Concordance for Everybody's St. Francis : by Maurice Francis Egan... with pictures by M. Boutet de Monvel.

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1.   cis of Assist . 3 II. III. The Beginning of the New Life The Wolf of Gubbio and 
2. w Life The Wolf of Gubbio and the Coming of Santa Clara 45 ... . 90 127 IV, St.
3. Bernardone, as a child, Francis kissing the hand walking with his parents Page
4. child, Francis kissing the hand walking with his parents Page 5 16 of a leper F
5. he head of a band of his pleasure-loving companions Francis carrying a stone for
6. asure-loving companions Francis carrying a stone for the reconstruction of the c
7. amien 36 Assisi St. Francis distributing gold to the poor of ... ... 58 67 77 in
8. 58 67 77 in Assisi St. Francis receiving food from a peasant woman to a beggar w
9. n to a beggar woman Brother Giles giving his clothes from St. Francis receiving
10. g his clothes from St. Francis receiving permission to preach repentance Pope In
11. nocent St. St. III Β°^ Francis consoling the friar who doubted his affection . 9
12. s affection . 93 100 Francis subjugating the wolf of Gubbio Children of Assisi f
13. olf of Gubbio Children of Assisi feeding the wolf of Gubbio Clara receiving her
14. eding the wolf of Gubbio Clara receiving her sister Agnes St. .... 105 116 Franc
15. and Brother Masseo St. Francis preaching to the people of Assisi 164 Santa Clara
16. i 164 Santa Clara and her sister waiting on St. Francis ... 177 Death of St. Fra
17. is possible that Francis was born during the last week of year 1181.^ there is S
18. st of Lucius Varius Rufus who, according to Browning, in the vestibule of the ba
19. Varius Rufus who, according to Browning, in the vestibule of the bath at Rome,
20. mitated the Emperor Augustus by assuming the guise and the garb of a mendicant,
21. ce a year Augustus begged through Asking and taking alms of who fear, may pass,
22. ugustus begged through Asking and taking alms of who fear, may pass, And I submi
23. hance and change of things.^ so averting, if ^Browning: "Imperante Augusto Natus
24. ge of things.^ so averting, if ^Browning: "Imperante Augusto Natus est." The dat
25. h is uncertain, some authorities placing it in 1 182. [4] FRANCIS BERNADONE, AS
26. ] FRANCIS BERNADONE, AS A CHILD, WALKING WITH HIS PARENTS YOUTH OF Francis, as S
27. than that of the emperor's. ITALY DURING THE LIFE OF ST. FRANCIS Italy β€” if we
28. €” if we may speak of the atoms striving In those to fly apart as Italy β€” was
29. se to fly apart as Italy β€” was longing for free- dom in a dim, half-hearted wa
30. nderstood. And there was great rejoicing in Assisi in 1198 when the German and I
31. t in the least hinder them from opposing the pope in other temporal matters, if
32. ; the strength of the empire was growing in the Two Sicilies, and that young pan
33. , graceful, and treacherous, was gaining strength in a palace in Palermo for his
34. lace in Palermo for his chance to spring. It was not a happy time greater for th
35. their belief in the value of advertising. They were practical. in this The ness,
36. the end of the twelfth and the beginning of the thirteenth century were not exce
37. o propitiate the (see gods by professing to be too mean for their arrows to pier
38. for their arrows to pierce him Browning's "Impe- rante Augusto Natus est") were
39. ed to their patron saints for the coming of a fat-pursed victim; the opulent lor
40. o passionate tears and curses by telling how the Roman gave up the meek Christ t
41. n gave up the meek Christ to the waiting desire for mob, or a sudden wealth or w
42. life of the Catholic Church. In judging the conditions of the time of Francis o
43. e Middle Ages the sacra- mental teaching about which the celebration mass center
44. central truths of life. Without knowing what the sacrifice of the mass stood fo
45. s of evolution. It is of Ufe the meaning and necessary, too, to comprehend the m
46. t against his teachings, and had nothing to do in with those new doctrines frequ
47. h those new doctrines frequently arising and with in Italy in the time of St. Fr
48. ike than that surround[13] EVERYBODY ing S ST. FRANCIS happy mother's in the arb
49. hen he lay in his arms under the glowing grapes near his father's house. And of
50. xuries he could give his own, not caring much who wept one of the with cold and
51. lived in her own land, and Peter, coming home and finding his little son, change
52. land, and Peter, coming home and finding his little son, changed his name from J
53. ey might act as buffers between the king and the and they accepted the mission.
