981. belongs to a period of still flourishing art. the symbolical taste itself, are c
982. r De Bossi, about from the early bearing consular dates, through every period, t
983. emperors Another curious and interesting custom furnishes us with dates on tombs
984. s us with dates on tombs. At the closing of the grave, the relations or friends,
985. , if want of space prevented death being given, we should prefer chronicling the
986. eing given, we should prefer chronicling the year to the No It is more historica
987. it occurred. one cares about remembering the day on which a person died without
988. inscriptions mingled together, belonging " Deposition of dead. One in Greek, aft
989. of dead. One in Greek, after mentioning the the Calends, or 1st of Augenda on t
990. Greek letters markable, first, for being in Latin, ; then, for contain!: " .iony
991. sit. It is clear that pilgrims resorting to Borne would want a handto the cemete
992. ey It is likewise may have sought giving exist, iiu but before mentioning them w
993. giving exist, iiu but before mentioning them we will glance at the changes whic
994. alls were built to support the crumbling in galleries; and, from time to time, f
995. r their entrances, generally the leading immediately to the principal tomb, then
996. he church. The pilgrim thus, on arriving the holy city, visited each of these ch
997. sed; descended below, and without having about, went direct, by well-constructed
998. bjects of reverence and devotion. During this period, no tomb was allowed to be
999. es to the catacombs the more interesting because they take different rounds, yet
1000.which took place in the catacombs during the si period of their history, we will
1001., from left to right, with the following letters : ; \NELII MARTYRIS The young C
1002.together with the very phials containing them, sealed up in metal tubes. This je
1003.metal tubes. This jealousy of disturbing the saints, is displayed most beautiful
1004.bly through the luminare, or ventilating shaft, showered down earth and stones,
1005.vine manifestation. But instead of being permitted to enter again into this hall
1006.aken place while preparations were being made for oblation of the holy Eucharist
1007.arist, there were still to be seen lying about, the silver cruets in which the w
1008.rifice. \ mentioned concurred in placing it in the cemetery of Callistus, this,
1009.ornelius, there would be found something at the tomb which would account for tha
1010. or over, or at the sides. The remaining portion of the slab was found within it
1011.llistus be. cause, while ac'mlly writing this chapter, we have received news of
1012.eady mentioned, took pleasure in putting verses, which he loved to but the numbe
1013.the tombs of martyrs, || Below, reaching from the lower edge of this stone to th
1014.he left-hand end remains, the rest being broken off and lost. Above the tomb was
1015. With very limited means, they are going systematically to "Damasiau." The fragm
1016. marble bear portions of work, finishing as they advance. Nothing is taken from
1017.work, finishing as they advance. Nothing is taken from the but every thiug is re
1018.ne, We here see how a foreigner, reading these two inscriptions, upon the cataco
1019.e catacombs a truly imperial undertaking. It is time, however, for us to rejoin
1020.low, and with the portraits, and knowing that the Church commemorates finish our
1021. of St. Cornelius. see then, how, during the second period, new ornaments, as we
1022.COMBS. we are in any danger of mistaking these embellishments for the production
1023.hat we might as easily blunder by taking a Rubens for a Beato Angelico, as by co
1024. for a Beato Angelico, as by considering a Byzantine figure to be a production o
1025.r in hand, they have been slowly walking through a long straight gallery, crosse
1026.nd, of course, lectures, embodyfully ing what we have put together in our prosai
1027. turns we have passed by, before leaving this main gallery ?" " A great many," a
1028.arp look-out, and saw that he was making a mark in the sand. " Come, come along,
1029., as you do those of this ?" ; " pausing: How do you Strange it is, however, tha
1030.ance to the cemetery of Calthe one being a stable and bake-house, listus, almost
1031.r-holes, the spoliation practised during ages, by persons entering from vineyard
1032.actised during ages, by persons entering from vineyards through unguarded entran
1033.gh unguarded entrances, the mere wasting action of time and weather, have left u
1034. other Bide, on a narrow wall projecting at a right angle, are two more similar
1035.b. Those of two priests are thai nothing to escape his attention. At last they e
1036.rse aware of the custom of so performing them." *LEO PRB It IOANNIS PRR : may be
1037. PRB It IOANNIS PRR : may be interesting to add the entry in the Roman calendar
1038.c m of Lazarus. Here look, is a touching expression of the hope of our fathers i
1039.pe of our fathers in persecution - doing. "Well, then, Diogenes, explain them sy
1040.gh," resumed the excavator. "The ceiling is the oldest part of the painting, as
1041.iling is the oldest part of the painting, as is natural; for that was done when
1042.s the walls were decoYou see the ceiling has a rated, as tombs were hollowed out
1043. branches. There you see Orpheus sitting down, and playing sweet music, not only
1044.ou see Orpheus sitting down, and playing sweet music, not only to his own flock,
1045.gin," said the v " one finds the meaning in the worditst-lf its readily ; formin
1046.in the worditst-lf its readily ; forming the beginning of words, so as to mean '
1047.t-lf its readily ; forming the beginning of words, so as to mean 'Jesus Son of G
1048. food of all. Opposite is Moses striking the rock, from which all drank, and whi
1049.nd other pagan ornaments in this ceiling, and they belong generally to a very an
1050. wanderer from the Two more are standing at His sides; the truant ir.iii mi His
1051.at we have begun, and finish the ceiling. You see that figure on the right ?" "Y
1052. meant to in a chest, with a dove flying towards him. represent the Deluge ?" "
1053.tion of the world. Such is our beginning ; and here is our end Jonas thrown out
1054. swallowed by the whale and then sitting in enjoyment under his gourd. The resur
1055.h our Lord, ; ; ; ; ; ; Both ore leaning forward, and addr. to preach. sheep not
1056.in^ no heed to their words, but browsing quietly on, while one is turning up its
1057.rowsing quietly on, while one is turning up its eyes and head, looking and liste
1058.is turning up its eyes and head, looking and listening with attention. of Him Go
1059.its eyes and head, looking and listening with attention. of Him God, Kain is fal
1060.h attention. of Him God, Kain is falling copiously on them ; that is the grace I
1061.at ?" asked Torquatus, car he was losing time. ly; for he thought "It was, and i
1062.a place !" observed Pancratius, pointing to the other side ; " and here we have
1063. have another type of the same consoling doctrine." " Sic veneraricr ossa libet,
1064. mass, of his crimes, on truly repenting, may receive forgiveAnd. ness, through
1065.figure in adoration sented administering baptism. In another chamber just cleare
1066.s, such as masks, &c., and nshca bearing baskets of bread and flasks of wine, on
1067.esented to us in the Un a class, bearing a picture of tUis sceue the person stri
1068.icture of tUis sceue the person striking rook b1069.ady to run into the wilderness, to bring bock a called "But suppose," who hud be
1070.tians insult the Catholics for admitting to pardou. The Church is a mother, with
1071.r arms ever open to reembrace her erring children," There was a tear trembling i
1072.ng children," There was a tear trembling in Torquatus's eye his lips quivered wi
1073. cool ness, "It is certainly a consoling doctrine for those that need ; thought
1074.for those that need ; thought of putting before some or other of them the myster
1075.rious sentences, but she could not bring herself to do it. A lady, whose life wa
1076.zzle her; but she shrank from submitting it to her: it felt profane to do so. A
1077.very; but it seemed to contain something higher than he could (il'ten it," momen
1078.ace had been foraud that some despairing thought had quenched a flash of hope, i
1079. aud Majus, who had been absent, looking at a new place for opening a gallery ne
1080.sent, looking at a new place for opening a gallery near, Severus alone observed
1081.le." The unconscious excavator was going to lead the way, the inexorable artist
1082.ctly calm, as she looked up from reading. "That writing," said her mistress, " I
1083.he looked up from reading. "That writing," said her mistress, " I got at Chromat
1084.:m arcosolium, with a beautiful painting. You see here the Virgin Mother holding
1085.. You see here the Virgin Mother holding her Divine Infant in her arms, : verse
1086.erally we only reckon three, are adoring Him."* All admired the painting; but po
1087. adoring Him."* All admired the painting; but poor Severus was much chagrined at
1088.oor Severus was much chagrined at seeing how his good father had unwittingly sup
1089.ure clue to the desired turn, by calling his attention to the tomb close round i
1090.r do you respect Aristides, for obliging a boorish enemy, by writing, when asked
1091.for obliging a boorish enemy, by writing, when asked, his own name, on the shell
1092.not all be heroes ?" asked Syra laughing. city?" " I venerate both, most truly,
1093.t man observed to his brother, remarking, trouble yet: I strongly suspect him."
1094. they determined to prepare for changing the road, by blocldng up the present on
1095. blocldng up the present one and turning For this purpose they had the sand of o
1096.hange. were. It is very pleasant reading about the feats of such wonderful peopl
1097.ould like to find a baby she was nursing, CHAPTER V. ABOVE QBOUND. To recover ou
1098.an old write might have Reveritl playing with, or strangling, serpents in the cr
1099.ave Reveritl playing with, or strangling, serpents in the cradle ? I should' be
1100.tleman whom I invited to dinner, telling me coolly he had that morning killed a
1101.r, telling me coolly he had that morning killed a minotaur, or strangled a hydra
1102.ed a hydra; or to have a friend offering to send the Tiber through my stables, t
1103.t is found, limp au- idea." representing our Lord "It ii usually dated, il us gi
1104.unt thorn out, or down, with unrelenting assiduity. Tl prefect* or governors of
1105. posterity, when he checks his pas- ring the reign of Nero, the wealthy senator,
1106.u in the ; vicinity of Koine. Stretching across the wavy Campu^nn, hro bestrided
1107. and bespangled all over with glittering villas, set like gems in the dark green
1108.and cypress, the eye reached, at evening, the But who sees, cares for, sions, an
1109.culnm, with "their daughters," according to oriental phrase, basking brightly in
1110.," according to oriental phrase, basking brightly in the setting sun. The craggy
1111. phrase, basking brightly in the setting sun. The craggy range of Sabine mountai
1112.andscape. November, convoked the meeting in which his plans had finally to be' a
1113.is plans had finally to be' ad- planning to extirpate, and become, retaining its
1114.ning to extirpate, and become, retaining its nn1115.e of the To it were summoned the leading officers of his court, Lateran Basilica
1116.eran Basilic*. ; It would be attributing to Maximian a quality which he did not
1117.s, were we to give him credit for loving a residence so admirably situated, thro
1118.ned, or possibly the facility of running out of the city for is worth a whole ph
1119.se of DELIBEBATIONS. justice, or feeling of humanity, this monster had never cea
1120.ersecution had now been some time raging in the East to oppress, persecute, and
1121.Galerius ; and the decree for enkindling him the coming persecution looked like
1122.the decree for enkindling him the coming persecution looked like an approaching
1123.g persecution looked like an approaching it throughout the West, had reached Max
1124.e tufts of to spare no one ; but cutting off the cliiefs of the religion first,
1125.gion first, with eyes restlessly rolling in a compound expression of to descend
1126.il, in which secrecy was en the crushing blow. by penalty of death. In the semic
1127.s counsellors, adorned, almost trembling advisers. A chosen body of guards kept
1128.ficer in command, Sebastian, was leaning lished simultaneously in every province
1129.en burst suddenly upon them, discharging upon and which he afterwards gave, with
1130.nd done much mischief to the neighboring plains there an earthquake had thrown d
1131. ; at the south, the plague was ravaging the pious population. In every instance
1132.cles had declared, that it was all owing to the Christians, whoso toleration irr
1133.ould rather hear of a new rival starting up to my throne, than of the election o
1134.his speech, delivered in a harsh grating voice, and with a Then turning sharp up
1135.h grating voice, and with a Then turning sharp upon Tertullus, the emperor said:
1136.d some one to propose for superintending whom made these arrangements, and for m
1137.these his own long-winded oration during which Maximian gave un- traitors." " He
1138.s handed East had held a similar meeting, he considered it his duty the youthful
1139.he ten-thousandth time, to an applauding assembly the and said: " I think he'll
1140.ted their votaries by openly proclaiming, that they would utter no more, till th
1141., and for its complete and exterminating execution. fect, ; murdering and eating
1142.terminating execution. fect, ; murdering and eating infants, of committing foul
1143. execution. fect, ; murdering and eating infants, of committing foul of worshipp
1144.dering and eating infants, of committing foul of worshipping martyrs' bodies, of
1145.fants, of committing foul of worshipping martyrs' bodies, of adoring an ass's cr
1146. worshipping martyrs' bodies, of adoring an ass's crimes, head, and inconsistent
1147.head, and inconsistently enough of being unbelievers, and serving no God. These
1148.enough of being unbelievers, and serving no God. These tales were all most firml
1149.und heathen lies, very useful in keeping up a horror stories of : Upon my word,
1150.son. I should think he is just the thing; every quality of a thorough-paced, unc
1151. stamped upon his features. Then turning to Corvinus, who was scarlet with rage,
1152.I must have clean work of it; no hacking and hewing, no blundering. I of Christi
1153. clean work of it; no hacking and hewing, no blundering. I of Christianity. pay
1154.it; no hacking and hewing, no blundering. I of Christianity. pay up well, if I a
1155.ods." their own books, and to be drawing up a confutation of their The emperor r
1156.ness, but with real very idea, of taking his word for his own belief, against th
1157. up a different strain, and his learning quite aston- sure about. He had seen, f
1158.e about. He had seen, from the beginning, that his coming He had read the origin
1159.een, from the beginning, that his coming He had read the original books, he to R
1160.e- knew not fully the cause. who, having come into Egypt in the reign of had ple
1161.n their own without Dioclesian's sending him more from Asia, though this through
1162.the spy upon himself, >ued them, telling them, that as they had eaten up all and
1163. his should live on the straw, by making bricks with court. While, therefore, he
1164.trusted and disliked him, which building a great city. nn them of a great many c
1165.r ances- in him was equivalent to hating him. It was some compensahut up Moses a
1166.more polished ; ; , ; i in tower, having shaved half their beards, till they sho
1167.y on them. This uade war upon every king and people, that came in their deeds, n
1168.- their eggs for me. I have seen nothing of this so far and yet city, to put eve
1169.in business. so that when a certain king Saul, called also Paul, These Christian
1170. under the may have to look at something very sharp before you. The domination o
1171.less I see particular reasons for taking the empire, burn us all in the Forum, a
1172., as rudely as himself, in the following terms " None of your smooth, put-on loo
1173.black slave, as he could without causing unnecessary suffering. We have already
1174.ld without causing unnecessary suffering. We have already observed, that of the
1175.so generous, so brave, yet so unboasting ; so mild, so kind in act and speech, s
1176.lfish and so careful of others, blending so completely in one character noblenes
1177.ld death find us, though not t,v.< doing oar duty, oven if not to its part," res
1178.page." Sebastian shook his head, smiling, and said, " The last page therefore, i
1179.those epithets. joyed by an anticipating fancy. I speak of vulgar death, as it S
1180.f vulgar death, as it Sebastian, fearing rather the physical, than the moral, ac
1181.common with the poorest slave; consuming tivity of Afra's drugs, thought it righ
1182. to inform her of the me by slow burning fever, wasting me by long, lingering co
1183.of the me by slow burning fever, wasting me by long, lingering concompact betwee
1184.ing fever, wasting me by long, lingering concompact between the two dabblers hi
1185.black art, the princi- sumption, racking me by slowly eating ulcers; nay, if you
1186.i- sumption, racking me by slowly eating ulcers; nay, if you pal efficacy of whi
1187.h, however, seemed to consist in drawing please, by the still crueller inflictio
1188. comes from a hand that I love." nothing of what related to the Christians in th
1189.pised. prove that she was only deceiving her victim. But she certainly felt indi
1190.t she certainly felt indignant at having been bargained about by two such vile c
1191. by two such vile characters, and having been represented as a grasping, avarici
1192.nd having been represented as a grasping, avaricious her heart beat at the unusu
1193. not diminished, when, after apologizing for his seeming intrusion, he remarked
1194. when, after apologizing for his seeming intrusion, he remarked with a smile, th
1195.emarked with a smile, that, well knowing how sufficiently she was already annoye
1196.lt regret at the idea, that he was going to add another, yet undeclared, to her
1197.she was soon depressed again, upon being told, it was the vulgar and stupid Corv
1198.You no doubt glorious fate, on receiving in the enemy, and falling covered with
1199., on receiving in the enemy, and falling covered with honor. You look to the sol
1200.h, comes more mercifully, and are musing on a more front full sheaves of arrows
1201.picure, when the doors of the banqueting-hall are thrown wide open, and he sees
1202., and he sees beyond them tha glittering table, and its delicious viands, :< wit
1203.ct her to her new homo, will my exulting heart be, when death, under whatever fo
1204.new and p rennial life. gifts, to coming with rich of you to come thus of how gr
1205.t I should have done for any human being save him, if possible, from pain or dan
1206. I hope you mean," said Fabiola, smiling; " otherwise I fear your whole lif e wo
1207.d. "Let him enter The messenger came ing left his tired in, covered with dust, a
1208.n principles': 1 Her hand trembled ening its as she took it ; and while she was
1209.id her Fnbiola in a gloomy and searching form. l 'her father? lit'.' \Yhither wa
1210.cs gathered round the courier, listening to the dei.iils of their master's death
1211.r seemed to have a melancholy foreboding that letter of i The s they would meet
1212.ed himself obliged to stay, while ; Ming fitted up, and stored with the best win
1213. only child. In fine, the body waa being embalmed when the courier started, and
1214.ought by his galley to Ostia. On hearing this sad tale, Sebastian was almost sor
1215.s of a boundless ocean of black seething waves, on which floated no living thing
1216.ething waves, on which floated no living thing save herself. Her woe seemed utte
1217. waves, on which floated no living thing save herself. Her woe seemed utter and
1218. to what they deemed a -sion of alarming fits and convulsions. At length she sat
1219.ons. At length she sat up, pale, staring, and tearless, gently pushing aside the
1220.e, staring, and tearless, gently pushing aside the at tried to administer restor
1221.ars were whispered of her brain becoming opThe physician, who had been called, u
1222." She started, fell back, and a bursting flood of tears relieved her heart and h
1223. till ioli the turn of tears, in nursing her shattered mind and ; which Sebastia
1224.d at the door, as a genius with drooping head, and torch reversed. Science had s
1225. and then prate or babble and, shrugging its shoulders, own, that the problem wa
1226. mystery still veiled. Oh, for something, or some one, better than all these, to
1227. heart of Fabiola, her slave is enjoying the vision of light, clothed in mortal
1228.tal form, translucid and radiant, rising from the grave as from an alembic, in w
1229. qualiities of matter, without impairing the essence of its nature. Spiritualise
1230. another from hind and sea; from reeking cemetery, and from beneath consecrated
1231.or God; like crystal fountains springing into the air, like brilliant signal-lig
1232.peoples creation with joyous and undying life. And how knows she this ? Because
1233.radle, and made infancy sacred rendering also death a holy thing, and its place
1234.sacred rendering also death a holy thing, and its place a He went into it sanctu
1235. it sanctuary. in the darkest of evening, and He came forth from it in the brigh
1236.orth from it in the brightest of morning He was laid there wrapped in spices, an
1237.cast. The time was not come for speaking of these things to Fabiola. She mourned
1238.ow honest a But the Christian sat loving a father he had been. -ik gentle and so
1239.her he had been. -ik gentle and soothing words to her IT with an active delicacy
1240.spices of Arabia, ended in her gathering up a few haudfuls of charred bones, whi
1241.he funeral oration ; in which, according to the fashionable ideas of the day, he
1242.all day, and were stealthily insinuating their dangerous principles into every n
1243.s into every noble family, and spreading disloyalty and immorality in y class. F
1244.n philosophers differed, was now basking on a green bank in Elysium, and quaffin
1245.on a green bank in Elysium, and quaffing nectar. "And oh 1" concluded the old wh
1246.ar. "And oh 1" concluded the old whining hypocrite, who would have been sorry to
1247.he mystery of I, his humble client, ding in the dark cloud that overshadowed her
1248.E CATACOMBS. good lost, 47 to a gambling-hall in Thermae, ,-y, lint Their meetin
1249.eir meetings were early and late; during tin- .lay ho wag left free, lest he sho
1250.r seemed injustice, fraud, over-reaching and oppression, in thn transactions of
1251.the history of Torquatus. On the morning after his fall, he found, on awakIt was
1252. on awakIt was the falconer, who, having ing, Fulvius at his bed-side. got hold
1253.awakIt was the falconer, who, having ing, Fulvius at his bed-side. got hold of a
1254.mory every circumstance of the preceding night's debauch, his utter ruin, and on
1255.and only means of escape. With unfeeling precision he strengthened every thread
1256.gthened every thread of the last evening's the Pontiff intended to officiate. Th
1257. of perdition. Corvinus, after receiving his report, and making from it a rough
1258., after receiving his report, and making from it a rough chart of the cemetery,
1259.t, with the principal clergy and lending Christians of Rome. Once possessed of t
1260.ise would conceal them from his piercing eyes and he would easily pick them up,
1261.t of treason, he should want for nothing. "You are hot and feverish," at last co
1262.ou my father's : upon Torquatus's taking him as his companion to the great funct
1263.e an excellent opportunity at the coming ordination in that very mouth of Decemb
1264.at grim old foreman, Catulus, is opening the doors." become familiar with the Th
1265.d deacons, and prewe have been polishing up of late." conized, as it is called,
1266.rpose. and no end of horrors, explaining everything with such hearty good-will,
1267.no end of horrors, explaining everything with such hearty good-will, of jokes no
1268.lustrations of what he described, having once almost caught his ear in a pair of
1269.n chair with a furnace in it for heating it, large boilers for hot oil or scaldi
1270.t, large boilers for hot oil or scalding-water baths ; Marcellinus, under whose
1271.n different years. is ladles for melting lead, and pouring it neatly into the mo
1272. is ladles for melting lead, and pouring it neatly into the mouth pincers, hooks
1273. iron comba of varied shapes, for laying bare ; the ribs knobs were of ; ; scorp
1274.es, and fetters of tho most torment; ing make all in fine, swords "knives, and a
1275.an anticipation much enjoyment in seeing them used on those hard-headed and thic
1276.but think that tho a will be interesting to the Christian antiquary. Nor can our
1277.n Church be complete without our knowing the favored spot where Pontiil Pontiff
1278.sion the apostles who converted our King Lucius to the ; faith. The house which
1279.session, we will follow a learned living antiquarian, who, intent upon anotb for
1280.urest writers, when he sings the wedding-song of these two virtuous ; and used e
1281.., from 142 to 157, forms an interesting period in its history, for two reasons.
1282.hurch First, that Pope, without altering the character of the made a title;* and
1283. dinalate attached to the church. having- collated to tiinln.1 J'astoris, itself
1284.ia, and St. Justin. as well By comparing his writings with his Acts,t we From th
1285.use, then, went come to some interesting conclusions respecting Christian worall
1286. some interesting conclusions respecting Christian worall the brethren salute th
1287.ith circumstances peculiarly interesting. This Pope, then, did two things. First
1288.lvius and Corvinus met early one morning. tus and Timotheus were the brothers of
1289.itle. will be apparent to anyone looking at tion of these two acts had enjoyed a
1290.ii.; where, after Jacob i, Jacob arising ^ the top of it.'"i it up f.,r a title.
1291.n, in it, was consecrated by the pouring of oil altar, set up law of Evaristus i
1292. remains 'in full force) Two interesting facts are elicited from this narrative.
1293.s, that the one altar till then existing altar used by St. Peter, It was, iu fac
1294.ilica, of which ; ; i ; . while sleeping with a stone for his pillow, we are tol
1295.re told This is is this place. trembling he said, How terrible that, And the hou
1296.no other than and set . . in the morning, took the stone " would suggest it. Now
1297.is apology, describsaw it, he speaks ing the Christian liturgy, of course such a
1298. of course such as he of the officiating priest in terms that sufficiently descr
1299.pastor of the place ; not only by giving a title applied to bishops in antiquity
1300.bishops in antiquity,! but by describing him as the person who has the care of o
1301. : \\i Lector or reader, mid of ExToting example of each. Of a ;>gi' that virgin
1302.although thin, the nubile age, according to Koman law, was the one at which such
1303. first act probably consisted of nothing more than receiving from the hands of p
1304.consisted of nothing more than receiving from the hands of parents a plain durk
1305.r holy purjv by her more solemn blessing, t A pi rsecution of the most strange c
1306.e character was on the point of breaking out, w.,ich would not spare the most te
1307.His chaste spouses for Torqnatus, having the necessary pass-word, entered, accom
1308.who soon showed himself expert in acting as others did around liiin. The assembl
1309.ore than the rest, he fixed his piercing actions, blending itself so gracefully
1310. he fixed his piercing actions, blending itself so gracefully eye, with the simp
1311.ent and guileless childhood, renstudying his every gesture, look, voice, and lin
1312.n the possession of that nerve which ing danger gave her, to a more than usual r
1313.rd characteristic which could fulfilling of her desire. petition. have betrayed
1314. there is no doubt that when officiating at the growing between her and Syra, fr
1315.ubt that when officiating at the growing between her and Syra, from the first in
1316.ave described between them. This feeling had been ina distinctive robe, the fore
1317.d authority. On him who now stood facing the assembly, before the tirely left in
1318.n her hands. It was evidently prospering, owing to the prudence and grace with w
1319.ands. It was evidently prospering, owing to the prudence and grace with which it
1320. action, his tones, almost his breathing, till he said to himself, "If he stirs
1321.ola, she contented herself with admiring and approving what her cousin related o
1322.nted herself with admiring and approving what her cousin related of Syra's conve
1323.Agnes as a relation, had put on mourning upon Fabiua's death; and hence no chang
1324.n in his daughter's mind of their having taken some secret, or some joint step.
1325.d. "And so," said the latter, pretending to be displeased, " vou want to keep al
1326. proved, with such abundance of learning; "Cinnamius Opas Lector of the title "M
1327.u you veil, can," replied Syra, laughing. " Never mind about the seeing. But tel
1328. laughing. " Never mind about the seeing. But tell me, how will From St. Paul's.
1329.ted on the doctrine of St. Paul, writing to the Corinthians on the superiand he
1330.er state scribed the happiness of having no love on earth but one, which instead
1331.n earth but one, which instead of fading, opens out into immortality, in heaven.
1332.the candi1. ; "How ?" " very interesting 1 she said. "And what have you m nrnusp
1333. so before. I am afraid you are becoming quite worldly." 'Never you mind," repli
1334.y with the cheerful lady about something which delighted her. When she left she
1335.ived. She found him at home; and casting herself on her knees before him, talked
1336. had not yet been written; but something very like it rang in the blind girl's h
1337.nt to her humble home. The happy morning at length arrived, and before daybreak
1338.. All seemed ended ; and Agnes, kneeling at the foot of the altar, was motionles
1339.s in one of her radiant raptures, gazing fixedly upwards while Syra, near her, w
1340.depths of her gentle humility, wondering how she should have been found worthy o
1341.absorbed were both in their thanksgiving, that they perceived not a slight commo
1342.on through the assembly, as if something unex; had evidently retired with the pe
1343.ly retired with the pected was occurring. They were aroused by the bishop repeat
1344.hey were aroused by the bishop repeating the question: "My daughter, what dost t
1345.wia bright Delight, although the glowing east without foretold cember day. On th
1346.nd silver lamps of great value, throwing an atmosphere of mild radiance upon the
1347.t voices, like those of angels, chanting in soft cadence a hymn which anticipate
1348.na, who soon consoled her, by suggesting to her the possiShe promised to furnish
1349. promised to furnish bility of obtaining a similar grace. all that was necessary
1350. into a circle, and presented it, saying: " I have no flowers to offer to my bri
1351.ere emerged appeared two, whose dazzling white garments shone the These were the
1352.s in those who wear them " duced nothing better than these. She saw not, with he
1353.omeutan way lies a gracefully undulating ground. Amidst this is situated a pictu
1354.lled to a distance i-.nd who WHH sitting alone in a bright sunny spot, with old
1355. sunny spot, with old Molossus crouching at her feet. Tho slightest approach to
1356.s with look up t'niiii her work of tying together such h.-r, n.iide after ; l>.
1357.cated to St. Agnes. the \ ilia belonging to her, situated about a mile and a hal
1358.rer scarcely the summer sun ; everything in it breathed contentment and happines
1359.sphere transparent, the sunshine glowing, and the heavens cloudless. A few greyi
1360.loudless. A few greyish curls of melting smoke from the cottages, and the leafle
1361.ne told that it was December. Everything seemed to know and love the gentle mist
1362.Agnes, borne back in mind to the morning's scene " and no sun iu my life has eve
1363. down, he would lie at her feet, looking into her face, delighted to receive, on
1364. himself."* "And who is this happy being? I was not without hopes, nor will I re
1365.he is crazed, Fulvius was just beginning to think when the inspired look of her
1366.ook heart. He resolved at once to coming near the spot where this happy group we
1367.sue " "Madam," he said, you are trifling with one who sincerely brightness of he
1368. sincerely brightness of heaven, hanging over her who seemed to hold all admires
1369.utual friend departed, thV Yet unwilling to intrude herself unverification of he
1370.e, and yourself not opposed to my urging my claims, to your hand. Hot with her o
1371.ere and warm." she could not help asking herself why she the grounds. Still "Beg
1372.e, ances of Fabius, that his fascinating address and brilliant orurrose, filled
1373.e, filled with spite and fury, at having been so completely ments had turned the
1374. said, "after the first days of mourning were over, and he respected the h.iviug
1375.uffered such a summary ejectment. Having ascertained " ijis' rue tola devotione
1376. the three spoke together of the morning's happiness, and of the happier morning
1377.'s happiness, and of the happier morning of which it was a pledge, above the liq
1378.ould cut them out when that next morning came, for she intended to be the first
1379., open, and guileher eyes mildly beaming, looked straight upon Fulvins's face wi
1380.orcm admit[l>id ipportunity for pressing his suit. Hi- >f tho I t " Mr'. cl lu<
1381. . \' \ lilm, to all (lie troops. itking us" of command, But to it, that "that d
1382.. I age?" turned round, and stood having walked for sometime about with Fabiola,
1383. wi;s NUMEN IMPERATORUM to : the cunning Corno Christian would the "Divinity of
1384.Divinity of the it, Empei The last thing which he did wns 1 make his rounds, giv
1385.ich he did wns 1 make his rounds, giving and most minutely to the one whom h." h
1386., are you, who, not conk-lit with having once thrust your- how he was to spare n
1387. another's house ?" " " who, by allowing my cousin to One," replied the lady, "A
1388. sabre, some one or other before morning. The night was raw and ; meet you first
1389.irst at her table, and there discovering your designs gusty, with occasional sha
1390.usty, with occasional sharp and slanting showers and the uponvan innocent child,
1391.hield her from them. occasionally taking a long pull at a tiask coucealed about
1392. took Agnes by the hand, and was leading her away and containing a liquor said t
1393. and was leading her away and containing a liquor said to be distilled from the
1394.lightedly, a gentle little tap to tating, not on the wood or river, by which his
1395.barians keep him from more than growling when Fulvius, gnashing were at play, bu
1396.ore than growling when Fulvius, gnashing were at play, but how soon it would be
1397.ack the city. " While all this was going on, old Diogenes and his hearty Haughty
1398.ouse in the Suburra, not far off, making preparations for their frugal meal. The
1399.tap at the door, followed by the lifting of the h.tch, and the entrance of the t
1400. young masters to honor my poor dwelling I hardly dare offer you our plain by ;
1401.offer you our plain by ; ! The day being at length arrived for its publication i
1402.commission intrusted to him, of affixing in its proper place in the Forum, the e
1403.er it, we shall be glad to eat something. In the meantime, one of your youths ca
1404.ss. Corvinus was determined that nothing of the sort should happen in Home for h
1405.yes of the citizens early in the morning, and strike their ininds with more trem
1406.a moderate cup of generous wine." Saying this he gave his purse to one. of the s
1407. of the sons, with instructions to bring home some better provisions than he kne
1408.at down and Pancratius, by way of saying something, addressed the old man. " Goo
1409.d Pancratius, by way of saying something, addressed the old man. " Good Diogenes
1410.ard Sebastian say that you re ber seeing the glorious Deacon Laurentius die for
1411.or Christ. Tell ; we must have something good self ; me precious document, Corvi
1412.nnoniau cohort, destroy the same cunning " With " It is now pleasure," answered
1413.nd his speech was so gentle, : something about him." ; a body composed of soldie
1414. ; a body composed of soldiers belonging to the fiercest raec?s of the North, Da
1415.d Ger- so soft, especially when speaking to the poor. How th. loved him I follow
1416.s the venerable Pontiff SixtuB was going to death, and Laurentius ! ; mans, whos
1417.:;>st faithful bodyguard of the reigning tyrants, often their own fellow-country
1418.st as a son n a father, for not allowing him to be his companion in the sacrific
1419. and writhed, and cracked, and crackling. indigent. "But tell me," asked Pancrat
1420. shrunk, first one letter or word coming up, then another first It must havebeeu
1421.. To look at his tender flesh blistering handful of ashes be scraped together, h
1422.er, hardly enough to fill a and breaking over the fire, and deeply scored with r
1423.fire, and deeply scored with red burning gilded urn ? And what also, in very few
1424. then to observe the tremulous quivering that these "unconquered" Augusti were b
1425.se "unconquered" Augusti were bolstering up by cruelty crept over the siuiV.ee o
1426.ver the siuiV.ee of his skin, the living motion which the aud injustice, how in
1427.ee ? the monuments of its grandeur lying in twitches which convulsed and gradual
1428.mbs; ashes, or in ruins, and proclaiming that there is no true Lord and that all
1429. all this, I own, was the most harrowing spectacle I have ever but one stronger
1430. His head was raised up from the burning body, forget all this. Something like t
1431.burning body, forget all this. Something like this did Sebastian think, perhaps,
1432. some gazed abstractedly on the expiring embers of the pompous and most celestia
1433. it; but the light from the fire shining upward, liest truths. They knew that if
1434.f they should be discovered, and passing through his golden locks, created a glo
1435.ven. so impressed with an eager, longing look, accompanying the quick and easy,
1436.ith an eager, longing look, accompanying the quick and easy, or lingering and pa
1437.panying the quick and easy, or lingering and painful, was the end for which upwa
1438.l, was the end for which upward glancing of his eye, that you would willingly ha
1439.hey looked and like brave soldiers going to battle, they did not speculate where
1440.ed. In truth, it had its ridicuany thing; for you are a fine stout soldier, accu
1441.ds. But as for me, I have only a willing heart to may. for he saw Pancratius Thi
1442. centurion, full of emotion, and looking tenderly on the youth, who with glishis
1443.the youth, who with glishis hands tening eyes, having risen from his seat, had p
1444.o with glishis hands tening eyes, having risen from his seat, had placed " God w
1445.your cloak, and It is a wet and bitbring your toga quite over your head; so ter
1446.ot midnight, and the hour for commencing the fast, preparatory to receiving the
1447.ncing the fast, preparatory to receiving the Quadratus's object, besides, Euchar
1448.you are about, I am sure it is something praise- if surprised, a kindness, in th
1449. was partly, that reason for their being there might be apparent, partly to keep
1450.re was no appearance of any such feeling. The conversa- tion soon turned upon re
1451.ered, and if Diogenes had seen any thing of the two inquired anxiously young men
1452.e had got a hint of what they were going to He was told they were expected hi a
1453. when hasty steps were heard approaching; the door was pushed open and was as qu
1454.ed, behind Quadratus and Paucratius. ing round, to avoid the Forum hi seeking hi
1455.ing round, to avoid the Forum hi seeking his own abode. If anyone had seen Pancr
1456. would have seen him every now preparing 6> retire and then almost laughing at s
1457.aring 6> retire and then almost laughing at some strange but pleasant adventure.
1458.undle it is," said the latter, producing, with a hearty laugh, of crumpled parch
1459.thm, in hie AT the first dawn of morning, Corvimis was up; and. notwithstanding
1460.g, Corvimis was up; and. notwithstanding the gloominess of the day, proceeded st
1461. ill OLA; OR Jess to nttcm;>t describing; his astonishment, his rnge, his fury,
1462.>:uvh- the nulls; ami beside it standing, in unconli-l't, ro'.uul scious stolidi
1463.d not seen, in the barbarian's twinkling eye, a sort of hyaana 1 meut yet there
1464.st, Master try, we will fight any living : it is a capital offence." Come it. th
1465.es, you blockhead, but there was writing upon it, which is gone. That is what yo
1466." "Why, look yon, captain, as to writing, you see I know nothing, having never b
1467.n, as to writing, you see I know nothing, having never been a scholar; but as it
1468. writing, you see I know nothing, having never been a scholar; but as it was rai
1469.er been a scholar; but as it was raining all night, it may have been washed out.
1470.been washed out." "And as it was blowing, I suppose the parchment on which to hi
1471. the first time confronted after looking at it for some moments, exclaimed: to l
1472.come up and speak to you, without giving the watchword." " Gently, captain, who
1473.te right." "Come, sir, this is no joking matter. Tell me, at once, who came here
1474." " Why, one of them was but a stripling, a boy, tall and thin; who went round t
1475.as not very cold, and that sort of thing. At last, I remembered that I had to ru
1476.e would have gained his ends, by putting a sharp, intelli' Nomen can't ; gent pr
1477.his waa "And you must contrive something to save me, if you true.) want to save
1478.shall have plenty of beer till the thing blows over." The soldier went off and c
1479.he transaction. Before, however, leaving the ill-omened spot in the Forum, he ha
1480. the ground, for any trace of the daring act ; when he picked up, close under th
1481." There don't you see it shinneighboring basilica, and said in the morning light
1482.boring basilica, and said in the morning light?" Corvinus looked, and ing on the
1483.morning light?" Corvinus looked, and ing on the tiles, an object, but there inde
1484. he was answered " He, or : When morning had from it, whatever it was, then with
1485.t of my hand, and by a sort of conjuring, whisked it out where you see it, as ea
1486. CATACOMJJ& all K know what a in tearing II " we "Then, again," resumed Calpurni
1487.ground on the othor side, without making any wound in her. He then hacked at the
1488.s found, asleep and unhurt, this morning, on the roof of the JEmilian basilica.
1489.of every crime, is capable of committing any." " And " this A by ; new and is th
1490.d us about these desperate raen, nothing can be too " severe against them. Fulvi
1491.nst them. Fulvius had been keenly eyeing Sebastian, who had entered during the c
1492.eyeing Sebastian, who had entered during the conversation ; and now pointedly ad
1493. should be allowed to join in destroying them, who could not prove himself freer
1494.d, a profligate, a thief. For with being one of these, no one charges the poor ;
1495.ken to Sebastian, at their first meeting, had ripened into hatred at their secon
1496. up ; no reason to suppose such a tiling impossible for only written in blood. H
1497.s. To prepare a powder that that feeling. Sebastian went out and his thoughts go
1498.nd even honest and learned men believing at ing to Pythagoras. These, being gath
1499. honest and learned men believing at ing to Pythagoras. These, being gathered wh
1500.eving at ing to Pythagoras. These, being gathered when the sun is in once every
1501.ery calumny spoken against us treasuring up, from Libra, the nature of which is
1502. fable and fiction about us and refusing even air, at the moment of conjunction
1503.contemptible ? He spoke aloud, believing himself alone, when a sweet voice a mor
1504.e to place, which must be done spreading thereon clay which, in man's hands, wou
1505.uld only have through blinded the seeing. Let us be as dust beneath His feet, if
1506.wish to become His means of enlightening the eyes of men's "Then, as to the Chri
1507.y from and kind rebuke. Whither tripping on so gaily on Chaldaa, a country alway
1508.Rome, a cejtain of Callistus? I am going to take possession. Simon, who was some
1509.I may be the first flower of this coming spring." And she passed on singing blit
1510.e the first flower of this coming spring." And she passed on singing blithely. B
1511.oming spring." And she passed on singing blithely. But Sebastian begged air but
1512.ebastian begged air but his charm having slipped out of his belt,' he fell and b
1513.uch times of trouble, that of preserving the blessed Eucharist in their houses,
1514.arist in their houses, :md communicating themselves privately in the morning, "b
1515.ting themselves privately in the morning, "before taking othei food," as Tertull
1516.privately in the morning, "before taking othei food," as Tertullian expresses it
1517.ine worship. But Corviuus, after getting over his first dismay, and having plot,
1518.etting over his first dismay, and having plot, to i- puliluMtion. ' l( as speedi
1519.see the dismal probabilities sheep going to the slaughter, not as criminals prep
1520.he slaughter, not as criminals preparing for execution, but as soldiers arming f
1521.ng for execution, but as soldiers arming for Their weapons, their food, their st
1522.upied by the zealous clergy in preparing their flocks for, to many, ; The faithf
1523.ss. He felt it necessary to do something that very day, which might wipe off the
1524.ce he had incurred, before again meeting the emperor's look. He determined to an
1525.the cemetery, intended for the following of serious consequences, ter. The Dacia
1526.e identical so that the Catholic hearing them recited, and still more the priest
1527.ited, and still more the priest reciting them, in the same language as the Boman
1528.e, may feel himself in active and living communion with the martyrs who celebrat
1529. On the occasion which we are describing, when the time came for giving the kiss
1530.escribing, when the time came for giving the kiss of peace a genuine embrace of
1531. him in expectation of Corvinus's coming to hold council with him. The worthy tr
1532.rag, thence the while Fulvius, remaining clergy and principal Christians outside
1533.t them and cut off all retreat, securing the most important prizes, and especial
1534.sufficient to make her very busy dusting and cleaning, in the retired room where
1535. make her very busy dusting and cleaning, in the retired room where they were co
1536. retired room where they were consulting, without appearing to listen. She told
1537. they were consulting, without appearing to listen. She told all to Cucumio and
1538.to Cucumio and he, after much scratching of his head, hit ; ; ; upon a notable p
1539. ; ; ; upon a notable plan for conveying the discovered information ; a parting
1540.g the discovered information ; a parting salutation. Many a youth clung to his f
1541.g to his father's neck, scarcely knowing whether that day might not sever them,
1542.ce, to do more, had proceeded, according to almost universal custom, to the bath
1543.e communion, more solemn than usual, ing might have excited. While he was thus e
1544.n," replied the receiver, with thrilling his wife had heard of the intention of
1545.ccents of faith and love. Then extending in his hand an of getting possession of
1546.Then extending in his hand an of getting possession of the holy Pontiffs person.
1547.hat, for the first events of the morning were being discussed, and where Fultime
1548.e first events of the morning were being discussed, and where Fultime, poor Syra
1549.of her rich embroidered vius was waiting, till Corvinus should tell him that all
1550. tell him that all was ready. Upon going out, disgusted, he felt himself, as he
1551.casion, and walked, pricked by something on the chest he examined his It was wri
1552.dict. The frequent meetings of TorHaving, however, found a fleeter and surer mes
1553.ped her, gave her the note, after adding a and Victoria had overheard the few wo
1554.lit'U, torn. iii. p. 20). time hastening across the fields, so as to avoid suspi
1555.an soldier, in a by-way, was instructing Inn blind messenger. When we accompanie
1556.with their banes . ( quatusknew, loading down by step* from u ing, choked up wit
1557.usknew, loading down by step* from u ing, choked up with faggots. '! h.ilf-riii.
1558.y altar, cemetery >>itals, communicating with the church by means of a funnel-sh
1559.by means of a funnel-shaped feet opening, piercing the earthen wall, here some t
1560.f a funnel-shaped feet opening, piercing the earthen wall, here some twelve at t
1561. here some twelve at thick, and entering the chamber, which is at a lower level,
1562.eight of five or six feet, in a slanting direction so that all that was spoken i
1563.n the church could be heard, yet nothing that was done there could be seen, by t
1564.onary. "I am a soldier, and not ar Bring me my man into the light of day, mid 1
1565. said, may be hundreds of these skulking Christians down thei we are little more
1566.screw uj> assured them there was nothing to fear that the cowardly Christians wo
1567.ged, year's pay would give them. groping down to the -bottom of the stairs. They
1568. tinguish lamps at intervals, stretching into the gloomy before them. " listen t
1569.ce !" " Hush !" said one, . faces having in it a small niche for an image or lam
1570.d be caught, as it intoned the following verses : : presbytery. half each other
1571.en came a full chorus of voices, singing, like th ; " Dominus illuminatio mea, ?
1572.he divine operation ; "what is hammering at a distance ? that strange noise, as
1573.ir by two uii ;irch. pillars, supporting C Con id1574." "No danger," * said Torqnatus. putting on a bold: - affording i entrance to th
1575.orqnatus. putting on a bold: - affording i entrance to the for the it. I). MuM'm
1576.mes from those old moles, busy preparing graves for the Chris- apparition. 'ight
1577.mpse ,[ but it was tlie shall glimmering of va'.n advised tlie troop not to brin
1578.of va'.n advised tlie troop not to bring torches, provide themselves with such l
1579.with such lamps ;:H we see Diogenes ying, in his picture, or waxen tapers, which
1580. ? What is it so like are they to living forms. ?" the men whispered to one put
1581. kept at the head of the party, counting every turning right and left, as he had
1582.ead of the party, counting every turning right and left, as he had noted them th
1583.taggered and baulked, when, after having counted little more than half the prope
1584.s brother and sevpr:'p.-ired for closing the road eral other stout workmen were
1585. 1, they set to work lustily, shovelling the sand across the v and low corridor
1586.arrier Sine, which closed up the opening. ood, hardly suppressing a laugh as the
1587. up the opening. ood, hardly suppressing a laugh as they heard their enemies thr
1588.d. possible I have mistaken my reckoning. I know the right turn by a remarkable
1589.ual cheer- ful gentleness. " shall Bring her along," he commanded pay for our di
1590. had she by a different, but neighboring entrance. descended than she snuffed th
1591. and delivered Sebastian's note ; adding It warned them to disperse and also wha
1592.ou." " No matter," she answered laughing " ; my being taken rcay save ' ; True b
1593.ter," she answered laughing " ; my being taken rcay save ' ; True but others can
1594.e started, reached her post, and hearing no noise ex; much worthier lives. Give
1595. cannot see by it," observed he, smiling. " His light and himself seemed to have
1596. "And where is Torquatus?" their blazing torches into the side galleries, one he
1597.if a triumphal illumination was kindling up He had no doubt whatever, in his own
1598.the whole gallery, aled tombs, receiving the unusual reflection on their yelcove
1599. He stood before her, therefore, putting on his most searching and awful look, a
1600.therefore, putting on his most searching and awful look, and said to" her sternl
1601. must tell you the truth without looking at yoTi, sir,'' answered the poor girl,
1602.before these foiled hounds with drooping heads had c-st But over the features of
1603.iers to march through the city, guarding a blind ;.;u-I. Return to your quarters
1604., vexed and mortified. " Miiid you bring her. The day must not pass without a sa
1605.carriage with her, he assumed a soothing tone and addressed divine emperors, and
1606.sh girl !" interrupted the judge, losing patience a they went to their devotions
1607.feeds the birds ox iie air, the blessing never to have seen other nurses the wea
1608.e never wanted the face of a human being, or the sun, or the earth ? What for an
1609.e sun, or the earth ? What for any thing since. strange fancies ore these ?" " B
1610.hich I know to be local from the varying you. norning in the autumn, leading a p
1611.o be local from the varying you. norning in the autumn, leading a poor lame man
1612.ying you. norning in the autumn, leading a poor lame man along the direction of
1613.Then that Bee Him always alone." meeting was a Christian meeting ?" " " what els
1614. alone." meeting was a Christian meeting ?" " " what else could it be ?" Come, c
1615. whom Torquatus had been able or willing to tell him will do. That will soon tam
1616." Pain ?" she echoed innocently. nothing, was certainly a Christian. His game wa
1617.ne in thy life ?" After a pause, looking at her steadfastly, 'he said, you hurt
1618.hurt by any " know whither you are going ?" Oh, no Christians never hurt one ano
1619.her." " Before the The rack was standing, as usual, before him and he made judge
1620.lly rather," was her brief reply. Having got out all that he desired, he consign
1621. been a cold and who had been conversing with her. If ther to her fate. drizzlin
1622.with her. If ther to her fate. drizzling day, like the same person preceding eve
1623.ling day, like the same person preceding evening. The weather, and the incident
1624., like the same person preceding evening. The weather, and the incident of the b
1625.owds could "Once more, before proceeding further, I call on thee to collect, as
1626.firmly replied the victim tir-d severing remained, past the hour of afternoon re
1627.er up no sacrifice but to the one living God and its from which they could see a
1628.he reply. Fulvius, indeed, was pondering whether, having lost one But the placid
1629.s, indeed, was pondering whether, having lost one But the placid gentlespy, he s
1630.turn sulh'eed to inlliot an excruciating, or more ,i " You are not hurt, I hope,
1631.atus, let me go," "Where are yon running to in such a hurry you ?" asked his cap
1632.y you ?" asked his captor, still holding him fast. ; n^idontally, was advancing
1633.g him fast. ; n^idontally, was advancing from r eauglit hold of him, saying, it.
1634.ncing from r eauglit hold of him, saying, it. He ? can I help her frame, Far mor
1635.he preparation and the cause of it being inunseen, and from that additional suff
1636.seen, and from that additional suffering- which darkness tiu-ts. A quivering of
1637.ring- which darkness tiu-ts. A quivering of her features, and a sudden paleness,
1638. at Diogenes's ; said Quadratus, looking round, and seeing in the Suburra. : tha
1639.aid Quadratus, looking round, and seeing in the Suburra. : that Thou ; ha=.t mad
1640.at the upon Thy Cross, even than resting upon the hard couch While this scene wa
1641.he hard couch While this scene was going on, the prefect, mortified, ordered Cat
1642.embly, which could not help sympathizing with the poor blind creaA murmur of sup
1643.rble. The angry judge checked the rising gush of feeling and all listened in Bia
1644.judge checked the rising gush of feeling and all listened in Bias she spoke agai
1645. anger, when Tertullus enternot covering my face with my hands in shame, when ed
1646.s the first salutation Another muttering of compassion was heard. which the pref
1647.ffled judge in fury your "Humbly waiting your divinity's pleasure outside, and w
1648.d with that what are you about, fumbling all day duty, sirrah anxious to propiti
1649. back, and, in softened accents, turning to the prefect, exclaimed ; fortune has
1650.pidity and cowardice; a pretty beginning, forsooth; but ! " " it is too lute. Sh
1651.rn of the i he shall smart for it. Bring him in." The wretch, whining and trembl
1652.r it. Bring him in." The wretch, whining and trembling, was introduced and cast
1653.m in." The wretch, whining and trembling, was introduced and cast himself at the
1654. from the scowl of the judge's welcoming embrace. Had she breathed out her pure
1655.s, garnished with a furious im'. rolling, like a lashed hound, into the midst of
1656.his set the imperial divinity a-laughing, and helped to mollify and sent ; his w
1657.ict disappear ? Corvinus told a rambling tale, which occasionally amused the emp
1658.o keep n >>s of of lire was one of being the and a shower of blows fell up:;:: s
1659.joyment of his imperial master. Smarting and humbled, he had to stand again befo
1660.ad of the family. in life, the restoring where the edict had been cut away." " A
1661.r's \< brought this i- it down. Thinking that your i father, my bi ability fur t
1662.ou may have to and the exclusive forming of your mind. You know have trained you
1663.u know have trained you, to care nothing about the means, so that our take his p
1664. their sovereigns, and cor>- this baring of both their hearts. The dark old man
1665.s for hi "He is one who has been staying some time with Chromatiaa sake spare me
1666.you abundance of selfishness and cunning, and shn "He is no longer a Christian,"
1667.oldness and remorselessness in directing and "Well, what do I care?" replied the
1668. replied the emperor peevishly; applying them. Our lot is cast by the same throw
1669. and spiteful all night and next morning self spell-bound to him, and powerless
1670.atify his revenge, for a dark, impending fate never failed to weigh upon his sou
1671.at was sure to be heaped every returning night. on him by Roman society. The rea
1672.st. was precipitous. Torquatus, carrying his light before him, and running heedl
1673.rrying his light before him, and running heedlessly, fell headlong down the ojie
1674.till, consciousness completely returning, he r" it is the but could not make out
1675. tapers about him, and menus of lighting them, " spurned in the manner I told yo
1676.ployed these, and was cheered by finding himself again in light. " You have been
1677.er, in foolery. Your recollected nothing, and went on, and on, entangling h; fun
1678.nothing, and went on, and on, entangling h; funds are nearly exhausted, and noth
1679. funds are nearly exhausted, and nothing is coming in. You more inextricably in
1680. nearly exhausted, and nothing is coming in. You more inextricably in the subter
1681.ely, Eurotas, you would prefer my trying to get this or his tapers, to feel seri
1682.ble," (Eurotas smiled at the idea coming degrees he began One after aninto eithe
1683.e surest and the for he had been fasting from early morning sud he v he had wan
1684.r he had been fasting from early morning sud he v he had wan You know our compac
1685.mpact. Either the family is himsi coming back to the same speediest. restored to
1686.I know, without your every day reminding me of tombs. But at he grew fainter, an
1687.itter condition," said Fulvius, wringing his hands, and these solemn monuments o
1688. to speak to hiy " Give me tune writhing in all his body. enough, and all will i
1689.s. Things do not look bright one resting in Christ was another at present. But,
1690.ght increased it was like a dawn plowing into day it entered the gallery and p;r
1691.urs, would be dead like them ia lighting his last t:ipt-r, nnd hud sunk down upo
1692. who carried bevirgins robed and holding lamps tween them a form wrapped up in a
1693.after youthful acolyte Tareisius bearing a censer steaming with perfumed smoke a
1694.lyte Tareisius bearing a censer steaming with perfumed smoke and, after others o
1695.n of that hallowed ground. It was coming on fast he could feel it ; his head ree
1696.s heart fluttered. The taper was getting too short for his fingers, and he place
1697.hree minutes longer but a drop filtering through the ceiling, fell ry. ; ; ; And
1698.but a drop filtering through the ceiling, fell ry. ; ; ; And even tended by Eepa
1699. figures seemed to move in an unchanging atmosphere of mildest lights. And " as
1700. remnant of candle, instead of profiting feeble, turned along the gallery throug
1701.is eyes upon it with cession was passing, and followed it, unobserved, at a dist
1702.t a distance. an idiotic stare, watching it burn down, as though it were the It
1703. soon the last spark gleamed smouldering like a glow-worm, on not pass the thres
1704.s the threshold, where he stood striking his breast and the red earth, and died.
1705.ast and the red earth, and died. praying for mercv. Was he dead too ? he thought
1706.n him. ever from consort with the living, his mouth would no more tone and joyou
1707. it was placed in the no light, or thing, again. He was associated with the dead
1708. it, under an arch. While this was being only his grave was much larger than the
1709.tuisti me." That," he exclaimed, rousing himself up, "that is for me." With ; ;
1710. for me." With ; ; ; No, it by something was beginning could not be death as yet
1711. ; ; ; No, it by something was beginning could not be death as yet. Death had to
1712. to be followed But even this was coming. The worm else. to gnaw his conscience,
1713. the beautiful vision darted a withering Hash he had betrayed them he had told o
1714.tal chord was touched, like the tingling nerve of a tooth, that darts its agony
1715.secilia, a blind virgin, who thi morning feU into the hands of the sol'' diers,
1716.imed, with a hollow moan; and staggering forward to the holy bishop's feet, fell
1717.nd the murderous attempt of that morning, now came dancing when these came, they
1718.ttempt of that morning, now came dancing when these came, they were the ones he
1719.essed him to his " Welcome bosom, saying, back, my son, whoever thou art, to Fat
1720.words; rest. " dark before him, shouting laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gna
1721.st. " dark before him, shouting laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing the
1722.rk before him, shouting laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth
1723. him, shouting laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth and spar
1724.uting laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth and sparks of fir
1725.hing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth and sparks of fire flying b
1726.ng their teeth and sparks of fire flying before his eyes, from his enfeebled bra
1727.his enfeebled brain to dart from glaring torches in their hands. He sunk down an
1728.biicly avowed the whole of his including the day's crimes; for it was still the
1729.y's crimes; for it was still the evening of have nothing worse than this. " His
1730.it was still the evening of have nothing worse than this. " His heart was too we
1731.ence of despair. His strength was ebbing fast, when he he heard a distant sound.
1732.r. He raised himself up; it was becoming distinct. So sweet it sounded, so like
1733.eated at the feet of her Spouse, smiling, with her eyes wide open, as she cast d
1734.nes and his sons took charge of him. ing was procured for him, in a Christian ;i
1735.ear 1 to hell ! Or are they accompanying expiation, shortened by 'For Thou, inte
1736.son why; for he v s, without her knowing the In fine, to remain in the neighborh
1737.sought. confirmed this, by communicating Fulvius'a motive of his attendance at t
1738.ianus, you must be My Early next morning Sebastian was with Pancratius. Have you
1739.ust leave Rome instantly, and go leading "Little or none, dear Pancratius. And h
1740.e contain ? No, I "Have I done something wrong, or are have done little by my wo
1741. Sebastian not to expose his life during the journey. He howmore necessary than
1742.secret as yet." and early in the morning, rushed suddenly through the gates, "Wh
1743.s the wretched exlooked about and having found a servant working in the garample
1744.about and having found a servant working in the garample of Torquatus has shown
1745.ps he may go him- latiuity corresponding to such a rude phraseology. " You are W
1746.are Which way did he and his comtrifling with me. self), and put them on their g
1747.wish is enough for mo," said he, smiling; Through yonder gate." 4 " And then ?"
1748.o come from Rome." steeds, were trotting across the campagna of Rome, to reach t
1749.ys two, it seems." " One Corvinus having resolved to keep the hostile expedition
1750.ition in good youth, very handsome, sing so sweet The other his own hands, as ho
1751.cation. He was welcomed most in plotting vengeance upon master and fellow-studen
1752.came a rush from all KMes, with menacing attitudes of o brutal onslaught. "Stop,
1753.ch most look back on from hearts teeming with softer feelings, than the contempl
1754.tarted on his journey, and after baiting The road Hi-omul, Oorvinus learnt there
1755.broke out from the benches. The dragging pace of his jaded wine, vexation, and r
1756.steeds provoked him, and he kept lashing them furiously on. Divine Emperor Maxim
1757. heard the tramp of horses " him. coming fast on behind, and dashed forward at a
1758.ncontrollable A shower of books, writing-tablets, and other school missiles spee
1759.the canal, and galloped forward, rocking the chariot from side to side at a reck
1760.a reckless rate. The horsemen i> hearing the violent rush of hoofs and wheels, a
1761.panion. By the faint light of the rising moon, and by the sound of his voice, th
1762.the youth recognized Corvinus struggling in the muddy stream. The side was not d
1763.ound him. But he coiild think of nothing that would have been such a treat to hi
1764.as left recollection to be the lingering victim of their feeble cruelty. Some, a
1765.iddle. He was, in fact, already becoming benumbed and exhausted by his wintry ba
1766.with the steel points, used in engraving writing on wax-covered tablets others e
1767. steel points, used in engraving writing on wax-covered tablets others exercised
1768.precocious bru; tality, body. inflicting every possible torment on his lacerated
1769.his ready instruments, left the expiring man where he lay, to die unnoticed. ; w
1770.yonr hand. So !" said the youth, leaning over the bank, and seizing his enemy by
1771.outh, leaning over the bank, and seizing his enemy by his arm, just as he was re
1772.nemy by his arm, just as he was relaxing his hold on a withered shrub, and falli
1773.is hold on a withered shrub, and falling back fainting into the stream. It would
1774.ithered shrub, and falling back fainting into the stream. It would have been his
1775.im. as evidence to convict him of having cut down the edict. The servants preten
1776.deep mud. They bore ! ; to a neighboring cottage, ; His faithful servant, howeve
1777.s own, but could not speak. till morning, he placidly expired. The last rites of
1778.ne, \\Hli y heart and a no slight rising of its indignation, against . repaired
1779.ired slept. while the carriage was being and had a good carouse with his money w
1780.prisoners, it will not appear surprising, that their number and their sufferings
1781.have greatly increased, with the growing of a by the labor and sweat Thermae of
1782.d sweat Thermae of Diorlesian were being devised and witnessed, without intensit
1783.he inauguration of his favorite building, and hands were doubled on the work to
1784.recompense which Catiy engaged in making final preparations. ulus mi.I/ced Corvi
1785.e those two, Rabirius," said the willing pnr" veyor to wild beasts they will do
1786.whether it were to vent with you nothing loth. " their own wanton cruelty upon u
1787.heir own wanton cruelty upon unresisting objects, or to please shall have their
1788.reTheir deacons visited them, by bribing their guards and sistance, but generall
1789. the eastern side of the more nourishing food, or warmer clothing to them, or gi
1790.more nourishing food, or warmer clothing to them, or give long arm of the hall.
1791.number of them the means of conciliating their keepers, BO as to obtain convicts
1792.nvicts (if we must use the term) resting after their labor. better treatment at
1793.rance, with a long white beard streaming on his breast, mild in aspect, gentle i
1794. assemblage of men, convicted of serving faithfully their tion. It was the confe
1795.tity to keep up their strength, clothing enough to guard them from the inclemenc
1796.es. Such an occasion was now approaching. The persecution Lad lingered. No perso
1797.note haQ yet been captured and something more wholesale was expected. The people
1798.seated on a block of marble, was talking to them, with a sweet gravity, which ri
1799.nd seemed more sport and an approach'ing imperial birthday justified ; their gra
1800.terpreted by them, who had an as meaning "that the Christians of right belonged
1801.get their sufferings. What was he saying to them ? Was he requiting Cyriacus for
1802.was he saying to them ? Was he requiting Cyriacus for his extraordinary charcomm
1803.tion of it, a portion of ity, by telling him, that, in the immense pile which th
1804.the immense pile which they were toiling to raise, would be dedicated to God, un
1805.ars by an illustrious name ?t recounting another more glorious vision, how this
1806. with its vestibule, under the directing skill of the mightiest artistic genius
1807.hat the world should What more consoling thought could have been ever st'O ? vou
1808.than that they were not so much erecting baths for the luxury of a heathen peopl
1809.f a wicked emperor, as in truth building up one of the stateliest churches in wh
1810.r your charge, for the honor of fighting in the amphitheatre, on occasion of the
1811. amphitheatre, on occasion of the coming festival." carnate, is affectionately h
1812.tance Corvinus saw the group and pausing, answered the officer, " I have none to
1813.t to be put off with Rabirius, gruinbing at this unreasonable demand, submitted
1814. and he paw killa oulriglit. o! Bundling against wounds and blows, before But th
1815.much of his time among the cona fine ing, and plenty ; youth, was not the place
1816.a poor prison in ane T fare court hoping lu-se dunand lodging than he did at hom
1817.T fare court hoping lu-se dunand lodging than he did at home. Two or and a brief
1818.their He pays, of course, well for being allowed all this ; so round to look. ma
1819. rather fastened into them, for securing the prisoners ; but have, rings many us
1820.ort of the damp stone floor, by strewing with broken potsherds this only bed all
1821.efathers underwent for the faith, during three centuries of persecution, we woul
1822.t have him content himself with visiting tortured that their contrary, some who
1823.r asrecovery appeared hopeless, learning what sort of life they were compelled t
1824.to die. We know of no writings so moving, so tender, so conrelieve the suffering
1825.ffected pathos, and Often, as in erating his plain profession of the Christian f
1826.fession of the Christian faith. charming truthfulness, which pervades the corres
1827.ulness, which pervades the corresponding nar. the case of one Ptolomteus, beauti
1828.age, he would not hesitate in concluding, question, Art thou a Christian ? and u
1829.ence. natural, graceful, and interesting are the simple soling, and so ministeri
1830.l, and interesting are the simple soling, and so ministering of strength to fait
1831.re the simple soling, and so ministering of strength to faith stances, ; ; ; And
1832. of what children and women, unmurmuring, for Christ. But we are wandering from
1833.muring, for Christ. But we are wandering from our narrative. Pancratius, with so
1834.As they were were unmeralong, staggering and stumbling helplessly, they aid any
1835.ere unmeralong, staggering and stumbling helplessly, they aid any perstruck by I
1836.rs," answered the prisoner" but becoming a Christian, I have been freed by Chris
1837.pe as those whom you see. " Then turning to a holy priest, Lucianiu, venerable f
1838.the gods edicts." or them with insulting ribaldry.* They offal, and assailed rea
1839.ictims, The youth had just thru awaiting their time of sacrifice. be was being h
1840.ng their time of sacrifice. be was being handcuffed, to request " can Ire answer
1841.o one," What viour. ' ' sort of learning and studies dost thou pursue ?" I have
1842.ariety of of Christianity; the wandering of fa] frc cnrucn <>!' Till-: c. 67 in
1843.e of "ii a, psalms which the cin-umbeing torn to pieces by, liberty. do not who
1844. that is " Wretch " The trine." learning?" greatest; because I follow the Christ
1845.ignificant to be able to utter any thing great ness, of ordinary culprits. To th
1846.blessed confessors of Christ. At evening they were led : "Thou art, methinks, a
1847.d I am a widow, named Rufina, professing the same were led by it to conversion."
1848.s prepared a feast for the bodies saving faith,' continued the other. At length,
1849.inued the other. At length, after having put similar questions, and received of
1850.Church, their mother, had been preparing similar answers from all the others, ex
1851.his at present. After, therefore, having him. and condition ?" " I am a the edic
1852.r, once or twice, reproved the unfeeling curiosity, and rude remarks, of the cro
1853., and rude remarks, of the crowd, saying, "To-morrow is not sufficient for you,
1854.house of Agnes, to send, towards evening, sufficient portions of the Bread of li
1855.ad of life to feed, early in the morning of their battle, the champions of Chris
1856.ncipal church to others, where stripling." Pancratius signed himself with the si
1857.gned himself with the sign of the saving cross, and calmly replied, "I am the se
1858.by the titulars, the office of conveying them to the martyrs in prison, and even
1859.martyrs in prison, and even to the dying, was committed to inferior ministers. p
1860.erior ministers. passions of heathen ing slaughter of so On this day, that the h
1861.e dignity of their gait, and the shining calmness of their countenances. Some me
1862. ceive a fragrant atmosphere surrounding their persons. boy's eyes, and his chee
1863.a linen cloth, then in an outer covering, and || THE VIATICUM. and discord witho
1864.E contrast put them on his palms, saying: "Remember, Tarcisius, what a treasure
1865.neeo Martym. ai. 66 FABIOLA; OR avoiding entlly the more public, and the too low
1866.on ground. to tear As he was approaching the door tress, The m> ily on die upon
1867.y on die upon him, and were just seizing him his breast, In a rich lady without
1868.ch lady without children, saw him coming, and was struck with his beauty and swe
1869.th arms fol his breast, he was hastening on. "Stay one moment, dear child," she
1870.e moment, dear child," she said, putting herself in his way: "tell name, and whe
1871.ius, an orphan boy," he replied, looking up " and I have no home save one which
1872.ich it might be smilingly; " displeasing to thes to hear. " Then come into my ho
1873.by gome giant strength. Some went reding to the further side of the square, othe
1874.eyes, raised up the bruised and fainting boy, as tenderly as a mother could have
1875.oment eyes with a in its " but I opening his am " Then The soldier raised the bo
1876.e boy with a kindled ence, as if bearing, not only the sweet victim of a youthfu
1877.ce, a martyr's relics, but the very King and Lord of Martyrs, higher sphere. She
1878. Tarcisius, whom I met a few mobeginning to play. " We jnst want one to make up
1879.rts. Come Tarcisius," he added, stopping him by He opened his eyes upon her, smi
1880.t she hastened to be a Christian seizing his arm, "whither so fast? take a part
1881.formance." take care of them. " carrying the divine mysteries; that's a "I I am
1882.divine mysteries; that's a "I I am going on busican't, Petilius, now; I really c
1883.r, a strong and " I will have no sulking, bullying youth, laying hold of him. wh
1884.g and " I will have no sulking, bullying youth, laying hold of him. when I want
1885. have no sulking, bullying youth, laying hold of him. when I want anything done.
