Concordance for Fabiola.

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1.   EARLY CHURCH IN PAGAN ROME, ILLUSTRATING THE AS EXEMPLIFIED IN THE LIVES OF St. 
2. faith had long before begun to vivifying it and sanctifying rays the risen virgi
3. re begun to vivifying it and sanctifying rays the risen virgin soil of this west
4. e horizon when dark and its light, ening clouds of persecution seemed aSbout to
5. to obscure instead of a bright promising, and cheerful day for the Church, a nig
6. night of disap- pointment and suffering. The good already accomplished by the e
7. ionaries seemed imperilled by the coming storm, and the work at that time in pro
8. ork at that time in progress was meeting with fierce and even it cruel oppositio
9. elves, was necessary that the found- ing of Christ's Church in America should un
10. mpant bigotry, partisanship, humiliating social ostracism. Like the heroic chara
11. nd sometimes perilous task of preserving, practising, and declaring their faith.
12. perilous task of preserving, practising, and declaring their faith. Such exampl
13. of preserving, practising, and declaring their faith. Such examples they found f
14. e testimony unto Christ Jesus, producing such beautifully fruits of virtue, and
15. eautifully fruits of virtue, and showing forth so and so powerfully the effects
16. riumphed over opposition ; and verifying the words of : the Apostle, victoria, b
17. in the story of Fabiola, the struggling Catholics of this country learned souls
18. nce. how to possess their While admiring the heroic fortitude of those martyrs,
19. e of those martyrs, though not presuming always predecessors in the faith footst
20. ncouraged to follow in their all bearing patiently religious privations and adhe
21. iently religious privations and adhering of to it their faith amid hatred and co
22. ith amid hatred and contempt, and giving bold testimony before unbelieving men.
23. giving bold testimony before unbelieving men. mr Inspired by the example of thes
24. rom heaven down by the Son of the living God, the truth which He had ; confirmed
25. e. and For tkis truth, they were willing to How opportune, at that time, was the
26. in a work from a master-hand, presenting light the trials most vivid and realist
27. e dome Roman Capitol ! Like the cheering flambeau borne in the hands of the acol
28. erness then to a great extent prevailing over our broad land. But as the primiti
29. itive Church emerged in fi'om her hiding-places, so, thank God, has that same Ch
30. eings by their holy and self-sacrificing lives. As the story of Fabiola taught o
31. period. beautiful engravings will bring Its many bright fortify more vividly be
32. was formed, the author of the following little work was consulted upon He not o
33. hurch of the Basilicas;" each comprising three hundred ; years ;" a third would
34. reetly,—that he will find In proposing this sketch, he added,—perhaps the re
35. first, by way and urged of illustrating the proposed plan. He was taken at his
36. tion, he consented with an understanding, that it was not to be an occupation, b
37. f situation and circumstances— varying ing ones. It has thus been composed bit
38. tuation and circumstances— varying ing ones. It has thus been composed bit by
39. upon ecclesiastical antiquities. Nothing would have been this easier than to cas
40. riter' habits, condition, ideas, feeling, ity. His desire was rather to make his
41. om frequently and almost casually seeing them, rather than have to be drawn from
42. named, we clearly draw out the following circumstances. She is evidently pursued
43. hoice under various images, representing him even as the object of homage to sun
44. ters brought, He has actually put a ring has transferred the blood from His own
45. ek to hers, has crowned her with budding roses. Her eye is really upon him, with
46. se's presence. finger, upon her unerring gaze, and returned looks of gracious lo
47. than the Church has done ? For, putting aside all inquiry as to the genuineness
48. ages are suggested and still more waving the question whether the hard critical
49. r of that saint. writer of the following pages considered himself therefore The
50. the reader to At any rate, even looking at the amount of information to be expe
51. rm, and one intended for general reading, judge. a comparison between the subjec
52. extended in some It consists concluding chapters. narrative of events. rather o
53. as been carefully suppressed, as nothing could be admitted here which the most s
54. olic eye would shrink from contemplating. It is recreation, indeed earnestly des
55. may rise from its perusal with a feeling that his time Rather let it has not bee
56. e Early Ages of the Church Administering the Sacrament of Extreme Unction, in th
57. AWINGS BY JOSEPH BLANC. " With trembling hands she drew from her neck the golden
58. n almost blind thrust at the unflinching handmaid " . . 51 "He who watched with
59. id " . . 51 "He who watched with beaming eye lem, chest, the alms-coffers of Jer
60. le slave, a 55 ' ' valuable emerald ring" " ' Hare ! said Pancratius, these are
61. es and he thrust ! ' it into the blazing fire " . . 321 * Is it possible WHOM I
62. " 409 ' . . PAOK "Each one, approaching devoutly, received from his and with te
63. cal food" "PaNCRATIUS was STILL STANDING IN THE SAME TO heed the movements of hi
64. d the movements of his 415 PLACE, FACING THE Emperor, apparently so absorbed in
65. and what was 481 her distress at finding poor Emerentiana lying weltering in 535
66. stress at finding poor Emerentiana lying weltering in 535 her blood, and perfect
67. finding poor Emerentiana lying weltering in 535 her blood, and perfectly dead "
68. St. Bonaventure St. Lawrence Display'ing his Treasures Interior of the Temple of
69. ans of the Deposited the Urns Containing the Ashes The Claudian Aqueduct Dead .
70. e Catacombs Interior of a Eoman Dwelling at Pompeii .... WELCOME 12 19 Plan of P
71. Door of Pansa's House, with the Greeting SALVE or 20 22 i4-P PAGE Atkium of a Po
72. e Midst of His Apostles, from a Painting in the Cata- combs Interior of a 1^^ Eo
73. Diogenes, the Excatator, from a Painting in the Cemetery of 205 . . . Jonas, aft
74. ery of 205 . . . Jonas, after a Painting in the Cemetery of Oallistus 206 307 La
75. es . . . 212 213 An Our Satiour Blessing the Bread, from a Picture in the Cataco
76. 249 250 The Last Supper, from a Painting in the Cemetery of St. Callistus 251 A
77. Cemetery of St. Callistus 251 A Ceiling in the Catacombs, from De Rossi's "Roma
78. lius The Good Shepherd, a Woman Pra:ying, from the Arcosolium of the Our Lord Un
79. f SS. Nereus and Achilleus 254 A Ceiling in the Catacombs, in the Cemetery of Do
80. . . tery OP Callistus 258 Moses Striking the Rock, from the Cemetery of " Inter
81. The Coliseum 420 PAGE A Lamp 430 Bearing a Monogram of Christ, found in the Cata
82. und in the Catacombs 447 Moses Receiving the Law, from a Picture in the Cemetery
83. y of "Inter Duos Lauros" Christ Blessing a Child, from a Picture in the Cemetery
84. mbs s U u ^ Interior of a Roman dwelling at Pompeii. |Jart JFir0t-|Jcace« CHAPT
85. and is about two hours from his setting the day cloudless, and its heat has coo
86. so that multi- tudes are their ii:ssuing from their houses, and making Caasar's
87. ii:ssuing from their houses, and making Caasar's gardens on one side, way towar
88. 's on the, other, to enjoy their evening walk, and learn the news of the day. ;
89. pa raised the Pantheon and its adjoining baths. But gradually it became occupied
90. the Imperial residence and its adjoining Circus Maximus. The Esquiline was usuip
91. ite, the Emperor Dioclesian was covering the space sufficient for many lordly dw
92. Campus Martius, sur- rounded by boarding, and divided into pens, in which the Co
93. es of the people, were held, for gi\-ing their votes. This was called the Septa,
94. in a letter to Atticus,t of transforming this contrivance into a magnificent and
95. traceable; the space now covered by ning thus along the present Corso), the Roma
96. the east side of this edifice, including in its area St. the present church of M
97. tympanum or triangular cornice, resting on two half columns. Using our privileg
98. nice, resting on two half columns. Using our privilege as "artists of fiction,"
99. as he would have been anciently Passing through the porch, on the pavement of w
100. d with pleasure, in mosaic, the greeting Salve, or Welcome, we find ourselves in
101. rble pave- ment a water, softly warbling jet of pure brought by the Claudian hil
102. ows in downy waves and ; before reaching its lower recipient, and wdder scatters
103. Door of pa„ea'Bhoase,^wiattie greeting SAI.VE of Under the we see furniture di
104. silver tables of oriental woods, bearing candelabra, lamps, and other household
105. mer period, all their however, retaining brightness of color and freshstat- ness
106. of an ancient house. m ues, representing indeed, like ; the pictures, mythologic
107. ological or but we cannot help observing that nothing meets the eye which could
108. ut we cannot help observing that nothing meets the eye which could offend the mo
109. re an empty niche, or a covered painting, proves historical subjects that this i
110. As drawn outside the columns, the coving roof leaves a large its centre, called
111. large its centre, called square opening in across it the impluvium, there is a
112. marbles, and adorned with bright gilding. The veil of the opening is above, whic
113. bright gilding. The veil of the opening is above, which, however, here {lapis s
114. bright but softened ray from the evening sun on to the place, where we hall, see
115. noble yet mild, show of traces of having passed through sorrow at some earlier p
116. be seen upon her person. The only thing approaching to this is a slight gold co
117. n her person. The only thing approaching to this is a slight gold cord or chain
118. trip of gold cloth she ; is embroidering with to richer gold thread and occasion
119. s orna- ments of earlier days were being devoted to some higher purpose. w But a
120. just '^^^'^"CsS/ hJ^the • as a leeling or more serious anxiety begins to 1 •
121. ars old, but tall for that age, with ing. elegance of form and manliness of bear
122. s the usual youth's 2^'reaching below the knee, and a hollow spheroid o
123. school.* shows us that he just returning home from While we have been thus notin
124. home from While we have been thus noting him, he has received his mother's embra
125. e pcedagogi of Christianity,— carrying for it the books which they themselves
126. ly venture to tell you." look of smiling expostulation drew from the openhearted
127. the day about myself." again, wondering what the bad was.) (The mother smiled "
128. was.) (The mother smiled "I was reading the other day that the Scythians each e
129. ther day that the Scythians each evening cast into an urn a white or a black sto
130. urn a white or a black stone, according as the day had been happy or unhappy; i
131. he days on which opportunity of relating to I have, or have not, you all that I
132. or was there a softer solicitude dimming her eye, that the youth sliould seize h
133. s, while he thus replied ? "Fear nothing, mother most beloved, your son has done
134. most beloved, your son has done nothing that may give you pain. Only say, do yo
135. dear Pancratius," she answered; "nothing that concerns you can be indifferent to
136. began, " this last day of my frequenting school appears to * me The to have been
137. or which our good master our work during the morning hours and ; you will hear,
138. good master our work during the morning hours and ; you will hear, to some sing
139. ie for truth.' (I I never heard anything so cold or insipid hope it is not wrong
140. ny of their vain opinions? what charming suggestions such a theme naturally make
141. aw a tear glisten in his eye, as bending affectionately toAvards me, he my recit
142. y child ; there are sharp ears listening.' "What, then," interrupted the mother,
143. t was in the highest repute for learning and for morality and now indeed But in
144. ur own Certainly, land, scarcely knowing the faces of our brethren. Cassianus pr
145. f slips, my school-fellows, not noticing these vehemently applauded my hearty de
146. mother slightly started); 'and something is at me I and ; preparing which Before
147. and something is at me I and ; preparing which Before you leave you are worthy o
148. ll other personal contests, —wrestling, boxing, implements of writing in schoo
149. personal contests, —wrestling, boxing, implements of writing in schools, the
150. wrestling, boxing, implements of writing in schools, the tablets being covered w
151. of writing in schools, the tablets being covered with wax, f The flat top, on wh
152. never had or I consciously done anything that could give pain to of him I any my
153. llows ; nor did I ever dream of claiming superiority over them. 'And as to I wha
154. e in j^ersonal combats, which, beginning in a cool trial of skill, end in an ang
155. ool-mates less could I think of entering ' How much had now formed a they were a
156. ther's memory," said the mother, placing her hand upon her son's head, " if conc
157. pon her son's head, " if conceal nothing from me. I shall never again have rest
158. rpose to be revenged face, ! ' So saying he dealt me a furious blow upon the whi
159. as an evil spirit. heart seemed bursting within ; me my rising anger the throat,
160. rt seemed bursting within ; me my rising anger the throat, made me so to seize m
161. unjust assailant by and cast him gasping on the ground. I heard — already the
162. l "And what did you do, then, my darling boy?" gasped forth the trembling matron
163. darling boy?" gasped forth the trembling matron. He side. replied, " I thought o
164. s, the cheek, yet surrounded by scoffing enemies, and struck ignominiously on Co
165. on Could I wish to be meek and forgiving. otherwise?* said, I stretched forth my
166. less you abundantly.' all moment, having seen faith, Cassianus came up at that f
167. iHILE III THE DEDICATION. the foregoing conversation was held, the day had fast
168. ncratius's last question only by kissing his glowing brow. It was not merely a m
169. ast question only by kissing his glowing brow. It was not merely a maternal emot
170. ly a maternal emotion that was agitating her bosom ; it was not even the happy m
171. as not even the happy mother who, having trained her child to certain high and d
172. nd it. Neither was it the joy of feeling of a having virtuous for her son one, i
173. er was it the joy of feeling of a having virtuous for her son one, in her estima
174. p. But say, to her this sublimer feeling. ; was an hour of still deeper, or, sha
175. ar; and has watched eagerly each growing inclination, and to be, first up tried
176. its merit could be And what was passing in that boy's mind, as he too remained
177. ought of a high gained. destiny awaiting him. No vision of a venerable Basilica,
178. quary and the devout pilgrim, and giving his name, which it shall bear, to the n
179. which it shall bear, to the neighboring gate of Rome.* rise in faithful No anti
180. and eagerly sought as their last resting-place, by hearts faithful still to his
181. of a silver canopy or ciborium, weighing 287 lbs., to be placed over the porphyr
182. they met his mother's countenance gazing anew upon him, radiant with a majesty a
183. d changed his position, and was kneeling before her; and well he might; for was
184. might he not well see in her the living saint whose virtues Lucina broke the ha
185. gerly have I watched in thee the opening germ of each I have Christian virtue, a
186. ess to the poor. But I have been waiting with anxiety for the hour which should
187. e of thy declamation this mornfull ; ing," she replied, "proves to me how thy he
188. g patrician blood to stand, the stinging ignominy of a disgraceful blow, and the
189. orntul words and glances of an unpitying multitude. Nay more; thou hast proved t
190. is genuine son, and not wish the panting youth ; " to resemble him ? Though I ne
191. I never enjoyed the happiness of knowing him, has not his image been ever before
192. than all these: nay, that the only thing which he has left on earth may be appli
193. lood," replied the youth, veins, flowing in my it and in these only. "which yet
194. med the mother, to give thee." thrilling with a holy emotion; "take from thy nec
195. time make over to thee." With trembling hands she drew from her neck the golden
196. but deeply stained. •^Arull trembling hands she drew from her neck the golden
197. ancratius," she " I said, with faltering voice and streaming eyes. self gathered
198. said, with faltering voice and streaming eyes. self gathered it my- from his dea
199. and kissed it fervently and her gushing tears fell on it, and moistened it once
200. oly matron put it to her son's quivering lips, and they were empurpled with its
201. they were empurpled with its sanctifying touch. He venerated the sacred relic wi
202. r ! hung it round the neck of her saying : " When next it is moistened, may it "
203. d in the three last chapters were taking place, a very different one presented a
204. uestrian order, whose family, by farming the revenues of Asiatic provinces, had
205. mense apartments and 'besides possessing many treasures of European art, it abou
206. es, was a true specimen of an easy-going Eoman, who was determined thoroughly to
207. he never dreamt of any other. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping, large peri
208. reamt of any other. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping, large peristyle, or c
209. r. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping, large peristyle, or court, surrounded
210. valents of clubs, tennis-courts, reading-rooms, gambling-houses, and gymna- Ther
211. , tennis-courts, reading-rooms, gambling-houses, and gymna- There he took his ba
212. the Forum to ; hear some orator speaking, or some advocate pleading, or into one
213. ator speaking, or some advocate pleading, or into one of the many public gardens
214. previously invited, or picked up during the day, among the many parasites on th
215. most he dreaded, so long as every thing was w^as well kept for comfortable, han
216. This the is his daughter, who, according to Roman usage, bears father's Fabiola.
217. er the sides of w^hich extends a opening upon a fountain, by a graceful terrace,
218. refined op])ortunities, taste directing anqDle means, and peculiar has evidentl
219. s * ari-angement of around. At ; evening repast approaching this moment, the hou
220. around. At ; evening repast approaching this moment, the hour of the and we dis
221. f this dainty abode engaged in preparing herself, to appear with becoming splend
222. eparing herself, to appear with becoming splendor. Pompeian Couch. She is reclin
223. lendor. Pompeian Couch. She is reclining on a couch of Athenian workmanship, ; i
224. room of Cyzicene form that is, hav- ing glass windows to the ground, and so ope
225. ss windows to the ground, and so opening on to the flowery terrace. Against the
226. e to her hangs a Table, after a painting in Herculanetun. mirror of polished fig
227. icient to reflect it is a whole standing on a porphyry-table beside a collection
228. therefore, content ourselves with saying, that Fabiola, now at the age of twenty
229. An only whose mother had died in giving her birth, she had been nursed and brou
230. it was to deny herself a desire. Having been left so much to herself, she had r
231. n Kome. Of Christianity she knew nothing, except that she * The milk of 500 asse
232. metic. understood it to be it, something very low, material, and vulgar. She des
233. fact, too much it, to think of inquiring into its fables, it. And it. as to paga
234. d life, In fact, she believed in nothing beyond the present of nothing except it
235. in nothing beyond the present of nothing except its refined enjoyment. ; and tho
236. e was morally iri-eproachable. beginning we seem to indulge in long descripthat
237. doubt, it was with the houses belonging to the old and wealthy families of Rome
238. e her left find, then, Fabiola reclining on her couch, holding in hand a silver
239. Fabiola reclining on her couch, holding in hand a silver mirror with a handle,
240. r a hand. stiletto, a sharp-pointed ring, with a delicately carved ivory handle,
241. ed their passion on them, upon suffering the least annoyance, or when irritated
242. o have great skill in herbs, and healing properties, perhaps also in more danger
243. so in more dangerous uses in compounding philtres, charms, and She is merely kno
244. inguished for her exquisite embroidering, and for her She is quiet, silent, but
245. e garrulous, light, and any little thing they do. make great pretence about Ever
246. only be in the triclinium* this evening as you enter in, to observe the brillia
247. me many trials A Slave. From a painting in Hercolaneum. A I Slave. Prom a paint
248. Hercolaneum. A I Slave. Prom a painting in Pompeii. before I could obtain it so
249. d obtain it so perfect : am sure nothing like it has been ever seen in Rome." "
250. ! " w tance of gold from Asia. I Nothing can equal its beauty ; nor, may add, is
251. to praise "what would you your own doing?" and what have Nothing to desire, nobl
252. u your own doing?" and what have Nothing to desire, noble lady, but that you may
253. but that you may be ever happy; nothing to praise of conscious of having done m
254. nothing to praise of conscious of having done more my own doing, for I am not th
255. nscious of having done more my own doing, for I am not than my duty," was the mo
256. servant, "but I mean that inward living consciousness within me, which makes fe
257. fe you will survive as a conscious being, and have "' still of joy and freedom m
258. n almost blind thrust at the unflinching handmaid." modestly, but with a fervent
259. . is a power that will call to reckoning the four winds of heaven, and make each
260. and joyful, not as and glorious, loving for ever, and beloved. This certain hop
261. of an eastern fancy are these, unfitting ? every duty You must be cured of them.
262. eek or Latin author." " In one belonging to is my own land ; a school in which t
263. tement, the haughty for "without waiting even death ; that future ideal existenc
264. ovei' me. me at once, and without daring to equivocate or disguise, you do so or
265. to me in place, and power, and learning, and genius, and in all that enriches a
266. er simple truth she paused, as faltering tress ; " to your authoritative questio
267. ble consciousintelli- ness of possessing within her a spiritual and living whose
268. essing within her a spiritual and living whose measure is of existence is immort
269. ose only rightful true place of dwelling is above the skies, whose only prototyp
270. n almost blind thrust at the unflinching handmaid. Syra instinctively put forwar
271. go," she said to Syra, who was stanching the blood with her handkerchief, "go to
272. some compensation." Then, after turning over her trinkets "Take this ring; on t
273. urning over her trinkets "Take this ring; on the table, she continued, and you n
274. need not return here again this evening." Fabiola's conscience was quite satisf
275. t, torn. i. "He who watched with beaming and noted the widow's the iDandaged rin
276. and noted the widow's the iDandaged ring." arm eye, the alms-eoffers of Jerusale
277. present to a menial de- on the following Sunday, in the title* of St. among the
278. e poor was found a valuable emerald ring, which the good Pastor, not far from he
279. Koman lady; must have been the offering of some but which He who watched, with
280. arm of a foreign female slave. * beaming Church. A Lamp, found in the Catacombs.
281. n the Catacombs. — CHAPTER THE jTJKING tlie V. VISIT. of latter part the dialo
282. y doors; and was easy, especially during such an excited scene as had just taken
283. d to leave was almost startled at seeing standing, in bright relief before the d
284. e was almost startled at seeing standing, in bright relief before the deep crims
285. e affection, as though they were looking be- yond all all else, surrounding obje
286. oking be- yond all all else, surrounding objects, and rested upon one, unseen by
287. dor, open and bright with un; disguising truthfulness a kindly smile played abou
288. sion with guileless earnestness, passing rapidly from one feel- ing to the other
289. ness, passing rapidly from one feel- ing to the other, as her warm and tender he
290. moment. it, and reverently kissed saying, "I But the child took her have seen al
291. ys But, ? seem to me to ! be celebrating one eternal espousal. good heavens what
292. ment slave ; I mean to wear this evening. but nobler, in my eyes, and that of a
293. gnes had and humbled almost to sickening, she said somewhat pettishly, "Do you t
294. hastiness of temper, in over-chastising a forward slave?" "JSTo, dear cousin, f
295. Agnes? notion or to of their feel, being allowed to move, it to act, to think, e
296. ^ most admire, — in mind, in reasoning, in truthfulness, and in heroic fortitu
297. her, perhaps almost admire a new feeling in me towards one in her station." "But
298. la, I could make her happier than making "No as yours. doubt, dear Agnes; you ha
299. Every body in your house always smiling, and cheerfully anxious to discharge hi
300. no one who thinks of comduty. "I manding. Come, tell me your secret." (Agnes smi
301. you. If make every body and every thing love amphitheatre, you were a Christian
302. rious, child ? You know I am only joking." ; and bent forward that keen and as t
303. fore her, nay, as if she heard si)eaking to her, some one It passed away, and sh
304. laves approach me; while that poor thing would hardly leave me, but watched by m
305. . The others me she has herself. nothing put by, and she certainly spends nothin
306. put by, and she certainly spends nothing on Nay, I have even heard that she be s
307. e my request. take her home this evening." "Well, be it so, Name your and let me
308. d now this great piece of business being settled between us, let us go down to o
309. ET VI. THE BANQUET. found, on descending, all the guests assembled in a hall bel
310. ot a state banquet which they were going to share, but the usual meal of a rich
311. therefore content ourselves with saying that every thing was elegant and exquis
312. t ourselves with saying that every thing was elegant and exquisite in arrangemen
313. eakness about her angry " after saluting his daughter, exclaimed, : display ; an
314. lay ; and still more of it. of punishing herself for : what she now thought a si
315. o as you please. But, seriously speaking, I must say that, even with you, this m
316. ss attractive. But you are not attending to me. Come, come, I dare say you have
317. u have some one already in view." During most of this address, which was meant t
318. la called them, transfixed, in a smiling ecstasy, as if else, but never losing t
319. ng ecstasy, as if else, but never losing the thread of the any thing out of plac
320. never losing the thread of the any thing out of place. She therefore at once ans
321. pledged me to him by his betrothal-ring, and has attending to some one discours
322. by his betrothal-ring, and has attending to some one discourse, nor saying adorn
323. ending to some one discourse, nor saying adorned " " me with immense jewels, "t
324. hy," answered Agnes, with a look glowing earnest- ness, and in tones of artless
325. iola, and enter with her into the dining-room. It was well she " Goodness tell !