54. ordinance to save the priest from siding with the nobles. There were convents wh
55. the consciousness that they were making a proper compromise between the perfect
56. cted; and their conditions were becoming and more all more despicable in the eye
57. ld is to be the best method of relieving the wretched soul from accursed. the we
58. Gnosticism were revived. strange reading of the book of Christianity and society
59. d In vain Pope Inno- cent III, occupying the most dangerous and insecure positio
60. not constitute and they were as nothing without love. The is little Francis was
61. ild, and Francis exterior had a charming youth. Besides, his do but spoil him. i
62. him. in childhood and mother had nothing to Peter Bernardone was rich enough to
63. ere always on her The first poet to sing the Italian speech was nurtured in the
64. s Umbrian stem. And Madonna Pica, making her little boy Francis a poet and a kni
65. ancis a poet and a knight, began the ing of the saint to Italy makto who was to
66. the antichrist, then unhappily reigning, not with the sword and lance of Pica's
67. nder at and admire without understanding, his success. Thomas facts of of Celano
68. ell that this attractive young stripling, better versed in the tales of the pala
69. the paladins than in the art of reading and writing, was in the eyes of the wor
70. s than in the art of reading and writing, was in the eyes of the world not only
71. at high point of view, too. THE BRINGING UP OF THE BOY For of of mind and the di
72. on He his, could afford to give anything that the most arrogant lord could give
73. rrogant lord could give and the charming Francis, with his romantic and fashiona
74. redicted that this cheerful and charming son of hers would in time do great work
75. er, "in the dominions religious painting what the hymn is in poetry," was first
76. of his son in the invention and carrying out of Besides, as a shrewd mer- chant,
77. , satin and velvet, he wished for making windows and balconies bright in the day
78. ic on the air.^ Β»This and the following quotations are from Dante Gabriel Rosse
79. e of the early of Francis appear a thing more evil than really In July both the
80. you and me; Of partridges and youngling pheasants sweet. Folgore ends his twelv
81. olgore ends his twelve sonnets by taking my thought of his best friend Were Than
82. ncis was rude to a poor bored him during business hours, man who chant. for the
83. d. *'But he came in the name of the King of kings! How much better should you ha
84. And after the poor man he went, leaving a crowd of customers to wait until he h
85. stomers to wait until he had made loving amends. THE DAWNING OF THE SPIRITUAL Im
86. l he had made loving amends. THE DAWNING OF THE SPIRITUAL Imperial absolutism no
87. his children. communal freedom. burning with the ardor of a knight, seeing the
88. rning with the ardor of a knight, seeing the vision of Charlemagne and Oliver an
89. ay things in that had an earnest meaning. year 1205 he had not found himself. No
90. badours for their hidden were as nothing. fine. He longed to do something great
91. nothing. fine. He longed to do something great and Just as he had gained strengt
92. teered to join him, and Francis, glowing with enthusiasm, offered to be his squi
93. his squire. and he started off, dazzling in his equipage and bearing a shield ga
94. ff, dazzling in his equipage and bearing a shield gallantly. Assisi expected him
95. ay of Francis, his magnificence; nothing for the But there a poor noble wretched
96. r noble wretchedly dressed and shivering with cold. Off went the trappings and t
97. eard a voice which seemed divine, asking him what was of the his aim in life. "E
98. id he was in love. "I am indeed thinking of a bride," noble, he said, "more more
99. entleness and innocence of his hero, ing Don Quixote. Francis Bernardone, seehow
100. roads was not then the magnificent thing Michelangelo made it, and the visitor w
101. ny beggars in the piazza, thus imitating unconsciously the great Augustus. He kn
102. ingly kissed the ulcers and the decaying His thoughts β€” features of his brothe
103. ew all the money he had, and was shining upon him. After this, the splendid youn
104. d the hospitals of the lepers, appearing to them he felt that a light like a liv
105. them he felt that a light like a living St. George, shining with glory. What he
106. light like a living St. George, shining with glory. What he most hated he had e
107. which was to make him, one with a being made in the Ukeness of God, God Himself
108. the vision of Spoleto gave meant. During his father's absence he He away everyth
109. s father's absence he He away everything that he could and him. his gentle give
110. uin." rebuild my house, which is falling into did Francis took the message Utera
111. is took the message Uterally. He meaning. not see that it had even a greater The
112. ian tissues to decorate a balcony during the carnival processions stuffs the cor
113. l for the priest of Damian that, fearing Peter's anger, he into refused the mone
114. ch of the money, at the same time vowing vengeance on YOUTH OF his son, ST. FRAN
115. eyond the Assisi said that understanding of all Assisi. the once-applauded Franc
116. his mother. appealed Peter, to returning consuls. from a journey, declared Franc
117. ncis to the Bishop of Assisi that, being devoted to God, he was responsible only
118. bishop advised him to give up everything, so that his father might be appeased.
119. e praised the Lord in the woods, singing to his brother the wind and to his sist
120. Provencal speech, which in the beginning of his mission was his preferred tongue
121. rt fell the hardest blow of this parting, for she loved him more than her wretch
122. d in a and with naked passer-by, begging stones from each that the church of St.