1886.laying hold of him. when I want anything done. So come, join us at once." good f
1887.oor boy feelingly, "do let me such thing," replied the other. "What is that you
1888.r. "What is that you seem to be carrying so carefully in your bosom ? A letter,
1889.uppose; well, it will not addle by being Give it to me, and I will put it by saf
1890.ver, never," answered the child, looking up towarda "No The venerable Dionysius
1891.e Dionysius could hardly see for weeping, as he removed the child's hands, and t
1892. anthan he did when livgel now, sleeping the martyr's slumber, ing scarcely an h
1893. now, sleeping the martyr's slumber, ing scarcely an hour before. Quadratus hims
1894. no one can read, without ; ; concluding that the belief in the real presence of
1895.derful secret." And he commenced pulling August, as commemorated A crowd of men
1896.uffs, pulls, blows, kicks seemed bearing. At this moment Sebastheir souls. He bo
1897. He at once recognized Tarcisius, having a few and being asked, as a better-dres
1898.gnized Tarcisius, having a few and being asked, as a better-dressed not be depri
1899. ; ; ; turned on his heel, "What bearing the mysteries."* is it ? Why only a Chr
1900.ards, had passed freely Sebastian, being known to "Christ's secret gifts, by goo
1901.identity of habitual thought iu an-iking, argument* iceu. more tiian from the u(
1902.ur window, and looked at the many piping arches of the ainpitheatre, as open for
1903., iny dear boy ; I remember that evening well, arid it to me as your heart antic
1904.urance that I should appease the roaring fury of those deputies of huniau cruelt
1905.d me. First on that night of the meeting in your apartments, you said there was
1906.d to give me your reason for despatching me hastily to Campania, and joined this
1907.ould commit yourself by some over-daring action, which might tarnish, even as li
1908.. And moreover, my dear boy, you harping of angelic lyres, walking in the proces
1909.y, you harping of angelic lyres, walking in the procession of whiterobed Saints,
1910.rocession of whiterobed Saints, inhaling the perfume of celestial incense, and w
1911.t for a triumph. You would have drinking from the crystal waters of the stream o
1912.y read or hear about another, but daring youth you might have been disturbed, ev
1913.ride at any rate, you would "And nothing more than you have described, Pancratiu
1914.ut merit and the special glory, of dying for simply being a presumption. That I,
1915.special glory, of dying for simply being a presumption. That I, a boy just come
1916.ool, who Christian." " have done nothing for Christ as yet, should be able to sa
1917.astian," he continued fervently, seizing both his you pelted and hooted, like ot
1918. !" yon are a Christian, and for nothing else, I felt that "And more still, Paue
1919.enances scow- generous, and so unsparing !" sobbed out Pancratius, as he threw h
1920.r's neck; then continued: " Promise ling on you with hatred, coi. tempt, and fur
1921., and fury, from every step me one thing more: that this day you will keep near
1922. notice that all was ready, for offering into its burning ocean of mercy and lov
1923.was ready, for offering into its burning ocean of mercy and love without fear of
1924.loor, with his limbs capitol proclaiming midnight that to-day, to-day, I shall p
1925.when it extinguishes but the approaching devoutly, from his consecrated hand his
1926. the sight of hideous beasts and sinning men, scarcely less frightful than they,
1927.e, before another sun has set, listening to the finely-tempered steel, the purit
1928.ire, or tip with a I determined, passing blight one single leaf of your palm. th
1929.have been seized for your boldly tearing down the edict, or your rebuke of the j
1930.nnected with my ' ; ; ; ; ; : ! ; trying would it be to part with the last tende
1931.ngular martyr, by " own body. Vrt living, he lay beiicatli the f eet of the hear
1932.not 'thinks, replied Pancratins, smiling, it lias been :ill on one side ; for /
1933.t hear the tramp of horses' hoofs trying to overtake thee ?" "Wretch 1" exclaime
1934. in a i'ury; and was ; ; '.' THE morning broke light and frosty and the sun, gli
1935.light and frosty and the sun, glittering on the gilded ornaments of the temples
1936.ar me calmly. It is the I was travelling quietly with a companion speak together
1937.eak together. towards Rome, after having paid the last rites to our master " Cas
1938.ream of life, huge monster keeps sucking in by degrees which soon animates and e
1939.rock and wave to and fro, by the swaying numbed, had let go its last stay, and t
1940. go its last stay, and thou wast falling backof the living mass. And, after this
1941. and thou wast falling backof the living mass. And, after this shall have been g
1942.iy will by which it entered, now bearing their fitting Vomitoria ; for never did
1943.ch it entered, now bearing their fitting Vomitoria ; for never did a more pollut
1944.sts of humanity issue from an unbecoming reservoir, fied it." drank "Ha and how,
1945., and with the blood of martyrs, gushing forth from the pores of the "By drawing
1946. forth from the pores of the "By drawing thee out, and laying thee resumed its f
1947. of the "By drawing thee out, and laying thee resumed its functions; and then co
1948.d then consplendid amphitheatre. chafing thee till thy heart The emperor came to
1949.e games surrounded by his court, signing thee to thy servants, rescued from deat
1950.to priestesses but they resisted, urging to the fight, it was unfair to make the
1951.rsed the games, the emperor, the yelling in a disguise which they abhorred. Duri
1952.n a disguise which they abhorred. During the early part of sneaked away. the day
1953. they remained thus together encouraging one another, rabble, the roaring beasts
1954.uraging one another, rabble, the roaring beasts, his horses and chariot, his sla
1955.ses and chariot, his slaves, and singing the Divine praises, in spite of the sho
1956.ts which his father, himself every thing and every body except onedrowned their
1957.s come which I have long de- approaching to love. There is It has been a tiresom
1958.agination which he had longed for during months. When the holidays, was over, he
1959. it was the only way he knew of drowning remorse. THE CHUItVU OF THE CATACOMBS.
1960.ItVU OF THE CATACOMBS. As he was leaving the couil, 71 prisoners, the lar.ittn,
1961.atius awoke as from a trance, and waving his arms, ran towards his enemy;* but t
1962.ute, as if a lion had been the enrushing on him, turned round, and ran away towa
1963.y towards into the trance, where meeting his keeper, he tossed him high A air. A
1964.echoed the cry, till the emperor, having One encounter with a single out to him,
1965.ghly let loose, without their inflicting further torment*, ly for thee." fessor
1966., " it is no charm that with despatching him. sweetly through the hushed amphith
1967.ve must content ourselves with following the last steps I wear, but a memorial o
1968.hful hero, Pancratius. As he was passing through the corridor that led to the am
1969.heatre, he saw Sebastian in her standing on one side, with a lady closely enwrap
1970.ed her, stopped it. fore her, and taking her hand, affectionately kissed hour."
1971. now inspired countenance, the thrilling music of his voice, the intrepidity of
1972.t " and let us have none of this fooling," exclaimed day was he to be disappoint
1973.ted into his eyes, On, on, as stretching forth his arms once more in the form of
1974.the form of a cross, the lanista, adding a stroke of his cane. her he called Lut
1975.hind the emperor ; give me your blessing." " Ha ha ha !" broke out a fiendish to
1976.nd caught only a glimpse of a fluttering cloak rounding a pillar. Who could it b
1977.a glimpse of a fluttering cloak rounding a pillar. Who could it be ? He guessed
1978. last ! look there, and got been weaving that Sebastian was certainly a Christia
1979.yet entered his twentieth year, standing without fetters, with his hands stretch
1980.orth in the form of a cross, and praying to God most attentively, with a fixed a
1981.ttentively, with a fixed and uutrembling heart not nor swerving the retiring fro
1982.d and uutrembling heart not nor swerving the retiring from the place where he fi
1983.ling heart not nor swerving the retiring from the place where he first stood, wh
1984.ood, while bears and leopards, breathing fury and death in least, their very sno
1985.ast, their very snort, were just rushing on to tear his limbs in I know not how,
1986.ppointed has Thy power day of Thy coming. Tarry not longer enough been shown in
1987.d thousand, in a chorus like the roaring of an avalanche, t A cage started up, a
1988.olled noiselessly All its feline cunning and cruelty it caught sight of its prey
1989.n, and to conspire together in animating the cautious and treacherous movements
1990.ll, while every eye was intent, watching the : ; " ; Pancrabrute to its victim.
1991.hes of the sleek tius was still standing in the same place, facing the emperor,
1992.still standing in the same place, facing the emperor, so absorbed in higher thou
1993. of breathless suspense. A deep snarling growl, an drew altogether back."J elast
1994.n drew altogether back."J elastic spring through the air, and it was seen gather
1995. were frantic, as they another rare-ring madly round him, roaring and lashing it
1996.other rare-ring madly round him, roaring and lashing its He stood erect for a mo
1997.ing madly round him, roaring and lashing its He stood erect for a moment, brough
1998.in the front Crouchhim, as if disdaining to attack him except its breast, slowly
1999. him except its breast, slowly advancing one paw before another, ing upon and th
2000.ly advancing one paw before another, ing upon and there it lay for some it hud c
2001.pnt> 73 FABIOLA: OR i month, and tasking Tip him, lips at Sebastian with a smile
2002.. THE CHBISTIAJf SOLDIER. me with having but poor return for your gracious <'""i
2003. hook. " thy Fulvius rose, and directing his hand, in accompaniment to his words
2004.have before observed, to the neighboring gate. In times of peace, a basilica was
2005.of recorded here," he replied, producing a parchment, and offering it, kneeling.
2006.ied, producing a parchment, and offering it, kneeling. shalt die such a piecemea
2007.g a parchment, and offering it, kneeling. shalt die such a piecemeal death as "
2008.s surprised by a heathen rabble, praying at St. Peter's tomb, and was hurried to
2009.reachery of Torquatus, by his describing his stocked repertory of vituperation.
2010., and I glory in the name." M ; counting every one as glorious who gave his life
2011.had conversed with Pancratius, recalling to mind the buoyant cheerfulness, the g
2012. he felt the grace of martyrdom swelling in hia and in tranquil certainty he awa
2013.r, whose presence but he had put nothing by, he was not getting he avoided rich.
2014.e had put nothing by, he was not getting he avoided rich. Every evening he had t
2015.t getting he avoided rich. Every evening he had to bear the reproachful and scor
2016.for such he had become that he was going to strike at higher game, the emperor's
2017.sual, met with a cold reception. bearing silently the muttered curses of the roy
2018.hus addressed him ; loyalty, more daring for you, than all your Dacian and PanYo
2019.lly and madness !" returned the sneering savage. would sooner surround myself wi
2020.ime from actHave I not had access to ing the traitor, if I had been one ? your r
2021.xhortation ; then asked him for the ring on hia finger, dipped it In hia own blo
2022.ia own blood, and gavp it back, "leaving him the inheritance of that pledge, and
2023.nk Fulvius with all my heart, for having, by his accusa; p. m tHe ii commemorate
2024. embarrassment of choice between seeking death or enduring life." " I will decid
2025.choice between seeking death or enduring life." " I will decide that Death is yo
2026.r you. tion, : Tin: and a slow lingering one it shall be. But," he added, in a l
2027.e added, in a lower tone, as if speaking to himself, " this must not g. All must
2028.ich ended in the stout centurion's being ordered at once to execution. But Sebas
2029.;,v. 73 Might them not be a more -riling one; ju sect, ; refined form of t! \V:I
2030.flective. Sebastian would belong to .ing in i the id re- tin: ! s, and d'Hit pis
2031.turned the others, she had heard nothing day before from a journey made into Cam
2032., I have a job for you to-morrow morning. It must be well done, " said the emper
2033.chief, with a grin which fate were going to fall on some one closely bound to he
2034.as suddeul-, ideas, amidst the deepening gloom. If Hyphax had been on his native
2035.ressV started more. The thought of being so near a Christian to ing repast, whic
2036.ught of being so near a Christian to ing repast, which she wished to take alone.
2037.e a smile; "Only that Sebastian is going to be shot with arrows toit was hardly
2038.as hardly an earthly one. morrow morning. What a pity he was such a hau "You wil
2039.; and early to-mor- youth :" row morning not this evening, mind, for I know that
2040.r- youth :" row morning not this evening, mind, for I know that by this "Be sile
2041. you are all drunk but to-morrow morning, when me on the subject." your hands ar
2042.ut to be one of Slowly, very astonishing. mind; none of your fine shots straight
2043.ut it was now too late to-morrow morning he would be no more. This second though
2044.fra, what do you mean ?" she was placing a ; she had not spoken. Sebastian a Chr
2045.stian a Christian " " snore, Oh, nothing, nothing. What can a poor slave know ?
2046.hristian " " snore, Oh, nothing, nothing. What can a poor slave know ? what can
2047.d her hand and a fortune, for the asking; and had acted most generously, and mos
2048.or this phenomenon, of a Christian being all that was good, virtuous, amiable ?
2049.me, you mearit, by your words, something that I must know." The slave came round
2050.urity for them ?" "They shall be binding only, if twenty-four hours after the ex
2051.rtia,* accept your terms ; "I ; of being a Christian ? variously in her mind, in
2052. them wrmt, TnVmln," he ; : nil retiring early vu i*st; L said, "at this hour? :
2053.r." there." said the barbarian, pointing across up to prayer. Tlif martyr's pray
2054.ly he uot do BO bettor, if he were going to be mar- ried instead." " As thou and
2055. instead." " As thou and " not tyr going to death, is seized, and made to bear h
2056. is seized, and made to bear him willing company,* is as prepared for martyrdom
2057.ge or strength; for the opposite feeling, which could suggest it, was unknown to
2058.llent faiuly not lesa than three I bring thee six hundred." ! dost thou expect ?
2059.ny place. His prayer, then, till morning, was a gladsome hymn of glory and honor
2060.some hymn of glory and honor to the King of kings, a joining with the seraph's g
2061.nd honor to the King of kings, a joining with the seraph's glowing eyes, and eve
2062.ngs, a joining with the seraph's glowing eyes, and ever-shaking wings, in restle
2063. seraph's glowing eyes, and ever-shaking wings, in restless homage. row, to-nigh
2064.in the leafless trees of the neighboring court of Adonis, its wayward music comp
2065.sic compose itself, and its rude harping upon the vibrating boughs form softer h
2066. and its rude harping upon the vibrating boughs form softer hymns, the only ones
2067.ht-hours. Now burst on him the thrilling thought that the morning hour approache
2068.m the thrilling thought that the morning hour approached, for the cock had crowe
2069.would soon hear those branches murmuring over to him the sharp whistle prisoner
2070., what has he tc do with our approaching nuptials ?" great deal." he bade "A "Wh
2071.re of fury and stupidthe point of laying violent hands on her; but she stood int
2072.st have known he " will have no trilling with him here. "1'shaw! pshaw! man; of
2073.ative land might do a vulture. of flying arrows, unerring in their aim. And he o
2074.do a vulture. of flying arrows, unerring in their aim. And he offered himself gl
2075.f gladly to their sharp tongues, hissing as the serpent's to drink his blood. He
2076. offered himhonor, and for the appeasing of His wrath. self particularly for the
2077.arthly to the celestial Church ; soaring like the eagle from the highest pinnacl
2078.and the blue embroidered veil of morning is rent in twain, like the sanctuary's,
2079." sweet and perfect to brook the jarring of a terrestrial voice ; Well, but I kn
2080.. ;;lf the money, in bribes and feasting." " 1 h-:\v two hundred more in reserve
2081.hat." Very is they came to him requiring no return ; for they brought heaven int
2082.of purest refreshment, more like gushing light than water, flowing from the foot
2083.e like gushing light than water, flowing from the foot of the Lamb, and poured i
2084., and receive the gift. in its sparkling bounds, as it rippled along towards him
2085.gone before him as if they were drinking, and bathing, and disporting, and plung
2086.im as if they were drinking, and bathing, and disporting, and plunging, and diss
2087.re drinking, and bathing, and disporting, and plunging, and dissolving themselve
2088.nd bathing, and disporting, and plunging, and dissolving themselves in those liv
2089.disporting, and plunging, and dissolving themselves in those living waters. His
2090.nd dissolving themselves in those living waters. His countenance was glowing as
2091.ving waters. His countenance was glowing as with the very reflection of of the ;
2092.'hou so, my ]. ;y sorceress, my charming But that will be too much for my scound
2093." As it pleases thee, provided the thing is done according to .est ? , ' 1 the v
2094.ee, provided the thing is done according to .est ? , ' 1 the vision, and the mor
2095..est ? , ' 1 the vision, and the morning dawn just brightening (oh, what a dawn
2096.n, and the morning dawn just brightening (oh, what a dawn that is !), caught his
2097.all live twenty-four hours; urns wedding." for, ueouscious of these amiaLike Pet
2098.er between two guards, he was slumbering souadly by the wall of the court. Fatig
2099.rs of Hyphax; so he set s< about earning them. He picked out of his troop of a h
2100. five marksmen, who could split a flying arrow with a one, called them into his
2101.room, told them their reward, concealing his own share, and arranged how the exe
2102.tian was conducted into tho neighbouring which separated the quarters of those A
2103.rows ,i trees, and from his own dwelling. It was planted with m the midst consec
2104.e followed , a the 1 .lark slave, having com- his executioners, have been of an
2105.nd oppobound to a site, by was returning to nernmtn wintry night, so she was v,
2106.to see the encouragin. Not a be stroking, with a silvery hand, tho downy M, tn S
2107.ecollection connected h. She was turning round to proceed on fill > obj.-ct. whe
2108. the whispered blessings of a few loving yours is unmistakable. and almost inspi
2109.rs is unmistakable. and almost inspiring acquaintances, had something cheering,
2110.t inspiring acquaintances, had something cheering, QB, are answering ny, to the
2111.ng acquaintances, had something cheering, QB, are answering ny, to the in it it
2112.ad something cheering, QB, are answering ny, to the in it it lent at least the f
2113.n upon natural courage, as the insulting multitude put But this dead and at nerv
2114.you." " How about me ?" " I was thinking of our ar last interview in tins place,
2115. indifference tied up, like a this being, with most unfeeling aimed at, accordtr
2116., like a this being, with most unfeeling aimed at, accordtruss of hay, or a stuf
2117.figure, to be coolly orders ; this being alone in the midst ing to the tyrant's
2118.ders ; this being alone in the midst ing to the tyrant's was strange, a horde of
2119. language but who were no doubt uttering uncouth, and unintelligible ; do before
2120.a match or their rude jokes and laughing, as men had more the a game which they
2121.had more the a game which they are going to enjoy; all this about to be acted in
2122. me, " kind of you, Afra, to be thinking but of your count rym I was not just th
2123.r count rym I was not just then thinking of you, you made How . their proper uea
2124., methinks, in what you our last meeting ? \\ h dazzled his eyes, wall upon him
2125.his eyes, wall upon him ; and the rising sun, which was it not, that made a fool
2126.rightly were exchanged have of suffering endured for His sake. but dust." ness h
2127. to I fear, turned out and an arrow ling- yours, " No doubt; for so says a prove
2128.langi The first Moor drew his bow-string to his ear, marksman the i the gold tre
2129.you really to the im- girdle.' .avoiding, according of my charms and philtres?"
2130.to the im- girdle.' .avoiding, according of my charms and philtres?" so cleverly
2131.s and philtres?" so cleverly approaching, yet lieve ie the power nil imposti And
2132.ere perial order, every and and enjoying and brawling, and jeering, see we have
2133.der, every and and enjoying and brawling, and jeering, see we have got rid of Fa
2134.d and enjoying and brawling, and jeering, see we have got rid of Fabius, Not qui
2135.s, Not quite all; you everybody laughing of feeling for the now drooping frame,
2136.e all; you everybody laughing of feeling for the now drooping frame, the fortune
2137.laughing of feeling for the now drooping frame, the fortune. That was a pre it w
2138.." removed each sharp pang, the enduring smart, all was sober earnest "What! do
2139. incantations the constrainand shrinking from her. the exhaustion, the weariness
2140.Afra's, the unruffled patience, untiring spirit, the unwavering faith, advantage
2141.atience, untiring spirit, the unwavering faith, advantage, saying: Earnest was t
2142. the unwavering faith, advantage, saying: Earnest was the " To be sure; what els
2143.rid of any the unsated love of suffering for his Lord. the listhe gaze of the ey
2144.good night," he replied, in great tening of the ear for the welcoming " Stay a m
2145.reat tening of the ear for the welcoming " Stay a moment," she added, somewhat p
2146.e cords that bound him; gained something. the carpet of blood which he and to al
2147.elf on the pavement. Did he lie, Nothing but rage, confusion his altar, " Then 1
2148." Prud vsyl rtrcQ. riches. when visiting the Crystal Palac-5. London, will flnd
2149.ew him nearer and whispered: " I feeling good hiiter. . "Li when he was improvin
2150.good hiiter. . "Li when he was improving, she was courteously invited to enter a
2151.otas, out of whom I can wheedle anything, that in .Fulvius has some splendid Chr
2152. She checked him by a pull, and pointing to the building t but she remained stil
2153. by a pull, and pointing to the building t but she remained still, unnoticed, in
2154.d beings were on the same spot, plotting bane to others, the window above was oc
2155.rits of good, were intent on unravelling their web of misrmmiug their dark appro
2156.. They are gone thence, the one sleeping in his tomb, the other slumbering on th
2157.eeping in his tomb, the other slumbering on the eve of execution. Death looks to
2158.a holy power, how much he prefers taking to his society the good, than the evil.
2159. so simple, frugal, and orderly. Nothing disturbed it, except the character of t
2160.She formed plans with Irene for carrying him off to her Campanian villa, wheie s
2161.h a sword in his hand, carefully turning and examining the hilt in the bright mo
2162.is hand, carefully turning and examining the hilt in the bright moonlight. He fl
2163.ht. He flung it down at last, exclaiming, with an oath, "It is only brass, after
2164.b of this, Fulvius." "Always reproaching me, Eurotas. And yet this miserable lot
2165.probation, who an but ordinary wayfaring was surely a greater trial than lose sa
2166.e To have yearned r's." after struggling for hours, and pestuous arm of the sea,
2167.and pestuous arm of the sea, and, having his skiff twirled round and round and a
2168.t. Paul sent back to earth and to having heard the mysterious words -which can u
2169.dored in silence the Divine Will, hoping tl regret. him the merit of a double ma
2170.ilege This of a martyr, that of speaking boldly to the persecutors. Nurse, me, I
2171.like Satan's buffets, after Xext morning, the slaves who received the body of Se
2172.stian iy a swarthy female figure passing by them, and " He is still alive." vhin
2173.periiig to them, lust .'ore, of carrying him out for burial, they bore The early
2174.tment of Irene. and the emperor's having gone, the evening before, ing, MU palac
2175.d the emperor's having gone, the evening before, ing, MU palace, facilitated thi
2176.r's having gone, the evening before, ing, MU palace, facilitated this movement.
2177. Dionysius But ije; not one arrow having touched a vital organ. taken place to s
2178.ced from the blind martyr's unsuspecting admiswit-Li the mad carouse and hideous
2179. THE CHURCH OF THE CATACOMBS. despairing of obtaining another interview, he wrot
2180.F THE CATACOMBS. despairing of obtaining another interview, he wrote her a reBpe
2181. he wrote her a reBpectful, but pressing letter, descriptive of his disinl attac
2182.disinl attachment to her, and entreating her to accept his suit. was but the fai
2183.s . And thy of time. no perishable being expressions of personal attachment. Thi
2184.dently. In the meantime, Fabiola, seeing the determination of Senastian not to f
2185.y, conceived the romantic idea of saving him, Deep silence was held while The em
2186.fully uttered. influence of a paralyzing awe; m for soon recognizing Sebastinr,
2187.a paralyzing awe; m for soon recognizing Sebastinr, he felt as if standing in th
2188.nizing Sebastinr, he felt as if standing in the toe of the dead. But quickly rec
2189. toe of the dead. But quickly recovering himself and his by extorting his pardon
2190. recovering himself and his by extorting his pardon from the eftperor. She did n
2191.r in his breast and her earnest pleading and tears would extract them, as heat d
2192.t a petition for an audience and knowing the covetousness of the man, presumed,
2193.ther's loyal attachment. This was a ring with jewels of rare beauty, and immense
2194., on his way to sacrifice. Uneucouraging as was this answer, she resolved to ris
2195.s answer, she resolved to risk any thing, and do her best. The appointed day cam
2196.ed day came and Fabiola, in her mourning habits, worn both as a suppliant, and f
2197., passion, he exclaimed: Ho 1" and bring him before me " name). Hyphax here " no
2198.s your his father,) ; name?" (addressing Corvinus, who was attending "go to the
2199. (addressing Corvinus, who was attending "go to the Numidian court, and summon H
2200. and pointed to the door, and the string ready drawn, they looked like an avenue
2201.ike an avenue of basalt statues, leading to ': ; an Egyptian temple. herself, mo
2202.tairs, though she saw her brilliant ring sparkling on his coarse hand. For on ea
2203.ugh she saw her brilliant ring sparkling on his coarse hand. For on each step he
2204.ful suppliant, looked at it hold, coming in, or going out, without re trough his
2205., looked at it hold, coming in, or going out, without re trough his breast or id
2206.ad she known how, or to whom. stretching out lu's hand to take a paper offered t
2207. drew back, and turned round, on hearing his name most unceremoniously and perem
2208.ch gave light to a back corridor leading to whore Irene's apartments were. She n
2209.ttle, or insur" The rection, for picking out the leaders. cunning rascals !" he
2210.on, for picking out the leaders. cunning rascals !" he exclaimed. "There, take t
2211. And he gave him Fabiola's splendid ring. H> >aek, delivered his gracious embass
2212.his gracious embassy, and threw the ring In an instant every bow dropt, and ever
2213.nstant every bow dropt, and every string reacross. lax, d. Jnbala, delighted, sp
2214.ted, sprang forward and caught tin; ring. A heavy blow from her husband's fist f
2215.fore them; his laeer. and arms appearing amidst the loose drapery he had thrown
2216.hine emname ?" asked the tyrant, turning upon him. peror's "I am come as from th
2217. wrath and vengeance is fast approaching. Thou hast HP blood of God's Saints upo
2218.adam, what ia your petition?" stretching out his hand to Fabiola, whom he She wa
2219. is too late !" her d, " \Yi :'' looking at the paper. A flash came to his " Wha
2220. life is have snid she was off. anything: els.-. l-'ahiola, -W, (by day 1 ' not
2221. not fur "But. rein', " I fear returning her petition, that blow must have been
2222.have to thank you for the beautiful ring which you sent, and which I have given
2223. volume ; ! ; ; I honor ! tyrant, seeing his work completed, ordered that Sebast
2224.choly, which lasted till towards evening, when she was disturbed by a letter bri
2225.when she was disturbed by a letter bring put into her hand. The slave, Graja, wh
2226.emples, stood thus for a moment, looking up with' an unnatural stare in her eyes
2227.s she remained for some minutes, holding the letter in both her hands, with her
2228.o come here." While her errand was being delivered, she composed herself, and ga
2229.man named Fulvius, Christian." for being a days in the life of man and of mankin
2230.at Columbus could critical " For nothing else ?" " For nothing, I am sure." " Th
2231.ical " For nothing else ?" " For nothing, I am sure." " Then we this for shall s
2232.o with Fabiola, has not all been working up towards a crisis ? Emperor and slave
2233.life and death, joy and sorrow, learning and simplicity, silence and conversatio
2234.ave they not all come as agents, pulling at her mind in opposite ways, yet all d
2235.mind in opposite ways, yet all directing her noble and generous, though haughty
2236.shall the resolution of these contending forces be determined ? That rests not w
2237.ook, and see what comes on the following day in his calendar, and he will agree
2238.tments of Irene, where she found nothing but desolation and sorrow. She sympathi
2239. there was almost an exultation breaking out through their distress; their cloud
2240.hristianity, as associated with anything ; hip late through life position or his
2241.was left alone. When there was something to do, her mind was at once energetic t
2242.ight handsome largitions. is the meaning of this, Agues?" eagerly inquired Fabio
2243.his absurd charge. " "What Agnes, making on herthe sign of the cross. The announ
2244.om it. She had found that faith existing in what she had considered the type of
2245.her guileless innocence, and unexcepting kindness, she had almost worIt made Fab
2246. mere chance-grown plants, but springing from the same seed. She bowed her head
2247.s perpetrators of the moat odious giving the property to the nearest relation, w
2248.e Christian name." that chance of making a free gift to me. The proposal from a
2249., father ?" I could have loved any thing in you. " I will have an " You think im
2250. think imperial n-seript prepared during the now, Fabiola; but you know not the
2251.noble minds, fine intellects, and loving hearts have How ready for signature man
2252.all on Fulvius, and show 11 his granting the property to the next in the settlem
2253. next in the settlement of it, something even worse than the worst of others!" "
2254.have already confessed it, and inNothing could be better, my dear father I shall
2255.d to do so again publicly in the morning." "In the morning! what, to-morrow?" as
2256.ublicly in the morning." "In the morning! what, to-morrow?" asked Fabiola, my li
2257.jected." shocked at the idea of anything so immediate. " I " that I could have o
2258.have only wish," added Tertullus, rising, "Yes, to-morrow. To prevent any clamor
2259.uck." " Fear she is well worthy of being your Is not that good news, dear ?" ask
2260.rly, taken. not, father And then putting on one of her daughter-in-law. Yes, to-
2261.aw. Yes, to-morrow is indeed the turning-point seizing her cousin's hands. ecsta
2262.rrow is indeed the turning-point seizing her cousin's hands. ecstatic looks, she
2263.Whilst this domestic interview was going on, a conference I have loved with all
2264. angels who surround Him! How was taking place between Fulvius and his amiable u
2265.how bland the whole ex- latter, entering late, found his nephew sitting sullen a
2266. entering late, found his nephew sitting sullen and pression of His face! And th
2267.nd heave, as if a new eleWhy, if nothing else happens, the first is safe the sec
2268. caprice. But I own I ment were entering in. She knew not what it was, but it ha
2269.what it was, but it has seemed something better than a mere human emotion. She f
2270.She feel pain and remorse at sacrificing so young a life, and for an ; ; ' : : '
2271. this same time a consultation was being held at the house Come Fulvius," said t
2272.vius," said the old man sternly, looking as cold "no softness, I 'hope, in as a
2273. 'hope, in as a grey rock in the morning mist this matter. Do you remember what
2274.y. : you always remind me of every thing I most v " Because of this you wish to
2275.ce, how powerful is wealth in conquering must not bo. I must take you from every
2276. magistrate, I will anright in one thing, she ought to be iu the other. be rathe
2277. so far but not if I succeed in offering her, with myelf the lady Agnes's great
2278.r generous and lofty disposition. Giving her that wealth independent of conditio
2279.endent of conditions, and then O'!':Ting yourself to her, will put her under one
2280.think there is no possibilty of securing it ! nied me. " ietly, my young many ?"
2281. other prospect before me, of retrieving my fortunes here. Still I munt, ily hen
2282.recy." Fulvius had been gradually losing patience, and could no " Leave that to
2283. to you, or rather of to-day for morning by a child, this time with the sword ha
2284. child, this time with the sword hanging over her neck A is approaching. Life or
2285.d hanging over her neck A is approaching. Life or death to you hangs upon it it
2286.pressible broke out from the smouldering heat within great day of your existence
2287. destiny J" black, HATRED. With flashing look, and furious gessolitary drop, ; ;
2288. ever from your mind. " " I fear nothing for Christ. For know, that I have an an
2289.know, that I have an angel ever guarding me, who will not suffer his Master's ha
2290.ve thee one more opportunity of rescuing thyself from destruction. Which wilt th
2291. SECOND PABT. THE day is not yet dawning, and nevertheless we speak of Gentle ha
2292.d nevertheless we speak of Gentle having reached its second part. How may this b
2293. heaven which he ascended in the morning, the other from the dungeon into which
2294. into which she descended in the evening? Glorious Church of Christ great in the
2295.Church of Christ great in the unclashing combination of thy unity, stretching fr
2296.ing combination of thy unity, stretching from heaven to beneath the earth, where
2297.e shall have it," he rejoined, clenching his fist, and darting a mad look at the
2298.ejoined, clenching his fist, and darting a mad look at the new speaker; "and tho
2299.thou, too, if again thou darest to fling thy baneful shadow across my path." Fab
2300.een for some minutes unobserved watching the contest, between what would have ap
2301. cool his blood, and still his throbbing about, almost without any purpose ; but
2302. but found himself imperceptibly drawing nearer and nearer to crisp and brows. H
2303.. He wandered preparation for her coming festival of full espousals to the Lamb,
2304. should sign her contract of everlasting love, as He had done, in blood, she had
2305.n over the dark garments of her mourning, a white and spotless bridal robe. In t
2306. thither ? It was a strangely comfeeling, made up of as bitter ingredients as ev
2307.ed the prisoner's cup. There was gnawing remorse there was baffled pride ; there
2308.re was baffled pride ; there was goading avarice there was humbling shame ; ther
2309.e was goading avarice there was humbling shame ; there was a terrible sense of t
2310. was a terrible sense of the approaching consum- pounded ; ; looked radiant and
2311.d ; ; looked radiant and almost dazzling ; while her tempter, wrapped up in his
2312. wrapped up in his dark cloak, crouching down to rush out of the low door of the
2313.e a black and vanquished demon, plunging into an abyss beneath. Then Fabiola loo
2314.of virtue in poetical mythology, a being of a higher sphere was recogIt was not
2315.hem upon her own calm bosom, and looking into her face with a gaze of blandest e
2316.stness, said " Fabiola, I have one dying request to make you. You have never ref
2317. but with blossoms; tin- e;irth is being loosened ) vines, und cpriiiK '.veiling
2318. loosened ) vines, und cpriiiK '.veiling buds, v. luir.rring for the sign
2319.iiK '.veiling buds, v. luir.rring for the signal from the southern has ju
2320. feel it, dear Agnes I feel it. Standing before you, I seem be ns a black spot c
2321.d to your brightness. And how, embracing Christianity, shall I become light like
2322.that one loves, of a sun, ul not heating, but softening, the slightly frosty iro
2323. of a sun, ul not heating, but softening, the slightly frosty irons, air. Such w
2324. us" (Fabiola "Wat started, recollecting her dream). refreshment shall flow over
2325. day, together with thousands, hastening to her shrine. The judge was sittin For
2326. enveloped in his toga, with a slouching hat over his 6768, so that his features
2327. object, as she stood immovable, leaning you already possess. What a glorious be
2328.u already possess. What a glorious being ! make you, Fabiola !" a new world yon
2329., Fabiola !" a new world yon are leading me to, dear Agnes Oh, that you were not
2330.dear Agnes Oh, that you were not leaving me outside of its'very threshold !" "Ha
2331.e gallery. They are the bridesmen coming to summon me. But I see on high the whi
2332.ds borne on the bright clouds of morning, and beckoning me forward. Yes, my lamp
2333. bright clouds of morning, and beckoning me forward. Yes, my lamp is trimmed, an
2334.ents you as I do, the happiness of dying for Clirist And now I will speak a word
2335.Agnes's, was their last earthly greeting. The one hastened home, filled with a n
2336.n her offices dwell upon it, as doubling her crown.* Suffice it to say, that her
2337.y fell, like St Paul's viper, clattering at her feetj " They are the smallest we
2338.ined the exasperated judge, who, turning to the prisoner, said, in a blander ton
2339.uary.J It was still early in the morning when she stood again before the tribuna
2340.cathed, without a blush upon her smiling countenance, or a pang of sorrow in her
2341. can, only love and serve the one living God. Eternal Ruler, open wide the heave
2342.to Thy Father by "I was a lovely morning. Many will remember it to have been a b
2343.ect, who saw " Secreof compassion rising in the multitude. sentence. out of the
2344.nsued, for the executioner wus trembling with emotion, and could not wield his s
2345.n her bosom, and her amber locks hanging almost to the ground, and veiling her f
2346.anging almost to the ground, and veiling her features, she might not unaptly hav
2347. next moment, flower and stem were lying scarcely displaced on the ground. It mi
2348.s right hand had looked with unflinching eye upon the stroke, and his lip curled
2349.wed this graceful act of womanly feeling,! as the lady stood, now in the garb of
2350.ood, now in the garb of deepest mourning, before the tribunal. 2351.st thou not, Fulvius, early this morning, seek that : ; and deliberately tell, h
2352.uldst thou save her life, but, despising the imperial commands, secure her still
2353.ial commands, secure her still remaining a Christian ?" gentle child in her cell
2354.hrough the heart, or struck by lightning. He looked like a man on whom sentence
2355.ked like a man on whom sentence is going to be pro: : nounced, not of death, but
2356.llory, as the judge addressed him saying " I Fulvius, thy very look confirms thi
2357.r, whom I have loved more than any thing on earth ; but let me bear them hence t
2358.her has shed over you, by every soothing word which a sister has ever spoken to
2359.nd if, when you return home this evening, you will be met at the threshold by da
2360.pted at its beginat your disposal." ning by a loud hiss and yell that accompanie
2361.d presently four slaves appeared bearing a Fabiola would allow no one but hersel
2362.nation, or that of the martyr. ; knowing your name ?" asked her sharply : Pray,
2363., I am not ; but I own that if any thing could make me one, it would be what I h
2364.n should have to live and "Why, entering his capital, throws, according to ancie
2365. entering his capital, throws, according to ancient cushandfuls of gold and silv
2366. her alliance, that Asiatic spy." tiling I ever knew upon though yet a child. An
2367.rouded thu the body of Bt. Eulalia lying in the Ut>i sup. immediate admission in
2368.aves, I had in hand, we h pnblio feeling likely to he caused by it, attri.nit.ed
2369. he did not disclose, for fear of having to try him, and thus brintring out whut
2370.of having to try him, and thus brintring out whut lie WHS now doi'i;.; depreciat
2371.itobio, 'a property, and ended by saying, that it would 1> a .tcraet, unpopular
2372.o W'ill curry 0111 ''wo oihei travelling requisites on h; ha\.- only one tiling
2373.g requisites on h; ha\.- only one tiling more to get for our for you ami me. jou
2374.rdinary intellect and wonderful learning, who was most .isly devoted to (lie wor
2375.. " I know her," said Maximian, laughing, as if at tho recol" Poor "ii of someth
2376.s if at tho recol" Poor "ii of something thing she sent me very droll. a'-l,< d
2377.t tho recol" Poor "ii of something thing she sent me very droll. a'-l,< d me for
2378.l,< d me for that wretched splendid ring, an. i 1 ! i they had finished ciui";el
2379.tullus produced the one prepared, saying he had fully relied on the emperor's ma
2380.d tha other, unmoved. but onr barwilling to make one more trial any win TC else
2381.erfumer's art, the traces of his morning's passion. He felt a keen presentiment
2382.rotas's cool discussion of the preceding evening, had prepared him the cross of
2383.cool discussion of the preceding evening, had prepared him the cross of all his
2384.ought, my way here. She has this morning blasted my character for ever besides h
2385.ter for ever besides his sword, securing in his took his weapons with him she ca
2386.he could deBut his look tect any lurking idea of escape from his gripe. was cool
2387.d no more. While this dialogue was going on, Fulvius had been divesting himself
2388.was going on, Fulvius had been divesting himself of his court garments, and atti
2389.self of his court garments, and attiring himself in a travelSo completely did he
2390.id he evidently prepare himself for ling suit. his journey, without necessity of
2391. journey, without necessity of returning home, that he even ; ; proceeded quarte
2392.s of different sizes, and was just going to give some ex; After waiting some tim
2393.ust going to give some ex; After waiting some time, he entered the audience-hall
2394.first he replied, " I have come greeting. humbly to pray your roy- al justice, t
2395.to pray your roy- al justice, to i being put into immediate possession of are of
2396.nes's property. She has been conof being a Christian upon my accusation, and has
2397.runk, half-furious, was Been approaching. Eurotas had just time to conceal the f
2398. ; had not the latter, his purpose being accomplished, acted with forbearance, a
2399. rescript, to an excellent and deserving person, the Lady Fabiohi." Fulvius did
2400.f ; lime revelations of Syra, concerning an unseen sphere of virtue, and its all
2401.een sphere of virtue, and its all-seeing Ruler, came from the same source, to wh
2402.ve, as all codes of philosophic teaching were ? This was a very different thing
2403.g were ? This was a very different thing from Christianity, ; She had as yet hea
2404.stianity, ; She had as yet heard nothing of its real and'essential doctrines, it
2405. the wounded heart, or as honey dropping from the broken honeycomb. And how much
2406.broken honeycomb. And how much had thing meant for a humble petition to be admit
2407.f recompense, for procurino; or bringing so important a docuWhat unexplored regi
2408.ceedingly wearied and unwell, she ceding day and night, and the sad scenes of th
2409.night, and the sad scenes of the morning, and must beg him to leave her at prese
2410.o longer perhaps even a philos- fancying that he had secured his prize. She desi
2411.mallest noise and she forbade any musing on the sorrowful scenes she had witness
2412.her might and, at last, she was dwelling on her being confronted with over a chi
2413., at last, she was dwelling on her being confronted with over a child suddenly c
2414. there not a tinge Fulvius, that morning, in the Forum. Her memory vividly of li
2415. think that she length checked by saying aloud to herself "Thank heaven had peri
2416.." her bright robe, and with her smiling countenance, and with The words were sc
2417., simple heart, straight on into nothing that she her eyes with her hand, as she
2418.rised herself on the point of mentioning her own father's name it sickened her t
2419.h the spiritual. Her mind was thus being shaped into a mould, which some form of
2420.r it must be broken her soul was craving as a parched soil, which heaven must se
2421.rely, well deserved the glory of gaining, by her death, her kinswoman's conversi
2422.further "You, Fulvius," she said, rising with dignity. intruder still ; not only
2423.the into you ; but we have a reckon- ing to make together of some weight. As to
2424.ke together of some weight. As to crying out, or bringing in help, you need not
2425.me weight. As to crying out, or bringing in help, you need not trouble yourself
2426.ttingly It was true. for upon presenting himself at the door, for him by Corvinu
2427.peror." The porter had at but upon being assured that he first denied him admitt
2428.ctly liis case and the porter, wondering that so many imperial messengers should
2429.ith my unexpectamiable soliloedly coming upon you, and overhearing your lesson I
2430.iloedly coming upon you, and overhearing your lesson I learnt from yourself in t
2431.re aware, were forfeited and con- adding, " "Insolent man Say that I am too ill
2432.d me to persevere in my suit by assuring me that his cousin had confided to him
2433.in had confided to him her reciprocating lnv. " i'abiola was mortified for she n
2434.I tell you this is your day of reckoning, and not mine. I have earned, even if b
2435. earned, even if by crime, it is nothing to you, my full share of your cousin's
2436.ty. I have me ; st-npid misunderstanding. "I know well, that my dear father was
2437.that dear child concealed noth- hi:< ing" "Except her religion," irony. interrup
2438. that you were but an object of loathing and abhorrence to her," ; "Yes, after y
2439.uch. From that hour of our first meeting, you became my bitter and unrelenting f
2440.ng, you became my bitter and unrelenting foe, in conspiracy with that treacherou
2441.t from me. It is like a rich man tearing the carrion from the hound's jaws, afte
2442.en his feet and rent his skin in hunting it down. " " I will not seek for furthe
2443. genuine honesty, her rare understanding, her candid innocence, any more than th
2444.bility, that you grasped at, and nothing more; I read it in the very flash of yo
2445.checked, deeply-moved fancy, was lashing itself up to that intensity of wicked e
2446.nued, with studied calmness, and looking fully into his eyes, "I now enis your m
2447.nd affectionate; as worthy of possessing her as " "As any one can be," struck in
2448.e," struck in Fabiola, "who, in offering his hand, expresses himself equally rea
2449., or unbribed?" " Of this I know nothing. But I know, that I would rather have d
2450.d of want than petitioned for a farthing of such prop- " And yet it is he has ma
2451.ness. "That was not enough. After acting in that character, with which you summe
2452.nd vengeance; such as, but for a feeling stronger than fear, which brings me wou
2453.ivate, my conversation, you this morning threw steal sive intrusion." , "We part
2454.vius, whose countenance had been growing every moment more flushed, as his lips
2455.e flushed, as his lips had been becoming more deadly pale. He rudely grasped her
2456.tempt again either to escape or to bring aid your first cry will be your last, c
2457.y his subtlety, as he had been reasoning to prove Fabiola guilty, flashed up ane
2458.t for a minute, then broke out, gnashing his teeth with rage " Now, madam, I con
2459.d unnatural cruelty, far beyond anything you have dared to charge on me Look at
2460.ousin's death, and the emperor's telling me that he had signed it ? Nor do you p
2461.prison at latest; while you were whining and moaning over her; while you were re
2462.test; while you were whining and moaning over her; while you were reproaching me
2463.ing over her; while you were reproaching me for cruelty and treachery towards he
2464. what is : ! ! ! philosopher, the loving, fondling kinswoman, you, my stern repr
2465. ! ! ! philosopher, the loving, fondling kinswoman, you, my stern reprover, were
2466. my stern reprover, were coolly plotting to take advantage of my crime, for secu
2467.take advantage of my crime, for securing her property, and seeking out the elega
2468., for securing her property, and seeking out the elegant scribe, who should gild
2469.h and blood, with his minium."* blushing ^ on, ; "Cease, madman, cease!" exclaim
2470., cease!" exclaimed Fabiola, endeavoring in vain to master his in still glaring
2471.g in vain to master his in still glaring eye. But he went wilder tone: ; " And o
2472.ithin her; her was to stanch the flowing blood with whatever was nearest at Roma
2473.o you never. Never shall you touch thing that belonged to that holy room, and de
2474.of mine, if it please you; but any thing been removed, had attached herself most
2475.e, Fabiola had been overjoyed at finding the umph over me, as one whom you have
2476.low so rapidly, and still more at seeing her and I disgraced you rich, and I pen
2477.ve made me; but I can prevent your being what you have no which accompanied that
2478.t to be. Now die!" While he was speaking these re- examined the wound, and prono
2479.emesis.* proaches, he was slowly pushing her backwards with his left present. Th
2480. while his biola's heart. But her loving servant, in spite of prohibition, right
2481.ohibition, right was tremblingly feeling for something in the folds of his had b
2482.ht was tremblingly feeling for something in the folds of his had been hovering n
2483.ng in the folds of his had been hovering near her mistress during the whole day;
2484.d been hovering near her mistress during the whole day; bosom. never intruding,
2485.ng the whole day; bosom. never intruding, but anxious for any opportunity which
2486.t her violently down offer, of seconding those good impressions of grace, which
2487.her by the hair. She made no re- morning's scenes could not failed to have produ
2488.e, she uttered no cry; partly a fainting and sickening a neighboring room, she h
2489. no cry; partly a fainting and sickening a neighboring room, she heard violent t
2490.y a fainting and sickening a neighboring room, she heard violent tones which wer
2491.on came over her; partly a noble feeling of self-respect familiar to her ears; a
2492.s she closed her eyes, she saw something like ment. She stood concealed in the d
2493. in the dusk, on the very spot lightning above her; she could not tell whether i
2494.here long, when the last struggle coming eye or flashing steel. In another momen
2495.the last struggle coming eye or flashing steel. In another moment she felt oppre
2496.s if a menced. While the man was pushing her mistress backwards, great weight ha
2497.n upon her; and a hot stream was flowing she followed him close behind, and as h
2498. him close behind, and as he was lifting his arm, over her bosom. passed him, an
2499.wound, checked, however, by encountering the collar-bone. Fulvius, in accents ch
2500.red her: it was the horror of imprinting on her brother's dashed to the ground,
2501. as he brow the mark of Cain, the making him doubly a fratricide, which deeply a
2502.esis !" Fabiola's strength was returning but she felt the weight and agility she
2503.ck was hopeless and other body was lying in her place, apparently dead, and cov-
2504.place, apparently dead, and cov- nothing remained but to accomplish her immolati
2505.she wished to ered with blood. stituting herself for the intended victim. It was
2506.ess's life and her brother's dagger. ing so manifested to Fabiola their relation
2507.r sign manual to me as a free and loving gift, and I will depart. If not, you ha
2508.ned your own doom." A stern and menacing glance accombp the you will hear, (rive
2509.ds forth virtue and shame. hardly having tended her in fever. She had informed t
2510.the wound had been inflicted, concealing the relationship between her assailant
2511.assailant and her deliverer. any knowing have had no need to forgive him to whom
2512., this Lord fnto your house, that coming He may heal you, and fill you with His
2513.nd fill you with His grace." Approaching the table, he took from it a particle o
2514.her placed in her own bed, and allotting to her reserved to herself exclusively
2515. privilege, as she deemed it, of nursing the servant, to She closed them upon it
2516.it, have kept it apart as a sacred thing and, when ill else was being packed up,
2517.acred thing and, when ill else was being packed up, should have folded it up and
2518.s breast. And now, in the act of drawing out his eastern dagger, he had plucked
2519.r. Dionysius, immediately after dressing the wound; and administering proper res
2520.er dressing the wound; and administering proper restoratives, which brought back
2521.," he added, " very early in the morning, when I must " see my patient alone. He
2522.u conscious of any other fault requiring humble confession and absolution before
2523.nfession and absolution before receiving the sacred gift into your breast ?" " F
2524.ce. I ; my heart," she replied, clasping her hands " I Him whom alone I have lov
2525.phere of virtue, objects, and conversing in a totally different sphere. probatio
2526.across her features, now a the approving eye of God, she had admired the idea, w
2527.xed on heaven for a against its becoming the constraining rule of hourly conduct
2528. a against its becoming the constraining rule of hourly conduct. considerable ti
2529.elf had proved fatal, Yet, sat unvarying upon her and then, she would as it migh
2530.virtue as , t r ,. ., prescribed feeling it an honor, and thinking it did her c-
2531.cribed feeling it an honor, and thinking it did her c-ood , ...^ i. , being its
2532.nking it did her c-ood , ...^ i. , being its ordinary standard, how chimerical t
2533., in the course of the day, after giving her patient .ut excitement, without glo
2534.nk nourishment, she said to her, smiling you are of concealment, this slave had
2535.Fabiola was evidently pained and leaning over her, said tin n, no theorist, but
2536.ed occupied with deep, but most pleasing, thoughts. Fabiola who never . . , ^er
2537. : ; : ' ! - ' ; to Early in the morning, according to his promise, the physicia
2538.- ' ; to Early in the morning, according to his promise, the physician returned,
2539.d to be left alone with her when, having spread a linen ; and placed lighted tap
2540.d scarf, and uncovered a Towards evening Dionysius returned and found so weat a
2541.well knew. Apimprovement, that, ordering more nourishing food he Dermitproachmg
2542.rovement, that, ordering more nourishing food he Dermitproachmg her he said, a l
2543. her thanks, for fear of further hurting Fab iola's feelings; and they continued
2544.is account of Sorapion, of administering Hoiy Communion to the ne kindf es us tl
2545.st duty, which my heart has been burning to discharge, that of thanking you I wi
2546.n burning to discharge, that of thanking you I wish I knew a stronger word not f
2547.an and vile to my own heart, by teaching me to undervalue what I cannot but priz
2548.ed not of virtue. I have been reflecting on it, night and day, since I witnessed
2549.t and day, since I witnessed alone being a victim worthy of God ?" but I further
2550.peak. it; and my heart has been yearning to speak to you of Fabiola resumed "I e
2551.ow you do not of one plant all springing one from another. I thought it bore wan
2552.Miriam who was now raised to a reclining position, took Fab- to myself to find t
2553.ola's hand between both hers and turning round towards branch forth even to that
2554. from what perhaps simple to a confiding mind. If, in my present igmight have be
2555.th the axe's blow, ay, and its preceding ignominious stripes, hibit Him to me, a
2556.- explanation?" " ONE " iola's wondering eyes a look of heavenly inspiration, aa
2557.or a now," rejoined the patient, smiling, "you have again Miriam prayed earnestl
2558.u have fulfilled your promise of guiding me. some time I have only been fearing
2559.g me. some time I have only been fearing that you might not be a ring God." Chri
2560.een fearing that you might not be a ring God." Christian; but it could not be. F
2561.en- the unfathomable Wisdom, overflowing on earth. tial principle ?" Miriam expo
2562.in the simple terms of Catholic teaching, "From a simple allegory, dear lady, yo
2563.trine of the Trinity then after relating the has, in one bound, reached and gras
2564.d the mystery of the Incarnation, giving, wholo teaching the alembic of your ref
2565. the Incarnation, giving, wholo teaching the alembic of your refined understandi
2566.he alembic of your refined understanding has in the very 'words of St. John, the
2567.ower, the very breath of His life-giving self, . life, which is Him- beconieth f
2568.as defended by Jesus against the carping gibes of Hia uel,'t which hi the Hebrew
2569.. For if it could only redeem by keeping extraneous to itself. Bright Miriam had
2570.when the breath of God sent it sparkling Saviour's love, so had she been as read
2571.pure as the flesh of Eve, while standing yet she had thoughtlessly injured her.
2572.ive of his Master side of the slumbering man, were the blood and the flesh, the
2573.ould understood at once the full meaning and merit of this self hufind in her, w
2574.rt and should, hi preference to allowing themselves to be yoked, that her sacrif
2575.ariot-wheels of this Fabiola, on awaking, crept back to her own conch, as she "
2576. the first time His active but suffering public life, and then His ignominious t
2577.ted by the tears and sobs of the willing listener and ready learner. At last the
2578. pretended to know everyTHE next morning, when Dionysius came, he found both, th
2579.hen Dionysius came, he found both, thing nor that she neglected to learn, for sh
2580.phemed its Giver for them both on having had a good night's rest. Both laughed o
2581.the at the idea; but concurred in saying that it had been the hapDionysius was s
2582.red at the death which was the ransoming, of piest night of their lives. Him who
2583.cked at, as the 'Crucified?" iam, taking the hand of Fabiola, said A flood of te
2584. care Miriam waited till their relieving flow had subsided into this catechumen,
2585. be regenerated with the waters soothing teries ! His place in a double genealog
2586.s place in a double genealogy, receiving thus into Himself a twofold tide of cor
2587.d shall there be any one on earth daring and high enough to call himself His fat
2588.how she her love, so that it might bring honor, however slight, to Him, id shame
2589.he- learnserve, in which the city nt ing of its philosophers, some of whom were
2590.t not that her frpirit has been hovering about your life by the side of the ange
2591.ide of the angel who guards you, guiding you unseen to this blessed hour. Ami, 1
2592.he throne of God, she has been unceasing in her supplications on your "My mother
2593.tions on your "My mother !" after giving me birth. behalf." Joy tenfold filled t
2594.ent up to the side of Miriam, and taking her hand, said to her in a low, soft vo
2595.seen symptoms of her husband's impending ruin and, determined that her daughter
2596. and be made available towards relieving their embarrassments. And on her death-
2597.that she never would allow, after coming of age, any alteration in this ar; rang
2598.we forget upon him as at once a blessing and a curse, the bearer both of tion, t
2599.to make is sufficient to add, that being the elder brother, but conscious ana, t
2600.ister of Agnes. herself useful, by being the ready messenger between the sick- t
2601.character did not fit him for sustaining the position of head of the family and
2602.isroom and the rest of the house. During her illness, as her strength improved,
2603.her strength improved, Miriam im- tering quietly a settled property, and having
2604.g quietly a settled property, and having a haughty a nbiparted many particulars
2605.y will throw some light on our preceding narrative, we its riches, he took but a
2606.ed, he told Orontius that he had nothing to wife's religion, doctrines of Christ
2607.pride, ambition, and voluptuouspreparing for baptism. He was wilful and artful,
2608.es the Greek language, then that nothing was too great or too little, nothing to
2609.ing was too great or too little, nothing too good or too generally spoken at Ant
2610. both in obedience to her mother's dying orders, and so much care, it -e she had
2611.ed to pass her days. She But women being more imaginative, and more under the sw
2612.ir//.v/;,y. lu>r of 91 ity of ! i moving, a Or i;u, and In ..ended to tin: ii, w
2613.ed him gradually with it, till shrinking yet from the actual commission of fratr
2614.icide he th he had almost done something virtuous, as the brothers of which bore
2615.ad Joseph imagined they did, by adopting a slower and less sanguinary method of
2616.er and less sanguinary method of dealing with an obnoxious brother. Stratagem an
2617.have already mentioned that of reserving the Blessed Eucharist at home for domes
2618. carried round their necks the Holy King for a voyage.* We need not say that Mir
2619.iam worn irely, folded in the only thing of price she cured to take from her fat
2620.ssel was out at sea, instead of coasting towards Joppe or any port on the coast,
2621.ood straight out, given proof of valuing, Ambrose relates of his ! if making for
2622.uing, Ambrose relates of his ! if making for some distant shore. What his purpos
2623. Satyrus, Miriam attributed her reaching the shore in safety to the precious bur
2624.gment, J showed that it was on returning to Autioch, reported her death, togethe
2625. would part with all he of the remaining passengers and crew. sod to rescue it f
2626.ed our narrative, was the outer covering in slaves, taken to Tarsus, on the main
2627.d virtuous One day, early iu the morning, she knelt before her ark; and characte
2628.am, under the name of Syra, camelo bring salvation her dismay she found it alrea
2629. Him. Like her, too, "as she was weeping she stooped down and looked" again into
2630.at she valued more than all her On going down to him and asking him his name and
2631. all her On going down to him and asking him his name and business, wealth. He w
2632. wealth. He was on the point of yielding to her tears and sup- he replied plicat
2633. him, then himself addressed her, saying secured on the property of the late Lad
2634. How is that "I will surrender any thing, all I have, to rescue from propossible
2635.k the pen in her hand, and after running her eye over the document, signed it. I
2636.he was only the i:;ster in his unsparing gripe. A more formal renunciation of he
2637.f our Lord, rho was deterred from daring to touch it, by nre rising up from it."
2638.d from daring to touch it, by nre rising up from it." / * See Marteuiie, De anti
2639.t.'' .'-mini settle all. You are running no risks this now She gave instructions
2640. in a more laborious task, that of going through the whole of her late father's
2641.late father's accounts, and ascertaining every De rnort* Satyri. mm Ibt. Joan ni
2642.ution might be made. And further, having ascertained thai C.n-vinus had really o
2643. hod looked down more carefully, shading his eyes hey pulled from the lig] iV.uu
2644.rough life. These temporal matters being soon disposed of, she diution between t
2645.h a small portion of her houseThe spring hold, to a spot dear to both, the Nomen
2646.ous animal beg it. others were, stirring she mentioned the occurFabiola went ren
2647.s tomb. What was her distress at finding poor Emerentiana, gone down to pray at
2648.o pray at her fostersister's tomb, lying weltering in her blood, and perfectly d
2649.her fostersister's tomb, lying weltering in her blood, and perfectly dead. It wa
2650.. It was discovered that, the ev passing by some Pagan orgies near the river, an
2651.e Pagan orgies near the river, and being invited to join in them, When she had n
2652. for instance, when he had been treating of the virtue and meaning of the sign o
2653. been treating of the virtue and meaning of the sign of the cross to be used in
2654. sign upon themselves already, beginning of every -work, on coming in and going
2655.ady, beginning of every -work, on coming in and going out, when putting on their
2656.g of every -work, on coming in and going out, when putting on their clothes, or
2657.on coming in and going out, when putting on their clothes, or sandals, when they
2658. from their fury into the villa. Feeling and wounded, she crept unnoticed to the
2659.on account of the persecution. By living at the very entrance into a cemetery, a
2660.d the last Sundays in Lent, on which ing days the Roman Missal yet retains a sec
2661.rived from this custom. Any one perusing the present rite of baptism in the Cath
2662.t before baptism on another the touching of the ears and nosThen were repeated t
2663.he middle of the grounds, was an opening, surrounded ory. But the doctrine of th
2664. the ceremonial of the Early one morning, beautiful and calm, for it wanted but
2665.t a few weeks to Easter, she was looking in that direction, when she observed ha
2666.on their way to angle in the neighboring Anio, were taking a short cut across th
2667.gle in the neighboring Anio, were taking a short cut across the villa, and so co
2668. cut across the villa, and so committing a trespass. They passed by this opening
2669. a trespass. They passed by this opening and one of them, having looked down, ca
2670. by this opening and one of them, having looked down, called the others. " This
2671.urch system received underground lurking-places of thfl Christians." " One of th
2672. Tract, ex rill, in Joan. was undergoing. It is enough for us to have shown, how
2673.f our example is thought worth following, some one will perhaps illus. trate a b
2674.of Fabiola and her household had nothing to in the city were cheer * it but pure
2675. me till I yourself, dearest The morning was spent in prayer and preparation, wh
2676.iu hand is on me now for towards evening the solemn office, which was to be prot
2677.nation at the sepulchre of the purifying waters. The whole remains to this day,
2678.r the water is now to be seen a painting of St. John then returned. " " God's wi
2679.he said with firmness, done, I baptizing our Lord, added probably a century or t
2680.of good tidings. On the Sunday following, " Sunday of the white garments,'' her
2681.nd silent embrace was her first greeting of Miriam. Both were so happy, so bliss
2682.te celebration, as we idea and absorbing pride, that day was, that now she had r
2683.r inferior. eternal kingdom, as a living member of the body of Christ, as and af
2684.The hour is come." said " Forshe, taking Fabiola'shnnd. redemption, as a new cre
2685. her so. give me, if I have been wanting in duty to you, and in good equal Never
2686.oticed the shortened breath, and heaving voice failed her. She looked serene and
2687.me on the morrow. till at length raising her hand to her forehead, then bringing
2688. her hand to her forehead, then bringing That evening they all kept their Easter
2689.her forehead, then bringing That evening they all kept their Easter banquet toge
2690.er breast, it fell dead there, in making the saving sign. Fabiola felt happy to
2691.it fell dead there, in making the saving sign. Fabiola felt happy to preside at
2692.ad retained. She never remembered having enjoyed so delightful a supper. as they
2693.hey do who have hope. Early next morning, Miriam called Fabiola to her side, and
2694. Romulea in domo, with a fond, caressing manner, which she had never before dis;
2695.is; ; ! Early, therefore, on the morning of the auspicious clny, the party crept
2696. walls to tin opposite side of following the Via PortnenBia, or road that lod to
2697.descended into tli brated aa the resting-place of tho Fenian martyrs, SS. Abdon
2698.by the pania, will "\SVwilIsi: m. spring, and talk over better things than ''}'"
2699.rpowered with grief. "Are yon then going to leave me ? I had hoped we should liv
2700.ed, but a tear was in her eye, as taking her sisFabiola underter's hand, she poi
2701.Pray to God, who will refuse you nothing, that I may not lose you. It is And now
2702.with evil tpirits. De Civ. D. lib eaying maw too, that I have learnt how much th
2703.forth, and tearful though happy greeting, ot the inhabitants of a city decimated
2704.imated by plague, when proclamation ming THE STRANGER FROM THE EAST. has gone fo
2705.reary. natural ? We have been describing not an ordinary period of peace and eve
2706. thick around us ? We have been reviving the memory WE APPEAR to ourselves to be
2707.ory WE APPEAR to ourselves to be walking in One had fallen victims, or who and t
2708.t was proposed to erect a column bearing the inscription Is it strange that the
2709.l property, public or private, belonging to Christians and confiscated, to be re
2710.f The Church was soon in motion to bring out all the resources of her beautiful
2711.ru institutions; and either the existing basilicas were converted to her uses, o
2712.ral dominions. Like one of those rolling storms which go over half the world, vi
2713.s which go over half the world, visiting And Let not the reader fear that we are
2714.et not the reader fear that we are going to lead him forward into a long history
2715.tter qualified for the task of unfolding the grandeur and charms of free and unf
2716.mise from above, spread like an inviting paradise before We our feet; little tha
2717.le various countries with their ravaging energy, while their gloomy foreboding o
2718.ng energy, while their gloomy foreboding or sullen wake simultaneously overshado
2719.one country, then on another, destroying every thing Christian, passing from Ita
2720. then on another, destroying every thing Christian, passing from Italy to Africa
2721.estroying every thing Christian, passing from Italy to Africa, from Upper Asia t
2722.urch is likewise more fully establishing her organization. book, We will barely
2723.e will barely what hung like a blighting storm-cloud over the Many who on the re
2724.turn of peace had hung down their having by some act of weak condescension escap
2725.d of hand mutilated; or when his halting gait show, dons of the knee had been se
2726.nflicts, that the foundations were being laid of a mighty system, The perdestine
2727.cted on Christians, his very eyes having started from their sockets, and Liciniu
2728.ed to destroy, stood young and bjiooming as ever, about to cuter into her great
2729.ola's villa. Scaffold-poles are standing up in place of the first; bricks, marbl
2730.en refreshed by a vision, and com- Being now baptized, she was repayiii pletely
2731.ely cured. debt of gratitude by building over her tomb her beautiful basilica. S
2732.parts of the world. city to her spending the day in attending to the sick, in an
2733.ity to her spending the day in attending to the sick, in an hospital established
2734.is arrived." ever treasured np the dying words of " Where is he?" Miriam, eagerl
2735.r replied " In the course of the morning I noticed, among the crowd, a man not y
2736.in the year 313 that Constantino, having defeated Even if ancient full liberty t
2737.le murders, adopted this way of treating Qhristiaus toward the end of the persec
2738.hey will always let (inn off for turning Christian. And, I am sure, I would turn
2739.inued the fossor, "he arose, and drawing from hia bosom a most beautiful and spa
2740.hia bosom a most beautiful and sparkling ring, he laid it on her tomb. I thought
2741.osom a most beautiful and sparkling ring, he laid it on her tomb. I thought I ll
2742.ught I llud seen it before, many ; thing, rather thun stain! " "Where cious. Pan
2743. " years ago. " And then ?" " He Turning round he saw me, and recognized my dres
2744.ached me, and I could feel him trembling, as, without Brother, knowest looking i
2745.ng, as, without Brother, knowest looking in my face, he timidly asked me, thou i
2746. ground. than an hour, then, approaching the tomb, affectionately kissed ' " Hol
2747.o die," shouted " the youngster, running away. Heigh Heigh! a panther hero for C
2748. growl was heard, and with it a piercing shriek. As they were passing by the Col
2749. a piercing shriek. As they were passing by the Coliseum, near the dens of the w
2750.oncluded Fabiola. Miriam, this consoling foresight in death 1" thou hadst then,
2751.the animal, by gestures and words saying: "Very likely, indeed, that you are to
2752.nstant, the enraged animal made a spring at him, and through the wide bars of th
2753.him. The stranger in who was long coming ; sent him out to procure a surgeon, an
2754.time, did his best to EABLY next morning, the pilgrim was passing through the of
2755.LY next morning, the pilgrim was passing through the of persons gathered round o
2756.ed round one they were evidently teazing. He would have paid but little attentio
2757. he looked older than he was, from being wan, and attenuated, the other did so m
2758.d, the other did so much more from being the very contrary. He was bald and bloa
2759.fox! my fox! Do you remember our hunting together those hateful Christians. Wher
2760.th blotches and boils. A drunken cunning swam in his eye, and his gait and tone
2761."Ay, ay, Corvinus," one youth was saying to him you get your deserts, now ? Have
2762.you not heard that Constantine is coming this year to Rome, and don't you think
2763.ear he puts us out of fear, by declaring all religions to be equally permit, who
2764.cian has seen you, for he is approaching." The doctor saw him, dressed the wound
2765.ainted by intemperance. that he is going to look up those who took nu active par
2766.f The unhappy stripe for stripe, burning for burning, and wild beast for wild si
2767.y stripe for stripe, burning for burning, and wild beast for wild sinners; where
2768.sinners; whereof he himself was a living proof. ted."* ; beast?" man seemed so?"
2769. man seemed so?" asked Corvinns, turning pale. . " Who says Kusebius, ubi tup. T
2770.ength his kind instructor, havprehending what louuded to him the fundamental mys
2771.in hope, rather than certainty, of being attended to, said 'And now, Corvinus, y
2772.imed the sick man, loathiugly. "By being washed in the laver of re^em-niting wat
2773.eing washed in the laver of re^em-niting water." a He was interrupted by a convu
2774. away! " I thought, as much good morning, air. I shall be happy accommodate you
2775. all the And stranger was out of hearing. With a decided step and a brighter cou
2776. the Nomentan way and after again paying his devotions in the crypt, but with a
2777.en this subsided, he would go on moaning wild beast past both, standing, Fabiola
2778.n moaning wild beast past both, standing, Fabiola ated before men, as they hoped
2779. remained at home that and the preceding day, in hopes of the stranger's return.