326. alogue, or she to the quick, as thinking that would have been hurt Agnes had con
327. Agnes was defendit, from her most loving friend. * Twelve was the age for marria
328. welve was the age for marriage according to the f Roman law. "Annnlo of St. fide
329. lapidibus pretiosis, tradidit auri- ing her, she had turned away from her fathe
330. from her father, and had been attending to the other guests. Roman purnius soph
331. house. first Two more remain, deserving further notice. of them, evidently a fa
332. ome in person and though most ; engaging in conversation, he manifestly scorned
333. but apparently good-natured and obliging, he had in a short time quietly pushed
334. society of Rome. This was, indeed, owing partly to his having been seen at the i
335. was, indeed, owing partly to his having been seen at the imperial He had court,
336. , however, would soon notice a wandering restlessness of eye, and an eagerness o
337. ss of eye, and an eagerness of listening attention for all sights and sounds aro
338. r his knit lip, brows, from his flashing eyes, and a curling of the upper which
339. s, from his flashing eyes, and a curling of the upper which inspired a feeling h
340. ng of the upper which inspired a feeling his of mistrust, and gave an idea that
341. at, while men reclined on couches during the repast, side, Fabiola and Agnes wer
342. Banqnet Table, from a Pompeian painting. described were opposite, and the maste
343. joarts of a round table ; one side being left unencumbered by the sigma* or semi
344. ar couch, for the convenience of serving. in passing, that a table-cloth, a luxu
345. r the convenience of serving. in passing, that a table-cloth, a luxury of Horace
346. k after such trifles." "Very interesting news indeed," answered Proculus. seems
347. f heavy work to be done, such as carving marbles and shaping columns." "True," i
348. one, such as carving marbles and shaping columns." "True," interposed Fulvius; "
349. ly," said Fulvius, with his most winning smile, it ; can hardly give a reason fo
350. never p n n borne a weight, yet working hard, and as happy, to ance, as all app
351. alpurnius, thus challenged, and thinking himself highly complimented, solemnly g
352. hat the second of these brothers, seeing the other's victims give better omens o
353. of an ass; for which he was hung by King Mardochteus of Macedon, upon a gibbet f
354. Judith. I However, Peter and Paul coming, as said, to Rome, the former was disco
355. us death, as the best means it; of being like their teachers, and, as they fancy
356. r teachers, and, as they fancy, of going to * them in a place somewhere among th
357. leopards to be ready before Then turning round sharp to his neighbor, he said, b
358. sharp to his neighbor, he said, bending a keen eye upon his countenance "A brav
359. ebastian placed his strong hand starting up vius Avas ; upon his arm, and contin
360. ough by a javelin? '* I torn of agreeing with the greatest of man am not ashamed
361. asked Fulvius, with a bland but taunting tone. "If you do," the soldier replied,
362. d is right," exclaimed Fabiola, clapping I her I close the discussion by my appl
363. m. lib. vii. ep. 1. David with his Sling, from the Catacomb of St. Petronilla. ;
364. illa. ; CHAPTER POOR AND VII RICH. URING the latter part of the conver- sation j
365. ed, Fabius quite abstracted, speculating his conversation with Agnes. had been u
366. rplexed him. He knew them and sauntering, as he did, every day into the great sh
367. , and uttered an exclamation recognizing in it of pity. the work of Fabiola, she
368. ely was divided be! tween two contending she went on first Poor thing " she said
369. contending she went on first Poor thing " she said, as washing, then closing an
370. first Poor thing " she said, as washing, then closing and dressing, the gash ;
371. ing " she said, as washing, then closing and dressing, the gash ; " it is a drea
372. d, as washing, then closing and dressing, the gash ; " it is a dreadful cut! Wha
373. t how wicked you must have been to bring it upon yourself! It is a savage wound,
374. ius himself would be afraid of disputing with her. No wonder, indeed, she was so
375. ated as not to know that she was hurting you. But this must be concealed it must
376. w learned one! before of a slave arguing with a noble mistress, — ; round the
377. d Syra's capsa or box, and after turning over in vain its scanty contents, she d
378. e door a light It was step came bounding across the room to meet her. see their
379. th a most affectionate tone, and leading her to a seat; "to-day I have brought y
380. treat to me, to see you enjoy any thing, than to enjoy it myself." " No, dear S
381. must try to do His will. think of eating the the rich, so food, I than I could o
382. rich, so food, I than I could of wearing the dress, of I love to long as can obt
383. give still me the consolation of feeling that I am, before God, will love only a
384. e God, will love only a poor blind thing. if think He I me better thus, than fee
385. think He I me better thus, than feeding on luxurious fare. * Porridge. ; would
386. weak enough to feel ashamed of appearing before her comrades with the She took i
387. ly much surprise them. then, not wishing to displease Euphrosyne, replaced it as
388. ll as she could with one hand, on coming out. She was in she saw the court below
389. as in she saw the court below, returning to her blind friend, when one of the no
390. ne, and, with a mortified look, crossing towards the door, and she stepped behin
391. d back a step, as if scared by something lying before him. He trembled violently
392. a step, as if scared by something lying before him. He trembled violently; effo
393. embled violently; effort, but recovering himself by a sudden he looked around hi
394. . At last he heard footsteps approaching, he recognized the martial tread of Seb
395. to pick up, but lodgings. and staggering, he went into his chamber, and only bec
396. him to bar the door. A lamp was burning brightly by the table, on which Fulvius
397. ins of blood. That dark man said nothing but his swarthy countenance was blanche
398. as ashy and livid. Pale, sick, repulsing roughly the of&cious advances of his sl
399. or " any one see thee pick the the thing up? "Tut, tut! this " fancies. Did —
400. th a river of crystal brightness flowing through it. Upon it is a galley weighin
401. through it. Upon it is a galley weighing anchor, with a figure on deck, in farew
402. a figure on deck, in farewell, is waving towards him, scene changes ; an embroid
403. e ship in the midst of the sea, battling with a furious storm, while on the summ
404. a torch in her hand, and black flapping wings, flies by, snatches it from the s
405. meal, and was her blind friend. waiting patiently the slave's return. Syra then
406. ld have thought was a parent ministering to her daughter, rather than a slave se
407. er daughter, rather than a slave serving a beggar. this beggar, too, looked so h
408. ew, and Fabiola insisted on accompanying her to the But when Agnes softly raised
409. er, she beckoned to Fabiola to enjoining silence by her gesture. The blind girl
410. ver imagined that there was such a thing as disinterested as to charity, it was
411. rt, Agnes entered the room, and laughing, said " So, Csecilia, I have found out
412. e plenty of opportunities for exercising charity; but a poor slave can only do s
413. t a poor slave can only do so by finding some one still poorer, and helpless, li
414. u present, to hear the good news I bring to Syra. Fabiola has allowed me to bewi
415. clapped her hands with joy, and throwing her How arms round Syra's neck, exclaim
416. ply troubled, and replied with faltering voice, " good and gentle lady, you have
417. the same." "No, no," said Syra, smiling, "that great Apostle's instructions to
418. froward.' * 1 Cor. Tii. I am from saying that f my 14. mistress 24. 1 Pet. ii. ;
419. er is persecution said to be approaching, and perhaps it will not pleases, disda
420. her soul is placed in His hands. falling And oh, dearest, best of ladies," she e
421. she exclaimed, on her knees and bedewing Agnes' s hand with tears, "do not come
422. that she has said one very wicked thing, told a great story, this evening." "Wh
423. thing, told a great story, this evening." "What because I is that, my pet? " as
424. is that, my pet? " asked Syra, laughing. "Why, you would have erty, said that I
425. d have erty, said that I declined eating was wiser and better than you, some tru
426. your tyrant and tormentor. such a thing " ! Oh, how could you me The servant no
427. nounced that Agnes' s litter was waiting at the door and any one who could have
428. we pass a little time before re-entering, to how the mistress within fares after
429. ves, with lamps and torches, are running about in every direction, looking for s
430. unning about in every direction, looking for something or other that is lost, in
431. n every direction, looking for something or other that is lost, in every possibl
432. to have her wound re-dressed, according to orders, and the scarf which had boun
433. n house w^here Syra had been. purloining any fore and then a grand general battu
434. a moment could have dreamt of suspecting a noble guest at the master's table of
435. knew could not bear Syra, had been using some spell to annoy the poor girl. For
436. ed the Moor to be a very Canidia,* being often obliged to let her go out alone a
437. ne at night, under pretence of gathering herbs at full moon for her cosmetics, a
438. alone, that on more coolly recollecting the incidents of the day, she remembere
439. ow in his possession. After attempt- ing to speculate on the possible consequenc
440. quences of this misadventure, and coming * f to no satisfactory conclusion, she
441. der bahny and sweet. Fabiola, on parting with Agnes, retired to her apartment an
442. en, to her disgust, she discovered lying on it the style with which she had woun
443. such weapon. Yolmnina., from a painting of Pompeii. Scrinium, from a picture in
444. ad often borne with scorn, but designing, cunning glances, such as she thought b
445. borne with scorn, but designing, cunning glances, such as she thought betrayed s
446. p her mind for to prevent Fulvius having any access to Agnes, at least at her ho
447. elf the strange especially as and having brought one so young into company which
448. she now found that her motives for doing so It was nearly at the same had been d
449. ly selfish. moment that Fulvius, tossing on his couch, had come to the determina
450. racter; had caught, with her penetrating eye, the affectation of his manner, and
451. fectation of his manner, and the cunning of his looks ; and could not help contr
452. s looks ; and could not help contrasting him with " the frank and generous Sebas
453. to her, yet she could not help dwelling on it and she felt as if that day were
454. but tinged with a rich carnation, rising from the bed-side of a kneeling slave (
455. , rising from the bed-side of a kneeling slave (prayer and willing sacrifice it
456. of a kneeling slave (prayer and willing sacrifice it of life breathed upwards t
457. ght spot as in a delicious a distressing dream. garden, richly illuminated by a
458. em it seemed her that they were enjoying felicity black, and deep ravine, at the
459. re flowed, though so deep, yet sparkling and brilliant, torrent between herself
460. ween herself and most stream, refreshing. Oh, for courage to plunge into this th
461. de it. ! And still they beckoned, urging her on to try ing on the brink, But as
462. they beckoned, urging her on to try ing on the brink, But as she was standclasp
463. the brink, But as she was standclasping her hands in despair, Calpurnius air se
464. vere curtain on which worked all running hideous chimeras, most and interwoven w
465. whose features she had noticed standing sorrowful at a distance, her, and, smil
466. rrowful at a distance, her, and, smiling she fancied she traced a spiritualized
467. vered face with his gold and purple wing; when she lost her vision in a calm and
468. lost her vision in a calm and refreshing sleep. Oar Saviour, from a representati
469. on every side Palatine. Augustus having chosen for his residence, successive em
470. ended the imperial residence neighboring Esquiline; the taking in the whole spac
471. idence neighboring Esquiline; the taking in the whole space now occupied between
472. lose to the arch of Titus. After passing through a vestibule, the visitor found
473. which can be distinctly traced. Turning from this, on the left side, he entered
474. shrubs, Still and flowers. left, keeping to the you would enter into sets of cha
475. rsion, but chiefly by care in recruiting after the scenes described in the new s
476. hrouded in such a gentle, simple bearing, and were accompanied by such prudence
477. him and he encouraged ; * "The sweating goal." all It was an obelisk of brick (
478. imes restrain him. As they were entering the palace, that part of which Sebastia
479. ast empire, as the means of establishing Christianity? " " God forbid I would sh
480. family of one of the Augusti, as showing a slight germ of better thoughts : I me
481. which is damp our energies that lurking thought that vengeance perpetual, and m
482. a window open to the ground, and leading to a terrace that ran along principal B
483. m of which was that side of the building. The night looked so bright through ^ ;
484. iman Italian moon does bathed all ; ming not a phere. in them, as flat surface,
485. the azure sky. was just such an evening things. as, years after, Monica and A.u
486. lumn, like the refluent sea-wave gliding down a slanting rock, came soothingly o
487. efluent sea-wave gliding down a slanting rock, came soothingly on the ear. On th
488. r. On the other side, the lofty building called the Septizonium of Severus, in f
489. ptizonium of Severus, in front, towering above the Coelian, the sumptuous baths
490. a long pause, he took neck, and resting on his shoulder. up the thread of his l
491. and said, in a softer tone " I was going to show you, when we stepped out here,
492. and no less true. It between us laboring here and the triumphal me, Sebastian,"
493. k!" * continued Pancratius, not noticing interruption. "These are the trumpet-no
494. ur triumph silence, I Both paused saying : for a time, when Pancratius again bro
495. llor; will your company be soon arriving?" " ISTot immediately and they will dro
496. only by the rays of the moon, streaming through the open window on that side. T
497. is small ; military couch. "What smiling, " is this great affair, Pancratius," t
498. olish," proceeded Pancratius, hesitating and blushing at every word. " You are a
499. eded Pancratius, hesitating and blushing at every word. " You are aware I have a
500. er, you know, in our plain way of living and my dear mother, for any thing I can
501. living and my dear mother, for any thing I can say, won't wear the lots of ; old
502. old-fashioned trinkets, which are lying locked up, and of no use to any body. d
503. e is what by And if a persecution coming, why run the risk w lictors stealing of
504. ing, why run the risk w lictors stealing of confiscation seizing them, or of plu
505. lictors stealing of confiscation seizing them, or of plundering whenever our liv
506. fiscation seizing them, or of plundering whenever our lives are wanted, to the u
507. ful heirs? " "Pancratius," said offering a Sebastian, remark to your noble sugge
508. u to have wish all the merit of uttering Now, just I tell me, what makes you dou
509. e would be sure to imagine was something grand or generous while I assure you, d
510. you, dear Sebastian, it is no such thing. For I shall not miss these things a bi
511. ; ; especially in the hard times coming." Of course Lucina consents?" I would n
512. quire gold-dust without her even wishing it. " " ! your assistance stand its is
513. this. I should never be able to to being known that I presumed do any thing con-
514. being known that I presumed do any thing con- sidered out of the way, especially
515. ed the window two voices were conversing together so close under them that the c
516. e cornice between prevented their seeing the speakers, evidently a woman and a m
517. e satisfaction of despotic and unsparing masters. To sit all day in a tribunal,
518. stretched upon the rack, and quiver; ing in agony on one side, wdiile the last s
519. ide, wdiile the last sentence of beating to death with bullet-laden scourges was
520. ath with bullet-laden scourges was being executed on the other to sleep calmly a
521. es before him, feet, thoroughly enjoying the cruel spec- up sottish, coarse, and
522. lute and dissipated character. any thing refined, or ability for any learning, h
523. ing refined, or ability for any learning, he united in himself a certain amount
524. nd a considerable measure of low cunning. in himself a generous feeling, He had
525. w cunning. in himself a generous feeling, He had never experienced and he had ne
526. ; for wealth, as the means of gratifying his desires, was synonymous with him to
527. way, to gather my simples, without being properly rewarded to second ? But how d
528. mean." "They cannot be separated; thing —depend upon it, there is one wMch yo
529. one wMch you may "What is that?'' bring with you that is irresistible." "Gold."
530. I trust. ; but I have somegot all thing better than that in prospect, that " I
531. ^:i The Clii'istians. Is there not going to be a persecution " of them soon ? "Y
532. dvice. Do not tire yourself with hunting them down, and catching, after all, but
533. elf with hunting them down, and catching, after all, but mean prey keep your eye
534. or one or two good fat ones, half trying to conceal themselves pounce upon them,
535. e, she would not tell a lie for anything, and gets us fulness." " dreadful scrap
536. Then she cares not for money our having them offered." ! " or gifts ; and so pr
537. eet a caravan of your countryfolk coming in all!" " " but you beat them Indeed!
538. an mounts; then turned back, and looking after him, As he departed by the Sacred
539. claimed: "Fool! to think that I am going to try experi" ments for you on a perso
540. ssembly was large and varied, containing clergy and laity, men and women. The pu
541. n and women. The puri30se of the meeting was to concert proper measures, in cons
542. er measures, in consequence of something which had lately occurred in the palace
543. m- briefly exj)lain. Sebastian, enjoying the peror, unbounded confidence of the
544. mployed all his influence in propagating the Christian faith within the palace.
545. had been so accused, and were expecting execution when their friends, admitted
546. arents of the unfortunate youths weeping over them, and caressing them, to allur
547. youths weeping over them, and caressing them, to allure doom dius, them from th
548. y the compassionCould ate wish of seeing the youths snatched from their fate. Se
549. hould be none. The room was a banqueting-hall but seldom opened in the what it h
550. it had, day, and consequently requiring very little light entered only, as in t
551. only, as in the Pantheon, by an opening in the roof; and Sebastian, anxious to
552. brilliant where it beat, It but leaving the rest of the aj)artment almost dark.
553. f tender looked upon the two vacillating confessors. It as he was some moments b
554. rter, I still less ; instead of standing before you as your as your reprover. Ca
555. e heard, that while angels were jDutting the last flower to your crowns, of tell
556. e last flower to your crowns, of telling you have bid them pause, and even thoug
557. e already your of Paradise, are thinking of on the threshold ? drawing them back
558. e thinking of on the threshold ? drawing them back, tears to tread once more the
559. s angels? when When, instead of standing manfully before Him, like good and fait
560. have come into His presence after having crawled through a few more years of inf
561. and, what is worse, gnawed by an undying worm, and victims " of a sleepless remo
562. soon. father, indeed, is right in saying, that for his sake Your and your mother
563. your mother's jon have been deliberating whether you should not them to Him who
564. l you make them Christians by abandoning Christianity? will you make them soldie
565. them soldiers of the Cross by deserting its standard ? will you teach them that
566. e more precious than life, by preferring life to them ? Do you want to gain for
567. st mother," they in turn said, embracing their parents. the father, I "we part n
568. were made, and to those souls fluttering upon the confines of life. Some hung up
569. knelt before Sebastian with a beseeching look and outstretched not be sej^arated
570. rs," replied the other, with a faltering voice, her once eloquent tongue has bee
571. of our Lord Jesus Christ, the beginning let its accomphshment be Thine alone. o
572. her mouth the sign of the cross, saying: "Zoe, speak; dost thou " believe? clea
573. ouse. Sebastian lost no time in j)utting them under the care of the holy priest
574. f the title of St. Pastor. and requiring such concealment, and the times were so
575. lment, and the times were so threatening, and all new irritations had so nmch to
576. wonder. Tranquillinus, who was suffering severely from the gout, was restored to
577. have personal experience of this healing ; ; ; power, I certainly will not resis
578. nistered baptism without faith preceding, as an experiment of its healing virSeb
579. eceding, as an experiment of its healing virSebastian took another tue, would ha
580. et us now come down again to the evening in which Sebastian and Pancratius met m
581. ted in the officer's ; plan for securing for the completer instruction of the co
582. of the converts, and change withdrawing from observation so of life many person
583. ytes should join him there, and, forming one household, should go on with religi
584. untry, and the emperor himself was going to the coast of Naples, and thence woul
585. r to southern Italy. pania; and carrying out the preconcerted plan. * It is not
586. ely was. w told, on the Sunday following this conversion, celebrated the divine
587. wal fi'om the city. At ties this meeting all details were arranged ; different p
588. to start, in the course of the following days, ous roads — some direct ; The R
589. hristian. altar, or confront Every thing was said and done to soothe, and even t
590. ountry. He insisted, however, upon going his own way. : Only one more point rema
591. newed a carp and Sebastian; each wishing to remain in Eome, and chance of martyr
592. stian to the arduous duty of encouraging confessors, and protecting Christians i
593. f encouraging confessors, and protecting Christians in Rome. To hear was to obey
594. ome. To hear was to obey and the meeting broke up with a prayer of St. Pastor,"
595. tor," in the converts, ; of thanksgiving. Sebastian, after bidding affectionate
596. f thanksgiving. Sebastian, after bidding affectionate farewell to his friends, i
597. his friends, insisted upon accompanying Pancratius home. " I fear As they were
598. tius home. " I fear As they were leaving the room, the latter remarked, like tha
599. aughter and occasional yells, proceeding from the adjoining yard, in which were
600. nal yells, proceeding from the adjoining yard, in which were the quarters of the
601. f the Mauritanian archers. to be blazing in the midst of it, for the A fire seem
602. ke and sparks rose above the surrounding porticoes. were, and asked Sebastian ac
603. court where they " Friend, what is going on there among our : neighbors? " " The
604. at makes you " think so? Why, I and sing detestable songs, and have heard that t
605. urpose* just what might seem to be going on here." "Good night, comrade," said S
606. then — exclaimed, as they were issuing from the vestibule, " Is it not strange
607. o would die yet, after we who One living God in take to keep ourrather than spea
608. ! long? " " ' the vestibule, and looking at the So long," said Pancratius, pausi
609. t the So long," said Pancratius, pausing on the steps outside now declining moon
610. using on the steps outside now declining moon, " so long as we shall continue to
611. en," replied the soldier, as if humoring his companion's of the Latial fanciful
612. ht, galleys and skiffs first the dancing waves with ; upon the water, then the s
613. imagined by those below." its toAvering pinnacles, ; " Just what I should have
614. un upon this benighted country. retiring, How beautiful will then be to behold t
615. r holy faith itself and worship starting live in those ? into light, till shines
616. ter's, be he Alban or be he Olymdwelling on that holy mount, whereon stands the
617. n said ; " Sebastian, you said something this evening, which I should * much lik
618. bastian, you said something this evening, which I should * much like to have exp
619. hat was it?'' " When you were contending with Polycarp, about going into Campani
620. re contending with Polycarp, about going into Campania, or remaining in Rome, yo
621. about going into Campania, or remaining in Rome, you promised that if you staye
622. ou would find cult to check your longing ardor to give your life for it diffi- C
623. the holiday ^Yhich its Eome is enjoying, sending out inhabitants to the neighbo
624. day ^Yhich its Eome is enjoying, sending out inhabitants to the neighboring hill
625. nding out inhabitants to the neighboring hills, or to the whole line of sea-coas
626. may turies come to imagine, that during the first three cen- the Church was tha
627. e cen- the Church was that the suffering faithful unrespited, under active in pe
628. , under active in persecution; trembling, worshipped for fear and and almost liv
629. ions, some from one another by breathing times of complete Either of these views
630. so we read of a bitter persecution being carried on in one part of the empire, w
631. us Severus had published his persecuting edicts, many Christians had Such were t
632. tas, with of whose martyrdom, containing most to the diary of the noble lady, tw
633. y years of age, brought down by touching, herself to the eve of her death, form
634. sort has secured for us most interesting information, connected When it it the p
635. others, in his province with unrelenting cruelty. He had condemned, among illnes
636. o him, in which he bids him take warning from this visitation, and repent of his
637. on, and repent of his crimes ; reminding hini of many judgments which had befall
638. as the charity of him they were offering up earnest prayers for their enemy's re
639. very well his duties without practising cruelty, * by acting as other Eoma Subt
640. without practising cruelty, * by acting as other Eoma Subterr. 1. iii. c. 23. m
641. n would encourage tumults. Asper, seeing one ready to yield upon the application
642. en brought him. title Pudens, on reading an act of accusation, declared the info
643. f governors and judges, in the enforcing even of imperial edicts of persecution.
644. Gaul, or Africa, or Church was enjoying peace. But Eome was undoubtedly the pla
645. as the privilege of its pontiffs, during the first three centuries, to bear the
646. be elected Pope was equivalent to being promoted to martyrdom. At the period of
647. orified by many noble martyrdoms. During such periods, the Christians were able
648. into districts or parishes, each having its title, or church, served by priests
649. ity. It is recorded, that in 250, during the pontificate of Cornelius, there wer
650. ntinued to be objects of devotion during these more peaceful intervals, and thes
651. that they were above ground, " threshing-floors," for he compares them to A whic
652. emble in these places without attracting attention, and consequently persecution
653. al for what may be be held every morning by the rich, attended by dependents, or
654. be entertained, that persons were moving in the highest society, were occupying
655. g in the highest society, were occupying conspicuous public situations, were nea
656. on this subject. No lie, no dissembling, no action especially, inconsistent wit
657. to have been not uncommon. For, speaking of a married woman communicating hersel
658. peaking of a married woman communicating herself at home, wife's religion * No a
659. at home, wife's religion * No according to practice in those ages of persecutio
660. es of a Catholic husband and wife giving com; munion to one another. De Monogami
661. ated fancies and popular views, they ing a son or daughter to have embraced this
662. raced this considered stupid, grovelling, and anti-social. Hence the ; hatred of
663. em was considered as un-Roman, as having an interest opposed to the extension an
664. prosperity of the empire, and as obeying an unseen and spiritual power. The Chri
665. d much upon the state of popular feeling when any demagogue or fanatic could suc
666. ogue or fanatic could succeed in rousing this, neither ; their denial of the cha
667. ll mitted her other slaves; but, feeling it wrong to turn so dangerous a charact
668. while his own brute force, and unfeeling recklessness, might be valuable auxilia
669. al. was about ten days after the meeting last described, that Corvinus went to s
670. m. Roman Gardens, li-oin an old painting. While sauntering about, Corvinus caugh
671. li-oin an old painting. While sauntering about, Corvinus caught a sight of Fulvi
672. r." Fulvius was staggered; then rallying, said, have you to make such an and Dio
673. ubdued "No more here; see friends coming. Meet me disguised at daybreak to-morro
674. saluted Corvinus I fear I "Good morning, comrade; in the cold " I I morning air
675. ning, comrade; in the cold " I I morning air, especially as have kept you waitin
676. air, especially as have kept you waiting you are thinly clad." own," replied Cor
677. t puzzled, by what I have been observing." had "What is that?" "Why, from an ear
678. hour, long, I suspect, before my coming, there have been arriving here from eve
679. fore my coming, there have been arriving here from every side, and entering into
680. iving here from every side, and entering into that house, by the back door in th
681. of a different class." " Whose dwelling is it, do you know ? It looks a large o
682. e man, bent down by age, was approaching, supported by a young and cheerful girl
683. n." ; this is only ? nii/ way of showing selfishness." How I do you mean first,
684. es, I get the satisfaction of supporting you. and was an lame,' eye to the blind
685. how straight she walks, without looking right " is," So she answered the other.
686. every one of come, and go boldly " doing as they do." ; That will hardly succeed
687. but she better known than they, as being a young heiress, nearly as rich as her
688. nce." " " Do you know what I am thinking, Fulvius " Something very bright, no do
689. what I am thinking, Fulvius " Something very bright, no doubt." "That when you
690. in the neighborhood of Eome for whining and importunate beggars. M^ w "What "Th
691. will take a more spiritual mode of doing so, inside. and find ourselves at once
692. od poured forth for Christ, accompanying the waving branches of the family-tree,
693. orth for Christ, accompanying the waving branches of the family-tree, the stem h
694. eated storms. This may appear surprising but when we reflect how many a soldier
695. ouses, ; untainted through a plague, ing in we cannot be surprised if Provi- den
696. Provi- dence watched over the well-being of the Church, by preservit, through ol
697. : w chains of tradition, and so enabling the faithful to say " Unless the Lord o
698. tire house, from her parents Yet nothing seemed to spoil, or but her good qualit
699. biola was an occasional visitor, ; going to see her at her house though Agnes an
700. xpressed to her young friend her longing for the day, when, meeting with a suita
701. d her longing for the day, when, meeting with a suitable match, she would re-emb
702. llish and open all the splendid dwelling. For, notwithstanding the Yoconian law
703. splendid dwelling. For, notwithstanding the Yoconian law "on the inheritance of
704. alth the miserly parents must be putting by; and concluded that all beyond the s
705. and the garden, with a detached sisting of a large dining-hall, or triclinium,
706. ith a detached sisting of a large dining-hall, or triclinium, turned into a chur
707. d the city for this ; purpose committing each region to one of the seven deacons
708. Church, Rooms were set apart for lodging strangers who came from a distance, rec
709. the office and archives for transacting the business of this charitable establi
710. charitable establishment, and preserving all local documents, such ; as the acts
711. and to pass hours there; always beaming, like an angel of light, consolation an
712. ht, consolation and joy on the suffering and distressed. This house, then, might
713. xed on the house of Agnes On the morning which we as the fittest for this purpos
714. ad been seen to enter by Corvinus. being known to whom sight of the commission,
715. sight of the commission, A Fish carrying ]> ! imi \\ iin-, fr >rii the Cemetery
716. XIV EXTREMES MEET. GEOUP of poor coming opportunely towards Corvinus to tack hi
717. s it ridi- • culed Catholics for using salutation it, on the ground that but t
718. ds, and was allowed closely, and copying their manners and gestures, he found hi
719. Two silver and goldsmiths were weighing and valuing most conscientiously this p
720. and goldsmiths were weighing and valuing most conscientiously this property and
721. stributed amongst the to pass. Following the others ; poor, in just proportion.
722. us heart. He would ; have given anything once the folly or to get it all, ing a
723. ing once the folly or to get it all, ing a dash at something, and running and al
724. r to get it all, ing a dash at something, and running and almost thought of mako
725. ll, ing a dash at something, and running and almost thought of makout. But he sa
726. or were all mixed up together and moving about, he remained unnoticed. But he so
727. rom its Dalmatian origin that is, having over the tunic, instead of the ; toga,
728. , instead of the ; toga, a close-fitting shorter tunicle, with ample, but not ov
729. poor. These officers went on marshalling the attendants, each evidently knowing
730. g the attendants, each evidently knowing those of his own district, and conducti
731. hose of his own district, and conducting them But as no one recogto a peculiar s
732. st parts of a nobleman's house, hav- ing entered by a cheat, dressed like a begg
733. , dressed like a beggar, and associating himself with such people, of course for
734. e looked towards the door, mediit tating an escape; but he saw his guarded by an
735. h they only looks, and repressive biting of their was a subject of consultation
736. casional glances towards him by scowling that he He saw ET : : he imagined that
737. magined that even the blind were staring at him, and the decrepit ready to wield
738. e hoped to frame some excuse for getting out of the scrape. courteously accosted
739. to while communication with the dwelling-house. Reparatus looked in the same dir
740. Pancratius, just entered, and gathering some hasty information from Secundus. C
741. rival. Nor could Corvinus help observing the graceful development and manly bear
742. e graceful development and manly bearing, which a few weeks had given his school
743. The upper part of the Quirinal, leading to the Nomentan gate, Porta Pia. ® U u
744. foot, clothed as a slave, counterfeiting a cripple, into the Forum before his tr
745. h what every Roman would resent, forcing your way into ? the heart of a patricia
746. e we shall have it in our power to bring you to trial at Do you understand me, y
747. eed," I replied the captive in a whining tone. I I " I Never, as long as live, w
748. we want no such oaths here. Then turning to the know this person his coming here
749. rning to the know this person his coming here ; Take others, is my he quite a Th
750. taken relief, the wretch's supplicating gestures and tone for accompaniments to
751. strong application for joined in crying out, " Pancratius, you will not send hi
752. tius, you will not send him away fasting and unsuccored ? " "Leave that to me,"
753. nto who ; led Corvinus, still pretending to saying : limp, the street, and dismi
754. led Corvinus, still pretending to saying : limp, the street, and dismissed him,
755. o by the custom, He and, found according Roman unlocked; possibility of a strang
756. cked; possibility of a stranger entering at such of a porter, girl no one could
757. the an hour. Instead he found, guarding the door, only a simple-looking indeed,
758. guarding the door, only a simple-looking indeed, about twelve or thirteen years
759. he mother had orphan daughter, intending to have her instructed and baptized. Sh
760. wkwardly situated, as a crowd was making He thought of retreating, but this woul
761. rowd was making He thought of retreating, but this would have hopes; he was goin
762. but this would have hopes; he was going to advance, when he destroyed all his r
763. ical juncture, whom should he see coming lightly across the court, but the youth
764. stress of the house, all joy, all spring, all brightness and sunshine. to As soo
765. e nor do we seek them ; replied, smiling, for "boasts of no clients, we have no
766. effort, over the heart as a most willing subject." Incapable of imagining that s
767. willing subject." Incapable of imagining that such words could allude to herself
768. ous attitude, the music of the thrilling tones which she uttered these words, th
769. spot, and sealed his lips till, feeling that he was losing the in the ; most fa
770. is lips till, feeling that he was losing the in the ; most favorable opportunity
771. e could ever expect his said, of opening mind " It (affection it could not is be
772. to ; her, he boldly of you I am speaking and I entreat you to believe my express
773. an instant to his feet; for her burning countenance. he saw poor, Sebastian, wh
774. o the impatient of her absence, striding forward towards him, with an air of ind
775. o doubt will quietly retire." his Saying this, she withdrew. Sebastian, with cal
776. ?" "I suppose," answered * he, regaining courage, luaa mirantur, " Ciijus pulchr
777. soli servo fidem." of St. Agnes. : ; ing met the lady of the house at the same p
778. mber may be on *a very different footing in a familiarity, still less a one Yet
779. or justify the audacity of your bearing towards the young mistress of this hous
780. Rome's richest heiresses. There nothing like hav- ing two strings to one's bow.
781. t heiresses. There nothing like hav- ing two strings to one's bow." This coarse
782. e ruder executor of her command." Saying this, he took the unbidden guest's arm
783. en he had put him outside, still holding him fast, he added "Go now, Fulvius, in
784. ation Rome; and I that hold this morning's insolence over your head, as a securi
785. eared some trap. When he saw the seeming assailant. It durst conceal nothing, an
786. ming assailant. It durst conceal nothing, and ; struggle at the door, he ran ste
787. cied, must be his pupil's new despairing of success in this way, he detached fro
788. inished of Syrian make, and Avas raising tian's head, it over the Sebas- wrenche
789. bastian to his centurion, who was coming up and was of moment to join his fetlow
790. rner, caught Corvinus, no longer limping, but running as w fast as his legs woul
791. Corvinus, no longer limping, but running as w fast as his legs would the back-do
792. r alluded to their feats of that morning. Each knew that the other had incurred
793. lf would assail in vain. A wall painting from the Cemetery of bt. PrieciUa. ffi
794. earts and houses for action, by removing from both w^hatever could attach themse
795. f the impious soldier, instead of having been made the inheritance of the poor.t
796. eat * principles be forgotten, of making the all We have it his property to the
797. days of tribulation which are preparing for us. And as the only return which is
798. r those who give, or do us good." During this brief address poor Pancratius knew
799. ew not which c=t St. Laurence displaying his Treasures. : way ants, to look. He
800. before him, as large as possible. making himself And his emotion did all but bet
801. d a cheerful banquet closed the edifying scene. in the neighboring titular churc
802. d the edifying scene. in the neighboring titular church. When all was over, Cjec
803. was over, Cjecilia insisted uj)on seeing her poor old cripple safe home, canvas
804. afe home, canvas purse and upon carrying for him his heavy and chatted so cheerf
805. the door of his ; poor but clean lodging. His blind guide then thrust his purse
806. rust his purse into his hand, and giving him a hurried good day, away most light
807. heavy about her, if she had been playing some and running as lightly as if she h
808. if she had been playing some and running as lightly as if she had nothing he mig
809. running as lightly as if she had nothing he might have discovered a solution of
810. t not his splendor; he is less scorching, but not less bright. As he ure, as ris
811. ight. As he ure, as rises in the morning, he dashes sparks of radiance over awak
812. dashes sparks of radiance over awakening nat- an Indian prince, upon entering in
813. ing nat- an Indian prince, upon entering into the to his presence chamber, fling
814. agerness to catch his royal largess. ing through a cloudless sky, And after care
815. but soon sends back, after disappearing, radiant mesis sengers from the world h
816. mesis sengers from the world he visiting and cheering, to remind If less us he w
817. from the world he visiting and cheering, to remind If less us he will soon come
818. ut now the leaves are large and mantling, and worthy in vine-countries to have a
819. . And of these some are already assuming ; their bright amber tint, w^hile those
820. in rich it, imperial purple, are passing rapidly to through a changing opal hue,
821. re passing rapidly to through a changing opal hue, scarcely less beautiful. It i
822. one's book, over the varied and varying landscape. For, as the breeze sweeps ov
823. ween, the brilliant w^eb of unstir- ring vine-leaves disj^lays a yellower or bro
824. r ilex, the rich chestnut, the reddening orchard, the adust stubble, the melanch
825. melancholy pine to the East —towering — to Italy v^diat the palm-tree is ab
826. hill, and plain, with fountains leaping up, and cascades gliding down, porticoe
827. untains leaping up, and cascades gliding down, porticoes of glittering marble, s
828. es gliding down, porticoes of glittering marble, statues of bronze and stone, pa
829. nd innumerable slaves were busy, dusting clearing the canals for the artificial
830. rable slaves were busy, dusting clearing the canals for the artificial brooklets
831. the artificial brooklets, * and scouring, trimming the hedges into fantastic sha
832. cial brooklets, * and scouring, trimming the hedges into fantastic shapes, and p
833. dges into fantastic shapes, and plucking Pampirms, pampino. up the weeds from th
834. encumbered with every huge wain carrying furniture, species of vehicle, from the
835. , to the light chariot or gig, ; dashing and as the best roads were narrow, and
836. and noise Nor was there a and squabbling filled the public ways. Sabine, Tuscula
837. shionable limits sufficient to Avatering-places round Vesuvius, a street of nobl
838. Brenta, received their from neighboring cities only, still less from wan- derer
839. Pliny calls its villas,* because forming its truest beauty, that Fabiola had has
840. of yachts, galleys, pleasureand fishing-skiffs from some of which rose the roar
841. iffs from some of which rose the roaring ; laugh of excursionists, from others t
842. e shore and half way down was an opening on a spring, confined for a favorite sp
843. half way down was an opening on a spring, confined for a favorite spot of green,
844. fresh by the gush, from an out-cropping rock, of a crystal moment till, in a na
845. s ledge, it bubbled and fretted, rushing over in which it went down murmuring an
846. ing over in which it went down murmuring and chattering, the most good-natured t
847. ch it went down murmuring and chattering, the most good-natured trellis, imagina
848. ed later, seldom paid more than a flying visit for a couple of days to this vill
849. he ture, or of villa, chiefly containing works on agricul- a local interest, a s
850. them become a home. Most of her morning hours were spent in the cherished retre
851. w amazed she was when, the day following the dinner at her house, Agnes informed
852. ormed her that Syra had declined leaving her service, though tempted by a bribe
853. till more astonished was she at learning, that of liberty. She could feel no the
854. elf. pleasurable consciousness of having earned this affection by any acts of ki
855. in slaves, even towards visitor calling But any upon her — oppressive masters
856. onduct any airs, any symptom of thinking she had done a grand thing, and that he
857. m of thinking she had done a grand thing, and that her mistress must feel it. No
858. nd never betrayed any signs of believing herself less a slave than before. softe
859. nd evidence, that there was such a thing in the world as disinterested love, aff
860. er formerly allotted to think of turning it never seemed to over to any one but
861. rfully set herself about it. The reading generally pursued by Fabiola was, as ha
862. nd refined She was character, consisting of philosophical literature. surprised,
863. f solid by a simple remark, maxim, bring down a a higher view flight of virtuous
864. it; nor did it seem to come from reading, or deep thought, or superiority of edu
865. es which she new to her. and was reading But there seemed to be in her maid's mi
866. tuned chord, which vibrated in unfailing unison with what was just and right, bu
867. cover it was an intuition than any thing she had before witShe was not yet in a
868. Baptist Precursor.* It was on a morning in October, that, reclining by the spri
869. on a morning in October, that, reclining by the spring, the mistress and slave w
870. n October, that, reclining by the spring, the mistress and slave were occupied i
871. tress and slave were occupied in reading and, drawing out a when the former, wea
872. ve were occupied in reading and, drawing out a when the former, wearied with the
873. ss of the volume, ; looked for something lighter and newer manuscript from her c
874. that stupid book down. Here is something, It will I am new told, very amusing, a
875. ing, It will I am new told, very amusing, and only just come out. be to both of
876. mplained, though grossly immoral, making light of all virtue; while every Christ
877. ll virtue; while every Christian writing was suppressed, or as much as possible
878. even unfit for thought, of such a thing as restraint put upon her studies. What
879. e of virtue could have made that reading seem which only described by the pen a
880. n educated could give her. "What smiling. possible harm can it do either of us?
