Concordance for Evaline, or, Weighed and not wanting : a Catholic tale / By P.J. Coen.

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1.    \ EVALINE; OR, WEIGHED AND NO T WANTING A Catholic Tale. By P. j. CO EN. M Let 
2. empests, and is never shaken j wandering bark, Whose worths unknown," "And bears
3. he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh
4. of January. The snow and thick ; falling fast and, as it is al- ready evening, t
5. ing fast and, as it is al- ready evening, the trees, robed in their wintry costu
6. e over and all out of doors are hurrying home to enjoy the comforts of the fires
7. e fireside, and partake of their evening repast. As the hours less advance, the
8. for no one thinks of those riot, maining outside, except avocation is whose plun
9. his proximity. It is on such an evening, dinner over dinner hour was half-past
10. mily of the house retired to the sitting- room, that a young girl of eighteen or
11. engaged over some needle- work, singing at the same time with great feeling the
12. ging at the same time with great feeling the plaintive song —"Tis hard it to g
13. r bright hopes blighted —the promising bud of Collections Weighed and not Want
14. d of Collections Weighed and not Wanting. J the morning of their days wither ere
15. s Weighed and not Wanting. J the morning of their days wither ere they bloomed
16. love, pure as the dew-drop, was weaving round Still their hearts, rent asunder.
17. , rent asunder. there are such suffering ones in our ; midst ber. and our heroin
18. der than herself, were the only blessing of the parents. While yet very young th
19. nd though of the former she knew nothing except large supply of the by name, she
20. to a very late hour at night, read- ing over her Bible, with which she was so c
21. t intimacy with her on every page. Being so religious, it was her greatest care
22. ung minds of the Weighed and not Wanting. 9 children with a sincere love of God,
23. e love of God, and a a fear of offending Him, and with sympathy for the sufferin
24. h education, them a desire for acquiring knowledge. A few up, years rolled on, a
25. now grown began in to think of " seeking his fortune" ; America and having an un
26. eeking his fortune" ; America and having an uncle there course, in good circumst
27. ceived a letter from his sister, bearing the sad tidings of grandmother's death.
28. ! how this news smote will It his loving heart. But death come regardless of our
29. l independence at the palace of the king, ; and the cottage of the peasant leave
30. eter- 1 Weighed and mined to not Wanting. ; 1 send for Eva and as the latter was
31. rrival the States firm, it as travelling was agreed that on her to live with her
32. with her uncle. Eva was Warm and loving was the reception she met with at her u
33. ce to be the recipient of an idle living. " I can work out/' she said, girls, "l
34. until he had had the pleasure of seeing his 12 Evaline ; or dear sister —to d
35. which, so easily attainable by " serving out' ? respectable family, is in indisp
36. n married and not unfrequently degrading to the sex. The parting of Eva and her
37. uently degrading to the sex. The parting of Eva and her brother extreme ; was to
38. a and her brother extreme ; was touching in the and as the plan of our story doe
39. ur story does not require of us to bring him before our readers again, Weighed a
40. r readers again, Weighed and not Wanting. 13 we will take our leave of him, and
41. me young ladies of our youth-worshipping will say. But we must assure them that
42. areful of his health, ir- which blessing others at his age have recoverably ener
43. e of enterprise, and was fond of gaining honor, wealth and popularity, no matter
44. marked of which we write he in was doing well, being engaged some academies and
45. ich we write he in was doing well, being engaged some academies and colleges in
46. in the capacity Weighed and not Wanting. i5 of professor of French, music and d
47. f professor of French, music and drawing. The which evening, with this a descrip
48. ch, music and drawing. The which evening, with this a description of chapter has
49. Evaline," said Jean Baptiste adress- ing her as soon as she had done singing, "
50. ing her as soon as she had done singing, " Why I that plaintive air ? Why so I
51. I sad? will Though you are about leaving, often. still I — must see you will w
52. or now, appoint a time and place meeting. a Nay, don't be so dejected, 1 Evaline
53. nd often. But I have to suffer something more is than that— something for whic
54. something more is than that— something for which there no remedy but imagine a
55. im, to me at least, except a passin. ing beauty, and his interest and share my u
56. that's pure, how Weighed and not Wanting. ' ij for plain so e'er the face/ and,
57. ough he strives to create such a feeling. course, I treat him politely, of I but
58. ers to a It is suit in an- time to bring matI close, which will do when uncle ne
59. erstand the reaair ; son of your singing that plaintive you sing yourself." " Je
60. of your singing that plaintive you sing yourself." " Jean, " it because of its
61. o. its Your heart ; is, I know, sterling in attachments and mine is, I think, no
62. llow if me then to say, by way of adding, possible, fresh impulse to our own mut
63. n— if our their minds are true nothing can check ardor, or subdue their power,
64. bitter Weighed and our days. not Wanting. 1 You I never confessed your love to m
65. e, as you have said, before this evening; but I've needed not words, your feelin
66. t as one.' " The hours had been stealing impel ceptibly away and they wondered,
67. bly away and they wondered, on ; hearing the clock strike, that the night was so
68. the same roof long time and when parting they changed pledges of constant, imper
69. had anticipated. Weighed and not Wanting. 21 Chapter II. We have now lost sight
70. lovers. we will suppose to be sojourning toiling the at at her uncle's, and Jean
71. we will suppose to be sojourning toiling the at at her uncle's, and Jean hours o
72. an hours of day in New York, and evening re- turning, as usual, to that house no
73. day in New York, and evening re- turning, as usual, to that house now havThese b
74. sual, to that house now havThese but ing for him no more attractions. were weary
75. deavored to while them away in read- ing the beauties of Shakspeare, so happily
76. line. self, Eva- Sometimes he would sing or play on his flute, to him- some air
77. n. Evaline, though not strictly speaking a was still decidedly handsome. She was
78. ; blue eyes, bright riage, and sparkling ; a stately car- and a charming far voi
79. parkling ; a stately car- and a charming far voice. But her manners were attract
80. ded Weighed and to his call. not Wanting. is 23 " Where that nice gentle girl?"