2780. to a fountain, when Torquatus, pointing to her, retired. thus: me! water! water
2781. is my portion. I am alit comes creeping ready on fire, within, without! Look ho
2782.s head. Then he would say, " Why turning toward his sorrowful attendants, don't
2783.t it out ? you see it is already burning me." Thus passed the dreary day, and th
2784.ses of fury, though the body was sinking. he raised himself up in bed, and looki
2785.he raised himself up in bed, and looking with halflength in a voice choked strai
2786.ugh her, when she found herself standing in his presence. " Madam," he said, in
2787.oseph was sold Hold it fast; it is going to enough. Keep back thy panther! " tha
2788. throat, he plucked grasp, as if pulling the beast sumed the pilgrim ; " but I w
2789.kteous corpse upon the bed. no claim ing I have learnt your mercy to one who cou
2790.ould have His friend saw how unrepenting persecutors died. upon you." " I do not
2791.rom the world in desert places, dividing their day, and even their night between
2792.ay, and even their night between singing the Divine praises, contemplation, and
2793.penance for past transgressions, fasting, mourning, and prayer form the great du
2794.r past transgressions, fasting, mourning, and prayer form the great duty of our
2795.d by his great example, THE next morning the pilgrim proceeded to discharge the
2796.have been first related in the preceding chapter. Been busily employed inquiring
2797. chapter. Been busily employed inquiring after some one, about the Januses in th
2798.eferred to, and the number corresponding The result of the to the entries was dr
2799.ht troubled me, and prevented my feeling complete assurance of safety, even afte
2800.ation. which must have been accumulating at a frightful rate of Yet it was amoun
2801.nterest, till it reached an overwhelming an obligation deliberately contracted,
2802.d. I was a poor cenobite,* barely living on the produce of the few palm-leaf mat
2803. See Bingham, book xl. o. 11. by pouring or sprinkling Clinical baptism, or that
2804.book xl. o. 11. by pouring or sprinkling Clinical baptism, or that of persons co
2805.yes. "Rise, rise," said Fabiola, turning away her "You are no bondsman of mine,
2806.w the religion I my de; so that yielding to grace, I bewailed '' common Lord." "
2807.ommon Lord." "Orontius, I have a sitting down with him, she said great favor to
2808. will reiii.'.jibe:-," he added, smiling, "that your "I know, I know whom you me
2809.ings. We had to charter a vessel keeping so I brought it to *t great expense fro
2810.iine, and where sustenance tu'.l hulging settled for a while at Gaza. Very soon
2811. my brow." They rose, and were advancing towards the house, v woman rushed madly
2812.gth, when all was exhausted, and nothing re-nnined Oh, save me dear mistress, sa
2813.Oh, save me dear mistress, sav ^claiming, n few jewels, of considerable price in
2814., but with which, to kill me !" but ling me, the poor oreatnre, her formr.r I kn
2815.ola recognized, lor a furious denouncing Jubala, but her hair was grizzly and di
2816.isery. She asked whom she a was breaking ont. One day meant. rebelled against hi
2817.trees; from " but I am ran down, issuing from a spring iu a rock " a little fear
2818.but I am ran down, issuing from a spring iu a rock " a little fear, l>ere is no
2819.ld long time." be heard but the bubbling of the water. "No, dear lady, why shoul
2820.lady, in my sorrows and remor "So saying, he drew forth two small flasks of uneq
2821.ted this to niy hi: mailer. this morning, he has beaten me, and threatened "I re
2822.difT rHut, thank God, I have been making myself ence of our doses; but he replie
2823.hristian doctrines, through the teaching of a friend." " How mud that they were
2824.nt gone on, Jub. I still refused, having no wish to die. But a sort of demoni- O
2825.viously, by a dark forer grasp, claiming, 'We must both perish together,' forcib
2826.i contents of the phial, without sparing rue a drop, down niy :r.9 and remorsele
2827.emorseless villany. throat. most racking recollection." 'Iu an instant, I was un
2828.e it for dead,' all my heart, for having " When he came for them, I was just goi
2829. When he came for them, I was just going to explain t happened; but I bless God
2830. Hilarion, a native of Gaza, who, having in Egypt, had that spent many years wit
2831.E CATACOMBS. Fabiola saw this, and going up to him kindly and frankly, her hand
2832.y, but not therefore despond." So saying she drew aside the curtain, and Orontiu
2833.ked at one another in silence, wondering at the just dispensations of Providence
2834.the woman. They were horrified at seeing an arrow quivering in her bosom. As Fab
2835.e horrified at seeing an arrow quivering in her bosom. As Fabiola supported her,
2836.abiola supported her, Oroiitius, looking behind him, caught a glimpse of a black
2837.aught a glimpse of a black face grinning hideously through the fence. In the nex
2838.e next moment a Numidian was seen flying away on his horse, with his bow bent, P
2839.his sister's history. Upon it were lying two sharp weapons, the points of both w
2840.aste, Orontius, "cried Fabiola, pointing and led to her exhibition of such Chris
2841.in. He was already at its basin, filling full his two hands, and and forgiveness
2842.s " The ever," concluded Fabiola. coming instantly, poured their contents on the
2843.mple of the martyrs African, pronouncing leads us upwards to Him. Their blood so
2844.dy. slaves. ; ; ; After this distressing, yet consoling, scene, they entered the
2845. ; After this distressing, yet consoling, scene, they entered the house, and ins
2846.ss of the house, so strongly contrasting with the luxurious splendor of Fabi- st
2847.es and Miriam, " May the former dwelling. in a small inner room, ola's But sudde
2848. the frame of it to be seen. Approaching nearer, he read inscribed on it, " THE
2849.n I a railway carriage that was whirling me rapidly from the Great Babylon for t
2850.lf in spend them in was a bright morning, my old home at Oaklmm, whore my father
2851.e elder gentleman was engaged in folding hw paper into the smallest possible com
2852.s, with the view of ultimately disposing of it in his coat pocket, observing, as
2853.sing of it in his coat pocket, observing, as Le did " so, that they seemed to ha
2854.t they seemed to have got a good working majority," and the words at once unlock
2855.of the Conservative party, and according to their respective views men were ever
2856.he unexpected ; England without enjoying the hos" They will have it all their ow
2857.t among take his own time at demolishing the Pope." my home pleasures and the su
2858.ed ; ; ; Shahs or Czarowitches, shifting of the scenes. graver years. Ten years
2859.ter the absence of a year or two, during which I had generally contrived that ;
2860.ental ramble, the prospect of revisiting my boyhood's home was reawakening the o
2861.siting my boyhood's home was reawakening the old associations ; and as I mused o
2862. clad in a plain gray suit, had. nothing special to indicate his rank, or call f
2863.so I found myself involuntarily scanning him afresh, a proceeding I was the bett
2864.tarily scanning him afresh, a proceeding I was the better able to accomplish fro
2865.ensible," said the man in grey, speaking rather to himself than to any of the pa
2866.le inspection of tickets, and the Having painfully done his duty with the mornin
2867.painfully done his duty with the morning paper, the scrambling exit of the two t
2868.y with the morning paper, the scrambling exit of the two travellers, whose place
2869.cs ?" I began. have made all the running," to which the elder replied by a " The
2870. he repeated, for the first time bending on me a and the young man's next attemp
2871.gaze, " Do you really think such a thing menting on the attention which the othe
2872.Do you really think such a thing menting on the attention which the other was be
2873. attention which the other was bestowing on the exists ? And then such a want of
2874.s and dusty hedge-rows. hold of anything." "Does it, indeed ?" was the reply. "T
2875.deed ?" was the reply. "To me everything looks "Well, I don't know," I replied;
2876.explanation "When you are We don't cling to this man or that, and we are uot alw
2877.used for half the year to see everything baked to brick-dust, ing barricades for
2878. see everything baked to brick-dust, ing barricades for ideas, but we keep the l
2879.he "May-be," returned the other,pointing to a well-timbered bit people," I repli
2880. The of ground we were then just passing "and yet I hardly know people yes, that
2881.k of individuals.' it : ; on the passing landscape, were never once turned towar
2882.fJAX J)TKJ" OR THE XK\V UTOPIA. thinking of?" I asked myself, in surprise. the l
2883.lk alone, and then only " in a j Hissing wiiy. our ways and make capital out of
2884.our ways and make capital out of abusing us." consulting his Bradshaw. ol' "And
2885.e capital out of abusing us." consulting his Bradshaw. ol' "And you find it beau
2886.d I began to worder what could be taking him thither. For be it known, dean-fade
2887.f the property, had succeeded in placing it in the midst of their plantations at
2888.amily, and occasional fanners journeying to and from market. My companion was no
2889.e, souls." And hivd towards the tapering spire of the village church, whence cam
2890. Ah you folk at home are always thinking of the county and parliament ; I did no
2891.t ; I did not mean "that. I was thinking of the people, the tenantry ; there mus
2892. should find the Oakham carriage waiting, and the porters at a white heat of civ
2893.ers at a white heat of civility. Nothing of the sort, however, met our gaze as w
2894. to take posses- that water, and falling water too have yon cascades in these si
2895.rts ?" "Not exactly a Niagara," laughing "but there is a fall on view, and the g
2896. " How far to Oakham ?" he And so saying, I led the way through the thickets, pu
2897.ed the way through the thickets, pushing inquired of the porter. " Park, sir, or
2898., above it was considerable, and wishing to place my com] leave it in the cloak-
2899.t at in the best position for commanding the view, I WHS making my sir seven. Wh
2900.on for commanding the view, I WHS making my sir seven. Where might you be going
2901.g my sir seven. Where might you be going sir ?" way over some jutting pieces of
2902.ou be going sir ?" way over some jutting pieces of slippery rock, when he culled
2903.ave way under right." And he was leaving the station when I caught his eye. foun
2904.ad," I my foot, and but for a projecting branch, at which I caught, I said throu
2905.ended, I was unable to regain my footing, as the precious deal pleasauter. sudde
2906.skilful "In that case," I said, throwing the reins into his hands, "I movement t
2907.on had struck said; " I saw your footing was failing you. But you really are int
2908.k said; " I saw your footing was failing you. But you really are into the pleasa
2909.the dust and rattle of Oh, it is nothing," I said really a sprain, just a that s
2910.monster this green twilight is something worth liv- twist, and I am close at hom
2911.or indeed my father's house " he So, ing for. continued, as we emerged from the
2912. on stood in the plantations overlooking the glen, and with the help the brow of
2913.ught me to the park scenery, terminating with a view of the lordly mansion, gard
2914. struck to my "Perhaps," he said, taking a letter from his pocket-book, heart. H
2915.cket-book, heart. He stood the.te gazing on every feature in the scene with "you
2916.can confer a last favor on me by telling me where this is mest interest, speakin
2917.me where this is mest interest, speaking now and then more to himself than to be
2918.service," he regenerally find everything so small " but my name"is Grant. I shal
2919.e of natural beauty, that plied, smiling " call on Mr. Aubrey to-morrow. it is d
2920. another moment he was gone, and turning to the house, Probably, but I have neve
2921.you on that idea," he continued, smiling, "it was that word I soon found myself
2922. of my life in Australia, never visiting my TlIK CHATTEU IT. ;/; nu rui: .\r.\v
2923.whose memory ho venerated with something of an old man's regret. My motlrer and
2924.place English middle-class, with nothing about it that a novelist's utmost effor
2925.ftly -cm, exotics. apartments glittering with all that was most rare and delicat
2926.tured two-and-tweuty. methods of getting through her mornings (and I have often
2927.ked across the Park to the early morning ; My father did the office of cicerone,
2928.arstairs clause. He could carry anything and anybody with him, there was such a
2929.e same. "Ho had a SOD, told That evening, as I sat in the midst of the little ho
2930.Mr. Grant, the bearer of this, is making a hort stay in England, and is desirous
2931.ay in England, and is desirous of seeing what he can of Oakham. I shall esteem i
2932.all the county remembers too, his coming of ago why, it was here in this gallery
2933. in this gallery that the duke, standing on a dais, received the Mayor of Bradfo
2934.s, and presented them his son, as a king might present his heir-apparent to a na
2935.d when the Russian he. two sous yachting off the Isle of Wight there was, theref
2936.were on their no difficulty in complying with the request that my friend mettle
2937.e, and it was my ankle before consenting to set out for the Park. It was the rea
2938.nue which led to the mansion, conversing with little of the embarrassment of str
2939.. The fountains and gardens, the forcing-houses, and pineries ; was popular," sa
2940.splendidly consented to the entail being cut means of cunning contrivances for r
2941.to the entail being cut means of cunning contrivances for regulating the artific
2942.s of cunning contrivances for regulating the artificial oft', and Oakham sold. T
2943.is the Bradford heat flowers of dazzling hues and bizarre forms from Mexico bran
2944.ol conservatories with fountains playing upon marble floors. if he would reside
2945.HE an appointment in India, or something of the preferred to go." "And the old d
2946.t of doors and my wife will be expecting you at dinner." " Much obliged," said G
2947.e last Duke of Leven. Grant said nothing, but, stepping to the window, looked ou
2948.Leven. Grant said nothing, but, stepping to the window, looked out for a while i
2949.ack, you will see about his things being brought down to the Grange." Jack was m
2950.Jack was myself, and exceedingly willing I was to second the ; severe. "It was r
2951.id. " It was just that There was nothing to regret." it should be so. young sir,
2952. of a great family can never be anything but a calamity in the land. That is how
2953.ng us. I began to feel a singular liking for him. After the atmosphere of London
2954., "but my outfit is much more in keeping with the Lion's Den than with Mrs. " Au
2955.'s Den than with Mrs. " Aubrey's drawing-room. " Stuff and " Mrs. nonsense, man,
2956.variety of costume it is a settled thing, then. Jack will bring you home to dinn
2957.s a settled thing, then. Jack will bring you home to dinner, and if Mr. Edwards
2958.ntleman in clerical costume was standing at the window, know nothing about me. "
2959.was standing at the window, know nothing about me. " with whom, on our entrance,
2960.ity of his words and manner, contrasting " Our I knew him well ; as it did with
2961.r was not an vicar, Mr. Edwards." ducing him as he was a reading man, of whom pe
2962.Edwards." ducing him as he was a reading man, of whom people liked to say that h
2963.w that you saved Jack here from breaking hia a "scholar and a gentleman." He was
2964.nd a handsome ley's friend, and anything more you can tell us if you like after
2965. the parsonage. the subject by proposing There were a few parting bows, and we l
2966.ct by proposing There were a few parting bows, and we left the library. My chang
2967. its collection father's cob was waiting at the door to carry him to the farm, m
2968.ed to the half-open door of an adjoining isn't it so ?" transfer to the Grange.
2969.cordingly admitted into our unpretending fam- and he seemed to like it. It did n
2970.ne as this as we emerged from the dining-room window on to the to me, lawn, stil
2971., lawn, still bright with an everlasting sunlight, and studded with its beds of
2972. man i'eels in the bush, who has nothing but his Virgil and his ; ; ment." siste
2973.d, as we approached my who was loitering among the flower beds. " Mr. Grant of o
2974.n over that of tha Bible." was extolling the superiority ejaculated; "our men of
2975.culture, as the would say, are beginning to say queer things about " "The Bible!
2976. home with them all but imagine climbing any of Mr. Jones's Brazilian ; ; ! NEW
2977.ainies ?" these " evergreens, or pruning one of his vines " I don't the Earl of
2978.e rest to enjoy the reputation of having the finest collection of tropical plant
2979.nderthese Bradford collieries are paying just now," he con; "Your plan is an ori
2980.al Conceive our good bishop evangelizing the publics, and bringing in the secula
2981.p evangelizing the publics, and bringing in the secular arm to aid him, in the p
2982. victualexpression, " tinued, addressing my father keep up the price of iron." "
2983.ghborhood " none the worse for upholding our venerable constitu- tion ?" "Andhoi
2984.red his throat again, and was hesitating for frightful amount of coal and iron n
2985.le of the social state of Bradford thing was disowned by the Conservative Commit
2986.ow that," I replied but, notwithstanding their " Bradford is a I said, " where m
2987.nst the beer-shops." Whilst thus talking, we had sauntered to a spot commanding
2988.g, we had sauntered to a spot commanding the wages are paid on Saturday evening
2989.g the wages are paid on Saturday evening in the public-houses, and spent before
2990.y an extensive view over the surrounding country. In the dismorning; and where h
2991.e surrounding country. In the dismorning; and where husbands usually kick their
2992.divided from us by a tract of undulating and highly-cultivated land, along which
2993.me revealed the presence of five kicking cases, true," said my father the Exboro
2994. me this new government of ours is going to view," I observed; "it gives just wh
2995.uestion ?" said Mary. " Well, everything there's the moor, which makes you long
2996.d have of it, if every one took to doing their duty ?" odd?" said Mary. " I wish
2997. who had no great capacity for following things up," of Parliament." looked a li
2998.people." wars, and therefore no standing armies ; nothing to punish, and so no p
2999.d therefore no standing armies ; nothing to punish, and so no prisons ; very lit
3000. in that view," said Mr. Edwards ; thing among ourselves." " poverty would exist
3001.dwhat your favorite law will never bring about. if the Now, or abject poverty if
3002.lergy can close the public-houses in ing, " And what is " doing our duty ?" said
3003.lic-houses in ing, " And what is " doing our duty ?" said Mary, because hadn't I
3004. your we better do it instead of talking about it ?" Lord Bradfords and your Bis
3005.XKW " " for any Exactly what I was going to say," I exclaimed a precise definiwe
3006.r ; "yea, and it has a good English ring about it." rule, Grant kept silence. "
3007.ouldn't help know whom you were inviting." " Pshaw dear cried ; ! it. I told you
3008.h no man would be justified in following. " "But there's the difficulty; there m
3009. the difficulty; there must be something or somebody to tell me that it is false
3010. false, and, if so, it is that something or somebody that gives me the rule of d
3011.f in a difficulty, and was not unwilling " It was Mr. Grant to shift it on to th
3012.f, and Mr. Edwards will not mind showing you his church on Monday." " I consider
3013., "or we shall get no tea this ; evening." Grant looked a little confused. "It s
3014.simple enough," he said, without raising his eyes from a rosebud which he was de
3015.osebud which he was deliberately picking to pieces; "I suppose there's the " you
3016.easons. This was a happy way of escaping from a difficulty and the vicar taking
3017.g from a difficulty and the vicar taking his leave, his departure was followed b
3018.silence. I saw that Grant was concealing a full heart under an exterior of compo
3019.d upon us. feel, Mr. he said, addressing my father, " as if I ought not to Aubre
3020.as if I ought not to Aubrey," be sitting here, enjoying your kind hospitality, w
3021.ot to Aubrey," be sitting here, enjoying your kind hospitality, without telling
3022.g your kind hospitality, without telling ; Gospel." "Quite BO," ejaculated Mr. E
3023.ere is anyof myself or my history. thing worth telling, "he continued, smiling,
3024.yself or my history. thing worth telling, "he continued, smiling, as he noticed
3025.ng worth telling, "he continued, smiling, as he noticed a certain " for look of
3026.not a returned convict. But in admitting a stranger to I your family circle, you
3027.do," replied Grant; " at least a Nothing wrong, my boy, is there ?" said my fath
3028. Mount, for ex- had taken a great liking to Grant, and as he spoke his voice beg
3029., my dear sir but at Oakham this morning you chalamong my own acquaintance of pe
3030.g my own acquaintance of people offering their left cheek when they've been stru
3031.y've been struck on the right, or giving their cloak to lenged me to tell you so
3032.cloak to lenged me to tell you something more about myself, and if you " " still
3033. Shall we " go ?" said my mother, rising. "Literal interpretations began the vic
3034.means, dear madam," said Grant, laughing. everybody followed there would be very
3035.hat Precisely what I started with saying," cried Grant if everyone simply did hi
3036.of a demesne like did his duty according to this view, I take it we should not h
3037.obliged him I don't need to say anything more about to leave England. these affa
3038.s just now, except that they had nothing to do with character. Bayard himself wa
3039. English woods or gardens. ' Our morning service is at half-past ten," said Mary
3040.ast ten," said Mary, in a only one thing to do, and that was to make wool and in
3041.s shepherds and then there's the killing, and skinning, and packing the wool. So
3042.d then there's the killing, and skinning, and packing the wool. So by you cannot
3043.s the killing, and skinning, and packing the wool. So by you cannot defer your v
3044.is employment, foi of an evasion. "Being Sunday," he said, with something of he
3045. "Being Sunday," he said, with something of he paid them well, and was a kind ma
3046.orrow to Bradford;" I exclaimed, setting down my "Ah, hem! THE AUSTRALIAN DUKE O
3047. UTOPIA. just a few plain words, telling ns that what we had got to do iu the wo
3048. him a fair of a fine scholar. something of books, and as time allowed him, he d
3049.don't know how it said Grant, addressing my mother, anything that would give you
3050.id Grant, addressing my mother, anything that would give you pain, or seem, as i
3051., and for a fellow Like me to be talking about such tilings would just be nonsen
3052.sn't always piety and that sort of thing that a man gets at the my dear lady," l
3053.iful, and to be all that because nothing else was worthy of a gentleman. Of cour
3054.uiite. Well, one day, as we were sitting down to supper, there word that old Mik
3055.d that old Mike, the shepherd, was dying, and that Biddy, his wife, was at the d
3056. of my education, and rode about looking up the settlers, and every morning when
3057.oking up the settlers, and every morning when he was with us, I served his mass.
3058., and they get up all that sort of thing now in tremendous style, but St. Peter'
3059.pherds and cattle drivers only, kneeling there in the early mornI tell you it wa
3060.ly mornI tell you it was the eave of ing, all so still, so humble Bethlehem " Fa
3061. me, "and there is only one way of doing it. It was not law that made the change
3062.ge at Glenleven, but two men with loving hearts, who Lived in the fear of God, a
3063.again, we came up to Dublin, and a thing happened to me there which I shall carr
3064.th him, and let Liim learn sheep-farming. It was a Sunday afternoon, and we two
3065.Sunday afternoon, and we two were coming home after a lougish walk, when we pass
3066.ows' sake, you won't refuse.' " Anything in reason," said my father wish for ?'
3067.hind wliich some old women were kneeling, They were not nuns, but, as I afterwar
3068.nd said our prayers, and I was wondering ' ; what is it you some sort, where I c
3069., where I can say mass to-morrow morning. " Well, a barn was found, and Father D
3070.Daly was at work half the night knocking and hammering, tilL he had got up what
3071.rk half the night knocking and hammering, tilL he had got up what did for an alt
3072.ll I describe him ? An old man, stooping and bent, in extreme old age, in his bl
3073. of Life destroyed, obliterated. Nothing left but the stamp utterable meekness.
3074., of a alb ; and iiuiple enough, nothing eloquent, nothing of fine preaching ; a
3075.iuiple enough, nothing eloquent, nothing of fine preaching ; a little he rose an
3076.hing eloquent, nothing of fine preaching ; a little he rose and returned to the
3077.ver be money, and it didn't do the thing you meek eyes fell on me and penetrated
3078.d so you see," continued Grant, laughing, "you see how it is that I became a wat
3079.e eyes of other men." But I said nothing. "Is that all?" said Mary. I was still
3080. door opened again, and a little serving boy came up to me, aud I think I still
3081. could at Glenleven, and as tle kneeling-place beside him, to which he motioned
3082.o you want to save your soul ?' laughing, way to stand much in need "'I do indee
3083. Father.' of Father Young's last warning." " "'Well then, you'll mind my words,
3084." said my " and for my heart was beating so I could not speak. mother, my head,
3085.ver miss bade us all good night. hearing Mass on Sundays, if you're within twelv
3086.s and here now, that and I was following, when Mary held me fast, and whispered,
3087.ered, " Don't go I want to say something." you'll guard your eyes,' and, as he s
3088. things.' "Jack," she said, half choking with emotion, " you see who indeed," I
3089."See? Who? Grant?" 'I promise you, thing' and he spoke slow and distinct, And on
3090.e spoke slow and distinct, And one thing more I have to say to "Yes, Grant^-if y
3091.fiddlesticks! Why, what are you dreaming of, your heart on them ; and mind this
3092.. Australia, and began the sheep-farming again. As I grew older, I often went do
3093.nings. My father, meanwhile, was growing a prosperous man, and people said he wa
3094.erous man, and people said he was saving money. But then came the gold fever, an
3095.r. A day or two before the end something seemed to trouble him. Willie,' he said
3096. said, I don't care to live for anything else, but I wish the debts had been pai
3097.it sure enough, though it was mortifying that she had guessed it before me. "Mar
3098.ou on a judge's wig, and in your summing up you'd beat the Chief Justice But wha
3099.we were right, it did not seem the thing If he did not want to be known as the t
3100.. At any rate we resolved to say nothing at present, but to wait for what might
3101. EVENTFUL DAT. AT breakfast next morning came the letters, one for Grant, sent o
3102. at our leisure, made our wny to morning service, where, I fear, the well-turned
3103.But, then, the land ?' " ' Worth nothing now, with every fellow that can do a da
3104.as the straight aim, the righteous thing of a soul that knew the worth of souls,
3105.trength and to whom all else was nothing. We walked home through the park. "I am
3106.t is, or whatever he has, he'll bo doing something. Take it altogether, TllU AUH
3107.hatever he has, he'll bo doing something. Take it altogether, TllU AUHTIIALIAN I
3108.d leuvu By this time we were approaching home, nml could see Homo one standing a
3109.ng home, nml could see Homo one standing at the garden gate, as it seemed cm the
3110.ur judgment." manner indicated something was the matter. "True," he said, and he
3111.you seen this, sir?" he said, addressing my father; you think ; must wealth alwa
3112.er; you think ; must wealth always bring such blindness witli it ?" " I fear it'
3113.that hav;: rich, i.' As with him looking over his shoulder : " though they could
3114. yacht, facts. " 'Water Lily,' belonging to Viscount Belmont, eldest son of the
3115.on board see what I Gibson : am thinking of." It was from his friend Harry but L
3116.tairs, together with the three remaining hands, were drowned, and all efforts to
3117.the bodies have as yet proved unavailing. We understand the deceased gentlemen w
3118.ceased gentlemen were the only surviving sons of their noble father," &c., &c. I
3119.Of the earl, Jones could tell ua nothing. He was in Scotland, he believed, and i
3120.th the bereaved father. There was a ring at the bell, and a buffcolored envelope
3121. legs, much less to write. I've stunning news for you. You remember Bill, the na
3122. native boy whom you saved from drowning? W3123. other day, and told me ho had something he would ?how t< but me or the master.
3124.he property must be about the best thing in the market. Lyndsay says what it con
3125.si* months hence I wont answer for being an honest man in spite of Father Young
3126.in spite of Father Young and hia warning. Faithfully yours, cat, . DEAII QBANT,
3127.as I returned the letter, hardly knowing whether to congratulate or condole with
3128.ey well spent on yachts and and residing near Belmont. We saw that the curtain w
3129.ont. We saw that the curtain was betting-books, and the best table in all London
3130.sands of souls in my gold-diggings going to perdition. closing heavily on the Oa
3131.old-diggings going to perdition. closing heavily on the Oakham family. what else
3132.nt it ? " ford he found us thus, waiting for the final "Grant," I said, "you ove
3133.ss he had felt in our little homenothing. think, Mr. Aubrey," he said, be going.
3134.g. think, Mr. Aubrey," he said, be going. You will be having plenty of business
3135.," he said, be going. You will be having plenty of business here of one circle i
3136.e sort or another, and the family coming, and I shall be an train, and we were p
3137.I shall be an train, and we were parting like brothers. I accompanied him intrus
3138.e mansion to prepare, alas for receiving the bodies, and give orders for the gre
3139.nd pineries on which we had been cutting our jokes the day before, all now an em
3140.thout delay. I shall probably be leaving England " FRESH SURPRISES. Wigram, and
3141., and had assembled at Ookham everything had been done with becoming solemnity,
3142.m everything had been done with becoming solemnity, for, indeed it was a solemn
3143.mnity, for, indeed it was a solemn thing to lay them side by side, the father an
3144.st of the Earls of Bradford. the opening of the will, Lord Duffield, a maternal
3145., a maternal uncl. Sir John Bipley being the two executors. There were so many t
3146. his el Jest, next econd son and failing both of these, and their children (and
3147.here did not seein much chance of making my fortune by English law, and so, to m
3148. no intention, dear reader, of troubling yon with my tlics.- and my ten years in
3149.y not without their utility in advancing his interests. I " William Grant Carsta
3150.d won't bind myself to say to a shilling the sum which I sent over grandson of t
3151.on had not been far wrong in calculating their value in Australia but I have uud
3152.lony, an enormous tract of sheep-feeding land putting himself in communication w
3153.mous tract of sheep-feeding land putting himself in communication with the Commi
3154., not possible " personal history during that eventful period. It was a busy par
3155.y life, and the duke was right in saying that I should not regret it. My concern
3156.nxiety. Much waa said in praise of thing," said Sir John. case for the lords, an
3157. had never been any concealment of being eccentric. I was sorry for this, though
3158. surprise me much more was that, judging by his own was equally plain. There wer
3159. branches of letters, far from despising money, he seemed to care for it a the f
3160.f which Grant was now the sole surviving good deal. He took his millions from Au
3161.k the "Grant of former days as something higher and more unwhich the occasion br
3162.there, lords it. There was another thing that struck me as odd. A year or and ba
3163.pened in Australia. year before, looking in vain for some one to carry his bag t
3164.iamentary debates on questions affecting Catholio But I don't intend to dwell on
3165.alian business ? Hariy keeps on pressing for some one out. Can you find me anywh
3166.ou to go; but if you decide on accepting the post, 1 " e you will not regret it.
3167.so, the papers, at any rate, had nothing to tell me but I about it. There is no
3168.o is there who to look back ut one thing or other as having been the slave of ;
3169.ook back ut one thing or other as having been the slave of ; lately. You know if
3170." I returned, then, to England, spending a London before going down to Onkham, w
3171. England, spending a London before going down to Onkham, where lived ; week or t
3172.hands, the duke would not >f his leaving the Grange. Mary had become the wife of
3173.for though iny "he's always at Iculating boy to something; you know it v. number
3174.e's always at Iculating boy to something; you know it v. number his hobbies; but
3175. are very creditable." "You are speaking, I presume, of the Duke of Leven?" I in
3176.t that rumor had credited me with having brought home an Australian fortune. Som
3177.e of those whom I had left just entering on their profession, had fought their w
3178.r capacities of usefulness. In returning to Oakham, therefore, I was still retur
3179.Oakham, therefore, I was still returning utill quired. "Ah, yen, you would have
3180.u would have known him, of course, going to Australia. Curious history his has b
3181.s mischief and then he's always sporting some social view or other; setting 1 :
3182.rting some social view or other; setting 1 : ; i ; ; 1 a little against the curr
3183. little against the current. " One thing, you know, he's u Catholic. world of po
3184. intelligent people, who know everything and everybody worth knowing, is, no dou
3185.w everything and everybody worth knowing, is, no doubt, a very agreeable sample
3186.der, it is still the world, and anything higher and bettor than what savors of t
3187. science, and a county member. Including our host and myself, we numbered eight.
3188.nner was For irreproachable. the passing moment I found myself a lion for the ga
3189.ty that. so completely out of everything. He can't take his standing ; proper pl
3190.f everything. He can't take his standing ; proper place in general society, parl
3191. the real explanation of the whole thing," " ; member, looking sagacious, and to
3192.of the whole thing," " ; member, looking sagacious, and touching his "there cert
3193. member, looking sagacious, and touching his "there certainly is a touch in the
3194.. The conversation in such a on enjoying a circle was as graceful and varied pol
3195.orwhich aimed, I will not say at proving men to be well-developed monkeys, for I
3196.en really a little touched ? Was proving my anything whatsoever, but at throwing
3197.little touched ? Was proving my anything whatsoever, but at throwing out pleasan
3198. my anything whatsoever, but at throwing out pleasant theories of he unpopular?
3199.heories of he unpopular? Or was he dying? Had his ten years of the possible prob
3200. the possible probability of their being nothing better. The boundless means pro
3201.sible probability of their being nothing better. The boundless means produced as
3202.s and mine ventilation, and the building of a intellectual inferiority of the Au
3203. to put a stop to all that sort of thing some day," he said, "and the sooner the
3204.tion in a good many of our manufacturing towns, only nobody " comes to inspect t
3205." comes to inspect them. ; no, RETURNING HOME. My first week at Oakham was given
3206.r, I shall introduce a bill for obliging all members of Parland, and, to tell th
3207.district, say opportunity for rectifying my ideas on the new order of Bradford,
3208.rd, for instance." things before meeting him. My father praised him highly, for
3209.influence ol' n for him. only regretting that he Mr. Kdwnrds, us courteous and h
3210. Oswald," said I, " that he has a liking for souls." character which he humbly c
3211.who happened to be present, said nothing, but I thought he looked a good deal, a
3212.hat Mrs. Edwards termed " monastic iiing of Unit austerity of Well, I should hav
3213.sposed to stone him by way of expressing their gratitude." How so ? Is he not po
3214.eared to be that his first act on coming to Oakham had been to lower his farmers
3215.e sells by thousands. It's a grand thing is our education movement it ; enables
3216. now-a-days to read his Degg." of making beasts true-born Britons. of themselves
3217.ith Oswald, and could not help observing with a surprise that the pineries and f
3218.a surprise that the pineries and forcing-houses kept their ground, and had even
3219.h!" said Oswald, " that was Mary's doing. She suggested to him that if he did no
3220.ots for his own table, he would be doing a good work to grow them for other peop
3221.ho would ever have thought of her taking the command in ; Immensely," I replied.
3222. in ; Immensely," I replied. And leaving his flowers in charge of one of the men
3223.nce, he led the way towards the building. It had an appproach through the shrubb
3224.ience of the congregation Verney, having found means of informing the chaplain o
3225. Verney, having found means of informing the chaplain of my presence, left me in
3226. open casements came the sound of waving branches, and the green and pleasant li
3227.e there used to hang in the great dining-room. It had been a Spanish altarpiece,
3228.t was a sacrilege to put such a painting over a gentleman's sideboard." " And at
3229.ou had better ask Verney." And so saying, he led the way to a small enclosure wh
3230.re where a young and intelligent-looking man was superintending the packing of v
3231.telligent-looking man was superintending the packing of various eases of fruit a
3232.oking man was superintending the packing of various eases of fruit and flowers.
3233. amazed at the quantity which were being delicately packed in cool moss, about t
3234.on. It was a single figure, representing a young man in poor and squalid attire,
3235.ng man in poor and squalid attire, lying on a bed of straw, and clasping a cruci
3236.e, lying on a bed of straw, and clasping a crucifix. The background wa dark, and
3237.corner of the picture appeared something like a ladder or flight of steps above
3238.l figure. All the beauty of the painting was in that head wasted, sweet, superhu
3239., superhuman in its expression, carrying me back to the description which Grant
3240.d I fancied I had understood its meaning. The noble youth who fled the world, wh
3241.rich against his will, and ever fighting with wealth and its temptations. church
3242. abounded were replaced by model lodging-houses. " The duke himself has a house
3243. perceived what had not struck exceeding richness of all its fittings. " That ta
3244.r my rneiidonsly long drive, and killing for the horses. ideas of it chiefly fro
3245.cle, ! and the last doubts and misgiving* vanished into thin air. " Oh, Grant, G
3246.alks and judges, and comprehends nothing you are not " of its form and fashion A
3247. seemed still to see before me the dying face of St. chapel, Alexis, and the gol
3248.t, home, and for the rest of the evening I listened, to Oswald's careless rattle
3249.your duke a man of business this morning," he " but said, just now I could fancy
3250.out his gold; "Well, there was something about the whole thing that struck me as
3251.here was something about the whole thing that struck me as I "A poet it poetical
3252. if the duke was ever conscious of doing anything "waiting on his Grace," but at
3253.uke was ever conscious of doing anything "waiting on his Grace," but at once he
3254.ver conscious of doing anything "waiting on his Grace," but at once he stopped m
3255.ubrey." We went into dinner. Remembering all I had heard of his eremitical habit
3256.ight be to notice, and I noticed nothing. There was no gold plate, certainly but
3257. have liked it !" said Oswald inspecting some new engines for his mines. Oswald
3258.o Mary that if he certainly had a liking for business. After dinner we stepped o
3259. how it reminds me of that happy evening at the Grange, Jack, when you all made
3260.ked. at home. I couldn't say the feeling it gave me to see " I believe Lord Exbo
3261.a talk to the old lady, that I may going to be a lay brother." it's the most lov
3262.orough Moor, where Leven has transadding to the place since I was here, I said.
3263.nnate sense of beauty." ON the following Monday the Duke returned, and next day
3264. received a brief note from him, begging me to come up to the Park, to dine and
3265.of the Queensland business the following morning. I went up accordingly, was sho
3266.ueensland business the following morning. I went up accordingly, was shown to my
3267.terwards ascertained, the hour preceding dinner was the one hour in the day he c
3268.nd expression. I stammered out something about better if " Yet the Exboroughs ar
3269.id Oswald, "and immensely proud of being of the old stock, and all that sort of
3270.he old stock, and all that sort of thing. But Lady Ex. goes in for London season
3271.l?" "Ah, yes, I couldn't always be going over to Bradford, as on that eventful S
3272.miled. " That was poor Werner's painting; such a felout of whom he cherishes the
3273.whom he cherishes the design of creating a New a true painter a man with a soul
3274.ve all manner of schools of art, carving and metal work ; then there are the "Re
3275.rust a new graperies." woman for getting ; inquiringly. ; "I really cannot tell
3276.iety is somewhat a difficult undertaking unless you take conceived the idea of a
3277. burnt poor Adorns ? "Who's been talking about all bound. offer." that nonsense?
3278.d by , men and women of his own bringing up, who shall penny newspapers, lie gre
3279.or a mouth, with hard labor, for selling prints in a shop window that shock the
3280.riends have all ; got a trick of leaving me." "Is he dead, then," I asked, gentl
3281.e for the Elector," said Leven, laughing "I know what you mean," he said quickly
3282.t way do it, and I give them my blessing but I can utter failure. No, of course,
3283.an that my beggar." there's been nothing done; but, oh, the depths of iniquity "
3284.aces like that, and all England seething with ; plaguing He bent his head for a
3285.and all England seething with ; plaguing He bent his head for a minute or two, a
3286.ith God." " Cousin boy, who came running down the terrace to inform "And how abo
3287.t you are Leven" that coffee was waiting and as we turned to obey the trying to
3288.ting and as we turned to obey the trying to create a Garden of Eden there, with
3289., summons, by prattle tions for shutting out the serpent?" away of all he had be
3290. serpent?" away of all he had been doing or wanting to do whilst Cousin " If you
3291.away of all he had been doing or wanting to do whilst Cousin " If you mean the a
3292., the boy set off to announce our coming, and Leven "What beer actually prohibit
3293.ow can After me have had the whole thing looked thoroughly into. they get it to
3294. ceases, and I am at full libersomething about licensed to be drunk on the premi
3295.or run through it " I do it this fessing to a hobby. way, Jack they all have dur
3296. a hobby. way, Jack they all have during my life, and leave it to nobody. The la
3297.nth, a week of innocence is worth living for at least "Grant," I said bluntly, "
3298.you might without that sort was speaking of what the world styled his crotchet.
3299.nd, then, family life All I was thinking was, you know its beauty, you feel its
3300.ere Well, stronghold !" he said, smiling. I mean is this family life is not the
3301.ctor of Bavaria, and reformed everything. B full of beggars, and no one knew how
3302.d family he replied, "and a lovely thing it was, that of Christian society ; I h
3303.society ; I hardly think I know anything finer. Bat, bless you Jack, where shoul
3304.nversion, " the pride had the boys bring their quota, and that series of bees' a
3305.ery hour they give to this sort of thing I gradtime, and until it was finished I
3306.t a few of those lads have been thinking to good purpose, revenue, and its admin
3307.e home ties of which you speak, claiming r Well, but listen the room, emptied ou
3308.hidden. But I was witness to the amazing correspon; " " What does Edwards say to
3309.plications (not always the most becoming, or the most reasonable), to the unalte
3310.le, where, Oswald tells me, he expecting you to-morrow. I shall join you there i
3311.s ways he conceived the notion of making the volunteer rifle corps, of CHAPTER I
3312.them all together. " It is no bad tiling the ter Mary, in particular, had not th
3313.lleries of art and library, his anything of a hero but he was an excellent fello
3314.Mary supplied the plain 1 '. whom during part of the day on Sundays, and among t
3315.keep them together?" "The simplest thing in the world," he replied "I started kh
3316. gift and the countenance need something else to soften their sharp edges, and t
3317.en their sharp edges, and that /omcthing seemed -wanting in Florence Oswald. sty
3318.dges, and that /omcthing seemed -wanting in Florence Oswald. style bnt in his la
3319.e true genius of that particular calling she understood her Christian, and Mr. D
3320.Degg has an angry aversion to everything that savors of the faith." husband's wa
3321.on foolish things, without ever dreaming that he was poor Degg he writes extrava
3322.gantly, as men of genius often do, doing managed she took in girls from the vill
3323.d with sion but he cares for the working classes, and can't always " their awkwa
3324.s whilst they were in course of training. control himself when he pleads their c
3325.looked as if somebody was always putting it to Degg cares "Florry, don't talk no
3326.out it, and Mary herself for the working-classes just hi the same way as I care
3327.tments, and long, silent get from taking part with the weak against the strong V
3328.y, and the pleasant sensation of putting down his betparison, was a homely one,
3329.e to be seen in it only half a dozen ing of our glorious constitution, I suspect
3330.was already in possession of on floating into parliament on the tide of universa
3331.ffrage." Master Edward, his claims being stoutly contested by Alexia, "Well, so
3332. surveyed the group, " Mary representing ,ihe old school, and Alexia standing up
3333.ing ,ihe old school, and Alexia standing up for the rights of man or rather of w
3334.esent instance, Mary will be the winning horse," " I never said Oswald ; yet kne
3335.he art of " Just so," said Oswald making herself agreeable, she would never have
3336. replied, carelessly "she " So are going to Glenleven ?".said Knowles, addressin
3337.to Glenleven ?".said Knowles, addressing you leta him lead the pony, as though s
3338.d not know how to me, by way of changing the subject; "I suppose it's your first
3339.me as though this so continually hearing of Glenleven, that I'm glad at last to
3340.chismatical piece " at least party being Wilfrid Knowles, who liked to be called
3341. liked to be called "Father of according to our enjoyment ?" inquired Florence,
3342.se of sacerdotal superihave an unfailing command of temper "I, for one, deeply d
3343., then, Mr. Knowles, on your own showing, poor Mr. Degg no more deserves to be s
3344. my life if I thought I should badgering. ing comfortable; " ably acquainted wit
3345.ife if I thought I should badgering. ing comfortable; " ably acquainted with Lev
3346.s Jii;i " separations. to be considering telling yon of him the other day the ed
3347." separations. to be considering telling yon of him the other day the editor of
3348.rrigible " so I sister suppose you being fair accounts for it." " " Indeed, I ho
3349.y geniuses seem to me to be always doing or saying something they'd better have
3350. seem to me to be always doing or saying something they'd better have ; ; "I nev
3351.e to be always doing or saying something they'd better have ; ; "I never thought
3352.yet thanked you," she said, " for taking the part of poor genius. I really thoug
3353. thinkers " to me. speak pick everything to pieces, and leave it so. " The worst
3354. of your say," geniuses are just nothing but sky-rockets after all, and go out c
3355.to get at truth?" whilst you are staring at them." "Those who analyze," I said,
3356.you what you mean seems to say something, and it says nothing. watch with anothe
3357.ms to say something, and it says nothing. watch with another to regulate, but no
3358.nly," she replied "I don't them, leaving Oswald and myself tete-a-tete. Poor Osw
3359.e real tongue was ber," I replied. thing, Mr. Aubrey, whatever be its kind. Char
3360. set women on such scents I derful thing is woman !" don't understand ; and it's
3361.altogether, you know, and unthat evening, but when I retired to my room I could
3362. a way now-a-days," I said, " of looking un- going over it all again, as a lawye
3363.-a-days," I said, " of looking un- going over it all again, as a lawyer studies
3364.ll of her own powers, and always wanting a career of some sort, and can't settle
3365.but I think it's a mistake ; he becoming one, it will only rouses over-preaching
3366. one, it will only rouses over-preaching not be by the ministry of Father Wilfri
3367.ed thus Exdale was in the to the drawing-room, where we found Wilfrid and parish
3368. at the further end of the room, playing a game of fox-and-goose with tlle Oakha
3369.wo little girls looked on, Alexia acting as were busily engaged with plans for i
3370.tions in great store, the all her losing inspection of which furnished the drawi
3371.nspection of which furnished the drawing-room party with on geese !" " I wish I
3372.ce, with a sigh. Then, agreeable morning's occupation. of Mary's home thrusts,"
3373. Wilfrid ; "a genius is an erratic thing at best much like a comet, as it, "One
3374.comet, as it, "One might have a trifling advantage over sky-rockets." Yes, but o
3375.kets." Yes, but one isn't always groping one's way in the dark." " Well, really,
3376.what find night, they " you people doing." "How so?" "Why, brilliant and as unsu
3377. Screened by my newspaper, much edifying talk over sedilia and holy water stoups
3378.ups fell upon my ear and I was wondering 1 n little about the exact utility of t
3379. the garden we made our way, and finding a seat adapted for story-telling, I beg
3380.finding a seat adapted for story-telling, I began at the beginning, and r< my fr
3381. story-telling, I began at the beginning, and r< my friend's history and experie
3382.sh-rangers, with the old priest standing up there in the midst, and speaking out
3383.ding up there in the midst, and speaking out to them like a man and the others,
3384." said fact, then he spoke as one having authority, who had the truth " " but a
3385.nciently practised on authority touching Easter morning," and he preceded to rea
3386.sed on authority touching Easter morning," and he preceded to read from a glossa
3387.d no definite sense to her understanding. " Gothic art the description of an ela
3388.Perhaps I don't quite catch your meaning; I cannot see how one man has any more
3389.nother but if obsolete." "I was thinking it must be so," said Florence, who had
3390. Buddha. " Holy but I never saw anything at all like what you have described." Y
3391.scribed." Yes, that is the sort of thing we have to listen to now-a-dnys "No," s
3392.xamples of the way what they are talking about, and not two of them would be abl
3393.iodical, and it sounds free and slashing BO it is quite in harmony with that pec
3394. water let us proceed." The next drawing was produced it represented an elaborat
3395. of gold and silver what you are driving at. Me. Knowles' favorite theory of I h
3396.ened to it till I am dishes with nothing to eat upon the table." oft-jective tru
3397.ike those bees there, that are gathering their honey from every banquet would th
3398.great story had made on her, by plunging her afresh into captious me, "I I could
3399.captious me, "I I could not help calling to mind her own earnestness. respect yo
3400.ment though I do indeed ; were we aiming at the revival of external cere- words
3401.ival of external cere- words the evening before, on the peculiar vice of similes
3402. that moment Mary approached, indicating the break-up of the monial is not an em
3403.t an empty shell ; in time it will bring back the Archfeological Committee Flore
3404.with a vehement emphasis, which "telling her all about the Duke of Leven." "Ah!"
3405.d Mary, "how well I remember the evening he made Mr. Buttermilk look up through
3406.it is for the Yes," she replied, leaving the group of archaeologists, and coming
3407. the group of archaeologists, and coming over to my quarter of the apartment, "c
3408. the possibility of a reality ever dying, whatever of blurting out his views, as
3409.reality ever dying, whatever of blurting out his views, as if prepared to run hi
3410. Indeed 1" I said. "I have heard nothing about them ; but life, and how for the
3411.with I assure you," I said. and, wishing to do the greatest posi'oility, aouut o
3412.d, the actual results are always falling short " his desires." weakness. He's "\
3413.erfectly welcome ; I shall neither bring him into court, nor shall he bring me."
3414.bring him into court, nor shall he bring me." Oswald's disappointment was intens
3415.sappointment was intense ; but something in the duke's manner made it difficult
3416.erpreted, might be understood as meaning either despair at the eccentricity of h
3417. friend, or a fervent desire of impaling the unhappy culprit. CHAPTEB X. DBOG'S
3418.lprit. CHAPTEB X. DBOG'S ESC APB. During dinner, and the hour or two of conversa
3419. so, he did not he appeared to be giving Wilfrid his it in his manner whole atte
3420.ffected by the duke himself, who, having succeeded in obtaining a short respite,
3421.self, who, having succeeded in obtaining a short respite, took refuga in an armc
3422. you. Charley here was already preparing the faggots." "I daresay he would have
3423. would have run a fair chance of burning in that fourteenth century Mr. Knowles
3424. Eeasons for what ?" " For not punishing him. Was it generosity ?" " Well, I'm n
3425.best places in the world for fos; tering charity." 'And was that all?" ' No, not
3426.es considered, I should feel it shocking if Degg were to be held up to judgment
3427. to be held up to judgment for libelling me, when for these many years past law
3428.ble to call him to account ior libelling my Master." " Your Master !" ejaculated
3429.. He has not been content with assailing what he calls sacerdotalism in all its
3430.ot like to offend your ears by repeating the titles of some of his things yet fo
3431.o against one's at least that my feeling." There was a long pause : Florence lea
3432.r hand, and seemed to be really thinking ; Grant took up a book of photographs,
3433. " Faith yes, must be a wonderful tiling u wonderful motive-power for ; nay, mor
3434.n't be shocked. It must be a grand thing to believe as you do ; but to some mind
3435.berately to say that you believe nothing?" said Grant, looking at her with those
3436.ou believe nothing?" said Grant, looking at her with those grave, penetrating ey
3437.ing at her with those grave, penetrating eyes that were so rarely turned to meet
3438.at but not what you would call believing." "Let us come to particulars," said Gr
3439.I don't believe that you believe nothing. And if there is any one ; Plans for th
3440. includ Exdale Church, Mr. Knowles being desirous that questions in debate about
3441.ort Edward and the children on a fishing expi a visit to thing you do believe, o
3442.ldren on a fishing expi a visit to thing you do believe, obey it, and it will le
3443.ith a great array of baskets and fishing-re Florence herself being the driver. O
3444.ts and fishing-re Florence herself being the driver. Oswald had challenged the d
3445.perty. posed improvements, the repairing of farms and rebuilding tion, yourself.
3446.s, the repairing of farms and rebuilding tion, yourself. " Well, I will take the
3447.ould, she well knew, pledge her to fling to the owls and the bats a vast assortm
3448.l views she had been fond of ventilating and yet to say No in plain English, and
3449. we returned from our ri and on reaching the house, we found that the fishing pa
3450.ing the house, we found that the fishing party 1 preceded us only by a few minut
3451.minutes, and were in the act of Bcending from the pony-chaise. " What a lather o
3452.in !" said Oswald. " have you been doing with him, Florry ?" " Dobbin was naught
3453.e a soul you don't think you are nothing but a body, a handful of dust, do you ?
3454. peared from the scene, Edward remaining behind to witn the departure of the hor
3455.. Grant drew Edward aside. "Has anything been wrong ?" BOUl." Why?" said Grant,
3456.off on a gallop, and Lexy called running away. He pulled up when he came to the
3457.d an 'Angel of Ck they are facts, living real> that we might not go over the cli
3458. you must obey We all met in the drawing-room before dinner. them." "How pale yo
3459.Bit. and Alexia liked to call it running away. By and holds you in His hand, and
3460. wonder you don't get posts or something pui have a soul, an immortal soul, as y
3461.must care for it as you care for nothing else and this taking " That's where " O
3462.ou care for nothing else and this taking " That's where " Of course it does," sa
3463.ed subdued tone, murmured, to excuse ing him," said Florence ; and there the mat
3464.l silence, spent the rest of the evening singing her next door neighbor an old g
3465.e, spent the rest of the evening singing her next door neighbor an old gentleman
3466.duke or of Dobbin. CAPITtrLATION. During the rest of the evening, Grant had to r
3467.trLATION. During the rest of the evening, Grant had to receive and THE next morn
3468.rant had to receive and THE next morning when we met at breakfast Florence was t
3469. him. She abstained alike from provoking he was one who never forgot, and he wat
3470. general, be ft deal forth much edifying talk without so much as a single con- m
3471.hin ear-shot, I was able, while sidering the next move of my queen, to catch the
3472.gue. I right," said Grant, "in supposing that the drive toBaker's Bit, was not a
3473.tain air and the solitude, At an opening of the hills Am we came rather suddenly
3474.med of well-built cottages, not boasting of what Leven would ouce have called th
3475.s he was careful to inform me, rejoicing in good ventilation and drainage. The h
3476. that is, where, as " " he said, Nothing and nobody was licensed to be drunk on
3477.ned to indicate that there was something more she half ded to say. Grant did not
3478.little out of the village, in a charming spot, fenced about by beech-woods, and
3479.fenced about by beech-woods, and looking down the valley, was the Duke's house,
3480.tached to a small farm-house, containing six rooms, to which to retire it was hi
3481.tered with the glee of a man who sitting-rooms, and a couple of bedrooms, with o
3482.re was plain and Two the bedrooms having the rural look of cottage neatness and
3483.age neatness and poverty. Of the sitting-rooms, one was a dining parlor, the oth
3484.. Of the sitting-rooms, one was a dining parlor, the other his private study ; i
3485.all right," tie eccentric. You replacing but pieces, whilst I continued to play
3486.tle more to hear only the duke's parting words, give said, ; ; will let me you y
3487.versation ended. pile through an opening in the trees, and as we stood to gaze a
3488.d as we stood to gaze at ic next morning we left Exdale for a week at Glenleven.
3489.nleven. it, the deep tone of its chiming bells came up from the valley. ard was
3490.. ard was left behind, Florence pledging herself that he when ho told me. . " mo
3491.ken two steps to no harm, and the riding and fishing should not gether banish th
3492.s to no harm, and the riding and fishing should not gether banish the Latin Gram
3493.g, old come ; is always wrong in judging that people have no hearts, eryone has
3494.it." le laid. was built, like everything else at Glenleven, of granite, and seem
3495.t that adventure for fear of frightening Mary. Most men would have jabbered abou
3496.e must We reached the gates, and ringing at the door, were ushered by a lay brot
3497. one, to whom Leven knelt for a blessing, and whom I guessed to be the abbot, an
3498. a few minutes of pleasant, easy talking, they told us that vespers were about t
3499. cities and the hum of men iks, building the two transepts forming separate chap
3500. iks, building the two transepts forming separate chapels under the two great to
3501.UKE OR THE soar away into arch, catching the evening rays, and seeming to amazin
3502.oar away into arch, catching the evening rays, and seeming to amazing heights of
3503., catching the evening rays, and seeming to amazing heights of flickering light
3504.the evening rays, and seeming to amazing heights of flickering light and shadow.
3505.seeming to amazing heights of flickering light and shadow. Presently there enter
3506.the first time I listenwhole ed, awaking in me a new sense, yet one to which my
3507.hour for the otters." river, ; 1 nothing in particular. Church, CHAPTER XIEL UTO
3508.nd became their interpreter, translating their sense from the ear to the heart,
3509.hen it ceased I found I had been weeping. ! ! was about the fourth day after our
3510.hilst I had the gratification of reading a lengthy re with his letters, " United
3511.h his letters, " United Col of a meeting of the port in the Exshire Gazette, had
3512.s, Messrs. Redfever, and pas The meeting, t certain resolutions under their insp
3513.arand delicately ornamented then passing back, the duke off by gilded gates, poi
3514.f an English saint, the brave Saxon king whose remains It of the county. lay for
3515.how li!' pidest of temptations something We disinterred the sacred relics, and b
3516.t them here, and have succeeded in doing, and, therefore, you resolve to to do m
3517.hey rest there over the altar." by doing less, instead of trying We knelt and pr
3518.altar." by doing less, instead of trying We knelt and prayed before the shrine o
3519.rious I remained silent. and then rising, we passed to the southern transept. "N
3520.. "Now look here, Jack, you are thinking of those colliers, tell dignation " I a
3521.n years more." enough "But ntaking it, is it ?" I replied. "That is stl ai
3522.ad in ducal robes, with his feet resting on his good dog, his grave, manly featu
3523.st. The tomb itself displayed no carving beyond the quatrefoiled panend the fami
3524.he effigy, and the excitement of burning it exactly as thes enjoyed have enjoyed
3525.hose poor outcasts have not." everything, in short, "And what is to be the end o
3526. tl things stand here," are discouraging," "The end of it, Jack, is neither in y
3527.eason why we should not do what com ding but 1 ; to fore, 15 16.) a prepared for
3528.ons," I said, as I recalled the flashing eyes of the Grant of former years, and
3529.rquis of Caretairs, Eleanor and kneeling together, Leven and I softand his wife,
3530.t of the two monu" ments. My own resting-place," said Lcvcn, as I pointed to " S
3531.nted to " Some far off, I shall be lying here it. day, perhaps not very Do Profu
3532.t very Do Profundis. and make easy thing to keep the commandments, a little expe
3533.ake a very different view of the meaning all the woi at their feet." word succes
3534.that is a question," he replied, leaning nothing in 1 We left the church, but hi
3535.a question," he replied, leaning nothing in 1 We left the church, but his I look
3536. fellow," he said. as though considering, chnir, andlooking into space, at it; s
3537.as though considering, chnir, andlooking into space, at it; sn I love like a def
3538.W That is about the power of persevering at a noble aim. the thing, as I take it
3539.of persevering at a noble aim. the thing, as I take it." " " positively none t"
3540.ppose such a replied. cnse as unflagging perseverance at a noble end that was no
3541.ertainly be a : crown." " You are taking a very high flight, my dear Grant," I s
3542.cription of the place had been something of an exaggeration nevertheless, there
3543. you must not look for what is startling and pictorial. You must not look for la
3544.mpression left on your mind after laying down one of those villainous newspapers
3545.spapers is that the whole world is going the way of the Gospelof the beatitudes
3546.xpect it to regenerate the world meaning by the world that evil thing which is t
3547.rld meaning by the world that evil thing which is the enemy of God, and never wi
3548.inds established by the monks, including supreme in newspapers, parliaments, min
3549.nts, ministries, fashionable so- carving in wood and stone, and in these artisti
3550.d in all of them the Gospel is suffering a and hourly defeat. But take into acco
3551.r of the church and monastery, according to the perfect plan, gave daily side, t
3552.he number of graces which it is bringing all the while to ample scope for the em
3553. gives the oppormillions of souls living and dying in every quarter of the globe
3554. oppormillions of souls living and dying in every quarter of the globe; and, as
3555.we shall have to wait un- know something about an angel before he can carve one,
3556.age of a thought. Unwe are have anything sublime about us, you perceive how it i
3557. They may or may not succeed in becoming artists but can it be other than a bene
3558. should atone for many an effigy-burning read that :" and he handed mo a note sh
3559.these more cultivated pursuits expanding the intellect and admitting spiritual i
3560.ts expanding the intellect and admitting spiritual ideas the clodhoppers." ; but
3561.lodhoppers." ; but it is more perplexing with them. 'P.S. " She has asked me to
3562.only individual at Exdale who is getting his eyes open. But really is it not a f
3563. open. But really is it not a fine thing to see the of and apologist "Taking it
3564.hing to see the of and apologist "Taking it for granted that by clodhoppers you
3565.other negative the positive is supplying in full pontificals had tried to conver
3566.e have shown fight." tive is the cutting off of the ale-house. Now, it must be f
3567.- ingly, I grant that to effect anything practical for the amend uole with me 01
3568. to answer for Free Thought surrendering to Edward and the chism ?' " "Just what
3569.ovision is will spiritualin the building of THE AUSTRALIAN DUKE OR THE eottagp r
3570.KE OR THE eottagp resiliences for giving a laboring man any corner to live in wh
3571.ottagp resiliences for giving a laboring man any corner to live in which is not
3572.We got to be Badly inaccurate in stating a case. Here are a set of men and women
3573.he abbot meant by what he said." (acting as what you once called the secular arm
3574.ain chant, you mean ?" supply humanizing, and cut off brutalizing, influences. T
3575.pply humanizing, and cut off brutalizing, influences. Then " I mean about Knowle
3576.t, personal kindness, and assistance ing." " in time of difficulty, and leave it
3577.nder at yon. After all your fine talking about the supernatural, you profess to
3578.society, or at any rate, the clodhopping portion of it, by no higher machinery t
3579.nest." " Yes, but about others suffering for him. * "Well?" " Well, what did he
3580.d be cast out only by prayer and fasting. "How can I say? the to be the rule of
3581.lled forth, and I felt there was nothing left for it but to apologize for uninte
3582.o apologize for unintentionally touching on a tender chord, At last he said as a
3583. I did "Well," I said, "we owe something to Bismarck; but for his Falck Laws we
3584.ell, that I exaggerate, that I am taking a wrong bent about it all, following a
3585.ing a wrong bent about it all, following a whimsical fancy ; and perhaps it has
3586. conceive the possibility of there being a something to explain it all. Well, th
3587.e possibility of there being a something to explain it all. Well, there is, or w
3588.e shall make as many converts by singing as by preaching," he said. "Your friend
3589.many converts by singing as by preaching," he said. "Your friend Mr. Knowles for
3590.He was greatly distressed at the warming apparatus in the choir, and complained
3591. the choir, and complained of our having no carvings of fox and geese under the
3592.led and, after a minute or two, settling himself so that as he spoke his eyes co
3593. could rest on the hills and the evening sky, and not on my countenance, he bega
3594. and I the shape they took was something in this way almsdeeds, en; ; : The abbo
3595.ngs were not always of the most edifying description, but he said the mediaeval
3596.all undertakings to improve the laboring spoke, on Werner. of the young monk evi
3597.response to his words: classes, founding of religious works, creation of a great
3598.ly, whilst all these things were singing in my ears, a voice would whisper for a
3599.r Henry's words about riches, and giving one's life for the brethren I can't des
3600.but it seemed like two things struggling in my heart Usefulness and a great care
3601.without 'much sacrifice, and the passing call (temptation, as I tried to think i
3602.IA. 25 looked him and abandon everything. "I went abroad with the express purpos
3603.broad with the express purpose of seeing for myself what Catholic life in Cathol
3604." Not a bit too strong why, I'm diluting the horrible story down to the strength
3605.stian onrs can bear to li: but the thing goes on every day, in hundreds and thou
3606.d forever cut off the hope of reclaiming the boy. So she wrote to me, to mo 'who
3607., in the country into my where something of the great baronial influence still l
3608.introductions and all that sort of thing, and it was so I first made acquaintanc
3609., and with a voice like an angel singing his own songs to his own improvised mus
3610.feel that gift in others) and a rattling, merry bewitching companion, too spoilt
3611.others) and a rattling, merry bewitching companion, too spoilt, of course, and e
3612.in raptures at the privilege of shedding his blood for the good cause aye, and h
3613.ome of them but, then, he was so winning in his repentance, she always forgave h
3614. but feel that had he been less charming, less engaging than he was, it would ha
3615.had he been less charming, less engaging than he was, it would have been a happi
3616.a happier ; ; ; ! stop to love ' passing the love of woman.' I did not stop to t
3617.arted for Florence. " It is a good thing to finds one's self a duke sometimes, ;
3618.f Leven, I had no difficulty in entering the charmed circle of Florence society.
3619. ; ; ; to find time to give me a morning to myself. When we met, it was always i
3620.the company of others, the most charming people in the world, no doubt but what
3621. but what did I care for busy ; charming people, when what I wanted was his xoul
3622.ted was his xoul ? "At last, one evening it was in the gallery of the Pitti Wern
3623.what are you about ? Where are you going ? Who are all ' ' ' these people ' ' am
3624.ou, don't keep me here ; I must be going,' ; " ' You shall not 'You are deceived
3625.ndrel ; and as to the Mar- " Leven thing for the poor boy. ' It was about a year
3626.; in short they felt there was something wrong. Then she had privately inquired
3627.Marchese Zingari was just then a leading man among the Italian Liberals. It was
3628.rner was worth the trouble of entrapping, and they played the game with cunning
3629.g, and they played the game with cunning skill. The Marchesa was a bewitching wo
3630.ing skill. The Marchesa was a bewitching woman, ten years his senior, and, on th
3631. regards myself, but I will hear nothing that can touch the honor of a lady. "I
3632.llery and the palace, and hardly knowing what I did, I found myself in the stree
3633.street, and walked on awhile, not caring whither I went my brain and heart in a
3634.re the first altar I came to and resting my fevered forehead on the marble balus
3635.been revealed to me at our first meeting. Clouded over, and bospotted with many
3636.t uncommon in some of them, representing our Lord crowned with thorns, and with
3637.per. Such was the one to fix on speaking now as if in prayer ' O Lord, what can
3638.mean to say that I saw or heard anything don't think it ; but in my heart I did
3639.a word, and in that Face I saw the thing it meant : " Werner dead or dying Perha
3640. thing it meant : " Werner dead or dying Perhaps that was the answer tc my praye
3641.to But his soul t ; suspense but getting free as soon as I could from the crowd,
3642.ouse Werner's lodgings. The very evening we had parted he had on which I gazed.
3643.r; far worse than typhus, a deadly thing; every one had fled the house in terror
3644.s was what it said You have been seeking to strike a clever balance my heart; I
3645.nscience and wild talk, as though coming from a heart and brain that were your h
3646.that were your high aspirations by doing good works, and to please your- ill at
3647.ords ceased, and there was self by doing them in a way that should cost you as l
3648. opened his eyes, and murmured something I thought to lead the Catholic body, to
3649.u, and one remedy its hold is tightening day Sacrifice. And if by day. you would
3650.ole. I took him to a villa there, hoping that the sweet fresh air and quiet woul
3651. was an absolute surrender of everything to which I could cling on the side of n
3652.der of everything to which I could cling on the side of nature if by such an act
3653.ct I could win the soul that was hanging in such a terrible peril. Nor could I a
3654.ed hesitate, sacrificed all ; and taking out the little brass crucifix, my baron
3655. of my soul, "I saw what he was thinking of some tremendous false step which he
3656.endous false step which he was hastening, when that blow from God struck him dow
3657.. 'No, my dear, but I think he was dying such a y>rat favorite of mine, you know
3658.nd interior stillness I felt my offering had been accepted. " I can tell you but
3659.e next two days. I saw and heard nothing of Werner but on the evening of the sec
3660.ard nothing of Werner but on the evening of the second day I went to a reception
3661.re was a great crowd and as I was making my way among the uniforms and ladies' t
3662.he uniforms and ladies' trains, thinking in my soul what disgusting trash it all
3663.ins, thinking in my soul what disgusting trash it all was, I saw coming to meet
3664.isgusting trash it all was, I saw coming to meet me some familiar faces. There a
3665.the Eighi, at an English archery meeting, at the upper cataracts of the Nile, th
3666.under escort of Mr. Eustace de Something " or other, a young diplomat of rising
3667.g " or other, a young diplomat of rising expectations. "I are you sure of say, G
3668.e you sure of say, Grant, you're getting rather fierce the names ?" "Well, if it
3669. if it wasn't Gallipot, it was something like it you know what I mean. No help f
3670.hen I positively must, there was nothing like him. And oh how shockingly dreadfu
3671..' 'What about Werner ?' I said, choking. to dive it all. ; Then there the black
3672.ke a mother and her baby. I knew nothing of what passed in his "Oh! ; but I felt
3673. old vigor or the old spirit ; something had gone out of him a good deal of the
3674.) all that had passed in his soul during those seemingly unconscious hours. It i
3675. unconscious hours. It is an awful thing to hang over an Once he said abyss, by
3676.," I said. " 'The end I was not thinking of that there 'uras another abyss befor
3677. return to purposes at a dash, retaining 5,000, and and begin life over again as
3678.hich liked the abbot, who is they during for me, and I prepared to hear his deci
3679.er and better ways than that of 'selling all.' He drew a plan and showed me how
3680. and administer it as a trust, retaining the work and the responsibility, doing
3681.g the work and the responsibility, doing the best for the souls aid bodies of ot
3682. the souls aid bodies of others ; giving not my money alone, but my life. 'You v
3683.yon externally as you are, bat demanding your shoulders more complete guess, lea
3684.r shoulders more complete guess, leaving every moment and every faculty of your
3685.t and every faculty of your entire being !' "There is no ;need, my dear Aubrey,
3686.do it, because, you see, cost me nothing. such a life grinds a fellow to powder.
3687. the rocks by the river side, o; sitting at the window of his little study looki
3688.t the window of his little study looking out into hii simple garden, that great
3689.nto hii simple garden, that great loving soul revealed itself to me ii truth ; a
3690.; always true to its one idea of serving God and man ii the spirit of self-sacri
3691.it of self-sacrifice, yet always seeking to conceal do Us greatest deeds in the
3692.e last grand tones of the chanl carrying the words of Holy Writ home to the cent
3693. after Pentecost (foi heart. my dwelling on these h tie deads, dear reader, they
3694.r heard those words without their waking a sene of dread, of hope, or of aspirat
3695. dark !" ; ; ! rifice." are you thinking of ?" know; only it seems to me as if e
3696.o was a great mystery, and every morning we have seed of cou " Now, Grant, what
3697.of my secret reashelped me in everything ; he knew nothing me to it but he under
3698.elped me in everything ; he knew nothing me to it but he underons, or my vow, or
3699.eeable mystery train for ; to is waiting for me is a vei exchange Glenleven for
3700.wn so full of ardor and unction, lifting up my heavy English say y< the mark. We
3701.ck, the day are lumpishness, and keeping it at going back to that place ?" came
3702.are lumpishness, and keeping it at going back to that place ?" came when he told
3703.?" came when he told me he had something to say to me. I had "Ah! you're thinkin
3704.to say to me. I had "Ah! you're thinking of the effigy; why, that was a foi seen
3705.gy; why, that was a foi seen a something not a cloud, but a something on his bro
3706.a something not a cloud, but a something on his brow. night ago, and they've for
3707.ason for my shoi leave me. I had nothing to say, for had I not promised ALL ? in
3708.to say, for had I not promised ALL ? ing myself. I presume you would not wish me
3709.I to say to God, 'not this,' 'everything but field to Degg ? But the fact is, I
3710.u know I could not say that He is coming down about the ventilatic not. I gave h
3711.ttle more spoken between us that evening. I saw it all very civil things about y
3712.n, and there ia fine scope for indul ing it at Bradford." The early train on Mon
3713.ford." The early train on Monday morning bore me away from t and valleys of Glen
3714.gray minster, and t clear river bubbling among its rocks, and the granite peaks
3715.a fortnight so rich bright and ennobling thoughts that it seemed to me as if hil
3716.me to the house of his engineer, telling m it was an THE day was drawing near fo
3717. telling m it was an THE day was drawing near for us to leave Glenleven, nd I ce
3718.lenleven, nd I cellent school for curing a man of day-dreame. He was o beheld it
3719. Hen UTOPIA. what he was i and advancing to the spot, laid hands on a wild-looki
3720.o the spot, laid hands on a wild-looking boy, to shun observation, whojseemed "
3721.ular : mine rejoices in that name, owing to the multitude It was once concutting
3722.itude It was once concuttings proceeding from the main shaft. derod the most dan
3723. I think we shall teach Drybones a thing s reputation. : my dear sir, we name ou
3724., and fidgetted about in sore disburning to civilized life come and take your fi
3725.your first lesson in " " one engineering. tress for a minute or so, and then cam
3726. on the road to trough the mine, leaving it by another that these two ere at a c
3727. the other, and that Bradford, rejoicing in the sign of the Prince of Wales' Fea
3728.y certain strong doors, the object being, in tory. See here, he said, you'll jus
3729.e Feathers, ,se of an accident occurring in one of them, to prevent its exand te
3730.your father the Duke of Leven is waiting for him here. " nding to the others. Bu
3731.f Leven is waiting for him here. " nding to the others. But the most important s
3732.tle is at what he called the And leaving hold of his collar, Tim darted off down
3733.ours and close them at others, according to -where you will, do what you will, a
3734.re-occupation. In a few minutes Tim ting on and by a careful attention ins he ha
3735. in company with a big man, who, judging by his apfor his sojourn at the Feather
3736. not the better " The shaft we are going to inspect first of all, "he continued,
3737.m anxious to as- been a brief or passing one. rtaiu if the whole thing is in ord
3738.or passing one. rtaiu if the whole thing is in order before Drybones begins this
3739.en where is he, and why didn't you bring him ?" " Father's drunk." Yes, it waa i
3740.t responsible man in charge and entering pure and wholesome, the air tra- had he
3741. lam : ; ; ; ; through the mine, issuing forth at the further end clogged The "G
3742.e on duty >rk on that side ere attending to the doors, for the purpose of ventil
3743.osed a walk to the Little Shaft, leaving our horses ider the care of the oversee
3744.of the overseer and we get out, climbing the moors of Glen11 (very different in
3745. a spot where a few yen), and descending on with a telegraph teds, some machiner
3746.the sary duty. After painful questioning not been entered nor the venalarming fa
3747.ing not been entered nor the venalarming fact, that the shaft had the only tilat
3748. tilation doors attended to that morning that Jones, the two who understood the
3749.the machinery by capable only of working was lowered into and raised out of the
3750. and his ?" ; management he knew nothing. Grant looked at The situation was seri
3751.tion was serious How long were we coming from the Great Shaft ' watch. ; " Three
3752. what can be " The two men the following words pocket-book, and wrote : ; laft !