881. duce it And, in the meantime, is amusing "Would you yourself, for any considerat
882. expected some new theory, some striking principle, to come out. Instead, they h
883. family? Do you think they have any thing to do with our affairs? " "Far indeed f
884. e, indivisible, undefilable, penetrating yet diffusive, ubi- quitous and unlimit
885. ed before there was any Power, beginning belong to ; He will exist after all lov
886. ill exist after all love, justice ending has ceased. wisdom, goodness, strained
887. goodness, strained as too, and unerring judgment Him by His nature, and are as
888. lowed from her reed, lips, as if opening of a musical made vocal by another's ;
889. : "But, Syra, can you think that a Being such as you have described, far beyond
890. occupy Himself with constantly watching the actions, of millions of creatures?
891. ; not only the sparkles that the falling drops strike from its rough sides glist
892. light, but black and loathsome creeping things, which seek to hide and bury the
893. sits them ? Far more would from throwing it appear so, were he to restrain his b
894. , or believe, that rays would be wanting, or light would fail, to scrutinize the
895. rful," observed Fabiola, a pause, during which her eyes were fixedly contemplati
896. hich her eyes were fixedly contemplating the fountain, as though she were testin
897. the fountain, as though she were testing the truth of Syra's words. "And they so
898. on. Terrible thought, that one is living, if you say is true, under the for stea
899. l ! It is enough to make one any evening commit ness ! Yet self-destruction, to
900. destruction, to get rid of the torturing watchful" it sounds so true! Fabiola lo
901. intellect struggled against the writhing passion, like an eagle with a serpent;
902. foe. than with beak and talons, subduing the quailing struggle, visible in her c
903. h beak and talons, subduing the quailing struggle, visible in her countenance Af
904. rd. Syra, with calm intensity of feeling, silently watched the workings of her m
905. of men, a consciousness of a controlling, an approving, and a. rewardmg Power to
906. ciousness of a controlling, an approving, and a. rewardmg Power too; am I right?
907. (Syra expressed approbation,) " standing by us when no other eye can see, or res
908. or restrain, or encourage us ; a feeling that, were we ever the same, shut up fo
909. unt of human if I principles, in guiding us, is and could not the position of le
910. alwhich exists before your Supreme Being, and that possible moral superiority wh
911. ve's neck, and wept. Her passion getting above her intellect; increasing softnes
912. getting above her intellect; increasing softness. was long and tender. Her hear
913. ithdrew her embrace she said " One thing Being more, Syra : dare one address, by
914. w her embrace she said " One thing Being more, Syra : dare one address, by worsh
915. ght. His kindness, and His wisdom, being. we live Hence, one may address Him, no
916. the conversation seemed to be trenching upon mysterious and sacred ground, neve
917. r face Avith her hands, and then looking up earnestly into Syra's " I face, said
918. said to her: am sure that, after having so clearly described to me the deep sen
919. s act, you have a real must habitmeaning in this heard, as awful saying, though
920. itmeaning in this heard, as awful saying, though I understand you not." "As " I
921. n Fabiola retired rest of the and during the day her mind and calm. alternately
922. a huge. bare, unfurnished hall, lighting up only a wilderness. help, from the on
923. much wasted splendor ? The next morning had been fixed for one of those visits
924. retired to his villa in Campania, taking with him a number of the converts made
925. but many of them had preferred remaining with him ; that numerous, the whole est
926. tion to her wish to discharge a pleasing duty of courtesy most kind friend of he
927. id the dust, and studded with glistening gems the garlands of vine which started
928. , and laurels, relieved by tall tapering cypresses, amidst which villa shone the
929. romatius, whom she had last seen limping with gout, the report were true that he
930. uired if kindly after her father, asking was going shortly to Asia. At this Fabi
931. indly after her father, asking was going shortly to Asia. At this Fabiola seemed
932. d contain herself no longer, and turning to Chromatius, she said "Why, what on t
933. hy, what on to earth have you been doing, Chromatius, send away all your statues
934. " "What! and never let me know any thing about it? You know there were several p
935. s a few But I I may pick up such a thing for you. cannot promise you a face with
936. ify so outrageous a proas I have ceeding?" Why, you see, grown older, I have gro
937. same opinion. retain tors, but belonging to quite another family, so did I these
938. either could I run a risk of their being bought friend, for the continuance of t
939. And pray, my most righteous old standing in it? villa " is it not an imposture t
940. it not an imposture to continue calling your a single statue " is left Ad Statu
941. " At " or " the palms." TO : a training-school, in which many were being prepar
942. raining-school, in which many were being prepared, as wrestlers or gladiators us
943. out by baptism, Chromatins, after making every inquiry into the truth of the fac
944. ome a Christian, as a means of obtaining a cure of the same complaint. This of c
945. vidence of Christianity, without risking an insincere baptism. Chromatins was ce
946. stian and Polycarp thrown into a blazing furnace not perhaps so difficult a matt
947. statues were broken in pieces, including, of course, those in the villa, as well
948. t all have not been destroyed. Something Rome. ; Chromatins was not cured. has b
949. Christians They were brought and, dying in glorious martyrdom, gave his name to
950. rs, Rome, to encourage and in the coming persecution, which and activity, He had
951. ho continued her last sentence by adding lovely spot, "But do you know. Chromati
952. —that try, " strange reports are going round the coun- about your doings here?
953. hat you have a quantity of people living with you whom nobody knows that you see
954. a most Platonic republic." life, forming " Highly flattered " interrupted Chroma
955. ! ; " Oh, no " replied Fabiola, laughing. ! Jos. vii. " How " kind of them ! " r
956. , with as much loose talk, deep drinking, occa- sional sallies of youthful mirth
957. d troublesome freaks in the for alluding to neighborhood, as others, — I beg y
958. about their motives and manner of living. Is not this a phenomenon ? " " It is,
959. ts. We meet at different times, and sing beautiful songs together, all breathing
960. beautiful songs together, all breathing virtue and purity, and read most improv
961. rtue and purity, and read most improving books, and receive oral instruction fro
962. y is on vegetables ; but I that laughing quite compatible with lentils, have alr
963. ystem," remarked Fabiola, with a knowing look. "Ha! you cunning really think tha
964. a, with a knowing look. "Ha! you cunning really think that this it thing " answe
965. cunning really think that this it thing " answered the judge ! ; "so you won't
966. is that?" asked the young lady. a saving plan after all ? may be for Nothing les
967. ving plan after all ? may be for Nothing less than this. We are determined that
968. ned that there shall not be such a thing as a poor person within our reach this
969. n. Have you taken the trouble of reading any Chiistian writings, by which you mi
970. uld not have patience to learn any thing about them. scorn them too much, as ene
971. s to the last degree, and as sanctioning every abominable crime, ever to give my
972. she said to him, " I have said something very thoughtless, I fear, or stirred up
973. s, and else. let us talk of to something One purpose of my visit to you was, ask
974. as, ask you if you knew of any one going immediately to Rome. I have heard, from
975. to write to him,* lest he repeat taking leave of me, to spare a young what he d
976. ." "Yes," replied Chromatins, "there ing early to-morrow morning. write your let
977. tins, "there ing early to-morrow morning. write your letter; the bearer is man s
978. oom a young man was seated, transcribing a large volume; which, on seeing a stra
979. cribing a large volume; which, on seeing a stranger enter, he closed and put asi
980. post in those days, and persons wishing to send letters had to dispatch an expr
981. Torquatus," said Chromatius, addressing him, " this lady desires to send a lett
982. put this into her bosom. After partaking of some slight refreshment, she farewel
983. tius an affectionate There was something touchingly paternal in his though he bu
984. d never see her again. different feeling So she thought; to perish was a very wh
985. e of bitter paganism, when every feeling and every thought in them seemed formed
986. ords ; but was startled, before reaching the gate, to find her chariot stopped p
987. s upon the road." or Fabiola, hesitating, said: liberty, if I "Would it be takin
988. said: liberty, if I "Would it be taking too great a expenses of a more should ?
989. ompense. He received alley. with smiling readiness, and disappeared by a side sh
990. ould not think he If There was something in his manner which made a ; disagreeab
991. uld have seen a likeness eager clutching of the purse. to Fabiola, however, was
992. tion she might have contracted by making him her the other side messenger. destr
993. to read them. she perused the following words from a book unknown to her "I say
994. dull outside, but where chipped emitting sparks of unable to decide whether he h
995. iamond, or of a worthless stone, a thing to be placed on a royal crown, or trodd
996. to his embarrassment by at once flinging its value, and Such were the alternatin
997. its value, and Such were the alternating feelings of Fabiola on her way home. "W
998. my perplexity, and forget such harassing words. So here it goes to the winds, or
999. e midst of His Apostles, from a painting in the Catacombs. w CHAPTER EEY XVIII.
1000. XVIII. TEMPTATION. ' early next morning a mule and guide On came packed a moder
1001., soft word in his ear, semani exhorting him to be faithful to the graces he had
1002.and probably sincerely, promised knowing his poverty, put a little hand, and ent
1003.ommunity, called him aside ; and flowing tears, conjured him to correct the irre
1004.rect the irregularities, but threatening, which had appeared in his conduct, rep
1005.ifested itself in his Torquatus, bearing, and cultivate more all Christian virtu
1006.priest's hand, and obtained his blessing ; then received from him letters of rec
1007.tered the house, Chromatius was standing at the door, looking wistfully, with a
1008.matius was standing at the door, looking wistfully, with a moist eye, after him.
1009.gal's father kept fixed on his departing son. As the villa was not on the high r
1010.abiola's purse, however, for prosecuting his journey. had him very much at ease
1011. to congratulate itself loudly on having achieved a waterfall by leaping down tw
1012.n having achieved a waterfall by leaping down two stones at a time, and plunging
1013. down two stones at a time, and plunging into an abyss concealed by a wide acant
1014.f bright-plumed waterfowl, lake. basking and fluttering on a What were scenes of
1015. waterfowl, lake. basking and fluttering on a What were scenes of a the travelle
1016.aveller's thoughts amidst these shifting act in his life's new drama? did they a
1017.h moody but eager gamesters were casting their knuckle-bone dice; and he felt a
1018.uckle-bone dice; and he felt a quivering creep over him of an excitement long su
1019.is- course, ungirded by inebriety, going round with the cup; the reproving count
1020. going round with the cup; the reproving countenance of Chromatins would seem wh
1021.uld seem when placed opposite, repelling with a scowl the approach of either. He
1022.ch of either. He was, in fact, returning only to the innocent enjoyments of the
1023.ese were but the accessories to a living and panting mass of human whose passion
1024. the accessories to a living and panting mass of human whose passions they enkin
1025.ts when suddenly he found skiff. opening, with an inlet of the sea before him, a
1026. there was a bold young fisherman living on the coast of southern Italy. One nig
1027.me time, was awakened by a loud shouting at a He looked round and saw the family
1028. the crew distance. of which were crying aloud, and waving their hands to invite
1029.. of which were crying aloud, and waving their hands to invite him back ; but th
1030.and soon amazed to find that the fishing-boat, towards which he had turned the p
1031.he opposite Evidently he had been making a circle but the end side. came within
1032. the end side. came within its beginning, in a spiral curve, and now he was comm
1033. spiral curve, and now he was commencing another and a narrower one. A horrible
1034.ntre, in which he could see a of hissing downward funnel and foaming water. Then
1035.a of hissing downward funnel and foaming water. Then, in despair, he threw down
1036.ir, he threw down his oars, and standing he ilung up his arms frantically; and a
1037.ms frantically; and a sea-bird screaming near, heard him cry out as loud as itse
1038.he circle his boat went itself, spinning round was only a few times longer than
1039.his breath, he felt the w^aters gurgling above him, and he was whirled down into
1040., and ! exclaimed the muleteer, pointing to a town and presently the mule was sl
1041. town and presently the mule was sliding along the broad flags of its pavement.
1042.as paid handsomely, and retired swearing and grumbling at the niggardliness of t
1043.mely, and retired swearing and grumbling at the niggardliness of the traveller.
1044.joined his host in a frugal meal, during which he learned the master's history.
1045.proved eminently successful. But finding a persecution imminent, and his Christi
1046.r ; In a fellow-Christian he saw nothing and as such he talked freely with him,
1047.uatus took his leave, and, pre- ^tending to have some business in the town, he w
1048.it, Alban Here he changed his travelling and rode on gaily between the lines of
1049. his letter, answered all inquiries, ing, He and accepted, without much pressan
1050.ressan invitation to supper that evening. then went to seek a respectable lodgin
1051. then went to seek a respectable lodging, suited to the present state of his pur
1052.; he had no love green fields or running brooks society of his tastes were for t
1053.ere for the gossip and free Eome. During the ; year, his daughter's presence was
1054.that he would not have presumed to bring in contact with her. his table; Men of
1055.unded late hours, with and deep drinking conversation, till and loose generally
1056.nd loose generally followed his gambling sumptuous entertainments. Having invite
1057.ambling sumptuous entertainments. Having invited Torquatus to sup with him, he w
1058. search of guests to meet him. loitering He soon picked up a batch of sycophants
1059.baths of Titus, But as he was sauntering home he saw two men in a small grove dt
1060. dtr round a temple earnestly conversing together. ment's look, he advanced towa
1061.t's look, he advanced towards them thing to this ; After a mo- but waited, at a
1062.tary himself this risen at "None morning." in " What ever possessed the fools to
1063.ld temples in public instead of skulking in by-lanes, as they used to do, I for
1064.notoriety, and profit too, if by hunting these possible." It is under- odious pe
1065.nder- odious people down, and destroying " Well, them be it so ; but to come to
1066.bius to one while he said: "To something very " that ; like it." " I hope," answ
1067.artled, the black witch has been playing no tricks with you heartily she were ou
1068. struck by a better ; charm that evening. I have my eyes open I saw how your hea
1069.a philosopher, and I understands nothing of such matters. wish, indeed, she life
1070.r." uj^ her books, and think of settling herself in instead of preventing others
1071.ettling herself in instead of preventing others. ; But I can give you better new
1072.ed. She had proved, Fulvius was thinking, an easy prize, in spite of her demuren
1073. Fabiola may think. But you have nothing to fear from her now. She and all her s
1074.beral found reasons for Christians being excepted from posed progress that kind
1075.gn element, it. One thought their During doctrine detestable, another their prac
1076.o same conclusion, Fulvius, after having glanced from one the other of the guest
1077.it his lip. At one time he was crumbling the bread between his fingers; at anoth
1078.s infinitely worse is, their maintaining such anti-social doctrines, conniving a
1079.ng such anti-social doctrines, conniving at such to the frightful excesses, and
1080.to the frightful excesses, and degrading themselves ass's head," proceeded disgu
1081.selves ass's head," proceeded disgusting worship of an fairly a third. arm, Torq
1082.d. arm, Torquatus now writhed and rising, had lifted his when Fulvius, with a co
1083.e every goblet and beaker dance and ring, as, in a choked voice, Torquatus excla
1084.s puffed himself out, evidently thinking himself ill-used, by foolish, in, who m
1085.sty old Fabius looked exceedingly having a guest brought to ; gentleman was evid
1086. to ; gentleman was evidently hesitating, whether he should not knock down someb
1087.n that he finds in his trap in a morning. Here was a man ready to hand, to put o
1088.er has had the opportunity of witnessing features, the expression it of fly, the
1089.od, approach its net, stroke of its wing, and studies * how and keenly watches e
1090. to Corvinus, went up to him, and taking him by the hand said, courteously: "I f
1091.ear, I spoke inconsiderately, in drawing out from you a declaration which may pr
1092.ch may prove dangerous." "I fear nothing," replied Torquatus, again excited; "I
1093.we can talk quietly together." So saying, he led him into an elegant room, where
1094.ne to be brought, for such as, according to to enjoy a commissatio, or drinking-
1095.g to to enjoy a commissatio, or drinking-bout. Roman fashion, liked But only Cor
1096. inlaid table were Fulvius, after plying Torquatus with more liquor, negligently
1097., and threw them playfully down, talking in the mean time on indifferent subject
1098.subjects. "Dear me! " he kept exclaiming, "Avhat throws! It is well I am not pla
1099.vhat throws! It is well I am not playing with any one, or I should have been rui
1100.en ruined. You try, Torquatus." Gambling, as we learnt quatus : before, for a tr
1101.atus : before, for a transaction arising had been the ruin of Torout of it he wa
1102. no intention, as he thought, of playing, Fulvius watched him as a lynx might it
1103.ed in all this, coupled with the poising of his hand, the knowing cast vice. of
1104.ith the poising of his hand, the knowing cast vice. of the wrist, and the sharp
1105.hance, low." if you will stake something very I must be very low indeed, merely
1106.w indeed, merely have renounced gambling. Once, indeed " It " — for recreation
1107.hey began to throw for the most trifling stakes, and Tor- quatus generally won.
1108. Cassianus mentioned ? " it recollecting " Who? "Yes, asked the other, surprised
1109.ere you the person," he asked, look- ing up to Corvinus, "who struck that nice C
1110. ? Corvinus was on the point of bursting into a rage but Fulvius checked him by
1111.rquatus's interest in the game deepening. He put forth sufficient skill to make
1112.es, and saw it was only Corvinus staring at him. All his skill was now put forth
1113.science had retreated faith was wavering; grace had already departed. For the :
1114.betrayed No, no," groaned the despairing wretch. told us all: quite to return to
1115.rtyrs. crite, You Torquatus, and nothing more." is it "Who looked up. side. that
1116."Who looked up. side. that is tormenting me?" is he exclaimed, and Fulvius was s
1117.s he exclaimed, and Fulvius was standing with folded arms at his if "And all thi
1118.tion) and to-morrow you will be standing before his father's tribu- nal to die f
1119.lent, till Fulvius aroused him by asking, "Well, have you made your choice; eith
1120.ntly answered, "Neither." and "Come, ing then, what will you do?" asked Fulvius,
1121.down beside him, and said, in a soothing voice, you, ^' soft I and tell Now, Tor
1122.? play with, you will only do my bidding." " And what is " "Rise to-morrow as us
1123.ong your all friends ; act as if nothing had happened " but answer "Call inches.
1124.t. " I my questions, tell me every thing." Torquatus groaned, it "A traitor at l
1125.ath! ? Ay, death by hear Corvinus pacing impatiently up and is it to down the Qu
1126.which ! be " Not death Oh, no, any thing but that Fulvius went out, and found hi
1127.us went out, and found his friend fuming with rage and wine he had hard work to
1128.ny violent and immediate measure. Having sent Corvinus sulky and to Torquatus, f
1129.orvinus sulky and to Torquatus, fretting home, he returned the room, his whom he
1130.om his chair, and endeavored, by walking up and down, to steady his senses and r
1131.But it was in vain his head was swimming from his inebriety, and his subsequent
1132. was sick too, and his heart was beating almost audibly. Shame, remorse, self-co
1133.mUnable to sustain himself longer on ing in turn uppermost. his feet, he threw h
1134.n a silken couch, and buried his burning brow in his icy hands, and groaned. And
1135.nd and round him, and a constant moaning ; sounded in his to rouse him. ears. st
1136.b Diogenes the excavator from a painting in the Cemetery of Domitilla " |)art Se
1137. we date the the commencement of meeting herself, JODag, after a painting in the
1138.meeting herself, JODag, after a painting in the Cemetery of Callistus. It was to
1139. dark and rather might be seen threading his way is still through the narrow all
1140.uble. He looked for the neatest dwelling in the street and being particularly st
1141.neatest dwelling in the street and being particularly struck with the cleanlines
1142. Majus and SevThe first was busy carving, or scratching rather, a rude epitaph o
1143.he first was busy carving, or scratching rather, a rude epitaph on an old slab o
1144. Jonas devoured The other son was making a rough design, in which could be by th
1145. evidently for a more permanent painting elsewhere. Further, it was clear that w
1146.the door, old Diogenes Avas busy fitting a new handle to an old pick- axe. These
1147.ns have considered the fossor as forming a lesser lector, ecclesiastical order i
1148.orm system pursued too, so in excavating, arranging, and filling up of the numer
1149.pursued too, so in excavating, arranging, and filling up of the numerous cemete-
1150.so in excavating, arranging, and filling up of the numerous cemete- round Rome,
1151., a system complete from the begin- ning, as not to leave positive signs of impr
1152.ous and recogfor sjDeculation of burying the dead, nized confraternity which was
1153.ted the purpose. A series of interesting inscriptions, found in the cemetery of
1154. ; grandfather, father, and sons, having car- on in the same place.* We can thus
1155.t cemeteries. the Capitol: The following 184:4 * Given by F. Marchi in his Archi
1156.h, no," answered the for artist, looking up and smiling. better in the "I do the
1157.d the for artist, looking up and smiling. better in the "I do them hand. poor pe
1158.rious thought struck me as I was carving her epitaph." "Let me hear it, Majus."