81. intings of the Bard of Erin, the feeling and pathos of Griffin, the descriptive
82. tive powers of Dickens, Bulwer's flowing and the periods. richness of She had co
83. e had commenced the study and was making a marked promusic, she of French under
84. of Jean Baptiste, gress. Of knew nothing gift as an art, ; though her ear was de
85. d that rare from correct nature of being borne away by the spirit of any air she
86. pirit of any air she sang, and of giving expres- 24 Evaline; or, sion in tone an
87. n tone and in countenance to the feeling of the piece. With trust this rather un
88. hand. trait. fin- He took a fine sitting por- It is not wonderful that he made w
89. ighed and beauty worshipper, not Wanting. 25 in; although not sensible to that c
90. ; although not sensible to that charming gift of nature but he admired the quali
91. erruled his poetic fancy. And now having made spirit. Evaline's acquaintance, he
92. ould she ? Their hearts had been too ing as closely intertwined, beat- with one
93. t with regard to his devotion. Regarding the letter, however, she lady cousins h
94. misgivings. Her Weighed and not Wa7iting. 27 had been quizzing a great deal " la
95. d and not Wa7iting. 27 had been quizzing a great deal " latterly. What countryma
96. d cut in society with a husband jumbling English together. French and broken Why
97. have to turn school teach- make anything of him, and perhaps make nothing of him
98. nything of him, and perhaps make nothing of him in the er in order to end !" " W
99. istened to these remarks, without mixing into the conver; but inly she concluded
100. y she concluded that there was something wrong. Her cousins saw but her album, i
101. Evalina thought her, but might be having discovered the mistake, fact that the s
102. rom the name of the writer corresponding to the initials subscribed to the pictu
103. njectures. A letter had come, and having fallen by Weighed and mistake into not
104. by Weighed and mistake into not Wanting. 29 Evaline's hands, she was aided in t
105. project by her sister Grace, and having received the sanction of the father, wh
106. ne ; much as now. Time, how- was flowing on cheerlessly for Evabut still it was
107. erlessly for Evabut still it was flowing on. That, at least, was a comfort. So a
108. ousins set Evaline ; about : or, writing the letter, which ran thus see "Monsieu
109. e deliberations. Weighed and not Wanting. ^\ Chapter ' III. It was a comfortable
110. ter ' III. It was a comfortable dwelling, located a convenient distance from the
111. nvenient distance from the in a bustling business part of Brooklyn, at and ferry
112. art of Brooklyn, at and ferry, affording easy transfer to New in York. The cars
113. door rapid succession, thereby rendering transfer still more rapid ; and as they
114. appearance with its huge, proto jecting windows, which showed advan 32 Evaline
115. les of Crispin art ; within, and hanging relatives outside, their more homely we
116. wo neat rooms, separated only by folding-doors, which, when thrown open, mirrors
117. r- cushion, afforded a delicious resting place on one while nearly opposite was
118. an we omit the two air-cushioned rocking-chairs in which the Weighed and not Wan
119. irs in which the Weighed and not Wanting. 33 mater and paterfamilias rocked them
120. m reposed a piano beneath baize covering, which the daughters tripped fairy fing
121. as in this apartment, and on the evening of the day that Evaline had departed to
122. aline, as he calls her, from progressing? I It can't come all to good, fear. The
123. y one from heaven they are always crying out, tics!' 'lost Now whom fancy a man
124. ics!' 'lost Now whom fancy a man looking for a shall wife he verily believes nev
125. nd would be able Romanist. I not Wanting. 35 to induce Eva to to turn hope she l
126. with them many others, that after having entered into the domain of reflection,
127. nto the domain of reflection, and having got the film with which fancy blinded t
128. st we old folks do. They boys who having seen water for time, the and invited by
129. m, and spurred on of others to to daring by the example into make one grand plun
130. into make one grand plunge the sparkling element, begin to realize their rashnes
131. eir rashness, is and learn that swimming not so easy of accomplishment, nor the
132. track of you. But to begin with swimming, and plunging into the sparkling elemen
133. But to begin with swimming, and plunging into the sparkling element — if boys
134. wimming, and plunging into the sparkling element — if boys did not ven- ture i
135. d I might add— Weighed and not Wanting. 37 a faint-hearted lady seldom gets a