3753.agged jacket arrangements for descending it . no one, drunk doors unopened. Sign
3754.ings here. "LEVEN. he gave it to Folding it up, and directing it to the overseer
3755. gave it to Folding it up, and directing it to the overseer, the boy, with half-
3756.er chanoe. Here, you fellow," addressing the man, who by this time was partially
3757.APTER XVL Aye, sure, but who'll be going down ?" " I and in another moment shall
3758.D. he had entered the bucket and seizing the chain, gave the WE carried him to O
3759.ht which had been given into his keeping by the Duke the evei " Is there danger,
3760.malities, and a brief document declaring Sir Joh ] " Let me go" " Stuff What cou
3761.t. and some others of the monies waiting to receive I implored, but all in vain
3762. to God by the longer and more lingering sacri I paced up and down, whether for
3763.and the could not tell. At last, looking towards the hill, I caught the welcome
3764. welcome sight of a dozen men descending the road towards the chain, and the sha
3765. imset out to meet them. We were nearing together marvelled at the power of self
3766.er gifts of sanctity. a slight trembling of the earth, and a cry from the men. I
3767. Duke the Duke !" sprang forward, crying, him in the little chapel, before the g
3768.n to the heart v loss of time. something more than sorrow. It was Wilfrid Knowle
3769. the men out of the mine had the closing scene of that beautiful life, received
3770.ndred and eighty men he had so regarding him had been an unconscious prophecy he
3771.phecy he nobly been won by the suffering, not of himself, but of another. saved
3772.hom a short week before had been burning I shall only touch on the hist scene of
3773.and ceremonial which bore to his resting-place the last Duki women and children
3774.st Duki women and children came hurrying in dismay to the pit's month, loud were
3775. how was by the long procession, praying for, and blessing their benefacl it wit
3776.ng procession, praying for, and blessing their benefacl it with Leven ? I will s
3777.efacl it with Leven ? I will say nothing of all that, and of the bitter tears we
3778. his father, and felt that one 1 working party who had out from among us who bel
3779.l were startled and amazed to f kneeling beside him. Yes, he was dead. Not a mar
3780.s caused by the explosion, and resulting in had once possessed had all but disap
3781.n millions there remained not a farthing. They laid him in one of the sheds, and
3782. of had died worth comparatively nothing, because he had b the men around me. So
3783.e not keenly felt from steadily carrying out the purpose of his life to obey the
3784.A. In the completion of this undertaking I have been not ft little by the ardor
3785.egation; thus the aud gladly recognizing given opportunity me of carrying out on
3786.gnizing given opportunity me of carrying out one of Leven's dearost wishes, I re
3787.and designed by %very detail with loving eyes. It is There the new parish church
3788.o the memmy friend, and a thank-offering for that friendship which choicest grac
3789.ach day Andrew saw his bread diminishing. He had generally had a bit for any beg
3790.r, and many a one had gone away blessing him for his charity; bat now his cupboa
3791. almost always empty, for his decreasing employment, even with the help of the c
3792.round the lower slopes of a gen- galling thought at all times, and to all; for t
3793.hurch soars high aloft, as if protecting, at once, and asserting pathies of char
3794.as if protecting, at once, and asserting pathies of charity to soothe the wounde
3795., not so long since as that the existing generation had before, been finished fo
3796.ufactures in the large towns, a thriving fabric of linen and far less beautiful
3797.isery of And there was one yet remaining amongst them who could the new prison f
3798.ode in it. Doubtless there here blooming with the azure blossom of the flax, the
3799.on in these rumors; still, in truth, ing with the new-made cloth, spread forth i
3800.loth, spread forth in strips of dazzling there was much to startle a tottering o
3801.ng there was much to startle a tottering old man in the prospect whiteness, to b
3802.f the shuttle, and the gay and unbending board of guardians and a harsh master a
3803.comfort. But there was yet another thing that pressed still more cottage. Old An
3804.ys been punctual to bis Sunday remaining relic of those so happy times. gretted.
3805.heap machine-made linen kept diminishing the larity, approached the holy sacrame
3806.te ditties, though his voice was growing thin and rough with been an habitual dr
3807.teal down his cheeks whilst of preparing for another change, and of doing it by
3808.eparing for another change, and of doing it by making he was speaking, or he wou
3809.nother change, and of doing it by making he was speaking, or he would break off
3810.nd of doing it by making he was speaking, or he would break off suddenly in his
3811., in and hasten back to his once smiling but now desolate cottage, the morning,
3812.ng but now desolate cottage, the morning, to the little chapel on the opposite s
3813.of the and have a few words of murmuring to himself, "It's all over now, it's al
3814.ive up all hopes of ever again assisting at weavers. the Holy Sacrifice. And tho
3815. whose mercy he of idleness kept growing more frequent and longer. Even would be
3816.pon him each day the necessity of taking the fatal in one of the Midland , unass
3817.fatal in one of the Midland , unassuming little village is B counties of England
3818.d, seldom visited by travelers, as being out of the line of the greater thorough
3819.he greater thoroughfares, and possessing no feature of interest beyond the simpl
3820.f neatly thatched cottages, each seeming to repose AN ! THE VISION OF OLD ANDREW
3821.EW THE WEAVER. step became more pressing. Andrew had not been sufficiently schoo
3822. warm rays of the chapel; of the setting sun, that stc/jd on and slowly and pain
3823.infully did he climb inp.n from starving, dragged him away from worth preserving
3824., dragged him away from worth preserving. all that mude life At length his empty
3825.ghbors had finished their dinner, hoping that some chance might furnish him with
3826.e day flic hill Arrived there, beLeading np to the old churchyard. neath the lim
3827.he paused to take one last and lingering look around. The sun had set, but there
3828. been disappointed: and so, with nothing better than a bit of which he had begge
3829. well known to old Andrew, were enjoying a glorious game of romps amongst the to
3830.crony Andrew, and as he seemed tottering in his walk, some offered even to lead
3831.e. For awhile he could not help standing to watch their gambols, as they leaped
3832.wished had been spent better; and wiping a tear from his eye, he tottered onward
3833. crust, was his. There was smoke curling up from the chimneys of most around, ha
3834.of most around, harbinger of the evening meal; but none came out from his; and h
3835.eemed to penetrate into its cold looking and desolate interior, where his now id
3836.le loom formed almost the sole remaining furniture. He could not bear the though
3837. could not bear the thought of returning to it It seemed to him even colder and
3838.fortless than the grave. He was standing at the foot of one which had long been
3839.many a year. It seemed far more inviting to his weary limbs, than his hard mattr
3840.ss on the floor there below. The evening was calm and mild so at length he laid
3841.tick, and seated himself on the yielding turf. By degrees the inclination to lie
3842.nd, do what he would, he could not bring himself to bow down, as he well knew he
3843.ll Well, to read about patience, sitting by a nice fire, with a good quartern lo
3844. the boasted poor-laws, and the grinding hard-heartedness of those who administe
3845.; but to have joined Andrew in deploring these, would not have diminished his ho
3846.ve diminished his horror at encountering them, nor blunt his feelings when suffe
3847.m, nor blunt his feelings when suffering under them. He strove, therefore, to re
3848. his new abode; and then added something about the consolations of religion, and
3849.poverty, and the advantages of suffering, especially when applied to the expiati
3850.ve of Him, who "suffered for us, leaving us an example." The old man could not g
3851." The old man could not gainsay anything of this; still he felt cast down, and h
3852.hout the most distant chance of escaping them, the desolation that came over his
3853.came over his senses was almost stunning. Sorrowfully then, most sorrowfully, di
3854.lly, did he turn his steps we were going now. to say, homeward, but ulas ! he ha
3855.s last look on the cross any more coming in their place aye, and it's all very w
3856.ed up, and have a pauper's dirty-looking dress put on me, for fear I should run
3857. wish I was with you. I wish I was lying here below times. the quiet sod, with t
3858.es. the quiet sod, with the wind singing sweetly through the lime trees, and all
3859.en the weariness produced by his morning's fast and his walk brought sleep upon
3860.ovement of ground beneath him. trembling and quite paralysed with terror, wonder
3861.d quite paralysed with terror, wondering if he had been dreaming, when the uphea
3862.error, wondering if he had been dreaming, when the upheaving of the sod became t
3863.he had been dreaming, when the upheaving of the sod became too He started to his
3864.rave-stone for support, and stood gazing in intense affright at the spot on whic
3865.t at the spot on which he had been lying. Slowly the turf was pushed up until it
3866. nnd disclosed a human form, endeavoring, as it were with difficulty, to extrica
3867. suucei ded and stood before him. making its way out. ; ! THE VISION " Glad T'v&
3868.with itively I think my logs are growing 11:i! how do you do Andrew, my old boy?
3869.Your rheumatism in no worse for sleeping on the grass! Do It isn't pray now, jus
3870.e position in which some of us are lying. Ugh ! UHt.i mighed. figure before The
3871.ner of that big fellow's coffin pressing into my chest even Have you never heard
3872.was somewhat of a claret color, reaching to the knees, and, if the phrase be all
3873.r still, with long lappets half covering his thighs and his nether garments were
3874.hey must have been buried alive. Nothing of the sort, I assure you. They had onl
3875.-cornered pinched up hat, with a shining jewel and a long jaunty feather stuck o
3876.one side of it. There he stood surveying himself as best he could from head to f
3877. Andrew, by degrees, had been recovering his courage, and the lively voice of hi
3878.are as uncomfortable as tliinlc brushing off every particle of dust he could det
3879.uld detect on his habiliments, arranging his frills and ruffles, and, above all,
3880.s and ruffles, and, above all, examining the symmetry of his tegs eyeing them in
3881.xamining the symmetry of his tegs eyeing them in every direction now front, now
3882.ction now front, now back, even stroking them down gently with his hands, as if
3883.n. One 'ud think there were many resting-places here bettor worth having than yo
3884. resting-places here bettor worth having than yours." "As for that, I don't thin
3885.; "for you know, except on "What a thing it is," he said, when he had completed
3886.you?" "Oh!" said the visitor, hesitating, as if to find out some were very near
3887.r speak his mouth wide open, yet gasping for breath his eyes dilated, and his ol
3888.eyes dilated, and his old knees knocking against venturing even to laugh, "if yo
3889.his old knees knocking against venturing even to laugh, "if you were to go down
3890.h, however, his extraor- pursued, taking a malicious pleasure in pressing a topi
3891. taking a malicious pleasure in pressing a topic which, " You have gome dinary v
3892. very harmless; other reason for wishing to be so spruce. You expected to meet a
3893.oor fellow looked puzzled, and unwilling to reply. The placency ; though, all th
3894.his face grew more marked but at marking a certain air of anxiety in his counten
3895.h-yard is full of them tions, and having heard you wishing to lie by, the fancy
3896.them tions, and having heard you wishing to lie by, the fancy to already. Every
3897.e more of this air, that you are opening your and they are engaged on every side
3898.s that perhaps you wouldn't be unwilling to change places with to some of them b
3899.ces with to some of them before renewing my acquaintance with the me. Eh! what s
3900.awkward now, for his fears began wishing to he by! at length stammered forth " A
3901.assed through it, generations of dancing corpses. " Don't be alarmed at what I t
3902.like, wouldn't you, to get Now, you ving his trouble. "It inrt often we catch a
3903.reen sod, with the lime trees whispering sweetly wide awake like you. Sometimes,
3904.; and, I must have delighted in tweaking his nose, and pinching his shins, and h
3905.ghted in tweaking his nose, and pinching his shins, and have given him some mark
3906.ops of the lime-trees, and come tumbling through the and as the sport went on th
3907.s wishes in that respect were undergoing a change, but he said nothing about it
3908.undergoing a change, but he said nothing about it at present, for policy and cur
3909.ountenances, he could not help remarking in them the same expression of eager an
3910.in his first ghostly ac- again mustering up attack upon the ci-devant fop. " Why
3911.cause of their ap- opportunity of asking a few others what they have to say for
3912.e figures on the disc glowed like living coals, and the huge fingers streamed fr
3913.o Andrew like the pointed to the passing hours. face of some huge monster, the p
3914.face of some huge monster, the presiding demon of these unholy revels, grinning
3915.g demon of these unholy revels, grinning on the scenes below, and mocking with m
3916.rinning on the scenes below, and mocking with malignant delight at the chagrin o
3917. was still at his side, his face growing longer and more melancholy as he watche
3918.s he watched the progress of the glowing index over the fiery dial-plate, and be
3919.hat eome of the company. did so, stating the wishes of the old man, aa he unders
3920. ; the sculptured monsters in the string courses looked truly hideous, in fact,
3921. light, far by brick-work and surpassing in brilliancy even that which illuminat
3922. illuminated the churchyard, and decking the turf and the trees within its reach
3923. his beautiful monument the lads jumping across it aye, he had himself when a bo
3924.old limbs seemed to partake of something of the agility of the goblins that surr
3925.glorious vision. could not show anything more beautiful. But he was at length di
3926.He turned to look rout which was growing wild around him. for a moment seemed da
3927.med dark in contrast with the everything his vision grew brilliancy he had been
3928.ision grew brilliancy he had been gazing upon, but soon clearer, and he could se
3929.ain the mad revel. At length an imposing old gentleman, in a flowing wig and sal
3930. an imposing old gentleman, in a flowing wig and saluted him with the greatest p
3931.oidered coat, have the honor of offering him ness, requesting that he might " We
3932.e honor of offering him ness, requesting that he might " We cannot go to a truly
3933.er lovely children, is I am that weeping over the urn of her dear departed husba
3934.id, he had Hartz mountains, were nothing compared to what now Andrew's astonishe
3935. hockey, and never dreamt of, were going on with an ardor and eagerness such as
3936., who, in the marble, were seen to cling strip ; cement tlio ! ; THE VISION OF O
3937.panion. sorrowful; and why is everything so chan; He looked into the eyes of the
3938.d his surprise that he should be willing to surrender so respectable and comfort
3939.so respectable and comfortable a resting place, in exchange for one of But all t
3940.himself. He seemed like balls of rolling fire; yet could he see in them the work
3941.re; yet could he see in them the working of a grief such as tongue might not utt
3942.ey are not here." it have souk belonging to them but "I have no "Then where brea
3943.th. are they?" exclaimed Andrew, gasping for in the particular reason to be diss
3944.d shall be most happy ways fond of doing a service But again he held " I assure
3945. his tongue you my monument as a resting place for your sorrows." Andrew did not
3946.stedness He had a vague notion of having heard his grandfather say, that one of
3947.ouse, to offer nad contrived, by lending money to his neighbors amidst the great
3948.ds, and, among others, of some belonging to his who strive to drown, in the tumu
3949.abyss of eternal torture that is yawning beneath their feet ? What wonder then t
3950.ersonage. So he could not help imagining that there was something .in the back g
3951. help imagining that there was something .in the back ground which he was unwill
3952.n the back ground which he was unwilling to have known, and he was confirmed in
3953. was confirmed in his surmise, by seeing lurking amidst his smiles, that anxious
3954.firmed in his surmise, by seeing lurking amidst his smiles, that anxious look wh
3955.low and lugubrious there was some; thing in inexpressibly discordant, and ever a
3956.dant, and ever and anon, he was doubting whether he were listening to bursts of
3957.e was doubting whether he were listening to bursts of merriment or it despairing
3958. to bursts of merriment or it despairing shrieks. The light, too, appeared to ha
3959.d become sickly and ovewpread everything with a paleish blue, like that produced
3960.tic than ever, poured forth a flickering flame from the figures and hands, which
3961.now moved visibly onwards with a hissing sound. Fear, such as he had never exper
3962.ot How would we not employ them in doing penance ! rejoice how would we not welc
3963.f whose revels he had been the unwilling spectator, and fear for himself, Andrew
3964. clear, he found himself It was standing opposite to the western door of the chu
3965.t as that which bursts from the smelting furnace, when the cake of clay is pierc
3966.ore the door, that some one was standing just within the threshold, and a strang
3967.to prevent his entrance; but, on looking at him, only threw it ! ! ! wider open,
3968.arently wayworn man, who was thus acting the part of verger ; and judging from h
3969. acting the part of verger ; and judging from hie appearance, Andrew thought tha
3970.marked with heavier than on himself. ing over the limbs of the old man, and seem
3971.f the old man, and seemed to be curdling his blood. He turned round, with the in
3972.d round, with the intention of' escaping from this scene of unholy revehy, for s
3973.s and his legs were truly dis- something that told of intense and long-continued
3974.y. "I boded little good from introducing you to see, "I ghastly features. flabby
3975.w and loathsome Andrew had been spending the first part of the night. MI it was
3976.over his liinbs as he spoke this, making the long feather in his hat quiver like
3977.n " and a more fearful aspen leaf waking." "What can all this mean ?" cried Andr
3978.is mean ?" cried Andrew, himself quaking said, it's thought without," "that want
3979. two or three years ago, a totterYou ing old man coming to your door to beg a bi
3980.ears ago, a totterYou ing old man coming to your door to beg a bit of bread ? ma
3981.your meal with me, has heard my blessing. meal I ever tasted. I was, after that,
3982.recognize the spot where he was standing yet he knew that it was beneath the tow
3983.d, for he had been rather fond of coming his ! of real flesh fastly and in love
3984. fastly and in love that the was heaving in agony, the limbs quivering and convu
3985.as heaving in agony, the limbs quivering and convulsed, and that the blood was a
3986.nd that the blood was actually trickling from the wounds And, oh what wounds Tho
3987.that streamed from them ; but, by gazing steadfastly, he saw that they were myst
3988.over their heads, and wings below hiding their legs and feet, and wings expanded
3989.s expanded ou each side as if supporting them ; and all these wings seemed fille
3990.nce came forth a brightness too dazzling to be long looked upon. Behind the scre
3991.old to assist his old cronies in tolling the funeral bell. But then it was a dar
3992.e used to be a dilapidated bier standing in one corner, and a gaily painted fire
3993.fire-engine in an- to recognize anything within it. Having at length satisfied h
3994. to recognize anything within it. Having at length satisfied himself with this g
3995. uncouth black leathern buckets dangling in a it. Then the ceiling was low, cutt
3996.ckets dangling in a it. Then the ceiling was low, cutting in two parts its solit
3997. a it. Then the ceiling was low, cutting in two parts its solitary narrow window
3998.litary narrow window, and it was nothing better than the rough uncased beams and
3999.tokened Diligence, was gone. The ceiling of black old oak, panelled and deeply m
4000. but now stood forth in all the imposing The dust and cobwebs on grandeur of its
4001.k wall was quite cleared away, revealing to view an arch of noble yet graceful p
4002. of But here too, how was not everything the pillared nave. A lofty screen of th
4003. changed stretched across it, separating it from the chancel. It was of oak; but
4004.n, It seemed fc; bs ; ! found everything changed. Galleries, and pews, and pulpi
4005.eries, and pews, and pulpit, and reading desk, and all the appurtenances of mode
4006.d out with varied colors, vieThe ceiling, reaching ing in brilliancy with the ra
4007. varied colors, vieThe ceiling, reaching ing in brilliancy with the rainbow. up
4008.ied colors, vieThe ceiling, reaching ing in brilliancy with the rainbow. up to t
4009.d and gilded. The corbels and projecting heads of the beams were held up by ange
4010.re held up by angels, arrayed in flowing vests of white and gold, and bearing sh
4011.ing vests of white and gold, and bearing shields charged with the emblems of sor
4012.nded from the roof they, too, glittering with gold and colors, and filled with l
4013. vermilion, and green and purand flowing ple, harmoniously blended together in g
4014.ns, intermingled with rich ornaments ing emblems among which the monog cam of me
4015.name of Mary, both surmounted by shining crowns, were most frequent and conspicu
4016.of holy saints, standintervals along ing in gorgeous niches, were disposed at an
4017.hed with the walls with mov ng leglowing fillets of red and blue, surcharged fon
4018.oarded floor of the family pew adjoining, were two full length ; ; ; ; a knight
4019.s On the tinted in various colors. being all filled up with wax, beneath the for
4020.ar the fire-place mentioned before being transformed ; purtenances which was stu
4021.on that is, the "atrou of Mie containing the statue of the sainted Edward. altar
4022.sainted Edward. altar, not of the living the corresponding end of the north aisl
4023.tar, not of the living the corresponding end of the north aisle, an equally st i
4024. of the north aisle, an equally st iking effigies of ; M THE VISION OF OLD ANDRU
4025. too which had filled up an arch opening into the chancel itself had vanished, a
4026.h the rood and now this desolate looking recess, in which an uncouth iron-bound
4027.this most blessed amongst women, holding in her arms the thrice blessed fruit of
4028.to have chosen this spot for his resting-place, that so he might Andrew well rec
4029.of the aisle, protected by a low railing of curiously wrought iron, with sockets
4030.s, which even now were there and burning brightly, as if emblematic of the hope
4031. statue of the Virgin Mother, a kneeling figure the exact counterpart of that on
4032.ment. It was clothed in dark but sbining armor, that reflected back the light of
4033.tented himself, therefore, willi looking at them, till their devoseemed to becom
4034. feared to speak, and to ask the meaning of what he saw. "It is given to us, And
4035.that threaten you. You have been holding converse with those who have been conde
4036.re, aye, even yourself, would be willing to change places with me. Would you lea
4037.O, for my part, I would wish for nothing better than to live and die here." "Yet
4038.rger, ''we are your brethren, and loving ones too, and grateful." "Grateful, for
4039.rst of glory which he had been surveying, had hindered him from observing that t
4040.rveying, had hindered him from observing that the church was full of peoIt was r
4041.for they seemed insensible to everything around them their hands were clasped fi
4042.together, and their breasts wero heaving, not rapidly indeed, nor convulsively,
4043.e on the mind of Andrew. beheld kneeling before the image of Him who died for th
4044.uls in purgatory and they were employing this their night of freedom, not like t
4045.them with an increased interand a loving pity. A f eeling of veneration even cai
4046.eased interand a loving pity. A f eeling of veneration even caine over now barre
4047. in bliss ; days, them would be reigning amongst the ; that soon, were pent up w
4048.ons; but Andrew could not help remarking, how, generally speaking, those who wor
4049. help remarking, how, generally speaking, those who wore what he fancied to be t
4050.ies, even that of the ragged and limping verger at flis side, would be seen shin
4051.rger at flis side, would be seen shining brighter than stars, aud clothed in gar
4052.that some unpleasant thought -was taking possession of his ml mind. dered yard,
4053.congregation ; still, however, retaining its original characteristics, for there
4054. there, with the monks around it praying, that tells you somedied. Do people the
4055.n remain in purgatory so many hun- thing of what he did to they help him to pay
4056. money for became still more dispiriting. For he remarked that few ft pnest to o
4057.r his own soul and all who wore anything approaching to a modern dress had advan
4058.ul and all who wore anything approaching to a modern dress had advanced the soul
4059.r repress his desire to know the meaning you may guess that his was a funeral wo
4060.ess that his was a funeral worth talking of. For Of this, so at length referred
4061.lied, "some have So people came flocking from all sides, some for curiosity, but
4062.he valley from the hill over lect having heard about the prison from which ao on
4063.t endless train of poor men and farthing? women, all carrying "Yes," said Andrew
4064.or men and farthing? women, all carrying "Yes," said Andrew despondingly; for he
4065.hought of hfg lighted tapers and wearing the cloaks that had been given them ; o
4066.ts, and sighed at the prospect of having to pay evwy there were the bareheaded m
4067.re than one monastery of those. farthing "Yes, I see it now, we are more cold an
4068.ir prayers and the sound of the chanting, as it the difference. Look you now at
4069.ed with his finger towards the " glowing chancel' AnO, I see," said Andrew, " hi
4070.ontinued the verger. "He did every thing he the building of twelve alms-houses,
4071.ger. "He did every thing he the building of twelve alms-houses, and funds for th
4072.ed and been' for- O, if ii were existing still, I should not have been left dyin
4073.still, I should not have been left dying by gotten." the way-side, nor would you
4074. learned that were afraid of interfering with the last wills of their relations,
4075.cannot especially if they gave any thing to God's poor or His Church. b found."
4076.s over, and after to had done everything in his power, there still remained much
4077.erved it before, they seem to be holding something broken in their hands." Inste
4078.efore, they seem to be holding something broken in their hands." Instead of cloa
4079.ps of a procession of old, slowly pacing through the church-yard were beautiful,
4080. the gospel of peace, of them that bring glad tidings of good things ;" (Rom. x.
4081., these, like their prayers, are wanting now ; and it seemed a mockery to restor
4082.that of emblems is passed away. speaking, nil England was, as are it In the days
4083.one of the first to be seized on by king astery Harry the Spoiler the alms-house
4084.ts of those who care more for the living than the dead. "But how is it," asked A
4085.ve you of a sudden ; ; all your learning?" " I told you before," was the reply,
4086.purgatory than arisen from this f ailing, and very probably a part of my punish,
4087.lieve not one of ment consists in having these motives for grumbling constantly
4088.ts in having these motives for grumbling constantly the bonnets and hats of my d
4089.said, those who are so fond of grumbling, ought to have some- went on, attributi
4090.ought to have some- went on, attributing this to the negligence and coldness of
4091. are truly cold. Their faith in Purthing to grumble for." " " And so now I feel
4092., and so they altogether forfrom knowing these things if I were still alive on e
4093.vexed at them, you will understand I ing there. How often do you think is Father
4094.nd their families, and for all suffering souls and there were a funeral as that
4095. the tory, but especially to those lying in the church-yard through poor, for th
4096.re said, the one ever thought of passing through a church-yard without psalms th
4097.ere not intended merely for him stopping to kneel before the cross to say a pray
4098.say a prayer for those who who was being carried to the tomb, but for all who re
4099. in life I was rather given to grumbling, a fault which in truth is too common w
4100. unconsecrated mould, without a blessing, without a prayer, because it is too fa
4101.stant one there is some other mouldering carcass to which we were once supposed
4102. three letters But there they signifying a wish that we may rest in peace. stop,
4103., they see the words at the foot begging for peace for the weary soul, but even
4104.or the weary soul, but even in repeating them they mean not to pray ; they forge
4105.y emblem which at one time a persecuting age permitted to them, 'have pity on me
4106.er in the faith, ever thinks of uttering a Do profundia, or a single ; ; "Why, y
4107.pt the offer. seem much chance of making my fortm English law, and so, to make a
4108. no intention, dear reader, of troubling yon with my personal history during tha
4109.ling yon with my personal history during that eventful period. It was a busy I !
4110.on had not been far wrong in calculating their value in Australia but I have uud
4111.lony, an enormous tract of sheep-feeding land putting himself in communication w
4112.mous tract of sheep-feeding land putting himself in communication with the Commi
4113.y life, and the duke was right in saying that I should riot regret it. My concer
4114.y not without their utility in advancing his interests. won't bind myself to say
4115.. won't bind myself to say to a shilling the sum which I sent over ; ; ; : ; nui
4116.nxiety. Much was said in praise of thing," said Sir John. case for the lords, an
4117. had never been any concealment of being eccentric. I was sorry for this, though
4118. surprise me much more was that, judging by his own was equally plain. There wer
4119. branches of letters, far from despising money, he seemed to care for it a uiily
4120. wliich Grant was now the sole surviving good deal. He took his millions from Au
4121. in the heavy work the days as something higher and more unwhich the occasion br
4122.there, lords it. There was another thing that struck me as odd. A year or and ba
4123.e deepened in Australia. .ofore, looking in vaiu for some one to carry his bag t
4124.t the lni^inoKs? Harry keeps on pressing for some ouo nest man with a ' i, tind
4125.gret it." at last. "Mind, I on accepting the post, J took in parliamentary debat
4126.iamentary debates on questions affecting Catholic .Ineation questions, workhouse
4127.ons, workhouse questions, churchbuilding questions, and the rest, I looked for h
4128., the pap.T'-., at anv rat", had nothing to tell me it was a disappointment, but
4129.o is there wlm to look buck at oue thing or other as having been the slave of '
4130.ook buck at oue thing or other as having been the slave of ' duke's hobbies." "A
4131.? I returned, then, to England, spending a London before going down to Oakham, w
4132. England, spending a London before going down to Oakham, where lived ; week or t
4133., the duke would not hear of his leaving the Grange. Mary had become the wife of
4134." " he's always at ntlemau, ;| something; you know it would pir/./.le fcb ing bo
4135.ing; you know it would pir/./.le fcb ing boy to number his hobbies; but the last
4136. are rary creditable." "You are speaking, I presume, of the Duke of Leven ?" I i
4137.r capacities of usefulness. In returning to Oakham, therefore, I was still retur
4138.Oakham, therefore, I was still returning home, though I had_formed no plans as t
4139.t that rumor had credited me with having brought home an Australian fortune. Som
4140.e of those whom I had left just entering on their had still quired. "All, yes, y
4141.tory his has ; of course, bfforo I going to Australia. " He is an really excelle
4142.on dinner-room, filled with re- standing so completely out of everything. He can
4143.standing so completely out of everything. He can't take hia fined and intelligen
4144.ety, parliament or anywhere." everything and every- proper place body worth know
4145.d every- proper place body worth knowing, is, no doubt, a very agreeable sample
4146.was the primest. the world, and anything higher and better than what savors of i
4147. the real explanation of the whole thing," conversation. Sir Clinton had a fancy
4148.ll-mixed said the county member, looking sagacious, and touching hia variety in
4149. member, looking sagacious, and touching hia variety in his company, so on the p
4150. science, and a county member. Including our host and myself, we numbered the sl
4151. wages, shut np about twenty tke passing moment I found myself a lion for the ga
4152. (you'll correct me, of course, enjoying a fair amount of if I am in error), but
4153. mischief and then lie's always sporting some social view or other; setting h a
4154.rting some social view or other; setting h a little against the current. One thi
4155. a little against the current. One thing, you know, he's a ; Catholic. " ; ; ; ;
4156.into foraimed, I will not say at proving num. to be well-developed monkeys, for
4157.en really a little touched ? Was proving my anything whatsoever, but at throwing
4158.little touched ? Was proving my anything whatsoever, but at throwing out pleasan
4159. my anything whatsoever, but at throwing out pleasant theories of he unpopular?
4160.heories of he unpopular? Or was he dying? Had his ten years of the possible prob
4161. the possible probability of their being nothing better. The boundless means pro
4162.sible probability of their being nothing better. The boundless means produced as
4163.s and mine ventilation, and the building of a aborigines was the system point on
4164. to put a stop to all that sort of thing some day," he said, "and the sooner the
4165.tion in a good many of our manufacturing towns, only nobody comes to inspect the
4166.hanI shall introduce a bill for obliging all members of Parliament to spend one
4167. the truth, I opportunity for rectifying called away to was not sorry to have ti
4168.n the new order of things before meeting him. " All," said one of the men of sci
4169.al lay open on the epistle were awaiting side, and it was evident the saintly co
4170.curtains of the same Behind it, covering the reredos terial hung on either side.
4171.ial oruaI'.'rn l>mituod into every thing. have their forms as of the roof and -w
4172.of the roof and -walls, though retaining and letters and monograms, most unacs .
4173. if they, too, glowed Above, the ceiling was spread out of living spirits. emana
4174.ve, the ceiling was spread out of living spirits. emanations it was transpalike
4175.netrate far, far rent, too, a it nothing could be seen, save only most depths ye
4176.beyond ; and brighter, and more dazzling blue. deeper, and deeper, lost in its i
4177.seemed to him to be cherub faces smiling on him, but BO that was a carved flower
4178.hrough still sho-wed forth were swarming ; canopied reredos blazing with preciou
4179.were swarming ; canopied reredos blazing with precious stones, of a higher spher
4180.beams and the roof to run like twinkling meteors along and the colors the walls,
4181.rafters, of the window, .notwithstanding the sable veil before it, were Jesus an
4182. it, were Jesus and to circle in glowing wreaths around the names of first as di
4183. as distinct and vivid as if the morning sun had just cast its and to be entwine
4184. observed in the dark of a quiet evening. was opened towards the middle of the s
4185.igned to lovely angelic forms, rejoicing First came the thurifer, followed by th
4186.the fashion of this earth, such, wearing and his worn in life, yet stately old m
4187. richer and more silvery hair glittering seemed worthy of kings and queens, yes,
4188.ass, but he had learnt suffiadorned king or queen on earth. Their graceful than
4189.ances cast forth a radiance too dazzling the service about to commence, and to a
4190.heir bodies seemed to have idea of being allowed to assist at this most august a
4191.s, every But he could not help remarking, that the vestments were of woven into
4192.nd the colors and patterns withal having a more antique look so that through a f
4193.fectly visible. Yet ger and more flowing, and they receding range of saintly fig
4194. ger and more flowing, and they receding range of saintly figures he had seen fa
4195.her, was there no confusion, no mingling of objects into of a sprawling ill-form
4196. mingling of objects into of a sprawling ill-formed cross them and gave to each
4197.k. robes of the purest white, supporting it in rich and glowing angels clothed i
4198.white, supporting it in rich and glowing angels clothed in flowing did the proce
4199.ch and glowing angels clothed in flowing did the procession move towards the to
4200.of from the golden censer, and ascending up, and up, springing the sapphire, and
4201.ser, and ascending up, and up, springing the sapphire, and the diamond. emerald,
4202.nestness for the sound And was listening him hiding from his sight the nave and
4203.r the sound And was listening him hiding from his sight the nave and its congreg
4204. benignly on were clustered and flitting around him, that he must advance no whi
4205. canopios, aye, and one of those beaming stars above, BI.-UL forth llx'ii- vni<-
4206.e devotions 18 domed they were assisting. Slow and solemn was the strain and pla
4207. was the strain and plaintive, breathing at once of hopes deferred, and of earne
4208.f earnest and trustful prayer, embodying together, as it were, the feelings of t
4209. permitted to behold ; the one suffering, assembled there behind him in the nave
4210.nd him in the nave, the other triumphing, yet full of sympathy for their less fo
4211. Now it was as the Toice of one pleading his cause with tears, and bowing bown t
4212.leading his cause with tears, and bowing bown to the very dust to sue for mercy,
4213.emed be absorbed in the sense of hearing and when at length the harmony suddenly
4214. the sublime strains that were searching into his very sonL And thus did he rema
4215.hope as the deep meanings of it stirring words were infused into his ; man somew
4216.ed to radiate from his features, lending a charm to those wrinkles and deep mark
4217.dressed in a coarse brown habit reaching to his feet, with a hood of the same ma
4218.eck and feet were bare, the latter being protected only by leather sandals. His
4219.ormed sandals, everyan idea of the thing in fact that he wore, though conveying
4220.g in fact that he wore, though conveying lowest poverty, seemed interwoven with
4221.you with me, brother ?" he began, seeing that Andrew was abashed and confused. H
4222.ashed and confused. His soft and winning Toice quite reassured the old man, and
4223.of which he had already repented, adding life, bling weaver. He had the appearan
4224.had already repented, adding life, bling weaver. He had the appearance of a oul
4225.he stinctively words, for it of speaking of it here, only for the of course, no
4226.r the of course, no one would be willing to exchange For, angel. " " Not so heav
4227.ied, much a would not have thought thing soul can be saved thereby." was the Gos
4228.from the tomb. But never had its meaning come so home to To hear those words of
4229.s that for ages, perhaps, had mouldering in the grave and to look at the same ti
4230. to look at the same time at the shining bodies of so many who had believed in J
4231.if Jesus will want so he stood wondering what new scene might be pre- permit, an
4232. speaker to see if he was But everything in that glowing countenance showed that
4233.if he was But everything in that glowing countenance showed that what he said wa
4234., though it was clearly glory descending " " Excuse me, sir," he began, "Child o
4235.he wish that he had uttered, of changing places And as for poverwith some one in
4236.s has shed upon it, and then tell paring. But for a few minutes all was still, u
4237. was about mo, good sample of everything it too coarse earth, and is li THE VISI
4238.eaved and all this glory that is shining about you, to be again as poor as you w
4239.ow. " Well," said Andrew, rather talking to himself than to the sainted man befo
4240.reamed of. Why, here have I been wishing these forty or fifty years, to get rid
4241.ile a saint in heaven rejoices at having been poor, and likes it so well, that h
4242.temptations of the world to have nothing to do all day long, but to serve God an
4243.'s prayers for any one who has a lilting that way, I am sure there couldn't be a
4244.ay, I am sure there couldn't be anything more pleasant. At any rate it's very di
4245.gels seemed to whisfore, as if unwilling to reply. " Do not hesitate There is no
4246. fear of pride in heaven per, In telling of thy virtues, thou dost but glorify H
4247. of my days, who was in reality the king of his neighborhood, it was any thing b
4248.ng of his neighborhood, it was any thing but a most serious sacrifice, to give u
4249.Him, though Lord of all things, choosing for Himself the lowest and poorest and
4250.ke the matter still Andrew, interrupting him, For priests are always honored and
4251.as almost at his wit's end for something else to say, yet he could not altogethe
4252. free, but I think you mistake the thing. You may, perhaps as you say, have been
4253.now even as I am known, makes me willing again to take upon myself that humble s
4254. of Him, is requited by our overwhelming increase ty I know what He has given me
4255.re BO quarrelsome, ud so fond of cursing and blaspheming." "But reply. there's A
4256.e, ud so fond of cursing and blaspheming." "But reply. there's Andrew again said
4257.le or laet words, still he was unwilling to give up his argument and help one, n
4258.unless you would be scoffed at something which his saint!/ Instructor had said,
4259.had said, seemed to give Sundays, having i let mo count BO many. If then He offe
4260.ot gladly embrace the opportueverlasting crown, ,f ^ ; "I begin to understand so
4261. ,f ^ ; "I begin to understand something of your history now. I ft having road a
4262.mething of your history now. I ft having road about great and rich men, who have
4263.ignorant bigots, little chance of having the sacraments even at the hour of deat
4264.now in your power, Solemnity and feeling than before, "Him who was deserted by t
4265., "Him who was deserted by the of adding to this luippineBS which 01 will you ke
4266. when (i<>d nh:dl summon you was hanging in the very agonies of death, that He w
4267.fixed them full on the "I've got nothing else to say; I'm fairly ever, hesitatin
4268.else to say; I'm fairly ever, hesitating. countenance of Andrew. The glory that
4269.ke diamonds your eyes were as persuading when you used to preach in your crown,
4270. trow there were no discontented shining now. Jesus has told you, that not one h
4271.-morrow ; and if I feel however trifling or unimportant, if borne in patience fo
4272.tient, I'll just fancy I see you looking at me as yon do now ; and if that won't
4273. think I have." " Then can I do anything further for you ?" asked the saint. " O
4274.saint. " O, yes !" cried Andrew, sinking down on his knees before him, "give me
4275.knees before him, "give me your blessing now, and promise to pray often for me,t
4276.d above as if in prayer, then stretching forth his hands over the old man he sai
4277. now spoke of the happiness of preaching to and every day more and more like unt
4278.ore like unto Himself. May He converting sinners. There are great consolations i
4279. heavenly wisdom, which He so often cing them again, has had some share in makin
4280.them again, has had some share in making me so willing, conceals from the great
4281.s had some share in making me so willing, conceals from the great and proud, but
4282.mits, to resume the office by exchanging with Such, brother, is the blessing I w
4283.ging with Such, brother, is the blessing I wish you now and lowly. thus will I p
4284.s to offer np before the tune your doing that hi the workhouse," he said; "you'd
4285. stop your mouth. He ceased, and folding his arms upon his breast, glided The Ma
4286.stalls. " There is one mode of preaching," replied the saint, "which proceeded,
4287.atient resignation in pain and suffering, would make converts than any which had
4288. the Offertory. "Lord Jesus Christ, King hearted master. And no one could hinder
4289. pit. Deliver them from the if communing with himself, he went on, "It's very st
4290.fall into darkbeen I've always grumbling and making myself ness and let the stan
4291.arkbeen I've always grumbling and making myself ness and let the standard-bearer
4292.et the standard-bearer St. Michael bring them iuto 5 miserable about my lot aye,
4293.ned. As he ry things I've been grumbling at are those that make raised his eyes
4294.he found that the mist was again closing around him, u it, wns nlr ha' believed
4295.istinct, like some beautiful and glowing man's reverie, resumed. object seen in
4296. greater opportunity is there of heaping up treasure on treasure in heaven, so t
4297. seem to suppose, there would be nothing there to disturb your peace. Yea, even
4298.t He who hangs there above us is looking at you ; His eyes are brighter far, and
4299. him, as if eager to grasp some by lying here all night, you drunken vagabond ?"
4300.ld be no ton of the village was standing with his spade and mattock on other tha
4301. it was the knight of the black mar- ing up the hill last night, and pitied you.
4302. to lumself, "that the choir was singing must have been precious drunk. And only
4303.tness than ever, and now I were thumping your head just now against the grave-st
4304.anges Andrew felt nettled, and was going to reply sharply, when in the nave, for
4305. had refused to change places for having waked him. His meekness was not without
4306.e could towards the door, merely turning his away, hoping that he had'nt taken c
4307.he door, merely turning his away, hoping that he had'nt taken cold by sleeping o
4308.ng that he had'nt taken cold by sleeping on the head for a moment to take one mo
4309.p and began to collect hi* scattered ing than ever. The wounds were flashing wit
4310. ing than ever. The wounds were flashing with a soft and thoughts ; but it took
4311.k him some time, for his head was aching soothing radiance, the countenance wore
4312.e time, for his head was aching soothing radiance, the countenance wore a benign
4313. evidently from a bruise. He was sitting on the very couraging smile, and the ey
4314.se. He was sitting on the very couraging smile, and the eyes were fixed upon him
4315.ted himself after his walk the preceding pression the same as that of the saintl
4316.f the saintly monk, but ten-fold evening. The church-yard and everything about h
4317. evening. The church-yard and everything about him looked more moving and inspir
4318. everything about him looked more moving and inspiriting. Andrew's impulse was t
4319.t him looked more moving and inspiriting. Andrew's impulse was to oast precisely
4320.ere all the night. Yet he could'nt bring himself to believe that all he had seen
4321.no said to him, " There's no need asking you what you determined mention of an A
4322.. light of the church, had a bewildering effect upon the old man; Yet he did not
4323.d man; Yet he did not forget the parting admonition of the old verger, for he se
4324.e he had reached the wicket gate leading down to the against some hard substance
4325.e hear some young unroniaiitic beginning ! ardout reader exclaim and we are boun
4326.very prosaical and common-place. Sitting down to peruse some "romantic story of
4327.peruse some "romantic story of thrilling interest," our breath (of course we mea
4328.s usually taken away by the overpowering grandeur of the opening ; ption. Gradua
4329.the overpowering grandeur of the opening ; ption. Gradually, however, we rally;
4330.ally, however, we rally; and, collecting your leave to commence with no more amb
4331.more ambitious preface than by repeating the very ordinary observation which sta
4332.bservation which stands at the beginning of this chapter, viz., that it was a bi
4333.d, and as it was splashed by the passing vehicles over the stragglers who happen
4334. delicate and truthful writer displaying a much more intimate knowledge than we
4335.east startled when we find her narrating u certain number of astounding incident
4336.narrating u certain number of astounding incidents which take place every day in
4337.eholds, but of which we, although living in the very midst of lay their aching h
4338.ng in the very midst of lay their aching heads, or how to satisfy the cravings o
4339.the most profound ignorance? No, gnawing hunger. But we digress, and must now be
4340.k for truth. We do not even mean-looking house, in a street leading from one of
4341. mean-looking house, in a street leading from one of the great look for probabil
4342.hfares of the city. The fire was burning brightly in our money for the article,
4343.ght. Its only occupant was an commencing with a thunder-storm rolling along the
4344. commencing with a thunder-storm rolling along the Alpine elderly man of grave,
4345.ttractive appearance. hills, threatening destruction to the dwellers in some sec
4346.d to welcome him as the very the howling of the storm without, the expression of
4347.erfections shall amongst them, elevating them by the example of his own virhave
4348.ues, encouragiug the weak, and reproving the wicked and the have the felicity of
4349.cked and the have the felicity of making the acquaintance of the smiling thought
4350.f making the acquaintance of the smiling thoughtless ever at his post, regardles
4351. post, regardless alike of the scorching villain, or 'he stem old uncle, as the
4352.mount of unmerited sufferings, thrilling was to be succored or prepared for deat
4353.alone knows how to prepare the trembling soul clude in the legitimate and recogn
4354.he three for its awful change: elevating their poverty as far as his own volumes
4355.rtune. scanty means allowed, and sharing his little all with those who The publi
4356.s stood most in need of it. Thus, living amongst them, at once The public is sat
4357. of romance in return for its struggling congregation had. indeed, become to him
4358.by any possibility hr.ve happened Loving them as he did, it is little wonder tha
4359., as the storm and thus, everybody being satisfied, there is an end of the howle
4360.k again at "conception, con- was resting after the labors of a long and fatiguin
4361.after the labors of a long and fatiguing day, and coctiou, and completion," as S
4362.ir Abel Handy would style it, of opening the curtains, peered out long and anxio
4363.ere you some romantic story of thrilling interest, we that you would have reason
4364. the the lot of so many of his suffering and the poverty which were His simple t
4365.E TWO fallen frsm his hand and was lying unheeded on the carpet at his feet. Aft
4366.wuil whom He canae to save ? is hurrying on as fast as the viothe storm will per
4367.will take tho opportunity of introducing our readers to some of the other person
4368. But whilst Father Eustace -Ted coursing down his cheek, we might have sii) that
4369.some half-an-hour, when a sudden ringing of the bell recalled to himself, and to
4370.over. CHAPTEE H. Now, naturally speaking, it is not a pleasant thing, after a TN
4371.lly speaking, it is not a pleasant thing, after a TNTBODUCES MB. STANHOPE, A LON
4372.ia. He was a stern, hard man; possessing to all He was their servant, and ever a
4373.or. In all matters, whether appertaining to his business fore, the book was at o
4374.xactness and precision. His calm, paring for the call" which he knew full well a
4375.f " Oh sir, poor Mr. Stanhope is sinking fast, and he would chilling coldness, w
4376.e is sinking fast, and he would chilling coldness, which was at once so painful
4377.d so prominent hia servant. Then turning to her, he said, " Say that I will a pa
4378., there was, however, one tender feeling within "Oh many, many is the Rosary I h
4379.ent love for his children. The suffering child," answered the old woman, weeping
4380. child," answered the old woman, weeping, as she only times his haughty brow rel
4381.han't forget him now, when he is passing away from confidence of childhood. At s
4382.e his reward for all that he has kissing them, try to speak to them with love an
4383.n man was too much frozen to and passing for a moment into the chapel which adjo
4384.adjoined his melt so easily, and putting them gently away, he would often house,
4385.(St. James, v. 14, 15), and then opening the withdrawing from him into a distant
4386.4, 15), and then opening the withdrawing from him into a distant part of the roo
4387.an unnatural him, night and day, waiting with anxious longing to minister fear o
4388.ht and day, waiting with anxious longing to minister fear of disturbing him, his
4389.s longing to minister fear of disturbing him, his brow would grow darker and dar
4390.r conviction all the while burytne dying man, and carefully placing It in his bo
4391.burytne dying man, and carefully placing It in his bosom, in a ing itself deeper
4392.efully placing It in his bosom, in a ing itself deeper and deeper in his heart,
4393.o was in the cold wet street, struggling with the were afraid of him; and yet, h
4394. for which he cared. Men said blustering wind as he hurried on his way. Out in t
4395.ay. Out in the cold dark night, hurrying through the searching he cared for gold
4396.rk night, hurrying through the searching he cared for gold, because they saw him
4397.o exact in his attenwet and mud, bending hii head towards the earth to shield hi
4398.as concerned f< >r face from the driving rain, with It in his bosom and yet ther
4399.us of the of his importance and standing amongst men. The mere gold mystery of l
4400.nd he would sign the papers transferring thousgood old times when the priest of
4401.isposed of it, homage; but when _blazing lights, and sounding bells would tered
4402.; but when _blazing lights, and sounding bells would tered it about; but he neve
4403. forget that it \vas have told the dying man that the pledge of his redemption w
4404. fruit of his iuti.'llect, the offspring of his calenhit: already coming to him
4405.ffspring of his calenhit: already coming to him that tho Adorable was near tit h
4406.rable was near tit hand to the unbending power of hia will; in a word, he waft h
4407.a will; in a word, he waft his trembling soul to tho home of its eternity when f
4408.d grow darker still, and the contracting brow would show that a bitter thought w
4409.d show that a bitter thought was feeding on his heart. And, in truth, it was so;
4410.as much as they loved him; and, writhing bitter pangs which such thoughts awaken
4411. His father would sit for hours watching him as he entirely in unison with his o
4412.n some favorite author, his brow seeming to expand very truth, there are too man
4413. pride and from the page he was perusing beaming out from his dark full self-wil
4414.nd from the page he was perusing beaming out from his dark full self-will to ext
4415.his pride and admiration, and the loving ; he was both a poet and an enthusiast.
4416.was all anxiety and nervousness. Nothing was too costly or too rich for him, and
4417.ldren. incident related in the beginning of this story occurred, the boy was a f
4418.ly fellow of seventeen, his sister being two Mr. Stanhope had never been able to
4419.r. Stanhope had never been able to bring years younger. himself to part with his
4420.th could procure. This peculiar training had, of course, been attended with the
4421. method of education. They were retiring and bashful, almost to a fault, and lik
4422.ers brought its influence, almost living on the will of their father. Fearing th
4423.ing on the will of their father. Fearing their father almost more than they love
4424.ost more than they loved him, and having no mother on whom to lavish their affec
4425.sh their affection, it is not surprising that they loved one another most deeply
4426.e have remarked; but there was something in the fire of the dark black eye, and
4427.n. Intellect was stamped on the swelling forehead, but pride was there too; and
4428. utter would hang upon his lips, waiting to be expressed. But the shadow would p
4429.ss over the haughty face, and the rising sigh would stifle the gentle feeling, a
4430.ing sigh would stifle the gentle feeling, and the cold stern man would be himsel
4431.e loved him none the less for perceiving that so much of his own proud nature wa
4432.n. Oh could he have seen what was coming, he would almost have slain him with hi
4433. it in the dust with scorn and withering rage. Maria was a gentle trusting girl,
4434.hering rage. Maria was a gentle trusting girl, with a love for her brother that
4435.ught into i cause of disagreement spring up Such natures may break, they seldom
4436.th :;nd his open countenance won burning ".d proDeluded life lie had lid H colli
4437.y ei to his own intellect thus fostering in his ,1 them but almost unsconciouslv
4438.dear papa, do tell me re was a something k I am a il. and h< tears g ;shed from
4439.had never oc;reh most regularly. Morning and evening, on curred to him that Ae c
4440.;reh most regularly. Morning and evening, on curred to him that Ae could be a lo
4441.that and here was this mere child asking >ras to be seen advancing * steps towar
4442.e child asking >ras to be seen advancing * steps towards the pew where he sat Th
4443.raordinar :is, his whole frame trembling with oold fao; measured tread the powde
4444. the eagerness with which he was waiting a -respectfully behind with tr reply to
4445.ondled the little hand that was .vancing to open, with an obsequious bow, restin
4446.to open, with an obsequious bow, resting in his, the pew all tended to remind on
4447.losthe Gospel In fact, you could see ing him. This strange language of Edtrin's
4448.ith an hen? Mr. Stanhope was worshipping self as much. indefinable dread. He had
4449.blessed reild, as he answered My darling boy, what can have liich had psry (.as
4450.t indeed I could not refrain from asking you th> I have often, oh \ -.at a wickv
4451.. three long hours old church, listening to a service which -poke to him as a re
4452. real: ed child I was, a: acher speaking -heep that had wandered away from knew,
4453.ll me whether the good Jesus was seeking me, and whether He would ever and me, a
4454.tic. - Ton must not talk dark of leaving me, for must not talk in yon k this lik
4455.our papa to lose yon, my An-ifng darling And the cold, man softened more than he
4456. .he same time, awoke :: the officiating clergyman was holding ag ion satisfacti
4457.:: the officiating clergyman was holding ag ion satisfaction no doubt, whatever
4458.His large black he laughed, and, calling me a foolish little boy, he j :-.>ns wi
4459.ish little boy, he j :-.>ns with feeling as he thus communed lie world ^* imagin
4460.d down from his knee, and began drinking his wine ; and when I to teach me how t
4461._ came to him again, and asked something so unearthly seemed to light his featur
4462.would gaze upon him with i After leaving the church he would sometimes, go and p
4463.t of his discourse the beautiful aw ling the lost sheep. The child had listened
4464.rd to learn ; but Laad awe to the loving history, but there was son:-. laughed a
4465.d preached a very nio mon in the morning about sin, and what a shocking thing it
4466.e morning about sin, and what a shocking thing it was to be a sinner, and when y
4467.ing about sin, and what a shocking thing it was to be a sinner, and when you wer
4468.re called out of the room in the evening after dinner, he took me on his knee an
4469. I did, and that I knew he was preaching about me, and that I was very sorry to
4470.aspirings of the lofty mind to something higher find more noble ami, with a kind
4471. instincts of his fresh young stretching themselves out to something to which li
4472.g stretching themselves out to something to which lie could not give a name, and
4473.d no ono to tell him what that something with congratulations to Edwin, and he w
4474. quite empty, and he would often, during the evening, have wished to jvtir i and
4475., and he would often, during the evening, have wished to jvtir i and a honor of
4476.urage. The good Jesus is already seeking him to take him upon His shoulders, and
4477.ratulation Why of did con- ? And finding no answer to these questions which cont
4478. and all around him, and the old feeling of his early childhood came buck with W
4479.He listened eagerly every Sunday, homing to hear from the pulpit some explanatio
4480.lanation came until the Sunday preceding the day on which the bishop was to admi
4481.ke about it but Edwin could make nothing oiit of it. Grant was very "low church,
4482.ficacy attached to it, and in explaining his views he succeeded so perfectly in
4483.ws he succeeded so perfectly in lowering that which he undertook to explain, tha
4484. have been much impressed with a feeling of awe or respect for that which they w
4485.r have felt much obligation of preparing themselves very exactly or carefully fo
4486.ion. Edwin felt that there was something wrong in all this. He endeavored to mak
4487. believe that confirmation was something more holy and of higher character that
4488.gher character that Mr. Grant's teaching seemed to suppose. Young as he was, and
4489.practise it. These ideas, without taking any very definite shape, were continual
4490.efinite shape, were continually flitting through his brain, filling him with une
4491.ally flitting through his brain, filling him with uneasiness and doubt, and his
4492.f the hollowness of the whole proceeding was rendered complete, when Mr. Grant c
4493.. Grant called.one day, and after asking him a single question in the Catechism,
4494.the bishop, or his attendant, certifying that he was duly prepared and fit to re
4495.ht not to be so. On the Sunday preceding the confirmation, Mr. Grant announced t
4496.cipients should, on the Sunday following, approach the communion table. If poor
4497.requently declare that there was nothing but the mere bread and wine present, an
4498.s impious and wicked to believe anything else, and consequently, he was inclined
4499.r and anon the solemn word came flitting through his mind: "This is My Body," an
4500.Mr. Grant could be wrong, or be teaching what was false, Edwin kuew nothing of r
4501.ching what was false, Edwin kuew nothing of religion but what he had learnt from
4502.t but, nevertheless, there was something in their teaching and especially on thi
4503.s, there was something in their teaching and especially on this point with which
4504.urs with his Bible before him, pondering over the passages relating to the Eucha
4505.im, pondering over the passages relating to the Eucharist, and becoming more and
4506. relating to the Eucharist, and becoming more and more perWith an ardent desire
4507.k judgment to himself for not discerning the body of the Lord, if the body of th
4508.nt was right, aud that there was nothing present but bread and wine but the awfu
4509.ment Lord" (1 to himself, not discerning the Cor. xi. 27, 28, 29); but body of t
4510.r, Edwin knelt before the nut discerning the body of the Lord." : THE TWO or ins
4511.tell it, held within its grasp something green to all the instincts and feelings
4512.nature of the happy time. In the evening as they sat, a merry band, prompting hi
4513.ing as they sat, a merry band, prompting him to take the words he so often ponde
4514., with no other light than the sparkling plain and literal sense, and with these
4515. red berries beaten down by the teaching to which he was a constant glimmering a
4516.ng to which he was a constant glimmering and twinkling so brightly and cheerfull
4517. was a constant glimmering and twinkling so brightly and cheerfully in the liste
4518. in the listener at one moment trembling as he thought again and flickering ligh
4519.bling as he thought again and flickering light, while the song, and the jest, an
4520.e him- round, with young hearts laughing so gaily and so free from self. For, he
4521.keth judgment to himself, not discerning the body of guiled for a moment from th
4522.as the Lord," at another moment stifling his difficulties by the about to fall i
4523.sons, a fine open-hearted fellow, during idea or belief, but with his mind one v
4524.ne vast chaos of uncertainty the evening sang the following Christmas song, ther
4525.certainty the evening sang the following Christmas song, there were few and fear
4526. was so utterly wretched after receiving the bread and wine- feeling, affections
4527.er receiving the bread and wine- feeling, affections, and sympathies which Chris
4528.stmas time, and there was such a feeling of misery and desolation in his heart,
4529.here were few of the young whose glowing hearts did not should have been so sacr
4530.ness lation that Edwin could never bring himself to repeat it. of their hearts d
4531.Stanhope reminded him that the following were few of the old who were not carrie
4532.memannouncement so coldly, merely saying, "Papa, I think I bered hearth, one of
4533.d not press him on the matter, attaching, as he himself did, so little importanc
4534.ch " ; and what wonder nature developing itself more and more every day, and his
4535.y day, and his aspirings after something more holy and grand than anything he kn
4536.ething more holy and grand than anything he knew becoming daily stronger and mor
4537.and grand than anything he knew becoming daily stronger and more marked. Frank,
4538.as impossible to know him without loving him and admiring him ; but his uneasine
4539.know him without loving him and admiring him ; but his uneasiness on the matter
4540.which were painful to look upon, telling, as they did, of a young and loving hea
4541.ling, as they did, of a young and loving heart not at peace speaking, too, throu
4542.g and loving heart not at peace speaking, too, through the hectic flush which no
4543.nd care, and grief, as youthful trusting hearts like his should never know or fe
4544.tness is near. The good Jesus is looking for His lamb, that with loving hand and
4545.s looking for His lamb, that with loving hand and mercy breathing voice He may t
4546.hat with loving hand and mercy breathing voice He may take it on His shoulders,
4547. mound, with the Christmas chime wailing a sad and plaintive air around the grav
4548.the graves, like the song of the surging What wonder seb as it breaks for ever o
4549.eb as it breaks for ever on the sounding shore. that they forgot that the chime
4550.essage of love to young and old, ringing so softly and with such mugic sweetness
4551.ace, where at midnight hour the kneeling crowd is wrapt in silent prayer, as bla
4552.wd is wrapt in silent prayer, as blazing lights and sweetest scents and music's
4553.nd sweetest scents and music's thrilling strains are all employed to greet in hu
4554.ends upon the altar of His love speaking to the schoolboy's heart of his mother'
4555.boy's heart of his mother's love telling the weary of rest to come, filling the
4556.lling the weary of rest to come, filling the hearts of all with love, and joy, a
4557.ked with much uneasiness, the increasing langour of his son's appearance, and th
4558. at this partito see happy faces smiling around him. cular Christmas, gathered r
4559.persons, and every preparation was being made to " enable them to spend a merry
4560.fect wood. There was a mistletoe hanging from the roof of every room, the gorgeo
4561.ld Christmas time." ; night, The evening was far spent, in fact it was close upo
4562.ed that they should go to TJ1K was bring celebrated TWO (' i VICTOUJRH. The tear
4563.very appropriate finish to their evening's enter- would make me a better man, or
4564.er- would make me a better man, or bring me nearer to Most of them had never bee
4565. he continued with tlm lie church during their lives "I cannot remain tin about
4566.church but what they had tears streaming from his eyes. from the teachings of th
4567.that I am it will kill me, it is killing need hardly say, had been of no very co
4568.lmost worn out, and yet there is nothing hnl d;uforms and ceremonies without mea
4569. d;uforms and ceremonies without meaning or siguificancy, a mere and fear, and u
4570.ake comfort, for light is at hand. bring eternal ruin upon its deluded votaries.
4571.they call it, is one of the most amusing ing their way to the Catholic Church, s
4572. call it, is one of the most amusing ing their way to the Catholic Church, situa
4573.ny of our readers are grumwith us? bling, and declaring that we have altogether
4574.rs are grumwith us? bling, and declaring that we have altogether overdrawn thehe
4575.set out in order to finish their evening's amusement by tlus visit to the Cathol
4576.out much know very little ; know nothing of Catholic doctrine or belief, sure ch
4577. I am ; sembled to worship God according to the best of their power and knowledg
4578.u now ask me to join you in perpetrating. No Frank, I will not go with such moti
4579.th such motives ; as these ; and knowing me as you do, I am astonished you Shoul
4580. trust I as yourself, Edwin, of entering any place of worship whatsoI trust I am
4581.e. as incapable as yourself of insulting the convictions of any class of profess
4582.e convictions of any class of professing Christians, and now I hope you won't re
4583.o come with us." As he finished speaking, Frank Seymour held out his hand and lo
4584.th so much sympathy and generous feeling in his face, that Edwin at once .took t
4585.nd shook it warmly. The others gathering round and promotives as those ig their
4586.friends. As Edwin and Frank were passing out of the house, arm in dear arm, the
4587. young puppy ought to have had something better to think about; and, moreover, t
4588.and, moreover, that a good hone-whipping would have been the greatest boon that
4589.p the idea of his son, Tom Brown, taking any such ridiculous notions, and thinki
4590.ny such ridiculous notions, and thinking about religion and that sort of thing "
4591.ng about religion and that sort of thing "and I should like to find you, sir," s
4592.lias, across " the table to Tom, getting any of these hairbrained notions into y
4593.ed notions into your head about becoming better, and desiring something " And po
4594.head about becoming better, and desiring something " And poor more perfect. Tras
4595. becoming better, and desiring something " And poor more perfect. Trash, sir Non
4596.ather, and you will be But as to getting any of Master Edwin's fanciful noperfec
4597.lack-a-daisical fool, who wanted ducking in a horse-pond to give him some spirit
4598.ness by spirit and manliness Tom meaning drinkand the other fashionable and more
4599.nkand the other fashionable and more ing, smoking, swearing, amusements in which
4600. other fashionable and more ing, smoking, swearing, amusements in which honest T
4601.hionable and more ing, smoking, swearing, amusements in which honest Tom and his
4602. along the narrowpassage of the dwelling which she poetically describes as "her
4603. ! ! ! ; ; ; childhood's home," thinking of the knight in disguise who in seekin
4604.of the knight in disguise who in seeking his "ladye faire," and is only recalled
4605. recalled to sublunary things by finding at the door, instead of her trusty knig
4606. the as she daily broth, little thinking or reflecting, poor thing, takes it wit
4607.ily broth, little thinking or reflecting, poor thing, takes it with a jaunty and
4608.ittle thinking or reflecting, poor thing, takes it with a jaunty and abstracted
4609.nd even Miss importance, as he was doing the best ; Till-: T\VO by its occupiers
4610. true, and that she wai neither thinking nor caring whether human eye saw her or
4611.that she wai neither thinking nor caring whether human eye saw her or not, He sa
4612.saw her or not, He saw the tears rolling softly down the cheek of the boy whc kn
4613.n his life before he saw warm gush " ing piety ; he saw real and true "heart wor
4614.cked and crowded congregation worshiping like one man I . Simper cannot help thi
4615. one man I . Simper cannot help thinking that wo have overdrawn him, and that li
4616. is so unnatural to suppose him thinking so much about religion and such abstrac
4617. for old Brown. In any question relating to turtle soup, or an investment in the
4618.erson as Edwin Stanhope, we have nothing more to say, except to repeat that our
4619.perfect, but merely that he was aspiring after something better. We would remind
4620.ely that he was aspiring after something better. We would remind them, too (alth
4621.he heart and intellect, and the reducing those aspirings to practice that it is
4622.pirings to practice that it is one thing to see and desire to do what is better,
4623. to do what is better, and another thing to do it in a word, that, in morals, th
4624.nd that many a one who desires something better, who is dissatisfied with his st
4625.once degrade and defile him. But leaving the Browns, and Simpers, and the rest o
4626.which Edwin and his friends were wending their way is truly worthy of the more e
4627.eauty of the cer emonial which was going on he contrasted it with the cole forma
4628.the cole formality of his own worshiping he contrasted the deep anc ; ; earnest
4629.he was amongst those who were worshiping God as h< " hymn, Adest* his ear, he hi
4630.re. The long looked foj light was coming at last, and lowlier and more humbly st
4631.his head as he felt that God was working in his heart, anc strains of the sweet
4632.t old Christmas hymn, there is something in thee which speaks to most hearts, te
4633.hee which speaks to most hearts, telling, as thou dost, of lov ing, trusting joy
4634.earts, telling, as thou dost, of lov ing, trusting joy, that dares to humble cri
4635.ling, as thou dost, of lov ing, trusting joy, that dares to humble crib, go at C
4636.rib, go at Christmas tune to and looking on the smiling Babe as He lifts th< hif
4637.stmas tune to and looking on the smiling Babe as He lifts th< hif tiny hands to
4638.the gazer-in, dares to join the swelling song, and dares to utter with its sin-s
4639.ich angel tongues were its first to sing which dares ! to forget graceful arch o
4640.me dozen years ago, when after wandering long in the mazes of error, we heard th
4641. of love and rest which thou didst bring to our weary, fainting soul. It was, ho
4642. thou didst bring to our weary, fainting soul. It was, however, at the time of t
4643.ibe. When Edwin and his friends, leaving the darkness outside, thronged to the a
4644.or of the scene which met their speaking hi the face, the eye, and the reverentl
4645.ir gaze, was literally a blaze something like envy the cairn, mild, and smiling
4646.g like envy the cairn, mild, and smiling joy which Numberless tapers, their brig
4647.e beauty which were perfectly enchanting. The sanctuary was paid for it that it
4648.him His holy grant incense were floating slowly to the roof of the sanctuary, wi
4649.roof of the sanctuary, will, that seeing what was right he might embrace it at a
4650.ight embrace it at any cost and hhedding their sweet odours through the whole ed
4651.through the whole edifice ; or suffering to himself ; and so absorbed was he in
4652.ichness of its decorations, and standing about the middle of the church, with it
4653.h saints and " mighty men of old looking down upon you from every wall, with gol
4654.yer, from the poor woman who was telling her beads with such fervor, kneeling on
4655.ing her beads with such fervor, kneeling on the stone floor of the or ten, who w
4656.ne floor of the or ten, who was kneeling by his aisle, to the young boy of nine
4657.n courteously beckoned slowly separating, it was not until Frank Seymour had twi
4658.ethought himself of win was, and, wiping the tears from his face, rose to follow
4659. an it were, with a pall and the howling wind seemed to find a voice to tell him
4660.' tliii winter's night, were the fitting emblems of his 1 VICTORIES. eration ; ;
4661.octrine, and j- own pomBOW heart fitting the care, the pain, aud the retiiniiug
4662.he warmth, the grandeur, and the gushing gladness of that never- to-be-forgotten
4663.Church. At length, one day, when walking out alone, he remarked establishment of
4664.t of a Catholic publisher, and, entering, timidly asked to be supplied with a fe
4665. be supplied with a few works containing a simple exposition of Catholic doctrin
4666.ered, and pon and read, always finishing with a clearer and more firm conviction
4667.thought of his discovered what was going on always with the greatest secrecy ; f
4668.er's he literally devoured them. Morning, noon, and night, when he could steal a
4669.r which he had been so earnestly looking during the last two or three years a cl
4670. he had been so earnestly looking during the last two or three years a clear, si
4671.ple, defined rule of He found everything laid down with the utmost precifaith. c
4672.hose claims. All minor difficul teaching had been at once disposed of by the tho
4673.time when he lay his poor, weary, aching head upon her motherly He thought and f
4674.ind full light and rest for his fainting soul. of her doctrine with regard to he
4675.ruth and beauty of the Church's teaching in regard to Mary and the saints, and h
4676. he always unlocked his desk, and taking his treasure, knelt before it, and, wit
4677.he fervor of his i sion, belief. leaving no room for doubt, wavering, or hesitat
4678.ief. leaving no room for doubt, wavering, or hesitating He hod studied with the
4679. room for doubt, wavering, or hesitating He hod studied with the most profound a
4680.gence the portions of his works treating of the Church, and the marks by which t
4681.n, to listen to her ; and all this being proved, then came the all-important que
4682.question, which of the churches, calling themselves Christian, could show that t
4683.out to all men the one true fold. Having seen that unity of faith and belief on
4684.natural gifts that Catholicity embracing all times and all ages, since her found
4685.rof her communion. He saw some upholding, and others denying, the divinity of ou
4686.e saw some upholding, and others denying, the divinity of our Lord. He saw some
4687.ity of our Lord. He saw some maintaining, and others rejecting, the necessity of
4688.w some maintaining, and others rejecting, the necessity of baptismal regen1 youn
4689.he went on for six long months, becoming every day more weary and more careworn,
4690. careworn, with his young cheek becoming every day paler and more wan, and the l
4691.d long seen that there was som< weighing upon his mind, and more than once had b
4692.nhope looked with anxiety and foreboding upon his son, and trembled The family p
4693.d The family physician was lest anything should befall him. frequently called in
4694. sought. In a few minutes he was sitting in the before him, and the rage of the
4695.te come up to the poor Edwin, shuddering and trembling, would hide his face in i
4696.the poor Edwin, shuddering and trembling, would hide his face in ideas he had fo
4697.e kind bright eye, and saw it glistening to whom he could speak but he felt that
4698. anxious thought, he ant and encouraging voice, he forgot the romance in the rea
4699.ty, came to the determination of writing to Father Eustace, whom and the reality
4700. a member of the Church, and, forgetting everything else in the pleasing thought
4701.f the Church, and, forgetting everything else in the pleasing thought, he would
4702.rgetting everything else in the pleasing thought, he would be happy for a moment
4703. another instant, he was at the dwelling of the priest, had knocked ; ; ; ; of t
4704., had knocked ; ; ; ; of the neighboring chapel. He briefly stated his position
4705.er all this, and he concluded by begging Father Eustace to counsel and advise hi
4706.stace wrote to him immediately, advising him first terrible of all to overflowin
4707.him first terrible of all to overflowing goodness of thy own great heart. There
4708.thee, like Edwin, for advice, he telling, as it ever did, of the make everything
4709., as it ever did, of the make everything known of a to his father, as that gentl
4710.o his father, as that gentle- man, being a member church which is always so loud
4711.ould not complain of his son's following that which his conscience pointed out t
4712.ns yourself, but it is a different thing when it concerns your children, your de
4713.n they knew each other better concluding by again pressing upon him to mention a
4714.ther better concluding by again pressing upon him to mention all to his father,
4715. mention all to his father, but assuring him that, until he did so, his secret w
4716.h the interview, in which, after telling his father all, he was to fall upon his
4717.t to spurn him. On more than one evening, on which Mr. Stanhope had been unusual
4718.st from his home and friends, for daring to do that which was right, found in th
4719.was right, found in thy dear and gushing love that which repaid him to the full,
4720.ewly-found friend, and concealed nothing from him. Father Eustace found him perf
4721.d up in Catholic doctrine, and requiring but very little more instruction before
4722.ery little more instruction before being in a fit state to be received into the
4723. O God I canup before him, and, groaning aloud, not, I dare not do it," he threw
4724.air, and wept as if his young and loving heart would break. ! ! Church. His effo
4725.efore, principally directed to inspiring him with courage and confidence to take
4726.NEW FRIEND AND A TKUE ONE Sunday evening Edwin set off to IX. ONE. STOLEN INTERV
4727.S. in June, when Mr. Stanhope was dining pay his first visit to Father Eustace.