123. e finished implacable father and mocking brother resisted the sunshine of his sm
124. orest of the poor. [44] II THE BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE IRANCIS now a free felt
125. ent and peace could come to every loving poverty. being only by honoring and say
126. ould come to every loving poverty. being only by honoring and saying; but the In
127. y loving poverty. being only by honoring and saying; but the In his day this was
128. verty. being only by honoring and saying; but the In his day this was a hard man
129. when the Western world was in the making, men ardently desired peace. But peace
130. cis, this prince had from [46] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE his childhood hved in a
131. fe. An Itahan by birth, but representing been the cause of imperial domination,
132. ecclesiasts, JuUan the Apostate. willing And yet he was the same man who was Boh
133. IS her spouse were St. Clare, protesting that, Christ, he would not have He kept
134. Luther proved the force of his training by breaking great breaches in the syste
135. ed the force of his training by breaking great breaches in the system which had
136. dogma of the times that the land-owning clergy must be directed nobility, it ag
137. ity, it against the powerful land-owning with its hereditary privileges. Thus wa
138. and temporally powerful. [481 BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Francis with sorrow; fo
139. nd were especially conians, by enriching the clergy, "buffers" between adept in
140. clergy, "buffers" between adept in using them as little or arrogant themselves a
141. f the principle of heredity among giving bates. all possible met it by wealth an
142. ically made a dependence of the limiting absolutism in German Empire. was progre
143. lutism in German Empire. was progressing in felt Law Germany, but In the Sicilie
144. for his own support. of Germany, during the great struggle Barbarossa for supre
145. e selves to him. more and more attaching them- When his time came, all this made
146. al life Italy was a place [50] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE of Without the temporal
147. ll a part of a rich organization knowing the panoply of war. Yet Francis, who wr
148. ANCIS to be received either for clothing or for books, or as the price of any la
149. s therefore take care lest, after having left all things, we lose the kingdom of
150. other, a thief, a robber, and one having a purse, unless he should become truly
151. forbidden to collect money for anything or to help any one to seek or make mone
152. ther raved, his disappoint[52] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE ment working like madne
153. ] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE ment working like madness in his soul, or that Angel
154. at was to lead them, Cecco, the charming and boyish Cecco, was not with- out fri
155. here was the poor Damian's, who, knowing how had lived, how well he loved the lu
156. awakened to the fact that he was ceasing to be in training as an athlete It came
157. ct that he was ceasing to be in training as an athlete It came upon him that his
158. . friend the priest race for was holding him back in the Out he rushed from the
159. ut to finish his piece bread and willing to relinquish the crust, were astonishe
160. Giustiniani's mother, day. This blessing be with me forever! My hope and doubt w
161. ed his beads. And It is lost his echoing feet forever? probable that he did not
162. hat he did not go to his mother, knowing that he would not receive what he desir
163. nd God gave him pleasure [541 the eating; BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE for was not
164. him pleasure [541 the eating; BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE for was not there his d
165. A PANTHEISM ABOVE THE GOD PAN Following of his interpretation of the meaning St
166. ing of his interpretation of the meaning St. the vision, Francis, having restore
167. meaning St. the vision, Francis, having restored Damian's and rebuilding St. Pe
168. having restored Damian's and rebuilding St. Peter's, spent two years in St. the
169. y new of the Angels. The idea of forming a religious It order had not taken form
170. ould obey the voice. He thought of doing no more. He did not dare Theology he re
171. , to aspire to be a priest. but learning that did not concern itself immediately
172. es, in his belief, books were as nothing compared with men and the things of nat
173. brigand his creatures who were suffering because the Lady Poverty was despised,
174. arve or to steal. and love, the ravening wolf of the highest pantheism. He the a
175. s. of lepers, nor of learned In speaking he used only the words of the gospel, b
176. ature he was not [561 tall, not imposing, but his expression was joyful BEGINNIN
177. but his expression was joyful BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE and sweet; his smile wa
178. ho followed St. Dominic were cultivating in order that they might be, and dark,
179. t he mission. Mary full knew the meaning On that morning he assisted, proba- bly
180. ry full knew the meaning On that morning he assisted, proba- bly alone with the
181. est to your souls. For my [601 BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE yoke is sweet, and my b
182. was the reply. last. for the rebuilding of churches of brick and mortar did he
183. ortar did he exist, but for the building up of souls He understood at Not only w
184. , had run through the streets of calling out, "Well-being and peace," and had th
185. the streets of calling out, "Well-being and peace," and had then disappeared. o
186. valle. In that naive and like the loving collection of traditions that gathered
187. ked to the arms of the Crucified. During the two years Francis had spent in Assi
188. own Francis the boy and the youth. Being a serious man, first he marveled at the
189. i San Francesco Sabatier. [62] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE errant, might be capabl
190. capable Bernard, in a world of anything. Time good wore on. oppressed, as all m
191. barons, ecclesiastical and were playing the part of Judas for power and riches,
192. of oil. him by the He heard him "snoring loudly, in fashion as though he slept r
193. e slept right soundly." asleep, Thinking Bernard to be really [63] Francis rose
194. only that. he remained until the morning, still Rising at dawn, "My repeating th
195. remained until the morning, still Rising at dawn, "My repeating the sacred words
196. ing, still Rising at dawn, "My repeating the sacred words. Bernard said: "Brothe
197. eart propose is "Bernard," he "the doing of what you we must ask our Lord Jesus
198. pray God that by our three times opening the missal He will show us the way whic
199. m we ought to take." until terce, asking THE SCRIPTURAL TESTS Bernard a lawyer.