136. judge about tors tell us that it. mixing the races the so- best possible thing f
137. ng the races the so- best possible thing for the ciety." " good of Oh, never min
138. w and 'tis well he as he can see nothing, he thinks nothing, wrong. as for And R
139. as he can see nothing, he thinks nothing, wrong. as for And Romanist and the all
140. turer and few of countrymen are anything else." Weighed and " not Wanting. 39 Yo
141. nything else." Weighed and " not Wanting. 39 You have But there a poor opinion o
142. so much, dear," said her father. Judging from his picture, five he can't be over
143. lina sister, ?" said she, adin- dressing her who answered her terrogatory with a
144. and have had an opportunity of observing them a short 40 Evaline ; or> time sinc
145. ne ; or> time since, as you were selling him a pair of boots." " Well, Grace, 't
146. seem to bloom ; through one everlasting summer, never experiencing the the slig
147. e everlasting summer, never experiencing the the slightest indication of winter
148. re to Weighed and silver the not Wanting. 41 head of youth, than a few extra yea
149. , there's an " if name to Jean ; cutting him it." off at once then end to A very
150. child-, we manage the hand-writdif- ing. have been thinking over the ficulties
151. he hand-writdif- ing. have been thinking over the ficulties that attend the proj
152. cquainted with your cousin's handwriting." 42 " Evaline ; Grace and I or> all ha
153. We then challenged her the other evening to letter in write— indeed we had the
154. a few sheets of note- paper ; and having entered on a new it contest in penmansh
155. were, I suc- ceeded at last in securing the name EvaI lina just in such a place
156. her. Mrs. Dorset, who had been listening Weighed and attentively all not Wanting
157. Weighed and attentively all not Wanting. 43 the time, and who showed by her loo
158. te- nance the plot which was so shocking to her honor and her pride, said in chi
159. her honor and her pride, said in chiding tones " : You are bright girls, indeed
160. And as for you," she said, add- dressing her husband, " you ought to have more s
161. which if discov- do more than any thing con- ceivable to " But, cement their af
162. ntinue his attentions and Eva perceiving this will learn to forget, or to despis
163. do anyhow. The more they they get. thing than this ' are thwarted, the fonder Sh
164. en in a Weighed and our last not Wanting. it 45 chapter was produced, and It met
165. e day, in the afternoon of the following Lafify Paddy — for such was the of th
166. ace, now against his back, thus covering him all over as with a coat. As the way
167. les but he endeavored to lighten calling to by mind the urgen- cy of the expedit
168. d hinted at by way of apology in sending him out er, such inclement weath- and f
169. er, such inclement weath- and flattering himself with ideas of his own self-impo
170. eas of his own self-importance in having been trust, thought worthy of such a at
171. worthy of such a at intervals, huiliming by way of episode, " The ; Weighed and
172. episode, " The ; Weighed and not Wanting. Wearing of the Green," — 47 " Pat Ma
173. " The ; Weighed and not Wanting. Wearing of the Green," — 47 " Pat Malloy,"
174. s destination. Pre- vious to his ringing the bell he fixed his hat, which, by th
175. absolute necessity was under of getting snow, needed no disencumbered of adjust
176. sition could not be it improved, sitting, as did, with equal it grace, no matter
177. ots energetically and now turned ; being nicely fixed up anew, he gave the bell
178. xed up anew, he gave the bell a becoming ring, which was soon re- sponded to by
179. p anew, he gave the bell a becoming ring, which was soon re- sponded to by the m
180. line; or, ; hour, and on such an evening and he was right in his conjectures. An
181. how he conducted his embassy, following chapter. will be told Weighed and not W
182. er. will be told Weighed and not Wanting. 49 Chapter IV. " Good evenin\ young Mi
183. young Miss," said Paddy, acgirl costing the who responded to his ring of the do
184. rl costing the who responded to his ring of the door-bell. " Good evening, sir,"
185. is ring of the door-bell. " Good evening, sir," she politely an- swered. " It Ve
186. say tkat Miss. } I'm for always running of messages the master, Miss ; this I w
187. " Indeed, Evaline ; this is or, nothing compared looking out for inside a with
188. e ; this is or, nothing compared looking out for inside a with what before we ma
189. have no errand," replied Paddy, getting inside as requested, and glad of the in
190. ishment, at the little same time looking the You have no errand! what then can y