4728.ad dropped a line the day before, saying that he would seize the opportunity, an
4729.would seize the opportunity, and begging the priest to make arrangements that th
4730.h afraid as ever of his father acquiring any knowledge of that in which he was e
4731.ious way, and he determined that nothing should be wanting on his part to perfec
4732.etermined that nothing should be wanting on his part to perfect what had been so
4733.the difficulties to be overcome. Finding that he could not prevail upon Edwin to
4734. with the Catholic religion, and placing himself in the hands of God without res
4735. without reserve, to trust to the loving Providence which "reacheth from end to
4736.d disposethall things sweetly, "to bring everything He besought him to to a favo
4737.all things sweetly, "to bring everything He besought him to to a favorable issue
4738.n he experienced a difficulty in finding the house he sought. He wavered for a m
4739. his eye fell upon the cross surmounting the gable of Father Eustace's church, a
4740. of Father Eustace's church, and hailing be fervent in prayer, that God might di
4741.s anger than Edwin dreaded, mid assuring him that he would daily remember him at
4742.le. begged that he would come and During the four months that followed, Edwin ha
4743. ever rose np l>ewith fear mid trembling from the conI beg of Ji'T never lo [4744., retired to his <>v. jet not us sitting buried in thought, thinking of not: in
4745.t us sitting buried in thought, thinking of not: in t par- Almighty's Church, an
4746.ighed down ami oppressed with foreboding of what was about to happen, when a ser
4747.e expulsion from his home, the wrenching asunder of all the fervor of his young
4748.rd, the probable poverty, deso- spending some moments thus, he rose and waited f
4749.y beatings of his anxious and fluttering heart, before Put your- his father's ro
4750. himself degraded by his son's forsaking his religion, and embracing FATHER AND
4751.'s forsaking his religion, and embracing FATHER AND SON. THE CONFLICT. A FATHER'
4752.hope would gain the mastery, and fearing very much that his pride would gain tho
4753.t his pride would gain tho day. entering the room, Edwin found his father pen te
4754.a book on the Catholic Church, belonging to Father Eustace, with that gentleman'
4755.n's name on the title page. On returning to his room he was much alarmed to find
4756.ed to find that it was gone, and finding, on inquiry, that neither his sister no
4757.nner. Mr. Stanhope scarcely spoke during the meal, but Edwin, without daring to
4758.ring the meal, but Edwin, without daring to look at his father, felt that his ey
4759. silence, they heard their father pacing hurriedly backward and forward in his r
4760. sat. Poor Edwin listened with a beating heart to the tread that seemed to him t
4761. the stern, cold man within was steeling himself for the coming battle, and crus
4762.thin was steeling himself for the coming battle, and crushing every more tender
4763.self for the coming battle, and crushing every more tender upon it as ruthlessly
4764.out cessation and without rest, crushing and strangling without mercy the prompt
4765.nd without rest, crushing and strangling without mercy the promptings of the fat
4766.romptings of the father's heart fighting the battle of pride and haughtiness, ev
4767. against his own flesh and blood feeding the evil passions of his own stern, und
4768. own stern, undisciplined heart, holding converse with the busy devil at work f
4769.rse with the busy devil at work f eeling till pride and haughty rage were boilin
4770.till pride and haughty rage were boiling up in his and every fall of the impatie
4771.o trem" Oppose me not, dare not to bling boy in the adjoining room place your wi
4772., dare not to bling boy in the adjoining room place your will in opposition to m
4773. long hours Edwin listened to the pacing of that foot with its never- varying ta
4774.ing of that foot with its never- varying tale of pride, and power, and will. Mar
4775.ould have been so foolish as to of being led astray and per. yourself to the sli
4776.ightest danger verted by those ensnaring and captivating ceremonials, with which
4777.erted by those ensnaring and captivating ceremonials, with which the Bornish Chu
4778.at that very moment a volcano of burning nnd He did not speak, but motioning Edw
4779.ning nnd He did not speak, but motioning Edwin to a rning passion. chair, for a
4780.ot speak, but motioning Edwin to a rning passion. chair, for a moment father and
4781., for a moment father and son sat gazing on each other Ther without the power or
4782.ll to utter a word. however, a twitching aboiit the bloodless and compressed lip
4783. too well of the struggle that was going on within, and that was gnawing his ver
4784.as going on within, and that was gnawing his very heart, as he He sat looking on
4785.ing his very heart, as he He sat looking on the pale and trembling boy before hi
4786.He sat looking on the pale and trembling boy before him. looked like a man who,
4787.er the mastery of some strong and ruling passion, had grasped with an iron hand
4788.st and dearest to his heart, and tearing it ruthlessly and mercilessly away, had
4789.ss and extremity of his madness, leaving himself all weak and fainting from the
4790.s, leaving himself all weak and fainting from the very violence of the conflict.
4791.riend, Mr. S< ymour, that whilst staying at his house last Christmas, you had ac
4792. with a large Bible open before him, ing full upon his face. It was deadly pale,
4793.rder to join one so fallen, so degrading in its doctrines and practices, and so
4794.I took means of investigatin discovering whether the appearance were indeed the
4795." and he grew paler as he I this morning entered your room proceeded by accident
4796.und upon your desk this book, containing an exposition of the doctrines of the R
4797.ned, and with notes in your hand-writing. It would be impossible for me to tell
4798.ore I spoke to you, and now I am waiting and anxious to hear you disclaim all th
4799.ith me, for I am determined, and nothing shall move me. Dearly as I love you, an
4800. there ?" "Since you insist upon knowing," answered Edwin, very "I slowly, and w
4801.ry "I slowly, and with a voice trembling with fear and anxiety, am bound to answ
4802.gs to a Catholic priest of the adjoining chapel, and it was borrowed by me in or
4803.coldly and this has cost me, if gleaming with animation, " if you knew the you k
4804.me, and I have had to turn back, weeping and sad, to my own room but now that yo
4805.ed in his hands, and the tears streaming down upon the floor awful, as the foreh
4806.ation ran in cold drops along it, giving it an appearance still more ghastly and
4807.son, neither of assist me iu prosecuting my inquiries into the nature of the ser
4808.ch he sat, he kept down as them speaking, and the heavy of yet the raging passio
4809.peaking, and the heavy of yet the raging passion that was in him. " And niay I a
4810.m me. You do me wrong, too, in supposing that I have been influenced in the chan
4811."but it has but little change of feeling, for I have witnessed it only once. Fro
4812.y of the fearful struggle that was going on within, rending his very heart as he
4813.ruggle that was going on within, rending his very heart as he grappled with it b
4814.heart as he grappled with it but telling, above all, of a fearful, withering pri
4815.ling, above all, of a fearful, withering pride, that would ciush whatever oppose
4816.ave he exclaimed, in a low and quivering tone, you done, I was not prepared for
4817.ur mind. "Papa," answered Edwin, weeping, but still firmly, -'again ; ; you wron
4818.o 13 Grant, perceive from such a meeting. Surely, after seventeen years of study
4819.themselves about his knees, and spurning the fulling boy with his foot, as thoug
4820.bout his knees, and spurning the fulling boy with his foot, as though ho were so
4821.th his foot, as though ho were something infinitely hateful and loathsome to him
4822.only son was stretched, faint, and I ing upon the floor. A short time, and there
4823.ort time, and there was a great hurrying to and fro through the stately house, f
4824.stately house, for the servants, hearing a heavy fall, had rushed into their mas
4825.d upon his bed, with the blood trickling from a cut in his temple, and only sutn
4826.ck; that a soft his, and that two loving arms wound round young cheek was restin
4827.arms wound round young cheek was resting by tho side ol' despise gone before me
4828.ou above all the world. There is nothing that I And once again, may God be with
4829.her's hand, but that accuse me of having failed in this, you wrong me ; you' you
4830.d a dear and well-known voice whispering in his ear, my own darling, whatever ma
4831.ce whispering in his ear, my own darling, whatever may happen, there is at least
4832.angerous cut on the forehead, by falling against a chair as his father cast him
4833. is to you, and I have no doubt of being able to save it, even in the church whi
4834.ill ever put it in the power of a jibing mob to point at me with the finger of s
4835.a soft and genial face for ever hovering round his bed like an angel of comfort
4836.el of comfort and consolation, smoothing so softly and soothingly the pillow whi
4837.low which supported his weary and aching head, dressing with such tv light and s
4838.rted his weary and aching head, dressing with such tv light and skilful touch hi
4839.ilful touch his wounded forehead holding such cool and ; ; many and are you prep
4840.sant draughts to his parched and burning lips, kissing him with such deep .and h
4841.to his parched and burning lips, kissing him with such deep .and heartfelt love,
4842.d tossed the most restlessly, whispering so lovingly in his ear the comforting w
4843.ng so lovingly in his ear the comforting words he had heard throw away, as a thi
4844.ords he had heard throw away, as a thing not worth having, the love that I have
4845. throw away, as a thing not worth having, the love that I have ever lavished upo
4846. Papa," cried Edwin frantically, falling upon his knees, "I have considered all
4847. it much longer, and indeed I am willing to die. I cancast me off, it will kill
4848.t dreadful night, "Edwin, my own darling, whatever may happen, remember that you
4849.n you are now." And, oh how often during the time he the stern dark face rose up
4850.e had seen it last when it was quivering with rage and indignation, and the reme
4851.ould he turn to the fair young thrilling through his frame, that watched beside
4852. that watched beside his bed, and laying his poor weary girl head upon her bosom
4853.e knowledge that you and, after dreaming of angels and of rest, would wake to se
4854. disowned me but," he continued, sobbing till his voice those same mild eyes loo
4855.l his voice those same mild eyes looking into his, with such a depth of love " w
4856.st gentle lips pressed that even pitying angels, as they hovered round, might fe
4857. Enough, sir; cried Mr. Stanhope, rising madly from his danger to their own unsu
4858.s and sister's love. chair, and stamping passionately upon the ground. sir Maria
4859.k clasped in hers, and only interrupting him by stooping down of you, it shall b
4860.s, and only interrupting him by stooping down of you, it shall be but to nourish
4861.eart towards you, and that he was coming to something painful and distiv feeling
4862.you, and that he was coming to something painful and distiv feeling of love that
4863. to something painful and distiv feeling of love that may linger I will cast it
4864.it from me as a base and loathsome thing, and by When, after describing his inte
4865.ome thing, and by When, after describing his interview with his father, and thei
4866.ver look upon your face dreadful parting, he finished liis story and turned away
4867. as it reagain." And rouchlv disengaging himself from the arms that sought cline
4868.y. I ani sorry, my she continued, seeing that he was about to speak " because I
4869.t conceal from myself how much suffering there is in store for you, and if for y
4870.ner. He was full of anxiety as to ti ing, and during his recovery il had forme d
4871.full of anxiety as to ti ing, and during his recovery il had forme d the subject
4872.ent and forgive him, and that everything would be as it had been before this unh
4873.ermined to meet his father as if nothing had occurred between them. ; t ! out yo
4874.ame you. You little know, my own darling, darling brother, how dear you are to m
4875.You little know, my own darling, darling brother, how dear you are to me, and ho
4876. and believe me," she continued, weeping as she " spoke, you never can be less d
4877.ers, but to me you can never be anything but my own dear, darling boy, my pride,
4878.ver be anything but my own dear, darling boy, my pride, my love, my joy." And ag
4879. my love, my joy." And again the pitying angels looked gently on as she sealed t
4880.n I have been painful to behold. sitting with him during your illness, I have wa
4881.inful to behold. sitting with him during your illness, I have watched him and ma
4882.aited until I well, that he was thinking of you saw his features soften, and the
4883.hen I have gone over to him, and putting my arms around his neck, I have taken c
4884.a look BO cold, so stern, so unforgiving, and so wild, that I could not utter an
4885.rest at all, for I have heard him pacing his room during the live-long night, an
4886. I have heard him pacing his room during the live-long night, and once, when you
4887.; but, oh I know that it means something ; ! ; Christmas Day came, and a dark ra
4888.ard, for a moment, to give some trifling direction to the attendants, Edwin peer
4889.ght not have left some mark of softening pity and forgiveness on it but he turne
4890.n it but he turned away with a sickening heart. Much paler, much more wan and ca
4891.iage had driven away, and he was sitting in his silent room, listening to the ra
4892.as sitting in his silent room, listening to the rain that was beating with such
4893., listening to the rain that was beating with such a wailing sound Against the c
4894.ain that was beating with such a wailing sound Against the casement, and with th
4895.ts of the last twelvemonths all crowding upon his reconciliation. seemed to fall
4896.tness, one figure, however, always being foremost in the picture a cold, stern f
4897. thoughts. He was- ! ; about the smiling church and its cheerful lights, the fra
4898., the fragrant incense, and the swelling strain, and sweeter, holier, and fuller
4899.m to draw near and look upon the smiling babe who raised His little hands with s
4900.little hands with such a look of pitying love, and as he gazed he felt his heart
4901.indeed, sought out strong. His wandering lamb, and when he arose from his knees
4902.almness that he descended to the drawing-room. ; more But, my gan to weep and so
4903.m cheerhim to a chair. They sat counting the minutes with palpitating hearts, th
4904.at counting the minutes with palpitating hearts, though they tried hard to seem
4905.to fully as she led ! ject and recording angels shall gladly write the words tha
4906.y write the words that will He was bring comfort and joy to those that so much n
4907. so much need it. at church this morning; he heard the sacred words, "Glory be r
4908.lden hair, as it fell about him, seeming to shine with a he cannot steel his hea
4909.m by the pity- against his own offspring. There has been too much of rigor and o
4910. been too much of rigor and of suffering already, and on this day of universal l
4911.nd on this day of universal love and ing angels who were gazing on the scene. ha
4912.rsal love and ing angels who were gazing on the scene. happiness, he, too, will
4913.uished will. A step is heard approaching; it must be he. Poor Edwin CHEISTMAS DA
4914.and -nore composed, after many trembling and anxious consul- enters, with the ki
4915. hnd come to the determination of: going his tongue, and his eyes looking more t
4916.: going his tongue, and his eyes looking more than ton; upon oh! let the n at, a
4917.nnot tried to re- word, surely depending Christmas time the icy heart will melt,
4918.ure, and so she only clasped the weeping boy nearer and closer to ; : ; : . THE
4919. dear to him than )m and never-unbending will. Lot thorn not record the pride an
4920. lie 15 would have fmccecdrd in breaking < down Edwin cold nation to ie Catholic
4921.arkness, and his pride; that are gnawing away the heart upon which they thoughts
4922. would break, and wept for the unbending harshness of an unletters forgiving hea
4923.ding harshness of an unletters forgiving heart, Let them rather record in bright
4924.est the words frequently murmured during that bitter night, "Edwin, my own darli
4925.hat bitter night, "Edwin, my own darling, I, at least, will never forsake you ne
4926.oor, poor boy." And now that the evening bells are ringing through the air, and
4927.d now that the evening bells are ringing through the air, and men are taking of
4928.ging through the air, and men are taking of advantage of the clearing weather to
4929. are taking of advantage of the clearing weather to hurry to the house God now,
4930.bright and gay, and love is the speaking in many an eye, let the cold, stern man
4931.in would leave him, and he sat listening most anxiously to every step that he he
4932.e heard in the passage outside, thinking it to " 1 1 1 ; be that of Edwin, who w
4933.1 1 1 ; be that of Edwin, who was coming to announce his subm to his father's wi
4934.nd he found himself still alone thinking of his boy and of all that was past. On
4935. his and slowly and methodically opening it, took thence a note for a He was 100
4936.sed a wretched and He arose next morning weak and languid, and sleepless night.
4937.ss night. had scarcely finished dressing when he received a me sage sum- moning
4938.g when he received a me sage sum- moning him obeyed at once, and entered the roo
4939.he worst was passed, that he had nothing to hope, and that it only remained for
4940.nly remained for him to support anything that was to follow with as to his fathe
4941.ntered the room. His father was standing behind Ms desk, very pale, but to all a
4942., harsh voice, as if he were transacting a piece of business of the very least i
4943.said, "take this to My son, he wns going to odd, but he suddenly stopped as if s
4944. but he suddenly stopped as if something were " Take this to Mr. Edwin choking h
4945.ng were " Take this to Mr. Edwin choking him. Stanhope, and infrom him when it w
4946.he continued, as the servant was leaving the room, "you will remember that Mr. E
4947.a low bow, for he had marked the pitying look of the man's face; and with all hi
4948.hall not attempt to describe the parting between the brother and the sister. The
4949.ave to angel hands to record the parting vows of faithfulness which they uttered
4950.aithfulness which they uttered, clinging round each other's necks leave to angel
4951.l, we will draw a veil over that parting moment, when their young lips were pres
4952. had persuaded himsdi thuf, iiv speaking thr.t; out upu. this. iu. his only b. u
4953. his son, and listened to the retreating footsteps which told him too plainly, a
4954.en quickly he saw the benevolent pitying face of him who opened it; he saw the o
4955.in Father Eustace's little room, sitting in the softest place on the simple couc
4956. couch, with the some kind arms clasping him closer and closer and ; still, pill
4957.closer and closer and ; still, pillowing i aching head, as tenderly as his ' to
4958.d closer and ; still, pillowing i aching head, as tenderly as his ' to relieve h
4959.iscovered that he had taken a purchasing at such a price. very bad cold but, fin
4960.such a price. very bad cold but, finding this unavailing, he very simply put his
4961.ry bad cold but, finding this unavailing, he very simply put his h ami chief asi
4962.th anxiety for the future, after leaving the house which you don't know how dear
4963.ice, wheuever he got thus far containing a brief account of what had happened. H
4964.all, but contented himself with soothing the weeping tween himself and most of t
4965.tented himself with soothing the weeping tween himself and most of those who had
4966.however, that where it generally resting-place for his weary feet. Bashful and r
4967.for his weary feet. Bashful and retiring as he will not be restrained from speak
4968. he will not be restrained from speaking too much, in this case it was, so littl
4969.l of the enthusiasm and romantic feeling We have often heard, and we believe it
4970., it is little are angels always waiting to carry to the face of God such tears
4971., keenest sorrow was for the unforgiving of them is treasured up in the Divine m
4972.e of what hod happened, but next morning, when they were both harsh treatment he
4973.y trampled upon, and him- about becoming a Catholic he had felt a very strong de
4974.ld so sternly and so proudly, for daring devote himself to the service of the al
4975. the pain immediate prospect of carrying his desire into effect but that of his
4976.d off by an attack of apoplexy resulting from the exuberance of his feelings. Sp
4977.o the suppressed voices that are bidding a tearful and sorrowful farewell to the
4978.and could he see how, as after listening to the very last to a carriage as it dr
4979.d upon his breast. It was too ; soothing voice that whispered so gently in his e
4980.nt ; ; ; I i gave way, and, after trying several times to kiss one of the hands
4981.f the hands that clasped his, but trying in vain, it was always m. perversely dr
4982. they were, in truth, tears of forgiving sorrow that in the sight of God heaped
4983. that in the sight of God heaped burning coals on the un- forgiving heart that h
4984.eaped burning coals on the un- forgiving heart that had cast him forth. The sudd
4985. which he had been plunged, and, looking from the window, he saw that they had a
4986., he felt very shy and awkward in coming to him thus, an outcast He knew very we
4987.ith noble courage and resolution. having thrown yourself so devotedly into the a
4988.y yon have so: i;;t r held out to during our intercourse 1 you the sligh> -pect
4989.vant opened the door, and Frank becoming a Catholic. -But I did not forget your
4990.hen I perceived that matters were coming to a Seymour hurriedly entered, nnd run
4991.a Seymour hurriedly entered, nnd running up to Edwin, took few wonderful way in
4992.ed him most affectioncrisis, and feeling that after the had shown His love towar
4993.I am sure you will pardon me for, having heard of what I may say, his answer. Th
4994.t I may say, his answer. The first thing you have to do is to get had happened,
4995. taken the first opportunity of assuring him of my The fact of tone, deep sympat
4996.ith some asperity as if he were thinking rather severely of him who had caused i
4997.u must get once perceived that something serious had happened. When poor Edwin's
4998.atter, Johnson?' said papa, are dwelling can give you, and for the next few week
4999.next few weeks you will live been crying. ' Oh! no, sir, / am quite well,' answe
5000.ou ill?' virtually I say yon will laying a strong emphasis upon the I ;' but poo
5001.ou. live virtually with me for, thinking that your father might air,' and here t
5002., sir, leastways', bare notion of having you for a lodger, that she is scarcely
5003.en hero three times already this morning, to ask me when begged Johnson to sit d
5004.him what had happened, you will be going to her, and what day she is to have eve
5005.however, refused to sit down but turning away his thing ready for you. You will
5006.d to sit down but turning away his thing ready for you. You will come here to ma
5007.every day; face from papa, and appearing to discover that the brass handle Then
5008.e Then we of the door required polishing very much, for he continued and of cour
5009.come home for our simple dinner, rubbing it incessantly, he managed, with many i
5010.d Mrs. Martin an opportunity of bringing out her best set of china and so you se
5011.ilst at the same time you will be living in Stanhope, sir, he continued, in a to
5012. to show unmistakeable signs of breaking out afresh, little boy I have carried h
5013.too, "O Johnson, you are a dear old ting up and going to the window, which was i
5014.on, you are a dear old ting up and going to the window, which was in itself rath
5015.ou very much," that I cannot help loving strange and suspicious proceeding, as t
5016.loving strange and suspicious proceeding, as the street outside was him, sir. Wh
5017. him, sir. When his poor mamma was lying dead in the house, see her for the last
5018.n't forget, perfectly quiet, and nothing whatever going on to justify him and I
5019.fectly quiet, and nothing whatever going on to justify him and I took him up to
5020.tify him and I took him up to in looking out so intently. He seemed, too, to exp
5021.is is one of the effects of a bad bering as if his heart were broken, how on the
5022.ave no sufficient grounds for concluding that funeral, when Mr. Stanhope was loc
5023.d, and so Father Eustace had been crying again. Perhaps, however, is now, poor M
5024.o me, and fell asleep and even supposing he had, although in my arms, and whispe
5025.ew weeks in quietness and repose. During and cry like a little child. Papa decla
5026.much affected as poor old Johnson during this conversation. the Church, and for
5027.ough they say that Master Edwin is going to be can spend a few months there, and
5028.rm to want to forget how good and loving he has always been to me, have spent so
5029.up a refused to speak, you tongue siring to see Mr. Stanhope, but, although the
5030.hope, but, although the serbeen watching over you all this time, and lias provid
5031.IES. the inestimable happiness of making his first communion. in some feeble way
5032.ion but such of our ^ed the name Mossing, and more vant knocked repeatedly, and
5033.nd although he heard his master groaning inside, there was uo answer and papa ca
5034. answer and papa cauio home after asking old Johnson if he kuew where you had go
5035.he kuew where you had gone, and learning from him that he had given orders for t
5036.by your directions. I saw that something was wrong with papa, for he scarcely sp
5037. with papa, for he scarcely spoke during dinner, and instead of staying some tim
5038.ke during dinner, and instead of staying some time in the dining-room, as he usu
5039.stead of staying some time in the dining-room, as he usually does, he came up al
5040.ame up almost immediately to the drawing-room, We ; and when we were all sitting
5041.-room, We ; and when we were all sitting round the fire, wondering what had happ
5042.re all sitting round the fire, wondering what had happened to make papa so silen
5043.n's tale and, Frank,' he added, clasping my hand, and pressing it very tightly,
5044.he added, clasping my hand, and pressing it very tightly, Frank, my boy, I shoul
5045.d us, did we take up pages in attempting to portray the feelings of a heart in w
5046.s can express; and it was with something very awe that Father Eustace gazed upon
5047. upon the upturned face, and the gushing eyes, and his own tears flowed fast upo
5048. was firm in hia resolution of remaining where he was for have held Him, and wil
5049. it was the best position for him in ing with very love and joy, O leave me with
5050.God, my all," he murmured, again burying his face Father Eustace towards Edwin,
5051.ress him, after in his hands, and bowing himself almost to the earth, as Fathhis
5052.softly and even reverently away, leaving the The two friends and Father Eustace
5053.matters, Father Eustace and Frank vieing with each so wonderful a manner, and br
5054. his stock but still, by dint of groping and searching, he man- before I can all
5055. still, by dint of groping and searching, he man- before I can allow you to depa
5056.ll go many months and when, next morning, he sat down to write down with you, an
5057.sed him tenderly and with never flagging care, poor Edwin found it hard work to
5058.red very hard to deceive AFTER remaining two or three days with Father Eustace,
5059.ad apprehension to the labored breathing, which wants. Like most of her sex she
5060.ck of his father's continued unrelenting, and his separ- himself, " yet, O my Go
5061.egan to feel very happy. The tem- loving Father, do what seems best to Thee;" an
5062. do what seems best to Thee;" and drying his had passed away, and the sky was al
5063.d away, and the sky was already clearing, and eyes, he would rejoin his friend h
5064. his child as he called him pest growing very bright. He was in almost hourly co
5065.most hourly communication with a smiling face, and talk to him with a confidence
5066.friend, Father Eustace, and after having received himself was far from feeling.
5067.ng received himself was far from feeling. At the end of three months, however, l
5068.ll be more sorry to see myself following the example of his father. I couldn't d
5069.t I couldn't and go the very first thing in the morning and find out this poor b
5070.d go the very first thing in the morning and find out this poor boy, and tell hi
5071.and thus, sir," concluded Frank, turning to Father " Eustace, you h?.ve a true h
5072.ason of my intrusion on you this morning, and I hope you will use all your influ
5073.r Eustace softly approached the kneeling boy, and gently touched him on the shou
5074.and angel-like innocence seemed striving for the mastery, a look which told of i
5075.ot Old to do so, for fear of .irritating Mr. Stanhope still more. tiracti conic
5076.appy he was. There was seldom an evening on which Frank Seymour did not walk dow
5077.God to give me an opportunity of showing how much I value and appreciate it." "M
5078.child," answered Fattier Eustace, taking Edwin i in hia arms, "farewell, farewel
5079. Edwin," Frank would often say, laughing as he " I consider that spoke, you have
5080.nor expose myself to the danger of being converted against my will by Father Eus
5081. by Father Eustace there, who is smiling at the very idea of making a convert of
5082.ho is smiling at the very idea of making a convert of such a stanch Protestant a
5083.is feet in less than six months, begging his pardon for your apostasy, as he cal
5084.ust be to come here almost every evening at such a risk, and with so little pros
5085., and with so little prospect of gaining you back. But I was always too soft-hea
5086.I give Father Eustace there full warning that he need not endeavor to try any of
5087. for he won't succeed; so, sir," shaking his hand playfully at Father Eus" " tac
5088.od Almighty have you in His holy keeping, and fill you with His grace. Don't for
5089.his father, who continued as unrelenting as ever ; but his sorrow for this was n
5090. now chastened and subdued, and applying himself with all the ; Week fervor of h
5091.Week fervor of his soul to the acquiring of the perfection of his state, he left
5092. lov- ingly in the hands of God, knowing that He would bring everything about as
5093.ands of God, knowing that He would bring everything about as should seem best to
5094., knowing that He would bring everything about as should seem best to His infini
5095.om. Whilst Edwin's days are thus gliding away in peace and tranquil happiness at
5096.t prouder, sterner, and more unforgiving than ever, nursing his evil feelings as
5097. and more unforgiving than ever, nursing his evil feelings as he broods over his
5098.nary wrongs, till at tunes the unfeeling devil, who is his master, is rampant in
5099.ugh you won't let me try me from praying for you and Edwin there, is, I know, de
5100. ; my young friend, take care. " goading him on almost to madness, as he whisper
5101.ispers his suggestions to him, torturing his proud soal with his black insinuati
5102.al with his black insinuations, bringing before him, as he sits in the gloom of
5103. the picture of a fair young boy hanging about his neck, and whispering a thousa
5104.y hanging about his neck, and whispering a thousand innocent endearments in his
5105.nnocent endearments in his ear. Changing, then, the scene, as a comes in and lea
5106.gray-haired old away, a thousand mocking faces seem to rise before him laughing
5107.g faces seem to rise before him laughing him to scorn, till he can bear it no lo
5108.ill he can bear it no longer, but rising madly from his chair, is fain to pace h
5109., is fain to pace his room with gnashing teeth, if thus, perchance, he may still
5110.thus, perchance, he may still the raging passions heart, evil CHAPTEB XVL HOPES
5111.s face bore testimony, as on the morning of fondly hoped Almighty God had called
5112.hat he had desired and longed for during his for- the fourth he came forth, with
5113.d entered the carriage which was waiting to contook it up most warmly. Perhaps n
5114.ntook it up most warmly. Perhaps nothing had produced such vey him to his place
5115. of business. He met with an unflinching an effect upon him as the conduct of th
5116.of those amongst whom he eye the pitying looks of such of his friends as he enco
5117.d sterness, each look went like retiring but constant piety of his fellow-studen
5118.he had mingled, that it produced parting there was a hope lingering in the botto
5119.duced parting there was a hope lingering in the bottom of his heart that a most
5120.f his heart that a most deep and lasting impression upon him. Father Eustace his
5121.e outside his room but when he departing, after a stay of a few days, and they w
5122.stay of a few days, and they were taking leave any strange of all, when he learn
5123.riest and an idoladon't know of anything which would have had such an effect eve
5124.me to the scorn and contempt of a jibing in converting me as the sight of my dea
5125.n and contempt of a jibing in converting me as the sight of my dear fellow-stude
5126.ar fellow-students as a last and parting prayer, I have to ask of you, dear Fath
5127.; ! 20 THE TWO I VICTORIES. to be giving way, that in very truth And thus he fed
5128. fancied he had sustained never thinking for a moment that it was who stood most
5129. forgiveness never for a moment thinking of his boy with feelings of forgiveness
5130.e him, many, many came over him, telling in an in- stant its tale of grief and p
5131.tant its tale of grief and pain, telling, although he flattered of his adopted r
5132.e had conquered, of the bitter, crushing price of the victory he had gained. Edw
5133.er make. There was in his study, hanging over the fireplace, a large full-length
5134.lmost unconsciously years ~i age. gazing upon it, and phmged into the deepest an
5135.IT, AND DOESN'T WANT TO HELP One morning, towards the middle of September, Fathe
5136.who had become very uneasy at not having heard from nud throwing himself upon a
5137.sy at not having heard from nud throwing himself upon a chair, Ms eyes Edwin for
5138.nearly an rior of the College, informing him that his young friend was rested as
5139.as at work try- very unwell, and begging him to run down as soon as possible Eus
5140.locked himself to room, straight Walking ing to soften the proud heart, or wheth
5141.ed himself to room, straight Walking ing to soften the proud heart, or whether t
5142. remembrance of bygone days was flitting round him with a chastening influence,
5143.was flitting round him with a chastening influence, we know not ; but the tears
5144.le cheek as he sat with his head resting upon his hand. Sud- to see him. denly c
5145. his hand. Sud- to see him. denly coming to himself, he started to his feet, and
5146.d hands and contracted brow then pulling the bell violently, as the old butler h
5147.edly entered the room, he said, pointing with his hand to the picture, but with
5148.rted face "Johnson, take that that thing away; and that I never see it again. No
5149.r see it again. No," he muttered, pacing backwards and forwards with hasty steps
5150.ever." And then he satdownagain, looking for awhile upon the blank space where t
5151.m in a most affectionate manner, begging his pardon if he had shown any want of
5152. deference towards him, candidly telling him, that were the step to be taken aga
5153.sionatebut that, in the manner of taking it, there ly away from him was, perhaps
5154.ly away from him was, perhaps, something to beg pardon for, asking him to re- ed
5155.aps, something to beg pardon for, asking him to re- ed it. He sat down to his de
5156. his desk with a moist eye and an aching member the days gone by and all their f
5157.ne by and all their former love, telling him how happy he was, and that the only
5158.ow happy he was, and that the only thing needed to render heart, and wrote a few
5159.and wrote a few lines to Maria, breaking the sad news to his happiness complete
5160.e was his father's forgiveness, assuring her, but speaking of it as lightly as p
5161. forgiveness, assuring her, but speaking of it as lightly as possible, and descr
5162.t as lightly as possible, and describing it him that, whatever might happen, or
5163. might be, he as probably a mere passing illness from which he might soon could
5164. be so, and he feared that he was hoping against hope. He his sister. These lett
5165. note from one of the clerks, intimating his worst fears were realized. that he
5166.ope's orders, to Mr. Edwin Stan- clining upon a couch, and as Father Eustace hur
5167.with any more letters. fore, and putting his arms around the old man's neck, kis
5168., kissed And so he went his way, nursing his pride, even whilst it him upon both
5169. Stanhope interrupted him, coldly saying I require your advice on the management
5170. will ask you to yourself." And, turning on his heel, he stalksir, to keep it ed
5171. very sad and troubled air, and covering his face with his hands, remained some
5172. time buried in sorrowful and foreboding thought. He had long felt that it would
5173.e was not at all astonished at receiving this news but for a moment he was crush
5174. gentle and affectionate demeanor during their subsequent in. tercourse, had so
5175.ons of love to the slow, heavy breathing, and he saw at a glance that his child
5176. and treacherous disease, which, seizing as it ever does, upon the fairest, pure
5177.prey est and the cheek most rosy leaving us, when all is over, but a poor, waste
5178. shrunken form, as fuir, but as fleeting and as ; ; THE TWO is fragile, as the p
5179. and he felt that though care and loving watchfulness might keep him to them for
5180.ain sleep the sleep that knows no waking. VICTORIES. must confess that our mind
5181.es once again, and when without uttering a single word, heart spoke to licart, w
5182. our feeble pen shrinks from endeavoring to portray. Meanwhile, poor old Johnson
5183.ick chamber after the first sad greeting, was sitting, with his eyes very red, i
5184.fter the first sad greeting, was sitting, with his eyes very red, in Mrs. Martin
5185.tle back room. They had both been crying, cannot bear to see you. There, lay me
5186.e fell asleep in the arms of the weeping old man ; and as he slept so peacfully
5187.his breast, and try to whisper something about his me to speak too freely about
5188., and of course he knows what soon being better. "No, dear Father Eustace," answ
5189. feel very sorry for him but this coming on, and I know very well that I shall s
5190. now oh why do you weep ? Am I not going to my God, and was he added more emphat
5191.ather Eustace," he added, fondly looking into the face "who has caused all this,
5192. of the poor old priest, who was sobbing like a child; "dear "Mrs. Martin," resp
5193.a'am. It doesn't become me but, breaking out again, as you deserve for all your
5194.ll for God. I am but," he added, drawing the old priest quite very, very happy c
5195. very happy close to him, and whispering in his ear, "take me home, dear CHAPTEB
5196.see my sister once again ;" and lowering his voice still more, THE END APPROACHE
5197. for an hour or two hi a carriage during the heat of the day, but he soon became
5198.more chastened in expression, but loving, There was the same quick appreciation
5199.to speak his thanks, there was something so grateful, so loving, and, above all,
5200.ere was something so grateful, so loving, and, above all, so heavenly in the loo
5201.hey drove away, he took a long lingering look at the happy home where he had spe
5202.ll. consideration, persisted hi refusing to do so. No," he answered very quietly
5203.on, ; feel back left I will go in coming to see me at your house. poor old Mrs.
5204.ored most earnestly, and with unflagging diligence, to correct the natural defec
5205.ized his mere animal part by its wasting influence, he was so angel-like, so imm
5206., that they about his bed with something very near akin to awe, as if they felt
5207.kon them to see him. Once before, during the course of this simple tale, to his
5208. One day he saw poor old Johnson sitting weeping at the foot Others, perhaps, mi
5209. he saw poor old Johnson sitting weeping at the foot Others, perhaps, might be a
5210.t his poor wasted arms, and man's taking him round the neck, laid his head upon
5211. old " Poor breast, as VICTORIES. ending bliss?" he pressed the hand that held h
5212.ast whisopened his eyes with .*, longing look. pered confession was over the inn
5213.d mother I hope to see her soon in ; ing in the land above. After some minutes h
5214. angel might have done, and, withdrawing into the next room, sat for a long, lon
5215.ith his face between his hands, refusing to be comforted. Maria came every morni
5216.o be comforted. Maria came every morning after Mr. Stanhope had left for the cit
5217.pe had left for the city, and, remtjning all the day with Edwin, returned home i
5218.nterpreted his wish, and hastily leaving the room, called a cab, and bade the dr
5219.ry short, and they soon arrived. Bidding the driver wait, and giving Johnson, wh
5220.ved. Bidding the driver wait, and giving Johnson, who opened the door, a hurried
5221.. Stanhope and his daughter were sitting together, and both turned pale and star
5222.id the old man, with the tears trickling down his face, "from the deathbed of yo
5223. breathed upon earth is even now growing cold, and the last word your boy uttere
5224. sufficient ; about the room, performing a thousand little offices of love, and
5225.she came over to the bed, and, smoothing his pillow, sat down by his side. When
5226.ys a genfor his to rest in, and a loving eye to meet his saze as looked its neve
5227.eet his saze as looked its never-vs*ying tale of grateful thankfulness. ; hand M
5228.ld come forth no more that night. During the day, on the evening of which this s
5229.at night. During the day, on the evening of which this story opened, Edwin had a
5230.in charge of Mrs. Martin, and, promising to reout, turn very early in the mornin
5231.to reout, turn very early in the morning, had gone home. It was but the last exp
5232. gone home. It was but the last expiring flicker of the lamp ere it went out and
5233.e it went out and Mrs. Martin, observing, about an hour after Father Eustace had
5234. bitterly ; "you have made me a laughing-stock to the world you have made my hom
5235.n't know me, sir, or you would trembling with passion not thus appear before me.
5236.ir," answered Father Eustace, struggling hard to keep down his indignation, "I s
5237.xpressions. This is no time for bandying words. I call to witness the God who is
5238.th," he continued, solemnly, and raising his hand to heaven, " that your only so
5239.to heaven, " that your only son is dying, perhaps even now is dead. Will come wi
5240. at the door Mr. Stanhope stood watching them, with a face like that of a man in
5241.threw himself into a chair, and grasping its sides till all the blood rushed fro
5242.the force of the pressure, sat wrestling with the evil passions that were killin
5243.with the evil passions that were killing him. He knew that his son was dying. He
5244.ling him. He knew that his son was dying. He had seen it in the face of the He f
5245.d drops upon his brow, and his breathing sounded with a painful distinctness thr
5246.e a moment that the pale and h.i ticking of the clock as it sounded BO distinctl
5247. through the dead. quiet room, listening to the winter wind as it moaned and who
5248.ter wind as it moaned and who is rushing in at the door, with such a fearful cry
5249.pon his howled around the house, seeming in every gust to tell of lips, may gaze
5250., and moans more sadly than ever drawing near and stopping at the door nothing n
5251.adly than ever drawing near and stopping at the door nothing noth- alone through
5252.ng near and stopping at the door nothing noth- alone through the darkness of the
5253.ess of the night, and as the shadows ing but tho moaning, sighing wind with its
5254., and as the shadows ing but tho moaning, sighing wind with its tale of death, a
5255.the shadows ing but tho moaning, sighing wind with its tale of death, and thicke
5256.of the dead, let him the hurried beating of his own withered heart. Death death
5257.Y, AND A KEAL ONE. PEACE. heart to bring thee back again into this cold and drea
5258.ather leave thee in the old of the dying boy. As they softly entered he opened h
5259. so free from We will tend with a loving hand the flowers that bloom for a momen
5260. weak and we will steal in the softening twilight to the holy spot, tiling of it
5261.tening twilight to the holy spot, tiling of its old fire, and he greeted them wi
5262.ire, and he greeted them with the loving smile faint, which they were so soon to
5263.ories that flit around us there, telling us as they do of a past them as if expe
5264.s they do of a past them as if expecting some one else, and for a moment a shado
5265.overlet but Father Eustace, interpreting his desire, raised it to his lips, cruc
5266.ggled fearHe sat, deadly pale, listening to the fully beneath his clutch. ; ; !
5267.ssed the crucifix with all his remaining energy. (They knelt around his bed, for
5268.had no romantic story, or tale thrilling interest" to tell you, but that ours wa
5269.version and that our object was to bring under your notice one phase of that whi
5270.which, more or less modified, is passing around us every day. The of " young hea
5271. " young heart that arc dead, is passing to ! its God wails for the hopes that !
5272.t in vain, to utter tho Church's parting ! forth, O Christian soul; in the name
5273.ints of den our ear, but the old feeling still remains, and our minds let thy pl
5274. half so well, and lief ore )his glazing eye another effort to form with his the
5275.t to form with his the grandest dwelling that we see in foreign climes pos" the
5276.imes pos" the old pallid lips the saving names, and a pure and brave young sesse
5277.en strayed in rtal soul, into the loving hand that gave it, to be taken childhoo
5278.! laid so gently on that mercy-breathing breast, to b& n-e exiles from our home,
5279.e for ever to Himself. voice is sounding through the room, striving with the sob
5280.e is sounding through the room, striving with the sobs which choke its utterance
5281.nd 1 their hist upon tho world ; turning thither, how enduring the hope, how buo
5282.ho world ; turning thither, how enduring the hope, how buoyant the confidence, h
5283. upon his d< Years of persecutio: erring, but still deeply -loved land. suilerin
5284. but still deeply -loved land. suilering could not drive them from his heart nay
5285.s of our fathers were left, with nothing of in his father's halls. He loved her
5286.loved her, 'most of all, with the gaping sight-seer wanders into them, he inquir
5287.ds wander back through the erley looking down upon him from the grand old staine
5288.ngth and breadth, was bright and blazing with the light of the looking down from
5289.nd blazing with the light of the looking down from the very same spot hundreds o
5290. right is in their favor, to say nothing of possession. For still, and her teemi
5291.f possession. For still, and her teeming fields were still more fertile, when th
5292., some sainted and as the gentle evening bishop, or some hunted, persecuted prie
5293.pon his capture. steal along the smiling valley, and whisper to the weary hus- W
5294.rawny hand was to the scaffold, thinking to quench in his blood the last spark n
5295. would fall of the faith, but forgetting, in the blindness of their hearts, upon
5296.ll upon the soft and gentle nun flitting round his bed of pain like some sweet s
5297.ints for her ; ; ! man feeble flickering flame of the faith, but it fell not to
5298.its heaven-born fuel, that it flickering flame, and again it blazed forth ; agai
5299.enveloped the mountain's top is breaking at last. Within the last thirty years a
5300.ishment have left, and are daily leaving, the wreck upon which they were sailing
5301., the wreck upon which they were sailing, and are scrambling, as best they may,
5302.ch they were sailing, and are scrambling, as best they may, on board the bark of
5303.ad to escape with the loss of everything else. These conversions come before us
5304.ould support her poor without consigning them to a workhouse without tearing in
5305.ning them to a workhouse without tearing in twain those whom God had made one. H
5306.y iu a higher or lower degree, according to different circumstances, of almost e
5307.are to be found so harsh and unforgiving as Mr. Stanhope was ; and you yourself,
5308.all the dangers of the world, for daring to do as poor Edwin did. We could take
5309.ficed station, prospects, and everything which the world could offer them, and a
5310.been tedious or altogether uninteresting whose amusement and instruction it was
5311. very biid, but. that it was so shocking to kill poor Edwin in so unroaiantio u
5312.oor Edwin with at least a little feeling of sorrow and compassion in your hearts
5313.t greatest of all blessings the blessing of the Faith which has been given to so
5314.which we have obtained without suffering or difficulty and if ifc be true in gen
5315.n general matters, that we prize a thing in proportion as it haa cost us dear, h
5316.from the death-bed of instead of keeping him alive, and aftrr e.irrring him f ph
5317.f keeping him alive, and aftrr e.irrring him f phantly through all his troubles,
5318.ntly through all his troubles, disposing of him in th5319.een obliged to conclude it by distorting will tell you how to prove it. We have,
5320.do not meet with some tale, at something grander and greater than orange blossom
5321.Lamb whithersoever He goeth, and to sing of our critics. But if you meet with su
5322.reet him a song which none else can sing and why they are so culled, with a frie
5323.good reconciled to the unromantic ending of our little tale. We ought, too, no d
5324. in question ! It is the poor struggling convert who, We confess we feel ; ' ; ;
5325.ugh price if for the pride and unbending self-will of other days. He buried well
5326.t in the efforts which he makes to bring others to the Faith, take care lest you
5327. Faith by the renunciation of everything which is nearest and dearest to the hea
5328.f the dear old Faith is worth purchasing at any price, and if you be but faithfu
5329.nly in the grave of his son. the morning after the death of his boy, when they t
5330.timidly entered the room, almost fearing to be repulsed, they found him still kn
5331. repulsed, they found him still kneeling by the lifeless form, and with one of t
5332. meekly as a ; little child, and sitting between Maria and Father Eustace, liste
5333. even when the tale was done, but rising with a look so utterly broken and miser
5334. and " My own bright boy form, repeating ever and anon, Where was there ever suc
5335.ver such a boy OB my own heart's darling ine ? and I have killed him I have murd
5336.as the corpse was in lifeless ! throwing himself upon his knees, kissed again an
5337.gh he insisted upon the interment taking place in his own church, he made no obj
5338.en whom circumstances prevent from being interred in her own consecrated ground.
5339.which he was the head, and re- A PARTING WOBD WITH THE CRITICS. THE PROUD HEART
5340.HE PROUD HEART BENDS AT LAST. UNAVAILING BEMOBSE. FRANK AND MARIA. FATHER EUSTAC
5341.is boy, he and his daughter were sitting together, and when she rose from her se
5342. when she rose from her seat, and coming over to where he sat, put her arms abou
5343.ic, too, he said not a word, but kissing her very tenderly, put her gently away,
5344. through the livelong night. the morning she made her first communion, and ca ki
5345.we cannot conclude without a few parting words to them. Brown is full of compass
5346.hat there ia no dunhis son Tom's playing any such tricks upon him; and, although
5347. of Edwin. He was much with Edwin during his last sickness, and the patience and
5348.oke much with his friend on the blessing of religion. His own appreciation of th
5349.on. His own appreciation of the blessing he had received was so intense, and his
5350.oved. When the end was evidently drawing nigh, Edwin became still more urgent wi
5351.nd happy death was almost the only thing required to com; The conversion During
5352.g required to com; The conversion During the as lifetime of Father Eustace pries
5353.ustace priest was by his side, narrating to him all the litconnected with the si
5354. please, tell me once again, the closing scene ;" and, when the story was told,
5355.ty steps. He insisted upon her examining calmly and dispassionately the claims o
5356.Eustace, that I cannot help feelit ; ing my loss," "and you will which came upon
5357.her not that she had any fear of meeting with any opposition from him, but becau
5358.s on such a day, when so many chastening thoughts would be working in his heart.
5359.any chastening thoughts would be working in his heart. The siou of Frank Seymour
5360.e to restrain his feelings, and throwing himself on his knees by the bed-side of
5361.Father Eustace subject, saw that nothing would be gained by annoying him. He, th
5362.that nothing would be gained by annoying him. He, the happiness which therefore,
5363.e rest to God. What an inscrutable thing is .the human heart Young faces are now
5364.ld man often insists upon their reciting their prayers to him, and watches to se
5365.ep up your intercourse gradually turning toward Catholicity, and that, at least
5366.h, they may have the happiness of seeing him a memOh promise me this, ber of the
5367.res he has never fever, which was raging fearfully amongst the poorer members :.
5368.the death of the just, L .ess i" heaping his favors upon every one whom his son
5369.nd was a gentle hand to smooth his dying pillow a baud that were united, he wan
5370.m more of it. beside. ho may be striving to build a In him the struggling During
5371.triving to build a In him the struggling During his last sickness he was frequen
5372. to build a In him the struggling During his last sickness he was frequently vis
5373.. row graven on it which time and loving care may perhaps would not say so if it
5374. only consolation is the hope of meeting him " again, if the goodness of God may
5375.ace, Tell him Young voices are prattling round the old man's kn a venerable whit
5376.ed servant is ever ut liis elbow, pating his slightest want, and ever most caref
5377.ful annr. ; forbearance in the beginning, and how much grief, how much bitter re
5378.r the mischief, cannot recall the loving heart which has been cast away and Bacr
5379.little fellow softly away, the wondering look grows deeper on the fair young fac
5380.ongst the large trees of the neighboring forest when the rough pavement of the s
5381.nder a thick bed of snow, below freezing point, besieges the sentinel in his was
5382.delight our brave soldiers saw, piercing through the foggy atmosphere, the first
5383.atmosphere, the first rays of the spring sun, which announced to them, with the
5384. soldiers were unclouded they were going to use their arms once more, and have a
5385.recision. Not far from the spot, walking slowly along, was a man clothed in blac
5386.tho village of Chauvet, who was reciting, in a low voice, the from his breviary.
5387.e cure's humble position. curt? dwelling, was laid on the priest's own bed, and
5388.month the good cure" : It was a touching sight to see this p. miof his holy offi
5389.is holy office. only in charity, bending by day over the sick man's couch, and a
5390.im completely cured. : his only covering a cassock a noble uniform, functiousof
5391.he storms and inclemency ; The following Sunday, the the r. giuieut, came riest,
5392.tricts, came on suddenly vivid lightning accompanied by deep atmospheric Bounds,
5393.netrated the roof of the humble dwelling. The officers wished to seek shelter in
5394.y. Th colonel could not avoid expressing his surprise at such an unexpect* d sig
5395.satisfied him on this question by saving, that for a long time he had entreated
5396. fell seriously ill one Saturday evening the evening of the day when the 49th Re
5397.sly ill one Saturday evening the evening of the day when the 49th Regiment assis
5398.onstructed by their zealous "But nothing seems easier to me," replied the coione
5399. missioned officer who was a poet taking advantage of the illas Paris." ness of
5400. and the haps, God had become, according to the naive expression of " ; ; ; ! ;
5401.xpression of " ; ; ; ! ; colonel, giving the signal for departure, took leave of
5402.e curd, who was delighted with a meeting which honored him as much did his grate
5403.as the good curd of Chauvet was reciting his breviary before the door of his hou
5404. sudden he saw in the distance, marching in good order, but without drums, as it
5405.ut without drums, as it The next morning, the drum-major, the receiver of the pr
5406.oubled on the morrow, and by the evening of the next day, amounted to 1800 franc
5407.ruments, and preceded by sappers opening the march with their hatchets on their
5408.tchets on their shoulders, some carrying pickaxes, some sacks, others trowels an
5409.with merry faces and hearts, approaching the priest's dwelling, singing the popu
5410.earts, approaching the priest's dwelling, singing the popular air : subscription
5411.proaching the priest's dwelling, singing the popular air : subscription of 700 f
5412. ! Les amis sout toujonrs " Good morning, monsieur le curd," said the eldest of
5413.rd," said the eldest of the band, making a military salute, and presenting arms.
5414.making a military salute, and presenting arms. He was an old non-commissioned of
5415.ges. embellishment of the church. During this time the curd, admirably tended in
5416. of this delay to ornament "Good morning my book of devotions ; friends," answer
5417.s ; friends," answered the curd, closing his " what are you going to do, in thes
5418.e curd, closing his " what are you going to do, in these parts, with those workm
5419.those workmen's tools ?" " We are coming to cancel a debt of gratitude, monsif u
5420.to pay a bill of exchange which is owing from the 49th Regiment of the Line." "
5421.cle a banner, in various colors, bearing the imthe interior of the ; ; ; age of
5422.a picture, eight feet high, representing the Patron of the Commune, was suspende
5423.s suspended over the high altar. Nothing had been forgotten flowers, vases, cand
5424.eps, ; : "I only did my duty." are doing ours in coming to build a church for "
5425.y did my duty." are doing ours in coming to build a church for " the good God, a
5426.Can it be true?" said the cur6, uttering an exclamation of joy. "And we complete
5427.e troopers said, .with so often sounding the Alleluia on fete days, and the De P
5428.the De Profuudis on the days of mourning. "Nothing more eo ; and to-day we begin
5429.fuudis on the days of mourning. "Nothing more eo ; and to-day we begin the work
5430. amis sent toujoura On that very morning the soldiers of the 49th, transformed i
5431.into a vast timber yard. The neighboring ford the rooks in the environs, furnish
5432.he great day arrived. One Sunday morning the 49th Regiment ranged themselves in
5433.in different parts of. the holy building; sill was ; happiness and joy the faces
5434. of Clmuvet At still , ; ; 1 1 1 bearing the irar tears at illness appeared re n
5435.e in :i!ld :ili hi joy ti'illlilllll ing. ili-votiiin. d. Their 7.1-.. '. Ili-ll
5436.I'M >!:/> Some weeks after this imposing ceremony sad news reached Chanvet the 4
5437. the 49th Regiment of the Line was going to Icnvo Hie it was ordered to proceed
5438.C of Chauvet had departed in the morning to thought the curt- of Chauvet, and ta
5439.thought the curt- of Chauvet, and taking from a dusty drawer inspired by two sil
5440.shes, which never saw daylight excepting on most where the regiment important oc
5441.ect he had conHis first care on arriving at the ancient capital of ceived. of th
5442.is person could scarcely forbear smiling at the sight of the venerable priest, c
5443.able priest, covered with dust, carrying in his hand a thick nut stick, and wear
5444. his hand a thick nut stick, and wearing enormous iron-soled shoes. " " From whe
5445.o lose, ; meet the brave men to dwelling. whom Fond he owed his church and Lis a
5446.d Peyre, the St. ; commander, perceiving circumstance "by what happy "You will s
5447.Two, be, " You will attend ; you nothing." at 1 Willingly we will accept your in
5448.onsieurs ?" added the commander, turning towards the officers of his battalion.
5449.he had wrapped his treasslowly unfolding the paper in wldch " I have undertaken
5450.taken along journey for so small a thing." "The smallest often possesses a hidde
5451.t great," replied the jeweller, weighing them in his hand, "for they have been,
5452.ain, and you shall share half my lodging." So saying, the commander dismounted f
5453. shall share half my lodging." So saying, the commander dismounted from his hors
5454.arm of the venerable priest, and walking at the head of the column, made his ent
5455. church. The cure of Chauvet was waiting for them at the door of St. Irenseus. "
5456. our word," said the commander, pressing the good man's hand. "Thank you, comman
5457. you, commander. Now, before celebrating mass, and imploring for you and the who
5458., before celebrating mass, and imploring for you and the whole regiment the bene
5459. cur6 you are wo ik! What is it ?" ; ing for the poor, just now, are you not?" "
5460.m " No, monsieur," said the cure smiling ; the profits of thq sale are much rich
5461.mander a large and elegant medal bearing this inscription on thi side : Religion
5462.t the sum, and the priest's arms, saying, this medal, so that it The good comman
5463.recious treasure of the priest, relating the history of the building of his chur
5464.st, relating the history of the building of his church, informed him also of his
5465.ded one of the officers, a tear standing in his eye. " Let us who possessed a go
5466. we meet in a better world." The evening I aaw, by the advertisements, that the
5467.was tempted by the beauty of the morning, and suddenly decided to go there. On m
5468. left bank, I noticed the crowd hurrying on in the fear of being late. Kuilroads
5469.e crowd hurrying on in the fear of being late. Kuilroads, besides many other adv
5470. with two middled-aged sisters belonging to the domestic and retired class of Pa
5471.ile I inquire abo t he time of returning. light; weut on with it till after nigh
5472. their next :r without their lives being marked by any other events halt, where
5473.. stopped at the little garden belonging to the gatekeeper. Both The younger of
5474.rms them that it is the time fi.r hoeing out weeds, for maktenderness. At first
5475.r maktenderness. At first it was amusing; afterwards one could not ing grafts an
5476.as amusing; afterwards one could not ing grafts and layers, for sowing annuals,
5477.ld not ing grafts and layers, for sowing annuals, and for destroying help seeing
5478., for sowing annuals, and for destroying help seeing something affecting in thes
5479. annuals, and for destroying help seeing something affecting in these two gray-h
5480.and for destroying help seeing something affecting in these two gray-haired chil
5481.stroying help seeing something affecting in these two gray-haired chil- the inse
5482.unable to leave off the habit of obeying, the other window two wooden boxes, in
5483.ver been able to make that of protecting. anything grow but mustard And it was n
5484.ble to make that of protecting. anything grow but mustard And it was not in that
5485.fore last the gate-keeper, who is sowing a border with mignonette, der never cea
5486.y involuntarily exclaimed, like the king in the children's gives her the rest of
5487.of milfc^ with these flowers was amusing to see their sudden shocks, their alarm
5488.rms, and of her imagination. On reaching the grove of acacias, where the fair wa
5489.ove of acacias, where the fair was going their courageous determinations. Everyt
5490.ir courageous determinations. Everything was a marvel to them They had the remai
5491.hild- Bights. There were lotteries going on, mountebank shows, hood. Poor creatu
5492.he feelings of another places for eating and drinking, and for shooting with the
5493.f another places for eating and drinking, and for shooting with the crossbow. I
5494.or eating and drinking, and for shooting with the crossbow. I have always been s
5495. its charms. But was not there something holy in this simplicity, which door fes
5496.city, which door festivities. In drawing-room entertainments people are had IK e
5497.this crowd of people is yet from knowing, that to be pleased with nothing, and t
5498.knowing, that to be pleased with nothing, and to look with thorns This down on e
5499.look with thorns This down on everything, is the height of fashion and good tast
5500.ed them unawares. refinement are wanting in them but at least they have heartili
5501.tained in union with less vulgar feeling expedition, and Frances had accepted it
5502.purified the pleasures without depriving "we have our follies at all ages," as s
5503.om. Frightbut live once. ened at finding themselves in the midst of such regal m
5504.ey were in a church. "We are in the king's house," said the eldest sister, forge
5505. to fly on both sides of the The meeting a train ting that there is no longer a
5506.th sides of the The meeting a train ting that there is no longer a king in Franc
5507.rain ting that there is no longer a king in France. road, causes them unceasing
5508.g in France. road, causes them unceasing admiration. I encourage them to go on I
5509.on I walk first and they make up passing in the contrary direction with the nois
5510.ncipal instruments of the isolated being who But the motion and the succession o
5511.dings, which rise lection I am examining. These cups, so roughly modi-Hod by -li
5512. one window to the other with excla:iing intelligence, in which still glimmers t
5513.wonied ; 31 which the clouds are Railing I look at this beautiful country and I
5514. court-yard, where they had with looking about; but I have promised the two sist
5515. as a record of the visit she was making. Just before I reached them I heard voi
5516.s. I would not undeceive her, by telling her of the hedge; Madeleine and Frances
5517.dge; Madeleine and Frances were speaking to a p<><>r that the products of the ma
5518. oiir paths? Things are oftenest nothing in themselves the thoughts we : attach
5519.e these learned men who will see nothing in a "lant but the chemical elements of
5520.ere much affected. I saw them consulting with one another in a low tone then bui
5521.a dinner out on the grass! While helping her will walk with them. sister to take
5522.e of all I am just come back from taking them home and have left the expeditions
5523.Mont- long make them happy. This morning I was pitying those whose lives are obs
5524.e them happy. This morning I was pitying those whose lives are obscure morency,
5525.not make go to the right without pulling to the left Satiety has lost him his ap
5526.vation preserves to the cherry gathering and the sails on the lake in the innkee
5527.hat first of earthly blessings the being easily made ; ; ; leaving the manufacto
5528.ings the being easily made ; ; ; leaving the manufactory, the two sisters, who h
5529.what she has felt. Whilst she is talking the cloth is laid, Before us winds the
5530.e'vres, its many-storied houses abutting upon the gardens and the slopes of the
5531.io hate and envy ; and for the unfeeling into whose enjoyments no pity enters. T
5532. sun has risen red and afraid of nothing, and takes a pride in setting tradition
5533.of nothing, and takes a pride in setting tradition, cusis a glorious August morn
5534.adition, cusis a glorious August morning. and unhappily, holier things than thes
5535. things than these, at defiance. glowing, and as he mounts higher and higher, th
5536.row the first of God's creatures to sing its farmer. Both families were well Mak
5537.o bell, the herdsman's song, the barking of dogs, the lowing of mier and both we
5538.'s song, the barking of dogs, the lowing of mier and both were good, simcattle,
5539. the shrill crow of the cock proclaiming that the business had known them from t
5540.fellow, destraw hats. lighted in cutting great hunches of bread for them, which
5541.farmer's wife, stood at her door looking on at could scarcely cany. the bright b
5542.oman, yet the main- and instantly taking off his sabots gave them to the child,
5543.is sabots gave them to the child, spring of the household as well as its sunshin
5544.lined them, on- his own feet. everything with the help of one lame servant, who
5545.rvice, and whom every one called Limping she kissed him tenderly when the story
5546.f buff-leather shoes, Marthe was turning away as the last of the reapers disap-
5547.en her youngest son, Aubin, came jumping over the press. blackthorn hedge, and r
5548.the press. blackthorn hedge, and running up to her for one more kiss. lose one's
5549.oose-boy; the geese were field. Fighting "I really had forgotten my very own lit
5550.my very own little sickle, mother making a horrid row, and I halloed to him to k
5551.at dear." his head." "Very well, darling, be off again, and work hard." " " For
5552.a shot, start- catch him I mean to wring the neck of that biggest goose of his a
5553.his as soon as the chap began blubbering she flew at me, and ling the birds in t
5554.egan blubbering she flew at me, and ling the birds in the hedge with his leap an
5555.wly ou "Why, where's the harm of licking Maclou ? " Poor little his young master
5556.ng master as if to thank him for keeping off the flies fellow, he was doing you
5557.eping off the flies fellow, he was doing you no harm and he's " such a good boy.
5558.flapped about ins head. " Is On reaching the field, Aubin and Yves, like the oth
5559., so I got rid of my sabots, the reaping-hooks cut their way farther and farther
5560.ere is no shadow cast by the trees thing he gave his the chirp of the grasshoppe
5561.I shall work, and the master, uncovering his head, recites the Angecertainly not
5562.boy, bids his comrades beware of falling asleep under one of the and for a good
5563.there, three feet underground, according to punish the other. But, mind, you are
5564. are a lictt<-r boy don't go on grieving your father and me. And why are you jea
5565.ith her innocent crest-fallen, muttering, differently. eyes, that Yves slnnk awa
5566. oft; too, someday, so lookout." ; thing to you." His shoes, for instance?" said
5567.ill me. I had " Very well; I shall wring that bird's neck, and Maclou will rathe
5568.cotte was a dreadful man, get a flogging." " You will never be so wicked." to be
5569.eanwhile, poor little Maclou was sitting under an old wil- there is Aubin, that
5570.one has always lived head, and was doing her best to comfort him. Maelou had tol
5571., and her his history, and was extolling the prowess of his beloved and everythi
5572.he prowess of his beloved and everything." " I should never have goose the pride
5573.es their elbows on their knees, puzzling how to solve the difficulty. you call m
5574.her drinks so." " I love cry and looking up saw Aubin standing before them, hold
5575.ve cry and looking up saw Aubin standing before them, holding my father," said A
5576. saw Aubin standing before them, holding my father," said Armelle quickly. " Wel
5577.replied Maclou, in his arms a struggling goose nearly as big as himself. " take
5578.oment's reflection "I'm just a foundling something There," he said, you I believ
5579.flection "I'm just a foundling something There," he said, you I believe she the
5580.atched by a hen, I suppose have anything to do with it, and drive it away." "But
5581.n her to me ?" By " To make were playing together quite merrily when they were i
5582.ee ?" " But this The geese came waddling to them as goose is your father's what
5583.did not even hear him ; she was kneeling by poor Maclou, who had thrown himself
5584.r Maclou, who had thrown himself sobbing on th 5 ground, and trying all she coul
5585.mself sobbing on th 5 ground, and trying all she could to comfort him but his gr
5586.ever when his dog Finaud, after snuffing about in search of his missing ; ; ; ;
5587. snuffing about in search of his missing ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ! ; ; ; ; ; fast as they
5588.they could with their web-feet, flapping their short wings, and screaming with t
5589.lapping their short wings, and screaming with terror. The dog barked furiously,
5590.with his head down, his nostrils foaming, and his eyes bloodshot. At length, by
5591.together and counted but one was missing the great white goose, the pride of the
5592.ttle master. He burst into tears, crying out : " He has killed her I know he has
5593.as Yves, mad with passion, and clenching his fists as he ; ! " Why, ; it geese s
5594.hat I keep our flock of is found missing, they mil just thiuk I have lost it." "
5595. spoke. beat you." " My father's beating won't be like your master's, Maclou ; i
5596.ster's, Maclou ; it's not worth thinking of." " O, how good you are !" and the l
5597.now my father would give you a thrashing. And what do you suppose Maclou's maste
5598.punish you, he would give you a scolding, I suppose if he did more, he would jus
5599.d you know it " wicked afraid of telling the truth to Yves," as they call you, "
5600. are a bad fellow, yes I am here waiting, and you can strike if you The little t
5601.d you can strike if you The little thing spoka so fearlessly, ami looked so calm
5602.hild, and brave as he was he liked being punished as little as any other child s
5603.red. stood, in her little niche, smiling OB every one, and holding " What out he
5604.niche, smiling OB every one, and holding " What out her Child to the poor and su
5605. out her Child to the poor and suffering, to young and old there about ?" was no
5606.lowers at her heard you just now talking about the goose, and Armelle, and feet.
5607.om her sweet hands on bent heads proving him with kindness, often with tears. Sh
5608.with tears. She never praised and aching hearts. "Our Lady of the Road," they ca
5609.his brother to him, for fear of exciting his temper ; and with a and I am sure s
5610.atient hopefulness she was always trying to find some tender spot in his heart;
5611.nch of wild-flowers Kerdrec was untiring in his efforts for the amendment of thi
5612.d as though the boy loved not forgetting the straw-cutter's little girl and last
5613.e a hope of Yves The boys were preparing for their changing for the better. and
5614.e boys were preparing for their changing for the better. and certainly both the
5615.ort." And the old servant cast a pitying great day," said the farmer, you comser
5616.ash fashion; Aubin wrote slowly, feeling as he did so the solemnity "No, father
5617.n a low and broken voice, " Take warning, Yves ; From this time the servants cal
5618. had gone to his mother for her blessing was a small matter; and the boy seemed
5619. saw Armelle busily employed in removing the wings of the plaints of him were co
5620.the plaints of him were constantly being brought to his father. dead goose. As s
5621.bed his orchard. delight he began flying about like a bird or an angel. A rough
5622.ed him from his dream, Yves was standing by his and by degrees Yves took to freq
5623. and by degrees Yves took to frequenting the tavrn on Sunlads as idle and mischi
5624.an excited expression. days, and keeping company with ; ; for Marcotte. As he cr
5625. he caught a glimpse of Armelle crossing the yard, and But what carrying somethi
5626.crossing the yard, and But what carrying something white, and a large basket. co
5627.he yard, and But what carrying something white, and a large basket. could Armell
5628.d a large basket. could Armelle be doing at the farm? He entered the big room wh
5629. for into the inner room was an alarming event. Limping Louison now came in, ful
5630.nner room was an alarming event. Limping Louison now came in, full of consternat
5631.me in, full of consternation, exclaiming that one goose was missing and at the s
5632.n, exclaiming that one goose was missing and at the same moment Jean and Marthe
5633.upper began. There was plenty of talking at the meal, much joking with Louison,
5634.enty of talking at the meal, much joking with Louison, and many compliments to t
5635.y. The farmservants discussed everything which concerned the interest of their e
5636.an inferiors. On this particular evening, however, his words were few and short
5637.ervants were on the point of withdrawing, when he said to the herdsman : ; had a
5638.ways regarded Aubin had become something terribly like hatred, ever since the st
5639.hat Aubin had told his mother everything. He was right in thinking that Marthe k
5640.her everything. He was right in thinking that Marthe knew the truth, though not
5641.r honest child's conscience at receiving Aubin's present. A fat goose would be v
5642. right ? And so, while Aubin was praying at the Calvary, she had taken the goose
5643.stooped down and kissed Armelle, telling her to keep the goose as a present from
5644. goose as a present from her, and giving her besides a loaf and a bottle of wine
5645.nch at church, one absent at the evening meal on SunThe unhappy boy hud become o
5646.come one of the habitues of the day. ing Pitcher, a low tavern, kept by a good-f
5647.a low tavern, kept by a good-for-nothing old fellow named Miichecoul, who kept a
5648.low named Miichecoul, who kept a running account with not forgetting to charge i
5649.pt a running account with not forgetting to charge interest. 'Drink what you lik
5650.ast, and all with the most uncomplaining But there came a day when Miiehecoul re
5651. fault did not keep him from associating with the low set who frequented Macheco
5652.the truth was that he was a sort of king among them, and the deference they show
5653.e; he is all she cares for." Ah, no, ing, pelled to send the latter ; ; ; poor m
5654. forgave Bupper ready, and it is growing late. " There is only one sheaf left no
5655.arm servants and day-laborers go singing merrily to took his little girl in his
5656.his little girl in his arms, and leading by a string the fetch the harvest-home
5657.irl in his arms, and leading by a string the fetch the harvest-home sheaf, with
5658.and Peirrot had watched by are preparing to lift it, but stop with a startled ex
5659.ith a startled exclamation at for taking care of the child. Chantefleur doted on
5660.ve. the sight of a ragged child sleeping quietly in the shadow of the sheaf. Poo
5661.e shadow of the sheaf. Poor little thing her thin hand was holding some the only
5662.r little thing her thin hand was holding some the only trouble was that every no
5663. had rubbed from the husk before falling to of having her home " it is the straw
5664.rom the husk before falling to of having her home " it is the straw- said he had
5665. change for the poor child but the thing that she CHAPTER IL most missed was hea
5666.t she CHAPTER IL most missed was hearing Chantefleur talk of her mother. One day
5667.a rosary round the child's neck, telling her THE HARVEST HOME. that her mother s
5668. hopeless drunkard he would come reeling home from the put it hi a wild rose-bus
5669.hich grew by the grave, and told Foaming Pitcher and load her with reproaches an
5670.hes and abase ; the little birds to sing to her mother when they were old someti
5671.nd the little feet bare. She was running out of the house with her child in her
5672.r cold often she had to beg. One evening, when she was about ten years old, her
5673.sed came hi with a coarse untidy-looking woman, whom he ordered shelter to the p
5674.he ordered shelter to the pale trembling woman, with her child's rosy face Armel
5675.roduced this ; a secret sorrow blighting all. The shadows were lengthening ; onl
5676.ghting all. The shadows were lengthening ; only a few sheafs had to be bound ; t
5677.s had to be bound ; the farmer, standing in the great wagon, caught them one by
5678.uld not do; high words followed, and ing, Machecoul said " Your wife has to beg
5679. his foot against the doorIn the morning he remembered nothing of what had step.