200. ll but Francis never took more BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE than one step at a time
201. or from St. Luke, he read, "Take nothing for staff, your journey, neither nor mo
202. cis had bought stones, used in repairing St. Damian's church, hearing that there
203. n repairing St. Damian's church, hearing that there was hard cash going for noth
204. , hearing that there was hard cash going for nothing, appeared and reminded Fran
205. at there was hard cash going for nothing, appeared and reminded Francis that he
206. od's servant? "Very Francis said, taking handfuls of gold from Bernard's bag and
207. s of gold from Bernard's bag and putting them into the bosom of Sylvester's robe
208. istrii- was spoken ST. FRANCIS RECEIVING FOOD FROM PEASANT WOMAN IN ASSISI A Β»^
209. EASANT WOMAN IN ASSISI A Β»^ ^ BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE every this, and in ever
210. ry this, and in every field. And hearing Agidius, sometimes called Brother Giles
211. ply three poor was a men of Assisi doing penance. robust man who Uked obedience
212. robust man who Uked obedience Searching for Francis in better than prayer. the
213. ter than prayer. the cool of the morning, he came to a cross-road. Whither shoul
214. e Francis then dwelt. himself was coming out. Giles begged that he of the Franci
215. es begged that he of the Francis Falling on his knees, might be admitted as one
216. id Francis, "God has given a great thing to thee. If the emperor should come to
217. ve no time fine clothes for the changing his of the "poor men" of Assisi. brown
218. an old v/oman in wretched rags, begging. of the Lord, dear brother," "For the l
219. obeyed, and his cheerfulness in obeying brought him instant peace and new pleas
220. ntended to be read in refectories during meals, there was a comparative disregar
221. aschal Robinson. Father [70] : BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE The four brothers set f
222. ise, or the thunder, could not In giving up all, make them less all. they had ga
223. e. He was ardent, direct, simple, aiming directly at the heart, and hitting the
224. iming directly at the heart, and hitting the core of the heart. Giles, who had n
225. ARE AROUSED But their success in moving hearts to the love of God and the amend
226. oung and chivalrous, who came, according to the words of Francis, "to exchange s
227. ther Morico, the privilege of occupying several little buildings at Rivo Torto,
228. f Francis said constantly [72] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE up their own that his f
229. The his father's old story of his having sold Foligno was reprecious stuffs for
230. wretched. to It is true that, according the precepts of Francis, the could find
231. uido by [73] everybody's He zeal leading ST. FRANCIS Was not his remonstrated wi
232. SUS POVERTY The bishop could say nothing to of his this. He and had troubles his
233. e for the church because she was growing in riches. Francis bishop. knew this to
234. and Bishop Guido himself [74] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE knew, too, that the bur
235. its vigilance he exercised in defending temporal appendages. Nevertheless, the
236. ympathy with beggars who might, by using some of their worldly goods, cease to b
237. ver small, is an obstacle to the leading of an absoAll brothers must work, lutel
238. Christlike life. that was but following the life of Christ, but they must work
239. si would not oppose him, the blood being thicker than water when alien Francis w
240. [76] ^ '^ r to PI o o r o H w BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Rome, Guido presented t
241. ests. He was most kind; but after having examined Francis and his brethren as to
242. lans, he told them that they were trying to knock their heads against a solid ro
243. gainst a solid rock. Francis was willing to do even this, if it pleased God. The
244. nnocent III S ST. FRANCIS It was walking. was not The people of Rome were turbul
245. e of Rome were turbulent and threatening. Not long since they had driven the pop
246. f Innocent. Arnold on the possession ing, of property was still vibrat- and at t
247. sion of queer hereall bent on destroying [80] vested interests. BEGINNING OF THE
248. troying [80] vested interests. BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE He had them humbly. dri
249. h the letter the evangelical was failing day by day. The pope said that he would
250. t the observperfection contains anything irrational or impossible to [81] ance a
251. CH IN 1210 The pope again sent to having prayed for Francis. And Francis, light,
252. father in a parable in which, according to St. Bonaventure, he told of a great
253. St. Bonaventure, he told of a great king who had married a beautiful, but lowly
254. ful, but lowly and poor, wife. This king nourished the children of this poor wom
255. rn of poverty? Had not Christ, preaching evangelical poverty, promis sulTi- ised
256. ernard. This great foundation, according to Bossuet, 'Timage la plus achevee de
257. eglise" lost much of its glory in losing its founder. Innocent across his HI hea
258. the memory [82] another vision BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE he had had, in which he
259. . At last he said: "Go with the blessing of the all Lord, and preach repentance
260. ather most humbly, and went away singing the praises of God. The Cardinal them t
261. much in the summer heat Campagna, having once been saved from starvation by a ma
262. from starvation by a man who, appearing suddenly, gave them bread and went away
263. bread and went away at the once. Having consulted with the brethren, Francis co
264. ry was the greater chances for spreading the love of made by God and the cities
265. had no books, but Francis [86] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE told them, looking of t