191. scarcely suppress a laugh, but striving to be as modest and : Weighed and not W
192. as modest and : Weighed and not Wanting. 5i serious as she could in such laugha
193. pocket. Here Miss," said he, blundering " over the superscription. Mis-shus Je-
194. further the girl interrupted him, saying Oh, I understand. You want Miss Hughes,
195. young yourself would be ? girl as making game ways in of the poor boy this count
196. long over they ,, make a humbug blushing tion the of him. " I'm not fooling at a
197. shing tion the of him. " I'm not fooling at all," girl, " I responded the unders
198. be ne- cessary." Weighed and not Wanting. 53 invita- Paddy thankfully accepted t
199. followed her to the kitchen, : lavishing on her his heartfelt " encomiums You're
200. left the ' Ould Dart/ : " Before taking his seat, he said " I don't know, Miss,
201. here he turned round, one just learning the steps of a round dance, so as to gi
202. must have the cup of tea, and something better and more substantial." girl The
203. she pitied him in her heart. She, owing to the education she got in the town of
204. nd or out of it, Weighed and not Wanting. 55 being a correct English speaker, wa
205. of it, Weighed and not Wanting. 55 being a correct English speaker, was sorry th
206. rran, a Kenny, a and an O'Connell, owing is to English oppression, doomed to plo
207. nd to his he commenced comfort, the ling in a to realize, much difference betwee
208. between travel- snow-stonn and reposing by a fire. kitchen foot, . And x\o\\ he
209. ne ; or, anon he inhaled in his dilating olfactory organ, the pleasant aroma of
210. , the pleasant aroma of the steamthe ing tea-kettle, anxiously expecting moment
211. mthe ing tea-kettle, anxiously expecting moment enjoying to come when his palate
212. tle, anxiously expecting moment enjoying to come when his palate would be no lon
213. ever be done," said Paddy, soliloquizing. That girl is worth the weight of her o
214. in you ; Weighed and Miss! not V/anting. 57 and happy is the man that will get
215. Why do you say so?" "asked she, smiling. " Faix! then, for the you needn't ask
216. then, sure I don't mane anySure I thing like that at all, Miss. know you have n
217. equal ! ; Weighed and in all not Wanting. taste as good, is 59 others. less They
218. household. when you sure that are going to get married, be your intended unders
219. e your intended understands housekeeping." " Wisha," said Paddy, tickled it —a
220. s himself —at prospective housekeeping "sure if I I was ould enough now be mar
221. l girl, Faix too, It and plainer cooking do poor Paddy." Baptiste, The bell ring
222. , The bell rings. was Jean who, on being inform- ed by the maid of the boy ing h
223. ng inform- ed by the maid of the boy ing his arrival to give nication, said who
224. long about immediately. He was effecting the necessary parel. change in his ap-
225. the comb carelessly through his flowing locks, which looked well their artless
226. tly down foreign accent, stairs, singing in a sweet voice, but with something of
227. ing in a sweet voice, but with something of a the first verse I of that touching
228. of a the first verse I of that touching song, " Ever of thee ly dreaming." " We
229. ouching song, " Ever of thee ly dreaming." " Well, am fond- Jane Anne," said Jea
230. wn ; Weighed and his cheeks, not Wanting. 61 having been checked in their course
231. d and his cheeks, not Wanting. 61 having been checked in their course by the ner
232. n checked in their course by the nerving thought of Evaline's inconstancy. at th
233. is pocket with the intention of perusing alone ; and affecting a care- lessness
234. ention of perusing alone ; and affecting a care- lessness which he did not feel,
235. re is my boy, no answer needed ;" adding, in a tone not intended for his ears, b
236. better wait," continued he, ad- dressing the boy, " and Jane see to Anne will ma
237. ative simplicity, anticipat- by inviting himself, and which had His received the
238. er-table. An un- Weighed and not Wanting. 63 easiness was traceable in his count
239. th your name," said the maid, addressing the boy as she passed in from the dinin
240. the boy as she passed in from the dining room call ; " I think I heard you ago."
241. me, Paddy, do you news the know anything about the letter brought? The young gen
242. would thin'. is it tell me But one thing at the is sartin — no one ; dead hous
243. e any- thin' worse." " Is there anything worse than a disin love, think appointm
244. , Paddy ?" — Weighed ci7zd not Wanting. is, 65 "Oh! then, 'deed there I'd Miss
245. the pain of love," said the girl smiling. " Faix ! then, time enough into a say.