5680.doorIn the morning he remembered nothing of what had step. happened, but noticed
5681.she recovered consciousness. Recognizing the man, she said " I had a fall, Cathe
5682.ad a fall, Catherinet, but it is nothing. Many thanks I am sorry to have trouble
5683. just managed to drag herself to wanting his breakfast. the bed, and to say " Ca
5684.ith tears in his eyes, to do her bidding. Poor Annette her long martyrdom was al
5685.ourney. She died very quietly, forgiving her hus" Who will take care band, but t
5686. is pretty little face met his wondering eyon, as Pierrot's BJI my wife?" The ch
5687.corn?" " " I was " I don't turn gleaning, "answered the little one, "and I fell
5688.m and it was Pierrot she answered. going," " Pierrot is a "A good riddance;" cri
5689.nds must be opened like mother's wedding-ring. The man turned pale he had placed
5690.ust be opened like mother's wedding-ring. The man turned pale he had placed His.
5691.pretty, yet a sad sight the little thing with her "Stop here," he said, "and I p
5692.r to beat you bare feet crossed, sitting smiling on her golden throne, crowned a
5693.t you bare feet crossed, sitting smiling on her golden throne, crowned again." B
5694.again." But La Gervaise rose, and facing him, said resolutely with flowers and i
5695.her;" opened the wife's hand, and saying, "I want to speak to you," led her into
5696.I wish for my sake was beside her taking care of her her mother or her angel- wa
5697. starred over with straw-cutter is going from bad to worse. daisies and how swee
5698. how sweetly the nightingale was singing She Gervaise is mistress is not a fit h
5699.the grave and slept quietly till morning then she slept on her mother's grave, a
5700.morrow ? Our men, who found her sleeping by the sheaf, ashamed of her rags and w
5701. ; : ; ; ; ; ; ; ! ; ; again. " thinking she opened the great oaken cupboard, sa
5702. opened the great oaken cupboard, saying, " I have all Jeanne's things here, and
5703.you what, you fellows, I've got to bring up Armelle as a good Christian girl. Lo
5704.I wish she had At the end of the evening, Jean spoke with honest indignapoppies
5705." " His wife Pere Patriarche was sitting quietly on the waittried, and it cost h
5706.hat is that as the price of a soul?" ing for the sheaf; his sons were beside him
5707.is sons were beside him Yves was looking unusually pleasant, and the father felt
5708.seems tolerably heavy," he said, smiling. The men laid it with a laugh at their
5709.ned the Book of the Gosp els, and taking a pen she wrote, in a bold, firm hand "
5710.ourLudy didfor The two went out carrying the basket containing their dinners, Qi
5711. went out carrying the basket containing their dinners, Qie girl with a Aubin ha
5712.he children sat refused them all, saying simply that she was too young, and befo
5713. before it on two large stones, chatting merrily. They baked wished to stay with
5714.es, sang songs, and One winter's evening it was snowing fast, as Armelle was tal
5715. and One winter's evening it was snowing fast, as Armelle was talked about Marin
5716.ss and Jean Patriarche's gener- bringing her sheep home; the wind was very high,
5717.oak over her head, as she osity. playing with Labrie, Maclou -was never far from
5718.lorn and desolate he would have died ing more from fear than cold. Something red
5719. ing more from fear than cold. Something red, glaring, was a for either of them.
5720.m fear than cold. Something red, glaring, was a for either of them. After their
5721. to cry out or run away. The two flaming eyes, for der their very sabots. Someti
5722.Labrie leaped gallantly on terrible king by a shepherdess, and a king of France
5723.rrible king by a shepherdess, and a king of France restored one of the creatures
5724.adopted parents took her to his cot- ing torches, were kneeling beside her. On t
5725.r to his cot- ing torches, were kneeling beside her. On the snow was a " Go "Hus
5726. it was empty. Marcotte, who was passing, said, pool of blood beside it a dead w
5727. it a dead wolf. winter, the first thing ; book ; : ; to Machecoui's tavern." aw
5728.i's tavern." away with a shudder, saying to Marthe, us go home. " Her father met
5729. go home. " Her father met them, singing, shouting, and cursing. Armelle tremble
5730." Her father met them, singing, shouting, and cursing. Armelle trembled from hea
5731.met them, singing, shouting, and cursing. Armelle trembled from head to foot but
5732.from head to foot but without hesitating a " moment, she went up to him and said
5733. been to your house to ask your blessing. God is giving me a great grace, and I
5734.ouse to ask your blessing. God is giving me a great grace, and I want you to sha
5735.are all in white? You are a fine looking lady now, fed and clothed with the best
5736.ied to speak, "you shall hear everything presently:" she was taken into the grea
5737.ubeside h in bin, pale as death, leaning his head on the table ; ; She took his
5738.ant to from sin or damnation by throwing yourself into the flames or preach, I s
5739.ay, and Armelle clung to Marthe, weeping bit- you agree to let him tyrannize ove
5740.where ?" ; stood Yves, his hand bleeding, and his forehead bound with a handkerc
5741.y killed the wolf." " The wolf was going to kill me?" "Well, and if I did save y
5742.p to him, and said, in a voice trembling with emotion : "It would prove that you
5743.d be a hell ; !" "No one, I wasn't going to stop you. Why, Armelle, I couldn't "
5744.So there was a heavy cloud overshadowing that blessed day a martyrdom." " But wi
5745. was never again the same merry laughing creature as before she grew very though
5746.She felt so safe under her motherly wing, ; sacrifice everything to duty?" " Eve
5747.er motherly wing, ; sacrifice everything to duty?" " Everything. But," she said,
5748.rifice everything to duty?" " Everything. But," she said, after a pause, your ha
5749. pause, your hand is the blood is coming through the linen. not properly bound u
5750.lothes she that he had seen him fighting. wore, and the bread she ate ; he would
5751.the bread she ate ; he would sit smoking by the well while he made her draw heav
5752.." " I know what that means just nothing," Then, all at once, he broke out passi
5753. the house you s-.re you slowly stealing away what little love my mother has lef
5754.r has left for nu: ! ; ; you are robbing me of never refused to do anything; she
5755.bbing me of never refused to do anything; she never complained. This cruel Yves
5756.nd their adopted ; daughter were talking together happily enough. From the day t
5757. posheart. But gradually another feeling came I can itive hatred. the love he wa
5758. was so btrange, so vehement, so ginning that it seemed still absolutely without
5759.d still absolutely without any softening influence, As to the simple happy child
5760. on quietly herself, she guessed nothing of all this, but went feeding her sheep
5761.ed nothing of all this, but went feeding her sheep, singing her songs, and readi
5762.his, but went feeding her sheep, singing her songs, and reading the stories When
5763.er sheep, singing her songs, and reading the stories When the Abbd Kerdrec of St
5764. junl fore did him the honor of drinking his wine and eating his Patriarche had
5765.he honor of drinking his wine and eating his Patriarche had no fancy for men of
5766. stand on an end. He delighted in giving his audience a fright, and seeing how c
5767.giving his audience a fright, and seeing how close the girls kept together when
5768.ith the dry little man, who kept looking at Armelle through his eyeglass. She, o
5769. eyeglass. She, on her part, saw nothing of what was going on; she kept touching
5770. her part, saw nothing of what was going on; she kept touching her left hand wit
5771. of what was going on; she kept touching her left hand with her right; it seemed
5772.ht; it seemed so strange to feel no ring thrre. Then she thought that Aubin woul
5773.ette's grave, and that the cur was going to tell the great event of the day to J
5774.g to her eyes at the thought of kneeling for Marthe's blessing. then the "death
5775.hought of kneeling for Marthe's blessing. then the "death chariot," which passes
5776.smen!" It is all delightfully terrifying, and Pere Loic was a great favorite wit
5777. the wolf." These words set him thinking. " She shall love me," he said, and he
5778.ve me," he said, and he set about trying to win her with all his might. Marthe w
5779.che. guests. \ve have settled everything have to see to our daughter's trousteau
5780. straw-cutter credit now." ; the teeming earth. "he refuses me Marthe and her hu
5781.rs," and offered them .to Armelle saying: "They are not to be gathered in Lent i
5782. late ; a hen came had taken to poaching, if to no worse. When ; was seen no mor
5783. borrowed, and forgot to pay; everything short of actual stealing he was capable
5784.pay; everything short of actual stealing he was capable of but he had not gone s
5785. of but he had not gone so far as taking money, and he made the in his way, it ;
5786.e drew from her finger her mother's ring, and gave it to the priest. girl rose ;
5787.e from her knees Kerdrec. wild wandering look in his eyes ; sometimes he laughed
5788.laughed idiotifor hours without speaking, cally; at others he would remain and t
5789.t more gloomy, silent and fierce-looking every day. he went by, scythe in hand,
5790. in one's cellar wouldn't be a bad thing in the each other, in the sight of God
5791.of Tobias and Sara he bade them rememing Well, Pcre Daniel, I will send you a co
5792.r God. Then he said that "Not a farthing." " they were very young, and had bette
5793. had better not marry till after Nothing at all ?" " One harvest. word, just one
5794. " " You have a now. I could do anything so that I may have Armelle for my daugh
5795. and three hundred francs on the wedding-day. I will thatch and -whitewash your
5796.s all right but I don't half like giving up Annette." " Why you turned her out o
5797.achecoul came in, he gave Yves a knowing wink, and said "Are things going on all
5798.knowing wink, and said "Are things going on all right?" ; : ' "Well, then, it's
5799.id the straw-cutter, "for only " evening I promised her to Yves. "It was a rash
5800.his affection. " "All that means nothing to me. Yves suits me best and a ; girl
5801.t is my own af" : Capitally ; I am going to marry his " daughter. "Did you not d
5802.the child from her Are you not insulting your dead wife by the presence of the w
5803.hamelessly forget iel, beware of braving God's anger !" priest indignantly. home
5804., and Aubin and ; EAKLY the next morning, the Abbe Kerdrec went to the Armelle l
5805.ked the thatch hung green and decay" ing on the rotten beams the door was almost
5806.e you." in one corner fowls were pecking on a heap of straw broken "All I know i
5807.loor and it all looked doubly disgusting on that fresh, sweet morning, when ever
5808. disgusting on that fresh, sweet morning, when everything was so bright and beau
5809.at fresh, sweet morning, when everything was so bright and beautiful when Nature
5810. along slowly and thoughtfully, blessing all the creatures of God. A book was pa
5811.k of Nature that he was studyHe drew ing, and his eyes were full of love and gra
5812.n the fair landscape. Daniel was walking before the door, reflecting on last nig
5813. was walking before the door, reflecting on last night's transaction, and never
5814.be Kerdrec till he spoke. " Good morning, my friend. I come from Jean Patriarche
5815.d have looked ugly for him ; but nothing was said for the child's sake. Now, how
5816.m of his paternal rights, hold a meeting, and make Patriarche Armelle's guardian
5817.e walked, " I see all La Gervaise, bring us paper and ink." Pierrot's wages, gav
5818.nd Jotright. " I have brought everything with me," said the priest "let neckerch
5819.s best he could. IIo shrank from letting him know that his brother was his rival
5820.ed him to go to the farm and say nothing of all him the sad story, ; : THE STRAW
5821.ho told him that the life he was leading deprived him of his natural Christian,
5822." You must marry La Gervaise." "Anything but that." Send her away then." " I dar
5823.ter Daniel's banns were published during mass. The Abbe Kerdreo did not fathom t
5824.athom the plot, but he haj a prerefusing furious; : rights, and that his daughte
5825.a Gervaise, the village children hooting after them all the way home. Daniel wen
5826.r, and said " Monsieur, there is nothing to prevent Armelle 's return home. I me
5827.eaker than I am remember the first thing is to do our diity, everywhere, always,
5828.ow in store for you. Remember one, thing whatever happens, however hard, however
5829.of her father's marriage. Never dreaming of all it involved, she was almost glad
5830.ord left the churchyard, holdArmelle ing Jean's arm, When they reached Daniel's
5831.bundle on a stool, and said good evening to her " In father. Presently she asked
5832.The poor girl fell on her knees, weeping convulsively. "You are doing a wicked t
5833.es, weeping convulsively. "You are doing a wicked thing, "said Patriarche. "You
5834.vulsively. "You are doing a wicked thing, "said Patriarche. "You have never thou
5835.aniel." farmer "he is She had everything to do ; her stepmother spent her time a
5836. stepmother spent her time and gossiping in the village, whilst Armelle washed,
5837.lowers which Aubin had laid there during the night. And so thn dnys went by, and
5838.mfort was her old friend Chantein coming to see Armelle in spite of the she fleu
5839.lf to an agony of grief. In heartrending accents she implored Marthe not to send
5840. with you. There is an end to everything on earth. You will be eighteen in Augus
5841.s brother of the he felt that everything was in Aubin's rivalry between them fav
5842.e! ath love while he himself had nothing but her unnatural And his heart told hi
5843.HAPTER V. TEX LIVES FOB ONE. One evening ing village It ; the two brothers walke
5844.ER V. TEX LIVES FOB ONE. One evening ing village It ; the two brothers walked to
5845.th an expression of horror, ni;d leaving the room for a minute, she returned wit
5846. bowl of water in one hand and a looking-glass in the other. drop of blood was o
5847.'s and a new knife bought. still evening; only now and then heavy masses of clou
5848.ckened his pace. Then they began talking of the commissary of police and the mag
5849.istrate had been sent for who was making a wedding suit for a neighbor of from R
5850.d been sent for who was making a wedding suit for a neighbor of from Rennes. At
5851.rm, of the fair arche was Marthe sitting watching him at the head of the bed whi
5852.e fair arche was Marthe sitting watching him at the head of the bed which was ju
5853.igation." " She has a reason for waiting, perhaps ?" Old Loic told his story, an
5854.ll"It seems strange for us to be walking together it does not ing what hod happe
5855.s to be walking together it does not ing what hod happened, he stated that he ha
5856.gistrate, "the two accounts do not thing." " As much as Labrie and Louision ?" a
5857.ision ?" agree." Yves muttered something about his having been drinking at "Yves
5858.Yves muttered something about his having been drinking at "Yves, you are not jus
5859.something about his having been drinking at "Yves, you are not just; you know ve
5860.eason." Machecoul's, and not remembering things clearly. Just then "Without reas
5861.mpt on tied to his mother's apron string. courage, always told that Armelle love
5862.d, but might have given her up you thing our mother's caresses and the love of t
5863.ose, " I will not hear of it Once saying you shall never marry her "After this I
5864.ously. The them." He fixed a penetrating glance, cold, clear and keen as steel,
5865.l the cloud passed over tered a sleeping draught to his patient, and the Abb6 we
5866. and the pale light showed a man rushing madly from say mass. Then the miserable
5867.n awful silence for Later in the evening Yves went home. There were many some mi
5868. condemn you. lights about people coming and going there was a light too You thi
5869.ou. lights about people coming and going there was a light too You think, perhap
5870.ink, perhaps, that I Labrie lay, whining, in one corner Lou- Deny nothing do not
5871.whining, in one corner Lou- Deny nothing do not speak in the inner room. ison wa
5872.speak in the inner room. ison was moving about with a scared face in the next ro
5873.Marthe entered tian ju-ople were talking in awe-struck whispers. "Who is that?"
5874."Who is that?" she said then recognizing Yves, "where did you to lose yours in a
5875.ou to lose yours in an honorable calling you must enlist toold tailor ; ; Return
5876.u must enlist toold tailor ; ; Returning from a wedding, Loic had seen something
5877.oold tailor ; ; Returning from a wedding, Loic had seen something dark lying in
5878. from a wedding, Loic had seen something dark lying in the road it was Aubin. Th
5879.ding, Loic had seen something dark lying in the road it was Aubin. The old man m
5880.ubin, who did not appear to see anything heroic in his own The doctor gave good
5881.conduct. doubted certainly, in examining the wound, whether the young man could
5882.tred w .s gone heart thought and feeling seemed alike dead in him he was hardly
5883. him he was hardly conscious of anything. The meadows were covered with a white
5884.eavens the birds began to chirp and sing all was fair and fresh and pure and he
5885.ithered tree stretched one bare arm, ing. He hurried like a gallows, towards Sai
5886.n ourselves. will make up for everything to us." of u Father. was praying with c
5887.rything to us." of u Father. was praying with clasped hands .md uplifted eyes, i
5888.hilated, " But the money ?" low bleating struck his ear a white goat had broken
5889.fastened her to a tree, and was sporting near him with her kids. Yves coaxed the
5890. burst suddenly into an agony of weeping, and sobbed string after sinking deeper
5891.o an agony of weeping, and sobbed string after sinking deeper and deeper into an
5892.weeping, and sobbed string after sinking deeper and deeper into an abyss of mise
5893.Aubin!" suicide. despair, only one thing seems possible "You shall see him befor
5894.n the cord he was stunned with suffering his shall." running Yves caught the han
5895.unned with suffering his shall." running Yves caught the hand of the priest, kis
5896. secure the cord to the great projecting branch. he slowly unfastened his neckti
5897.nd old Breton farmsinners. er in feeling sure that the money queotion would be n
5898.culty. "We must not expect any softening on the part of the Aubin knows that I l
5899.the Aubin knows that I left him thinking him dead. My parents know the truth, an
5900.There was a marvoices in the air calling me Cain This tree seemed to have riage
5901.ngue and it said it was a gibbet waiting for me " which stains the road cries al
5902.; give the money to M. le Cur6." nothing can cleanse. I hated Aubin because he w
5903.I have wronged her I made a Next morning the straw-cutter and his daughter were
5904.and deaths !" I condemn you to something more terrible," said the priest; care,
5905.nt of accomplish- when God was smoothing the way before her, was it for her to T
5906.r, was it for her to There was something awful in the silence which en- remember
5907. The AbbC Kerdroc At the farm everything was strangely quiet. The servants repen
5908.was wearied with his sin, without having the strength to What he felt was a desi
5909.TEE the never left his IV. of disturbing her hen the lever was highest, her touc
5910.thed him; her a smile whispered blessing, her loving kisses, always brought The
5911.r a smile whispered blessing, her loving kisses, always brought The sound of the
5912.ys brought The sound of the door opening gently made lips. Armelle entered betwe
5913.hen the me here, time conies for signing," and he left the room abruptly. At nig
5914.atriarche had begged There was something the Abbe Kerdrec to stay the evening. I
5915.ing the Abbe Kerdrec to stay the evening. It so awful, so mournful, in this depa
5916. words, and then added, with a trembling hand, "Died There would be only that la
5917. greatly he was army in Italy. something more than a gallant soldier, he was a h
5918.was Yves. noticed in him his most daring feats had always a touch of He defended
5919.rom He shunned all notice after drowning, at the risk of his life. and his super
5920.h a few regiments of such men we nothing ; ; ; ; 1 ; ; There was a fearful strug
5921.father. Aubin had guessed what was going on by that wonderful in; should conquer
5922.r; Aubin held out his be that of helping and saving others. French, English, han
5923.ld out his be that of helping and saving others. French, English, hand. Chinese
5924. ; ' ' You We will pray for you !" bring you back safe Yves felt crushed he was
5925.ck safe Yves felt crushed he was sinking on his knees at the foot of the bed but
5926., "Good-bye, long embrace. Then, turning to Annelle, His preparations were soon
5927. learn It was a regular day of rejoicing in the how he was going on. in church.
5928.day of rejoicing in the how he was going on. in church. Pere .re when Aubin appe
5929. was there a happier At last the wedding-day came. ! "I " God are going away ?"
5930.e wedding-day came. ! "I " God are going away ?" am a soldier" ; ; another, ther
5931.ier" ; ; another, there were seven owing still. On the field, in the trenches, a
5932.e hawthorn hedges the day on the evening of which he more the scene changed ; de
5933. arm, he started as if and then, turning away with a gesture JH- Imd seen Annett
5934.hip, as lily on a dunghill loses nothing of its fragrance and its blooming Oaths
5935.othing of its fragrance and its blooming Oaths, bad language, ill-usage nothing
5936.g Oaths, bad language, ill-usage nothing could really purity. harm her. Her duty
5937.only the virtuous and holy do. his doing; he it was who had misery she had endur
5938.ain, the AbbS Florent, found him sitting " Tell alone in the tent. He had a book
5939.s lips moved as though he were repeating somepresent, but the future, that I am
5940.sent, but the future, that I am thinking of." reading; " And what do thing he ha
5941. future, that I am thinking of." reading; " And what do thing he had learned by
5942.inking of." reading; " And what do thing he had learned by heart. you wish to do
5943.ce, the Explain yourself, Yves." mailing in his hopeless remorse from the assemb
5944. he came upon the executioner fashioning the cross. And all this misery was aggr
5945. because it must be so. I have one thing to do a task which is laid upon me and
5946.." you came in. It Shall I go on reading aloud ?" " Go on," said the Chaplain. Y
5947.d the priest, gently. what I was reading when !" "And then" " " Then you Morbiha
5948. Abbot of La Trappe. Tell him everything speak to him "Cain said to his brother,
5949.ore them all, and to realize the longing you have just expressed that of living
5950.g you have just expressed that of living with holy men acquainted with your sad
5951.hich " And he said ; Me " You are saving me !" exclaimed Yves. " I have shown yo
5952.be every kind of hard penance everything to subject the flesh to the spirit : ab
5953., told his own his; lute silence, trying fasts, wearisome watchiugs. everything
5954.g fasts, wearisome watchiugs. everything to tear the heart from earth and fix Th
5955. ; tory to the priest, and then, looking into his face, exclaimed: " Now you kno
5956. die. I attempted the life of everything to confound human wisdom, to exalt the
5957.an wisdom, to exalt the soul by humbling it, and to purchase eternal happiness a
5958. labor and penance with love and longing. To live by daily dying that was the li
5959.love and longing. To live by daily dying that was the life for him. The army ret
5960.ook leave of the Abbo Floreut, promising to write to him. Then he started for St
5961.ut I have been a bad sou, an neighboring villages: Yves was decore, and wore a n
5962. i the direction of the flames, crossing I fields, leaping distin- i, ditches. A
5963.f the flames, crossing I fields, leaping distin- i, ditches. As they approached
5964.en, at last, and "No there i the burning buildings, the crackling of the flames,
5965.e i the burning buildings, the crackling of the flames, and ill of the masses of
5966.you Just as they dashed into the burning house,, people were each other in a lon
5967.re each other in a long embrace, weeping, trembling, murmuring talking of a help
5968.er in a long embrace, weeping, trembling, murmuring talking of a helpless old ma
5969.g embrace, weeping, trembling, murmuring talking of a helpless old man, who slep
5970.e, weeping, trembling, murmuring talking of a helpless old man, who slept in a s
5971.s old man, who slept in a shed adjoining a broken words of love and tenderness w
5972.the poor people whose property was being destroyed, the wail- their work. Armell
5973.ood at the door, with a child in her ing of children, the sound of axes, the cre
5974.hildren, the sound of axes, the creaking of the bucket- arms, and another at her
5975.and another at her side. She was looking anxiously cluiiu as water was drawn fro
5976. water was drawn from the well, mingling with the down the road the group had ju
5977.d the group had just reached the turning. Sho shouts of the workmen and the voci
5978.ed by the smoke. trembled as the meeting with his father drew near. The old Yves
5979.nd, man came forward. Without hesitating, Armelle went up to and so, laden with
5980. laden with this double burden, carrying one, dragging him, saying, as she put h
5981.is double burden, carrying one, dragging him, saying, as she put her arms round
5982.rden, carrying one, dragging him, saying, as she put her arms round his neck : "
5983.s Yves, the other, he struggled, panting up the quivering staircase, father ; he
5984., he struggled, panting up the quivering staircase, father ; he has saved Aubin
5985. has saved Aubin ; we owe him everything." Then blinded by the smoke, enveloped
5986. smoke, enveloped in flames, and feeling as all turned away with a feeling of aw
5987.eeling as all turned away with a feeling of awe, as the father embraced though h
5988. father embraced though he were drinking draughts of fire. At the top, he sank h
5989. down with his burden, faintly murmuring, " Ten ment, still less the mother's fe
5990.none could tell whether they were living or farm, in the village may be imagined
5991.Louison limped about, vive them. waiting on every one. Old Loic hastened up to s
5992.im ; to his rescue was slowly recovering. and I should be afraid to say how many
5993. her ; and the poor old man is beginning been very good, and the goal was very n
5994.hed. " to come to at last. The following Sunday, after Vespers, he asked for a p
5995. Yves knelt down he insisted on speaking fire was told. parly. way with this fel
5996.turned to Aubin, and said in a faltering voice " My The next morning, the farmer
5997. a faltering voice " My The next morning, the farmer dressed for a journey, was
5998.that has saved your life ? It is waiting, surrounded by his family, while Yvea r
5999.up and threw soldier. round the fainting " Yves ! my brother ! Yes, he lives; hi
6000. felt himself embraced strong and loving arms; he heard voices that were ! mothe
6001.eard voices that were ! mother's parting kisses. Aubin was making a last appeal.
6002.other's parting kisses. Aubin was making a last appeal. " Why should you leave u
6003.proper by " I am father answered : going to take yonr brother to Thymadeuc to th
6004.place your home? his Where are you going ?" And music in his ears; and he closed
6005. ears; and he closed his eyes, wondering if it was all a dream the danger, the p
6006.ned full consciousness. Day was breaking, and he looked around, first at one, an
6007.e, lie caught both his hands, exclaiming, "Ten, father, ten!" there was a sense
6008., and the tender voice of Armelle trying to comfort her. The ; ; THE END. The Fi
6009. of the same value. a " Praise for doing what you allow quarters. me is right! o
6010.." n. Whilst this conversation was going on at the military postthe frequenters
6011.Lambelin is quite a lambin* this morning," said the colonel, in a forced tone, w
6012.y of five centimes a day." " This saving seems to me impossible." now a geuend t
6013.to the other there was kept up a running fire of bon-mots, repartees, and jokes,
6014. pity it is so often dry, and ! "Nothing more true, sir, nevertheless. I have al
6015. have had the honor of servyears, during ing my country. " Your calculation seem
6016.e had the honor of servyears, during ing my country. " Your calculation seems to
6017.elin entered the room, his arrival being greeted by a burst of applause. "What n
6018.rst of applause. "What news do you bring ? " was shouted out. "I will tell you a
6019.ce ? And how have you been able to bring me so often these " sums, out of your o
6020. the story of the soldier Bois, relating what the reader has just heard. " The c
6021.ve will come to his aid and do something for his old This suggestion was receive
6022.f virtuous actions, though not spreading BO quickly as that of scandalous ones,
6023. the Caf6 Neuf, where after breakfasting at the hotel Minerva, it was the custom
6024.ocha. About twenty officers were playing billiards in the gardens of the establi
6025.r the benefit of the hero of the morning. The Caf6 Nuovo had just changed its na
6026.Italian demagogues. It was there, during thn o mouths, that plots were formed ag
6027. the million y of tli .t of him, Nothing is easier, sir; we time an opportunity
6028.ier." it." " And I am far from depriving myself of " " Where do take it ? day, p
6029.ings about the country we are now living is it " That you as happens. One who ha
6030.quivo'al in. good religious make us sing hymns, which reminds me of my signs of
6031.thy. The landlord of the cite, advancing toown village church. Then sometimes to
6032.with extreme discretion, scarcely daring (Jive us then a bowl of punch." As to p
6033.ind looks, and unanimous welcome " Bring it then," said one of the officers, beg
6034.en," said one of the officers, beginning to com- of the officers, hn at last bec
6035.ecame more at his ease. He was beginning to confess that the cookery of the hote
6036.n a servant brought "Some one is reading it," he answered. " Have me n box, dire
6037.its contents. It was as follows, morning." "A " Well then! good action ought to
6038. to be recompensed you have been a bring us a glass of water; you surely have th
6039.he officers, with difficulty restraining sum of one hundred francs, quite a fort
6040.urtheir auger, took their departure. ing two years, and by the most generous sac
6041.r too black O my "God." And then turning his eyes to chocolate, no ieos, no beer
6042.moment, the brave Colonel Devaux raising his glass but at the en 1 of a month (h
6043. this liis establishment on his agreeing to change the name as above true model
6044.mot ,er and her son. in. Notwithstanding all these flattering speeches, of which
6045.in. Notwithstanding all these flattering speeches, of which he On the same day,
6046.een in the regiment, he had not touching with his lips the sparkling draught. hu
6047.not touching with his lips the sparkling draught. hud a single punishment, arid
6048. punishment, arid he was remarked during the "What my friend, do you despise tha
6049.." " I would do so, but I have something here," answered Bois worthy of praise,
6050.r as we shall see, in the hotel pointing to his heart, I have something here, wh
6051. pointing to his heart, I have something here, which chokes ' \Vell then, give u
6052.of your mother. I did, without betraying the quality or the number of persons Dr
6053.reader, what was the surprise and making acquaintance with the police. " " but w
6054.asnient of this poor soldier, on finding himself seated Happiness cheers," answe
6055.oxicate. at Therefore, before separating, messieurs, let us splendidly He would
6056.ish much to retire," he said, whispering in my ear, and An instant after, Bois e
6057. and An instant after, Bois experiencing in himself the truth of the axiom enoun
6058. ! ! ' THE PORTRAIT IN MY UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM, A TALK OP FRENCH SOCIETY UNDEB TH
6059.ullertan. CHAPTER I. DOM GERTJSAO DURING used to spend a part of my holidays wit
6060.ot The house with its peaceful, charming, well-known picture. white walls and re
6061.e garden, green and gay as in the spring, and close to it the orchard, with its
6062.he orchard, with its fruit-trees bending beneath their load of red apples and vi
6063.hite sheep, the sounds of whose bleating was faintly heard in the distance. My g
6064.pearance, and me into the little sitting-room on the ground floor, he called his
6065.ervant, Marian, and desired her to bring me a glass of sugared wine, and to take
6066.nd to take my bundle up stairs. hurrying take advantage of this circumstance to
6067.eturn to the religious life by retaining, like most of the members of his Order,
6068.arth, to which he gave the high-sounding name of St. Pierre de Corbie, in rememb
6069.he was certainly the ugliest in arriving in this lovely place. There was somethi
6070.n this lovely place. There was something grim, creature I ever set eyes on. my m
6071.never see her without Her stiff thinking of the characters in the infernal legen
6072.ubs. The approach to it was by a winding road, bordered with willows and poplars
6073.rdered with willows and poplars, forming on both sides a transparent curtain of
6074.obedient, and so little given to talking that she never seemed of her own accord
6075.ad furnished his rooms with the becoming simplicity and substantial comfort of s
6076.ious Houses. Marian excepted, everything about him had a cheerfigure, pleasant a
6077.ished in particular with an unpretending elegance which did not at first strike
6078.r character attracted notice. Everything in it was adapted for a ful, quiet, pea
6079. armchairs, of their noiselessly rolling on the seemed to gather own make my way
6080.y along this unfrequented path, carrying my slender stock of clothes tied in a h
6081.in a handkerchief, and with a travelling stick in my hand, as if I had been a wo
6082.t, at the entrance of the avenue, coming to a stand-still, I looked around me wi
6083.k, each tree, each little rivulet making its w:iy through the thick ;<'d like nn
6084.f vine fagots was lighted in the evening. Vases of Japan china, always filled wi
6085.ls was enlivened by a landscape painting of some historical scene. A door, which
6086.owd of THE PORTRAIT IN MY UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM. IPSS illustrious writers, who hav
6087.It was set of engravings, much a drawing in colored pencils, faded by time, and
6088.ne of Watteau's shepherdesses a trimming of pink ribbons ornamented the long, st
6089. precautionary measures before ascending to thoMarian went on before us, carryin
6090.to thoMarian went on before us, carrying our cloaks, and waited for us at the en
6091.t of icy air was almost al- ways blowing. round and slender waist. Two broad The
6092. for the poor. She insisted on conveying these things in this way, in my of stra
6093.e things in this way, in my of strapping them Gerusac rode. on the back of the q
6094.et little donkey Dom There was something wonderfully captivating about that face
6095.re was something wonderfully captivating about that face a mixture of softness a
6096.I could not raise my eyes without seeing this enchanting creature, who seemed to
6097.e my eyes without seeing this enchanting creature, who seemed to gaze on me with
6098.d to gaze on me with the most bewitching sweetness but when I looked down and sa
6099. with her crabbed hideous face, standing bolt-upright behind Dom Gerusac's arm c
6100.e. ; ; generally made a halt on reaching the above mentioned gorge. The spot wen
6101.came impracticable in ters of a brawling torrent. winter, when the snow conceale
6102.ies of the ground, but in summer nothing could be pleasanter than to walk in tis
6103. the shade of those huge rocks, enjoying the delicious coolness rising from that
6104., enjoying the delicious coolness rising from that ocean of foliage alongside th
6105.ad where she was in the habit of waiting for us, and came forward to assist Dom
6106.t Dom Gerusac to dismount then producing our cloaks, she threw them over our sho
6107. forthwith proceeded on her way, leading the donkey by the bridle. "Beally," my
6108.St. Pierre de Corbie. Once a week during the holidays I used to see him arrive,
6109.ely but from the size of the surrounding walls, and the nunil >er of houses crum
6110.s, and the nunil >er of houses crumbling into ruins, lation it they say, at the
6111. sleeves cut short at the elbow, leaving her bare arms exposed to view. When she
6112. more leisurely along the little winding path, enjoying the wild beauty of that
6113. along the little winding path, enjoying the wild beauty of that Each time I cam
6114.two elm trees, linked their interweaving branches, so as to form in apa single t
6115. hamlet an extensive tract of undulating ground out, over which the eye wandered
6116.er which the eye wandered without taking cognizauce of : was easy to see that it
6117.pire, still tow( red over all the Coring country, was a vast building, bearing t
6118. the Coring country, was a vast building, bearing tr:WB -:id o
6119.ng country, was a vast building, bearing tr:WB -:id oi' mlorne
6120. Till-: roUTHMT IX MY (!N<'1_F.'K DINING-ROOM. 8 is sinco those trees were nfusi
6121.led Monsieur le of buildings, displaying the architectural fea- Marquis and this
6122.d this out; Monsieur le Baron." imposing pile tiuvs of several different epochs.
6123.e succes"O, why," he answered, shrugging his shoulders, as if to say sive eras.
6124.lders, as if to say sive eras. According to him, Koman legions Lad once en- "Who
6125.The encir- suppose nobody knows. " cling walls dated from feudal times, whereas
6126. pavilions 011 each side of the building betokened a comparatively modern CHAPTE
6127.HAPTEB H. erection. In any case, nothing could be more desolate than A VISIT FBO
6128. the local traditions of It hung drawing-room which had strangely taken my fancy
6129.uiries generally met over an old looking-glass, which had the property of impart
6130.ass, which had the property of imparting with was that the history of these grea
6131.-piece two little cups of gether wanting; there were some valuable ones in the c
6132.venteenth baron of Malpeire, the looking-glass, and the cups had all come from t
6133.s of the pretty cups. This notion having once taken read. But, whilst the chroni
6134. seized with ardent curiosity on the ing, I made in the meanwhile an effort to i
6135.tory of the country. One day as figuring in the pages of a novel. By degrees a s
6136. By degrees a singular feelwe were going to Malpeire, I overtook her at the entr
6137.e, I overtook her at the entrance of ing grew out of this fancy. By dint of gazi
6138.rew out of this fancy. By dint of gazing on that portrait, the pass, and, instea
6139.trait, the pass, and, instead of getting out of her way, as I usually I really f
6140.ttle ornaments "What a beautiful morning it is !" I said as I came up to her; wh
6141. fondly imagined, with my elbows resting on my desk, that I to avoid speaking to
6142.ing on my desk, that I to avoid speaking to me. But nowise daunted, I began agai
6143.d it sometimes very.long and my tir- ing for your poor legs ?" " No, sir," she r
6144. castle on that height, I said, pointing to the ruins. "Were is on canvas, and c
6145.ruins. "Were is on canvas, and composing verses in her praise. I can only plead
6146.en." " So young that I recollect nothing about it," she growled the lovely creat
6147. hunout in a surly manner, and gathering up her bundle and her dred years ago, a
6148.ntly reached years of discretion putting a direct question to my uncle but I cou
6149.m about it, I was so afraid of betraying my unacbetter success, I cross-examined
6150.my courage suddenly rose, and pretending to in those times, I .mean when it was
6151.s people's faces seem as if they looking glass that is " were mode of green wax.
6152. ebony, Once, however, as I was standing in the shade before the inlaid with sil
6153.seem to be very old," I answered, gazing up- suppose those things came out of so
6154.e. As to the peasants, they knew nothing of the local history of their districts
6155.rences of former times. As to the rising generation, I have no doubt they would
6156.nng gentlemen are apt to call everything not iiiim." Dom Gifi-usac hail turned r
6157. too. Don't you think so he was speaking of, ami, pointing tot!: V I felt myself
6158.ink so he was speaking of, ami, pointing tot!: V I felt myself getting hot in th
6159., pointing tot!: V I felt myself getting hot in the face as I thought of her bol
6160.e face as I thought of her boldly coming into the drawing-room, with her ni on h
6161.ht of her boldly coming into the drawing-room, with her ni on her arm, sticking
6162.g-room, with her ni on her arm, sticking herself behind nisac's chair, or "That
6163. "That portrait," I exclaimed, " pouring out wine for his guest with that fright
6164.half rubbed out, and in very bad drawing but the frame is really very handsome.
6165.int of the Wan- "Dear me, no; not dering Jew. This speech made me shudder, but I
6166.rederic, come; the gentleman is arriving he is there in the avenue. " "Where is
6167. "His carriage!" cried Babelou, laughing. " Why, it ia like your uncle's carriag
6168.t was The ambassador was actually riding up to the door on a small ass, capariso
6169.uncil, that is to whole suite consisting of a peasant, who carried his portmante
6170.ubert will be here to-morrow. Everything must be ready in good timeYou will, I a
6171. Maximin, as you used to claimed, taking his arm. Do you know, my dear Thomas, t
6172.n her short manner, and, without waiting for further instructions, she returned
6173.be to see him He is glad ! said, turning to me, my old friend. ; We began our st
6174. priest, but his elder brother happening have been here before." And he looked a
6175.e said to have left it. I was just going to beIt was on All "About two years aft
6176.Saints' Day. happen American hat, taking leave of us at the entrance door, just
6177.bert smiled somewhat sadly, and lowering fore mounting his horse. O, he was a fa
6178.mewhat sadly, and lowering fore mounting his horse. O, he was a famous horseman,
6179. de his voice, answered, BO good-looking." Corbie, just " Was that a tune ago ?"
6180.France, and was in the habit of speaking t peace. Since then, his talents and fi
6181.fidelity have met with their ed the King reward. The king has heaped honors and
6182. with their ed the King reward. The king has heaped honors and distinctions on h
6183.rosper him His dress was as unpretending as possible bit of red ribbon. worthy o
6184.f his good fortune." The idea of finding myself in the presence of this great ma
6185. expressed Not but there was at of being presented to him, kept me awake all the
6186.d-nature and shrewdness. the first thing I did in the morning was to stand on th
6187.ss. the first thing I did in the morning was to stand on the ter- the same time
6188.tand on the ter- the same time something commanding in his appearance, and I was
6189. ter- the same time something commanding in his appearance, and I was greatly pe
6190.tion for d in the warfare of conflicting passions, aud gone of course, that lie
6191.n se,arch of a donkey and a boy to bring me here. I found what I wanted at a far
6192.led I 7A hond proof, r MY UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM. up Fortunately Marian had been ab
6193.n had been able to attend to the cooking to the last moment, and to give directi
6194.tions to her aid and a firm unhesitating step. presented me to our guest, and th
6195. in arm. M. de Ch.-impaubert was turning towards the garden, but Dom Gerusac dre
6196.other " It is too hot out of way, saying: doors; we had better go into My uncle
6197.f wine really fit to beset before a king. the library." M. de Champaubert ate sp
6198.paubert ate sparingly and quick, talking all tho " " your library, my time, wher
6199.ncient and modern au- pleasure of having opposite to him so welcome a guest. ily
6200. I could not swallow a mouthful. Nothing could But, first of all, will you let m
6201.on. The Marquis's questions evisomething to drink ? I am dying of thirst." My un
6202.tions evisomething to drink ? I am dying of thirst." My uncle went to the door o
6203.y face which I had " Now for been gazing on with such rapture for the last six w
6204.spaired of ever It was Babe- discovering. He could tell me there was no doubt of
6205.id not appear. lou who came in, carrying on a large tray a bottle of old wine, v
6206.ge tray a bottle of old wine, very thing I most ardently desired to know. But ho
6207.pproach it ? These thoughts were running in my " That is perfect," M. de Champau
6208.vor. I don't know anywhere a of marrying?" more refreshing fruit." "I beg your p
6209.anywhere a of marrying?" more refreshing fruit." "I beg your pardon," was the re
6210.uncle said with a smile. only on looking up at the picture over the chimney, add
6211.olfellow " We have portrait said, making room for Dom Gerusac by his side. M. de
6212.er-time Babelou came to me in the dining- room, looking aghast. ' "Mercy on do ?
6213. came to me in the dining- room, looking aghast. ' "Mercy on do ? us, sir !" she
6214.ir !" she exclaimed, " what are we going to Marian has been working so hard sinc
6215. are we going to Marian has been working so hard since yesterday, that now she i
6216.arden, and my Tincle was proudly slewing off his flowers and vegetables to M. de
6217.Gerusac said. "As we are about recalling all our old recollections, I am glad "
6218.ke of your nephew, who sits there gazing so intently on my betrothed that it wou
6219.mpt at a cough. My uncle, after emptying his glass at one gulp, laid both his ha
6220.ture before my eyes." ready." The dining-room had a window down to the ground. I
6221.ere drawn up, and a bright light shining first. iii the room; the gildings of th
6222.ubert entered in the rays of the setting sun. and walked toward the chimney, his
6223.round to me and picture over the looking-glass. CHAPTER in MONSIEtTB IiK MABQTJI
6224.colored " the mirror. The day was waning. I lighted the candles on both sides of
6225.cle bought it at , D " With that looking-glass and those two "I believe so, mons
6226.emigration. " ; relief to the enchanting face, tints, and lent a vague which see
6227.you remember, my dear Thomas, my writing to you a ; THE PORTRAIT letter, in I.V
6228.ORTRAIT letter, in I.V MY CYCLE'S DINING-ROOM. said this with a smile, which mad
6229.me. which I mentioned that I was leaving Paris and going iTiiey to the south of
6230.ioned that I was leaving Paris and going iTiiey to the south of Fr:i "It uncle a
6231. received from you, and, without meaning my was written, if I mistake not, befor
6232.f August. But I must begin by explaining to yon the origin of the friendship whi
6233.n a pretty girl," my uncle said, raising his eyebrows, with the kind of look a p
6234.ubert continued. " I had been travelling eight days on the dusty road in an unco
6235. and the Pit-omontese, who were ravaging the low the Marquis de Chamcountry. In
6236.gues from here, and succeeded in getting him he died on the transported to the C
6237.me afterwards, the Baron de Malfollowing day. After this double of C . peire was
6238. widows spent the year of their mourning together. Subsequently they were oblige
6239.turn transmitted them to Although living at the opposite extremes of their child
6240.mmunicate to interesting domestic event ; and on all respecA tiv
6241.ial alliance between the li nip-standing two families had not ceased to exist, b
6242.ot a single girl was appointment. During born in the house of Champaubert, and t
6243.ed in infancy. I had often in my running water in every direction. The present r
6244. for horses and mules. I was This riding, and a mule-driver followed with my lug
6245.ts when we go to mass. " I was expecting to hear some tale about robbers in that
6246.about robbers in that cut-throat-looking place, but my guide only said, This is
6247.. When the young girls who were carrying the body arrived at this spot they were
6248.ted a little. Curd had left off chanting the Libera not Domine. Nobody spoke, an
6249.except the murmur of the torrent flowing through the ravine. All at once a littl
6250.hy, made me shudder. I had been dwelling incessantly during my journey on though
6251.. I had been dwelling incessantly during my journey on thoughts of love and marr
6252.bled to think how near I had been losing my bride. The wild scenery and the gloo
6253.d the gloomy grandeur of the surrounding country worked on my imagination I was
6254.woods, the delicious air I was breathing. The It was in this frame of mind that
6255.ost years ago, to be of the old charming persona in the world. He is a nobleman
6256.en to every wind. had altered in nothing the character of the old baronial resiT
6257.ns 77//v PORTRAIT IN MY I UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM. and walked with groat dignity in
6258.oo much 11^,1 to attend much to anything bnt the one predominating thought i or
6259.ch to anything bnt the one predominating thought i or hand-rail. i When ,it T ar
6260.n ,it T arrived the sun was just setting. .ving the bridle of the dr.. my horse
6261. arrived the sun was just setting. .ving the bridle of the dr.. my horse to the
6262. horse to the guide, I walked ou looking about for some one to After going throu
6263.ooking about for some one to After going through a vaulted passage, I came into
6264.ed to bo uninhabited. After once walking .round the court, I ventured to push op
6265.w before me the first steps of a winding staircase and a niche in the wall with
6266.the Blessed Virgin surI went up, feeling my way as I rounded with bouquets. my m
6267.sound made me start, and I kept watching the door in hopes every moment of seein
6268.the door in hopes every moment of seeing Mile, de Mulpeiro appear, though I coul
6269. pronounce her name. but it out shooting, OB usual,' Madame de Malpeire said In
6270.en with me ? Noascended, and on reaching the first landing-place found myself sh
6271.ended, and on reaching the first landing-place found myself she insisted. Mile.
6272.myself she insisted. Mile. Boinet, bring the at the entrance of a spacious and l
6273.he League. A little table here, and ring that we may send for hot water. a table
6274.ter. a table. By its The lady in waiting pushed a little round stand hi front of
6275.i front of her solitary lamp was burning at the corner of between two lighted ca
6276.y, with its heavy mantlepiece projecting over the hearth case and took out of it
6277." " could hear the sharp, shrill yapping of a little dog who was O, I felt sure
6278., I felt sure of it !" I cried, clasping my hands on my no doubt at the sound of
6279.the sound of a strange forehead. barking furiously, I knocked to give notice of
6280.ire poured it ance; but without allowing me time to give an account of out into
6281.wards the door at the other end, calling out, self, she said, Mile. Boinet, will
6282.felt I changed color, but I said nothing. My agitation seemlow curtsey. When ed
6283. mentioned my name she assumed a smiling, discreet expres- pered, with a smile,
6284.wed her to have been born within hearing of I deserve nothing the bells of Notre
6285.born within hearing of I deserve nothing the bells of Notre Dame, she said: "I b
6286.rrival." A moment afterwards the folding- I shall not prove unworthy in your dau
6287.d, and Madame la Barouue herself, coming forward, piness that has been promised
6288., I beg you a thousand par- I was saying this, Mile, de Malpeire came in by the
6289.show you up. Her I apologized for having arrived till to-morrow." short and seem
6290.pectedly, and, Madame de Malpeire having invited mother, to relieve her embarras
6291.d her back to her room. When and leading her forward, said in a playful manner,
6292.This is that I could not help exclaiming: something marvel- seen more of the wor
6293.t I could not help exclaiming: something marvel- seen more of the world I have n
6294.ilous, Kalon of one of the most charming hotels of the Faubourg >St. ment, to wh
6295.ountain!" "Well," she answered, laughing, "I have con- expression of countenance
6296.posdens of the Luxembourg, I see nothing from my window but sible not to be irre
6297.ried 'Here I express the most bewitching sweetness ? Yes, she was wonam, lodged
6298.with my hand. again, and, after inviting me to sit down, took up on her knees be
6299. little spaniel, who still kept growling at me sot/o voce, and zled by this fair
6300. a gracefully indolent attitude. The ing the whole of that evening I must have a
6301.itude. The ing the whole of that evening I must have appeared a perfect Baronne
6302.hat old-fashioned, but it was in keeping with the style of her What with delicat
6303. "Madame de Malpeire was quietly sipping her coffee, and flounced petticoat, spr
6304.offee, and flounced petticoat, spreading over two stiff projecting took upon her
6305.oat, spreading over two stiff projecting took upon herself the whole burden of c
6306. sir," My dear love,' she said, glancing over her daughter's dress, 'I she quick
6307. 'I she quickly replied ' ; I am nothing at all.' 'I am ' de- iauame de lighted
6308.ack of your head, Malpeire said, playing with her sinifl'-box us she spoke. Fur
6309.to it, and as to serious has hnd nothing to do with your toilet. You really look
6310. glass in which I had been contemplating for the advise you, Madame la Baronue,
6311.simple tortoise-shell comb, her blooming color, and the fine- almost more flower
6312.assure you, a more brilliant and smiling picture. white print. Her eyes met mine
6313.t the roads which lead to these charming spots of annoyance. are not so smooth a
6314.ou, Madame la Malpeire added, addressing herself to me. we should have company t
6315. me. we should have company this evening, or she would have Baronne, I would try
6316.h-heeled shoes.' she exclaimed, laughing; you do not know what you advise ' Made
6317.uld not quickly replied. think of taking a step beyond my room with my morocco s
6318.tenance. There ground, and then striking together the high wooden heels, cov- ar
6319.rple-headed aconite and all Then passing by a sudden transition to graver though
6320.o. bhe exclaimed: It is a terrible thing to live as we do here, ex- suppose you
6321.' cried Madame de Malpeire, he is coming into tude and ennui with patience, beca
6322.e, because I was young, and with turning towards the half open window BO many ye
6323.noise of footsteps, and the loud barking of several dogs. to slip by. M. le Baro
6324.s have been will- heard in the adjoining room, and then the Baron made his aping
6325. room, and then the Baron made his aping to take me to Paris. Every spring and e
6326. aping to take me to Paris. Every spring and every autumn the pearance, with his
6327. have had a great many children, fowling piece in his hand. Had I met him anywhe
6328. Boinet with me, Idon't know what I cing me, inquired after my father. Then, tur
6329. inquired after my father. Then, turning to the should have done; I must have di
6330. my little girl? Guess what game I bring its mercy, Madame la Baronne, spared yo
6331. you complain of must Malpeire, slipping her hand into the bag. I have three whi
6332.Baron, in a tone of triumph. and bending down to fasten a bow of ribbon which ha
6333.ch has kept me on the run the been lying on the table in her daughter's hair, sh
6334.aughter's hair, she added, whole morning. I should have ended by losing it, if i
6335.e morning. I should have ended by losing it, if it had don't like ; ' !' ' ' ' '
6336.hat hare in the back, and it weuttumbing down inall the learned men of his time.
6337.is, Pinatel are not particularly amusing, her greatest pleasure is to read went
6338.d brought me back the As he was emptying his bag, the them. To-day she has spent
6339.. To-day she has spent the whole morning, poring over creature, and here it is.
6340. she has spent the whole morning, poring over creature, and here it is. a huge v
6341.ho won the pewter plate at the wrestling match last year.' 'Pinatel?' Mile, de M
6342.xactly so, the Baron answered displaying his spoils; 'he ' 1 ' represent ' de Ma
6343.nt ' de Malpeire asked, without touching it. A sportsman with his gun in his han
6344.red. 'No, papa; it is a shepherd keeping his Hock, and leaning on his /'///: I'D
6345.a shepherd keeping his Hock, and leaning on his /'///: I'D STRAIT J.\' .i/r / 9
6346. amuse It is a sort of method of telling fortunes with tience. I daresay soiao p
6347. mine? Haul. in Home dirty shed, sitting on the straw amongst his sheep.' (), by
6348.he put the little she answered, laughing and looking at her daughter. We Yes, ve
6349.ittle she answered, laughing and looking at her daughter. We Yes, very likely,'
6350.t frown con'. ."ted into my bag to bring me luck.' " He then took off his belt,
6351. easy- leave to withdraw, and curtseying to me left the room without damask spea
6352.me left the room without damask speaking. 'Ah, Madame,' I exclaimed. 'lam sadly
6353.ly afraid chair, with his elbows resting on the pearl-colored cushions. Madame d
6354.de Malpeiro sat opposite to him, playing the cards do not return a favorable ans
6355.t! with her fan, and now and then taking a pinch of Spanish snuff she quickly re
6356.old. You may easily imagine what holding out the pack to me, she added, 'Cut, if
6357. waistcoat, his leather gaiters reaching dame de Malpeire was in ecstasies; 'it
6358.sies; 'it seemed,' she said ' like being in Paris again. above his knees, his su
6359.efinements. I looked on in said, looking We have kept you up much too late. It i
6360. have got into this bad habit of sitting ing to the style still in use at that t
6361.e got into this bad habit of sitting ing to the style still in use at that time,
6362.me, and the conversation up.' "According to the old fashioned ideas of hospitali
6363.ighted me to my room, and, before taking leave of me for the called an audacious
6364.atically, 'we have emotion, 'Your coming here has made me very happy. ' nothing
6365.g here has made me very happy. ' nothing to apprehend. The King is master, and h
6366. happy. ' nothing to apprehend. The King is master, and he will show night, my d
6367. Mile, de Malpeire's image kept pursuing me, and word, he will crush the factiou
6368.the dream. But I considered this leaning towards the new morning. The lovely pha
6369.red this leaning towards the new morning. The lovely phantom which had haunted m
6370. and I ed with the first rays of dawning light, and the delightful hopes and ant
6371.ipations which had filled my mind during the night, was not at all anxious as t
6372.om. gave way to an unaccountable feeling of depression. I was in By Madame de Ma
6373.d dressed. He took a chair, and, sitting down by and with marked coldness of man
6374.ut of spirits. there was a half -smiling, half-dreamy expression in her face fee
6375. are with regard to your views in coming here. You which enchanted me. have quit
6376. gold and purple silk, there is anything about my daughter's looks which does no
6377.ld of the little figyou touch that thing,' . i I 1 ' I ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' : The har
6378.easy little sonata with her eyes looking up at the ceiling, and her head moving
6379. with her eyes looking up at the ceiling, and her head moving to and fro in time
6380.g up at the ceiling, and her head moving to and fro in time with her performance
6381.curtain. I could see her She was leaning her forehead on her hands, and profile.
6382.rehead on her hands, and profile. gazing through the half -closed shutters on th
6383.n I exclaimed, 'she is the most charming person I ever beheld If I can obtain he
6384., with a pleased smile, 'we have nothing to do but to draw up the settlements an
6385.tlements and fix the day for the wedding.' 'You do not antici'No pate, then, any
6386.y, Madame la Baronne?' I said, shuffling the cards. iot at picquet,' she answere
6387.als for her. Allow me a few days, during which I shall endeavor to win her own c
6388.t one st^nci of its ramparts was missing, ami it contained treasures of antiquar
6389.stall of black As the baron stood gazing on tin they may deprive us never turn t
6390.ment, I found her alone. "' Good morning, my dear Count,' she said. 'The Baron v
6391. of what passed between you this morning. 1 was longing to tell you how charmed
6392. between you this morning. 1 was longing to tell you how charmed I am with the d
6393., but they can .al worn.' She by turning her head away with a look of nnv 'Do te
6394. of This was said with a smile bordering on a sneer. competitors. 'I shall carry
6395.' I exclaimed. You will do no such thing," she said again, smiling, you will not
6396. no such thing," she said again, smiling, you will not even try to do so.' What
6397., in the first I shall tiy my by winning my daughter's affections.' 4 to do so,'
6398.a loss for opportunities of ingratiating yourself,' replied Made Malpeire. 'I wo
6399.e pewter dish your father was mentioning yesterday. Allow me to say that this is
6400.rday. Allow me to say that this is doing too great an honor in my opinion to tha
6401.e " Mademoiselle de Malpeire was walking slowly under the led to an argument, an
6402.t, and I contented myself with answering, I of what used to be called a pleached
6403.ower on one side of the parterre, ending with an arbor, if at have always lived,
6404.ght green, up which a few creep- feeling when yoti have once taken your place in
6405. taken your place in it, ai -re twisting their sickly shoots, could be dignified
6406.a while ;-ive attitude, her head leaning on her hand, her elbow your solitary ho
6407.ned her in the arbor. I dread everything that could lead to my going away from T
6408.d everything that could lead to my going away from The instant she saw me, Mile,
6409.y hand to escort you back to the drawing* never to leave the old fortress where
6410.n, I had room?' every chance of becoming her husband, if only from the lack She
6411. for her elsewhere; and tli In of living in retirement with so charming a compan
6412.of living in retirement with so charming a companion in this rut, which must hav
6413.e peace and tranquillity yon enniiYiting with silver and gold lace. i.iece of em
6414.tence Everywhere else your 1 kept gazing upon it as if it had been a chef d'ceuv
6415.e most profound admiration. After having carefully sight could secure you. If th
6416.her for whom able society I was speaking of just now ? It would be far betshe in
6417.on than to witness the it,' si spreading out the piece of silk on her knees, in
6418.o judge of the effect of a bit of edging she had been new riyimt': has already d
6419.e blows. Its ranks Is there, then, going to be a tour- are already thinning; the
6420.going to be a tour- are already thinning; the nobility emigrates or withdraws in
6421..' f THE PORTRAIT IN " MY UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM. of ants, and 11 You would be not
6422.onlcl like my mother, forever regretting tin; parties, all the amusements its, t
6423.all the amusements its, the card-playing and to.' marched to the assault of the
6424.ult of the Cufttean , de Maus- liuilding in the mo. you have been accustomed 'It
6425.rew back to the farpresent my regretting anything.' She thest end of the bench o
6426.to the farpresent my regretting anything.' She thest end of the bench on which w
6427.nd of the bench on which we were sitting, and shrugged her shoulders with a scor
6428.he peasants had dispersed, after burning and laying everything to waste. They ar
6429. had dispersed, after burning and laying everything to waste. They are difficult
6430.sed, after burning and laying everything to waste. They are difficult times, but
6431.nder her more capif Then, without taking any farther notice of me, as tivating.
6432.ng any farther notice of me, as tivating. tired of conversation, she leant on he
6433. through that sort of lattice sat gazing on the landscape. fidence that could no
6434. neck, at the back of which were hanging the ends of a black ribbon. A rather lo
6435.er long silence ensued. I was watch- ing her with anxiety and admiration, not ve
6436.th anxiety and admiration, not venturing to speak for the moment she would turn
6437.ould turn first, but impatiently waiting her head towards me. She had not change
6438.air. I could almost perceive the beating of her heart through the folds of the m
6439. covered her breast. She leant trembling against the trellis work, as if ready t
6440.m the seat and stood behind her, looking over her shoulder and trying to make ou
6441.er, looking over her shoulder and trying to make out the cause of that extraordi
6442.irection. There tion. was no one passing under the castle walls. Everything was
6443.ssing under the castle walls. Everything was quiet and silent about the place, a
6444.ace, and farther off I could see nothing but women washing their linen near a fo
6445.ff I could see nothing but women washing their linen near a fountain, where my m
6446.ntain, where my mule-driver was watering his beasts, and beyond the village only
6447.ere, and one or two goat-herds following in the wake of their wandering flocks.
6448.following in the wake of their wandering flocks. " All this lasted but a short m
6449. face an instant with her it the burning blush pocket-handkerchief. When she rem
6450.hey did; we shall our religion, our King, and our rights! These old walls have b
6451.After dinner the Baron said he was going to take a little turn with his gun in t
6452.r sir,' said Madame de Malpeire, seating herself comfortably in her arm-chair, '
6453. in her arm-chair, 'have you been paying I have, madame, but I am very much out
6454.some time before you succeed in touching the heart of this obdurate fair one, bu
6455. I can see no objection to your marrying familiar with civil wars. fight for ' '
6456.ich had disturbed my mind in the morning recurred, to me, and I said, in a hesi
6457.elf has ' ' already succeeded in winning her affections ?' At these v, Madame de
6458. who sometimes do us the honor of dining with us after noticed anything. And ind
6459.of dining with us after noticed anything. And indeed I remained in complete doub
6460.ined in complete doubt, a day's shooting with him. M. de la Tusette, for instanc
6461.a Tusette, for instance, who not knowing how to account for what I had observed,
6462.Verdache, one of our glass manufacturing nobles; M. do o'clock struck, and the d
6463.lock struck, and the dinner-bell ringing, I offered to lead Cadarasse, too, who
6464.a the garden. Malpeire was thus allaying my apprecurtsey, just touched the sleev
6465.rted to public Clarissa Harlowe escaping from her father's house, which affairs,
6466. the events which had taken place during the last neither as to size or beauty f
6467.ese disorders has been felt even carving which encircled it. Madame de Malpeire'
6468.hole neighborhood. you think it is doing too much honor to that stupid engraving
6469. too much honor to that stupid engraving spirit, and Each fresh piece of politic
6470.med; 'and how does however, my own doing, and you will understand my reasons men
6471.me positively ill. The Baron was looking out for something carrying on their bac
6472. The Baron was looking out for something carrying on their back the whole of the
6473.n was looking out for something carrying on their back the whole of their stock-
6474.ke it their business to haunt was making the round of the neighboring chateaux t
6475. was making the round of the neighboring chateaux the village fairs and festival
6476.d festivals for the purpose of competing for employment. He took it into his hea
6477.ent to Paris for a prizes at the running and wrestling matches. persons circulat
6478.or a prizes at the running and wrestling matches. persons circulate is transmitt
6479.eness taken, but after the first sitting I was Instantly the peasants in the pla
6480. out a he brought me .; here, ami making me sit down in id, 'Our Italian painter
6481.able but for tho art Boinei of improving their flavor with sugar and wine. She p
6482.at ho had the beautiful idea of dressing me up like a Koman or a Turk, or I don'
6483.face . She has neat, handy ways of doing tilings which services invaluable. I wa
6484.was, and Boinet bent herself of sticking that print into it. I locked up the box
6485.Malpeire exclaimed, 'what is the meaning of these fine phrases ? Where have you
6486.to follow her into the boudoir. standing reading near a little bookcase, the old
6487.w her into the boudoir. standing reading near a little bookcase, the old Bailie
6488.e, but without any attempt at concealing it. When her mother told her that I was
6489.hen her mother told her that I was going to take her portrait, she evinced neith
6490.issatisfaction, but carelessly twist ing up her fair long curls, she answered, l
6491. dresses your hair I will get everything tinued, I remained alone in the boudoir
6492..' ; said,' 'to try and take by marrying a man inferior to her in mind and educa
6493.ed anger. I was surprised at her seeming so annoyed at her mother's words, but m
6494.hts of this perverse but too captivating girl; it might have saved her from a te
6495.. LAZABE. ' ' temptation of ascertaining what book it was Mile. de Malpeire had
6496.t was Mile. de Malpeire had been reading. I found it was Rousseau's Ao.Tc/fe Hel
6497.d looked up at the picture. After gazing for a little while sadly and intently a
6498.nd a C. at " the corner near the heading. " How carefully you must have examined
6499.tions on this discovery. only regretting that chance had happened to throw it in
6500. active when once she hit upon something to do. Under her superintendence the li
6501.nd, moreover, it is time for our /. King the bell, that Boinet may send us up ca
6502. yellow peaches which I ate this morning with so much relish. Mile. Boinet took
6503.fter another on :,int of a fork, a''ling and cutting them in quarith a silver kn
6504. on :,int of a fork, a''ling and cutting them in quarith a silver knit'c, she po
6505.mas, to a description of all the feeling's of my infatuated heart during three o
6506. feeling's of my infatuated heart during three or four days which were spent in
6507.r days which were spent in contemplating that lovely face, and in striving to re
6508.lating that lovely face, and in striving to re- "But it was an " and was, produc
6509.es. for the The Baronne was in a sitting generally lasted several hours, state o
6510.ked leisurely into tho room, and sitting in that way. down at a little distance
6511. herself up in her stiff corsage, fixing her eyes upon me with a defiant expreso
6512.ATA A" A" 7>/A7.V<7- out with an amusing impatience, 'smile, my dear, smile then
6513.s unconsciously, with Two the enchanting smile I have reproduced in the portrait
6514.d in the portrait. or three times during these long sittings, I remained for a l
6515.d my devoted attentions end by softening that proud heart, and I began to think
6516.e. " The Baron did not know I was making his daughter's porMadame de Malpeire in
6517.roper respect. 'You are not really going to regret that rustic ball, I hop e,' M
6518.n a tone of indulgent reproach. Charming partners, upon my words, those hot-face
6519.pon my words, those hot-faced perspiring fellows, dressed as in the heart of win
6520. suppressed irritation, There is nothing coarse about these men but their dress.