1159.ry of a But what is your reason thinking thus " ? " I Simply because * posterity
1160.ry of would sooner commit to the keeping of the pious poor than that of the wick
1161., unfortunately, not intelligible, being in cipher. rich. And my rude record may
1162. the Nomentan Way. "Never mind that; ing. its simplicity is worth much fine writ
1163.uch fine writ- What is that slab leaning against the wall?" is "Ah, that you is
1164.d, and saw the old man vigorously trying to cut off the end of a little wedge wh
1165.efect in his which he removed by drawing the back of his brawny hand across his
1166. to joy was It is a very different thing, and requires a heart as hardened as mi
1167. of such another youth, in their winding-sheet, then fold of lime, instead of ba
1168.f lime liave been found in tombs forming exact moulds of different parts of the
1169.has a comrade younger than himself lying in the same bed. of Kestitutus, the As
1170.d. of Kestitutus, the As we were closing the tomb boy not more than twelve or th
1171.o deliver the message I came to to bring. that to-morrow at dawn you must come m
1172.her's house, to arrange about jDreparing the cemeteries for our com* On the 33d
1173.tomb was discovered unviolated. On being opened the bones, white, bright, and po
1174.shed as ivory, were found, corresponding to the framework of a youth of eighteen
1175.of the Jesuits' college at Loreto. ; ing troubles. Our holy Pope filled up, will
1176. you, who know them so " well." "Nothing would give me greater pleasure," answer
1177.ancratius " Diogenes rebuked him, saying, "That he comes to us in Pancratius' s
1178.d. I Only a * trifle, But as I was going eai-ly the cemetery this morning, ninus
1179.s going eai-ly the cemetery this morning, ninus." turned into the Baths of Anto-
1180."What!" interrupted Pancratius, laughing, "do you " fre- quent such fashionable
1181.hem next? " and moreover they are making a tomb for themselves in the cemetery o
1182.Here it is," said the latter, exhibiting it, as follows CVCVMIO ET VICTORIA SE V
1183.s in the epitaph " but we are forgetting Torquatus." "As not a this I entered th
1184.." "As not a this I entered the building, then," said Severus, "I was little sur
1185.e (the tomb) for themselves while living. sarius of the Antoniiie" (baths). Foun
1186. Severus," returned Pancratius, blushing deeply; "but he best." is young as yet
1187.which aftbrds little scope for appearing on a affairs. public scene, or taking p
1188.ng on a affairs. public scene, or taking part in general Her ing, house, besides
1189.scene, or taking part in general Her ing, house, besides being, or rather contai
1190.in general Her ing, house, besides being, or rather contain- a title or parochia
1191.rochial church, was now honored by being the residence of the supreme Pontiff. t
1192. name, one easily slurred in pronouncing it. the Catacombs. cftra- The Martyr's
1193.f the Church, from his ordinary dwelling, to a securer asylum. For this purpose
1194.eat delight, in that and the follow- ing pontificate, ferred to it, when the wil
1195. church, the care of own sex, the making, and keeping in of sacred vestments and
1196.care of own sex, the making, and keeping in of sacred vestments and linen instru
1197.r, and the and female converts preparing for baptism, as well as the attending t
1198.ng for baptism, as well as the attending them at that sacred rite, belonged to t
1199.itional employment. Early in the morning of the appointed day, the meeting menti
1200.orning of the appointed day, the meeting mentioned in our last chajDter took pla
1201.l instructions were given for increasing collection of alms, to be employed in e
1202.ion of alms, to be employed in enlarging the cemeteries and bui-ying the dead, i
1203.in enlarging the cemeteries and bui-ying the dead, in succoring those driven to
1204.ries and bui-ying the dead, in succoring those driven to concealment by persecut
1205.oncealment by persecution, in nourishing prisoners, and obtaining access to them
1206., in nourishing prisoners, and obtaining access to them, and finally in ransomin
1207.access to them, and finally in ransoming or rescuing the bodies of martyrs. coll
1208.em, and finally in ransoming or rescuing the bodies of martyrs. collect their ac
1209.r each region, to and record interesting events. The cardinals, or titular pries
1210.rticularly of the Holy Eucharist, during the persecution * Sixty ; and to each w
1211.heery than otherwise, under the exciting forebodings of a coming perse- A Chapel
1212.der the exciting forebodings of a coming perse- A Chapel of the Blessed Sacramen
1213.l to guard, than he issued No commanding his to the subordinate superintendents
1214.perior assembly. The Capena was pointing to mid-day, as he issued from it with h
1215.with his sons, and found already waiting the three young men. They walked in par
1216. "Cataeombes ; by various ways (slipping round different tombs that lined the ro
1217.ey entered the instruments for procuring light. Severus proposed that, as the gu
1218.esides, they will wish to know something of the subsequent history of those wond
1219. divided into three from their beginning to the period of our narrative, ; or a
1220.eason to hope that new epoch it is being commenced. "We have generally avoided u
1221.menced. "We have generally avoided using the name of catacombs, because might mi
1222. other names, had among them The meaning of this word is comCatacumbas.t ; unkno
1223. the relics of SS. Peter and Paul having been for a time buried there, in a cryp
1224.in a crypt This term became the existing near the cemetery. was generalized, til
1225.ury, a subject of controversy. Following two or three vague and equivocal passag
1226.originally heathen excavations, building of the These sand-pits were called aren
1227. of easiest possible access, for drawing out mateand will make it as ample as is
1228.of, and the supply of what he is seeking. And ; * As Jd Nymphas, Ad Ursum jnleai
1229. we find in the arenaria still abounding round Eome. But the catacombs are const
1230.would imply, merely to lead to something else. They are themselves the catacomb
1231.hey are evidently so made body was lying by the side of the grave, while this *
1232.ide of the grave, while this * was being dug. much prized for That is, the red v
1233.olcanic sand called puzzolana, so making Roman cement. irtfb When was tiles, the
1234. is no evidence of the Christians having ever buried any where, anteriorily to t
1235.el of our resur- and speaks of our being buried with Him in baptism, was natural
1236.to be ready to rise with Him. This lying in wait for resurrection was the second
1237.ed to bury is them alluded to the rising again. The unknown in Christian inscrip
1238.or again, as a pledge, or precious thing, intrusted to faithful, but temporary,
1239.sted to faithful, but temporary, keeping. gests that it is The very name a while
1240.y a place where for ; mitory, slumbering many lie, as in a till dawn come, and i
1241.deas, which are combined in the planning of the catacombs, were not later insert
1242.bhorrence of the pagan custom of burning the dead nor have we a hint that this m
1243.n. The style of paintings, yet remaining, belongs to a period of symbols, and th
1244.d the symbolical taste still flourishing art. Their itself, are characteristic o
1245.i, about three hundred are found bearing consular dates, through every period, f
1246.the Romans deposited the urns containing the ashes of the dead. w century (a. d,
1247.d, 350). Another curious and interesting custom furnisiies us with dates on tomb
1248. with dates on tombs. At the it, closing of the grave, its wet and leave there a
1249. the full date of a person's death being given, we should prefer chronicling the
1250.eing given, we should prefer chronicling the year, to the day of the month, when
1251.j® : : m No one caves about remembering the day on which a person ; died, witho
1252.inscriptions mingled together, belonging to both orders of the dead. One in Gree
1253.the dead. One in Greek, after mentioning the "Deposition of Augenda on the 13th
1254. It is remarkable, letters; first, being in Latin written with Greek then, for c
1255. written with Greek then, for containing a testimony of the Divinity of ; our Lo
1256.ity of ; our Lord lastly, for expressing a prayer for the refreshment till of th
1257.ted. We up the portions of words wanting, from the falling out of part of the pl
1258.tions of words wanting, from the falling out of part of the plaster. bene mereht
1259.£:/ T6C " in* . I To the well-deserving sister Bon . . The eighth day before th
1260.ave forgotten, that we were establishing the fact, that the Christian cemeteries
1261. an earlier age. But, generally speaking, they were satisfied to under the pavem
1262.and some- times in their places, bearing consular dates of the fourth century, a
1263.on the walls. monuments become rarer ing, at latest. and interment in the cataco
1264.s us, in his own epitaph, from intruding into company of the saints. Restitutus,
1265.pter, may well be considered as speaking in the name exclusive of the early Chri
1266.ve of the early Christians, and claiming as work and property, the thousand mile
1267.y, with their six millions of slumbering inhabitants, who trust in the Lord, and
1268.T TELL ABOUT THE CATACOMBS. lived during the first period in the lOGENES history
1269.t of this chapter have no direct bearing upon it our narrative, will serve essen
1270.o comes to our aid but before mentioning them, we will glance at the changes whi
1271.ircases were made; support the crumbling galleries; then walls were built to and
1272. over their entrances, generally leading immediately to the principal tomb, then
1273.e church. The pilgrim, thus, on arriving at the holy city, visited each of these
1274.ed ; descended below, and without having to grope his constructed passages, to s
1275.s made into the scarfs, devotion. During this period, no tomb was allowed body g
1276.llistns, because, while actually writing this chapter, we haye received news of
1277.he very phials displayed most containing them, sealed up in metal tubes. This je
1278.metal tubes. This jealousy of disturbing the saints, beautifully in an incident,
1279.ably through the hmimare, or ventilating shaft, alive, as showered down earth an
1280.vine manifestation. But instead of being permitted to enter again into this hall
1281.aken place while preparations were being * Acta Martyr, torn. 341 iii. : made fo
1282.holy Eucharist, there were in seen lying about, the silver cruets still to be wh
1283.heir less fortunate neighbors, by giving an account of what they had seen. Accor
1284. for It is clear that pilgrims resorting to to the cemeteries, that they hand-bo
1285.es to the catacombs the more interesting because they take different rounds, yet
1286.which took place in the catacombs during the second we will give a brief account
1287. broken across right, with the following letters from left to I The young Cavali
1288. above it mentioned concurred in placing this, off, in the cemetery of Callistus
1289.ornelius, there would be found something at tomb which would account was verifie
1290. or over, or at the sides. The remaining portion of the slab was found within it
1291.ed the ; ; tomb, thus: t Below, reaching from the lower edge of this stone to th
1292.he left-hand end remains, the rest being broken and lost. Above the tomb was ano
1293.eady mentioned, took pleasure in putting verses, which he loved to write, but th
1294.tions, here see how a foreigner, reading these two inscripwith the portraits, an
1295.o inscripwith the portraits, and knowing that the Church comeasily memorates the
1296.the oil of St. We see, then, how, during the second period, new orna- ments, as
1297.t we must not, any danger of mistak- ing these later embellishments for the prod
1298.y The difference is so blunder by taking a Rubens centuries. immense that we mig
1299. Beato Angelico, as by confirst sidering a Byzantine figure to be a production o
1300. other side, on a narrow wall projecting at a riglit angle, are two more similar
1301.NNIS PRB. Eoman it It may be interesting to add the entry in the calendar. in Ca
1302. Callistus, almost entire; the one being a stable and bake- One is, most probabl
1303.r-holes, the spoliation practised during ages, by persons entering from vineyard
1304.actised during ages, by persons entering from vineyards through unguarded entran
1305.gh unguarded entrances, the mere wasting action of time and Aveather, have left
1306. he has appointed have done wonders. ing as they advance. it is With very limite
1307. With very limited means, they are going systematically to work, finish- Nothing
1308. systematically to work, finish- Nothing is taken from the spot where as far as
1309.possible, to all found ; but every thing state. is restored, its original Accura
1310.aintings, ; a truly imperial undertaking. It is time, however, for us to rejoin
1311.rers, as, taper have been slowly walking through a long straight gallery, crosse
1312.and, of course, in our prosaic embodying what we have put together second chapte
1313.urns we have passed by, " before leaving this main gallery ? looked around "A gr
1314.ke sure. continued, still He Oh, pausing "How what is do you distinguish the rig
1315.p a look-out, and saw thas he was making a mark in the sand. "Come, come along,"
1316.e upon him, and allowed corners. nothing to escape his attention. At last they e
1317.rse aware of the custom of so performing them." " Perhaps my two friends," inter
1318.est times down to some of my son's doing." " Well, then, Diogenes, explain * the
1319.though not so fully instructed A Ceiling in the Catacombs, From De Rosi 'Roma So
1320.e excavator. oldest part of the painting, as is natural "The ; ceiling is the fo
1321.e painting, as is natural "The ; ceiling is the for that was done when the crypt
1322.re hollowed out. it, You see the ceiling has a sort of trellis-work painted over
1323.here you see Orpheus only to his sitting flock, down, and playing sweet music, n
1324. to his sitting flock, down, and playing sweet music, not but to the wild beasts
1325.nd other pagan ornaments in this ceiling, and they belong generally to a very an
1326.inue what we have begun, and the ceiling. You see that figure on the right? " Th
1327.pparently in a chest, with a dove flying towards him. " Is that meant to represe
1328.n of the world. Such in is our beginning ; and here our end ; out of the boat, a
1329. the whale Jonas thrown and then sitting : enjoyment under his gourd. its fruit.
1330.ntation in observed Pancratius, pointing to the other side ; " and here we have
1331.tus, but a figure bandaged all consoling doctrine." languidly; "I see nothing ro
1332.ing doctrine." languidly; "I see nothing round, and standing up, like a huge * T
1333.idly; "I see nothing round, and standing up, like a huge * The arched tombs were
1334. always look, is Here a touch- A Ceiling in the Catacombs. In the Cemetery of Do
1335.emetery of Domitilla, third century. ing expression of the hopes of our fathers
1336." said the youth, "one finds the meaning in the word itself; its letters forming
1337. in the word itself; its letters forming the beginning of words, so as to mean J
1338.tself; its letters forming the beginning of words, so as to mean Jesus ' Christ,
1339. food of all Opposite, is Moses striking the Christ, our rock, from which drank,
1340.same cemetery fish ; another interesting painting. On a table is lie a loaf and
1341.tery fish ; another interesting painting. On a table is lie a loaf and a a pries
1342. lie a loaf and a a priest is stretching his hands over them ; and opposite a fe
1343.eared out, are very sented administering baptism. ancient decorations, such as m
1344., such as masks, &c., and fishes bearing baskets of bread and flasks of wine, on
1345.he is represented to On a glass, bearing a picture of this scene, the person str
1346.cture of this scene, the person striking the cemeteries. rock has written over h
1347.er from the flock. Two more are standing at His sides the truant ram on His " ;
1348.erson evidently sent by Both are leaning forward, and Addressing One on either s
1349.Both are leaning forward, and Addressing One on either side is apparently giving
1350. One on either side is apparently giving sheep not of the fold. no heed to their
1351.ld. no heed to their words, but browsing quietly on, while one is turning up its
1352.rowsing quietly on, while one is turning up its eyes and head, looking and liste
1353.is turning up its eyes and head, looking and listening with eager Rain is fallin
1354.its eyes and head, looking and listening with eager Rain is falling copiously on
1355.and listening with eager Rain is falling copiously on them; that is the attentio
1356.quatus, care- " he thought he was losing time. "It was, and indeed is, the heres
1357. mass, of his crimes, on truly repenting, ness, may receive forgive- through the
1358.ady to run into the wilderness, to bring back a lost sheep." "But suppose," were
1359.tians insult the Catholics for admitting to The Church is a mother, with her arm
1360.er open to pardon. re-embrace her erring children." There was a tear trembling i
1361.ng children." There was a tear trembling in Torquatus' s eye quivered with the c
1362.coolness : " It is certainly a consoling doctrine for those that need it." dtr :
1363. grace had been and that some despairing thought had quenched a man's heart. a n
1364.iogenes and Majus, who place for opening a gallery had been absent looking at ne
1365.pening a gallery had been absent looking at near, now : returned. Torquatus addr
1366.m to The unconscious excavator was going the way, when the inexorable artist int
1367.an arcosolivm, with a beautiful painting. while the generally You here see the V
1368.y You here see the Virgin Mother holding her Divine Infant in her arms, wise Eas
1369.though we only reckon three, are adoring Him."* was much had unwittingly supplie
1370.ure clue to the desired turn, by calling his attention to the tomb close round i
1371.guishable by so All admired the painting; but poor Severus at chagrined seeing h
1372.ng; but poor Severus at chagrined seeing how his good father remarkable a pictur
1373.petitions of right, in the this painting. One has been It is lately found, we re
1374.lcedon, whence this mode of representing our Lord usually dated. It is given in
1375.ve us observed to his brother, remarking, trouble yet: I strongly suspect him."
1376.hey determined to prepare for ; changing ing of off at the road, by blocking up
1377.determined to prepare for ; changing ing of off at the road, by blocking up the
1378.ging ing of off at the road, by blocking up the present one, and turnFor this pu
1379.d of the intended change. Moses striking the rock, from the Cemetery of "Inter d
1380.for several she often thought of putting before some or other of them the myster
1381.rious sentences, but she could not bring herself to do it. A rect, lady, whose l
1382.zzle her; but she shrank from submitting so. A learned man, well read and litera
1383.overy but it seemed to contain something higher than he could comprehend. It was
1384.ctly calm, as she looked up from reading. "That villa, writing," said her mistre
1385.ed up from reading. "That villa, writing," said her mistress, "I got at Chromati
1386. do you respect, Aristides, for obliging a boorish enemy, writing, by when asked
1387.s, for obliging a boorish enemy, writing, by when asked, his his banishment? " D
1388.nd not every-day men." "And why laughing. should we not all be heroes?" asked Sy
1389.uld were. It is we very pleasant reading about the feats of such ; wonderful peo
1390.would hke to find a baby she was nursing, ? playing with, or strangling, serpent
1391.o find a baby she was nursing, ? playing with, or strangling, serpents in the cr
1392.s nursing, ? playing with, or strangling, serpents in the cradle I should be ver
1393. very sorry to have a gentleman, telling whom I invited to dinner, me coolly he
1394.to dinner, me coolly he had that morning killed a minotaur, or stables, to clean
1395.ed a hydra; or to have a friend offering to send the Tiber through my them. Pres
1396.TIONS. I now been some time for rag- ing in the East under Dioclesian and Galeri
1397.d Galerius; and it the decree enkindling it throughout the West, had reached Max
1398. spare no one; to descend It but cutting the chiefs of the first, the poorest cl
1399.begin and his its terror to the crushing blow. to For this purpose the emperor,
1400.en burst suddenly upon them, discharging upon their heads its mingled elements,
1401.n HercuWest. ; leus convoked the meeting in which his plans had finally to be ad
1402.t, city, To it were summoned the leading ofiicers of his and of the state. The p
1403.hunt them out, or down, with unrelenting assiduity. The chief prefects or govern
1404.erculeus in particular preferred. During the reign of Nero, the wealthy senator,
1405.e city was a view^ unequalled Stretching even in the vicinity of Rome. across th
1406.le all tombs, Maximian Herculeas holding his horse by the wdie and protected hy
1407.e wdie and protected hy a shield bearing; and bespangled ' over with a she-wolf.
1408.and cyprcss, the eye reached, at evening, the purple slope of hills on which, as
1409.culum, with "their daughters," according to oriental phrase, w basking brightly
1410. according to oriental phrase, w basking brightly in the setting sun. Sabine mou
1411.hrase, w basking brightly in the setting sun. Sabine mountains on the sea left,
1412. perfect landscape. would be attributing to Maximian a quality which he did not
1413.s, were we to give him credit for loving a resiIt dence so admirably situated, t
1414.se of boar which he had still of running out of the of this and wolf, was the mo
1415.on, without sense of justice, or feeling of humanity, this monster had never cea
1416.persecute, and slay whoTo him the coming persecution looked an approaching feast
1417.coming persecution looked an approaching feast does to a glutton, who requires t
1418.tufts of straw, with eyes restlessly ing in a compound expression of suspicion,
1419.nged his obsequious and almost trembling adviseis. A chosen body of guards kept
1420.ficer in command, Sebastian, was leaning negligently against it on the inside, b
1421. of the religion he its all was planning to extirpate, and become, retaining " o
1422.ning to extirpate, and become, retaining " of name of the Lateran Basilica, the
1423.nd done much mischief to the neighboring plains; part of a town; there an earthq
1424.t it In every instance, all was ravaging the oracles had whose charms brought de
1425.whose charms brought declared, was owing to the Christians, toleration irritated
1426.ad afflicted their by openly proclaiming, that they would utter no more, till th
1427.made his own long-winded oration; during which gave unequivocal signs of wearine
1428. the Emperors had held a similar meeting, he considered it his The usual calumni
1429.he ten-thousandth time, to an applauding the stories of murdering and eating inf
1430.o an applauding the stories of murdering and eating infants, of assembly committ
1431.ding the stories of murdering and eating infants, of assembly committing foul cr
1432.d eating infants, of assembly committing foul crimes, of worshipping martyi's' b
1433.y committing foul crimes, of worshipping martyi's' bodies, of adoring an ass's h
1434.worshipping martyi's' bodies, of adoring an ass's head, and inconsistently enoug
1435.head, and inconsistently enough of being These tales were all most unbelievers,
1436.s were all most unbelievers, and serving no God. probably their reciters knew pe
1437., very useful in duty to sit ; : keeping up a horror of Christianity. But, at le
1438. read their own books, and to be drawing up a confutation Indeed, so of their er
1439. have laughed at the very idea of taking his word for his own that belief, again
1440. up a different strain, and his learning quite read the original astonished his
1441.their forefathers, the Jews; who, having come into Egypt in the reign of Ptolemy
1442.aten up the corn there, and sent telling it home. Upon which Ptolemy imprisoned
1443.should live on the straw, by makbuilding a great ing bricks with Phalerius, hear
1444.on the straw, by makbuilding a great ing bricks with Phalerius, hearing from of
1445.great ing bricks with Phalerius, hearing from of their ancestors, Then Demetrius
1446.st learned for w men, in a tower, having shaved half their beards, should write
1447. that came this made war upon every king and way and destroyed them all. It ; wa
1448.s priests so that when a to certain king, Saul, called also Paul, spared a j)Oor
1449.ould rather hear of a new rival starting up my * throne, than of the election of
1450.his speech, delivered in a harsh grating voice, and with a vulgar foreign accent
1451.mense applause and plans were formed ing execution. " Prefect, for the simultane
1452.or complete and exterminat- Then turning sharp upon Tertullus, the emperor said
1453.or superinfor merciless dealings tending these arrangements, and these traitors.
1454.should think he paced, is just the thing ; every quality of a thoroughis unconsc
1455.stamped upon his features." Then turning terror, to Corvinus, to who was : scarl
1456.I Mind you, sirrah, I must it no hacking and hewing, no blundering. am well serv
1457. sirrah, I must it no hacking and hewing, no blundering. am well served but I pa
1458. it no hacking and hewing, no blundering. am well served but I pay off well, too
1459.external, even to the extent of exciting imperial jealousy? : ; near a tiger, th
1460.e about. He had seen, from the beginning, that his comIt ing to Rome had not bee
1461., from the beginning, that his comIt ing to Rome had not been acceptable to Maxi
1462.ies to pay, without Dioclesian's sending him more from Asia, though this had its
1463.ted and disliked him, which in to hating him. It was some compensa- tion, theref
1464., as rudely as himself, in the following terms "None want of your smooth, put-on
1465.uck their eggs for me. have seen nothing of of this so fai- and yet you have had
1466., ; or you may have to look at something very sharp before you. The property of
1467.ss I see particular reasons for ; taking the w^hole to myself. to Now you may go
1468.ack slave, as he could without L causing unnecessary suffering. We have already
1469. without L causing unnecessary suffering. We have already observed, that of the
1470.rave, yet so unboast- ^^ youths whom ing ; so mild, so kind in act and speech, s
1471.lfish and so careful of others, blending so completely in one character noblenes
1472.shed, when, after interview. apologizing for his seeming intrusion, he remarked
1473.r interview. apologizing for his seeming intrusion, he remarked with a smile, th
1474.emarked with a smile, that, well knowing how sufiiciently she was already annoye
1475.elt regret at the idea that he was going to add another, yet undeclared, w ambig
1476.aps was soon depressed again, upon being told it was the vulgar and stupid Corvi
1477.er by those epithets. Sebastian, fearing rather the physical, than the moral act
1478.h, however, seemed to consist in drawing money from the purse of a reluctant dup
1479.eluctant dupe. He of course said nothing of what related to the Christians in th
1480.med to prove that she was only deceiving her victim. But she certainly felt indi
1481.t she certainly felt indignant at having been bargained about by two such vile c
1482. by two such vile characters, and having been represented as a grasping avaricio
1483.nd having been represented as a grasping avaricious woman, whose price was gold.
1484., I should have done for any human being, — possible, from pain or danger." "T
1485.ur hope you mean," said Fabiola, smiling; whole life would go, in works of unrec
1486.h not surprise if us, than in thus doing our duty, even ? not to its comple- tio
1487.page." Sebastian shook his head, smiling, and "The last page of this world's boo
1488.weak. fate, You no doubt are full musing on sheaves of a more glorious on receiv
1489. sheaves of a more glorious on receiving in front arrows from the enemy, and fal
1490.front arrows from the enemy, and falling covered with honor. You it. look to the
1491.ot it 1 cai'e enjoyed by an anticipating fancy. as speak of vulgar death, may co
1492. common with the poorest slave consuming me by slow burning fever, wasting me by
1493.orest slave consuming me by slow burning fever, wasting me by long lingering con
1494.suming me by slow burning fever, wasting me by long lingering consumption, racki
1495.ning fever, wasting me by long lingering consumption, racking me by slowly eatin
1496.e by long lingering consumption, racking me by slowly eating ulcers nay, if you
1497.consumption, racking me by slowly eating ulcers nay, if you please, by the In an
1498.picure, when the doors of the banqueting-hall are thrown wide open, and he sees
1499.s beyond brilliant lamps, the glittering table, viands, with its attendant minis
1500.to when the bridegroom announced, coming with rich conduct her to her new home,
1501.ct her to her new home, will my exulting heart be, Avhen death, under whatever g
1502. immediately." The messenger came having left in, covered with dust and jaded, h
1503.ed packet. Her hand trembled unloosening " its as she took it; and while she was
1504. father was dead. A fashionable watering-place near Naples. Monogram of Christ,
1505. gath- ered round the courier, listening to the details of their master's death.
1506.hter seemed have a melancholy foreboding that they would meet no where and where
1507.iged to stay, while his galley was being fitted up and stored with the best wine
1508.s after a hearty supper, ; and on coming out of a bath, chill, he w^as seized wi
1509. only child. In fine, the body was being em- balmed when the courier his galley
1510.ted, and was to be brought by On hearing this sad tale, Sebastian was almost sor
1511.s of a boundless ocean of black seething waves, on which floated no living thing
1512.ething waves, on which floated no living thing save Her woe seemed utter and unm
1513. waves, on which floated no living thing save Her woe seemed utter and unmeasure
1514.hat they deemed a succession of alarming fits and convulsions. At length she sat
1515.ons. At length she sat up, pale, staring, and tearless, gently ter pushing aside
1516.taring, and tearless, gently ter pushing aside the hand that tried to adminisIn
1517.light, ; whispered of her brain becoming oppressed. The physician, forcibly into
1518.father She started, back, and a bursting flood of tears She spoke of her father,
1519.sleep took the turn of tears, in nursing her shattered mind and frame. Euphrosyn
1520.d a master, how honest a man, how loving a father he had been. But the Christian
1521.nce, except to speak gentle and soothing words to her mistress, and served her w
1522.ibulation that a bright angel was riding in the dark cloud that over- shadowed h
1523.was to Fabiola in a gloomy and searching form. become of her father? Whither was
1524.d at the door, as a genius with drooping head, in, and torch reversed. Science h
1525.peep ble ; in with dread, and, shrugging its shoulders, still own and then prate
1526.abthat the problem was Oh, for something, yet unsolved, the mystery or veiled. s
1527. heart of Fabiola, her slave is enjoying the vision of light, clothed in mortal
1528.tal form, translucid and radiant, rising from the grave as from an alembic, in w
1529.r qualities of matter, without impairing the essence of lovely its nature. Spiri
1530.nother, from land and sea ; from reeking cemetery, and from beneath con; secrate
1531. for God ; like crystal fountains spring- ing into the to heaven, like brilliant
1532.God ; like crystal fountains spring- ing into the to heaven, like brilliant sign
1533.ons, side by repeoples crea- and undying life. And how knows she this? Because O
1534. with joyous ; infancy sacred; rendering also death a holy thing, and place a sa
1535.acred; rendering also death a holy thing, and place a sanctuary. its He went int
1536.e went into it in the darkest of evening, and He came forth from it in the brigh
1537.cast. The time was not come for speaking of these things to Fabiola. She mourned
1538. day in gloomy meditation on the morning He and he rose again robed in And from
1539.spices of Arabia, ended in her gathering name Calpurnius spoke the funei-al orat
1540.e funei-al oration ; in which, according to the fashionable ideas of the day, he
1541.all day, and were stealthily insinuating their dangerous principles into every n
1542. into every noble family, and spi-eading disloyalty and immo- ! ^ rality in ever
1543.n philosophers differed, was now basking on a green bank in Elysium, and quaffin
1544.on a green bank in Elysium, and quaffing nectar. " And oh " concluded the old wh
1545.ar. " And oh " concluded the old whining hypocrite, who would ! have been sorry
1546.r seemed injustice, fraud, over-reaching and oppression, in the transactions of
1547.s of Torquatus. his fall, On the morning It he his found, on awaking, Fulvius at
1548. the morning It he his found, on awaking, Fulvius at bed-side. was the of falcon
1549.-side. was the of falconei', who, having got hold a good hawk, was to strike com
1550. circumstance precision of the preceding of escape. night's debauch, his utter r
1551.uin, and only means added With unfeeling the to it. he strengthened every thread
1552.trengthened every thread of last evening's web, and many more meshes : The posit
1553.eath. compact he should want for nothing. and feverish," at last concluded Fulvi
1554. that grim old foreman, Catulus, opening the doors." They entered filled into a
1555.istian. this them we have been polishing up of late." "Now, Catulus," said Corvi
1556. round his museum of horrors, explaining every thing with such hearty good-will,
1557.useum of horrors, explaining every thing with such hearty good-will, and no end
1558.lustrations of what he described, having once almost caught his ear in a pair of
1559.ron chair with a furnace for for heating ; it, large boilers hot oil or scalding
1560. water baths into the ladles for melting lead, ; and pouring scorpions, neatly m
1561.e ladles for melting lead, ; and pouring scorpions, neatly mouth for pincers, ho
1562.nd iron combs of varied ; shapes, laying bare the ribs or scourges armed with ir
1563.acles and fetters of the most tormenting make in fine, swords, knives, and axes
1564.ataeonn,bes de Ronie." ^ ment, in seeing them used on those hard-headed and thic
1565.good refection, he was led to a gambling-hall in the Thermae, and for of course.
1566.lvius lent him money, but every farthing, exacted a bond. By these means, he was
1567.eetings were early and late; lose during value, the day he was left free, lest h
1568.t free, lest he should his through being suspected by Christians. to Corvinus ha
1569.le in favor of Corvinus, after receiving his report, and perdition. it it, makin
1570.his report, and perdition. it it, making of a rough the chart of the cemetery, d
1571., with the principal clergy, and leading Rome. Once possessed of this knowledge,
1572.ise would conceal them from his piercing eyes; and he would easily pick them uj)
1573.erefore insisted upon Torquatus's taking him as his companion, to the first grea
1574.e an excellent opportunity at the coming many priests every remonstrance, dispel
1575.hink that the answer will be interesting to the Christian antiquary. Nor can our
1576. Church be complete, without our knowing the favored spot where Pontiff m and ce
1577.sion the apostles who converted our King Lucius to the faith. The house which th
1578. for 300 years, can And that, in tracing it out, we may not be misguided by nati
1579.no ignoble spot. follow a learned living antiquarian, who, intent upon another r
1580.purest writers when he sings the wedding-song of these two virtuous spouses. It
1581.cessor plied the churches of interesting. of St. Peter, who multi- Pome with cir
1582.ts ; will be apparent to any one looking at Genesis xxviii. where, after Jacob h
1583.njoyed an angelic vision, while sleeping with a stone for his pillow, are told t
1584.r his pillow, are told that, " trembling he said. we How terrible is this place
1585.gate of heaven. And Jacob set it arising in the title, morning oil took the ston
1586.cob set it arising in the title, morning oil took the stone, ..... and up for a
1587.ok the stone, ..... and up for a pouring on the top of itr t celebrated, The chu
1588.up in it, was consecrated by the pouring of oil upon it, as is done to this day
1589.r monument.! ; ; Two One is, interesting facts are elicited from this narrative.
1590.r that the one altar then altar existing Avas not of stone. It was, in fact, the
1591.om its history, for forms an interesting period in 142 to 157, two reasons. that
1592.two reasons. that Pope, without altering the character of the church itself, add
1593.church itself, added to it it and having collated to his brother Pastor, an orat
1594.arned apologist St. Justin. By comparing his writings with his Acts,t we come to
1595.h his Acts,t we come to some interesting conclusions respecting Christian time,
1596. some interesting conclusions respecting Christian time, Secondly, in this ponti
1597.lvius and Corvinus met early one morning. ISTovatus and Timotheus were the broth
1598.st liturgy, Now course in his describing it, the Christian of as he saw he speak
1599.f as he saw he speaks of the officiating priest in terms that sufficiently descr
1600. of the title place ; not only by giving him a applied to bishops the in antiqui
1601.ops the in antiquity,* but by describing him as prisoners, person Avho sick, has
1602.re commonly record Lector or interesting reader, and of Exorcist. We will one ex
1603.ith the higher orders. Torquatus, having the necessary pass-word, entered, accom
1604.ered, accompanied by Fulvius, who acting as others did around him. large. It soo
1605.ore than the rest, he fixed his piercing studying his every gesture, look, voice
1606.the rest, he fixed his piercing studying his every gesture, look, voice, and lin
1607. there is no doubt that when officiating at the altar, a distinctive robe, the f
1608.ty. On him who now altar of stood facing the assembly, before the Peter, which w
1609. action, his tones, almost his breathing, as he till he said to himself: " If he
1610. Easter Sunday. That more than receiving fi'om But when any danger threatened, t
1611.oly purpose, by her more solemn blessing.* the hands of parents a plain dark dre
1612.dress. act probably consisted of nothing A persecution of the most savage charac
1613.e character was on the point of breaking out, which would not spare the most ten
1614.tself in her words and actions, blending so gracefully with the simplicity of an
1615. chaste bridal-hour. danger gave filling her, to a She eagerly seized on the cla
1616. eagerly seized on the claim that coming more than usual relaxation of that law
1617. that a holy friendship had been growing between her and Syra, from the first in
1618.ave described between them. This feeling had been all that Agnes had heard Fabio
1619.race wdth which was evidently prospering, owing it was conducted. In herself wit
1620.th which was evidently prospering, owing it was conducted. In herself with her f
1621.isits to Fabiola, she contented admiring and approving what her cousin related o
1622.la, she contented admiring and approving what her cousin related of Syra's conve
1623.Agnes as a relation, had put on mourning upon Fabius's death and hence no change
1624. in his daughter's mind, of their having taken some secret, or some joint step.