246. 'm not in a bit of a hurry about getting love pains, or " I any other pains eith
247. mplimented ; and countenance brightening to the genial influence of his reflecti
248. for glasses beyond doubt, of the coming of that " drowner of sorrows," Jane Ann
249. it indeed of homely material than dining-room ; relative in the affect, in but t
250. t home with the agreeable maid ; waiting on him and after the usual pre- liminar
251. ter the usual pre- liminaries of carving, she asked him for Weighed and not Want
252. he asked him for Weighed and not Wanting. 6j a story about the " ould country,"
253. ently acted upon he by her many pressing him felt invitations to allow to commen
254. that himself buoyed into a story-telling mood, he prepared ration his throat for
255. ration his throat for the nar- by taking a drink of tea and com: menced " I'm go
256. o tell you a story about a once to thing that happened my own it grandfather ; a
257. ighed and gether they " will not Wanting. sport, 69 make mane it any how." Arrah
258. the tents." " What do you mean by taking a little ," girl, asked the feigning sh
259. ing a little ," girl, asked the feigning she did not unis derstand this Irish te
260. the parallel of the ' Americans hav- ing a smile " I ?' mane takin a drop of som
261. ever seen a girl drink anyfear, in thing intoxicating for love, or part of the c
262. irl drink anyfear, in thing intoxicating for love, or part of the country. my Do
263. for I'm sure your story is interrupting you. quite entertaining. So now that we
264. is interrupting you. quite entertaining. So now that we un- derstand each other
265. hat we un- derstand each other regarding those technicalities, I pray you to pro
266. ill now go on. Weighed and I not Wanting. Ji was sayin' in my grandfather was ta
267. suited the action to the word by taking he called dis- a refreshing draught. "W
268. rd by taking he called dis- a refreshing draught. "Well," continued for a fight,
269. in her power to keep him ; from leaving her company use. but 'twas no So up he
270. y grandfather was not long about getting the best of him ; but as the spalpeen h
271. lways, Weighed and and so it not Wanting. 73 was now. But when they were whipped
272. they were whipped, on the point of being should come up and tap who my grandfath
273. press a smile, ; Weighed and not Wanting. : J5 which Paddy noticing said b'lieve
274. d not Wanting. : J5 which Paddy noticing said b'lieve 'tis it, " You don't I thi
275. may be true," said the girl ; feign- ing a belief in fairydom it is " but tell m
276. They Weighed and happened to not Wanting. , JJ be devartin themselves at the tim
277. d by Paddy's account of the waterfearing habits of the fairies ; affecting a bel
278. earing habits of the fairies ; affecting a belief in these preternatural beings,
279. , of is indeed your story really amusing, and notwithstanding say, there what so
280. tory really amusing, and notwithstanding say, there what some people may may be
281. ghed and several of the ould not Wanting. Jg people have seen them from time ndi
282. iste entered. the boy to him, and taking the hall-way, asked He beckoned into hi
283. e." particu- Did the master say anything lar when he gave you this letter?" " He
284. ff I Weighed and started ; not I Wanting. 81 and faix ! paid well for the right
285. 'm ; very thankful to you." And slipping into the kitchen for his hat, and polit
286. itchen for his hat, and politely wishing the girl good night, too, he disappeare
287. ered himself on his way by humairs, ming anon as before, some of his native to r
288. before, some of his native to ruminating as how he could best spend his dollar.
289. ne ; or> Chapter V. " There is something very strange and letter," said mystifyi
290. ery strange and letter," said mystifying about this Baptiste, as cigar, Jean he
291. as cigar, Jean he paced his room puffing a anti- which he smoked by way of dote.
292. y much dejected that he needed something soothing. This was his trial. " critica
293. jected that he needed something soothing. This was his trial. " critical day," h
294. feels the weight Weighed and not Wanting. 83 of his misery to be oppressive —c
295. his misery to be oppressive —crushing. it He from draws forth the picture of
296. osed, and gazes on anxiously, submitting it, long and were, to a as phrenologica
297. s it by way of every word. Then studying with heart, less the picture once again
298. the picture once again still a breaking, but a confiding he said : " Could that
299. again still a breaking, but a confiding he said : " Could that sweet guileconce
300. Evaline ; or, up with love when looking sending a frame, at me, thereby through
301. ; or, up with love when looking sending a frame, at me, thereby through thrilli
302. frame, at me, thereby through thrilling sensation my ? now shoot out the arrows
303. d.' " Evaline, " he said, apostrophising the I ? I picture, " you know how much
304. a voice speak within is still me saying —Evaline the same. is " But there the
305. same. is " But there the letter, giving a flat denial to the whisperings of tha
306. difference of hand- Weighed and writing, hers. it is not Wanting. 85 is plain ;
307. hed and writing, hers. it is not Wanting. 85 is plain ; but the signature Still,