266. NNING OF THE NEW LIFE told them, looking of the upon the autumnal beauties valle
267. crowds that came. tween the ever-warring factions of his city, the patricians an
268. s a said a friar one night. solemn thing to this brother, and he dared not break
269. y and even sinful; and so, understanding his scruples, Francis Francis invited o
270. luxurious at an unusual time. in eating alone A sick brother longed for grapes,
271. The [88] friars dwelt at Rivo BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Torto until one day a p
272. r to pray mission," said Francis, taking this as a sign, "is not to keep a stabl
273. 9] Ill THE WOLF OF GUBBIO AND THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA RAN CIS was now free pri
274. to an unlayman's of accredited assuming the or- the dained. basis of prerogativ
275. uspect. Francis had desired the blessing of Innocent III for his way of life; bu
276. afterward substituted, implied a giving way for to the relaxation Francis prela
277. ned; it must be admitted that, excepting the people who concerned themselves pio
278. concerned themselves pious inwith making cheerful songs and the Francis had terp
279. paradise. He was looked on as the living symbol of Christ, must be repeated, tha
280. weetly, as light falls. In the beginning there were murmurs against this imprude
281. patient, or of Brother Giles, the loving and literal, or of Brother Junipero, wh
282. d red- and-white roses, and the changing sky, held great consolation for the lit
283. or the little band, and Francis, singing of the wonders of God in nature, kept l
284. y, How It could they be happy on nothing a day? must be remembered that at this
285. at at this time Francis was not thinking of improving the general condition of l
286. me Francis was not thinking of improving the general condition of labor. A begga
287. of a sudden the whole world was running loved, after him. Unless we have someto
288. , after him. Unless we have someto thing in our hearts that yearns to love as he
289. of the medieval heart. New came flocking to Portiuncula. brethren Brother Thomas
290. hey were priests, ever and anon cry- ing out in spiritual and vocal unison, "Our
291. Francis said to the man who was willing to give his money to his relatives, but
292. term of reproach. Fired by his preaching, an ardent young peasant, driving two o
293. aching, an ardent young peasant, driving two oxen, came in his way. "What shall
294. hat ox." The the old couple were willing to agree to this. The power permeates a
295. which his biographers agree. of reading the is And he had he loved. the gift mi
296. other was particularly unhappy, thinking that the dislike of Francis meant some
297. GuLbio) f 101 ] ST. FRANCIS SUBJUCiATING THE WOLF OF GUBBIO oiaauo TO THE WOLF O
298. way of largely because he understanding it. It cannot be in the least comprehen
299. Christ, his and he acted only according to nature; for wolves must eat. The cit
300. le, he went out to meet the wolf, making the sign of the cross. His brethren acc
301. addressed properly, happened β€” a thing which had never before, β€” and he was
302. had never before, β€” and he was willing to "you evil here, hear reason. ''Broth
303. ntinued Francis, have done great hunting and killing God's own without His permi
304. cis, have done great hunting and killing God's own without His permission, and n
305. hout His permission, and not only eating animals, but men created in the God; an
306. and was wilUng to But Francis, according manner of the Middle Ages, exacted a sy
307. isi fed him every day. This peace having been arranged, the wolf, much to the am
308. 's punishment, he with the wolf standing near him and are listening attentively,
309. wolf standing near him and are listening attentively, more terrible than the tee
310. of the oath, to keep him from returning to his pagan ways; and perhaps, after a
311. be tempted to find amusement by chasing the terrified houses. men of Assisi int
312. nocent, why did you let [1081 THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA yourselves be taken? you
313. you may increase and multiply, according to the comSee, I snatch mandment Franci
314. they Francis had given them his blessing. The mighty love in the heart of Franci
315. est saints of the view church concerning women has been blurred by over[1091 EVE
316. saints, who were men engaged of in doing noble acts for the love God, did not lo
317. tial passion, did not sur- render giving it it because up, he it was evil, but b
318. of the saints this [110] most THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA though he had saintly po
319. way to a convent. So when Clara, having listened to Francis in the cathedral of
320. e, and to follow him literally, becoming as absolutely poor as she could. She wa
321. to make a good marriage for the charming little Clara; but after she had heard F
322. ve no suitor, and at eighteen, according to the popular opinion of Assisi, was i
323. ion of Assisi, was in danger of becoming an old maid. not Juliet of Verona quite
324. uliet of Verona quite capable of falling in love at an earlier age? Thomas of Ce
325. iginem," et virtute β€” [112] THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA etc. The name of her mot
326. to mass arrayed in all for the blessing of the palms, the splendor of ments, as
327. custom. beautifully adorned, new spring garHer companions, to take the went for
328. Clara was born, and when a child, having no rosary, she made [113] EVERYBODY bea
329. er. S ST. FRANCIS Many of other edifying things were told On March and the night
330. old On March and the night the following 19, 1212, Clara, Monday, with her Aunt
331. ather's house. through the usual opening, for only those who never returned went
332. was that one saved one's soul in saving one's neighbor. all for Christ sacrific
333. inue his interpreted its Francis meaning. Since the holy church approved gospel.