1625.ou want call said the latter, pretending to be displeased, to keep all the good
1626.ee that you can," replied Syra, laughing. be dressed Never mind about the seeing
1627.. be dressed Never mind about the seeing. But tell me, how wall you ? What have
1628.bit and veil, and form. very interesting " she said. ! their color " How " And w
1629. so before. I am Caecilia, " if becoming quite worldly." people choose to should
1630. with the cheerful lady, about something which delighted her. all When she left
1631.ived. She found him at home; and casting herself on her knees so fervently to hi
1632.m had not yet been written but something very tears, ; before him, talked to as
1633.nt to her humble home. The happy morning at length arrived, and before daybreak
1634. foretold twilight, although the glowing the a bright December day. large dimens
1635.ii' of St. Pete of great value, throwing an atmosphere of mild radiance In front
1636.t voices, like those of angels, chanting in cadence, a hymn, which anticipated t
1637.dst of them appeared two, whose dazzling white garments shone the These were the
1638.ddressed the young aspirants, in glowing and affectionate words. He told them ho
1639.atiated on the doctrine of Paul, writing to the Corin- thians on the superiority
1640.lingly described the happiness of having no love on earth but one, which instead
1641.n earth but one, which instead of fading, opens out into immortality, For bliss,
1642.ltar, ; made furnish and Agnes, kneeling at the foot of the was motionless in on
1643.s in one of her radiant raptures, gazing fixedly upwards while Syra, near her, w
1644.depths of her gentle humility, wondering how she into ; should have been found w
1645.absorbed were both in their thanksgiving, that they perceived not a slight commo
1646.on through the assembly, as if something unex- pected was occurring. They were a
1647. if something unex- pected was occurring. They were aroused by the bishop repeat
1648.hey were aroused by the bishop repeating the question daughter, what dost thou s
1649.na, who soon consoled her, by suggesting to her the possi- bility of obtaining a
1650.ng to her the possi- bility of obtaining a similar grace. all She promised to fu
1651.o a circle, and presented " I it, saying to offer to my Bridegroom, neither did
1652. no flowers ; heart has produced nothing better than these." She saw not, with h
1653.Nomentan way lies a gracethis undulating ground. Amidst situated a picturesque r
1654. St. Agnes. Here was the villa belonging to her, situated about a mile and a hal
1655.idence, except to say it that everything in breathed contentment and happiness.
1656. transpaA few rent, the sunshine glowing, and the heavens cloudless. greyish cur
1657.vens cloudless. greyish curls of melting smoke from the cottages, and the Everyt
1658.ke from the cottages, and the Everything leafless vines, alone told that it was
1659. alone told that it was December. living seemed to know and love the gentle mist
1660.uld receive, It lie at her feet, looking into her face, delighted to on his huge
1661. the three spoke together of the morning's happiness, and of the happier morning
1662.'s happiness, and of the happier morning of which it was a somepledge, above the
1663.ould cut them out when that next morning came for she intended to be the first a
1664. forward, but stopped suddenly on coming near the spot where this happy group we
1665.he outward brightness of heaven, hanging over her who seemed to hold all its spl
1666.verification of her dream. Yet unwilling to intrude herself unexpectedly upon th
1667.grounds. Still she could not help asking herself, ? why she could not be cheerfu
1668.surances of Fabius, that his fascinating address and ornaments had turned the we
1669.d waited till the first days of mourning were ovei-, and he respected the house
1670.uffered such a summary ejectment. Having ascertained out her parents, or villa,
1671.suburban a good opportunity for pressing his suit. he considered it He rode out
1672.r. which she would The sun was declining, and her companions had and she was sit
1673.d her companions had and she was sitting alone in a bright feet. strolled to a d
1674.y with spot, with old Molossus crouching at her The slightest her, approach to a
1675. made her look up from her work of tying together such winter flowers as the oth
1676.hile she suppressed, dislike. by raising a finger, this expression of instinctiv
1677.Agnes, borne back in mind to the morning's scene has been to me," replied " and
1678.himself."* And who I is this happy being ? I was not without hopes, have a place
1679.pen, and guile- her eyes, mildly beaming, looked straight upon Fulvius's face wi
1680.ssed itself on mine." was just beginning to think; when the inspired look of her
1681.." " Madam," he said, " you are trifling I with one who sincerely authority, adm
1682.osed to claims to your hand. I my urging my now, therefore, seriously and earnes
1683.ke, rose, with spite and fury, at having been so " Is it completely deluded. not
1684.to be rejected," he said, " after having been encouraged, but must insult too ?
1685.ood confronted with Fabiola, who, having" walked for would now probably self. so
1686., too, you, who, not content with having to thrust yourself into my kinswoman's
1687.plied the lady, first " who, by allowing my cousin to meet you at her table, des
1688.s upon an innocent and there discovering your in child, feels herself bound W6 :
1689. took Agnes by the hand, and was leading her away and Molossus required what he
1690.tap, to keep him from more than growling; when Fulvius, gnashing his " teeth, mu
1691.re than growling; when Fulvius, gnashing his " teeth, muttered audibly ! day and
1692.EDICT. for its publica- HE ,-^ day being at length arrived tion in of the Rome,
1693.us fully felt the importance of affixing commission intrusted to him, p the in i
1694.ss. Corvinus was determined that nothing of the sort should happen in Rome for h
1695.yes of the citizens early in the morning, and strike their minds with more treme
1696.ed by a pillar, of much the same cunning precaution as was taken by the Jewish p
1697., a body comijosed of soldiers belonging to the fiercest races of the JSToith, D
1698.n the decline body-guard of the reigning for if of the empire, the tyrants, ofte
1699.all the troops. But any Christian making use of it that night, if he should chan
1700.hould chance to discover it, the cunning Corvinus had one chosen which he felt s
1701.possibility of Emperors." The last thing which he did was to make his rounds, gi
1702.ch he did was to make his rounds, giving to each sentinel the strictest injuncti
1703. sabre, some one or other before morning. The night was raw and and the gusty, w
1704.usty, with occasional sharp and slanting showers Dacian wrapped himself in his c
1705.alked up and ; down, occasionally taking a long pull at a flask concealed about
1706. a flask concealed about him, containing a liquor said to be distilled from the
1707.he Thuringian forests muddily meditating, not on the wood or city. While all thi
1708.e wood or city. While all this was going on, old Diogenes and his hearty off, ma
1709.tap at the door, followed by the lifting of the latch, and the entrance of two y
1710.r poor house in the Suburra, not far ing preparations for their frugal meal. ; t
1711.l meal. ; to honor ; my if poor dwelling ! I hardly dare oifer you our plain it,
1712. town, we shall be glad to eat something. In the meanfor us. time one of your yo
1713.t and cater Come, we must have something good self ; and I want you to cheer you
1714.a moderate cup of generous wine." Saying this he gave his purse to one of the so
1715. of the sons, with instructions to bring home some better provisions than he kne
1716. ®4rb. and Pancratius, by way of saying something, addressed the man. " Good Di
1717.d Pancratius, by way of saying something, addressed the man. " Good Diogenes, I
1718.d Sebastian say that you remember seeing the glorious Deacon Laurentius die for
1719. die for old Christ. " Tell me something about him." happened,* and as I With pl
1720.eful and his speech was so when speaking to the poor. How they all loved him I f
1721.s the venerable Pontiff Sixtus was going to death, and Laurentius met him, and s
1722.s a son might a father, for not allowing him to be his companion in the sacrific
1723.plate of the We have never had any thing so splendid since. There were golden la
1724.ook fire, at his tender flesh blistering and breaking over the and deeply scored
1725.his tender flesh blistering and breaking over the and deeply scored from a cauld
1726.auldron, to observe the with red burning gashes that cut bars went across rise ;
1727.which the agony gave tremulous quivering that crept over the surface of his skin
1728.over the surface of his skin, the living motion to each separate muscle, and the
1729. all this, I own, was the most harrowing spectacle I have ever beheld in all my
1730. His head was raised up from the burning body, and stretched out, as if fixed on
1731.down but the light from the fire shining upwards, and passing through his golden
1732.om the fire shining upwards, and passing through his golden locks, created a glo
1733.heaven. impressed with an eager, longing of his eye, that look, accompanying the
1734.ging of his eye, that look, accompanying the upward glancing you would willingly
1735.t look, accompanying the upward glancing you would willingly have changed places
1736.I know, would accustomed stand any thing to toil for you are a fine stout soldie
1737.wounds. But as me, I have only a willing " ? heart to give. Is that enough, thin
1738.e centurion, full of emotion, glistening eyes, having risen from his seat, and l
1739.full of emotion, glistening eyes, having risen from his seat, and looking tender
1740. having risen from his seat, and looking tenderly on the youth, who with had pla
1741.in will " God give your cloak, and bring your toga quite over your head a wet an
1742.about, stuirlily am sure it is something praiseworthy." Quadratus of the Suburra
1743.ed anxiously Diogenes had seen any thing and the two young men He was do. ; for
1744.e had got a hint of what they were going to told they were expected in a few mom
1745. when hasty steps were heard approaching; the door was pushed open, fast barred,
1746. Here it is," said the latter, producing, with laugh, a bundle of crumpled parch
1747., Here And he thrust it into the blazing * " while the stalwart sons of Diogenes
1748.goes!" And he thrust it into the blazing fire. a faggot over There it frizzled,
1749.to keep it down, and drown its crackling. and writhed, and cracked, and shrunk,
1750.racked, and shrunk, tirst or word coming up, then another; tirst an emperor's it
1751. " unconquered " Augusti were bolstering wp by cruelty resemble that and injusti
1752.r in ruins, the monuments grandeur lying in is and proclaiming that there no tru
1753.nts grandeur lying in is and proclaiming that there no true Lord but one stronge
1754.m. he gazed abstractedly on the expiring embers of the pompous Something like th
1755.expiring embers of the pompous Something like this did Sebastian think, perhaps,
1756.st, whether quick and easy, or lingeiing and painful, was the end for which they
1757.ey looked and, like brave soldiers going to battle, ; they did not speculate whe
1758.at down was not midnight, and commencing the fast, preparatory to receiving the
1759.ncing the fast, preparatory to receiving the Quadratus's object, besides holy Eu
1760.d, a kindness, in reason for their being there might be apparent, partly to keep
1761.re was no appearance of any such feeling. tion soon turned upon recollections of
1762. for the good old fervent times, calling them. as Pancratius would persist in Se
1763.k a round, to avoid the Forum in seeking his own abode. If any one had seen Panc
1764.ght, when alone in his chamber preparing to retire to rest, he would have seen h
1765.n him every now and then almost laughing at some strange but pleasant adventure.
1766.DISCOVERY. , T the first dawn of morning, Corvinus was up and, notwithstanding t
1767.ng, Corvinus was up and, notwithstanding the gloominess of the day, proceeded st
1768.t would be useless to attempt describing his astonishment, his rage, his fury, t
1769. of parchment round the nails % standing, in unconscious stolidity, tinel. and b
1770.d not seen, in the barbarian's twinkling eye, a sort of hyena which told him he
1771. for the first time conand after looking at it for some moments, " Well, is not
1772.es, you blockhead, but there was writing on is it, which gone. That is what you
1773.hy, all look you, captain, as to writing, you see ; know nothing, having never b
1774.n, as to writing, you see ; know nothing, having never been a scholar night, it
1775. writing, you see ; know nothing, having never been a scholar night, it but as i
1776. scholar night, it but as it was raining may have been washed it out." "And whic
1777.hed it out." "And which " it was blowing, I suppose the parchment on was written
1778.ite right." sir, Come, this is no joking matter. Tell me, at once, who came here
1779.." "Why, one of them was but a stripling, a boy, tall and thin who went round th
1780.as not very cold, and that sort of thing. At last I remembered that I had to run
1781. : The Dacian, with a stupid neighboring basilica, and said ing on the tiles, "
1782.tupid neighboring basilica, and said ing on the tiles, " There, don't you see it
1783.e, don't you see it shin- in the morning light?" Corvinus looked, and there inde
1784.hout any apparent by a sort of conjuring, whisked it out of my hand, and up wher
1785.y country, to I we will fight any living men, but we do not choose And, secondly
1786.me up and speak ; to you, without giving the watchword." " Gently, captain who ?
1787., intelligent foreigner. will by putting a sharp, sottish, prsetorian on duty, i
1788. boat." "And you must contrive something to save me, if you true.) want to save
1789.a few days, and you shall have the thing blows over." off, The soldier went * an
1790.ction. Before, after, ; however, leaving the ill-omened spot in the Forum, he ha
1791. the ground, for any trace of the daring act ; when he picked up, close under th
1792.CHAPTER XV EXPLANATIONS. ^"HEJSr morning had fairly broken, crowds the Forum, st
1793.roup of regular frequenters were talking over. There were Scaurus the lawyer, an
1794.ground on the other side, without making any wound in her. He then hacked at the
1795.s found, asleep and unhurt, this morning, on the roof of the JEmilian basilica.
1796.ows is no reason to suppose such a thing impossible; power of magic has no bound
1797.uch for instance are pulse, or according to Pythagoras. is These, being gathered
1798.according to Pythagoras. is These, being gathered when even with the sun in Libr
1799.e have a most important evidence bearing on this of ; uiatter, recorded in histo
1800.p high into the air but his charm having slipped out for which reason of his bel
1801.of them committed last night, in tearing ; down a supreme still edict of the imp
1802. every ciime, is capable of conniiitting any." "And this that, no doubt," observ
1803.ld us about these desperate men, nothing can be too severe against them." Fnlviu
1804.st them." Fnlvius had been keenly eyeing Sebastian, who had ; entered " during t
1805.ng Sebastian, who had ; entered " during the conversation; -and now pointedly ad
1806.gly asked Fulvius. to join in destroying That no one should be allowed them, I c
1807. profligate, or a thief. Foi- with being any of these, no one charges the poor C
1808.ken to Sebastian, at their first meeting, had ripened into hatred at their secon
1809.nly intensity now to add to that feeling. ten in blood. ; * See Luciau's address
1810.Luciau's address to the judge, beginning of St. Justin's upon Ptolemaeus's conde
1811.ven honest and learned ; men ; believing at once every calumny spoken against us
1812.ery calumny spoken against us treasuring up, from age to age, every fable and fi
1813. fable and fiction about us and refusing even to inquire into our doctrines, bec
1814.d contemptible? " spoke aloud, believing himself alone, when a sweet voice answe
1815.eye of the body, only blinded the seeing. if by spreading thereon clay; which, i
1816.only blinded the seeing. if by spreading thereon clay; which, in man's hands, wo
1817.wish to become His means of enlightening the eyes of little men's souls. Let us
1818.," said Sebastian, "for Whither tripping on so gaily on " I day of danger? Do yo
1819.hat 1 have been named guide of the going to take possession. spring." cemetery o
1820. of the going to take possession. spring." cemetery of Callistus that I am Pray,
1821., may be the first flower of this coming And she passed on, singing blithely. Bu
1822.f this coming And she passed on, singing blithely. But Sebastian begged her to s
1823.erse before was to be their last meeting The oratories were to be closed, there.
1824.ch times of trouble, that of jDreserving the A great privilege was, consequently
1825.arist in their houses, and communicating themselves privately in the morning, "b
1826.ting themselves privately in the morning, "before taking other food," as TertuUi
1827.privately in the morning, "before taking other food," as TertuUian expresses it.
1828.he for faithful felt, not as sheep going to the slaughter, not as criminals pi-e
1829.e slaughter, not as criminals pi-eparing for execution, but as soldiers arming f
1830.ng for execution, but as soldiers arming fight. Their weapons, their food, their
1831.upied by the zealous clergy in preparing their flocks earth. for, to many, their
1832.of the prayers that the Catholic hearing them recited, and priest reciting them,
1833.earing them recited, and priest reciting them, in the still more the same langua
1834.e, may feel himself in active and living communion with the martyrs who celebrat
1835. those sublime mysteries. are describing, On came it the occasion which we when
1836.casion which we when the time for giving the kiss of peace brotherly love —sob
1837.ursts of tears for was to many a parting salutation. Many a youth clung to his f
1838.g to his father's neck, scarcely knowing whether that day might not sever them,
1839.faith and love. receiver, with thrilling accents ovarium, or white linen cloth,
1840.rium, or white linen cloth, he extending in his hand an received in it a provisi
1841.en in another and more precious covering, or even placed in a gold locket.* It w
1842.isites for divine worship. after getting over his first dismay, But Corvinus, an
1843.first dismay, But Corvinus, and hav- ing as speedily as possible another, though
1844.for He felt it necessary to do something that very day, off which might wipe the
1845.o small square golden boxes, with a ring at the top of the lid. These very ancie
1846.y Bottari to have been used for carrying the and PelliBlessed Eucharist round th
1847.litia, tom. iii. p. 20). ; again meeting the emperor's look. He determined to an
1848.he cemetery, intended day. the following He repaired, therefore, while it was st
1849. him in expectation of Corvinus's coming to hold council with them. The worthy t
1850.pal Christians; while Fulvius, remaining outside with another company, would int
1851.t them and cut off all retreat, securing the most important prizes, and especial
1852.verheard sufficient to very busy dusting and cleaning, in the retired make lier
1853.icient to very busy dusting and cleaning, in the retired make lier room where Sh
1854.room where She told they were consulting, without appearing to ; listen. and he,
1855. they were consulting, without appearing to ; listen. and he, after much scratch
1856. ; listen. and he, after much scratching of his head, hit all to Cucumio upon a
1857.ucumio upon a notable plan for conveying the discovered information to the prope
1858.e to do more, had pro- ceeded, according to almost universal custom, to the bath
1859.icion, which his absence on that morning might have excited. While he was thus e
1860. of an immediate assault, and of getting possession of the holy Pontiff's person
1861.the hall where the events of the morning were being discussed, and where Fulvius
1862.ere the events of the morning were being discussed, and where Fulvius was waitin
1863.discussed, and where Fulvius was waiting, till Corvinus should disgusted, tell h
1864. that himself, all was ready. Upon going out, he felt : as he walked, pricked by
1865.elt : as he walked, pricked by something on his chest he examined his garments,
1866.stians assembled in the cemetery. Having, however, found a himself, in the poor
1867.opped it, her, gave her the note, adding a few words to with the pen and ink whi
1868.rvinus and his troop were time hastening across the fields, so as to avoid towar
1869. Christian and a by-way, was instructing liis blind messenger. When we the catac
1870. Door-keepers, —an oflSce constituting a lesser order in the Church. Confirmat
1871.chamber without any altar, communicating with the church by means of a funnel-sh
1872.urch by means of a funnel-shaped opening, piercing the earthen wall, here some t
1873.ans of a funnel-shaped opening, piercing the earthen wall, here some twelve feet
1874.some twelve feet thiclc, is and entering the feet, chamber, which ing direction
1875.nd entering the feet, chamber, which ing direction at a lower level, at the heig
1876.n the church could be heard, yet nothing that was done there could be seen, by t
1877.he men's, one of these sur- faces having in a small niche for an tomb in it. Eac
1878. the way which Tor- quatus knew, leading down by steps from a half-ruinous up wi
1879.to come out or go in. Corvinus, building, choked with Torquatus and a smaller bo
1880.ht, prejDared to descend. "I don't Biing like this underground work," said an ol
1881.d but I have no love soldiers. for being stifled or poisoned, like vermin in a d
1882. be hundreds little is of these skulking Christians down for," there, and we are
1883.ution. He assured them there was nothing to fear that the cowardly Christians wo
1884.s encouraged, they went WVTl : " groping down to the bottom of the before them.
1885.in- guish lamps at intervals, stretching into the gloomy length Hush ! " said on
1886.e caught, as et it intoned the following verses Dominus illuminatio mea, salus m
1887.en came a full chorus of voices, singing, like the sound " ; * of many waters "D
1888. that strange noise, as if of scratching and hammering at a distance? I have hea
1889.noise, as if of scratching and hammering at a distance? I have heard it for some
1890.vered." danger," said Torquatus, putting on a boldness which he did not feel. "
1891.s, Diogenes and his sons, busy preparing graves for the Christians " No we is sh
1892.d in vain advised the troop not to bring torches, but to provide themselves with
1893.as we see Diogenes rej)resented carrying, in his picture, or waxen tapers, which
1894. kept at the head of the party, counting every turning right and left, as he had
1895.ead of the party, counting every turning right and left, as he had noted them; t
1896.taggered and baulked, when, after having counted little more than half the prope
1897.e the sand had been prepared for closing the road ; near which his brother and s
1898.ed, they set to work lustily, shovelling the sand across the narrow and low corr
1899.ought from the low^ roof behind, opening. huge flakes of sandstone, which closed
1900. bai-rier they stood, hardly suppressing a laugh as they heard their enemies thr
1901.ment, I entreat you," taken my reckoning. I know the right turn by a remarkable
1902. since their road led away their blazing torches into the side galleries, one he
1903.if a triumphal illumination was kindling up the very atmosphere of the gloomy co
1904.ds along the The sealed tombs, receiving the unusual reflectiles, tion on their
1905.before these foiled hounds with drooping heads had reached the entrance, they re
1906.they soon perceived was the glim- mering of a lamp. This was held steadily by an
1907. first seen so like are they to ; living forms. " Who can it be ? What is it ? "
1908.her usual cheerful " gentleness. " Bring her along," he commanded ; some one at
1909.d the cemetery by a ent, but neighboring entrance. the strong is No the in- soon
1910.y and delivered Sebastian's note; adding also what she had observed. It wai'ned
1911.ave much matter," she answered, laughing; lives. "my being taken Give me a lamp,
1912.she answered, laughing; lives. "my being taken Give me a lamp, Pancratius." "Why
1913.not " " see by it," observed he, smiling. "True, but others can." They may be yo
1914.e started, reached her post, and hearing no noise except that of quiet footsteps
1915.er, therefore, put on his most searching and awful look, and said to her sternly
1916. must tell you the truth without looking at you, sir," answered the poor girl, w
1917.iers to march through the city, guarding a blind girl. Keturn to your quarters,
1918.mortified. ^ "Mind you sacrifice." bring her. The day must not pass without a "D
1919.he reply. Fulvius, indeed, was pondering whether, having lost one But the placid
1920.s, indeed, was pondering whether, having lost one But the placid he should not t
1921.carriage with her, he assumed a soothing tone, and addressed dialogue. " her. He
1922.he weaklings of the flock. for any thing since." " But you can walk about the st
1923.. Do you remember very early one morning in the autumn, leading a poor laine Vie
1924.early one morning in the autumn, leading a poor laine Vieus Patricius? " man alo
1925.ow ; could I deny it? "Then that meeting was a Christian meeting?" " " Certainly
1926.hen that meeting was a Christian meeting?" " " Certainly wdiat else could it be
1927.would be avenged. After a pause, looking at her steadfastly, he said, " Do you k
1928.aid, " Do you know whither you are going? " tell He wanted no more his suspicion
1929. whom Torquatus had been able or willing to ; Agnes, nothing, " Before the judge
1930.been able or willing to ; Agnes, nothing, " Before the judge of earth, I suppose
1931.lly rather," was her brief reply. Having got all that he desired, he consigned h
1932.r fate. It had been a cold and drizzling day like the preceding evening. The wea
1933.old and drizzling day like the preceding evening. The weather, and the incident
1934.drizzling day like the preceding evening. The weather, and the incident of and w
1935. left, ; and only a few more persevering remained, past the hour But just recrea
1936.ed with some compassion, and imagin- ing there could be in overcoming the obstin
1937.imagin- ing there could be in overcoming the obstinacy of a poor, ignorant, blin
1938.ish girl!" interrupted the judge, losing patience a little; "hast thou learnt al
1939."How What so? dost thou think a blessing never to have ? seen the face of a huma
1940.to have ? seen the face of a human being, or the sun, or the earth ? strange fan
1941. And this I to be local from the varying object looks upon me as with a countena
1942.hurt one another." The rack was standing, as usual, before him and he made a sig
1943. the same person who had been conversing with her. If there had been silence hit
1944. breath ; " Once more, before proceeding further, sacrifice to the gods, on thee
1945.up no is sacrifice but to the one living God and its ready oblation myself." sig
1946.truly, sufficed to inflict all a racking pain, through this, her frame. an excru
1947.through this, her frame. an excruciating, or more Far more grievit ous was unsee
1948.e preparation and the cause of suffering being and from that additional A which
1949.aration and the cause of suffering being and from that additional A which darkne
1950.at additional A which darkness quivering of her features and- a sudden paleness
1951.ke Thee, stretched upon Thy than resting upon the hard couch at the poor man's t
1952.ht of my lenity. We will try some- thing stronger. sides." * Here, Catulus, appl
1953.embly, which could not help sympathizing with the poor blind creature. A murmur
1954.rble. The angry judge checked the rising gush of feeling; and all listened in si
1955.judge checked the rising gush of feeling; and all listened in silence, as she sp
1956. ! ! I suffer ; at once I ; not covering my of face with my hands in shame when
1957.en stand before Thee." Another muttering compassion was heard. "Catulus!" shoute
1958.y; "do your what are you about, fumbling all day with that duty, sirrah ! torch
1959.e " ! ; ; but he drew back, and, turning to the prefect, exclaimed in softened a
1960.her pure nance to her Spouse's welcoming embrace. Had she breathed soul, as a sw
1961.e lives of martyrs of their deaths being the of prayer, as in St. Praxedes, St.
1962. doubt quite accidentally, was advancing from " He reeled, and the soldier caugh
1963.the soldier caught hold of him, ? saying: You are not hurt, I hope, Corvinus let
1964.uadratus, let me Where " are you running to in such a hurry still can I help you
1965.u? " " asked his captor, be gone holding him fast. "Let me Who will loose, I say
1966." " Pancratius " said Quadratus, looking round, and seeing ! that he had got cle
1967.aid Quadratus, looking round, and seeing ! that he had got clear off; " I do not
1968. the Suburra. While this scene was going on, the prefect, mortified, But ordered
1969.utation which the prefect Humbly waiting your divinity's pleasure outside, and f
1970.idity and cowardice : a pretty beginning, forsooth for it. Bring him in." The wr
1971.pretty beginning, forsooth for it. Bring him in." The wretch, whining and trembl
1972.r it. Bring him in." The wretch, whining and trembling, was introduced and cast
1973.m in." The wretch, whining and trembling, was introduced and cast himself at the
1974.m which he was spurned, and sent rolling, like a lashed hound, into the midst of
1975.his set the imperial divinity a-laughing, and helped to mollify its wrath. " Com
1976.sappear " crtli Corvinus told a rambling the emperor " Well," ; tale, which occa
1977.joyment of his imperial master. Smarting and humbled, he had to stand again befo
1978.atus ? " "He is one who has been staying some " matins and a party of Christians
1979.and spiteful all night; and next morning begged his father to let him go on the
1980. funds are nearly exhausted, and nothing coming You must strike a blow." " Surel
1981.are nearly exhausted, and nothing coming You must strike a blow." " Surely, Euro
1982.ely, Eurotas, you would prefer my trying to get this wealth by honorable," (Euro
1983.ble," (Eurotas smiled at the idea coming into either of their minds) " rather th
1984.I know, without your every day reminding me of the bitter condition," said Fulvi
1985.itter condition," said Fulvius, wringing his hands, and writhing in all his body
1986.ulvius, wringing his hands, and writhing in all his body. " Give me time enough,
1987. one thought, but one aim the i-estoring of our house to that greatness and sple
1988.ality in life, brought it down. Thinking that your father, my brother, had great
1989. guardianship, and the exclusive forming of your mind. You know how Fulvius, I h
1990.ius, I have trained you, to care nothing about the means, so that our great ends
1991. into himself wdth shame, at this baring of both their hearts. The dark old man
1992.you abundance of selfishness and cunning, and she has given me boldness and remo
1993.oldness and remorselessness in directing and applying them. Our lot is cast by t
1994.emorselessness in directing and applying them. Our lot is cast by the same throw
1995.r heart than ever; for a dark, impending fate never failed to weigh upon his sou
1996.d to weigh upon his soul every returning night. The reader will peihaps be curio
1997. and smooth, and the Torquatus, carrying his light before fell descent was preci
1998.escent was precipitous. him, and running heedlessly, headlong down the opening,
1999.ng heedlessly, headlong down the opening, and reuiained stunned and insensible a
2000.that he knew not where he was. returning, he and groped about, till, consciousne
2001.ut him, and means dered from of lighting them. He employed light. cheered by fin
2002.m. He employed light. cheered by finding himself again in the staircase, these,
2003.of which, indeed, he recollected nothing, and went on, and on, entangling himsel
2004.nothing, and went on, and on, entangling himself more inextricably in the subter
2005.r began to fail, for he had been fasting from early morning; and he found himsel
2006.r he had been fasting from early morning; and he found himself coming back to th
2007.rly morning; and he found himself coming back to the same spot, after he had wan
2008. peace," was the inmate of one; "resting in Christ" was another; and even the th
2009. would be dead like them he was lighting his last taper, and had sunk down upon
2010.n of that hallowed ground. It was coming on fast ; he could feel it ; his head I
2011.luttered. fingers, The taper was getting it too short for his and he placed on a
2012. might burn three minutes longer ceiling, fell feel of but a drop it. filtering
2013.g, fell feel of but a drop it. filtering through the upon it, and extinguished S
2014.r to get a light from body. of profiting tinder, damped by the cold perspiration
2015. upon it with an idiotic stare, watching it burn down, as though this were the c
2016. soon the last spark gleamed smouldering like a glow-worm, on the red earth, and
2017.e upon him. from consort with the living, his He was mouth would no more taste f
2018.ound, his eyes behold no light, or thing, again. He was associated with the dead
2019.e is death Death had to be folwas coming. The worm was beginning to gnaw his con
2020.be folwas coming. The worm was beginning to gnaw his conscience, and it grew apa
2021.e death as yet. else. lowed by something But even this He him tried to think of
2022.ayed beautiful vision darted a withering flash; them ; he had told of them ; to
2023.tal chord was touched, like the tingling nerve of a tooth, that darts its agony
2024.nd the murderous attempt of that morning, now came dancing, like demons hand in
2025.ttempt of that morning, now came dancing, like demons hand in hand, in the dark
2026.n hand, in the dark before him, shouting, laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gn
2027. the dark before him, shouting, laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing the
2028.k before him, shouting, laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth
2029.him, shouting, laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth ; of lir
2030.ting, laughing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth ; of lire flying
2031.hing, jibing, weeping, moaning, gnashing their teeth ; of lire flying before his
2032.g, gnashing their teeth ; of lire flying before his eyes, from his enfeebled bra
2033.is enfeebled brain, to dart from glaring torches in their hands. his eyes. He an
2034.the this." infernal pit can have nothing worse than ; His heart was too weak for
2035.ence of despair. His strength was ebbing fast, when he fancied thought his ear.