308. is not this difference of hand? writing a consolation Does it not seem to indic
309. icate foul play? Besides, accordleft ing to the boy's confession, Evaline the ho
310. aline ; or, mind of Jean Baptiste during the eveDoubts and hopes chased each nin
311. the eveDoubts and hopes chased each ning. other in his mind, like light and shad
312. ape. Now his spirits, by reason glancing ; of an occasional ray across them, wou
313. somewhat cheered now his despair gaining the ascendancy, they to the would sink
314. owest depths. Now mind built up pleasing fancies of love and fidelity, still scr
315. her out in bold relief ruthlessly joying over his agony. He was, indeed, more th
316. nd he gave exsong which in the following he sang in tones quite in keeping with
317. lowing he sang in tones quite in keeping with air, : the plaintiveness of the an
318. elings Weighed and O would I not Wanting. 87 When And all the heart then knew of
319. yes have known, The burden of a fleeting tear ; But still the heart will fondly
320. ; But still the heart will fondly cling ; To hopes no longer prized as truth An
321. truth And memory still delights to bring The happy visions of my youth. etc. O I
322. ich to had probably much do in directing them. She was the sole engrossing objec
323. ecting them. She was the sole engrossing object of his heart's affections. Witho
324. ile bliss. in the sunny beams of dawning hood ! O days of boy- which of us has n
325. n gazed back fondly on you, ever growing more and more lovable as you contrast w
326. Baptiste figured to him- on this evening all that Evaline had been to him once,
327. eemed be ; and the contrast was crushing. And hence, from the very depths of his
328. depths of his ! Weighed and not Wanting. 89 misery he gave plaintive utterance
329. gain!" And he knew well the deep meaning these words embody. He knew they meant
330. anced ere Jean Baptiste thought of going to rest —indeed, he hour surprised hi
331. knew thither, not the balm of refreshing sleep. still His thoughts fluttered hit
332. uttered hither his and fitful. rendering slumbers Now he dreamt that he was gazi
333. lumbers Now he dreamt that he was gazing 90 placidly Evaline; or, on a beautiful
334. he had Weighed and heard his not Wanting. ; 91 name called but unable to see any
335. to see any one, he concluded he dreaming. had been He now rest. settled himself
336. cean beat with fury. And hapfaint pening to look around he caught a glimpse of t
337. pse of the form of a vessel just sinking beneath the tide ; and he thought that,
338. r, threat- 92 Evaline; or, itself. ening to deluge even the island And now and s
339. rance of a beautiful female form gliding, angel-like, across the waves, and smil
340. ngel-like, across the waves, and smiling playfully as if in consciousness of her
341. ll command ment and ; view of the raging eleif raising her right hand as to sign
342. t and ; view of the raging eleif raising her right hand as to signal order, the
343. ters placid. looked once more And taking him by the hand, she bid him walk on co
344. And he proceeded, he thought, a willing cap- — Weighed and tive, for not Want
345. p- — Weighed and tive, for not Wanting. 93 he knew she was kind as she was pow
346. triumphantly ; along unto a safe resting-place and then smiling, drawing her vei
347. to a safe resting-place and then smiling, drawing her veil, and sweetly, she fon
348. resting-place and then smiling, drawing her veil, and sweetly, she fondly lispe
349. his po- but unable to discover anything disconnected from pure ideality, he con
350. ; no more that for he preferred figuring to him- again and again the lovely figu
351. attached to no steady be- In the morning he was, pale and want of sleep and nerf
352. e when weighed, she would not be wanting. He was now more determined than before
353. st her real attitude towards him. taking our leave of him for a will And now whi
354. rogressed there on the memorable evening of Paddy bassy. Laffy's em- Weighed and
355. ssy. Laffy's em- Weighed and not Wanting. 95 Chapter VI. Paddy's return had been
356. ver, by lively conversation sions having his been made at intervals to contri- l
357. ost buted to the pleasure of the evening were a few songs sung by the sweet, mus
358. musical voice of Evaline, Grace playing the accompaniments on the exquisite tas
359. ano with of The performances both having been frequently applauded by the father
360. pplauded by the father and mother during the g6 evening, the " Girls, Evaline ;
361. father and mother during the g6 evening, the " Girls, Evaline ; or, former at l
362. ang after I it in Old England, returning terrible from the Russian war. saw been
363. n war. saw been engagements never during my service, but had my ingenuity I more
364. set about captivat- — Weighed and ing your heart, after in not Wanting. 97 wh
365. and ing your heart, after in not Wanting. 97 which ;" I succeeded twelve months'
366. t that we girls could know air, anything about that. However, Grace, papa's favo
367. , I bore a recreant's pare, And fighting still for what he sighed, He captured w
368. ather " and when you as your " are going to get married, don't task the advances
369. won And And I think / was worth looking then turning to her daughters she advis