334. ld have no doubt that he lived according to the counsels of the She would pray n
335. or would not pray; she [114] THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA by giving up all the lux
336. 114] THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA by giving up all the luxuries of her existence, b
337. e luxuries of her existence, by becoming utterly dependent on the will of God. H
338. amian's, that gray same, little building, to-day the olive-trees. among it its p
339. of his country. Her aunt and the saving ruin, for later it from "honorable comp
340. der of Poor Ladies. Her [118] THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA young sister Agnes soon
341. se was also provided for the ministering Franciscan priest and for the Zealots.
342. o be absolved of Christ." from following the way putting into Against the most v
343. Christ." from following the way putting into Against the most violent oppositio
344. do not msh to be absolved from following the way putting into of Gl^ Against the
345. absolved from following the way putting into of Gl^ Against the most violent op
346. FRANCIS A^J).THE TURTLE-X>0VE THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA ceeded in obtaining the
347. OMING OF SANTA CLARA ceeded in obtaining the bull from the pope authorizing her
348. ining the bull from the pope authorizing her communities to be entirely poor. HE
349. ity offered the bread of way of grasping it. Christians feared to in sacrifice.
350. he weak world was belief rapidly failing, the eyes of steps growing blinder, sha
351. pidly failing, the eyes of steps growing blinder, shambling, strength for virile
352. eyes of steps growing blinder, shambling, strength for virile acts ebbing, and c
353. ambling, strength for virile acts ebbing, and corruption walked abreast with sen
354. that raises the heart. In the beginning Clara of abbess. would not accept the p
355. her sisters, bathed the feet of serving-women, because they were poor and labor
356. She would often light the lamps and ring the bell for prayers before her communi
357. se. She would allow others to do nothing that she could do herself. Very often f
358. better part. All grace [124] THE COMING OF SANTA CLARA and even to believing si
359. ING OF SANTA CLARA and even to believing sinners, Francis was one of the physica
360. t have disturbed their peace. and sewing altar linen after for the friars, the T
361. en after for the friars, the The mending making of their were looked β€” all the
362. r for the friars, the The mending making of their were looked β€” all these thin
363. oubt ameliorations of the friars knowing how these amelioDuring a cold rations w
364. he friars knowing how these amelioDuring a cold rations were brought about. wint
365. ly managed this. Francis, humbly fearing the adoration seemed almost one. in of
366. elaxation of the rule which Rome, seeing through the eye of prudence sense, trie
367. t. Francis, which was to give a stunning blow to feudal privileges, was to succe
368. he Poor Ladies, common β€” β€” following implicitly in the way of Francis. [126
369. the all was end, his desires. beginning and the very substance of He wished to
370. ong for this union in love and suffering, Christ appeared to him at St. Damian's
371. tells us, as biographer, cross. a living figure upon the Eighteen years after th
372. t in the form says, of a seraph "leaving," as rewarded his ecstatic desire, the
373. wn of his But in 1213 the mystic longing had not been Crucified." his given to h
374. e language of his country. the beginning of his mission he had used the Provenca
375. he must reach their hearts by the living word, and so he sung his hymns to them
376. , and he seldom preached without singing. It was the custom of the [1281 ST. FRA
377. IS AND THE PEOPLE sermons with a rousing of Francis as friars to preface their h
378. LEYS John and Charles Wesley in mingling hymns with preaching and ejaculadiscipl
379. Wesley in mingling hymns with preaching and ejaculadisciples of The tions were
380. sciples of The tions were only following the If way of Francis. there is a curio
381. n. live solely in the practical blessing of love extended to all There were thos
382. d peace. was the burden of his preaching, "may to-morrow be a pillar of God's ho
383. of God's house." There were those living in the world who would become children
384. spouses life who loved each other during a long he obtained the This was grace t
385. would not tolerate. To Francis a singing brigand had more signs of grace than a
386. 134] ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE Browning caught an echo a place for Joy and Peac
387. uld the poor be joyful when the starving? rich hated them and gave them left nau
388. of the third order men and women living in the his Whereat wife [1351 Bona Donn
389. could, and gave away with a deep feeling of righteousness what they did not care
390. icitude." Martha, busy with much serving, was chided by the Lord because she ask
391. Brother Giles, "and were to have nothing to do beyond his own lips, he would hav
392. on by human means. God Himself, sending His Son as man, had done this He ; had
393. often a not irreverent way of admitting Visible that nothing invisible of human
394. nt way of admitting Visible that nothing invisible of human life is evil in itse
395. . This rule of love and peace, spreading through Italy, live in gave feudalism a
396. e goods of widows and orphans, enslaving these helpless creatures by making them
397. aving these helpless creatures by making them their wards. fostered THE FOUNDATI
398. defense of and their country." Swearing and of the dueling, and the common amus
399. ir country." Swearing and of the dueling, and the common amusements higher class
400. to form this society for persons living in the world. Luc- had been eager for s
401. in should drive out the joy of suffering for the love of God. But faith and pray
402. ous chalices for the service of the King of kings, yes, and pearls and velvet to
403. r those who would should serve according to the gospel there be nothing for thei
404. according to the gospel there be nothing for their own vanity. Magnificence was
405. l ST. FRANCIS thy sins?" asked the dying man. He answered, "I will." "Wilt thou
406. Why not?" "Because I have put everything in the hands of my relatives and friend
407. said, "his relatives him for not having left and them more than he did." The Br
408. s and Sisters of make restitution during their Penance must lives, and not wait
409. io and Bona Donna, and Francis, visiting their home, simple and peaceful, had as
410. that it Pope Honorius III had by placing In the brethren of the third order unde
411. ishop of Rimini. cities many Honokilling the brethren were highly taxed unless t
412. o could work, and would not, was sinning; the beggar who could not work, and yet
413. cessity as a curse instead of a blessing, likewise sinned. The paraphernalia gar
414. modern. Angelo had been a very charming and attractive youth, the of view, like
415. e fine flower of generations of breeding, delicate, view β€” a point Monte Casal
416. d these men could not even make a living, and so they went to beg; but Angelo, w