2036.on raised himself up; it He was becoming distinct. So sweet it sounded, so like
2037.hell would have Or are they accompanying the fearful Judge to try me? " And now
2038.ght increased it was like a dawn glowing into day Those words are not ; ; it ent
2039.he gallery and passed across it, bearing in it, as in a mirror, a vision too dis
2040.gins First, there came robed and holding lamps ; then four who cloth, carried be
2041.m the youthful acolyte Tarcisius bearing a censer steaming with perfumed smoke;
2042.lyte Tarcisius bearing a censer steaming with perfumed smoke; and, tiff after ot
2043.ers, the seemed to move in an unchanging atmosphere of as they passed before him
2044.me." me." " 7%a^," he exclaimed, rousing himself up, " that is for With an this
2045.he funeral procession tance. was passing, and followed unobserved, at a disit It
2046.pherd looked brightly breast and praying for mercy. down on him. But he would no
2047.s the threshold, where he stood striking his The body had been laid upon the gro
2048.mb prepared for it, under an arch. being done, Torquatus drew nigh to one of the
2049.virgin, of the soldiers, in this morning fell into the hands cemetery, and whose
2050. exclaimed, with a hollow and staggering forward to the holy bishop's feet, fell
2051.ly, and pressed him to his bosom, saying, "Welcome back, my son, whoever thou ar
2052.owed the whole ; of his guilt, including the day's crimes for it was the evening
2053. the day's crimes for it was the evening of the same day. return, All rejoiced a
2054.eated at the feet of her Spouse, smiling, with her eyes wide open, as she cast d
2055.ns took charge of him. An humble lodging was procured for him, in a Christian co
2056.to public penance, obtained a shortening of its term, — from the writand were
2057.ht. this, firmed vius's by communicating Fuldesigns, and the motive of his atten
2058.d a household office. Early next morning Sebastian was with Pancratius. dear boy
2059. youth, I face and Have ? done something wrong, or are to be you doubtful "JSTei
2060. enough reason for me," said he, smiling; "but I would go the world's end to sav
2061. on their powerful steeds, were trotting across the campagna of Rome, to reach t
2062. track of the Latin way. Corvinus having resolved to keep the hostile expedition
2063.d been procured from without her knowing the why ; for he wished to remain in th
2064.e indeed, Cassianus, you must be leading! " Little am obliged Have you made no i
2065.n not to expose his the end. life during the journey. till He, however, determin
2066.a of Chromatius and early in the morning rushed suddenly through the gates, and
2067., nor a He was confounded and and having found a servant working in the garden,
2068.d and and having found a servant working in the garden, asked him where his mast
2069. He looked about; latinity corresponding to such a rude phraseology. " You are t
2070.h a rude phraseology. " You are trifling with me. " "Which way did he and his co
2071.ms." One good youth, very handsome, sing so sweet. The other very big, very stro
2072.s soon as he was a He was engaged during his journey, upon master and fellow-stu
2073.stian been there before him. in plotting vengeance ; ; but that vinus officer, a
2074.ame a rush from all sides, with menacing attitudes of a brutal shower of books,
2075.des of a brutal shower of books, writing tablets, siles, A was directed against
2076.ch most look back on from hearts teeming with softer feelings than the contempla
2077.ful youths But he could think of nothing that would have been such a treat to hi
2078.s inflicted was left to be the lingering victim of their feeble cruelty. tells S
2079. with the steel points used in engraving writ; ing on wax-covered tablets others
2080.steel points used in engraving writ; ing on wax-covered tablets others exercised
2081.of a precocious brutality, by inflicting every possible torment on c--^ his lace
2082.is ready ins-truments, left the expiring His faithful servant, however, raised h
2083. in his own, but could not speak. gering till morning he placidly expired. The l
2084.but could not speak. gering till morning he placidly expired. The last rites of
2085.ith a heavy heart and a no slight rising of its indignation, against the heartle
2086.dne, vexation, and remorse. The dragging pace of his jaded steeds provoked him,
2087.steeds provoked him, and he kept lashing them furiously on. While they were thus
2088.ed they heard the tramp of horses coming fast on behind, and dashed forward at a
2089.d dashed forward at an and after baiting for uncontrollable speed. tance, The at
2090.canal, and galloped forward, rockThe ing the chariot from side to side at a reck
2091.a reckless rate. horsemen behind hearing the violent rush of hoofs and wheels, a
2092.on. the By the faint light of the rising moon, and by the sound of the youth rec
2093.the youth recognized Corvinus struggling in side his voice, muddy stream. The ba
2094. water He was, in fact, already becoming benumbed and exhausted by his wintry ba
2095. me hold of So " said the youth, leaning over the bank and ! seizing his enemy b
2096.uth, leaning over the bank and ! seizing his enemy by his arm, just as he was re
2097.nemy by his arm, just as he was relaxing his hold on a withered shrub, and falli
2098.is hold on a withered shrub, and falling back fainting into the stream. It would
2099.ithered shrub, and falling back fainting into the stream. It would have been his
2100.im, as evidence to convict him of having cut down the edict. The servants preten
2101.deep mud. They bore him to a neighboring cottage, while the carriage was being r
2102.ng cottage, while the carriage was being repaired, and had a good carouse with h
2103.e !#/ Thermae of Dio- clesian were being erected by the labor and sweat ' of Chr
2104.prisoners, it will not appear surprising, that their number and their sufferings
2105.have greatly increased, with the growing intensity of a most savage persecution.
2106.pected guration of his favorite building, and hands were doubled on the work to
2107.otted to the departments of the building art. religious culprits, to such many o
2108.tity to keep up their strength, clothing enough to guard them from the inclemenc
2109.s, or to wanton cruelty upon unresisting But the Christians blessed confessors,
2110.. Their deacons visited them, by bribing their guards; and young men would boldl
2111.ong them, and distribute more nourishing food, or warmer clothing to them, or gi
2112.more nourishing food, or warmer clothing to them, or give them the means better
2113.ve them the means better of conciliating their keepers, so as to obtain treatmen
2114. assemblage of men, convicted of serving faithfully Like the their divine Master
2115.age Such an occasion was now approaching. The persecution had lingered. No perso
2116.fully repaired; and The people something more wholesale was expected. ; : demand
2117. day justitied sport; and an approaching imperial birth- their gratification. Th
2118.ave been interpreted by them, as meaning right belonged to them." that the Chris
2119. Christians under your honor of fighting in the amphitheatre, on officer, " I oc
2120., on officer, " I occasion of the coming festival." " Really," answered the have
2121. suit us." us choose Rabirius, grumbling mitted nevertheless over. to It just va
2122.r men were actively ^ employed in making final preparations. bis Catulus to nudg
2123.those ; two, Kabirius," said the willing pur- veyor to wild beasts " I " they wi
2124. plebeians, and will go with you nothing loth." "They glee. shall have their wis
2125.tre of the we must use the term) resting after their labor. group was an old num
2126.rance, with a long white beard streaming on his breast, mild in aspect, gentle i
2127.seated on a block of marble, was talking to them, with a sweet gravity, which ri
2128.s. What was he for his extraorit, saying to them Was he requiting Cyriacus dinar
2129.traorit, saying to them Was he requiting Cyriacus dinary charity, by telling him
2130.ting Cyriacus dinary charity, by telling him that, in commemoration of a portion
2131.the immense pile which they were toiling to raise, would be dedicated to God, un
2132.llustrious name ? t Or was he recounting another more smaller oratory was to glo
2133.of tliat superb with under the directing skill of the mightiest artistic genius
2134.orld should ever see What more consoling thought could have been vouchsafed to t
2135.than that they were not so much erecting baths for the luxury a heathen people,
2136.f a wicked emperor, as in truth building up one of the stateliest churches in wh
2137.nately honored saw the group and pausing, asked the superintendent the names of
2138.ed, and text. the height of the building diminished by several feet. take that o
2139.crepit old creatures, or tiger's flowing, whom a single stroke of a bear's paw k
2140.oung blood and plenty of life struggling against wounds and blows, before death
2141.it is He pays, of course, well for being allowed so not our business to ask ques
2142.his forefathers underwent for the during three centuries of persecution, we woul
2143.t have him content himself with visiting the catacombs, as we have tried to make
2144. tried to make him do, and thus learning what lead ; sort of life they were comp
2145. made We know of no writ- ings so moving, so tender, so consoling, and so minist
2146. ings so moving, so tender, so consoling, and so ministering of strength to fait
2147.tender, so consoling, and so ministering of strength to faith and to hope, after
2148.with the unaffected pathos, and charming truthfuhiess, which pervades the corres
2149.uhiess, which pervades the corresponding narrative of Vivia Perpetua, a delicate
2150.age, he would not hesitate in concluding, how much moie natural, graceful, and i
2151. moie natural, graceful, and interesting ai-e the simple recitals of Christianit
2152.humens and slaves, suffered, unmurmuring, for Christ. But we are wandering from
2153.muring, for Christ. But we are wandering from our narrative. with some twenty mo
2154.with some twenty more, along, staggering fettered, Pancratius, and chained toget
2155. offal, and assailed them with insulting ribaldry.* They reached the Mamertine p
2156.ms, of both cifully struck and stumbling by the guards who conducted them The yo
2157.ducted them The youth had just was being handcuffed, to request one of the capto
2158.not the place to which a sexes, awaiting their time of sacrifice. time, while he
2159.r fare man might court committal, hoping there to enjoy better and lodging than
2160.hoping there to enjoy better and lodging than he did at home. Two or three of th
2161.f these ; dungeons, for they are nothing better, description of the one which *
2162.s fastened into them for securfloor, ing the prisoners ; but many used ; be laid
2163.of the stone floor, damp bed by strewing with broken potsherds allowed to the ma
2164.further with him than simply reiterating his plain profession of the Christian f
2165.," answered the prisoner; " but becoming a Christian, I have been freed by Chris
2166.ope as those whom you see." Then turning to a holy priest, Lucianus, venerable f
2167.every science, and have sort of learning tried every variety of learning. But fi
2168.learning tried every variety of learning. But finally I adhered to the doctrines
2169. dost thou find delight in that learning ? " "The doctrine." " " greatest; becau
2170. a mere man, am too weak utter any thing great of His infinite Deity this ofiice
2171. At am a widow, named Eufina, professing the same savdng faith," continued the o
2172.ontinued the other. length, after having put similar questions, and receiving of
2173.ing put similar questions, and receiving offer similar answers from all the othe
2174.wisdom, for thou art yet but a stripling." Pancratius signed himself with the si
2175.gned himself with the sign of the saving cross, I and calmly replied, " I am the
2176.o dignity of their gait, and the shining calmness of their countenances. Some me
2177.rceive a fragrant atmosphere surrounding their persons.* * P13. 319 and 146, Act
2178.s rally suggested. The eve of " fighting with," that is being torn to pieces by,
2179.e eve of " fighting with," that is being torn to pieces by, wild beasts, was alw
2180.blessed confessors of Christ. At evening they were led forth to enjoy what was c
2181.er, once or twice reproved the unfeeling curiosity, and rude remarks of the crow
2182.y, and rude remarks of the crowd, saying, "To-morrow cient for you, because you
2183.Church, their mother, had been preparing a much more dainty banquet for the soul
2184. particularly Reparatus, company. having provided as well as possible for their
2185. forbade this at present. After, who ing, still dwelt in the house of Agnes, to
2186.d of Life, to feed, early in the morning of their battle, the champions of Chris
2187.sters. titulars, the office of conveying them to the martyrs in and even to the
2188. to the martyrs in and even to the dying, was committed to inferior min- On this
2189.ome were unusually excited by the coming slaughter of so many Christian victims,
2190.a linen cloth, then in an outer covering, and put them on his palms, saying " Re
2191.ering, and put them on his palms, saying " Remember, Tarcisius, what a treasure
2192.pped lightly along the streets, avoiding equally the more public, and the too lo
2193.ow, thoroughfares. As he was approaching the door of a large mansion, its saw hi
2194.r of a large mansion, its saw him coming, and was struck with his beauty and swe
2195.e folded on his breast, he was hastening on. moment, dear child," she said, putt
2196.. moment, dear child," she said, putting herself in his way: " tell me thy name,
2197.ius, an orphan boy," he replied, looking up, mistress, a rich lady without child
2198., save one which it might be displeasing to thee to hear." " Then come Oh, that
2199.just escaped from school, were beginning to play. came into "We just get want on
2200.ts. Come, Tarcisius," he added, stopping him by seizing his arm, whither so fast
2201.sius," he added, stopping him by seizing his arm, whither so fast ? take a part
2202.Petilius, now; I really can't. lam going on business of great importance." "But
2203.the first speaker, a strong and bullying youth, laying hold of him. " I will hav
2204.ker, a strong and bullying youth, laying hold of him. " I will have no sulking,
2205.ng hold of him. " I will have no sulking, want any thing done. So come, join us
2206." I will have no sulking, want any thing done. So come, join us at once." entrea
2207. do let me go." "No seem to ; such thing," replied the other. "What ? is that yo
2208.e other. "What ? is that you be carrying so carefully in your bosom well, it wil
2209.l A letter, I suppose not addle by being for half an hour out ; of its nest. Giv
2210.ver, never," answered the child, looking up towards heaven. " I will see it," in
2211. A all crowd of And he commenced pulling men from the neighborhood asked eagerly
2212.im reveal to what he was effect. bearing. Cuffs, jduIIs, blows, kicks seemed hav
2213.e at once recognized Tarcisius, hav; ing seen him at the Ordination and being as
2214.ing seen him at the Ordination and being asked, as a better- dressed man, the sa
2215.s it? Why, only a Christian ass, bearing the mysteries." * This was enough. able
2216.b closed upon him, and were just seizing him, to tear open his thrice-holy trust
2217.ome giant strength. Some went i-eel- ing to the further side of the square, othe
2218.eyes, raised up the bruised and fainting boy, as tenderly as a mother could have
2219.nswei'ed eyes with a smile ; he, opening his " but I am carrying the divine myst
2220.le ; he, opening his " but I am carrying the divine mysteries take care of them.
2221.arms with tenfold reverbut the very King and Lord of ence, as if bearing, not on
2222.ery King and Lord of ence, as if bearing, not only the sweet victim of a youthfu
2223. could hardly lated, the see for weeping, as he removed the child's hands, and t
2224.'^fnffW^ifil ; 'M an angel now, sleeping the martyr's slumber, than he did when
2225.artyr's slumber, than he did when living scarcely an hour before. Quadratus hims
2226.asus composed ; read, without concluding that the belief in the real presence of
2227.y one of those casual, but most striking, arguments that result from identity of
2228.of bright intelligence. Sebastian, being in, known and out of, the prison daily;
2229.ur window, and looked at the many gaping arches of the amphitheatre, as open for
2230.dear boy as if ; I remember that evening well, and it your heart anticipated the
2231.e of the of first to appease the roaring fury of those deputies human I cruelty.
2232.e, before another sun has set, listening to the harping of angelic lyres, walkin
2233.er sun has set, listening to the harping of angelic lyres, walking in the proces
2234.to the harping of angelic lyres, walking in the procession robed Saints, inhalin
2235.in the procession robed Saints, inhaling the perfume of celestial incense, and d
2236.rfume of celestial incense, and drinking from the crystal waters of the stream o
2237. be, in a few hours, real of " " nothing more than you have described, Pancratiu
2238.t of school, who have And ; done nothing for Christ as yet, should I shall be ab
2239.," he continued fervently, it is seizing friend's hands, " " true ; it is true !
2240.pon ten thousand countenances scowl- ing on you with hatred, contempt, and fury,
2241. them its and plunge destruction burning ocean of mercy and love without fear of
2242. " ! the capitol shall enjoy proclaiming midnight —nay, hush! the —that watc
2243. the sight of hideous beasts and sinning men, scarcely less How much : — ; fri
2244.s of both ! How much look of more trying would it be to part with the last tende
2245.d me. First on that night of the meeting in your apartments, you was one motive
2246.d to give me your reason for despatching me hastily to Campania, and desire to d
2247.t yourself by some ful heart over-daring action which might tarnish, even as lig
2248. of your desire, or I tip with a passing blight one single leaf of your palm. de
2249.ve been seized for ; your boldly tearing down the in his court. edict, or your r
2250.nly condemned, and Each one, approaching devoutly, and with tears of gratitude,
2251.hens with honor, as a gallant and daring youth you might have been disturbed, ;
2252.ive merit and the special glory of dying for simeven in your conflict, ; ply bei
2253.or simeven in your conflict, ; ply being a Christian." " Quite true, Sebastian,"
2254.n, and for common with the rest, nothing else, I felt that my task was ended " ;
2255. so wise, so generous, and so unsparing!" sobbed out Pancratius, as he threw hi
2256.ck then continued " Promise me one thing more that this day you will keep near m
2257.e notice that all was ready for offering oblation in the dungeon itself. The two
2258.nd conse- And then each one, approaching devoutly, and with consecrated tears of
2259.o offer it over his own body. Yet living, he "lay beneath the feet of God." The
2260. XXIII FIGHT. broke light and glittering frosty; HE morning and the sun, ornamen
2261. light and glittering frosty; HE morning and the sun, ornaments buildings, on th
2262. and thus the huge monster keeps sucking in by degrees that stream of life, whic
2263.lls seem to rock and wave to the swaying of the living mass. And, after this sha
2264.ck and wave to the swaying of the living mass. And, after this shall fury, it wi
2265.avenues by which it entered, now bearing their fitting name of Vomitoria ; for n
2266.ch it entered, now bearing their fitting name of Vomitoria ; for never did a mor
2267.s of humanity issue from an unbe- coming reservoir, through ill-assorted channel
2268.drunk with the blood of martyrs, gushing forth from the pores of the splendid am
2269.nd priestesses but they resisted, urging that as they had come spontaneously to
2270.n a disguise which they abhorred. During the early part of the day they remained
2271. they remained thus together encouraging one Before the citizens were the prison
2272.rison to a strong ; another, and singing the Divine praises, in spite of the sho
2273.e Methinks," replied Pancratius, smiling, "this does not It look like a combat.
2274.t hear the tramp of horses' hoofs trying to overtake thee ?" "Wretch!" exclaimed
2275.k together. Cassianus " I was travelling quietly with a rites to companion our m
2276.on our master towards Rome, after having paid the last " (Corvinus winced, for h
2277.took hold of thee, and thou wast falling the water. I saw thee I insensible. I h
2278.fied it." and how, pray ? " " By drawing thee out, and laying thee on the bank,
2279.ay ? " " By drawing thee out, and laying thee on the bank, and chafing thee till
2280.and laying thee on the bank, and chafing thee till thy heart resumed its functio
2281.ts functions; and then " Ha ! consigning thee to thy servants, rescued from deat
2282.rsed the games, the emperor, the yelling rabble, the roaring beasts, his horses
2283.emperor, the yelling rabble, the roaring beasts, his horses his father, himself,
2284.rses his father, himself, —every thing and every body except onelife, he could
2285.atius put his hand on almost approaching to love. "Corvinus, / have freely forgi
2286.for days, which he had longed for during months. When the holiday was over he wa
2287. it was the only way he knew of drowning remorse. As he was combat. leaving the
2288.wning remorse. As he was combat. leaving the prisoners, the lanista, or master o
2289.uccessively let without their inflicting a mortal wound. i. The confessor p. * S
2290.pren- amused themselves with despatching him. But we must content ourselves with
2291.we must content ourselves with following the last As he was passing steps of our
2292.ith following the last As he was passing steps of our youthful hero, Pancratius.
2293. amphitheatre, he saw Sebastian standing on one side, with a lady closely enwrap
2294.r, stopped before her, knelt, and taking her hand, affectionately kissed it. "Bl
2295.On, on, and us have none of this fooling," exclaimed the kim'sfa, adding a strok
2296. fooling," exclaimed the kim'sfa, adding a stroke of his cane. Lucina retreated
2297. a last look there, and —your blessing." out a fiendish tone close behind "Ha!
2298.r. caught only a glimpse of a fluttering cloak rounding a Who it be? He guessed
2299.a glimpse of a fluttering cloak rounding a Who it be? He guessed not. was Fulviu
2300.f evidence that he had long been weaving Christian. —that Sebastian was certai
2301.yet entered his twentieth year, standing without forth in the form of a cross, w
2302.t, attentively, with a fixed and praying to and untrembling heart; stood, nor no
2303.h a fixed and praying to and untrembling heart; stood, nor not retiring from the
2304.trembling heart; stood, nor not retiring from the place where he first swerving
2305.g from the place where he first swerving limbs in while bears and leopards, brea
2306.s in while bears and leopards, breathing fury and death in their very snort, pie
2307.ir very snort, pieces. were just rushing on to tear his And yet, I know not how,
2308.w one wild beast after another careering madly round him, roaring, and lashing i
2309.other careering madly round him, roaring, and lashing its sides with its tail, w
2310.ng madly round him, roaring, and lashing its sides with its tail, while he seeme
2311.scattered the dust around him, bellowing fiercely. ! "Provoke him, thou coward e
2312.atius awoke as from a trance, and waving his arms ran towards his enemy * Hist.
2313. Romans, in his Acts, ap. : been rushing on him, turned round and ran away towar
2314.way towards the entrance, where, meeting his keeper, lie tossed him high of the
2315. the "He he cry, is till emperor, having commanded silence, called it out to him
2316. now inspired countenance, the thrilling music of and his generous selfdevotion
2317.ars started into his eyes, as stretching forth his arms once more in the form of
2318.Lord, is the appointed day of Thy coming. Tarry not longer; enough has Thy power
2319.lieve " ! Paneratius -was still standing in tlie same place, facing the emperor,
2320.till standing in tlie same place, facing the emperor, apparently so absorbed in
2321.d thousand, in a chorus like the roaring of an avalanche.* by magic, from the mi
2322.the sand. At last All its feline cunning and cruelty it caught sight of its prey
2323.n, and to conspire together in animating the cautious and treacherous movements
2324.ll, while every eye was intent, watching the stealthy approaches of the sleek br
2325.ts victim. Pancratius was still standing in the same place, facing the emframe.
2326.still standing in the same place, facing the emframe. been a hermit's peror, app
2327.round him, as another, for if disdaining to attack its breast, its The panther h
2328.ad him except in stolen front. Crouching upon it slowly advancing one paw before
2329.ront. Crouching upon it slowly advancing one paw before it had gained of some mo
2330.ss suspense. the its air, lay snarl- ing growl, an elastic seen chest, spring th
2331.ing growl, an elastic seen chest, spring through and it was gathered up like a l
2332.his right hand to his mouth, and looking up at Sebastian with a smile, directed
2333.xhortation ; then asked him for the ring on his finger, dipped it in his own blo
2334.is own blood, and gave it back, "leaving him the inheritance of the pledge, and
2335. Buinari, vol. i. p. 323. A Lamp bearing a Monogram of Christ, found in the Cata
2336.have before observed, to the neighboring gate. In times of peace a basilica was
2337.rprised by a heathen rabble %lj> praying at St. Peter's tomb, and was hurried to
2338.reachery of Torquatus, by his describing his former companions, espe; cially the
2339.ield, who looked only to the viccounting every one as glorious who gave his life
2340.had conversed with Pancratius, recalling to graceful thoughts, mind the buoyant
2341.he felt the grace martyrdom its swelling in his breast, and in tranquil certaint
2342.een disappointed. but he had put nothing by of Eurotas He had ; not been obliged
2343.urotas He had ; not been obliged getting rich. to ask for assistance ; from the
2344.ence he avoided he was not Every evening he had to bear the reproachful and scor
2345.—that — for such he had he was going to strike at higher game, the em- peror
2346.with a cold reception. But after bearing silently the muttered curses of the roy
2347.as often reproached me for I with having your gracious made, by my discoveries,
2348.d out of to is iron hook." and directing his hand, in accompaniment : his words,
2349.orded here," it, he replied, produc- ing a parchment, and offering kneeling. The
2350.d, produc- ing a parchment, and offering kneeling. The emperor was about to make
2351.- ing a parchment, and offering kneeling. The emperor was about to make an angry
2352.vored host there wiU be more more daring for you, than in all your Dacian and Pa
2353.ly and madness ! " returned the sneering savage. " I would sooner surround mysel
2354.chery proves enough if I for me." acting the traitor, at any time from had been
2355.nk Fulvius with all my heart, for having, by his ; accusation, spared me the emb
2356.assment of choice between life." seeking death or enduring "I will decide that p
2357.between life." seeking death or enduring "I will decide that point for you. it D
2358.eath is your award; and a slow lingering one lower tone, as All if shall be. But
2359.l be. But," he added, in a out. speaking to himself, "this must not get must be
2360.ich ended in the stout centurion's being ordered at once But Sebastian was to be
2361. have a job sire," you to-morrow morning. must be well done," " Perfectly, said
2362. have started more. The thought of being so near a Christian, to him who worship
2363.uarters; and early — to-morrow morning, —not this evening, mind, for I all k
2364. to-morrow morning, —not this evening, mind, for I all know that by this time
2365.ou are drunk, —but to-morrow morn- ing, when your hands mind; none are steady,
2366. had her hand and fortune for the asking, and he had acted most generously and m
2367.was sure not gilded, but — gold. being Then how account for this phenomenon, o
2368. ? could he be that he was Then in being a Christian it She turned variously in
2369. of this religion, and a more grovelling one just as she knew there was in her o
2370.reanism? one coarse, material, wallowing in the very mire of sensualism the othe
2371.e. and the others, she had heard nothing, for she had only returned the day befo
2372.t it was now too late; to-morrow morning he would be no more. This second though
2373.ll sufl"er a Sebastian's fate were going to to her, on some one tie. closely bou
2374.welt on these ideas amidst the deepening gloom. She was suddenly It disturbed by
2375.o came to prepare her mistress's evening repast, which she wished to take alone.
2376. news?" " " Only that Sebastian is going to be shot with arrows ; to-morrow morn
2377. be shot with arrows ; to-morrow morning. What a pity he was such a handsome you
2378.y information is indeed very astonishing. " Do you know that he turns out to be
2379. if maid's swarthy face. she was placing a flagon of wine upon the table, just a
2380.what do you mean ? " to her "Oh, nothing, nothing. What can a poor slave know? "
2381.ou mean ? " to her "Oh, nothing, nothing. What can a poor slave know? " more, wh
2382. come, you meant by your words something that I must know." The slave came round
2383.ty for them ? " "They " shall be binding only is still alive." is if, twenty-fou
2384.him there," said the barbarian, pointing across " You would not think the court,
2385.door commanded. that he sleeps. is going to be shot to-morrow. could not do so b
2386., if See how soundly he He he were going to be be the married instead." "As thou
2387.s than three hundred pounds."* " I bring thee six hundred." all this "Excellent!