370. I think / was worth looking then turning to her daughters she advised them stron
371. to possess the wonderful power of being able to lash the tranquil current of hi
372. x him, I bet." Weighed and " not Wanting. his wife, Y 99 get My dear," said why
373. nce. ; It is quite there and the footing, too, very bad to-night." " I'm sure, p
374. I'm sure, papa," said Evalina, help- ing her sister in excusing Paddy, for whom
375. valina, help- ing her sister in excusing Paddy, for whom gard, both had entertai
376. ained a high reto his readiness to owing do any- thing they asked him, and also
377. eto his readiness to owing do any- thing they asked him, and also to the great d
378. ten his afforded tales them by narrating amusing about Ireland, " I'm sure he mu
379. afforded tales them by narrating amusing about Ireland, " I'm sure he must be wa
380. t Ireland, " I'm sure he must be waiting the gentleman's return." " Pshaw !" sai
381. l let with the Frenchman, that something out may thwart the effect " It is we an
382. effect " It is we anticipate/' consoling," said his wife, " that he knows nothin
383. " said his wife, " that he knows nothing about the purport of the letter that ;
384. n in any way come from the I undertaking, have great doubts. This is — Ha Padd
385. ply uttered in a Weighed mid not Wanting. 101 tone that showed the master's voci
386. ciferation had produced no very cheering sen- sations within his breast. " I wan
387. n ears of the terrified boy, a trembling voice — who " just goin,' sir." Paddy
388. the soles stair- mat. the " I'm thinking," said the housemaid, following lest hi
389. thinking," said the housemaid, following lest him to the foot of the stairs, to
390. this last tion. very important cleansing operait " I'm thinking you'll catch fro
391. portant cleansing operait " I'm thinking you'll catch from the master this time.
392. s in the parlor yet," asked Paddy. Being answered : in I the affirmative, he con
393. id, I Weighed and see sir. ; not Wanting. it 103 then, but I thought was right "
394. re a good boy," said Mrs. Dorencouraging him. "Just tell us, like a good boy, wh
395. e always it feels sorry for rein. having given after such a loose He likes you,
396. entleman said or did he mention anything about sending a written reply ?" " I'm
397. or did he mention anything about sending a written reply ?" " I'm sure," said he
398. re," said her husband, not first, giving the boy a chance to speak " I'm sure th
399. ak " I'm sure the gentleman said nothing it about sending a written reply, for n
400. gentleman said nothing it about sending a written reply, for not needed." " Tha
401. y ; he didn't say one word about sending 104 a letther I ; Evaline; or> but as s
402. old self, gentleman him- notwithstanding his irate serious- ness, could not refr
403. - ness, could not refrain from indulging in a smile. " The tide of men and women
404. not even " — Weighed a7td not Wanting. io5 fre- excepting Grace, who was I a
405. hed a7td not Wanting. io5 fre- excepting Grace, who was I a very duent reader, "
406. said Grace, " I now got, remember having read the passages. What Evalina fine me
407. at Evalina fine memory you have anything you read once, you for ever." remember
408. y boy," said Mr. Dorset, air, " assuming a bland ladies you have got the on your
409. ladies you have got the on your scolding side, so there's no use Besides, I of m
410. yis, sir ;" and then Weighed courtsying a?td not Wanting. 107 ladies, very poli
411. then Weighed courtsying a?td not Wanting. 107 ladies, very politely to the who h
412. sther know So I thought the best I thing to do was to say waited for an didn't g
413. elay would prevent the maid from putting the adventures of the afternoon under a
414. es of the afternoon under a scrutinizing inquiry, and leave them buried in that
415. never be roused. Weighed and not Wanting. 109 Chapter VII. " Upon my word and ho
416. I. " Upon my word and honor," addressing his wife said Mr. Dorset, daughters as
417. him to wait the gentleman's return? ling us, And now, trif- though be the news h
418. the ; girls from such a rash undertaking that you have followed out you must wai
419. boy w e have ever r had I —so willing, so docile and so faithful. ; shouldn't
420. , "Grace and I 1 Weighed and not Wanting. 1 1 should be lonely without poor Padd
421. must just was rather tardy admit evening, —but it is the first time ; and cons
422. stories." tell us one of Paddy's amusing " Shall I tell it in his own style, and
423. she did justice to the task of imitating Paddy's vernacular —by we mean his Hi
424. years ago, and which was spoken by king and knight and peasant long before the
425. very mornin' and Weighed ani not Wanting. 113 with evenin' you might see the poo
426. f whenever there was that a drop getting through, they all doted on him. " In th
427. though her owner prevent her from making every other cow in hersel' aiqual to vi
428. ighed and turn to a neighbor not Wanting. 1 1 if he desarve it at all. So, owin'
429. r is or dead Weighed and " * not Wanting. 117 Faix ! then 'tis about time for yo
430. w " ' for luck that drove the poor thing out/ B'lieve me, Billy, there's somethi
431. aline ; or> (blessings with you, darling of my heart) her usual expression whene