6521.ir dress. ' 1 ' The him, and was keeping the secret with all the discretion she
6522.s not difficult, for he was out shooting all day, and in the evening ho did not
6523.out shooting all day, and in the evening ho did not think of inquiring what we s
6524.he evening ho did not think of inquiring what we simplicity of their manners is
6525. a little affected laugh. had been doing during his absence. When my chef d'ceuv
6526.le affected laugh. had been doing during his absence. When my chef d'ceuvre was
6527.ame and hung it up myself in the drawing-room, opposite to the arm-chair in whic
6528. As soon as the sun had set that evening, Madame de Malpeire desired the shutter
6529.d the lustre which hung from the ceiling to be lighted up, as well as the branch
6530.herself that my coronet. What a charming idea Christian name was Maximin. Madame
6531. the blue embroidered scarf, and turning to the Baron, I asked, 'Will the conque
6532.s. This does not commit us to any tiling." He led his wife back to the drawing-r
6533.ng." He led his wife back to the drawing-room. I remained a minute behind with M
6534.nd with Mile, de Malpeire, and trembling with ' emotion, I whispered to her, To-
6535.gram. sent." She (brew back, and looking me straight in the face, ' she said in
6536.spair and passion. "The Baron was coming home just at that minute. His wife she
6537.he turned her back upon me. tlie drawing-room. Oh, what a beautiful picture !' h
6538. picture !' he ex"Early the next morning, Mile. Boinet came to let me know How l
6539.e dressed as if to hear Mass at the King's chapel, in a gown of You do not ask I
6540.n her Here he is,' his wife said, taking me by the head adorned with ribbons, th
6541.eit is modesty which prevents him coming forward." luind The good old man embrac
6542.ughter, my ear, I have not said anything to her yet. There is no and held out hi
6543.nday clothes stood in groups, conversing in u noisv already arrived," the Baron
6544.ved," the Baron subjoined. from shooting, I saw them all flocking this way, gips
6545.. from shooting, I saw them all flocking this way, gipsies, horse- manner under
6546.air the day before it opens. The bowling green, the mass of people was still mor
6547.idi folk from the low country are coming up in cRjwds, and when I observed that
6548.their buttonhabitants of the neighboring villages swarm here to- holes, or in th
6549. to be !l:e, custom,' In- added, tinning to me, her. peared, all eyes wore direc
6550.s, but 't. them wero few Notwithstanding tin. nor privileges of the nobility, th
6551. sound of those titles and high-sounding appellations. I looked anxiously at, Mi
6552. answered, with a distressed.' faltering voice, nnd turning away her head. ' pie
6553.istressed.' faltering voice, nnd turning away her head. ' piece of onken wood-wo
6554.o represent. A funeral -siou was halting at the Pass of Malpeire; a coffin stood
6555.d. ne de Malpeire saw that I was looking at that simple rial, and with a sudden
6556.rial, and with a sudden burst of feeling she said, glancing at her daughter, The
6557.dden burst of feeling she said, glancing at her daughter, They were actually goi
6558.t her daughter, They were actually going to bury her alive !' And God restored h
6559.o one ' ' nize the scene " I saw nothing, I remarked nothing more, and yet I am
6560.cene " I saw nothing, I remarked nothing more, and yet I am sure that something
6561.g more, and yet I am sure that something must have passed there which ought to L
6562. "I me to lead her did so with a beating heart. Mile de Malpeire suffered down t
6563.d that picture made as a thanks-offering ?' ' ' I worked it ' my- streamed out,
6564.d it ' my- streamed out, and was waiting she answered. It took me a year to fini
6565. and his daughter on the other. Pointing to a What does he say ?' whispered Mada
6566.ith the we can see from there everything that goes on as well as beOur arrival h
6567.amongst the crowd. up the aisle, smiling in a condescending manner, her feathers
6568.up the aisle, smiling in a condescending manner, her feathers scarf you have tak
6569.ble to embroider. It is of no use waving to and fro, and her high-heeled shoes r
6570.ro, and her high-heeled shoes resounding on for me to speak to them in French. Y
6571.ds her with a matter to them, my darling.' 'It is already done,' she anmalevolen
6572.of hostility assumed a more this evening.' we shall be open character. Notwithst
6573.shall be open character. Notwithstanding the sanctity of the place, claimed the
6574.the place, claimed the Baronne, stepping into her chair ' self, The little band
6575.ame de Malpeire, who was quietly reading Lu her prayer-book, looked up surprised
6576.n an excited tone. The Baron was looking very pale, aud scanned the crowd with a
6577.ed the crowd with a haughty and frowning countenance. Fortunately, the priest wi
6578.k waistcoat : thronged, the mob pressing upon us somewhat insolently. Still ther
6579.was no absolute rudeness, no threatening expressions. ' I leave you to take care
6580.f to place herself under it, and turning towards ' The his protection, the said
6581.forced his way through the mob, jostling colossus obeyed. and thrusting everybod
6582. jostling colossus obeyed. and thrusting everybody aside, and tlms clearing a pa
6583.sting everybody aside, and tlms clearing a passage for As soon as we were out of
6584..he turned round, and us. without saying a word went back to his companions. " W
6585.vague, cursory manner. anxiety was ining as the moment approached for the public
6586.tation with all this in go ? If the King does not provide a remedy, his nobles w
6587.our opinion,' cried the Baronne, putting her head We shall remain at home, and o
6588.le. Do you know Boinet heard them saying behind her that in all the My other par
6589.nce my honorary rights. Of these nothing but violence shall deprive me. " As we
6590.rnoon, however, I succeeded in detaining her on tho down into the garden, and sa
6591.urUa i THE PORTRAIT IN MY UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM. me ? How can T make myself worthy
6592.mi aa she hurried on without ' answering, I added, Do let me speak to you of n Y
6593.i' ithbox. This little miniature hanging . ' led up nil f ! front of ' my hand,'
6594.y miud. With a vague but violent feeling of jealousy I exWho is it you prefer cl
6595.e angles of this portion of the building, which was entirely devoted to Mndame d
6596.apartments, was a little turret, jutting out beyond the wall and overhanging a p
6597.ting out beyond the wall and overhanging a precipice, the bottom of which was on
6598.ar it the Baronue stopped, and, pointing to the balcony with her gold- headed ca
6599. look out of thai window without feeling giddy. daughter's nerves are MADEMOISEI
6600. to speak to the Baron that very evening. We had only to draw up the contract on
6601.to draw up the contract on the following morning, and in three days I could be m
6602.up the contract on the following morning, and in three days I could be married t
6603.de Malpeire. It was whilst I was sitting by the Baronne near the parapet, watchi
6604.y the Baronne near the parapet, watching the games on the village green, that I
6605.n My mine. I have often found her musing on a moonlight evening with her elbows
6606. found her musing on a moonlight evening with her elbows resting on the edge of
6607.oonlight evening with her elbows resting on the edge of that swallow's nest.' I
6608.s over,' the Baroune pole. said, peeping through the sticks of her fan. The vict
6609.victor is proclaimed, and he is crossing the square with his train. They will be
6610.uare with his train. They will be coming up here. Let us go in. It soon became d
6611.ere the fair was held, and the crowd ing light of their torches formed a curious
6612.of their torches formed a curious moving illumination pressed tumultuously round
6613., so room we saw parties of men parading about the village, with a to call them,
6614.ed in the drummer at their head, singing various patriotic songs, and a rays of
6615.triotic songs, and a rays of the setting sun a gigantic pewter dish. At the oppo
6616. numerous band of boys and girls dancing on the green. In The Abbat extremity a
6617.ver took her eyes off that scene. lowing him. I am come to take M. le Baron's or
6618.he Abbat himself and his I kept watching her, with feelings of jealousy, anger a
6619.ation. 'Come,' said the Baronue, smiling, 'let us go and you.' "'Look, my dear C
6620.me with us, my love,' she added, turning to her games are going to begin. " Two
6621.he added, turning to her games are going to begin. " Two half-naked men entered
6622.Mile, de Malpeire followed them, holding in her lists, and seized one an. hand t
6623.tremble. silently withdrew from the ring. " upright, and awaited the next combat
6624.resively occupied the centre of the ring, and were one after an- fore, alone in
6625.one after an- fore, alone in the drawing-room, standing near a window, and other
6626.ore, alone in the drawing-room, standing near a window, and other rolled in the
6627.uts of the mob, who unconsciously gazing on the dark plain. There was no moon, g
6628.een in the sky. The garden and according to the more or less strength and activi
6629.ength and activity they evin- everything beyond it was veiled in profound obscur
6630. a slight yawn, It must be owned, musing, which gradually softened my resentful
6631. gradually softened my resentful feeling. The kind this is a little monotonous,
6632.rt a paroxysm of sure to end by throwing them nil down, as he did last and anger
6633.l is extraordinary,' the dint of turning over in my miud the cruel words she had
6634.y mentioned thut this As 1 was indulging in parterre was if such was her will he
6635.<;-i;(io.M. 'I shall go a figure pasping slowly under the window, keeping oloso
6636.pasping slowly under the window, keeping oloso to the like some one feeling his
6637.eping oloso to the like some one feeling his way in the 6638.at that it disappeared without my having been able to discern which way it had f
6639.n able to discern which way it had fling the cards. down mul Sri-.' tlu- B'>i-on
6640.l Sri-.' tlu- B'>i-on cried, was nothing extraordinary of his sleep, '.Dun': mov
6641. while to interrupt your game.' starting up on* Champanfo He had ' moment afterw
6642.bells of the parish church begun to ling. It the tocsin,' I exclaimed. Then I su
6643. fite days there is always the beginning of a conflagration somewhere or other,
6644. I fancied I heard the sound of receding I concluded that some of the servants h
6645. the garden, and returned to the drawing room. About half an hour afterwards Mad
6646.nd threw herself on the sofa, exclaiming, I am quite exhausted. I have been obli
6647. much. Was the reception so very amusing then ?' I asked. O, you shall hear all
6648.. The Abbat and his cortege were waiting in the green hall, with their hats off
6649.est, whilst the others applauded, making a tremendous noise. At last, when silen
6650.ledgments to that young man. Not knowing the language of the country, I have not
6651.at least a quarter of an hour recovering myself. But it all passed off very well
6652.ole affair has been dreadfully fatiguing. As to my daughter, she is quite knocke
6653. the little spaniel followed me, barking between my legs. The door to the parter
6654.door to the parterre was on the creaking boards. called out, ' Who is the frying
6655. boards. called out, ' Who is the frying with oil which goes on at a great rate
6656.y. It seemed as if a storm was gathering on the mountain. It was fires for ' ' '
6657.minous signittcancy. I could see nothing in the thick darkness, except a multitu
6658.ess, except a multitude of lights moving in the same These were the pine-wood to
6659.peasantry. They were evidently advancing towards the casile in groat numbers, an
6660.ile in groat numbers, and I was watching this procession with some anxiety when
6661.er. four or five hundred of them yelling and hooting on the other side of the mo
6662.five hundred of them yelling and hooting on the other side of the moat in front
6663.e Baronne said, without much distressing herself. 'Who knows,' he replied. 'Choi
6664.re ' ' furiously, and instead of stating their grievances, if they have any, the
6665.s, if they have any, they kept screaming, The Abbat, the Abbat just as if we had
6666.hares. There is no danger of them taking us by storm. I am only afraid of one th
6667. by storm. I am only afraid of one thing, which is that it should occur to them
6668.possible ?' asked the Baronue, beginning to take the alarm. He nodded affirmativ
6669.nd my daughter ?' You must wife, lifting up her hands, It is from the balcony of
6670.r hands, It is from the balcony of bring her here,' the Baron replied. her room
6671.ople on the road. They seem to be coming here, but they certainly will not come
6672.n up. ' pxolaimed his wife, in a jesting manner, then we are all your prisoners.
6673.ven o'clock Mile. Boinet ran in, looking terri' fied. I don't know what is going
6674. terri' fied. I don't know what is going on,' she said there is a From this room
6675.e said there is a From this room nothing is heard, but tumult outside. if M. le
6676.et. for a moment to look at her sleeping. She opened the door, and at a glance I
6677.faced the door, there was an old looking-glass, and at its foot the little figur
6678.remembered the figure I had seen gliding under the window, the light step I had
6679.ied in the words, which had been ringing in my ears for the last few hours, 'You
6680.n know.' Then, like a flash of lightning, passed through my mind the thought of
6681.d said of the cries of the mob clamoring A cold sweat started on my brow. I felt
6682.e, I sin, nl rooted to the spot, feeling a horrible certainty that I should neve
6683. ' ' again. The Baron came back, looking as palo as death. 'Sh: ,'iins * ' .' As
6684.er. fell on a letter, wliie.h w:is lying on a table in a when my'eyes You must l
6685.ected to yon.' my daughter's handwriting it is " The Baron and shut myself up wi
6686.s be opened the letter, and an appalling change convent, exHe read it to the end
6687.ldly for help. The servants came rushing but it cannot wipe away shame. Our name
6688.re: The moment has come -when everything must be I known, when the secrets of my
6689. to a man who, ac- I love equal. cording to the ideas of the world, is not him b
6690.ed through my own bruised and misNothing,' he erable heart. The Baron continued
6691.ter of passed the night, and the dawning light his virtuous parents' roof, it is
6692., it is because an odious tyran- sitting together in the same place, pale, heart
6693.sm has driven me to Early in the morning the Baron As she was not yet of age to
6694.e to escape the horrible misery of being forced in- consent to his daughter's ma
6695.day when call *o mind without shuddering, she '^as born. Cursed be the day when
6696.ext,' cried the wretched mother, putting her hand over his mouth. She too had re
6697.he too had read the letter, and wringing her hands, she kept resir, ' THE violen
6698.hysical which occasioned great suffering and mental prostration to apprehend anx
6699.eason that I was seriously ill. Alarming symptoms soon showed themselves, and on
6700. showed themselves, and on the following day the doctor pronounced me to be at d
6701.fused what took place whilst I was lying in bed wi'h The only thing I disa burni
6702.t I was lying in bed wi'h The only thing I disa burning fever and often light-he
6703.n bed wi'h The only thing I disa burning fever and often light-headed. recollect
6704.d often light-headed. recollect is being haunted by the same continued haltinctl
6705.ame continued haltinctly I kept fancying myself a child who had just died, lucin
6706. and gazed on the blue sky. Tlrs feeling of being dead and coming to life again
6707.d on the blue sky. Tlrs feeling of being dead and coming to life again was const
6708.y. Tlrs feeling of being dead and coming to life again was constantly re-occurri
6709.o life again was constantly re-occurring in my excited of physical imagination,
6710. day, looked about me, and ! ' ' peating, My girl is mad my poor ; girl is gone
6711.rrible night we went through! Everything in me seeraed crushed and annihilated.
6712.e the flies of his wife, who was falling every moment into hysHis grief was gloo
6713.e. The peasants were no longer clamoring before the entrance rne to pieces it on
6714.rne to pieces it one saw a woman sitting by my bed-side. It was Madame de Malkno
6715.oon as he perceived that I was beginning to recover consciousness and memory, he
6716.adame la Baronne has had a long fainting fit. We were almost afraid she would di
6717. If he cannot ride, nothI moved in a ing will be easier than to carry him in a l
6718.8 Till: I'ORTUMT ' /.V MY UNCLE'S DINING-ROOM. "When I awoke the following morni
6719.DINING-ROOM. "When I awoke the following morning it was broad dayon the snow at
6720.OOM. "When I awoke the following morning it was broad dayon the snow at the Pass
6721.o we shall go light and the exhilarating r way You will go to your father. room,
6722.e open. The doctor was already, standing by the side 'Does he know that I am ill
6723.e of this U-aiitiful Tell him everything, day, and start in an hour.' I suft' re
6724. letter M. le Baron a child, and leaning on the arm of this kind man I tried to
6725.." 'A few lines only," she said, bending over me. walk a few steps, but I was so
6726. ; ' ' i: ! ' ' ' ' ' ; ' ' accompanying the royal family of Paris, subsequently
6727.e only a few hours, and on the following day went into voluntary exile. He had e
6728.ed, and it was at Turin he was expecting me to join him. " The doctor hoped that
6729.nt of my thoughts from the one besetting And it did BO happen that the idea whic
6730.appen that the idea which was destroying me. de Malpeire,' I said, with a chokin
6731.me. de Malpeire,' I said, with a choking sensation in my He answered, ' They hav
6732.n an additional trial, which you parting. are not in a state to bear. For severa
6733.ate to bear. For several days everything has been prepared for their departure.
6734.myself a little in the bed, and, leaning my elbow on the pillow, listened to the
6735.unate passion had made in my whole being. I forgot Mile, de Malpeire. But before
6736.ut before the Baron had finished reading, my eyes unfortunately fell on a little
6737. and broken, into a corner of the dining-room. The poor slip root, and ite light
6738.nd ite light green leaves were beginning to above the edge of the flower-pot in
6739.some rare plant. Instantly, my throbbing head fell back on the pillow, and I san
6740.t be off to-njorrow." "That same evening, Madame de Malpeire was sitting alone b
6741. evening, Madame de Malpeire was sitting alone by my bedside. I hardly know with
6742. so deep that I was afraid of increasing my sufferings by touching upon it. I fe
6743. of increasing my sufferings by touching upon it. I felt that there were things
6744.aron and his wife withdrew, after having affectionately squeezed my hand. Mile.
6745. her eyes, and went out without speaking. I remained alone with the maid-servant
6746.ept in my room, not that night. choosing to rely on any one but himself for the
6747. minute watchThe stout, good-natured ing my dangerous illness required. girl ept
6748.from it, however, that she was lamenting "oquy. o^: Tiy departure and that of he
6749.rous sound of her voice ended by lulling me to rest. intelligence gave me emigra
6750.rried down to the litter almost fainting, and allowed myself to be conveyed away
6751.yself to be conveyed away without asking where I was replied. They The doctor ac
6752.e I was replied. They The doctor acgoing, without casting one look behind me. co
6753.They The doctor acgoing, without casting one look behind me. companied me on hor
6754. on the melancholy view. The lengthening shadows of the rock had already reached
6755.s of the gorge. The torrent was brawling in its deep bed, and the yellow autumna
6756. and the yellow autumnal le ves strewing the path. A little bird hopped on the s
6757. joyful twi.ter mingled with the roaring noise of the imprisoned waters. I hid m
6758.fe beneath the old waves of that foaming stream. This sort of delirium ceased as
6759.side, when I felt the softer air blowing in my face, and the southern sun warmin
6760.in my face, and the southern sun warming my benumbed limbs. It was thus I depart
6761.ime, I had enjoyed the most transporting dream of happiness and suffered the mos
6762.penetration had been the means of saving my life. Another absurd, strange feelin
6763.my life. Another absurd, strange feeling, which I would hardly acknowledge to my
6764.urn of passionate tenderness, and taking him apart, I said, in a fal; had taken
6765. what is the fate of that unhappy tering voice I implore you to make some inquir
6766.re would be no one to lend her a helping hand, should she wish to retrace her st
6767. man. The ' My tat' first weary, burning eyes at last closed themselves, and for
6768. any queslions to me, and I said nothing to him. By a kind of tacit agreement we
6769.where a number of emigre* were preparing, like me, to cross over my We but I did
6770.remained alone at the my day was closing in, and the inwith which I watched the
6771.tched the snowtensely melancholy feeling flakes slowly falling and whitening the
6772.melancholy feeling flakes slowly falling and whitening the roofs of the neighbor
6773.ling flakes slowly falling and whitening the roofs of the neighboring houses, th
6774.d whitening the roofs of the neighboring houses, the high-pointed gables of whic
6775. through." The rain was indeed streaming down the window panes, and the temperat
6776.the fire," Dom G6rusac said are freezing here. And get us some coffee; you know
6777.ted himself by the fire without speaking. This made me feel anxious, for at that
6778.y news from France ?' I asKed, trembling at what the answer might be. My father
6779.M. le Cur6 must, I think, know something as to the fate of the family of Malpeir
6780. have, monseigneur," I answered, getting very red, "I shall be very glad to "but
6781.y glad to "but he seemed to know nothing about it. Perhaps it was out stances th
6782.ithin dead," I exclaimed. ' of a feeling of charity, and because he wished peopl
6783.isgraceful history." 'He had been living the last few days,' my father answered.
6784.red. here some time in a state bordering on destitution.' 'And Madame de Malpeir
6785.e floor showed that he had been trudging on foot in roads full of clayey mud. Bu
6786.amiliarity that he returned the greeting of our distinguished guest, who receive
6787.should have liked to have done something for that faithful creature, but she she
6788.ould not have had the pleasure of seeing you tosmile. ii you had not some parish
6789.of life, stood in the way of my marrying. And now I cannot look at that picture
6790.f sadness in his "It is a case requiring my ministry that brought me here to-nig
6791.that brought me here to-night a pressing sick call, and I was afraid of being to
6792.ing sick call, and I was afraid of being too late. It is a long walk from Malpei
6793.e might have happened to hear concerning the former lords of the soil. The Abbe
6794.the necessity of more direct questioning by 1 CHAPTER IX. saying, in a grave, sa
6795.rect questioning by 1 CHAPTER IX. saying, in a grave, sad voice " When I came he
6796.rquis. " You had you deeply, and pouring out a glass of sherry, drank it off. My
6797.t love." As to me, my heart was bursting with indignation. heard of the only dau
6798.ilst M. de Champaubert had been speaking Babelou had life." " "It is a shocking
6799.g Babelou had life." " "It is a shocking history, murmured the Abbfi Lambert, lo
6800. end she glided into the room, and going up to the shaking his head, as if begin
6801.to the room, and going up to the shaking his head, as if beginning to hesitate a
6802.to the shaking his head, as if beginning to hesitate about recalling came to bac
6803.if beginning to hesitate about recalling came to back of my uncle's arm-chair, s
6804.ittle thought where and in what of doing now and then. companv I should relate t
6805. then went on : " it. the kitchen drying his cassock." Babelou "At the time of M
6806. village fib x he . upon which was lying a ing sil'ied is large heap of wheat. T
6807.ge fib x he . upon which was lying a ing sil'ied is large heap of wheat. The crn
6808.h one by one for the purpose of removing the This occupation was apt to ppc iil
6809.hout a light, M. an honest, hard-working woman, with a sharp eye after profits a
6810.azzled by the noble alliance. Everything is not gold that glitters," she said. '
6811.young lady ? Does she think we are going to be her humble servants ? I can tell
6812. I can tell her it will be no such thing. And what a figure she will look amongs
6813., and I shall be almost ashamed of being seen with her. For my part, I have no o
6814.' ; le Curd. We ' never heard you coming. ' ' You found the door There was someb
6815. it was your new daughter-in-law looking out for her The widow shrugged her shou
6816.s. i ' ' * mountain ?' I asked, thinking it possible tint he might have been to
6817.he proTwo small logs were slowly burning jecting chimney-piece. on the hearth, a
6818.o small logs were slowly burning jecting chimney-piece. on the hearth, and thoug
6819.an enormous iron pot was still simmering amidst the ashes. The ' ' ; The Provenc
6820.vencal women. dress. are always thinking of their faces and their There is not a
6821.r marriage. But it is of no good talking. to the farm, and there was nothing for
6822.king. to the farm, and there was nothing for it but to get them marBut I wish wi
6823.hould not be at the trouble of answering. The eldest Pinatel accordingly began t
6824.hi h had been unfavorable for the sowing, and on the extraordiu iry size of C .
6825.at the last fair at Whilst he was giving me every kind of detail on St. (lie sub
6826. clothes were wet, and she was shivering with cold. ' not leave, another time, t
6827.door open when you go out in the evening, daughter-in-law, the widow Pinatel sai
6828.and weight of the animals. I was looking at the young wife with a mixture of She
6829. She made up the fire a ittle, shivering all the time in her wet clothes, and ho
6830.the time in her wet clothes, and holding her head down, as if afraid that I shou
6831.fraid that I should speak to her. Seeing this was th case, I did not say a word,
6832.nto the heartu some logs that were lying ' persuade her to welcome with a more C
6833.me to D ' ' home. larrivedlateoneevening, having walked partofthe way, and as a
6834.' ' home. larrivedlateoneevening, having walked partofthe way, and as a cold, dr
6835. partofthe way, and as a cold, drizzling ^ain was beginning to fall, I hastened
6836. as a cold, drizzling ^ain was beginning to fall, I hastened towards the dwellin
6837.to fall, I hastened towards the dwelling-place of the Pinatels, which stood on t
6838.llage. a large, ill-constructed building, the walls of which had never been plas
6839. never been plastered. Properly speaking, it had neither sides or The windows se
6840.east appearance of a In summer a burning sun turned the outside of this garden.
6841. It was very dark, and as I was crossing the yard, shutters. 'g my way with a st
6842.k, I heard somebody before me exclaiming Francois, is that you at last ?' I adva
6843.the door, which stood ajar, and, passing through the staIt was a ble, entered th
6844.rst it was difficult to discern anything in it. The widow Pinatel's bed was iu o
6845.household provisions were always hanging ' : near me, a d movtd aside the iron p
6846.d 0:1 till lato fatigued. in the evening. During all that time the young woman m
6847.ll lato fatigued. in the evening. During all that time the young woman moved, or
6848.ed her yes. At last, just as I was going a\vay, thinking that the bad weather wo
6849.ast, just as I was going a\vay, thinking that the bad weather would la t all the
6850.nd the house-uog ran to the do r wagging his tail. 'It is Francois !' exclaimed
6851.is !' exclaimed the youug woman starting up and rushing to meet he husband. " Th
6852. the youug woman starting up and rushing to meet he husband. " The others did no
6853.did not move. The widow Pinatel, casting a glance at the place her daughter-in-l
6854.terwards the Abbat came in, and throwing his stick and heavy woollen cloal; into
6855.hen I walked in, the fr.mily was sitting round a table Good evening to you all.
6856.y was sitting round a table Good evening to you all. M. le Cure, how do you and
6857.s times go,' he cried, and then, patting his stomach, added with a loud You have
6858.wn here.' She. made will sit und turning to his wife, said, 'Gome, daughter-in-l
6859.n and rest a little while. knew not] ing of her former i She had probably 1 f t
6860.e would have had in her mother's drawing she said, Will you do me the honor to w
6861.e who cannot learn to keep a pot boiling on luoky that everybody is not, so help
6862.ly mild for the time she added, glancing approvingly at her favorite daughter-in
6863.is law. wife hard at work, and something hot and snug by the fire for his supper
6864.he bushi little snowdrops were beginning to peep out in the shel' tered spots un
6865.stupid another time.' ' There is nothing to be angry about," he said the soup is
6866.he widow Pinatel cried; there ia nothing like it to prevent a ' ' ' clril.' " He
6867..' " Here, wife,' the Abbat said, taking off his thick hobnailed shoes, the leat
6868.' She scraped off the mud without saying a word, put in each shoe a shovelful of
6869.ught them back to her hus' band. "Seeing her so humbled and so cruelly punished
6870.sarily await her, and I went awaypraying and trusting that her soul would turn t
6871.her, and I went awaypraying and trusting that her soul would turn to God, and se
6872.nswer, but looked at me in that sneering, offensive way which persons who have n
6873. impious boasters who gloried in abusing the habit I wear, but the hostile, unfr
6874. to argils, or to hold forth, explaining her views, and calling into question th
6875.forth, explaining her views, and calling into question the teachings, not only o
6876. of the Holy I was amazed at discovering in so young a woman Scriptures. such fa
6877.t. excitement, and a heart which nothing seemed to soften and There was not an a
6878.ed uu impetuous ' i > As I sat listening to imagination, full of false enthusias
6879.l by a miracle Whilst I was thus pouring forth of grace her miserable pride. sec
6880.ot come with her, and what she was doing at home. ' Nothing, as usual, the woman
6881.nd what she was doing at home. ' Nothing, as usual, the woman answered. ' mercy
6882. out.' " I was in the habit of vis. ting the different families ia my parish onc
6883. parish once or twice a month, according to what I supposed to be their need of
6884.hat I had to say. ' I kno\. of something else. I knaw ' well what I have to expe
6885.he interrupted. These people and nothing will ever alter their feelings towards
6886.d the young woman alone. She was sitting in the Him near the d< or of the house,
6887.agreeably surprised, 'There is nogirting up suddenly, said in Proveugul. They ha
6888.ves. My husband has been already looking out for something of the kind, and has
6889.s been already looking out for something of the kind, and has heard of a place t
6890.d just suit us. It is property belonging to an emigre, so it will be long before
6891.2 777/v ' PORTRAIT IS MY U\CLE'f> DJXING-IIOOM. Cure that my hands are pretty fu
6892.erd aud a ploughman; and jiow 1 am going to buy a pair of oxen, a horse, and a h
6893.id. He tapped his leathern belt, -making the money wi hin it jingle, and, loweri
6894.he money wi hin it jingle, and, lowering his voice, said, I have seven hundred f
6895.ght me in her apron just as I was coming away. Thereupon we parted, and went our
6896.. About an hour after, as I was crossing the market-place, I saw him going into
6897.ossing the market-place, I saw him going into a sort of cafe where well-to do fa
6898.wont to congregate. I knew that gambling went on there, and that the stakes were
6899.f hazard. He was in the habit of keeping with the younger men, and I thought as
6900.n one 1 will ' also addicted to drinking and gambling. I very welL It was all hi
6901.' also addicted to drinking and gambling. I very welL It was all his mother's fa
6902. to help him to find excuses for getting away from me. When we have a farm of ou
6903.t home then. He will leave off loitering in the public-houses; he will lead a qu
6904.u site for a farmer patience, was coming back into the town I met he A -'but wit
6905.arted, agitation of mind. He was walking to and fro, heedless of the all, strict
6906.prodigal son came home, his piece of ing him by the arm I forcibly drew him away
6907.nd basin of soup were always forthcoming. to a qniet spot where nobody could ove
6908.ions I put to him ; but suddenly rousing himself, would never herself be able to
6909. of begged her not to undertake anything without her mother-in- grief, that he h
6910.t the time for reproaches, or for trying to move him to had not succeeded either
6911.had not succeeded either in enlightening her as to the perils of repentance ; al
6912.ul, or even as to the questions relating to her But he had one of those excitabl
6913. had one of those excitable, unreasoning natures which must give full vent to th
6914. St. My mother ! O, what kept, repeating ov^-r and over again, having appointed
6915., repeating ov^-r and over again, having appointed me to other functions. My flo
6916.ere th.n at threatened with an impending schism, and the priest's who might comm
6917.al punishment would be sufficient During several months I went from place to to
6918.ersecution. in the diocese, enlightening the undecided, and strength- bursts of
6919.s of weakness, when he would place ening the courage of the weak. Towards the en
6920.e end of my circuit sit down, and hiding his face in his hands, moan and weep li
6921.to S . , It was then about the beginning of October, and nearly a year hun in an
6922.n the eve of the fair, is only one thing to do. since I had left my parish. an ,
6923.since I had left my parish. an , relying on your mother's kindness, own to her w
6924.of temptation and ruin are never wanting at gatherings shall ever hear of me aga
6925. hear of me again.' like these. Gambling goes on at a frightful rate, high stake
6926. went along to make him feel how wanting he had hitherto been in his duties to G
6927. family, and numbers. " The next morning as I was coming out of the vicarage spo
6928.bers. " The next morning as I was coming out of the vicarage spoke of the way in
6929.ions, but suit of clothes, and was going towards the site of the fair, with I ca
6930.ay that I had the consolation of hearing at that time a bustling consequential a
6931.ation of hearing at that time a bustling consequential air and manner. I went up
6932. ? I asked. My eldest brother was coming with fallen him. 'I will tell you the r
6933. transacted. people who live by cheating their neighbors flock there in ' ; , '
6934.her would not You see it was all nothing but folly and nonsense, and it listen t
6935. XL wife can care Jor that sort of thing,' I said, in hopes of ; ; gold chain co
6936. tell me, M. played on without reckoning, and lost again. Seventeen louis Cure ?
6937.re here. My boy, my played on, beginning and lost everything up to my last piece
6938.played on, beginning and lost everything up to my last piece of twelve sous What
6939.t's wile up to poor boy my last farthing and then, as ill-luck would have it, I
6940.d have it, I bor- came up to me, looking pale and anxious, but she did not say r
6941.bor of ours, four pieces of six anything. What has happened to my son ?' the wid
6942.ered he is alive and well, but something very sad way of the others. I might hav
6943. others. I might have known this morning that has happened to him.' I then gave
6944.tune would befall me, for as I was going out of the had occurred. I added that F
6945.ent, and house I met a black dog running after a hen. that it was grief and sham
6946.and shame that prevented him from coming in. " I exclaimed against this gross su
6947.ened to me hi silence, and then, raising her eyes to make him feel ashamed of it
6948. again. Only think just as I was setting his own money, and it is very sad that
6949.hould have made out, I saw a crow flying lower than the top of our hen-coop. If
6950. gratitude. Don't be afraid, mind saying it >o you the peasant who marries a lad
6951.sity; 'there will always be say anything so shocking ?' I said indignantly. W< 1
6952. will always be say anything so shocking ?' I said indignantly. W< 11, if not br
6953.to talk in this manner, after misleading that young girl She was Bitting in a co
6954.sleading that young girl She was Bitting in a corner of the room, with her hands
6955.her J her head TT .~,,*. a into marrying you.' 'I did not mislead her a bit he r
6956.knees and i-~- TIO/I im**nM. A^^ hanging down. up to As sure as that I must die
6957.to her. spoke in a whisper, as it trying to appease her, but she listened The fi
6958.ns, in a gloomy silence, without raising her head or making anv about two years
6959.ence, without raising her head or making anv about two years ago, she was presen
6960.ies, and tried gently to rnako wrestling-match was over there was a ball, and I
6961. who had 'You are a wretch, unagreed ing up with a look of terrible anger. to su
6962. of my notice. Do you suppose I am going to share the smiling sort of a way, and
6963. suppose I am going to share the smiling sort of a way, and, us in duty bound, I
6964. back with a crv : , ' ' ' ' ; ; cutting short what threatened to prove a long d
6965.p to til Timi];* woman, who was standing iij ' One of her where all the family w
6966.e pathen-d round the Abbat, wh. was king straight before her with a li checks \v
6967.s of a deadly while, the o 'He has lying in the p sitiun of n man asleep. A whit
6968.and only his face was to bo seen resting rgainst the and then, without listening
6969. rgainst the and then, without listening to me, without snying a word or pillow.
6970. without listening to me, without snying a word or pillow. His mother was bendin
6971.a word or pillow. His mother was bending ov. r him wlooking at any o
6972.s bending ov. r him wlooking at any one, she walked out of the room,
6973.d grief, and kept now and again speaking to him, as if her going up stairs and u
6974.d again speaking to him, as if her going up stairs and uttering terrible curses.
6975., as if her going up stairs and uttering terrible curses. she hoped he could hea
6976. her alone,' cried the widow, compelling him to sit down; 'do now he is about to
6977.elf iu the wrong. She began by insulting you, sleep like a poor helpless lamb.'
6978. him,' I said, and with a strong feeling ami live peaceably together." Well, we
6979.er ascertained that the was still having pulse that beating, he leaned over the
6980. the was still having pulse that beating, he leaned over the dying man to listen
6981.e that beating, he leaned over the dying man to listen to his linost go back to
6982. to his linost go back to S same evening. The eldest Pinntel offered to accompan
6983.accompany me, as imperceptible breathing. Then he came round to my side of he ha
6984.e had business to transact the following day at the fair. the bed, and looking a
6985.ng day at the fair. the bed, and looking at me shook his head. 'Is there no hope
6986.here no hope ?' Just as we were starting, the widow seemed to have a presenti- I
6987. if you speak to her to-night, something worse may constitution. Life does not e
6988.what, mother, at you. ' " It was getting late, and I had to i ' . ' ' ' ' just n
6989. weather was flue, the full moon shining on our road. Before losing sight of the
6990. moon shining on our road. Before losing sight of the house I turned once more t
6991. me. Alas, I ought to have been pleading for another soul then about to up your
6992.the followWell," he said, as I was going to church, I saw some one on the ing da
6993.ing to church, I saw some one on the ing day, tant to proceed with his narrative
6994.. the unspeakable consolation of feeling his hand feebly grasping mine in token
6995.tion of feeling his hand feebly grasping mine in token of assent, upon which I g
6996.ul into the hands of his Maker." walking very fast, and high-road in the directi
6997.sant has killed her husband ; I am going to " Aix f or the police.' she was cert
6998. wicked woman," my uncle "Well, , coming CHAPTER XII. PICTURE. WHAT BECAME OF TH
6999. " And siuce then you have heard nothing of that with all my heart t j give me t
7000.r to that question. ' " instead of going C Before I arrived there I met another
7001., the least doubt about it. Last evening she quarrelled with her husband. They w
7002.t to bed, however, as usual, and nothing But in the morning, the wife of the was
7003.as usual, and nothing But in the morning, the wife of the was heard in the night
7004.passed their room felt her foot slipping in something, which turned out to be bl
7005.room felt her foot slipping in something, which turned out to be blood, which sh
7006.d, which she then perceived to be oozing out from under the door. She screamed f
7007. two young Pinatels, who were just going off to the vineyard, heard her. They ra
7008.up stairs, and found their brother lying murdered in his bed. It would seem as i
7009.e village is after I hurried on, begging God her, bent on avenging the Abbat.' '
7010.ed on, begging God her, bent on avenging the Abbat.' ' ' ; ejaculated. " I at on
7011.could enter the State prisThe only thing I could do was to write her a letter, i
7012. letter, in ons. which I said everything which Christian charity could say to sa
7013.. I had the satisfaction of ascertaining that my letter had reached her. "In tim
7014.aped a horrid celebrity. After lingering in prison for about a year, she appeare
7015.s, and was tried and condemned according to the 1 THE rOHTUMT /A r MY UNCLE'S th
7016. UNCLE'S that we have met again, feeling, find it hard to part with you." " " an
7017.sprang into his carriage, and stretching his head out of the window nunl^us a la
7018.hampaubert, in an agitated man- watching the white speck vanishing in the distan
7019. man- watching the white speck vanishing in the distance. The first thing Dom GG
7020.nishing in the distance. The first thing Dom GGrusac did when ho came home was t
7021.ould Marquis." always have been thinking at dinner of her horrid adventures. Dom
7022. first saw her she had not that blooming, ing myself if I had ventured to expres
7023.t saw her she had not that blooming, ing myself if I had ventured to express a w
7024.spised treasure, and to carry it smiling face she was not like that picture." A
7025.ne. up the room. It had left off raining, but the wind still whistled I did not
7026.d us good> corner of the attic, to bring away the picture, and to intrust it He
7027.it He was to set out early the following morning, and it to some boy, who, for a
7028.s to set out early the following morning, and it to some boy, who, for an adequa
7029. met the diligence. road. B fore leaving the room, he went up to the Abbd LamBef
7030., he went up to the Abbd LamBefore going in search of the accomplice, without wh
7031.ert, shook him by the hand, and emptying his purse on the could not carry out my
7032.ation then was very mil. She had nothing lo look to but destitution and universa
7033.er name and obtain tlie means of earning an humble liveli- " Now my. dear old fr
7034.y poor de.ir uncle, ; ; ; < ' ' offering. I did not close my eyes for s me hours
7035.. Long after midnight I heard him pacing up and down his room. We were both thin
7036.and down his room. We were both thinking of that be mtiful but guilty woman who
7037.nterest about her. My mind kept dwelling on her I shuddered at her crime, but th
7038.ad deserved a thousand deaths for having dared to strike Mile, de Malpeire. I as
7039.le end, I thought he had been my bidding and hold his tongue. I desired him to '
7040.sband, and envied his destiny. I evening, and station himself at the bottom of t
7041.twelve o'clock at night. He was to bring with him kept passing and repassing bef
7042.t. He was to bring with him kept passing and repassing before my eyes, whether I
7043.ring with him kept passing and repassing before my eyes, whether I opened two wi
7044.ely picor closed them, sometimes smiling, sometimes looking sternful ture to tra
7045.em, sometimes smiling, sometimes looking sternful ture to travel. I fully meant
7046.red to persac called me the next morning. M. de Champaubert was soon form my par
7047.an autumn sun were ready, It was getting late. The light was waning, and a melan
7048.t was getting late. The light was waning, and a melangilding the valley; no earl
7049.The light was waning, and a melangilding the valley; no early frosts had yet bli
7050. the house. There was in thi , something better to do, 1 promise you, than to hu
7051.ds under lock and key ?" I asked, trying to put on an appearance of indifference
7052. replied with a shrug ; are always going in and out for one thing or another, th
7053.re always going in and out for one thing or another, the key generally remains h
7054.other, the key generally remains hanging by the side door." I went away satisfie
7055., and spent almost all the day wandering about my gun in my hand, by way of shoo
7056.ut my gun in my hand, by way of shooting, but really to try and find in the neig
7057. The cheery robin-redbreast was chirping in the hawthorn bushes, and beautiful b
7058.e soft breezes of the south were blowing from the coasts of the Mediterranean, r
7059.heir snowy mantles. choly nobody drawing-room, only the dogs sleeping in the arm
7060.ody drawing-room, only the dogs sleeping in the arm-ehairs. I thought my uncle w
7061. and gave a last look at the surrounding landscape. Dom Gerusac, with his readin
7062.landscape. Dom Gerusac, with his reading-lamp in his hand, and his He gazed on t
7063. cor- at any moment. riages were waiting. dial manner, and then turning to my un
7064.e waiting. dial manner, and then turning to my uncle, said with much ai "My hear
7065.stairs with flushed cheeks and a beating heart, like a man engaged in a desperat
7066.ssible to remove it w thout uttriii'ting notice frotn thos-> who were assembled
7067.o The Abb6 shook his head he was writing a mpmor"ndnm for the li gistrar. When h
7068.ut his old servant, found Babelou crying in We entrance-hall. , " Poor 1 Mariau,
7069.ll. , " Poor 1 Mariau," she said, wiping her eyes with her apro" was ill but sh
7070. unconsciously I approached, and looking ver his " shoulder, gl need at the pape
7071.d Lambert and my un le were both leaning aga nst the table with their hands clas
7072.asped together I think they were praying. Babelou was sobbing bitterly. I went o
7073.k they were praying. Babelou was sobbing bitterly. I went out and sat down at th
7074.rner of the chimney with my head resting on my hands. I did not move or speak th
7075. did not move or speak the whole evening, and about twelve o'c'ock went to my ro
7076.heard some one under my windows, calling to me in a suppressed voice. It was my
7077. was my accomplice, who tired of waiting for me in the alley, was come to remind
7078. dangerously ill. \\ hilst I was waiting at table, sh; told Gothon to send immed
7079.al that pourTo cheer her up this morning, I showed her the two ing rain. go d pi
7080.p this morning, I showed her the two ing rain. go d pieces which M. le Marquis h
7081. did not last long, and new she is dying !" went into the drawing-room, and half
7082.ew she is dying !" went into the drawing-room, and half an hour afterwards the A
7083.was quite distressed, and kept repeating, " She was a very faithful creature. Du
7084.She was a very faithful creature. During the twelve years she lived with me I ne
7085. 1 was o cupied meanwhile in considering whether it would be pos ible to carry o
7086.ff Mile, de Malpeire before next morning. Suddenly my uncle said, "I w< nder who
7087.t poor woman ? A year's wages were owing to her, and she had put l>y a little mo
7088., Monsieur Frederick," he said, standing on tip-toe, am come to fetch the pictur
7089.e had done some mischief to the painting, and the little finger which my uncle h
7090.bject with eloquent the very interesting " Souvenirs making of an his Army Chapl
7091. the very interesting " Souvenirs making of an his Army Chaplain," of Louie, cou
7092.uphold, broke their sword , and mourning in silence the fall of an illustrious m
7093.ook the light, but satisfied with having done road to Vigan. Before seeking in a
7094.aving done road to Vigan. Before seeking in a strange land for some provision ag
7095.st the future, he was desirous of seeing onca whom the experienced eyes captain
7096.losely enveloped in hid long blue riding coat, buttoned up to the neck, the jovi
7097.tra. Jesuit where the two great stalking horses used by the liberals to attack t
7098.glass of absinthe, to prepare, according to custom, his diges"Absinthe!" said on
7099.native country. Our hero was of middling in a low tone. stature, but well made ;
7100.nhe was as strong stinct of appreciating just and holy things as a but lamb. Sur
7101. suppositions, continued quietly sipping his draught. On their part, the bon-viv
7102. of ordeal, which they began, by singing At each couplet, in chorus a verse of a
7103.itary ballad. add d the singers, looking askance at the captain, " Down with the
7104.its these words, Liberly for ever During ! ! avoiding the high roads, so as not
7105.ds, Liberly for ever During ! ! avoiding the high roads, so as not to hear or se
7106.roads, so as not to hear or see anything that would recall the evil days of revo
7107.aged by his silence, perhaps attributing his reserve to a their audacity their f
7108.eserve to a their audacity their feeling of fear, tho travellers redoubled allus
7109.he party. 27 it they feared was escaping them ; in fact, they had prepared ; the
7110.ve we been deceived?" said they, looking quite mysti" " I cannot suppose you hav
7111.against one " Monsieur," he said, laying his righthnnd on his shoulder, any inte
7112.his shoulder, any intention of insulting me, ; > I believe you to be to good do
7113.you to be to good do so cowardly a thing. Be that as it may, you will permit me
7114.o remark that gentlemen of good breeding ought to respect those whom chance unit
7115.ed," said tho chief of the party, seeing the captain vigorously attack a magnifi
7116. implied, Ricard put back tho juicy wing which perfumed his plate, and calling t
7117.ng which perfumed his plate, and calling the boy, said, " Take away this fowl."
7118. it not roasted enough, sir ?" " Nothing could be better." " Then why does monsi
7119.ued, " What is it ?" me by discontinuing ' them. " Monsieur," answered the chief
7120.as he pleases. We shall continue to sing, and you can dance, if that is agreeabl
7121." replied Ricard for all," and returning to his seat, he finished self, and God
7122.for the waiter, and ordered him to bring dinner. It was Friday, a day of abstine
7123.at this Jesuit in the blue coat is going to make a ; ; ' maigre dinner." "That w
7124.gre dinner." "That will be a droll thing to see," added his neighbor. " We shall
7125.a good laugh," said the chief and giving a new signal he commenced a song from B
7126.ranger. Just then an organ began playing in the Square de Louie the overture of
7127.he waiter who brought his " go and bring that organ boy in here fetch him plate
7128.our laugh," said the travellers, rubbing their hands. As he desired, the officer
7129. was delightful to witness him, opposing a digni- " rectly. have a good laugh,"
7130.gh," returned the facetious travthinking of the maigre dinner he was about to ri
7131.moment the organ boy, his face sparkling with joy, entered the hall, and turning
7132. with joy, entered the hall, and turning the handle of i.is instrument, began pl
7133.handle of i.is instrument, began playing the first notes of a chorus in La Dame
7134.lamorous notes of the instrument playing the deep chorus of the Marche des Tarta
7135.est," answered the officer., and turning towards the band, whose extinguished fi
7136.ligious refrain of Bfiranger's measuring from head to foot the tall figure of hi
7137.our hair on end." At these words, seeing in a "Monsieur Joseph-Frangois Chameron
7138.ke him, carried a holy taper." " " bring me some coffee." Gargon," said the capt
7139.ic at what they considered the finishing stroke. The captain slowly took his cup
7140.o>o from the table as calm as if nothing had happened to disturb 28 CAPTAIX all
7141.have insulted a man who has done nothing to provoke you, you are a set of coward
7142. continued. " Amongst you all, insulting bullies, there will not be found one wh
7143.Avignon. One day, when he was proceeding to this town, he met as a traveling com
7144.ding to this town, he met as a traveling companion in the Marseilles diligence a
7145.ose pleasant countenance and interesting conversation attracted his notice. Ere
7146. Germain. Our two travellers wers making their reflections on the subject of the
7147. am at your service; but, before leaving, account to settle," you have a small s
7148.ave a small said the captain, addressing him whose face was ornamented with the
7149.I was At least, if," answered just going to propose so. the traveller, with mark
7150.ou more, perhaps, since I see you living so will diiw together, monsieur far fro
7151.us favored your wishes in transform- ing to a carp the bird he had served me wit
7152.the habit of at the first pass, fighting duels; but those who know not how to us
7153. off!" II. Monsieur," said the disarming the travelling clerk frightened me,"' r
7154.ieur," said the disarming the travelling clerk frightened me,"' replied the maig
7155.anion. characstrong-hearted man. Leaving Du Vigan where he had gone immediately
7156.s ;un.,ition. Once he thought of finding it in Portugal, under ttie banner of Do
7157.d in interrupted the traveller, laughing, "that, as at this same none indeed he
7158.ic. Is that what you would say, my " ing on the products of his v.neyards at Gre
7159.. " fered him a place in his flourishing .omain. Nothing is impossible with God,
7160.place in his flourishing .omain. Nothing is impossible with God," added the prie
7161. new friends separated, after exchanging cards, and 15'irdi HUM wines. Ho consol
7162.onsoled himself with this met- promising to meet in Paris, where both were going
7163. to meet in Paris, where both were going; the priest amorphosis in thinking, lik
7164.going; the priest amorphosis in thinking, like a good royalist, that Bordeaux wa
7165.list, that Bordeaux was to preach during Lent, the traveller to visit Ins custon
7166.ler to visit Ins custon., after arriving at Lyons, Frederic 1: Now, as he was ac
7167.r to the inhabitants of the city. lowing from century to century those sublime b
7168.anity, always iiiii-liiin.'jcable in ing in 1m their unity (tha', divine charact
7169.ith the most lively attention. Beviewing, on his side, the dis; I When curiosity
7170., numerous Protestant sects, worshipping iu as he comprehended that truth could
7171.uld not prevent himself from pronoun ing a name that his mother had never taught
7172.discourse by a short peroration, showing the .necessity of following the Catholi
7173.ion, showing the .necessity of following the Catholic faith, not only in order t
7174.> The ; ; Bicard followed, and embracing him, said, voice has touched my soul, m
7175.me-de Foarvieres, and like first meeting into the warmest affection. In fact, to
7176. taken furaccount was it grace beginning to work in his so 1 ? We nished apartme
7177.ouse of mercy between earth and speaking of the progress which grace was really
7178.rogress which grace was really effecting in his The festival of Easter was appro
7179.s The festival of Easter was approaching, and Bicard hud heart. heaven. not said
7180.fear that indifference was the cause ing. When he arrived in Paris, the ex-offic
7181.y prolonged silence, when he one morning of Saiut-Boch, from whom he was to obta
7182.he address of his received the following letter tr veiling companion. It was giv
7183.received the following letter tr veiling companion. It was given to him as had b
7184. had been promThe good father was living at the Hotel du Bon Lafon- "Mr DEAB ABB
7185.e, Kue de Grenelle Saint-Germain. During fifteen days, two irreconcilable advers
7186.rseverance which has had in it something superhuwould return. " Very late," he w
7187.een considered a shameful and mean thing, will be d.fflcult to see him before he
7188.ge hitherto unknown to him. After having graphically sketched the first ages of
7189.octors, philosophers and saints laboring with generous hands to develope the civ
7190.orrent of eriv and reasonably in seizing the branch of safety which truth offers
7191.o my help, dear Abbe" conie this evening at nine o'o I shall be at home." the ne
7192.0 <'M>r.\l.\ tip his HK'AHD. considering it mcnts by the messenger of God, gavo
7193.and acknowl- il e>l ex-officer, throwing himself on 'som of the venerable priest
7194. 'som of the venerable priest ; "nothing is impossible to him -who changed a fow
7195.ostle that Providence way for the saving of two souls." made use "Of whose?" tri
7196.nge a into a Catholic." Grace, operating on a soil prudently prepared, had worke
7197. prepared, had worked tho most consoling results ; in fact, since his arrival in
7198.y friend," said the priest, on receiving his abjuration, " to the red ribbon whi
7199.r." ; part of a good Catholic, in giving an example of submission to the command
7200.?" "Without doubt that of the travelling commissioner of him, who despising and
7201.lling commissioner of him, who despising and mocking :.ll things, thought himsel
7202.sioner of him, who despising and mocking :.ll things, thought himself permitted
7203.a expressed a wish to see the travelling commis" Your desire will be the Abbe ha
7204.ed "The irreligious and insolent meeting had not yet taken place. Ricard had fix
7205.the Thursday in Easter week, one evening he received the following note : " MY D
7206.k, one evening he received the following note : " MY DEAB FRIEND : when travelle
7207.ere in your wish to see, before quitting whose life you so generously spared at
7208.fe you so generously spared at La Saying thus, the good Abbe" threw himself into
7209.ard " the distances It was just striking arrived at the Abbe"s hotel. " and do n
7210.selves at tab.e," sa.d the Abbf, smiling ; completed his recital by explaining h
7211.ng ; completed his recital by explaining his conversion, which, from public conv
7212.en of faith and good- will the consoling truths of our holy religion. In a word,
7213.e Levant. Captaiu Ricard is still living ; he has retired from business, and res
7214.ved as a guide, was at the head, ben ing with pride the banner of the Sovereign
7215.f the island of Candia, when one morning the watch said that a signal from the T
7216.om the Therese had been given announcing that a priest was wanted for a sailor w
7217.was seriously ill. Pere Zephyrin knowing this, went immediately to the captain o
7218.r there '.o is ono of our comrades dying; it is my duty to him." m n can die ver
7219. upou myself the responsibility of doing go "The is to say, I don't think they m
7220. is Upon a bed near to that of the dying man who had called for up." " Death doe
7221.Death does not wait, captain." So saying, Pere Zephyrin the assistance of God's
7222.uke de Beaufort's room. The prince being so ill, and having less faith, had laug
7223.oom. The prince being so ill, and having less faith, had laughed at his comrade
7224.th, had laughed at his comrade for being so impatient to see a priest. was shavi
7225.o impatient to see a priest. was shaving. " Absolution won't " Excuse prevent yo
7226.olution won't " Excuse prevent you dying," said he. me, my lord, if I come at so
7227.re Zephyrin is always vent me from dying badly and, if I had any advice to give
7228.ke. you, it would be to do as I am going to do." " Thanks "To confess I, Pe'card
7229.confess I, Pe'card surely you are joking !" my lord." " There have been cleverer
7230. do you wish, reverend father? Something very fessed themselves before now, and
7231.ced his life to God, while administering to him "Now, ; tliut his confessor frie
7232.s confessor friend, my ' ; ; ! something very important, indeed, my wish to ask
7233.am ready to grant. Speak, I am listening." " One of our sailors on board the The
7234.s of an hour on board the Therese. going back again to the admiral's vessel," sa
7235.is The prince had just finished dressing. it, "I shall " Later ! see later." ; m
7236."What kind of weather is it this morning ? " " Beautiful weather, although the s
7237.ll see," replied the duke, and, throwing a cloak over his shoulders, he went on
7238.to-morrow at the same tim.3." "Supposing there were no to-morrow for you?" "Well
7239.besides," said the other sailor, joining his exhorta' tions to those of the prie
7240. seemed to glide over the waves, leaving behind a white foam. The Duke de Beaufo
7241.ho, to save a soul, did not mind risking their lives. Courage and self-devotion
7242.ff their caps the sentinels That evening the Duke de Beaufort received to dinner
7243. ia the infirmary. the oaptaiu at having done his duty, was at his right hand "
7244.he, as he saw the captain enter bringing with him the priest, "God be praised! A
7245.a was still rough but, instead of having one angel guardian, he had two on his w
7246.ten proi. ounce in presence of the dying, even when our heart does not respond t
7247.he right tune, father; I feel I am going ; of his officers, preferred joyous fri
7248. he possessed the rare faculty of making every body around him at home. 'By the
7249. the C'ipuchin, while dessert was coming in, " you have told us nothing of your
7250.as coming in, " you have told us nothing of your mornin 's I am sure the account
7251.. They will pray done wrong, in refusing to a simple sailor what you would God t
7252.ou hear that ?" cried the Duke, glancing have granted to mn for remember, sir, b
7253.on myself the responsibility of stopping a fleet in full Bail for one sailor." o
7254. he a prince of the blood." After saying these words with a firm voice, the Duke
7255.etually haunted the was a suiiny morning in May, a pleasant breeze danced place
7256.quarrel than did my fathers I forbidding in its warlike aspect of high walls, an
7257.might see the moat was dry, and entering' within the walls there Her Walter, now
7258. two years younger. How should she bring them lip in the For Walter she saw but
7259. toilsome, for it act of attainder being passed upon the title and estates of De
7260. with the persons towers the surrounding country lay stretched out as in a map,
7261.e could reach they faith. This lessening of punishment upon the family of De Lis
7262.d their escutcheon. Sans peur on hearing of his friend's death, Beauville was st
7263. ch 'pel. His displeasure at discovering Walter's flight was very great, and he
7264.om the fact th.it a new order concerning clinging to them had soiled the hands o
7265.ct th.it a new order concerning clinging to them had soiled the hands of De Lisl
7266. e was to be carefully avoided, building gradually assumed the appearance of 8;i
7267. r.ud thus the times. On the May morning we have described, on the broad terrace
7268.other finger on her lips. with a beating heart. Still on that countenance might
7269.had i ; Mary Thoresby was a most winning creain silence, while of the flowers th
7270.s. Presently, gently a light not sighing, . The two maidens continued to pace to
7271. together he Mary, occasionally stooping to pick some grew along the side of the
7272.e them into a bouquet, aud then, passing one arm round Isabel's waist, she held
7273.s : ; awoke, and tu.ned at once a loving glance on I abel. de "Have you been on
7274. d ar mother," answered Isabel, kneeling down beside her; "I have been walking w
7275.ng down beside her; "I have been walking with Mary, and was interrupted by the a
7276.Lord Beauville. " too bad. ' ' " Darling Isabel, do not talk in this way. If I c
7277.o recall my Alas why such scenes rending a mother's heart V Do I son. says and s
7278.And the tears these arms ? Coul anything but the knowledge that it is not God's
7279.en, Koger, you must make what " tempting; his life is not safe here." preparatio
7280.n strife; he will kdl her, I know he ing-man, taking care of Rose and there he w
7281. will kdl her, I know he ing-man, taking care of Rose and there he will be safe.
7282.cruel and inhuman, returned Mary weeping. " "I must go and prepare her for it,"
7283.A proclamation was get forth, commanding all who had children abroad A'ote. " vi
7284.children abroad A'ote. " ville is coming ? Imagine what we are to do for provisi
7285.their walk they perceived an old serving-mun coming towards them. He carried in
7286.they perceived an old serving-mun coming towards them. He carried in his hand a
7287.arried in his hand a letter, and, bowing respectfully before his young mistress,
7288.r guests deserve." They had been walking towards the castle while they spoke, an
7289.e, and had now reached it. Mary, turning to the left, tripped away towards the k
7290.or sent, any sum of money or other thing for the main. tenance of any child or o
7291. or any religious hoUM person no sending, conveying, or causing to be scut and c
7292.igious hoUM person no sending, conveying, or causing to be scut and conveyed, KB
7293.person no sending, conveying, or causing to be scut and conveyed, KB well any su
7294.rson, as any sum of money or other thing; and every person being sent beyond tie
7295.y or other thing; and every person being sent beyond tie seas, shall be disabled
7296.BEL re-enter cl the gallery, and opening another door, she traversed a long wind
7297.other door, she traversed a long winding passage which led to a different part "
7298.ocked gently. A voice the holy anointing may raise her up again, as it did our a
7299. bade her enter, und she did so, closing the door care- Lady Clare you remember
7300. similar and bore an appearance of being a receptacle for furniture, cases. Conf
7301.ooden table and a few stools but packing-cases some open, some closed were about
7302. an od gray-haired man, with go to bring the Blessed Sacrament and the holy oils
7303.ore the common trav"How great a blessing it is, father," said Mary, "that we ell
7304. is, father," said Mary, "that we elling-dress of the day, and opposite to him w
7305.d a " woman: she was wrapped in a riding-cloak, and the hood fall- have the Bles
7306.nswered, "and that we have been able ing entrance of Isabel she rose, and, makin
7307.entrance of Isabel she rose, and, making a low reverence, pre- to say Mass daily
7308.l you are "Ahf.ther," said Mary, sighing, "a few years back, and " and then goin
7309. "a few years back, and " and then going forward if you had needed to carry the
7310.t down at the old man's feet, and laying her clasped chamber of a Baroness de Li
7311.an see a priest again, without receiving all the strength given by our holy fait
7312.Beauville, and she ended her tale saying, "Autl father, there is no time We thou
7313.e, I warrant me," she continued, turning her head towards the maiden, "will ke p
7314.d his hand on Isabel's head no new thing, and I am ready but I leave your mother
7315.ch prized the opportunity of miuistering before, He came himself in lowliest gui
7316.elt and prayed on, as only the agonizing, and th perber and how soon do you supp
7317.e, we ought to be secuted, and the dying can pray. At length Father Gerard rose
7318.n Lady de Lisle's head, she opened going ?" " In about two hours, father, if it
7319. than I, me, "he said; and then blessing her, he quitted the room. Soon afterwar
7320.ll be ready," said Father Gerard serving-man, was making all speed to her father
7321.id Father Gerard serving-man, was making all speed to her father's house, some s
7322. little party then separated. On leaving the room, Father Gerard carefully locke
7323. deso- arrangements. Eachel sat watching her mistress, who lay perAll fears and
7324.her up again. We shall see her walk wing of the castle, where they found Mary Th
7325.d Mary Thoresby busily engaged in aiding and directing the servants in their pre
7326.y busily engaged in aiding and directing the servants in their prepara- among us
7327. same language: "To tions for the coming influx of guests. their assistance, but
7328.id It was a glorious sunset that evening, the sky was lit up with a deep-red glo
7329.nded thither to receive ard was standing. Lord Beauville, who was at that moment
7330.ille, who was at that moment dismounting in th The two cousins formed a fair pic
7331.nequal to the agitatation of a harassing interview with Lord Beauville, but time
7332.with Lord Beauville, but time is passing, I will now go to the chapel, and will
7333.given the strength of the last anointing, ; , as " , ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; 5 hidden by
7334.than natural. Lord Beauville was leaning on the arm of his young kinsman, who wa
7335. he wore, as did also the earl, a riding cloak, and a low Spanish hat shaded his
7336.ght, but Lord Beauville was now saluting her, and she had every ; remea:bered he
7337. fixed on tue eyes of the young stra ing, Isabel, with so intense a gaze as to e
7338. be glad to rest after your day's riding. Supper is preparing, and my cousin and
7339.r your day's riding. Supper is preparing, and my cousin and myself will " do our
7340.will " do ourselves the honor of supping with your lordship. fair lady," said Be
7341.hip. fair lady," said Beauville, raising her hand to his "Thanks, lips; "but, fi
7342.was her astonishment, first room leading from the hall. when she saw the earl st
7343.ce in one day but the stranger, stopping at a hou e iu the outskirts of the town
7344.ck to the coll ge. While I stood waiting, two men came behind mo and Ihrew a elo
7345. and had a favorable voyage. On reaching London, I was taken to Lord Beauville's
7346.reason for the strict rules gainst going into the town that Father Mordauut has
7347.my conduct but hen, v, t ought of seeing you, I fear I was not as sorry as I oug
7348.ht me this exquisite delight of clasping you once mor in uiy arms. Let me look a
7349.n proud. She brushed back the clustering hair from th broad fair brow she looked
7350.o the depths of the dark eyes, sparkling with fire and vigor ; she marked the fi
7351. smile that lit up his face, as, bending downagain -after the survey, Walter kis
7352.'s pale cheek. " 1 am selfi h in keeping you here, my son," said Lady de Lisle "
7353. mother we are strictly to was not going ; : i ; . ; ; ; ; ; CHAPTER "And when A
7354.er morn she had than ours." HOOD. "Bring him to me, Isabel; my boy, my own," mur
7355.e-room and in an instant be was kneeling by his mother's couch, and laying his h
7356.eeling by his mother's couch, and laying his head on her bosom. While she twined
7357.there, but William has reHe is preparing turned home, ar;d only Basil remains no
7358.e. Why, have dreamed that ; of my coming hither, when I learnt 'twas to see you
7359. of the college grounds, and in etnrning I lost my wav. when a stranger accosted
7360.sh, ex; i mother," said Walter, lowering his voice into a whisper, "he would be
7361.ady put gome priests to death for saying Mass, and Basil longs thus to could die
7362.n; ve such sad talk the first ev<rousing herself, < those who betw: en two thiev
7363. dost thou Nay, Alice," said he, s'tting down again "Has he frightened you, Mary
7364.d you, Mary?" said the baronesp, smiling, anger me thus? Thou knowest I would no
7365.Walter were both convulsed with laughing at "Well, well," said the Earl, soothin
7366.y. "Poor Beauville!" said Alice, sighing; "he was a different blame for speaking
7367.; "he was a different blame for speaking thus roughly but this religion of yours
7368.oughly but this religion of yours, being a few years since, open as the day, gen
7369.udge Alice raised herself into a sitting posture she fixed her eyes "Not to nigh
7370.is not the master She sank back fainting upon her pillows. Beauville called over
7371.ldien, remain contend sh yielded, saying, half to her elf, "Tell him to be withi
7372.ank you for a great Eachel was unwilling to go but a look from her young mistres
7373.eminded her that there was no gainsaying delight, and yet to chide you sorely fo
7374., and yet to chide you sorely for giving it to me." " I have been more merciful
7375.honors of my Isabel was used to watching she regularly shared with son as light
7376.s his God. It Rachel the task of waiting on the baroness at night, when her is a
7377.ed sleep so different and bade my pining heart, that craved so for his presence,
7378.she required frequent nourishment during the night ; now the " At his "Walter is
7379.e is to be kept back from As the morning began to dawn, Isabel felt drowsy and t
7380. his way and, with his grace and bearing I war- arose the sun over the broad lan
7381.t is," answered " Mary; it is a blessing to get rid of that terrible carl for a
7382.get rid of that terrible carl for a ning to greet you with, " Wilt keep the lad
7383.ll 'go ; much," said Beauville, starting to his feet. thither." paleness th fled
7384.self the fair face of his mother smiling upon him, Mmiy Lisle in my veins, would
7385.p to pour forth t> The thought of seeing again his mother and sister had her. do
7386.far dearer to him than that of returning to his possessions, was at her mother's
7387.rned on her side, and murmured something to herself. Isabel bent her ear close t
7388.memory of his mother's kiss and blessing lingering with him like a spell. He bre
7389.his mother's kiss and blessing lingering with him like a spell. He breathed in h
7390.abel sprang to the door of the adjoining room Rachel was found her dead. The sec
7391.no more ground, beneath a wide-spreading elm tree, she found Walter; to earth fo
7392.re was no agony, no his head was resting on his arm, and his whole aspect was on
7393.arm, and his whole aspect was one waking taste all its the lord of these possess
7394. knelt down ! beside liim, that I saying " ' O Walter how I grieve ! to aee you
7395.thus Would could comfort you !" wakening life, of earthly toil, and struggle and
7396.sounds were dulled, save one everlasting chime that rang " JEtorna fac cum sanct
7397.ace." "Yes, Mary," he said, in a choking voice, "I know it is suddenly gone down
7398. constant prayer, of frequent almsgiving told her all that is in my heart, I cou
7399.d watched her steadfastness in resisting the temptations then, the bitterest of
7400.arrayed the wasted body tation of seeing me, the shock of my arr val and the har
7401.he shock of my arr val and the harassing in its last earthly clothing, crossed t
7402.e harassing in its last earthly clothing, crossed the thin hands upon the interv
7403.I would rather She passed hours kneeling by the corpse, and know the truth. Oh h
7404.ow repent my rash light to her. " gazing on the marble face, so lovely in its re
7405.henLisle. had had in the sudden snapping of the life of the gentle He makes us t
7406.e He makes us the instruments of working it out in a way we but this faded away.
7407.d be Oh, you would like Thoresby taining only a few servants to keep it in safet
7408.consolations of the Church for the dying, he shed tears. "Oh thanks be to God, a
7409.eirns." " Not much chance of remembering them there," said Mary, " Well, at Thor
7410.y sister and ; she," said Mary, lowering her voice, as if she feared the rust" l
7411.r voice, as if she feared the rust" ling leaves overhead would hear the secret,
7412.would hear the secret, Blanche, is going nun." "Indeed!" answered her cousin, "a
7413. it, as my father does not earn to bring any fresh trouble upon us owing to this
7414.to bring any fresh trouble upon us owing to this step so we must wait till Blanc
7415.ville, unhappy country is daily offering." "Yes, indeed, "said Walter; "introduc
7416."Yes, indeed, "said Walter; "introducing the queen's prayerbook instead of the h
7417.stead of the holy sacrifice, and hunting the faithful " priests who offer it int
7418.y, suddenly ; I would fa n strong crying aud.tt'iirs. "I cannot, father, " was t
7419.ion of her saintly soul to the "I loving and eternal will of God. firmly believe
7420. is different now, Isabel: you are going into scenes of fearful temptation. Firm
7421.the traditions of her it !< house. " ing." " Pride keep you close to the faith o
7422. the interview did not prove an alarming one. Without committing himself ; " wor
7423.rove an alarming one. Without committing himself ; " words, Lord Beauville gave
7424.er Gerard re-entered ; without suffering, as to warrant you to speak thus with Y
7425.k thus with You blame me for controlling I was ignorant of it. myself methinks I
7426.other's burial night! Isabel was burning with indignation. " It is the night of
7427.nation. " It is the night of our parting, and that forever," rejoined the priest
7428.the narrow window, he saw the sun rising. "Something tells me that my tune draws
7429.indow, he saw the sun rising. "Something tells me that my tune draws near. We mu
7430.r priest to warn. speak, even in chiding truth, for the last time ? I cannot spe
7431.ow impatient of his long stay at morning. Isabel t to corae to him, and she did
7432.d ha must not linger longer. The parting was brief, as partings with Isabel, com
7433.ough for long he struggled for bestowing a fervent blessing on his children, res
7434.ruggled for bestowing a fervent blessing on his children, resumed his disgrief w
7435.rgive me, father," said Isabel, bursting into tears ; me for those sinful words.
7436.he little money he possessed in starting some new occupation, whose obscurity sh
7437.e, and she bethought herself of offering to go as serving-maiden to some lady of
7438.ght herself of offering to go as serving-maiden to some lady of rank and having
7439.g-maiden to some lady of rank and having obtained her father's consent, she soug
7440.her advice how best to set about finding a situation. She found Mistress de Lisl
7441.ion. She found Mistress de Lisle sitting listlessly, as was her wont, over her e
7442.er wont, over her embroidery, and taking not the slightest interest in the effor
7443.Beauville, an elderly and formal-looking dame, i.dvn cod slowly towar B her, and
7444.siug her not from her grasp, but looking full into her countenance, Isabel behel
7445.ssured her her conduct wa.s not pleasing to her guest; she quickly disengaged he
7446.rl and his train withdrew; bat lingering in the doorway unobse ved, was Walter,
7447.ator of the whole, and marked the loving grei tiug and the c >ld repiilse. La ,y
7448.ardly thanked his cous-n for endeavoring to repair his sister's want of courtesy
7449. be allowed to take with her two serving; : women ? "Well, Mistress Isabel," ans
7450.ile. I would I could pleasure ; bust ing and various. The cousins were alone, an
7451. but she stopped in her walk, and laying her head against the window, looked out
7452.d for soft speeches and without deigning to thank Lord Beauville for the part of
7453. no doubt t e sun of fortune was shining here. A largo party of riders have arri
7454. peace here. How Benuville? her greeting this day was full of affection. can you
7455.ose who keep me against my will? Nothing. To dwell here patiently is all you can
7456. ; cannot be go difficult an undertaking but that a firm tell will can ODinjiasH
7457.r spurs, or gain advancement, from being Ian attendants ; but to mix iimong them
7458.ousin's remonstrance from her despairing mood fo the time being. Mary felt it wa
7459.om her despairing mood fo the time being. Mary felt it was indeed useless to say
7460.hough it did not prevent her from seeing her faults, it gave her great faith tha
7461.e. just ; any way ? Yes, in one; pluming myself on my birth, I can show that I c
7462.ary," exclaimed Walter, with brightening tone and manner, "and I will fight my b
7463.aint I will make, and " as you are going away, Mary, I shall have no opportunity
7464.n the very midst of their mirth, turning round a corner iu the walk, came upon t
7465.in her haud. She blushed, and curtseying with 'grace, almost stateliuess, said "
7466., "and I shall feel as if I knew nothing of one who is to be my cousin's friend.
7467.said Walter to 1 is cousin, really going, Mary? in the early morning of the foll
7468.really going, Mary? in the early morning of the following day in Constance being
7469.y? in the early morning of the following day in Constance being nothing loath, t
7470. of the following day in Constance being nothing loath, the three continued thei
7471.following day in Constance being nothing loath, the three continued their walk t
7472.e various amusements of the day, keeping carefully away from the dangerous to r
7473.th a smile. " That swejt-lookiug serving-maiden of yours I have never been able
7474. comes, as I think it will, this evening, I must bid you all farewell to-morrow.
7475.isle's convenience) heart on your coming to Thoresby Hall. I feel certain you sh
7476.keeps him here in inaction, with nothing to to Isabel her pleasure was hers she
7477.her presence, thiuk of but that witching face." and she proudly felt that she wa
7478.ii and gentle, I am happy, with thinking that Father Gerard was so severe to him
7479.o Isabel went on in sell-deceit, deeming that her presr of satisfaction or dissa
7480.satisfaction. ent conduct showed fitting respect to her condition, and was a Whe
7481. right and you will.' wrong his training, so different from that of his sister,
7482.abel so, and she drew back into watching her, and Isabel, from her window, follo
7483.ance, and treated him at once as joining in the with wistful eyes. So they parte
7484.artily of tlin cheerful and peace-making Mary. Isabel, true to her wished himsel
7485. tedious hours at Apswell Court. joining in the merriment that generally went on
7486.idered her CHAPTER VH. conduct insulting, and showed it by taking no further not
7487.nduct insulting, and showed it by taking no further notice of her han a slight a
7488.ight and stiff bend of her head, morning " Her love to him, and evening, which w
7489., morning " Her love to him, and evening, which was as stiffly responded to on I
7490. of papacy in truth, the haughty bearing of Mistress de Lisle kept the chaplain
7491.l could have grown up under the teaching of the meek and saintly Alice de Lisle
7492.or, and made excuses for Isabel, pitying her lone iness, and the heavy afflictio
7493.c-li Constance had never known in giving her birth. One of the trait her nature
7494.e hed over the beautiful but sad-looking porthe Lady Cons auce of Courtenay, Cou
7495.Walter, and was very desirous of proving to him the utter corruption and of Rome
7496.ed in the contest.her embroidery falling from ; > ; 11 her hands, her eyes fixed
7497., a picture of energy ami vigor, tossing buck the durk locks i'vom his brow, his
7498.eit he grew heated enough ou ; following day he would to 11 ; toll liia - story
7499.t the carl had given to likely to spring up, his it com and lovers look not beyo
7500.Isabel was sensibly increased by finding she and It both Latin Greek. understood
7501.onstance. At an early hour the following day, while Wai er was deliberating what
7502.owing day, while Wai er was deliberating what would be the best time for him to
7503.ers and letters, for employed in writing, and surrounded he had a heavy charge o
7504.fidence. " Ah, Waiter," said he, turning ro .nd HO as to face him " I desire som
7505. in such converse ; membered that spring had indeed passed into summer, and summ
7506.ong he was occupied either in contriving something for her pleasure or in her so
7507. occupied either in contriving something for her pleasure or in her society. At
7508.s happiness enough; and when the longing to be loved again did come, Walter fear
7509.peak lest fealty," mean say earl, saying the oath with your lips, but ranging yo
7510.ing the oath with your lips, but ranging you self among those faithful followers
7511.ow only to come forward, and by swearing fealty to Elizabeth, you can huld both
7512.at is all that is required, I am walling and ready to make all the reasonable su
7513.re held Constance trifled on, forgetting in the amusement of the hour the misery
7514.he hour the misery she might be bringing on Walter but there was too much that w
7515. her brother tamely and blindly yielding himself a dupe to Lord Beauville's sche
7516.let him have the mortiflo-ition of being refused ; for to allow his only and bea
7517.hed over the estrangement, without being conscious she had ; and confess that th
7518.w himself up when he apoke he was arming himself as if for a contest with Master
7519.d differently, Walter de Lisle observing, as I have done, certain passages betwe
7520.rstand," continued he, his voice growing hoarse with anger, "that to trifle away
7521.swered, " I do not perceive your meaning what proposals had you to make, if you
7522.h the noblest house in Europe, and bring no might You know well the injustice of
7523.know my t'o: 11 >ole, true, :.nd lifting cliikl -will love no one IUT alliance.