2388., what has he to do with our approaching nuptials ? " " A great deal." "What now
2389.ury and He seemed on the point of laying violent hands on her; but she stood int
2390.ill ! his have known he have no trifling with him here." Pshaw ! pshaw man ; of
2391.t us see. Why, my fellows ousness coming uppermost. ! ; will consume half the mo
2392.e half the money, in bribes and feasting." I have two hundred more in reserve fo
2393., my princess, my sorceress, my charming "Well, But that will be too much for my
2394." As it pleases thee, provided the thing is done according to my iDroposal." " I
2395.ee, provided the thing is done according to my iDroposal." " It is a bargain, th
2396.er that, we will have a glorious wedding." meantime, was unconscious of these sa
2397.r, between two guards, he was slumbering soundly by the wall of the court. Fatig
2398.d enjoyed the rare advantage of retiring early to rest and the marble pave; ment
2399. ; or the friend, of is the martyr going to death, unknown name, who salutes sei
2400.eized, and made to bear him ; If willing company,* is as prepared for martyrdom,
2401.or strength it, for the opposite feeling, which could suggest It was unknown to
2402.his heavenly Lord, in any place. morning, was a gladsome hymn of glory and honor
2403.some hymn of glory and honor to the King of kings, a joining with the Avings, se
2404.nd honor to the King of kings, a joining with the Avings, seraph's glowing eyes,
2405.oining with the Avings, seraph's glowing eyes, and ever-shaking in the bright in
2406. seraph's glowing eyes, and ever-shaking in the bright in restless homage. Then
2407.in the leafless trees of the neighboring court of Adonis, he bade wayward music
2408.compose its itself, and its rude harping upon the vibrating boughs form softer o
2409. and its rude harping upon the vibrating boughs form softer only ones that earth
2410.ours. Now burst on him the for thrilling thought that the morning ; hour approac
2411.e for thrilling thought that the morning ; hour approached, the cock had crowed
2412.would soon hear those branches murmuring over him to the sharp whistle And he of
2413.harp whistle And he offered himof flying arrows, unerring in their aim. self gla
2414.he offered himof flying arrows, unerring in their aim. self gladly to their shar
2415.f gladly to their sharp tongues, hissing as the serpent's, to drink his blood. H
2416.n for God's honor, and for the appeasing of his wrath. self particularly for the
2417. from the earthly to the Church; soaring like the eagle from the highest pinClou
2418.oidered the sanctuary's, veil of morning rent and he sees quite into its reveale
2419.o sweet and perfect to brook the jarring of a terrestrial voice they came to him
2420.strial voice they came to him, requiring no return for they brought heaven into
2421.of purest refreshment, more like gushing light than water, flowing from the foot
2422.e like gushing light than water, flowing from the foot of the Lamb, and poured i
2423.d receive the gift. Yet in its sparkling bounds, as it rippled along towards him
2424.one before him as if they w^ere drinking, and bathing, and disporting, and plung
2425.m as if they w^ere drinking, and bathing, and disporting, and plunging, and diss
2426.re drinking, and bathing, and disporting, and plunging, and dissolving themselve
2427.nd bathing, and disporting, and plunging, and dissolving themselves in those liv
2428.disporting, and plunging, and dissolving themselves in those living in twain, li
2429.nd dissolving themselves in those living in twain, like ; ; ; ; waters. of the v
2430. the vision, His countenance was glowing as with the very and the morning dawn j
2431.glowing as with the very and the morning dawn just brightening that is!), reflec
2432.ry and the morning dawn just brightening that is!), reflection (oh, what a dawn
2433.l ears of Hyphax so he set about earning them. He picked out of his troop marksm
2434.troop marksmen, who could split a flying arrow with a fleeter one, called them i
2435.room, told them their reward, concealing his own share, and arranged how the exe
2436.stian was conducted into the neighboring court of the palace, which separated th
2437.se African archers from his own dwelling. It was planted with rows of trees, and
2438.istian constancy, to see the encouraging looks of many, and hear the whispered b
2439. the whispered blessings of a few loving acquaintances, had something cheering,
2440. few loving acquaintances, had something cheering, and almost inspiring in it ;
2441.ng acquaintances, had something cheering, and almost inspiring in it ; it lent a
2442.something cheering, and almost inspiring in it ; it lent at least the feeble aid
2443.ent of grace. very shout of an insulting multitude put a strain upon natural cou
2444.ut up in the court of a house this being, with most unfeeling indifference tied
2445. a house this being, with most unfeeling indifference tied up, like a truss of h
2446.figure, to be coolly aimed at, according to the tyrant's orders ; this being alo
2447.ding to the tyrant's orders ; this being alone in the midst of a horde of swarth
2448. before a but who were no doubt uttering their rude jokes, and laughing, as men
2449. uttering their rude jokes, and laughing, as men do ; match or a game, which the
2450. ; match or a game, which they are going to enjoy all this had more the appearan
2451.s. Angels looked over him and the rising sun, which dazzled his eyes, but made h
2452. ; Witness he cared to have of suffering endured for His sake. The first Moor dr
2453.sake. The first Moor drew his bow-string to his ear, flesh ; arrow trembled in t
2454.astian. and an Each chosen accomavoiding, marksman panied the followed in turn h
2455.of applause each so cleverly approaching, yet according to the imperial order, e
2456.h so cleverly approaching, yet according to the imperial order, every vital part
2457. part. And for so game went on drooj)ing ; every body laughing, and brawling, an
2458. went on drooj)ing ; every body laughing, and brawling, and it jeering, and enjo
2459.)ing ; every body laughing, and brawling, and it jeering, and enjoying frame, wi
2460.y laughing, and brawling, and it jeering, and enjoying frame, without a particle
2461.d brawling, and it jeering, and enjoying frame, without a particle of feeling wi
2462.ing frame, without a particle of feeling with blood all ; the now painted * all
2463.earnest —each sharp pang, the enduring smart, the exhaustion, the weariness, t
2464.the faith, steadfast heart, the untiring spirit, the unwavering the unruffled ji
2465.art, the untiring spirit, the unwavering the unruffled jiatience, the unsated lo
2466.jiatience, the unsated love of suffering for his Lord. Earnest was the prayer, e
2467.the eye on heaven, earnest the listening of the ear the welcoming strain of the
2468.t the listening of the ear the welcoming strain of the heavenly porters, as they
2469.ch he fell.* * The reader, when visiting the Crystal Palace, will find in the Eo
2470.see a chapel of fair dimensions standing alone. It is the one to which we allude
2471.ave, far advanced, when the black having completed her marriage settlement quite
2472.to her tion, own satisfac- was returning was to her mistress's house. It was, in
2473.ight, and the moon seemed to be stroking, with a, silvery hand, the downy robe o
2474.tiful object. night, so she well turning round to proceed on her way, when she f
2475.sts, your African cousins, are answering it from the amphitheatre. it What was a
2476.elf." before described. " I was thinking fool * and what a you made The fountain
2477. " How kind of you, Afra, to be thinking of me, especially just then thinking of
2478.ing of me, especially just then thinking of you, but of your country- as I was n
2479.de a fair fool of me at our last meeting What which has become of your promises,
2480.ccasion Mine, know, proved 'the sterling; yours, I fear, turned out but dust." "
2481.he asked Corvinus, amazed, and shrinking from her. of Afra's, so was only a sudd
2482.thought she pushed her advantage, saying "To be one that " is sure too ; what el
2483. the second, and to has gained something. Tou have done the first, and what have
2484.t, and what have you earned ? " "Nothing but rage, confusion, and stripes." " Th
2485.; carefully. but have observed one thing riches. Not a single suit has been acco
2486.is our last interview; and and unfeeling good hater." She drew him nearer and wh
2487.otas, out of whom I can wheedle anything, that Fulvius has some splendid Christi
2488. She checked him by a pull, and pointing to the building ; ! : opposite, exclaim
2489. by a pull, and pointing to the building ; ! : opposite, exclaimed " Hush ! look
2490.d beings were on the same spot, plotting bane to others, the window above was oc
2491.hs, who, like were intent on unravelling their web of mischief, and counterminin
2492.their web of mischief, and countermining their dark approaches. They are gone th
2493.. They are gone thence, the one sleeping in his tomb, the other slum- bering on
2494.ping in his tomb, the other slum- bering on the eve of execution. power, seeing
2495.g on the eve of execution. power, seeing Death looks to us like a holy how much
2496.s like a holy how much he prefers taking to his society the He snatches away the
2497.h a sword in his hand, carefully turning and examining the hilt in the bright mo
2498.is hand, carefully turning and examining the hilt in the bright moonlight. He fl
2499.ht. He flung it down at last, exclaiming with an oath, " It is only brass, after
2500. of this, Fulvius." " Always reproaching me, Eurotas. And yet this miserable gai
2501.t j^robably from your master for morning, the slaves w^ho received the body of S
2502.sed by a swarthy female " figure passing by them, and whispering to them, He is
2503." figure passing by them, and whispering to them, He is still alive." irb ; w In
2504. irb ; w Instead, therefore, of carrying him out for burial, they bore him to th
2505. of Irene. The early hour of the morning, and the emperor's having gone, the eve
2506.of the morning, and the emperor's having gone, the evening before, to his favori
2507.d the emperor's having gone, the evening before, to his favorite Lateran palace,
2508.wound But curable ; not one arrow having touched a vital organ. loss of blood th
2509.mes she contented herself with receiving intelli- gence at the door, and putting
2510. intelli- gence at the door, and putting into the hands of Sebastian's hostess a
2511.ut after two days, when he was improving, she was courteand, for the first time
2512.seen such a frugal, and orderly. Nothing dissister. turbed it, except the charac
2513.She formed plans with Irene for carrying him off Campanian villa, where she woul
2514. not We of Sebastian. ordinary wayfaring salvation, It —was man man on j)robat
2515.estuous arm of the and, after struggling for hours, and having his skiff twirled
2516., after struggling for hours, and having his skiff twirled round and round and a
2517.sent back to earth and to Satan's having heard the mysterious words which only o
2518.dored in silence the Divine Will, hoping that purpose was only to give him the m
2519.ilege This of a martyr, that of speaking boldly to the persecutors. I will use t
2520.t it may be the sooner." Moses receiving the Law, from a picture in the Cemetery
2521.m the blind martyr's He was unsuspecting admissions, that Agnes was a sation bet
2522.exhortations of Eurotas; but, despairing respectful, of obtaining another interv
2523.but, despairing respectful, of obtaining another interview, he wrote her a entre
2524.her interview, he wrote her a entreating her to accept his suit. but pressing le
2525.ing her to accept his suit. but pressing letter, descriptive of his disintereste
2526.and could admit from no perishable being expressions of personal attachment. Thi
2527.dently. In the meantime, Fabiola, seeing the determination of nrr Sebastian not
2528.y, conceived the romantic idea of saving him, in spite of himself, by extorting
2529.g him, in spite of himself, by extorting his pardon from the emperor. heart. She
2530.me ; his breast and her earnest pleading and tears would extract them, as heat d
2531.She accordingly slight token and knowing the covetousness man, presumed, as she
2532.ther's loyal attachment. This was a ring with jewels of rare beauty, and immense
2533., on his way to sacrifice. Unencouraging as was best. this answer, she resolved
2534.s answer, she resolved to risk any thing, and do her habits, The appointed day c
2535.ed day came and Fabiola, in her mourning worn both as a suppliant, and for her f
2536.tairs, though she saw her brilliant ring si:)arkling on his coarse hand. each st
2537.h she saw her brilliant ring si:)arkling on his coarse hand. each step he snatch
2538. how, or whom. Max- imian was stretching out his hand to take a paper offered to
2539. drew back, and turned round, on hearing his name most unceremoniously and perem
2540.t to a ments were. back corridor leading to where Irene's apartShe now looked up
2541.ore stood there them; and arms appearing amidst the loose For he had heard drape
2542.peror's name?" asked the tyrant, turning upon warn thee that the day Thou hast s
2543. fast of wrath and vengeance approaching. inheritance of His poor. For these, an
2544.emed under the influence of a paralyzing awe; for soon recognizing Sebastian, he
2545.f a paralyzing awe; for soon recognizing Sebastian, he felt as if standing in th
2546.nizing Sebastian, he felt as if standing in the presence of the dead. But quickl
2547.ence of the dead. But quickly recovering himself and his passion, he exclaimed:
2548.ome of you, go round instantly and bring him before me " (he did not "Hyphax her
2549. "Ha! he is gone, I name ? " (addressing see; then here, you Corvinus, who was a
2550.en here, you Corvinus, who was attending his father,) "go to the Nuuiidian court
2551. and pointed to the door, and the string ready drawn, they looked like an avenue
2552.ike an avenue of basalt statues, leading to an Egyptian temple. "H3'phax," said
2553.that my men have sworn, that no or going out, man passes that threshold, coming
2554.g out, man passes that threshold, coming in, without leceiving, through his brea
2555. threshold, coming in, without leceiving, through his breast or his back, a hund
2556. in battle, or insurrection, for picking out the leaders. "There, take that "The
2557. leaders. "There, take that "The cunning rascals!" he exclaimed. And he gave him
2558.s black spouse." Fabiola's splendid ring. He hastened back, delivered his In an
2559.ant gracious embassy, and threw the ring across. and every string relaxed. Jubal
2560. threw the ring across. and every string relaxed. Jubala, delighted, sprang forw
2561.hted, sprang forward and caught the ring. A heavy blow from her husband's fist f
2562.adam, what is your petition?" stretching out his hand out of — to Fabiola, who
2563.and disgusted, and almost " ! ; fainting at the sight befoi'e her; it is so she
2564.ate ! "Why from his " too late?" looking at the paper. " A flash came that eye,
2565.not else. her life have is was any thing Fabiola, thy day not "But, as you said
2566.lied the emperor, more serene, returning her petition, "I fear it is too late; *
2567.t, by the bye, I have the beautiful ring which you sent, to thank j^ou and which
2568.ferings earn us honor tyrant, The seeing his work completed, ordered that Sebast
2569.culprits were "put out of their Breaking the legs of the crucified was considere
2570.now stands his basilica. Christ blessing a Child, from a picture in the Cemetery
2571.as had its day. has not all been working up towards Emperor and slave, father an
2572.life and death, joy and sorrow, learning and simplicity, silence and conversatio
2573.ave they not all come as agents, pulling at her mind in oi^posite ways, yet all
2574.ind in oi^posite ways, yet all directing her noble and so with Fabiola, And a cr
2575.all the reso? lution of these contending forces be determined * "If thou hadst T
2576. the reader look, and see must be an ing day in his calendar, and he will agree
2577.d sorrow. Irene, where she found nothing but but she saw She sympathized fully w
2578.as almost ; their an exultation breaking out through their distress; Hers was a
2579.hristianity, as associated with anything amiable or end. intelligent, seemed at
2580.choly, which lasted till towards evening, ; when she was disturbed by a letter b
2581.when she was disturbed by a letter being put into her hand. The Greek slave, Gra
2582.sed, as stood thus for a moment, looking up with an on her temples, unnatural st
2583. deep groan. : for some minutes, holding the letter in both her hands, with her
2584.. come here." While her errand was being delivered, she composed herself, and ga
2585.tion of a " man named Fulvius, for being a Christian." " For nothing else I ? "
2586.s, for being a Christian." " For nothing else I ? " " For nothing, am sure." I T
2587." " For nothing else I ? " " For nothing, am sure." I Then we shall soon set tha
2588.biola was left alone. When was something to do her mind was at once energetic an
2589.ere largitions. "What " I is the meaning of this, Agnes?" eagerly inquired Fabio
2590. am, thank God ! " replied Agnes, making on herself the sign of the cross. The a
2591.basit. She had found that faith existing in what she had considered the type of
2592.her guileless innocence, and unexcepting kindness, she had ; almost worshipped.
2593.t She bowed her head in a kind springing from the same seed. of reverence for th
2594.reasonable. I could have loved any thing in you." " You think so now, Fabiola ;
2595.noble minds, fine intellects, and loving hearts to have they enslaved, and induc
2596.eve us to be all we ! are not, something even worse than the worst of selfish in
2597.d to do so again publicly in the morning." "In the morning! " —what, to-morrow
2598.ublicly in the morning." "In the morning! " —what, to-morrow?" asked Fabiola,
2599.abiola, shocked at the idea of any thing so immediate. Yes, to-morrow. To preven
2600.news, dear? asked Agnes eagerly, seizing her cousin's hands. ecstatic And I then
2601.sin's hands. ecstatic And I then putting on one of her I looks, she exclaimed, "
2602.heave, as if a new element were entering in. She knew not what it was, but it se
2603.not what it was, but it seemed something better than a mere human emotion. She *
2604.l. At same time a consultation was being held The reader had better listen to it
2605.d sorceress I was any right in one thing, she ought to be in the other. will ans
2606.e." how powerful is wealth in conquering will allow, too," rejoined Corvinus, "f
2607.f I "Yes, so but not succeed in offering her, with myself, the lady Agnes' s gre
2608.r generous and lofty disposition. Giving her that wealth independent of conditio
2609.pendent of conditions, and then offering yourself to her, will tions, either to
2610.think " there no possibility of securing it except through her? share "None what
2611.sonable plan, all for himself. of giving the property to the nearest relation, "
2612.am sure there is no chance of his making a free gift to me. The proposal from a
2613.ave an imperial rescript prepared during the night, ready for signature; and I w
2614.show the to the emperor how his granting the property tlement of is it, next in
2615.ust be made " to fight another." Nothing could be better, my dear father; I shal
2616." "I only wdsh," added Tertullus, rising, "that I could have seen this peerless
2617., father: she is well is worthy of being your daughter-in-law. Yes, to-morrow in
2618.n-law. Yes, to-morrow indeed the turning-point my fortunes." his critical Even C
2619. While this domestic interview was going on, a conference was taking place betwe
2620.ew was going on, a conference was taking place between Fulvius and his amiable u
2621. his amiable uncle. The latter, entering late, found his nephew sitting sullen a
2622. entering late, found his nephew sitting sullen and alone in the house, and thus
2623.quences sure?" dir " w " Why, if nothing else happens, the to first is safe ; th
2624.caprice. pain and remorse at sacrificing so young a result." life, But I own and
2625.result." life, But I own and for looking as an insecure " Come, Fulvius," said t
2626.nly, ; cold I a grey rock in the morning mist this hope, matter. "no softness, D
2627.y to you always renund me of every thing I most wish forget? " " Because of this
2628.his crimson Eurotas roused him by saying : " Well, and probably a final critical
2629. other prospect before me, of retrieving " : Still I must fly hence." owe at Jan
2630.the utmost secrecy." "Leave that morning it is to me, Fulvius; you see how event
2631.-day Life or death to for it approaching. you hang upon its the great day of you
2632. PART. HE day is less we not yet dawning, and neverthespeak of having reached it
2633.yet dawning, and neverthespeak of having reached its second part. How may this b
2634.hich he asthe from cended in the morning, the other she descended in the evening
2635., the other she descended in the evening? the dungeon into which in the unclashi
2636.the dungeon into which in the unclashing comGlorious Church of Christ! great fro
2637.eneath bination of thy unity, stretching prison-house of the just. the earth, wh
2638.to cool his almost without any throbbing brows. He wandered about, drawing neare
2639.obbing brows. He wandered about, drawing nearer and purpose but found himself im
2640.ld be his ; strangely compounded feeling, made up of as bitter ingredients There
2641. as bitter ingredients There was gnawing remorse; as ever filled the poisoner's
2642.r filled the poisoner's cup. was goading avarice there was there was baffled pri
2643.was a terrible sense of the ; ; humbling shame ing consummation ; of his villany
2644.ible sense of the ; ; humbling shame ing consummation ; of his villany. It was t
2645.hich " I from your mind." I fear nothing for Christ. For know, that have an ange
2646.r know, that have an angel ever guarding me, who will not suffer his Master's Bu
2647.ude." Fulviiis had been gradually losing patience, and could no longer restrain
2648.child, this time Avith the sword hanging over her neck flame irrepressible broke
2649.pressible broke out from the smouldering heat ; within him that and, in an insta
2650. one black, solitary drop, With flashing look, and furious gesture, he broke for
2651. give thee one more opportunity rescuing thyself from destruction. of Which wilt
2652.e shall have it," he rejoined, clenching his fist, and darting a mad look at the
2653.ejoined, clenching his fist, and darting a mad look at the new speaker; "and tho
2654. thou too, if again thou darest to fling thy baneful shadow across path." my Fab
2655.She had some minutes unobserved watching the contest, between what would have ap
2656. ever did. In preparation for her coming festival of full espousals to the Lamb,
2657. should sign her contract of everlasting love, been for * viary. 475 " Mecum eni
2658.e dark gar- ments looked of her mourning a white and spotless bridal almost dazz
2659.hite and spotless bridal almost dazzling; while her robe. In the midst of that d
2660. wrapped up in his dark cloak, crouching down to rush out of the low door of the
2661.a black and van- quished demon, plunging into an abyss beneath. Then Fabiola loo
2662.e by which, in poetical mythology, being of a higher sphere was recognized on ea
2663.hem upon her own calm bosom, and looking into her face with a gaze of blandest e
2664.tness, said : "Fabiola, I have one dying request to make you. You have never ref
2665. a cultivated mind, a tine moral feeling, and a virtuous yet over eyes, of life.
2666.feel dear Agnes, — I feel it. Standing before you, I seem to be as a black spo
2667.Christianity, shall I And how, embracing you?" become light like "You must pass,
2668. ders us" (Fabiola started, recollecting her dream) of refreshment shall flow ov
2669.u already possess. What a glorious being Christianity will make you, Fabiola! "
2670.ola! " "What a new world you are leading me to, dear Agnes! " Oh, that you were
2671.r Agnes! " Oh, that you were not leaving me outside its very threshold ! ; pn ^
2672. me. But I They are the bridesmen coming to sumsee on high the white-robed bride
2673.ds borne on the bright clouds of morning, and beckoning Yes, me for- my lamp is
2674. bright clouds of morning, and beckoning Yes, me for- my lamp is trimmed, and do
2675.e you And now to as I happiness of dying I I will speak a word to you which neve
2676.Agnes's, was their last earthly greeting. The one hastened home, filled with a n
2677.Church in her it, dwell upon as doubling her crown.* Suffice it to say, that and
2678.uary.! It was still early in the morning when she stood her angel protected her
2679.cathed, without a blush upon her smiling countenance, or a pang of sorrow in her
2680.ow-white dress.* It was a lovely morning. its Many now will remember it to have
2681.earth is frost, but with blossoms; being loosened round the and spring seems lat
2682.oms; being loosened round the and spring seems latent in the swelling buds, whic
2683. and spring seems latent in the swelling buds, which are watching for the signal
2684.in the swelling buds, which are watching for the signal from the southern breeze
2685.pand, t vigorous, The atmosphere, rising into a cloudless sky, loves, of has jus
2686.that one a sun, already air. not heating, but softening, the slightly frosty St.
2687. already air. not heating, but softening, the slightly frosty St. Such we have f
2688.ogether with joyful thousands, hastening to her shrine. The judge was crowd form
2689.ne. The judge was crowd formed a sitting in the open Forum, and a sufficient cir
2690. enveloped in his toga, with a slouching hat over his eyes, so that his features
2691. object, as she stood immovable, leaning with her elbow on a marble post. Agnes
2692.e open space, and stood intrepid, facing the tribunal. Her thoughts seemed Chain
2693.nd bid : : shook her hands, and they ing at her feet.* fell, like St. Paul's vip
2694.ned tlie exasperated judge, who, turning to the prisoner, said, in a blander ton
2695.d can only love and serve the one living God. Eternal Ruler, open wide the heave
2696.fect, who saw symptoms compassion rising in the multitude. " Secretary, write th
2697.nsued, for the executioner was trembling with emotion, and could not wield his s
2698.n her bosom, and her amber locks hanging almost to the ground, and veiling her f
2699.anging almost to the ground, and veiling her features, she might not unaptly hav
2700. next moment, flower and stem were lying scarcely displaced on the ground. It mi
2701.s right hand had looked with unflinching eye upon the stroke, and his lip curled
2702. the lady stood, womanly " Sir," feeling,! as now in the garb of deepest mournin
2703.! as now in the garb of deepest mourning, before the tribunal. she said in a ton
2704. shrouded thus the body of Eulalia lying in the Forum. UU stip. The Christian Ma
2705.et whom I have loved more than any thing on earth ; but ; me bear them hence to
2706.her has shed over you, by every soothing word which a sister has ever spoken to
2707.ayer. And if, when you home this evening, you will be met at the threshold by da
2708., sir, I am not " ; but I I own anything could make me one, it would be what hav
2709., blotted out from earth this day! thing I She was the purest, sweetest, holiest
2710.st thou not, Fulvius, early this morning, seek that cell, and deliberately tell
2711.uldst thou save her life, but, despising the imperial comgentle child in her man
2712. her mands, secure her still " remaining a Christian? : Fulvius stood, pale as d
2713.hrough the heart, or struck by lightning. He looked like a man on whom sentence
2714.ked like a man on whom sentence is going to be pro- nounced, —not of death, bu
2715.loiy, as the judge addressed him, saying " Fulvius, could arraign thee on counse
2716.lly, " may I have the " honor of knowing your name ? " Fabiola," she replied. al
2717.pted at its beginat your disposal." ning by a loud hiss and yell that accompanie
2718.d presently four slaves appeared bearing a Fabiola would allow no one but hersel
2719.overeign, at his coronathrows, according to or on first entering his capital, an
2720.hrows, according to or on first entering his capital, ancient custom, handfuls o
2721.es, to of business, the death of feeling exaggerated the public likely managemen
2722.t he did not disclose for fear of having to try him, and thus bringing out what
2723. of having to try him, and thus bringing out what he was now doing depreciated t
2724. thus bringing out what he was now doing depreciated the value of Agnes' s prope
2725.f Agnes' s property, and ended by saying that it would be a gracious act of clem
2726.rdinary intellect and wonderful learning, who was most zealously devoted to the
2727. her," said Maxim ian, droll. " laughing, as if at the recol- lection of somethi
2728.as if at the recol- lection of something very Poor thing ! she sent me a splendi
2729.ol- lection of something very Poor thing ! she sent me a splendid ring, and yest
2730.Poor thing ! she sent me a splendid ring, and yesterday asked Sebastian's life,
2731. to just as they had finished cudgelling him M^ ®trb ; r death." And by for he
2732.tullus produced the one prepared, saying he relied had fully on the emperor's ma
2733.erfumer's art, the traces of his morning's passion. He . felt a keen presentimen
2734.tas's cool discussion of ; the preceding evening had prepared him designs, all h
2735.ol discussion of ; the preceding evening had prepared him designs, all his and h
2736. be in my way here. She has this morning blasted my ; character for ever she can
2737.was utterly ruined. to the After waiting some time, he entered the audience-hall
2738.want you here ? " was his first greeting. "Sire," he replied, "I have come humbl
2739.your royal justice, to order of my being put into immediate possession my share
2740.' s She has been d-t^ convicted of being a Christian upon my accusation, all and
2741. rescript, to an excellent and deserving perbut kissed the looked a ruined, Lady
2742.t the most trusty of our servants elling requisites ; he will carry our small tr
2743.- on his horse. Two others are preparing for for you and me. ney, I and then I "
2744.d then I " Pray what have only one thing more to get am ready to start." is our
2745.ll only be ready at noon." "What willing to that for?" asked Fulvius, with some
2746.d no more. While this dialogue was going on, Fulvius had been divesting himself
2747.was going on, Fulvius had been divesting himself of his court garments, and atti
2748.self of his court garments, and attiring his look could detect any lurking idea
2749.tiring his look could detect any lurking idea of escape from his gripe. himself
2750. from his gripe. himself in a travelling suit. So completely did he evidently wi
2751.evidently without necessity of returning ; prepare himself for his journey, home
2752.ons with him besides his sword, securing in his girdle, but concealed under his
2753.ith two small to give and was just going explanations, when her husband, half-dr
2754. half-furious, some was seen approaching. Eurotas had just time to conceal the f
2755.sy that amounted to hatred. ; pose being accomplished, acted with forbearance, a
2756.ow intended calmer moments to concerning an the sublime revelations of Syra, vir
2757.ource, to and its what did it all-seeing Kuler, all came from amount more than t
2758.e, as all codes of jDhilosophic teaching were? This was a very different thing i
2759.ng were? This was a very different thing its real from Christianity. She had as
2760.ristianity. She had as yet heard nothing of and essential ; doctrines, its fatho
2761. the wounded heart, or as honey dropping from the broken honeycomb. And how much
2762.ome, exhausted almost by the pre- ceding day and night, and the sad scenes of th
2763.night, and the sad scenes of the morning, and retired to her own apartment, no c
2764.in her bright robe, and with her smiling countenance, and with over a child sudd
2765.mple heart, straight on — into nothing ; that she had been allured by conscien
2766.rised herself on the point of mentioning her own father's name — it sickened h
2767.h the spiritual. Her mind was thus being shaped into a mould, which some form of
2768.r it must be broken her soul was craving as a parched soil, which heaven unist s
2769.rely, well deserved the glory of gaining, by her death, her kinswoman's conversi
2770.t denied him admittance ; but upon being assured that he felt bore an important
2771.the emperor for his gracious act; adding, "Say that I am too ill to-day to prese
2772.ered: at last he stumbled into something, meant for an humble petition to be adm
2773.t. ; demand of recompense, for procuring or bringing so and unwell, she must beg
2774.of recompense, for procuring or bringing so and unwell, she must beg him to leav
2775.resent. He did so quite elated, fancying that he had secured his prize. After he
2776.small table by her couch, but sat musing on the sorrowful scenes she had witness
2777. another of the late events was dwelling on her being confronted with Her memory
2778.he late events was dwelling on her being confronted with Her memory vividly repl
2779.t, which she at length checked by saying aloud to herself: "Thank heaven! and, a
2780. and, at last, she Fulvius, that morning, in the Forum. I shall never behold tha
2781. that " gracious speech " " said, rising You, Fulvius," she still ; with dignity
2782. visit to you; but we have a reck- oning to make together of some weight. As to
2783.ke together of some weight. As to crying out, or bringing in help, you need not
2784.me weight. As to crying out, or bringing in help, you need not trouble yourself;
2785.for him by Corvinus; for upon presenting himself at the door the porter, who had
2786.actly his case and the porter, wondering that so many imperial mesHe begged seng
2787.ed, madam, with my unex- pectedly coming upon you, and overhearing your amiable
2788.ectedly coming upon you, and overhearing your amiable soliloquies about myself;
2789.re in my suit, who more than by assuring me that his cousin had confided to Fabi
2790.fied was too true, him her reciprocating love." now remembered that this from th
2791.of ; for she his stupid misunderstanding. "I know this well, that ; my I, dear f
2792.whom that dear child con- cealed nothing "Except her irony. religion," interrupt
2793. that you were but an object of loathing and abhorrence to her." "Yes, after you
2794.uch. From that hour of our first meeting you became my bitter and unrelenting fo
2795.ing you became my bitter and unrelenting foe, ! ; — in conspiracy with that tr
2796. genuine honesty, her rare understanding, her candid innocence, any more than th
2797.ility, that ; you grasped of and nothing more first it I read it in the very fla
2798.nd affectionate; as worthy of possessing her as "As any one can be," struck in F
2799.e," struck in Fabiola, "who, in offering his hand, expresses himself equally rea
2800.ess. " That was not enough. After acting in that character, of a spy, with which
2801.n, and my conversation, you this morning threw off all sense of female propriety
2802.nd vengeance; such as, but for a feeling stronger than fear, which brings me ; h
2803.vius, whose countenance had been growing every moment more flushed, as his lips
2804.e flushed, as his lips had been becoming more deadly pale. He rudely grasped her
2805.empt again either to escajDC or to bring aid your first cry will be your last, c
2806.I tell you this is your day of reckoning, and have earned, even if by crime, it
2807. earned, even if by crime, it is nothing to share of your cousin's confiscated p
2808.d from me. It is like a rich man tearing the carrion feet from the hound's jaws,
2809.r he has swollen his his skin in hunting it and rent you; down." "I will not see
2810.y-moved to that intensity of was lashing up stitutes a moral frenzy, — wicked
2811.tudied calmness, and entreat go, looking fully into his eyes, now you want money
2812., or unbribed ? " Of this I know nothing. But I know, that I aa^ouM believe, tha
2813.d of want than petitioned for a farthing of such property " ! "Then would you ma
2814.nt. " subtlety, as he had been reasoning to prove Fabiola guilty, flashed up ane
2815.t for a minute, then broke out, gnashing his convict you of baseness, rapacity,
2816. unnatural cruelty, far beyond any thing you have dared to charge on me ! Look a
2817.ed you ; ; me know the Bah while telling ! Agnes was in prison at latest while y
2818. prison at latest while you were whining and moaning over her while you were rep
2819.atest while you were whining and moaning over her while you were reproaching me
2820.ning over her while you were reproaching me for cruelty and treachery towards he
2821.dy, the virtuous philosopher, the loving, fondling kinswoman, you, ting to take
2822.rtuous philosopher, the loving, fondling kinswoman, you, ting to take advantage
2823.he loving, fondling kinswoman, you, ting to take advantage of my stern reprover,
2824., were coolly plotmy crime, for securing her property, scribe, and seeking out t
2825.curing her property, scribe, and seeking out the elegant who should gild your co
2826.r own flesh and blood, with his blushing minium.'" " Cease, * madman, cease ! "
2827.cease ! " exclaimed Fabiola, endeavoring in vain to master his glaring eye. But
2828.ndeavoring in vain to master his glaring eye. But he went on in still wilder ton
2829.f manual not, to me as a free and loving and I will you have signed your own doo
2830.ned your own doom." A stern and menacing her glance accompanied these words. Fab
2831.ou never. Never shall it you touch thing that belonged to that holy maiden, be a
2832.gold of mine, if it please but any thing that ever belonged to her, from me no t
2833.ave made me but I can prevent your being what you have no right to be. For this
2834.emesis.* Now die!" While he was speaking these reproaches, he was slowly pushing
2835. these reproaches, he was slowly pushing her backwards with his left hand toward
2836. while his right was tremblingly feeling for some- thing in the folds of his bos
2837. was tremblingly feeling for some- thing in the folds of his bosom. As he finish
2838. the hair. She made no partly a fainting and sickening resistance, she uttered n
2839. made no partly a fainting and sickening resistance, she uttered no cry sensatio
2840.ion came over her partly a noble feeling of self-respect checked any unseemly ex
2841. she closed her "eyes, she saw something like lightning above her she could not
2842. "eyes, she saw something like lightning above her she could not tell whether it
2843.ot tell whether it was his ; ; ; glaring eye or flashing steel. In another if mo
2844.it was his ; ; ; glaring eye or flashing steel. In another if moment she felt op
2845.en upon her and a hot stream was flowing over her bosom. A sweet voice full of ;
2846.la' s strength Thy Nemesis was returning; but she ! felt the weight upon her inc
2847.released herself. Another body was lying in her place, apparently dead, and cove
2848. first Her • was to stanch the flowing blood with While she was a general rush
2849.me Fabiola had been overjoyed at finding the blood cease to flow so rapidly, and
2850.low so rapidly, and still more at seeing her Cemetery of Callistus. servant open
2851. Fabiola's heart. bition, But her loving servant, in spite of prohihad been hove
2852.vant, in spite of prohihad been hovering near her mistress during the whole w da
2853.d been hovering near her mistress during the whole w day ; -g-fl-p never intrudi
2854.he whole w day ; -g-fl-p never intruding, but anxious offer, for any opportunity
2855.portunity which might While of seconding those good impressions of grace, scfene
2856.enes could not fail to which the morning's in a neighboring have produced. room
2857. to which the morning's in a neighboring have produced. room she heard violent t
2858.st struggle comWhile the man was pushing her mistress backmenced. wards, she fol
2859.d him close behind and as he was lifting his arm, passed him, and threw her body
2860.wound, checked, however, by encountering the were too familiar to her ears • ;
2861.the horror of imprintof Cain, the making him doubly a fratricide, which deeply a
2862.new, would have for a moment have it ing on her brother's brow the mark been use
2863.eless intended victim. Still and nothing remained but for to accomplish her immo
2864.complish her immolation, by substituting herself the she wished to spare her bro
2865. consummation of his crime, and in doing so manifested to Fabiola their relation
2866.t apart as a and when all else was being packed up, should up and put it in his
2867.s breast. And now, in the act of drawing out his eastern dagger, he had plucked
2868.r. Dionysius, immediately after dressing the wound, and administering proper res
2869.er dressing the wound, and administering proper restoratives, which brought back
2870.ives, which brought back consacred thing have folded it sciousness, desired the
2871.," he added, " very early in the morning, when I must her cines see my patient a
2872.laced in her own it, bed, and, allotting to her attendants the outward room, res
2873.e privilege, as she to deemed of nursing the servant, feel grateful for whom a f
2874.before she could hardly in fever. having tended her the She had informed the oth
2875.e had informed the others how concealing the relationship deliverer. wound had b
2876.s to be expected, but only the approving eye of God, she had admired the idea, w
2877.ut she had rebelled against its becoming the reward ; constraining rule of hourl
2878.t its becoming the reward ; constraining rule of hourly conduct. Yet, fatal, if
2879.m in virtue as And when Miriam had being its ! ordinary standard, how chimerical
2880.erse with her again Early in the morning, according to his promise, the physicia
2881.er again Early in the morning, according to his promise, the physician returned,
2882.r cloth ; much improved. He when, having spread a linen upon the table, and plac
2883.ents of which she well knew. Approaching her he said drew from " My dear child,
2884.ith all my heart," she replied, clasping her hands; " I long to possess Him whom
2885.u conscious of any other fault requiring humble confession and absolution before
2886.nfession and absolution before receiving the sacred gift into your breast? " ".