417. Driven from the door, the three starving robbers went away cursing God and man.
418. three starving robbers went away cursing God and man. Young Angelo was pleased w
419. and wine, and kneel to them, confessing humbly your fault in treating them hars
420. confessing humbly your fault in treating them harshly." Then Angelo realized β€”
421. too, were little ones of Christ, lacking as yet only good-will. sore, Foot- wear
422. holy Francis," and they went, wondering that any man could be so good as not to
423. remained on earth fifteen years, living so that the fast of Lent was a feast fo
424. f Lent was a feast for him." Thus during all his life Francis loved sinners and
425. ad Once Brother Masseo, perhaps doubting whether the hunoble houses. all mility
426. this work, but the glory of God shining and working in him. And Masseo was plea
427. but the glory of God shining and working in him. And Masseo was pleased and sati
428. humility, and went into Viterbo wearing only his breeches. and the cord were to
429. wded, the thoughtless, not understanding the good intention of this innocent, ho
430. ittle of the good God had done something more innocently outrageous than usual.
431. of The Penitents at Assisi were getting ready for this great and the sacristan
432. is faculties and resources in decorating the altar. Some benefactors had given t
433. ntil he came back from his to be praying Juniper, who happened in the chapel, gl
434. ne than a woman came in to beg something for the love of Christ. "Wait," said Ju
435. e poor woman his Father's goods, cutting the precious bells off with his knife.
436. stan leave Juniper in charge of anything he can give to the poor!" Off he ran to
437. , who was so angry that, when rebuk- ing Juniper in the chapter, he lost his voi
438. oice. Brother Juniper delighted in being scolded; [156] ST. SO he of FRANCIS AND
439. D THE PEOPLE was filled with love during the torrent that fell reproaches upon h
440. said Juniper, affection- ately, offering the dish of porridge, "I noticed scolde
441. ve?" for biographers tell us that, going boldly among the infidels, he almost co
442. converted the Sultan of Babylon, knowing, as he did, that the was mentioned many
443. as the less discern- name of Christ ing thought. Among the Mohammedans in Moroc
444. Among the Mohammedans in Morocco, during the crusade of St. Louis, he gained res
445. ly lighted Christmas tree are fulfilling the hope of Francis, crib. for it was h
446. than to [1591 hear. EVERYBODYS Not being aloud of his ST. FRANCIS not celebrate
447. born babe on the first Christmas morning. Francis lavished all possible care on
448. ho taught kindness to animals by showing that divinity had smiled on them. THE I
449. mitigated public penances by exchanging them for easier means of making earthly
450. changing them for easier means of making earthly satisfaction for spiritual It w
451. chapel at Porti- uncula, truly repenting of his sins and having f 162 1 the birv
452. , truly repenting of his sins and having f 162 1 the birv' ver, tb inn rr:iu(^ n
453. ,x 1^. >; 'S'fV β€’FΒ«AN<:'iS FR BACHING TO THE PEOPLE OF ASSISI β€’JJ40a4 rrlHT
454. d at the liberahty of Honorius in giving Francis so Some cardinals were much. As
455. r the protection of Rome. his increasing No man could now persecute them as here
456. rld. This he sought to correct by laying stress on the spiritual honor the ponti
457. ft of gold or silver. The absence giving the is of a corroboratory document indu
458. ten privileges. HIS DISLIKE FOR LEARNING IN HIS ORDER Cardinal Hugolino, afterwa
459. the sacred cis Fran- said, "I am nothing, [166] I know nothing." ST. FRANCIS AND
460. aid, "I am nothing, [166] I know nothing." ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE cardinal i
461. written and memorized. Francis, drilling himself, learned by heart. The an elabo
462. id in purple and lectics. red, ghttering gold and amethyst, learned in style and
463. . Francis brothers. discouraged learning among and his His contemporary [1671 fr
464. When one could live with nature and sing with of God. nature, why should one rea
465. one read? he thought, not [1681 knowing that Seneca had long ago uttered ST. hi
466. uin." Why should simple brothers, having this gift, long for learning? Francis w
467. ers, having this gift, long for learning? Francis would not permit one of his yo
468. tten there and everywhere? Book-learning he did not despise in others, but let h
469. aurels in Rome. Divini, called the "king of poets," had gone to the Convent of S
470. Francis intrusted the work of correcting the song of his heart, the "Canticles o
471. The servant of God," he said, "in eating, drinking, dissleeping, and other corpo
472. t of God," he said, "in eating, drinking, dissleeping, and other corporal works,
473. said, "in eating, drinking, dissleeping, and other corporal works, must creetly
474. "In all the house there will is nothing that we only the can give her that be o
475. this will may sell it; be more pleasing to Virgin than that God and the Blessed
476. e of It It is related knew without being brethren to told the needs his and thei
477. might. Later, after the he died wearing the habit of his master. At the great m