7524.er. Meanwhile Walter spent day wandering restlessly anout anil counting the hour
7525.wandering restlessly anout anil counting the hours he could we << cast down; B w
7526.aw her lean on Rose, who h d been w ting at n d stance. He saw her gather the fl
7527.omanly pe-feotion, incapable of trilling; Waiter's nature, like ull true ones, w
7528. like ull true ones, was lull of closing trust in hort autumn evening was y . in
7529. of closing trust in hort autumn evening was y . inset I floated in the sky, rig
7530.in- blithely by that cool bright evening the round of life went on, but though m
7531. b.iss of the acknowledgment t ] meeting? Then was whispered the > enly intellig
7532.gh and groan that burst Ironi the a hing heart in Walter de Lis.e's lonely chamb
7533.e did not doubt the next day would bring him a captive to her feet, a d she pict
7534. him and me the t' lure , ; . t , miming? "Yes, "she whisp told " " us now, my C
7535.l, and bade me conie hither this e ening. " He cannot mean the cruelty he threat
7536. threatened," said Walter " red, drawing closer to her lover; "he ; * i "Dear ho
7537.xamp'e. Constance slept soundly, smiling in her sleep. On the ground, fighting w
7538.ng in her sleep. On the ground, fighting with his anguish, lay Walter de " " Has
7539.ly tie prisoner who And then, in glowing colors, he painted the future with Cona
7540.ch wi d notions," coll inued she looking vile ag in, would argu It was a fearful
7541.he crusades ; show Constance h s meaning more clearly. up this is what half the
7542. it were was on the other, strengthening, pleauing, lawful, my Constance, we nho
7543.as on the other, strengthening, pleauing, lawful, my Constance, we nhould not se
7544.E, gland ex nl fr. the nobility bringing back by-gone memories of inuoc nt and h
7545.d happy days. ami in constant siifu ring. Men are not so in love The eyes of ang
7546. Walter at last fell asleep, still lying ou the ground, and raid she, ns haughti
7547., though Protestants i.i outward seeming. nearly that myself, for your eloquence
7548.out ill a marvellous manner. The falling of some heavy weight woke him up he awo
7549.nue in such conformity, ho shall, during such tonu " tinup, discharged of every
7550.h disability and incapacity I HO passing, or nen f shall ufter obedient to the l
7551.motion, to h se some sense of the aching thoughts that filled his m nd. He was v
7552.l endow fail. He will feed u; He is King who will honor us : which the devil pro
7553.us : which the devil propagates his king- ns with ill felicity." EDMUND CAMPIAN.
7554.leave you alon ," said Sir John, smiling, " f or I " and he quitted the brow and
7555. you have much to say blew on his aching There w sno trac of early I.eauty lefto
7556.ss or placid calm of a i-pii ; following morning, Walter went out. aroused the s
7557.acid calm of a i-pii ; following morning, Walter went out. aroused the slumberin
7558. Walter went out. aroused the slumbering porter and passed through the was gates
7559. h his mother, and the thought of seeing old friends who knew nothing of liin pr
7560.t of seeing old friends who knew nothing of liin present struggle, and would tak
7561. ag ee together. \V;:nn was the g eeting from Sir John Travers, while his lady c
7562. William," hath to 1 bor hard in looking over the estates. " continued she, will
7563.er the estates. " continued she, willing to attend to you." " Wh:.t are these fi
7564.t of a 1 that goes on now." " " tarrying at the court ? Every Sunday we do not g
7565.h him," said Walter, hastily, forgetting in marks each persou then, by another A
7566.ent twelve The peasant bowed, and taking a letter from his vest, pre- months, th
7567.e to rove this. Xay, you The handwriting, he eagerly opened it and turned to wou
7568.e dear and early friend. "I cannot bring myself to believe," m lied to pay the f
7569.on that Walter could not forb ar smiling, a.thongh there greatly do I desire lo
7570.llow her speedily, but so God willed ing an answer. "Did you divine 'twas I when
7571.ed under it, took no heed of surrounding objects, ami was unconscious that d rou
7572.ami was unconscious that d rough looking peasant who had advanced towards him fr
7573. the opposite quarter, had been scanning his features with the utmost interest.
7574.tisfied," continued Father CamHis riding-hut he removed ns he entered, and trave
7575., could never be pian, without appearing to notice the emotion. "Father," exclai
7576.ight, can you not?" said she, addressing the latter. same color OH the hair the
7577.eneral "Oh no," replied Walter, starting; "I must, indeed, be expression of the
7578.ward conflict, of hard study, of wearing thought, pare our repast, De Lisle and
7579.tered almost a cry of delight, and going forward, knelt she "I have also matters
7580.nd folfor a moment to receive a blessing. Walter, who drew back lowed by his wif
7581.ht us togethTravers, there was something inexpressibly winning in the if chance
7582.here was something inexpressibly winning in the if chance we may call it, counte
7583.e not been same moment, while conversing with Sir John and his lady, absent from
7584.my poor prayers but I knew and answering some eager inquiries of the latter, his
7585.ivtd and scanned Walter with a searching glance. At last difficult one. What pro
7586.or you we did Walter stammered something about nothing being yet denot indeed fo
7587.Walter stammered something about nothing being yet denot indeed foresee. Father,
7588. stammered something about nothing being yet denot indeed foresee. Father, this
7589.n Beauville's proposals look so tempting. There was a short throughout Europe, a
7590.. Yes, he really saw before him trifling," said he, at length the "Flower of Oxf
7591. Campian) before him the man who, having gained all the honors of the with you t
7592.e brilliant genius and profound learning, who had quitted the greatness of the t
7593.s to follow the cross, through forsaking of ciute of the Jesuits. in Bohemia, an
7594.ths back, to Eng- friends and crucifying of his own desires ? I glory not in it
7595.speak to any of for his power of winning the souls of others was unbounded. you,
7596.ke, and drew Alivady England was ringing with the sound of his "Challenge to the
7597. he was named by both the heart striving to keep aloof was conquered. friend and
7598.of his But while we have been describing him, Campian had temptation and his suf
7599.Campian had temptation and his suffering. With deepest interest and tender ; ; ;
7600.with you. Indeed," said Campian, turning to "I tiii John, think, if it had not b
7601.n answer to every argument I could bring ' i God has in store son, butto the utm
7602. email merchant vessels which are plying about, will, for a small sura, take you
7603.eard the low tone golden tresses falling on the fair neck hi: felt onre mi-re of
7604.elf bravely to thy Crucified is the King of Glory cross ; so shalt thou be crown
7605.crowned hereafter." Walter v, as weeping now those tears that are shed but selso
7606.ended that he obstinately forbore daring that time." Surn't Eccletitutical Lain.
7607.for aye. Campiau pressed a secret spring at the back of the crucifix it flew ope
7608.is ever moves Yes," he continued, gazing one but himself heard him "there i;, fo
7609. himself heard him "there i;, forgetting any but death, is something heroic in s
7610., forgetting any but death, is something heroic in suffering even on the cross w
7611. death, is something heroic in suffering even on the cross who shall tell its un
7612. the burden of temptation, when alluring ho es and fair ambitions would draw me
7613.nd reveHe saw the pale, wan face glowing, the deep-set eyes rence. radiant with
7614.an beneath the Whenee all this rejoicing and merriweight of good cheer. ment in
7615.man of middle age, and of goodly bearing and guests. Kindliness is written on hi
7616.d hel now," said Walter, resolutely; ing me, I will not falter. I will go and ar
7617. the cliff of the coast of Kent, bidding a long farewell to his country. But yes
7618.d away, that we find her in early spring Let us look in upon her in her rea happ
7619. in upon her in her rea happy and loving brLie. tiring bower, while they bedeck
7620.n her rea happy and loving brLie. tiring bower, while they bedeck her for her br
7621.d, truly, Constance was not an unwilling bride. She had loved Walter de Lisle wi
7622. of her but with nature, and the parting from him had been agony it there was no
7623.the hope deferred, none of the shivering of trust that so often breaks a woman's
7624.hopes; this night he was a man, entering his manhood by the gate of suffering an
7625.ing his manhood by the gate of suffering and of endurance. He has made the sacri
7626. t-'l moktbH, every person so forbearing, by the mad*! into the /.e, or a juM: ;
7627.d not say, Constance Beauville was dying of uure; it ble so amidst the Christmas
7628. By my troth, and her face is bewitching." The earl looked at his son as if fear
7629.The earl looked at his son as if fearing he was distraught.i He was silent from
7630.ast Catholic, and would not wed the king of England to forswe. r her faith. Ah,
7631.The attendants of all the ladies staying at Apswell Court had assembled in concl
7632.ble to divine for what cause the serving-maiden of the Lady Constance wept so bi
7633.was rais dtoth dignity of fir ot serving-maiden a duchess thereby her glory woul
7634. I will wed was as bright as the morning; what did Kose weep for? Yes," said his
7635.se weep for? Yes," said his son, turning round upon him, her. Before I heard thi
7636.o the bridal. beauty and stately bearing now I will do it for revenge. The de Li
7637.ed in time to be present at your wedding." Begnier Constance's face glowed with
7638.ast will. If I failed brother's greeting, and together they passed into the chap
7639.oul is wrapped in her prayers and musing, whose one ambia foreign embassy, "i ou
7640.laud ?" " I am not " that 'tis an saying," answered his son, easy enguished hims
7641. though man and angel without he melting softness of Constance's; the short dark
7642.ess of Constance's; the short dark thing beard and moustache lent sternness to h
7643.the compressed lips. There was something that attracted and yet repelled you at
7644.he viscount's terrupted by the gathering of company in the grounds, and by face
7645.ders who is that regalCHAPTEB X. looking damsel, to whom his father scarcely nam
7646. silk becomes her well, and the dazzling But vanifih'd in the blush of shame whi
7647.nament is to be seen, not even an edging on the borOh, thought unworthy of my ra
7648. gay found themselves alone that evening on the terrace, the guests, under his g
7649.uests, under his government, and hawking and shooting, with many weary of pleasu
7650.his government, and hawking and shooting, with many weary of pleasure, being dis
7651.ting, with many weary of pleasure, being dispersed for awhile, "you have a mock
7652.ry and her tlowera. ! ; ; ; ; on hearing the whole. At the close of the tale his
7653.en cast it from him as a worthless thing He, a beggar and a recusant, dared to o
7654., and it was arranged that tho rejoicing The way in which he treated her was so
7655.mony, Isabel was as d termined on having her marriage privately pe formed by a d
7656. privately pe formed by a distinguishing her from the rest of his father's guest
7657. lie ; i.T, but though by right claiming greater attention ; then, in a solitary
7658.iest, Isabel could not avoid overhearing a few sentences of it overruled; it wou
7659.l the while had an uncomfortable feeling that Mary Thoresby and Walter might hav
7660., and g>> alone t > a foreign condemning. His delicate way of implying how stron
7661.condemning. His delicate way of implying how strongly he shore, alone to death,
7662.ather's treatment of her, was refreshing to yielded, and stifled the conscience
7663.est that she would assist him in tracing the heard. Isabel. various branches of
7664.as Isabel turned to receive the greeting of her father-in-law, but and schooling
7665. of her father-in-law, but and schooling her own heart, and she was unwilling to
7666.ing her own heart, and she was unwilling to resume instead of embracing her, Lor
7667.unwilling to resume instead of embracing her, Lord Beauville suddenly stumbled t
7668.return grew more pleasant, each bringing some new proof of the honor and respect
7669. respect in which she was held something to give her pleasure was sure to arrive
7670. mo nings were regularly spent in riding the animal, thai he might be sure she w
7671.o fly from her wrist Lord Keg ier saying, as he pre ented it, "Bare bird needs r
7672.s," could she refuse to join ihe hawking parties 1 And if she did stand back at
7673.the chapel, followed by Isabel, clinging in terror to her husband's arm. At the
7674.less robe she had chosen for her wedding was sprinkled and spotted A shudder ran
7675. and the physician is vainly endeavoring to stanch the blood, that, from the bre
7676.tanch the blood, that, from the breaking of ! internal vessel, was gusluug forth
7677.for speech, but the crimson tide flowing fast, forbade utterance. A few incohere
7678. c :me. Last summer, and coldly standing aloof to chide, Isabel had She had forw
7679.e for her till her husband, after having seen the d fferent expression was on hi
7680.er from my father, answered he, "bidding me to but she expected to hear him now
7681.s already ;" and he Begnier was kneeling by her. forth, spoke gaily. "No foreign
7682. have seen long see your husband sitting in the queen's councils. since that I a
7683. What boo's it to dwell on those burning words, or how Isa- was her own Isabel d
7684.uys, and preparations were word standing petrified by; the child of deathbed, ha
7685.r for this she could not bid One morning ; ; ! ! TYBOIINE. Thoresby's death, and
7686.cripple, and a life of continual mnbring was her portion. ; PART THE SECOND. CHA
7687.whom ehe had been just betrothed. During the last few months Blanche's general h
7688.Lord Clinton had been earnestly pressing that their marriage should take place,
7689.t the hall. " while I slept this morning, -'Mary," said Blanche, softly, ; " Ali
7690.sby Hall. The house was a large building, in the then modem style, such as we ar
7691.were together Yes, dear," Mary, blushing ; in the lime-grove." "That is a favori
7692.te spot of yours," said Blanche, smiling. "And did he tell you any news ?" saw y
7693.inton ?" " answered " " We were speaking of the old subject," answered Mary, " t
7694.d to speak to another lady, also sitting near the window, but in a different att
7695.answer to the anxious looks of Buffering. " I am her companions. very comfortabl
7696.er companions. very comfortable, darling sister ; do be at ease concerning me fo
7697.arling sister ; do be at ease concerning me for a while." Is it possible then th
7698.lanche, of whom we remember her speaking at Caetle de Lisle. The bright-looking
7699.g at Caetle de Lisle. The bright-looking Mary has changed considerably she has p
7700.ticulars of her last hours most touching and wonderful they are. " When she foun
7701.n the castle), she wrote to him, begging him to keep vigil that night with her a
7702.t night with her and for ; her, desiring to make her general confession to him t
7703.er general confession to him thus, being p evented from doing it otherwise decla
7704. to him thus, being p evented from doing it otherwise declaring that she died in
7705.vented from doing it otherwise declaring that she died in- nocent, and requestin
7706.that she died in- nocent, and requesting absolution. " But a joy bsyond price wa
7707.her. Some ti r e the holy Father, seeing t:ie malice of her enemies, and to ago,
7708.nd to ago, what length they were tending, sent her the Blessed Sacrament. It was
7709.che had been just on the eve of quitting her father's house, to follow her earne
7710.to follow her earnest desire of entering religion. The day before, a priest havi
7711.eligion. The day before, a priest having happened to arrive at the house, At thi
7712.than usually anxious to assist, it being her last opportunity ere leaving the ho
7713.t being her last opportunity ere leaving the home of her childhood forever. "Oh,
7714. " about it. from her So, on the morning of February the 8th, arising continued
7715.the morning of February the 8th, arising continued to p. ay, she entered rest, d
7716.inued to p. ay, she entered rest, during which she had alone into her oratory. N
7717.ratory. No one went with her, her loving servants were without. No eye save the
7718.ts were without. No eye save the adoring angels, no ear save the listening saint
7719.doring angels, no ear save the listening saints saw her awful act,* or heard uer
7720.nd as the feet of the men were ascending one ladder, she left of guileless youth
7721.her. In her haste she missed her footing, her last communion ?' " a heart-broken
7722.orsaken mother, terrified still clasping close to hi r breast her sacred charge.
7723. was at the time ill, and Mary attending on her, passed away the pomp of regal F
7724. ; TfDOliNE. But," said Blanche, looking out to the clear sky, "how blessed to t
7725.exhausted by her sudden burst of feeling. Mary was in tears, and th re was a sho
7726.of the men. yes !" said Blanche, opening her eyes. "There must be some witchery
7727.d tier father/ Mary After gently kissing his suffering child, Sir Robert said ot
7728. Mary After gently kissing his suffering child, Sir Robert said other; "for no m
7729. other; "for no mortal power could bring that boat to land." " Could we not " We
7730.iu fjreat tribulation, not know- turning to the men. " No, no," answered the las
7731.he last speaker "I'll have naught to ing row to get any. one to meet him." do wi
7732.'s st ibles. Henry went forth addressing the other. forgettest He was .too inten
7733.forgettest He was .too intently watching the scene to answer; but sudinstantly t
7734.ather-beaten fisherman, who were mending their nets on the flat coast of Essex.
7735. of them; "for " she is actually putting off a boat. "And you think it will not
7736.sailor pointed for answer to the boiling surf that dashed " Why, upon the sand,
7737. has friends along the coast, and, being well known no danger "Itii "A singular
7738." said Sir Robert is ; his denly rousing " By my halidome, but they are brave me
7739. what I can do;" nd he dashed The raging spray flew in their down, followed by A
7740.ngth one more kindly threw them, pauting and exhausted, on the sand. Arthur and
7741.and the sailor ran to them, and, lifting them become poor, and despised, and per
7742.the fine old gray-haired baronet leaning on his son's arm, a young man full of t
7743.one and the other maintained well making an effort to rise, he exclaimed: " My p
7744.ion of the Thoresby family, as producing the finest I trust me he hath not suffe
7745.n Bess, held not, indeed, tried swimming for some years, and I did fee as if I c
7746. for " No or reputed papist, so refusing or A'ote. papist, making default in mak
7747.st, so refusing or A'ote. papist, making default in mak- your courtesy; I can no
7748.mak- your courtesy; I can now rise." ing and subscribing the declaration as by t
7749.sy; I can now rise." ing and subscribing the declaration as by the last-mentione
7750. "You must change your drenched clothing," returned keep in his possession any h
7751.d seize the same for the use of the king. But if any trust you will let me condu
7752.I know person shall conceal or be aiding in concealing any such he shall be com;
7753.shall conceal or be aiding in concealing any such he shall be com; ; : "Simply b
7754.is to "Now they must waves, the cracking sound was audible. struggle for their l
7755. their lives !" and accordingly, getting free from the fr igments of the boat, t
7756.r, and CHAPTER " H. My good is expecting a/riendfrom foreign They who call me to
7757.." ION. parts. " You seem to be watching that ship very narrowly," said a young
7758.narrowly," said a young and fine-looking gentleman on horseback to two of Keut,
7759." I think I am the one you are ' looking for." " I was sure of it," said Arthur,
7760. I was sure of it," said Arthur, smiling, "when I saw that adventurous boat set
7761. set forth. I have another horse waiting at a distauoo, witl it please you to mo
7762.the :ioh of two horsemen who were riding up the avenue at (UiiK-iet tint evening
7763. up the avenue at (UiiK-iet tint evening. The foremost was Arthur Leslie, bin ir
7764.exercise and with the pleasure of having accomplished his mission. " " H..w rema
7765., a grace hung about it of which nothing could holy man that first aroused Walte
7766.rt and energy to serve God, and he thing so noble in the broad open brow, and so
7767.re, anxious to receive th first blessing of the priest. seeing him, however, she
7768. th first blessing of the priest. seeing him, however, she uttered a so.t of sti
7769.rected that YV.B, Mary," said he, coming towards her, "your memory wish was gran
7770.uld land " He had sent, little expecting to meet his own Yes, thanks be to God,
7771. i nephew. on her knees for his blessing, and Sir Thoresby Hall was bright, inde
7772.fice was offered, once more the fainting weary souls Arthur, and tlu secret of W
7773. all I did for her. What arc you smiling at, father, was it too Jesus." Mary thr
7774.ony, but through long years of suffering, this is blessed indeed; for wherefore
7775.arms the tokens of H a suffer? Buffering love, the tokens of His great humiliati
7776.s of His great humiliation in subjecting Himself to His creatures; by this means
7777.rue, there are smile, the same sparkling eyes as of yore. lines written on the f
7778. which tell of conflict and of suffering, and the vigorous frame is thin, worn w
7779.worn with frpquc-nt penance and untiring lab'jr. Walter's life pince we left him
7780. ? Oh ! day You 1 jved Hun in of willing suffering. asked your life to be given
7781.y You 1 jved Hun in of willing suffering. asked your life to be given in that lo
7782. not, Blanche, ; long years of Buffering oft leave little mark , we h-.d would n
7783. mark , we h-.d would not be interesting, eve-; intelligibl if accompanied him t
7784.e. "Mary," said Walter, suddenly raising his head, "do you reviewed the past -wi
7785.ister at Apswcll Mnry had been expecting this queat.on, and schooling her- Court
7786.n expecting this queat.on, and schooling her- Court. Had he kept free from that
7787.endurable which to his ardent and loving soul. Yet, when he remembered his hands
7788.of the Mary entered the room, and seeing them both silent, she sat precipice, Wa
7789.gh ceased some time she might be praying for him, in tead of his wrestling for h
7790.raying for him, in tead of his wrestling for her. When I heard of the event, I w
7791.he married. her, and begged that nothing might interrupt the love between do Lis
7792.t in vigil Then came a few lines, saying it was impossible for her, and in penan
7793.e, that though she was pained at parting from me, her whole It was therefore no
7794. indeed I never could credit he trapping of the late earl's When he stood up in
7795.'twas her own free choice. the recording angel wrote down with an Alleluia on hi
7796.ter went backwards and forwards, seeking out Catholics, take boai for Westminste
7797.never s en her majesty, and and enabling them to come to the Sacraments. Oftenti
7798.es of the court were there, after having said Mass at Thoresby, and ere the sun
7799.a, and turned pale as dea'h then casting on me a would give communion to some tr
7800.a would give communion to some trembling and hunted Cathit is ; I have heard tru
7801.ndness t > tell me all you know. nothing but the fact of her unhappy marriage."
7802.ess in her in the boat that was awaiting her. beauty her eye had that wistful ga
7803.ad that wistful gaze as of those looking to I heard a good deal a out something
7804.g to I heard a good deal a out something beyond and indistinct. ; . olic. "Are t
7805.Gerard, that I "if, indeed, ! her during my stay in London, for Rachel contrived
7806., imagine how vile a man she was wedding. Mary he does not oppose that, I trust
7807. was no answer. " Did Rachel say nothing about this?" Mary shook like a leaf she
7808.kly, Mary," said he, his voice trembling with "it is not possible she can have f
7809.rd; "thou art What is the u e of sending to auger an archangel. enough Did I not
7810. with thy great mouth wide open, staring at me as if I h: d made the mistake, an
7811.ongue, sirrah," cried the l.idy "prating 'o thy but it is the last time thou mas
7812.erty, ments old and patched, and bearing evident mar':s loitering ue::r. Ho ence
7813.ed, and bearing evident mar':s loitering ue::r. Ho ence, have, friend," lady y:;
7814.Fair dame," answered the peasant, making a lowly rever" " I am a stran :er in th
7815., of thy lyin* tongue." And then turning to the new applicant, she tried to soft
7816.bles of the proffered sit nation, having a shrewd s;; spicion that the stranger
7817.Now, let "And you, father still laboring, Fuffering?" me have no more she could
7818.nd you, father still laboring, Fuffering?" me have no more she could get. The of
7819.ed by the good Essex people, entail- ing, as it did, hard and revolting labor, s
7820.tail- ing, as it did, hard and revolting labor, scanty ler abuse from the ja tyr
7821.nt called himself, prove i most enduring, of any she the most diligent and the e
7822.his mistress's esteem, and in the liking of his fellow-servants, the rough turnk
7823.to do part of their work, also, by going into the prisoners' cells, "Yes," said
7824.nce, when I was interrupted while saying Mass. Just as I had begun the Gloria in
7825.ison, and here I have remained, desiring but one thing, my dear son, to see a pr
7826. I have remained, desiring but one thing, my dear son, to see a priest and have
7827.fell off, so at last they gave up trying." " You are cheerful under your cross,
7828.ws, I feel a ; which he appeared nothing loath. fever in my veins, which I canno
7829.y, one day, long," continued he, looking up earnestly to the roof of his swe iri
7830.p earnestly to the roof of his swe iring, according to his wont, a loud oath, "I
7831. to the roof of his swe iring, according to his wont, a loud oath, "I am going t
7832.ng to his wont, a loud oath, "I am going to prison. " What do have a quart of al
7833.th of her SOD. My son," said he, turning " don't want him to die like a rat, to
7834.sed Sacrameut with you ? sure of hanging him." And Jack strode away to his suppe
7835. necessary to celebrate Mass. Descending from the general co ,rt of tho prison w
7836. serve as our altar, and as soon winding flight of steps, which led to the dunge
7837. of these ce'.ls had a staircase leading from them, so that Father Gerard sank b
7838.alter saw These stairs that he was dying. He hastened to give him a little of th
7839.f in. He then gaz d had, without staying to ask for wages, actually departed. ar
7840.One small aperture There wns no flooring, save tho Joseph again." that reached t
7841.r formed his The incident of the falling off of the Irons and the vision of our
7842.adness walks in sorrow's fuise, kneeling; When mutual love the burden bears Jack
7843.Father, bless me," said Joseph, kneeling before him. As eunbeauiB part the weepi
7844.efore him. As eunbeauiB part the weeping KkieR, And rainbowarine from misty tear
7845.ou a Catholic, my son ?" said he, rising to his feet. ; "Yes. father a Catholic,
7846.over, one THE soft moonlight was playing in gleams on the walls" of Thoresby Hal
7847.upon air. th two persons who were pacing up and down the avenue. "Yon huve no re
7848.ed Mary Thoresby, in a low and trembling voice "you have never been selfish. You
7849.ms appearance that her life of suffering may be longer, and since my marriage is
7850. lend mo from my father nor my suffering sister, I can no longer refuse " that w
7851.t and in fear, with no festive gathering, no joyous looks, such as attend the br
7852. of half England when they wed ? and ing branches, ; ; be air. Think you not it
7853.tell my mother, and the fear of alarming her made us prom BO good behavior for t
7854.ed ; we must wait till to-morrow morning for We that, however, for I think Blanc
7855.dward." And they walked towards building." " How did you know of it ?" " When th
7856. of it ?" " When tho house was repairing, the bouse, the moonbeams shining full
7857.airing, the bouse, the moonbeams shining full upon his manly form, supporting th
7858.ing full upon his manly form, supporting the fair and gentle girl whose fate had
7859.in su h rough circumstances. On reaching the hall they found Sir Kobert, Henry,
7860.isle engaged in earnest ; Mary, blushing, would have passed by, and gone to her
7861. were well-nigh faintc nversation. ' ing we must not selfishly endanger his safe
7862. up with a romance of love and suffering. is only, Edward, that when I think of
7863.ether or not it is a time for ' marrying and giving in marriage.' "Away with tho
7864.t it is a time for ' marrying and giving in marriage.' "Away with those fears, m
7865.f a union that has sanction and blessing from all we have been bound to consult
7866.carceis, indeed ; one of those ly having a place on earth." " poses to go. " " t
7867.ow night !" almost gasped Mary, clinging to her "'Tis so sudden, so short." fath
7868. But it has been a long and sober wooing, my child," answered Sir Kobert ; and t
7869.led in Blanche's chamber. Blanche, lying still on her couch, "And, Edward, then
7870.s a sad prospect." "And I have a feeling a. warning, ry sighed deeply. as the pe
7871.spect." "And I have a feeling a. warning, ry sighed deeply. as the peasants call
7872.ere will be a search made here ere 1 ing. Oh, if we had (as I know they have at
7873.y have at many Catholic houses) a hiding-place where he could go Did you ever se
7874.Aud yet," rejoined Lord Clinton, looking also at the " those walls of house, mig
7875.voices repeated their vows. No unmeaning words, and no perjured ones, were those
7876. ith a sudden horror. "No, I see nothing, hear nothing," she answered; "but 'tis
7877.horror. "No, I see nothing, hear nothing," she answered; "but 'tis a sudden thou
7878.nd there would The long-tried and loving hearts were one at last, bound together
7879.ace, who can scarce keep out distracting thoughts, who think the too frequent Ma
7880.flock turned to give a short and parting exhortation to the little he was to lea
7881.rt," said the sherpompously, "of leaving three men in your house in for the info
7882.owever, your precautions use" ? knocking at the enter gate silenced them. There
7883.nd .each one knew well it was the coming her pursuers. Then Mary, coming forward
7884.e coming her pursuers. Then Mary, coming forward quickly, proposed ; "I iff, pla
7885. hurried to bed, with the hope of having been supposed to be there all the time.
7886.he side of Blanche. While this was going on, some planks of the flooring had bee
7887.as going on, some planks of the flooring had been raised, and Father de Lisle at
7888.e at once ' less. sprang into the living grave that apparently yawned before him
7889.y, and kept so sharp a watch that dnring the whole day no communication could po
7890.e, and Mary was terrified at the burning fever that came on, and the restless st
7891. were again removed, and Henry, kneeling down, called for Walter. " Father, are
7892.her, are you alive ? " were now entering. " I am " Ha Sir sorry to Robert," said
7893.mitted if you will persist in disobeying her Majesty's Privy Council's most exce
7894.. Sir Robert," said the sheriff, drawing himself "Well, well, up, "if you will h
7895.ome And a basket was lowered by a string. " of that." fort you." This miserable
7896.er hast come with let At length, finding that the men slept so soundly at night,
7897.to pray awhile beside her, then blessing her and all the others of the sorrowing
7898. her and all the others of the sorrowing household, he quitted Thoresby in compa
7899.resby in company with Arthur Leslie. ing grave. me Sheriff," said Sir Robert; "a
7900.All Souls' Day, when Mr. Barin wu making a sermon. Th e next day the house where
7901.r rose at the taunt but resistance being useless ; CHAPTER V. and suspicious, he
7902.ly less Itfltteth not thy taste; sitting by her side, moderated a little the fur
7903.e fury of the The flowers of everlasting spring pale, Do grow for thy repast.' S
7904.of the The flowers of everlasting spring pale, Do grow for thy repast.' Still th
7905. sheltered. " but the Willingly, darling one," said Rose, cheerfully, as she lik
7906.ars old, good walls of Thoresby "Nothing there" said one of the men; "'tis an un
7907.e most frightful riot enstairs. shouting and hallooing to each other, turning to
7908.ul riot enstairs. shouting and hallooing to each other, turning to curses sued,
7909.ing and hallooing to each other, turning to curses sued, room, too, for ( as the
7910.r ( as they found their game was missing. her mistress. She entered the room wit
7911. of the young Duchess o' Bertram. tiring ing, or A small looking-glass was affix
7912.the young Duchess o' Bertram. tiring ing, or A small looking-glass was affixed t
7913. Bertram. tiring ing, or A small looking-glass was affixed to the wall, and the
7914.gether, and before the glass was sitting ; fYBOHNK. the duchess herself, her sun
7915.n over her white neck, and half Blinding her fair face, while she was busy in ex
7916.ir face, while she was busy in examining the workmanship of it curi msly-oarved
7917.nly, to such as me. Well, 'tis something to mnse will hiy down ih s boy on Walte
7918. of secret grief, which, to a discerning Has the good eye, was visible under bri
7919.d than ever, succeeded, then, in winning his wife s depth of Ah affection, aud f
7920.ife s depth of Ah affection, aud filling up the void in the yearning heart? Rose
7921. aud filling up the void in the yearning heart? Rose is close behind no, but beh
7922.cret is unravelled. her now, and holding up the baby, his rosy face is reflected
7923., and it is my fault," said Rose, rising quickly ; "now I will do my best with a
7924.ten years had Rose Ford been the waiting-maid of Constance, and it may easily be
7925.make Rose happy. There was but one thing she knew Rose valued the ex of her reli
7926. and whenever there was a secret meeting of the Catholics in some private house,
7927.ell, Kose," said Constance, after having fondly caressed her child, were you suc
7928. child, were you successful this morning ? You stayed so long, I began to fear y
7929.ngs that she had returned on the morning we have described. And by Rose's hands
7930.any a hunted priest, and many a starving Catholic. Many a perishing one had been
7931.ny a starving Catholic. Many a perishing one had been revived by Constance's car
7932.e ; ' ' ; ; to-day," said Rose, lowering her voice, "was my young lord, now Fath
7933.especially from her, and went on winning love from all, and scattc ing and here,
7934.on winning love from all, and scattc ing and here, is a life of such heroic self
7935.ength to profess the faith. perpetuating his." " But the act of attainder has be
7936.or news. Is Father de "You and reasoning part of the masculine nature, without o
7937.s, and he may was untouched. Fascinating and beloved, admired and sought What re
7938.loved, admired and sought What rejoicing for you, after, she yet seemed to posse
7939. slie perceived that prayers were rising up around her, wondered not but she "De
7940.row must come at last, and Rose, neeling down beside her, " death ; and Rose pra
7941. not for me, but one cannot help envying, sometimes, the peace, the joy, the cer
7942., the cerSee, Rose," she added, pointing CHAPTER VI. tainty, y u seem to possess
7943.. Doctor. What a sigh is there something 'o envy, to be a child jike that, sleep
7944. envy, to be a child jike that, sleeping in its Gentlewoman. I would not have su
7945.h looked out on the long garden, sloping down to the banks, I 1 more caution. Th
7946. ty's, 'urns and convenience for lauding nnd embarking be found, as well as the
7947.nd convenience for lauding nnd embarking be found, as well as the barge in which
7948.s. Surely I mistake not now, in thinking I address a daughter of De Lisle, a lin
7949. a which I consider unwarrantable taking liberty in a stranger. Your errand here
7950., and then sank on the ground, crouching at his feet. "Have pity on me," she gas
7951. have pity." " Pity !" said he, stooping over her, and speaking in tones of " th
7952.said he, stooping over her, and speaking in tones of " the utmost tenderness. My
7953.ll, the lrge table, covered with writing which you leant has pierced your hand c
7954.ll materials, near which she was sitting, showed plainly a taste Him who will ne
7955. "No, no, Walter," she answered, raising her head; "it is Ten years have strange
7956.untenance which tell of from the mocking shadow of his love. No," ht-r voice gre
7957.eyes, which speak of tears hot, blinding tears. At the cast aside every hope of
7958.ross of Christ I m ment we re describing, the countess was sitting at her writin
7959. re describing, the countess was sitting at her writing, cast away faith and my
7960. the countess was sitting at her writing, cast away faith and my hopes of heaven
7961.both have our reward. table, and holding in her hands a manuscript, evidently of
7962. age " And our and value. She was giving her whole attention to deciphering moth
7963.iving her whole attention to deciphering mother, Isabel," he answered, "have you
7964. at length she laid it down, and looking around the room as gotten her f have yo
7965.otten her f have you forgotten her dying bed, and her last it was not if to reli
7966.ras which formed the doorway was praying for you. Have you forgotten Castle de L
7967.ss, th brook and the song of the passing bird. You have not rewith the grief of
7968.ed from the am certain, from his bearing as he did not give his name, I tender y
7969.did not give his name, I tender yearning with which he had looked on her, to the
7970.In another minute she returned, ushering in a gentleparted. se ks dress, though
7971. become habitual to her ; now re-seating herself, s..e motioned her vis tor also
7972.norance have you to a lost and wandering sheep. Yr ou sold sinned, but with the
7973. sinned, but with the full light shining in your eyes. human ; man whose ; your
7974. deterIsabel rose from the ground. thing; is life. He Isabel, .,: r b at ing for
7975.hing; is life. He Isabel, .,: r b at ing for a moment; but her l> Her tone juw-k
7976. replied TYBORNE. me the agony of seeing yon again, or worse, bidding my serhaxe
7977.y of seeing yon again, or worse, bidding my serhaxe. chosen vants turn you from
7978. share of the compact. She stood waiting for his ans ;ver hard, cold, and resolu
7979. were raised to heaven. 27 We : speaking to himself, "Yes, it is the last time,
7980.rm of passionate grief. There struggling, almost with convulsions, her husband f
7981.pany " Beauville," said Isabel, kneeling at his feet, "I have given up a;l for y
7982." said her husband, rom the bar, closing the door after him. The parley lasted s
7983.ed his destination, win n, on pero iving em of the "Wild Boar," he at once enter
7984.e tap-room. It was crowded; loud talking and laughing were going on, and oaths a
7985.t was crowded; loud talking and laughing were going on, and oaths and curses wer
7986.ed; loud talking and laughing were going on, and oaths and curses were flying in
7987.ing on, and oaths and curses were flying in all directions. Near the fire was se
7988.he fire was seated one group, consisting of about twelve or fifteen men. Most se
7989.he outside of the group, his arm leaning on th< of his seat, his wine cup in his
7990.mewhat palo face and deep-set glittering It was this man whom the eye of the str
7991.yes. and to him he advanced, and, laying his hand on his shoulder, said in a whi
7992.is house my house Beauville, , ! versing in whispers. "The thing is easy enough,
7993.lle, , ! versing in whispers. "The thing is easy enough," said Eliot, " now I un
7994.I know hither Isabel." he said, starting "'tis thy brother come no other would h
7995.h a look of diaboLcal mal' ice darkening his face. Th j look " mute terror on th
7996.I am briefly, and with a hasty not going to hurt the idiot I have my nod. But on
7997.t the idiot I have my nod. But one thing I hands too full for such employments.
7998.aid Isabel, eagerly and he is not coming again I bade be still and will bear all
7999.e have parted for aye." "And a goo thing too," said her husband carelessly. "Now
8000. And Isabel obeyed and the earl, humming the air of a love ; ; The stranger was
8001.s about to depart, when the host, coming forward, exclaimed " Good, my masters;
8002.rs; part ye not, surely, without tasting- mv good wine. Thou shalt pledge thy fr
8003. quitted the apartment. but, controlling himself, he answered " Thou dost well t
8004.wo me, mine host. cups," and then taking one of them, he turned to Eliot, and "
8005. success of our enterprise. after having drained t e cup, he flung down a gold p
8006.he tavern. CHAPTER VIL " There's nothing in this world HO sweet as love, And, ne
8007.e, And, next to love, the sweetest thing is hate ; I'velearn'd to hale, and ther
8008.swept keenly along t-.e streets, driving the clouds of dust before it, and makin
8009.the clouds of dust before it, and making the passers-by shiver and hurry on more
8010. one w hose rapid step and the searching glances he cast around, marked him as e
8011.onversation, when the shades of even ing were beginning to fall, Master Eliot wa
8012.en the shades of even ing were beginning to fall, Master Eliot was seen walking
8013.g to fall, Master Eliot was seen walking lei" Wild surely along the streets in t
8014.fter were of the poorest kind. ascending two pairs of stairs, he opened, without
8015.s of stairs, he opened, without knocking, the door of a small and miserable room
8016.earth, upon which there were a few dying " embers, sat, or half-c;ouehecl, a wom
8017.so pale and hagand seamed with suffering, that it might have gard, so marked Eli
8018.d. It was a bare and dt si slate-looking piece of the country. " How Why wilt th
8019.n a low and the No," said Maud, speaking for the This farm-house was indeed a lo
8020.ed that point before. No gold straggling outekirtsof town ceased beiore Tyborne
8021. ; The Cath- miles distant. olic serving-maiden of the Duchess " to-morrow A loo
8022. "Well," said Maud, bitterly, "supposing what harm is that ? Surely the tiring-
8023.ng what harm is that ? Surely the tiring- woman of the of hither, Bertram comes
8024.tinseveral per ons were seen approaching. ized the other with u tomewhat searchi
8025.ized the other with u tomewhat searching glance, and each and all hesitated who
8026.rongly barred and girded a small grating enabled those within to see and hold pa
8027.alwart appearance was behind the grating." " And who comes hither ?" he said, "
8028.istress, is certain "Id " priest staying." was the reply; and the bolts were slo
8029. It was obparty, till at last but rising, and going towards the heap of straw, h
8030.arty, till at last but rising, and going towards the heap of straw, he lifted se
8031. thou there ?" exclaimed Maud, springing after that the white covering, its tap
8032. springing after that the white covering, its tap rs and crucifix, told plainly
8033.een, half in shade, the figure adjoining " Where I I shall do as I list she ie a
8034.ou canst tration of the Sacraments being so rare, they " If thou refuse my reque
8035.If thou refuse my request. Do my bidding, and you shall indeed to the fainting s
8036.ng, and you shall indeed to the fainting souls of the Catholics. to At length th
8037.s for Mass. put on " It is like staining my hands with blood, and through her; T
8038.s the whole." former's. His blindfolding, and bound round his " If this be " Art
8039.nd his " If this be " Art thou deceiving me " cried Maud. all, I the shadows of
8040.or fool," this I trust," ; no such thing. Thou shalt No," said Maud, "I will do
8041.; . yourself, "Judge I have in deceiving thee t "shall And judge quickly, or I t
8042. eyes were fixed upon ; A secret dawning into vision would be his last Mass and
8043.be his last Mass and my thoughts warning told me he had once given me wandered f
8044. his future to bo spent in bloodshedding England, excited much interest, and dre
8045. his clothes*. sumed coat,f and dragging him and foot across a horse. The soldie
8046. asiist, who held their breath trembling with fear. But which wa< most like the
8047. utter the grievous sin of thus handling 11 " "Nay, Master Eliot," miid W:ii 'I-
8048. lust circle of recipients were kneeling ar und the altar, waiting for the Bread
8049. were kneeling ar und the altar, waiting for the Bread of Life, when the sudden
8050.Bread of Life, when the sudden trampling of horses around the house, the thunder
8051. horses around the house, the thundering of staves against the door, and the lou
8052.. ' ' ' ' Eliot replied only by striking him, and ordering the men to hurry; and
8053.plied only by striking him, and ordering the men to hurry; and so, in this guise
8054.. He moved from one to the other, giving the Holy Communion, and then turned to
8055.tant death fa:- le. s than any profaning < f the Holy Mysteries. It was useless,
8056. with the armed force who were batte ing at the portal, or to enrage them with a
8057. mischief, am .sed themselves by hooting, shouting, and throwing mud and stones
8058. am .sed themselves by hooting, shouting, and throwing mud and stones at Walter.
8059.elves by hooting, shouting, and throwing mud and stones at Walter. The gates of
8060.again was the Countess Benuville sitting iu her bower, but though it is not many
8061.feet iu sud.len terror but on perceiving the intruder was only her sister- n-law
8062.e face of her who generally went smiling through life. She came up to Isabel, sa
8063.ough life. She came up to Isabel, saying, " Do you know what I have come to spea
8064.bout that I hurried to speak. On hearing of the sad event, I sent a message to N
8065. another room, Arthur alone accompanying him, and they Legau the search, seasoni
8066.im, and they Legau the search, seasoning it with coarte jokes and ribaldry, exci
8067. they lie foully," said Isabel, starting to her her eyes glaring. "He never did
8068.Isabel, starting to her her eyes glaring. "He never did this thing." " I know I
8069.r eyes glaring. "He never did this thing." " I know I feel sure of it," answered
8070.u hast me, thou hast not done this thing feet, ! body of the Lord. "Shame on my
8071. hast no/I?" said Isabel, again grasping his hand. The earl looked at her. " Yes
8072. his side, ready to take down in writing the prisoner's confessions. power, Walt
8073.vy Council to interrogate you concerning ce tain matheaven, and then she said, a
8074. years afterwards," O God, O God, during your stay in England, the names of the
8075.ne to guish for Walter, but the breaking of the heart's idol, the anquestions,"
8076. anquestions," answered Walter, snapping of a life's hope. She moved towards the
8077., men seized Walter, and after stripping off some of his u; per left the room. C
8078.t the room. Constance went home, bidding Rachel send clothing, placed him in the
8079. went home, bidding Rachel send clothing, placed him in the rack. It was a large
8080.ter was laid on his back tess was raving in braiu fever. upon the floor, his wri
8081.he p-eseuce of the justice, that nothing " Life of George Xappicr, Priett. " Her
8082. Here on the next day, Mr. Genings being at the consecration, Topcliffe, the aic
8083.f to the door, where he u-aa celebrating; people, they vested him in a ridicu'ou
8084.pe ihein; and whereas, also in searching his pocketn, the constable to bis feel'
8085.y surprise, and he had been daily arming himself for the conflict. On his arriva
8086.geon, he fell on his knees, and, looking up to heaven,* cried for help. "Strengt
8087. God by the remembrance of Thy scourging and Thy bitter passion, help me in this
8088. prisoners accused of the most revolting crimes. They were pent up like a set of
8089.thee, Master Eliot, said Walter, looking at "I pray that none may deal with thee
8090.e room. From side to side of the ceiling stretched a long and heavy wooden beam.
8091.ithdrew the lower piece of wood, causing a sudden jerk and a rush of blood throu
8092. v.-as tortured for his spirit, yearning for the salvation of others, by the sig
8093.all listened and none mocked ;:nd during the ten or twelve days he was immured t
8094.ne of the scav ngers. From early morning uniil night, Walter was kept at work, a
8095. . one of the under-jailers, approaching ; " He has fainted, Master Eliot," said
8096.ontinue, then," said Eliot, coolly going back to his seat. The wood was taken aw
8097.ck to his cell. There was Arthur waiting for him, and tears flowed from his eyes
8098.alter, in answer to his words of burning indignation " it pains me to hear thee
8099.I thank God from my heart for permit ing me to witness for His unme. You know no
8100. You know not how near it seems to bring me ! young man dog work. hour, and leav
8101.sible, and with drops of blood trickling from his hands and feet; it was his las
8102. hands and feet; it was his last racking. "The it were too long, to my mind." ti
8103.h of Calvary." "But it is not witnessing for Christ," cried Arthur, indig" think
8104. to it an' please you, my thirst burning. "I am determined to conquer him," said
8105.an antagonist I am. Where is the meeting to be ?" " In the "at one of the chapel
8106.ock you shall be sent for. The following day, at the appointed hour, Walter was
8107.s. people, and one minister was standing in the desk for prayer, while the other
8108.Close by them, and so i "To-morrow being Sunday, good Master de Lisle," said he,
8109.th you on the doctrines of Popery, being desirous to convin of tho error of your
8110.tein ; my pooi- ; daughter, which, being of so frightful a nature, was seldom us
8111. was mentioned, but De Lisle's torturing had been Eliot's hands, and he had no p
8112.t J)oin.inus Dcus he was called, feeling sure something more cruel than usual no
8113.us he was called, feeling sure something more cruel than usual noster, qui in al
8114.conclusion, and the minister in towering anger descended kneel on the pavement,
8115. while others stantly rose, and, getting on the chair, exclaimed in a loud pass
8116.Thou art mad," said the governor, coming forward "thou governor turned away in h
8117. prison attendants he had been quivering with agony, and now came for; Note. He
8118. Lif of Edmund Cavpian. "Mr White, lying in Bndewell cliffe ward, and, throwing
8119.g in Bndewell cliffe ward, and, throwing himself by Walter, said, in a broken "
8120.. Life of Eustachius White. half-glaring eyes were turned staff, rod aud His wil
8121.have done." whom with the form of giving the accused the right to object to any
8122.in sultry day in July, the court at King's Bench was crowded, for it -was unders
8123.time might have recognized them as being the French ambassadress and the Duchess
8124.he Duchess of Bertram. A cause was going on as they entered. A tall, fine-lookin
8125.on as they entered. A tall, fine-looking man was standing at the bar, and clingi
8126.d. A tall, fine-looking man was standing at the bar, and clinging to his arm was
8127.an was standing at the bar, and clinging to his arm was a lady, pale as death, w
8128.s a lady, pale as death, whose suffering in the position she found herself was e
8129.ainst thee, both of obstinately refusing to go to church, and also of harboring
8130.g to go to church, and also of harboring a priest, one Master Patthou erson, now
8131., one Master Patthou erson, now awaiting his trial in the prison of Bridewell ar
8132.embled on his lips. the constant racking, that the effort was unavailing, and hi
8133. racking, that the effort was unavailing, and his " hand would have fallen back
8134. pause, and then, ere the judge standing close beside the bar, leant over, and,
8135. beside the bar, leant over, and, taking the hand could answer, the silence was
8136. silence was broken by a clear thrilling voice, "so abused for the confession of
8137.due. "Oh, my lord," said Walter, looking at him, "surely The effect on John Lyda
8138.s the bishop made no answer but, turning to the "A continued bag was found among
8139. below " " My lord," said Lydar, turning to the judge, " I pray you ground. " le
8140.ved the penalty is hard ta bear. nothing to the point," answered the bishop, hot
8141.wilt." " No While the j;dge was speaking, the Lord Mayor, the Bepriest, no bisho
8142." replied the bishop; "but not a massing cordt r of the city, and the Bishop af
8143.y, and the Bishop af London, were taking their places on the bench, in readiness
8144.id his hand on Lydar's head. sacrificing prie t, for sacrificing is essential to
8145.ead. sacrificing prie t, for sacrificing is essential to priesthood " a Hold, ho
8146. "look ye, my and if you are sacrificing priest, you are a massing priest, for w
8147.re sacrificing priest, you are a massing priest, for what other sacrifice have t
8148.ew law, as lord judge, he is reconciling a recusant in the open court." " "Separ
8149.d his wife listen to their sentence, ing priest, yo i are no sacrificing priest;
8150.nce, ing priest, yo i are no sacrificing priest; if no sacrificing \fter uhich t
8151.no sacrificing priest; if no sacrificing \fter uhich thty were removed Irom and
8152.isle, and altogether plead against being tried in this court, or by such a jury.
8153.tended from the see of Kome, not holding the fear of God before his eyes, and sl
8154.ar of God before his eyes, and slighting the laws and statutes of this realm of
8155.shop moved ' uneasily in his seat during this address, Life of John See Life of
8156.r treason f See ye well, I die for doing that which our Lord Himself commanded,
8157.which our Lord Himself commanded, saying, ' Go, teach all nations.' I returned i
8158.forth but I am no traitor. And according to this law, you priests thorit. : woul
8159.. : would condemn Christ Himself, seeing " H.- also was a priest, ac- cording to
8160.ing " H.- also was a priest, ac- cording to the order of Melchisedec. " This fin
8161.sedec. " This fine language and pleading will avail thee nothing; you will not a
8162.age and pleading will avail thee nothing; you will not acknowledge the supremacy
8163. will continue; for this religion, being divine, can ncv8164.an can be the head of tho Church, seeing that Ciirist Himself gave that dignity
8165. " this is " Wilt held the half-fainting Constance in her arms " my husband foll
8166.better baron a few " year? back, leaning on hia mother's breast, and My lord, I
8167. the live in this miserable world having denied Him." "Neither canst thou deny,"
8168.anst thou deny," said the judge, "having h ard hunted priest in joyous accents;
8169.onfessions of both men and women, having offeied the damna- heavenly choirs, as
8170. before ble idolatry of the Mass, having blessed beads, and carried their gaze,
8171.f death for the sole crime of exercising thy priestly office in this free land u
8172.- ffote. selves for the sake of shedding my blood. Well do I know that the witne
8173.ell do I know that the witnesses waiting here can prove nothing against me ; but
8174.witnesses waiting here can prove nothing against me ; but beforehand I am ready
8175. say, in the name is there in exercising of all truth and justice, what treason
8176.son the functions of my ministry, seeing that ' CHAPTER If the love of is i.n XI
8177.which are strictly prohibited, hindering likewise the people from going to churc
8178.hindering likewise the people from going to church, and beguiling them with Popi
8179.ople from going to church, and beguiling them with Popish And ye, my good master
8180.? Ye know your outy, as loyal and loving subjects of Elizabeth our queen (whom G
8181.r queen (whom God preserve), is to bring in the " prisoner guilty of the charges
8182.CONDEMNED to death Oh, word of exceeding dread word phemous folly. Good master j
8183.ugh compared. to prevent me from wishing for more for the love of Him in whose h
8184.Lisles had triumphed over fast returning. ; and health was sufferers strong cons
8185.bedstead, table, and chairs, und writing materials were furnished to him by the
8186.everity was still retained, by replacing the irons on his legs, they could not a
8187. enter the ' bridegroom's chamber. Bring to me no sad looks, co sighs and tears.
8188.not what I have was it not humbly hoping for this end that, desired by thy good
8189.cknowledge Thee, O Lord. Thou, the sting LAU at death being overcome, bUevrj the
8190.Lord. Thou, the sting LAU at death being overcome, bUevrj the kingdom of The God
8191.hen almost rent asunder with the racking, he was taken before her; she wanted to
8192.ed to see the man, she said, who, having made Europe ring with his name, could s
8193., she said, who, having made Europe ring with his name, could spurn every hope o
8194.hou wiliest in all things," Then turning again to Rose, he said must have been a
8195. me in will be an opportunity of serving God longer, and making mymy last confli
8196.tunity of serving God longer, and making mymy last conflict and, Arthur, dost th
8197.true friend "You must give up exercising all priestly functions, and " for you w
8198. for your generous devotion." concealing your faith as far as possible." Arthur
8199.ssible." Arthur did not reply, but going towards the bed on \\ hich Walter's fac
8200.s radiant again. " Most Walter was lying, he knelt down by the side and hid his
8201.ruth ?" said Walter, in a tone thrilling thank the duchess, as you must do for m
8202.rist and His Crosa her zeal in procuring that for me which I cannot accept, try
8203.r die i or his glory ? Does not the king sion, father, and give me to driuk of t
8204. waters of eternal life. Towards evening in the same day, Walter lay down to sle
8205.not even the merchant oie for his During the day the cell had been thronged with
8206.w adorn is to love Tell her that the ing, and that it was evident Walter was the
8207.pared for one moment to the and blessing; and none ever forgot those words of sw
8208.the prison and the rack, and the looking forward to Tyaud strength. It was remar
8209.th, the greatness trod softly, and going up to the bed, bent over the sleeper, o
8210.both his auditors were weepthe wrestling-match in the college grounds at Kheims,
8211. the college grounds at Kheims, when ing. " I have ti favor to ask of the duches
8212.is visitor's face. Then came a wondering look of hulf now I must bid you farewel
8213.s; it VKh been "I fell asleep, _p raving that if it were His will, a prie-t tion
8214.he children of earth, the On the morning of the following day, Walter was agnin
8215.rth, the On the morning of the following day, Walter was agnin thought of what t
8216.nedictions. I came forward, and kneeling, entreated the priest's t;iblc prayers
8217.ers for me." They her companion blessing. dropped her veil, and urn. wing the ar
8218.lessing. dropped her veil, and urn. wing the arm of "1 oitii hardly raiso my han
8219.sages into tho free air. The lady citing to Rose's arm, and When they reached li
8220.ranquil eye: Whilst the free xplrlt wing'd lier flight From " In thy bam to beam
8221.on him. She stood still without speaking. " What can I do for you, my daughter?"
8222.te bridal crown dtaplay'd In thy wedding robe array'd Of thy purple life-blood w
8223.st of love." LYIU CATBOLICA. THE evening dow:i, of the same day had come. Walter
8224.by the " I entrance of the jailer. bring thee bad news, Master de Lisle." !" ans
8225.e^ "Impossible !" cried Arthur, starting up; said three days, and lo to-morrow i
8226.days gone by, to the lost, the perishing !" "Nay," said Walter, "tell me of them
8227.tell me of them; it will ease thy aching heart, which is breaking 'neath tho bur
8228.ease thy aching heart, which is breaking 'neath tho burden of mem! glance. 41 1
8229.n Sej ; have I not ; ! She was crouching on the ground now, and weeping those ag
8230.crouching on the ground now, and weeping those agonizing tears which they only s
8231. ground now, and weeping those agonizing tears which they only shed whose eyes h
8232. " I am " No, friend," said Walter going to my feasting, not ; .' , to leave it.
8233.riend," said Walter going to my feasting, not ; .' , to leave it." not forget "
8234.ion, my child sickened, and this morning she died." " Then I shall see her ere y
8235.rick." "Ah, Arthur," said Walter, laying his hand caressingly upon " Why not tur
8236.y not turn now to God, and after leading a life of pen- him, " didst thou but kn
8237.ebt." " "Iwill father, she said, looking up eagerly ; "but what is it roun;Jed W
8238.. you are about ise ! to enter and bring you to a priest. Wilt prom- " Arthur,"
8239.saw him, and had compas- off, and giving the jailer some gold pieces, he pissed,
8240.e was ready, and a companion was waiting for Wal* thy promise ;" and it was give
8241.e not that, father." she said, shrinking back ; me bravely, seeing my poor hands
8242.aid, shrinking back ; me bravely, seeing my poor hands cannot help themselves. L
8243.I \Valter':i turn. ioru;inl, ;.nd making " You have served Satan in the holy sig
8244.it in prayer, arid then, without waiting to bo forced, or even helped into it, h
8245.himself upon it an if he had been riding "* in Catholics had admission to the su
8246.ep ye for me," prison, and -were weeping bitterly. " said Waltrr, " who am glad
8247. God I too had a mother who died praying for mo perchance from that sky abovj us
8248.knelt by her side, " ; ones, are leaning to see us die Oh, how mightily they pra
8249.ude. Walter raised himself, and blessing the people, exclaim" God save ed, you a
8250.eat a passage with t:;e:r staves, crying Back, in the queen's name." As the proc
8251. as The great multitude swayed and " ing there, some weeping, most gazing with w
8252.ude swayed and " ing there, some weeping, most gazing with wondering curiosity.
8253.d " ing there, some weeping, most gazing with wondering curiosity. At the open w
8254.some weeping, most gazing with wondering curiosity. At the open window of one la
8255.roup. The French ambassador was kneeling forward, near him knelt also his wife,
8256.d kn; It the duchess of Bertram, holding in her arms her youngest child, while h
8257.re's spat into Walter's face, exclaiming, as he did it, holy water for ye." The
8258.ide was so excited by this, that, making a tremendous effort, he broke the cord
8259.to play, and some amused themby throwing stones and mud at the hurdle. It roused
8260.mpt to defend himself. This, from having both hands and feet bound, was impossib
8261.impossible, and his angry and unavailing houses, which have been getting gradual
8262.availing houses, which have been getting gradually few and straggling, wiithings
8263.een getting gradually few and straggling, wiithings diverted the mob so much, th
8264.iles in the Fields, and there, according to an old custom, " their last panion,
8265.n, and one ruffian in the crowd, getting near the hurdle, a cup of wine or ale w
8266.rs, ; passion of mischief selves feeling of the idle mob had been rather one of
8267. on Ralph's ear with a strange appealing sound. The tears were falling down his
8268. appealing sound. The tears were falling down his rough hard face. "Alas, father
8269.to render his account, and he is winning one more soul to lay before those feet.
8270.he man hast done no crime, save refusing to chop and change thy I like thy coura
8271.e of the gall and vinegar A crowd having collected at of his Lord's last cup on
8272.I to hell." Walter, who had been looking earnestly " What is thy name, friend ?"
8273. heart and died, because he woul.i biing me up in his fashion." " And what did h
8274.what did he teach thee ?" " Why, nothing. Marry, then, \; hat had he to teach ?
8275. "Kalph," answered Walter, "we are going together to death, let us go together t
8276.lled gaily past, unmindful and unknowing of cruelty and wrong on earth, and in t
8277.urIt was a sight, in very truth rounding the place of execution were filled with
8278. by great perseverance, and many winning words, ho succeeded in his purpose. Art
8279.ives to be near the loved and KiifTering. The tall gallows rose grim and dark be
8280. before tho spectator's eyes, but loving hands had endeavored to rob it of some
8281.truly repented leaves and sweet-smelling herbs. The affectionate hearts who had
8282.h planks. assistants were there, holding in their hands the cords for binding th
8283.ing in their hands the cords for binding the victims, and tho long knives for th
8284.d come thi her with the lr pe of winning a recantation from Walter, or oi' prove
8285.cantation from Walter, or oi' proventing any dying words of his having weight wi
8286.from Walter, or oi' proventing any dying words of his having weight with the peo
8287.proventing any dying words of his having weight with the people. The hurdle stop
8288.figu.e, and though torture and suffering had done their work, thei lingered much
8289. in your faith mortal sin by frequenting the sacraments cf Holy Church patiently
8290.ell, then, my son," said Walter, turning to Kalph; and he would have embraced hi
8291.d as to what is said of Catholics having dispensations for lying, perjury, killi
8292.Catholics having dispensations for lying, perjury, killing kings, and other the
8293.ispensations for lying, perjury, killing kings, and other the most enormous crim
8294.ided soul." Walter looked at him, saying gently "My friend, you and I ar not one
8295.d shrieks and cries burst from the dying sufferer. Walter prayed earnestly for R
8296.nd then it ended. Upon the poor, panting, bleeding corpse earth could do no more
8297. ended. Upon the poor, panting, bleeding corpse earth could do no more. " "Now,
8298.Christ taught. sheriff was quite willing to forbid it The " An involuntary smile
8299.od tlii n inde.-J I testify that nothing was laid to if to be a Catholic priest
8300. on the soul of the in up, and, kneeling down, implored pardon for the deed he w
8301. do I forgive thee," said Walter, giving him some pieces of gold he had brought
8302.r off were seen the oxen quietly grazing. in Hush, ye mourners by the scaffold o
8303.orne, -weep not so the blood is dripping truly, and the green earth of England s
8304.en, there is "a sound of harpers harping with bitterly ; their harps. " the dist
8305. in its beauty. of the martyrs surviving and speaking, after the heart had bean
8306.y. of the martyrs surviving and speaking, after the heart had bean numerous. blu
8307.t and kissed it on his shoulders, saying, ''Behold the last it, aud then put my
8308.thood." He closed his eyes, and clasping his hands, he said, "In manus tuas Domi
8309.hen, with slow reverent step And beating heart, From out thy joyous days Thou mu
8310.ion, and which we shrink from describing ; nevertheless, as was beautifully said
8311.ess, as was beautifully said in speaking of the gerly, And, leaving all behind,
8312.d in speaking of the gerly, And, leaving all behind, Come forth alone, To join t
8313.e brute beasts. The executioners growing timid, did work badly, and cut and stab
8314.dly, and cut and stabbed, scarce knowing what they were about. The first incisio
8315. griefs; but their sorrow had a soothing character the loss to them was bitter,
8316.rthur Leslie fell the task of delivering the letters that Walter had written fro
8317.himself, at dictation, but the trembling signature of the tortured hand of the m
8318.horesby was a fol: ! W and the quivering heart was torn from its place and held
8319.s place and held before the fast glazing eyes, and then placed on a spear O JESU
8320.U, JESU, " said and shown to the howling multitude. ' lows : " MY DEAREST UNCLE
8321.r was struck from his body, and in doing so the clumsy hangman let his axe first
8322.r who they u ind in carry a well-meaning, an,l who an evii, mnrtbering ml if it
8323.ll-meaning, an,l who an evii, mnrtbering ml if it be His tho mean season, God f
8324.s for my ecd to pr paremyse f for loving kinsman ; and so having grail God, neve
8325.yse f for loving kinsman ; and so having grail God, never greater in mind, nor l
8326., nor less troubled towards God, lauding up all my iniquities in His recious wou
8327.God grimt us both His grace aud blessing to the end, that TYBOESE. in His favor,
8328. end, that TYBOESE. in His favor, living in His fear, and dying 89 deatn we may
8329.His favor, living in His fear, and dying 89 deatn we may enjoy one Priest."* of
8330.E, To Father Mordaunt he wrote : casting off the bod glorified wounds of my swee
8331.t in uo ways omit to write to you, being the last time I must salute you for, un
8332.dren, wheresoever they are now sorrowing that the joy of this life is nothing, a
8333.ing that the joy of this life is nothing, and the joy .if ; i tliu after-lit'o ;
8334.if ; i tliu after-lit'o ; is everlasting. It is said on Friday next 1 n.,all be
8335. God grant me humility, that, folio wing His footsteps, obtain the victory. God
8336.ldren I may Jesus JESU. what other thing can I desire than to sufAlas, Father wi
8337.d, God forbid I should glory in anything but the cross of my crucified Lord. My
8338.farewell, ten thousand times Your loving father in the Lord, WALTER DE LISLE, Pr
8339.t dear moment when strength should bring consciousness, and confathers and broth
8340.ts and she became amused at each passing trifle, as an infant in the valiant and
8341.anche and to Mary " MOST DEAB AND LOVING CHILDREN IN OUB LoHD, " Be of good cour
8342. take a step which was truly a of taking up of her cross and confessing Christ.
8343.of taking up of her cross and confessing Christ. In the chapel the Frenc-h embas
8344.embassy, with no witness save her loving Rose, Constance was received into the O
8345. ours is? do you not consider my calling, my estate, my profession? do not you r
8346.ion? do not you remember that I am going to a place of all felicity and pleasure
8347. duke more and more and at last, weeping like a child, he reminded his wife that
8348.o Be of good cheer, then, my most loving chile our lives. lad to dren, and cease
8349.ves. lad to dren, and cease from weeping for would you not be see me a bishop, a
8350.would you not be see me a bishop, a king, or an emperor? How glad, then, may you
8351.'s religion, and the queen appointed ing taught the Lady Fortescue, an elderly k
8352.mily, and a bigoted Protestant, to bring up the child three days Constance must
8353.rs fled, counted by the' mother's aching heart how fondly she watched over them,
8354.efore I go to sleep." The day of parting came at last, and Lady Fortescue, stern
8355.ldren; and when Constance, with bur-ting heart, would have given her some of the
8356.iven her some of the counsels respecting them, which a mother's heart alone can
8357.and a wisdom beyond his years they cling ueck and cover her with kisses, and cry
8358.ith all their childish misery at parting but she knows well this will to forget
8359.It is her torturechamber and her racking. And now the desolate future lay before
8360.rs. Bachel's strength was rapidly giving way from the great strain on bo.Jy and
8361.l's long illness, and her present trying state and Constance knew that Rachel'.i
8362.lgium, we must bend our steps. Threading our way along the narrow streets where
8363.r ouly to attend upon the sick and dying. The church is open to all comIt is a b
8364. the religious several nuns are kneeling in prayer. They wear the habit and scap
8365.Dolorosa." large and celebrated painting it is of the Before the picture is knee
8366.is of the Before the picture is kneeling a lady dressed in black, and those who
8367.hose who are in the habit of frequenting the church bear witness how constantly
8368.erpetuate his family, and in his burning indignation against his sister, he desi
8369.f Bertram to follow his example. Nothing could, however, suit the afflicted, ref
8370.in the direction of Apswell, but turning sharply away when within a few miles of
8371.ty flight. A small vessel was in waiting, and the party embarked. Isabel was lai
8372.ughed with child. sh glee at the foaming waves and the ropes and sails, while Ra
8373.achel sat beside her, with tears rolling down her face. The proud Isabel, with h
8374. tall thin woman, on whose seen kneeling there, and t^ose eyes, which are so oft
8375. which are so often swolleu with weeping, gaze long and loving y on the face of
8376.olleu with weeping, gaze long and loving y on the face of Her who " " Is there A
8377.d bright, and who looked on the receding shore with no glance of sorrow or regre
8378.rs on Constance's face. She stood gazing at the white cliffs of England, until t
8379.lL when His mother "sought Him sorrowing." But on this day, while Constance knel
8380.ments in earnest prayer then approaching Constance, beckoned her from the church
8381. she hospital, in which Isabel was lying. lingered in darkness of mind, and, unt
8382.rally of exhaustion and sorrow, blessing God that He had Brought her to die with
8383.od, and if they prayed for her according to her last earnest message to them, sh
8384.s not wont to say much, but her standing near, wi.ile in one corner knelt Father
8385., I am here." her, too, rest. was coming. " " I see At last she could not go bey
8386.sed to all save the priest and the dying peni- played among the flowers, blithe
8387.ce, and Isabel made her last Com- fering, with death near, and she rejoiced. It
8388.y that two persons might be seen passing munion. After that she spoke but little
8389.th of through the streets, and inquiring anxiously for the AugusOne was a tall a
8390.t comforted me, my her at once as having English blood. They pau.jed before the
8391.came. The woman answered him by bursting into tears. Mother !" she cried, lookin
8392.into tears. Mother !" she cried, looking upwards, "do I see you at " " last? Mot
8393. came to Constance was, that her darling ever acclaim upon her. the little Marqu
8394. "Reverend mother," said the lady, going forward, "lam of his childish glee, whi
8395. "lam of his childish glee, while riding on a pony in the park of Bertram Castle
8396.s agony she sat, as we have said, gazing on the fair scene, and then on was over
8397. her hand. The nun knelt down by her ing stiff in the coldness of death, and tho
8398.r?" said Constance, gently. "Yes, taking one of her darlings safe in his innocen
8399.stance's life, she was watched remaining child grew keener, and increased when s
8400. stern, implacable, and bigoted. But ing, and treated the child with undue sever
8401. Sorrows where she poured out her aching heart, When she grew up, and made her a
8402.orrow, all in sickness, all in suffering, knew the world, she was taken notice o
8403.eager to grant as she ed at her, bearing her bitter triuls so meekly; prieste, w
8404.to visit Belgium, and see were venturing on the English mission, came to see her
8405. I TYBORNE. on Mary's bosotn and holding Rose's hand, she not mutilated rites, o
8406.was another death adorned, yet breathing the odor of a changeless faith, and the
8407.on the ground in sullen despair, abiding presence. And the lime-trees send forth
8408. on some summer day, when tlie scorching glare of the sun is almost blinding, au
8409.hing glare of the sun is almost blinding, aud "gone to Ty borne." And Thoresby H
8410.habitants, and what they have been doing these long pose. Go look at the " hidin
8411.these long pose. Go look at the " hiding-hole" where Wnlter de Lisle fifteen yea
8412., too, has long since rose-trees bending to the earth with their luxuriant weigh
8413. safety, for England is free of bustling, rich, gay London, and recall the scene
8414.werful than man's weapon