2887.er but I am not conscious of any knowing offence. have had no need to forgive hi
2888.use, that you with His grace." it coming He may heal you, and table, Approaching
2889. He may heal you, and table, Approaching the he took from a particle of the Bles
2890.e form of unleavened bread, which, being dry, he moistened in water, and placed
2891.n, teaches ns that this of administering Holy Communion to the sick, without the
2892.ed occupied with deep, but most pleasing thoughts. left her, who except for mome
2893.ant's mind were removed from surrounding objects, and conversing in a totally di
2894.from surrounding objects, and conversing in a totally dif- ferent sphere. Now a
2895.perfect and calm enjoyment sat unvarying upon her and then she would turn round
2896.nce, which was as yet prescribed feeling it an honor, and thinking it did her go
2897.cribed feeling it an honor, and thinking it did her good, to be in contact with
2898.hment, she said of the day, after giving her patient to her, smiling: "I think y
2899.after giving her patient to her, smiling: "I think you are much better, Miriam,
2900.evident!}^ pained softly: it and leaning over her, said title. Oh, do not, entre
2901. her thanks, for fear of further hurting Fabiola's feelings and they continued t
2902.ed a " I "fulfill little Towards evening Dionysius returned, and found so great
2903.urned, and found so great that, ordering more nourishing food, he perquiet conve
2904. so great that, ordering more nourishing food, he perquiet conversation. said Fa
2905.st duty, which my heart has been burning to I discharge, that of thanking you, w
2906.burning to I discharge, that of thanking you, word, —not — wish I knew a str
2907.d I vile to my own on heart, by teaching me to imdervakie what I cannot but priz
2908.ot but prize as an unrivalled reflecting it, act of virtue. since I have been it
2909.sed it, and my I heart has been yearning to speak to you of and even yet dare no
2910.er, in who was now raised to a reclining position, took hand between both hers a
2911. took hand between both hers and turning round towards a soft and mild, but most
2912., stripes, heir to ay, and its preceding ignominious and leave written in his wi
2913. her bosom, fixed on Fabiola's wondering eyes a look of heavenly inspiration, as
2914.Christian " ; For have only been fearing that you might not be a but it could no
2915.eet words, which your promise of guiding me. Now as tell you just now uttered, w
2916.ped the master-key of our whole teaching : the alembic of your fine understandin
2917.: the alembic of your fine understanding has extracted, and condensed into one t
2918.hen you spoke sacrifice, God alone being a victim worthy of God ? " "Yes; but of
2919.res and together, like the I ; springing one from another. thought bore only the
2920.ravel; yet perhaps simple to a confiding mind. If, in my present ignorance, I ca
2921.ore, now," rejoined the patient, smiling, "you have I will, there- again seized
2922. will accept His, as that of an unerring God." Fabiola bowed her head, and liste
2923.are the unfathomable Wisdom, overflowing on earth. Miriam expounded, in the simp
2924.achsublime doctrine of the Trinity ; ing, the then after relating man, unfolded
2925.e Trinity ; ing, the then after relating man, unfolded the mystery of the Incarn
2926.d the mystery of the Incarnation, giving, in the very words of St. John, the his
2927.His wisdom, the evidence His life-giving life, which it to Him ? Shall He take u
2928.s place in a double genealogy, receiving thus into Himself a twofold father?" "
2929.ll there be call any one on earth daring and high enough to himself His No," sof
2930. Bright as could only redeem, by keeping extraneous to itself. the blood of Adam
2931.e breath of the of God sent it sparkling through his veins, pure as the flesh of
2932.pure as the flesh of Eve, while standing yet in the mould Almighty hands, as the
2933. drew it from the side of the slumbering man, were the blood and the flesh, whic
2934.ry and should, in preference to allowing themselves to be ties, yoked, even by t
2935.us life, youth. His active but suffering public and then His ignominious Passion
2936.ted by the tears and sobs of the willing listener and ready learner. At last the
2937.e who cannot say she was ignorant, thing ; for she pretended to know every nor t
2938.at the death which was the ran- ; soming, of fied ? Him whom she has mocked at,
2939.eech. Miriam waited till their relieving flow had subsided into that gentler dew
2940.which softens the heart then in soothing ; tones addressed her as follows: In th
2941.ntensely. His gracious and condescending familiarity with sinners, and His singu
2942.allen. loved still more; and, forgetting herself, she only thought love, how she
2943.st her herself. " so that it might bring honor, however slight, to Him, and sham
2944.as defended by Jesus against the carping gibes His host she was told that she wa
2945.ound her miswas not yet completed) lying She at her feet, over which she had sob
2946. selfunderstood at once the full meaning and humiliation she did not stir, but t
2947.e had been accepted. Fabiola, on awaking, crept back to her own couch, as she th
2948.E XXXIII. MIRIAM'S HISTORY. next morning, when Dionysius came, he found both pat
2949. congratulated them both on rest. having had a good night's at the idea ; Both l
2950. Both laughed it but concurred in saying that had been the happiest night of the
2951.ysius was surprised, till Miriam, taking the hand of Fabiola, said " Venerable p
2952.he wife of Fabius." : ately after giving " "My mother!" exclaimed Fabiola. "She
2953.t that her life spirit has been hovering about you through you, guiding the thro
2954. hovering about you through you, guiding the throne of who guards you unseen to
2955. And, before God, she has been unceasing in her supplicaby the side of the angel
2956.ent up to the side of Miriam, and taking her hand, said to her in a low, soft vo
2957.rentiIt was her delight to make by being the ready messenger between the ana, th
2958.k-room and the rest of the house. During her imparted illness, as her strength i
2959.s they throw some light on our preceding narrative, before our story commenced,
2960.was wilful and artful, with of preparing for no love for any restraint upon his
2961.ginative, and more under But women being ness. in any fancies of the sway of the
2962.model of virtue, simple and unpretending. It was a period, we may observe, in wh
2963.Antioch was renowned of for the learning of its philosophers, some whom were emi
2964.seen symptoms of her husband's impending ruin; and, determined that her daughter
2965. and be made available towards relieving their embarrassments. And on her death-
2966.arrange- would ment. allow, after coming of age, any alteration Matters grew wor
2967.ly looked upon him as at once a blessing and a curse, the bearer both of salvati
2968.ions it is sufficient to add, that being the elder brother, but con- scious that
2969.ter character did not him for sustaining the position of head of the family and
2970. of head of the family and administering quietly a settled property, and having
2971.g quietly a settled property, and having a haughty ambition to raise his house i
2972.ed, he told Orontius that he had nothing died. to leave him, that all he had liv
2973.d the understood principle, that nothing was too great or too little, nothing to
2974.ing was too great or too little, nothing too good or too after the ruin wicked t
2975. both in obedience to her mother's dying and because she had in view the establi
2976.mission of fratricide —he —shrinking yet hie thought had almost done somethi
2977.et hie thought had almost done something virtuous, as the brothers of Joseph ima
2978.of Joseph imagined they did, by adopting a slower and with an obnoxious brother.
2979.other. less sanguinary method of dealing Stratagem and unseen violence, of succe
2980.have already mentioned that of reserving the Blessed Euchar- home for domestic c
2981.f our Lord, she was deterred from daring to touch it, by fire rising up from it.
2982. from daring to touch it, by fire rising up from it." aperire, igne De Lapsis. f
2983.ed our narrative, was the outer covering in which Miriam's mother had preserved
2984. continued One day, early in the morning, she knelt before her ark and after fer
2985.Him. Like her, too, " as she was weeping she stooped down and looked" again into
2986. wealth. He was on the point of yielding to her tears and supplications, when Eu
2987. him, then himself addressed her, saying " Miriam, we take you at your word. We
2988.u offer ? " " I will surrender any thing, all I have, to rescue from profanation
2989.k the pen in her hand, and after running her eye over the document, signed it. I
2990.al renunonly the faster in his unsparing gripe. ciation of her rights was exacte
2991. given to her of the necessity of moving, as Oron- and his friend intended to pr
2992.neck what she had given proof of valuing, more than any wealth. For, as St. Ambr
2993.necks the Holy Eucharist, when embarking for a voyage.* We need not say that Mir
2994.ore it securely folded in the only thing of price she cared to take from her fat
2995.ssel was out at sea, instead of coasting towards Joppe or any port on the coast,
2996.captain stood straight out, as if making for some distant shore. What his purpos
2997. Like Satyrus, Miriam attribher reaching the shoi-e in safety to the precious bu
2998.ear Cyprus. ; live besides, on returning to Antioch, reported her death, togethe
2999.ath, together with that of the remaining passengei'S and crew. She was picked up
3000.m, under the name of Syra, came to bring salvation character, to the house of Fa
3001.th he replied her. On his him and asking him ness, " going down to name and busi
3002. On his him and asking him ness, " going down to name and busi- My I name, noble
3003.rd, and he shall least." You are running no risks now at She gave instructions,
3004. in a more laborious task, that of going through every the whole of her late fat
3005.late father's accounts, and ascertaining be made. case of injury or oppression,
3006.ppression, that restitution might having ascertained that Corvinus had really ob
3007.rough life. These temporal matters being soon disposed of, she divided her atten
3008.ortion of her household, to a The spring had set in, spot dear to both, the Nome
3009. for instance, when he had been treating of the virtue and meaning " of the sign
3010. been treating of the virtue and meaning " of the sign of the cross to be used i
3011.ady, "in the course and at the beginning of every work, on coming in and going o
3012.t the beginning of every work, on coming in and going out, when putting on their
3013.ng of every work, on coming in and going out, when putting on their clothes, or
3014.on coming in and going out, when putting on their clothes, or sandals, when they
3015.he middle of the grounds, was an opening, surrounded above by a low parapet, con
3016.a went down herself, distress at finding poor and perfectly dead. with a Tew ser
3017.ants, and what was her Emerentiana lying weltering in her blood, which gave ligh
3018.what was her Emerentiana lying weltering in her blood, which gave light and air
3019.ated and loved. for it Early one morning, beautiful and calm, she observed half-
3020.t a few weeks to Easter, she was looking in that direction, when who on their wa
3021.on their way to angle in the neighboring Anio, were taking a short cut across th
3022.gle in the neighboring Anio, were taking a short cut across the villa, 0]3ening;
3023.g a short cut across the villa, 0]3ening; others. and so committing a trespass.
3024.lla, 0]3ening; others. and so committing a trespass. They passed by this and one
3025.y passed by this and one of them, having looked down, called the is "This " one
3026."This " one of those underground lurking-places of the Christians." One of their
3027.ed down more silence. carefully, shading his eyes from the light, called the oth
3028.threw down a volley of them at something They laughed very heartily as they went
3029.ves with close at hand, below. ; pelting it. When self others were stirring she
3030.lting it. When self others were stirring she mentioned the occurrence, that the
3031.What was down to her distress at finding poor Emerfoster-sister's It pray at her
3032.ster-sister's It pray at her tomb, lying weltering in her blood, and perfectly d
3033.r's It pray at her tomb, lying weltering in her blood, and perfectly dead. that,
3034.d, and perfectly dead. that, the evening before, was discovered passing by some
3035.e evening before, was discovered passing by some Pagan orgies near uuei y,iru w
3036.s near uuei y,iru w the liver, and being invited to join in them, she had not on
3037.d from their fury into the faint Feeling herself there to pray. and wounded, she
3038.on account of the persecution. By living at the very entrance into a cemetery, a
3039.ly or petitioners t baptism. Once in ing the first, this last class, they had to
3040.rived from this custom. Any one perusing the present rite of baptism in the Cath
3041. ; repe- baptism on another the touching of the ears as it and nostrils, or the
3042.secution which the Church was undergoing. enough for us to have shown, how not o
3043.f our example is thought worth following, some one will perhaps illustrate a bri
3044.of Fabiola and her household had nothing joy. to but purely spiritual The titles
3045.istery. Early, therefore, on the morning of the auspicious day, the city, party
3046.ls to the opposite side of the following the Via and Portuensis, or road that le
3047.Our Father. rtrb w brated as the resting-place of the Persian martyrs, SS. Abdon
3048.rtyrs, SS. Abdon and Sennen. The morning was spent towards evening the solemn in
3049.n. The morning was spent towards evening the solemn in prayer office, and prepar
3050.who was thrice immersed in the purifying waters. The whole remains to this day,
3051.r the water is now to be seen a painting of probably a St. John two baptizing la
3052.ing of probably a St. John two baptizing later. our Lord, added century or Immed
3053. long and embrace was her first greeting of Miriam. for all that Both were so ha
3054.heir Fabiola' s grand idea and absorbing pride, that day was, that risen to the
3055.s of the an eternal kingdom, as a living member body of mr : Christ, as admitted
3056.me noticed the shortened breath, heaving chest of her dear it sister. and She wo
3057.n the Miriam's side morrow. That evening they felt kept their Easter banquet to
3058.whom she had She never remembered having enjoyed so delightful side, a supper. E
3059.htful side, a supper. Early next morning, Miriam called Fabiola to her and with
3060.abiola to her and with a fond, caressing manner, which she had never before disp
3061. Fabiola was overpowered with then going to leave me? ever as sisters together.
3062.ed, but a tear was in her eye, as taking her hand, she pointed up towards heaven
3063.Pray to God, who will refuse you nothing, that I may not lose you. It is sister'
3064. Do get well : I am sure tlifere nothing serious in the matter; the warm weather
3065.ll sit again together Campaby the spring, and talk over better things than philo
3066. A maiden brave, a martyr great. Eesting in sight of bastioned gate. From harm t
3067. pure and faithful sighs." Administering the Sacrament of Extreme Unction, in th
3068.f good tidings." On the Sunday following, " Sunday of the white garments," Diony
3069.. "The hour " is come," said she, taking Fabiola' s hand. Forgive me, if I have
3070.hand. Forgive me, if I have been wanting in duty to you, and in good example." T
3071.St. Augustine mentions a priest's saying Mass in a house supposed to be infested
3072. her forehead, joyful, at length raising her hand then bringing sign. it to her
3073.at length raising her hand then bringing sign. it to her breast, it fell dead th
3074.er breast, it fell dead there, in making the saving A smile passed over her face
3075.it fell dead there, in making the saving A smile passed over her face, and she e
3076.ST. ^E appear to ourselves to be walking in solitude. One by and actions, one, t
3077.al? very dreary. We have been describing not an ordinary period of peace and eve
3078.ck around us the ? We have been reviving memory of the cruellest persecution whi
3079.t was proposed to erect a column bearing the inscription that the Christian name
3080.eir dominions. Like one of those rolling storms which go over half the world, vi
3081.s which go over half the world, visiting various laoClXEBIAS. After amedal in th
3082. ofFrance, countries with their ravaging energy, while their gloomy foreboding o
3083.ng energy, while their gloomy foreboding or sullen wake simultaneously overshado
3084.one country, then on another, destroying every thing Christian, passing from Ita
3085. then on another, destroying every thing Christian, passing from Italy to Africa
3086.estroying every thing Christian, passing from Italy to Africa, from Upper Asia t
3087. actual peace, but hung like a blighting storm-cloud over the entire empire. And
3088.nflicts, that the foundations were being laid of a mighty system, destined to pr
3089.cted on Christians, his very eyes having stalled from their sockets, and Liciniu
3090.red to destroy, stood young and blooming as ever, about to enter into her great
3091.in the year 313 that Constantino, having defeated Maxentius, gave full liberty t
3092.his great change. It was like the coming forth, and tearful though happy greetin
3093.forth, and tearful though happy greeting, of the inhabitants of a city decimated
3094.lso ordered public or private, belonging to Christians and confiscated, to be re
3095.l The Church was soon in motion to bring out all the resources of her beautiful
3096.basilicas ; and either the most existing uses, or were converted to her built on
3097.et not the reader fear that we are going to lead him forward into a long history
3098.ualified, The the task of free unfolding the grandeur and charms of Labanim or C
3099.mise from above, spread like an inviting paradise before our feet we must lead o
3100.on, and likewise more fully establishing her organization. * f The ceremony empl
3101. peace had hung down their heads, having by some act of Aveak condescension esca
3102.urned hand mutilated or when his halting gait showed that the tendons of the kne
3103.ola's villa. Scaffold-poles are standing up in place of the first bricks, marble
3104.by a vision, and completely cured. Being now baptized, she was repaying her debt
3105.ed. Being now baptized, she was repaying her debt of gratitude, by building over
3106.aying her debt of gratitude, by building over her tomb her beautiful basilica. S
3107.he city to her ; ; villa, after spending the day in attending to the sick, in an
3108.lla, after spending the day in attending to the sick, in an hospital established
3109.ola, who had ever treasured up the dying words is whom of Miriam, eagerly asked,
3110.lesale murders, adopted this of treating Christians towards the end of the perse
3111.r replied " In the course of the morning I noticed, among the crowd, a man not y
3112.inued the fossor, "he arose, and drawing from his bosom a most beautiful and spa
3113.his bosom a most beautiful and sparkling ring, he laid it on her tomb. I thought
3114.osom a most beautiful and sparkling ring, he laid it on her tomb. I thought I ha
3115., many years ago." "And then?" " Turning round he saw me, and recognized I my dr
3116. my dress. He approached me, and looking in could feel him trembling, ' : as, wi
3117. and looking in could feel him trembling, ' : as, without my face, he timidly as
3118.he, more than an hour, then, approaching the tomb, and retired." Torquatus, it i
3119.riam, ! thou hadst, then, this consoling foresight in death Noe and the Ark, as
3120. STRANGER IN II. ROME. ARLT next morning, the pilgrim was passing through the Fo
3121.LT next morning, the pilgrim was passing through the Forum, when he round atten-
3122.ered whom to they were evidently teasing. He would have tion paid but a little s
3123. he looked older than he was, from being wan and attenuated, the other did so He
3124.th blotches and boils. A drunken cunning swam in his eye, and his gait and tone
3125."Ay, ay, Corvinus," one youth was saying to him, "won't you get your deserts, no
3126.you not heard that Constantino is coming this year to Rome, and don't you think
3127. we feared it, when much more from being the very contrary. bloated, with a face
3128. out of permitted." * fear, by declaring all religions to be equally "That is al
3129.supposed that he cuted on them; is going to look up those who for took an active
3130.e for stripe, " ? lex talionis,\ burning burning, and wild beast for wild beast
3131.ripe, " ? lex talionis,\ burning burning, and wild beast for wild beast "Who "Wh
3132.o "Why, says so?" asked Corvinus turning pale. it would surely be very natural,"
3133.And " very just," added another. turning Christian. Oh, never mind," said Corvin
3134.ey will always let one off for any thing, rather than stand — And, I am sure,
3135.an fury, !/' told the youngster, running away. you how you were to die," shouted
3136.f: crtr® ; and with pared it a piercing shriek. As they were passing by the Col
3137. a piercing shriek. As they were passing by the Coliseum, near the dens of the w
3138.the animal, by gestures and words saying: "Very likely, indeed, that you are to
3139.e enraged animal made a inflicted spring at him, and through the wide its fangs,
3140.rocure a surgeon, who was long in coming and, in the meantime, did his best ; ;
3141. fox! my fox Do you remember our hunting together those hateful Where have you b
3142.ill But I have found the remedy, and ing." make it known is to you, as soon as t
3143.he worst whereof he himself was a living proof. of sinners The unhappy man seeme
3144.tupor; if he listened, not comprehending what was said. At length his kind instr
3145.d. At length his kind instructor, having expounded to him the fundamental myster
3146.in hope, rather than certainty, of being attended " to, went on to say And now,
3147.s all this of It is by Baptism, by being born again Ghost." water and the Holy "
3148.imed the sick man loathingly. " By being washed in the laver of regenei'ating wa
3149.ing washed in the laver of regenei'ating water." He was interrupted by a convuls
3150.ence against out God and man. on moaning thus And then, when this subsided, he w
3151., within, without tion. ! comes creeping up, all round me, And he beat nearer an
3152.ed, and he blew at it round Then turning towards his sorrowful attendants, he wo
3153.ut it out? you see it is already burning me." Thus passed the dreary day, and th
3154.he raised himself up in bed, and looking ing. with half-glazed eyes straight bef
3155.aised himself up in bed, and looking ing. with half-glazed eyes straight before
3156.l baptism, or that of istered by pouring or sprinkling persons confined to their
3157.that of istered by pouring or sprinkling persons confined to their beds was admi
3158.er on the head. book xi. c. 11. is going to fly at my throat. if It comes ! Oh !
3159. And with a convulsive grasp, as pulling the beast from off his throat, he pluck
3160. the bed. His friend saw how unrepenting persecutors died. The Sacrifice of Abra
3161. 1 CHAPTER AND LAST. III HE next morning, the pilgrim proceeded to discharge the
3162.th by the first related in the preceding chapter. He might have been seen busily
3163.ve been seen busily em- ployed inquiring after some one about the Januses in the
3164.ate time, * and the number corresponding to the entries was drawn out, and exami
3165.." ; " I thought as much at good morning, sir. I shall be happy to accommodate y
3166. A great fool that for must say, begging his pardon," he added, when was out of
3167.rdon," he added, when was out of hearing. With a decided step and a brighter cou
3168. the Nomentan way and after again paying his devotions in the the stranger ; cry
3169. There seemed to be an all understanding, instinctive to both, that obliterated
3170.mained at in home that and the preceding day, hopes of the stranger's return. to
3171.ed. a fountain, when Torquatus, pointing to her, She rose, as she saw the long-e
3172.ugh her, when she found herself standing in his presence. " Madam," he " I said,
3173.epaid you so richly. to one Only morning I have learnt your mercy claim upon you
3174.rom the world in desert places, dividing their day, and even their night, betwee
3175.y, and even their night, between singing the Divine praises, contemplation, and
3176.nce for our past transgressions, fasting, mourning, and prayer form the great du
3177.r past transgressions, fasting, mourning, and prayer form the great duty of our
3178.oubled me, and prevented left my feeling complete assurance of safety even after
3179. debt, which must have been accumulating at a frightful rate of Yet it interest,
3180.est, till it had reached an overwhelming amount. was an obligation deliberately
3181.leaf was a poor cenobite,* barely living on the produce mats that I could weave,
3182. up — At any myself. went this morning to the Forum, found my creditor's exami
3183.mbly "Else, rise," said Fabiola, turning " away her weeping eyes. You are no bon
3184.said Fabiola, turning " away her weeping eyes. You are no bondsman of mine, but
3185.rother in our common Lord." Then sitting down with him, she said " Orontius, I h
3186. length, when was exhausted, and nothing re- mained but a few with which, jewels
3187.urged up the odious office of denouncing Christians; for a furious persecution w
3188.; for a furious persecution was breaking out. For the first time in my life I re
3189. a little clear stream ran down, issuing from a In this rock we spring in a rock
3190.n, issuing from a In this rock we spring in a rock at the head of the valley. sa
3191. a sound could be heard but the bubbling of the water. fearful speech. when Euro
3192.s. would know the end of its " So saying, he drew sizes, forth one, handed me th
3193.gths. But a sort I still refused, having no wish to die. he seized me of demonia
3194.a giant's grasp, as back, and exclaiming, ' I sat on the ground, threw me on my
3195.e contents of the phial, without sparing me a drop, down niy throat. "In an inst
3196. bless God with all my heart, for having ; spared me. That old man was Hilarion,
3197. Hilarion, a native of Gaza, who, having many years with the holy Anthony in Egy
3198. my ; won on me sister; so that yielding to grace, I bewailed my sins at the fee
3199.end to do now ? " " Set out this evening on my return. I have accomplished " ; t
3200. ; my will second was to lay an offering on the shrine of Agnes. You remember,"
3201. Agnes. You remember," he added, smiling, that your good * A. D. 303. t Confessi
3202. best that remained in Eurotas's keeping her." so I brought "But have you means
3203.e me every wiiere sustenance and lodging but I will accept from ; you a cup of w
3204. name of a They rose, and were advancing towards the house, when a fell woman fe
3205.gh the shrubs, and : at their exclaiming " Oh, save kill me " ! ! dear mistress,
3206. ! dear mistress, save me He is pursuing me, to me Fabiola recognized, in the po
3207.ity "What, have you really been thinking of this, Ju! Oh why did I ever leave yo
3208.because I hinted this to my this morning, he has beaten me, life. husband take m
3209.od, I have been and threatened to making myself acquainted with Christian doctri
3210.hristian doctrines, through the teaching of a friend." "How long has this bad tr
3211.iosity. him, is my "How was most racking recollection." that?" asked Orontius, w
3212.us, with eager "Why, when he was leaving Rome, he asked me to prepare for him tw
3213.elf. I When he came them, was just going to explain to him, that, contrary to ap
3214.ked at one another in silence, wondering at the just dispensations of Providence
3215. a shriek from the woman. fied at seeing They were liorri- an arrow quivering in
3216.ing They were liorri- an arrow quivering in her bosom. As Fabiola In the support
3217. In the supported her, Orontius, looking behind him, caught a glimpse of a black
3218.aught a glimpse of a black face grinning hideously through the fence. moment wit
3219. his bow next a Numidian was seen flying away on his horse, bent, Parthian-wise
3220. its haste, Orontius," Fabiola, pointing to the fountain. He was and coming alre
3221.nting to the fountain. He was and coming already at basin, filling full his inst
3222.was and coming already at basin, filling full his instantly, poured their conten
3223. head of ; the poor African, pronouncing the words of baptism of expiation. and,
3224.ed with her blood After this distressing, yet consoling, scene, they entered the
3225.od After this distressing, yet consoling, scene, they entered the house, and ins
3226.ss of the house, so strongly contrasting with the luxurious splendor of Fabiola'
3227.us splendor of Fabiola's former dwelling. was arrested, or casket, set But sudde
3228.nly the frame of to be seen. Approaching nearer, he read inscribed on it " The b
3229.t staggered. this, Fabiola saw and going up to him kindly and frankly, placed -h
3230.y, but not therefore despond." So saying she drew aside the curtain, and Orontiu
3231.his own, and his sister's history. lying much conUpon it were ; two sharp weapon

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/