478. abit of his master. At the great meeting Portiuncula, of the friars at the where
479. nder penalty of excommunica- the cutting of the trees. Above the for the holy wo
480. ked him. Francis rejoiced in the singing of his beloved birds, but he could scar
481. carcely see them. Blindness was creeping upon him. Now its he could see only the
482. or how God beautiful, is!" how purifying, this creature of In this lonely place
483. le hut by himself. Brother Masseo having taken upon himself all the daily duties
484. . There he suffered the agony of knowing that his own brothers were betraying th
485. ing that his own brothers were betraying that cis his ideals. As his master knew
486. e love of worldly prudence, were casting Lady Poverty from the hearts of many of
487. e more and more real as the great living Christ feast of the exaltation of the h
488. he holy cross nearer. On *'a the morning of this feast all came he had says watc
489. ed peared night. There ap- seraph having six wings," Thomas of Celano, "and, she
490. o, "and, sheltered by these feet glowing wings, was borne a most beautiful man w
491. 'β€’' - .., - - e nearer. On the morning iil? ( ..a492. t'T. SANTA CLARA AND HER SISTER WAITING ON ST. FRANCIS ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOP
493. of the spirit. The vision, disappearing, left behind it a marvelous fire in his
494. with nails, the heads of the nails being seen hands and the upper part of the fe
495. ed his tunic. The servant of God, seeing the holy signs thus deeply impressed on
496. his familiar companions, and yet fearing to discover the secret of the Lord, was
497. natus both by grace and by name, knowing that the holy man had seen some marvelo
498. st thou shouldst be condemned for hiding the talent committed to thy At these wo
499. he order of the aforesaid vision, adding that he who had appeared to him had sai
500. his true love into his own image, having fulfilled the forty days which he had t
501. ANCIS AND THE PEOPLE man, mount, bearing with him the image of the crucified eng
502. ers of flesh by the finger of the living God. And because it is written that it
503. good "to conceal the secret of the king," therefore this man, who was conscious
504. Back to the Portiuncula he went, growing ecstatic in weaker and blinder, but kno
505. tatic in weaker and blinder, but knowing the secret of the King, which he had co
506. nder, but knowing the secret of the King, which he had confided only to a few of
507. and the sick healed, and he went singing homeward. Now he was near Clara again,
508. he gave to her the consolation of eating under her roof. But was near her, and s
509. help him in his need as only ministering and loving women can. More and more he
510. his need as only ministering and loving women can. More and more he desired tha
511. who forgive for love of Thee Sustaining afflictions and tribulations! Blessed b
512. will! To them the second death can bring no evil. Praise ye, and bless my Lord,
513. full extent, he went to Siena to Willing to used to consult a physician learned
514. t to be joyful at the thought of leaving his brethren, but he saw too well that
515. prudence and common sense was corrupting his ideals. They found money necessary;
516. not correct and amend them by preaching, admonitions, and example, I will not b
517. I were a worldly authority," Recognizing that his kingdom was not of this world,
518. conciliation, which meant the preventing of a disastrous war, we owe the lines i
519. city, Italian or foreign, tear the dying and precious one from those to whom he
520. es on his precious body. HIS HAPPY DYING all Francis now joyous again; left to h
521. s Sister God. He became Death was coming. of all He sang when he could, but alwa
522. ut always he begged his brethren to sing of God, of the sun, creatures, and he l
523. or Sister die at the Portiuncula, saying, "Praise be to Thee Death!" To the the
524. f thee shall many be elected to the king- dom retti, of eternal life!" "And havi
525. dom retti, of eternal life!" "And having spoken St. these words," writes the aut
526. nd come to St. Mary of the Angels. Bring with thee a shroud for my body and the
527. d for my funeral. I pray thee also bring me some of the food thou gavest me when
528. e brother wondered, there was a knocking at the door, and in this came noble lad
529. he hour of his death; for on the evening of Saturday, after vespers, before the
530. umber of these birds came on the singing, off his roof above his bed and flew ab
531. ked earth, with his like his Lord. Lying on the hand covering the wound on the r
532. ike his Lord. Lying on the hand covering the wound on the right side, he said: "
533. e tears whose grace sight of the failing body, clothed only in the cincture of p
534. poor for the love of Christ, said. bring this," he as poor as Francis rejoiced.
535. er went on until the end. Then the dying Gospel of St. John should be read to β€
536. ise supplication to the Lord," finishing with: "Bring prison, that I my soul out
537. ion to the Lord," finishing with: "Bring prison, that I my soul out of may Thy n
538. may Thy name: the just wait for singing. me until Thou reward me." He died Then

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/