432. us- band was about tance, to do anything of impor; — was all she said but she
433. s the ould man with to himser, and bring her home field ; me/ In with stalin' hi
434. ass nicely 9 Weighed and for not Wanting. little 1 1 himser, just like a gasson
435. the to do he overtook in her, and having succeeded tail, getting it hoult of her
436. her, and having succeeded tail, getting it hoult of her he twisted round his ar
437. n and ould women shanakissin (conversing) and smokin\ to have a They stopped the
438. shout : — Weighed and " ' not Wanting. ! 121 1 11 not let go the cow if she's
439. he was outside the hill now. Everything 122 Evaline; awful strange or, looked d
440. s know valleys, the trees and everything seemed like a revolvin' round wheel d f
441. time. Weighed and bit, till not Wanting. i 123 further he says to himsel' I I'l
442. dy, machree/ Weighed and " ' not Wanting. 125 ? Oh ! wisha, Billy, who did you r
443. much and was frequently applauded during narration for her perfect mimicry of Pa
444. ct and accent. L Weighed and not Wanting. 127 Chapter VI I We past. will suppose
445. ceased and a The snow-storm in, bracing frost set and the bright sun looks chee
446. eerful in the heavens. Many are availing themselves of the fine day to have a li
447. are cleared of such offensive carpeting. hailed the Jean Baptiste dawning of th
448. peting. hailed the Jean Baptiste dawning of this day with a kind of sad pleasure
449. He was anxious mind at ease by learning some- thing definite. He wished to know
450. ous mind at ease by learning some- thing definite. He wished to know the truth o
451. ut on his journey, in thought succeeding thought like the billows of the ocean,
452. seem to grow out of each other, leaving but a interval momentary of calm. At on
453. sh at anfitful, its but withal consoling mind ; —-now one, beam across his now
454. Meanwhile, the uncle had been indulging the, to him, very agreeable idea that t
455. little think- - Weighed and not Wanting. to 129 visit ing that he was soon have
456. eighed and not Wanting. to 129 visit ing that he was soon have a from the latter
457. sincere in his devoin and less confiding to Evaline, probability Mr. Dorset's ex
458. has weighed the matter carefully during the past few days ; determined to put t
459. rives, and finds the old gentle- waiting on the some male customers, discharging
460. on the some male customers, discharging daughters were " 130 like Evaline ; off
461. tions to his customers. little, feigning to observe the for the first time, Fren
462. w he very asked him to be seated, adding that he would wait on him in a few mome
463. wait on him in a few moments. his Having got through with cus- Weighed and tomer
464. Weighed and tomers, he " if not Wanting. 131 approached him, and asked for he c
465. him, and asked for he could do anything him ? " Really," said Jean, rising to a
466. thing him ? " Really," said Jean, rising to answer ; the interrogatory, " if I d
467. an serve very much." Well, sir, anything you ask I will it an- swer fair if I ca
468. ntroduction you ; and know I was staying with you up her is it for some time wis
469. is it for some time wish to after giving situation. know how ?" I long since she
470. f she wrote this" Weighed and (producing the strained will as I not Wanting. " o
471. ucing the strained will as I not Wanting. " of 133 letter) her unconI —the sig
472. not unacquainted with her handI writing, is see that the body of the letter ?"
473. pose so," repeated Jean Baptiste, laying particular emphasis on the words. that
474. long, to suppose and too favorably thing. is I any such feel fully convinced tha
475. nt of this mystery to time." " One thing in felt I do tell you," said the old ge
476. guardian." at the Here he gave a knowing glance French- man. " And I think it is
477. vantage of her youth to make a plaything of her. not allow " it." I'll You are q
478. honor had nerved him, fire, eye glancing and his limbs shak- Weighed and ing wit
479. cing and his limbs shak- Weighed and ing with motion," fault I not Wanting. 135
480. nd ing with motion," fault I not Wanting. 135 find do not indeed with you to see
481. owledge. do find fault with you to bring undue pressure upon her for — if you
482. with that, And manage against despairing thoughts ?" He view, departed, troubled
483. tranquil waters would out in refreshing streams to irrigate the aspirations of
484. ld come. " Ever her at Shakspeare having !" said Evalina to father, overheard th
485. r Weighed and the language ; not Wanting. 137 and, by the bye, Mossieu he contin
486. letter it —indeed, its is 'tis nothing short of —than of genuineness. Should
487. he meet with Eva, or Evalina and nothing ple to meet, truth ' as he calls her, f
488. no sign of a plan, or plot, in hav- ing got cousin to accept a challenge in pen
489. aughter, Evalina her, I but con- finding was disowned by cluded from the fact of
490. cluded from the fact of the writer being French, that probably her name had Eval
491. eighed and suit his tastes ; not Wanting. 139 and that as the letter beI trayed
492. en and there to stop advances by writing him a letter in his my own name, but ha
493. a letter in his my own name, but having found by chance a sheet of paper with t
494. thought that it own hand, I by changing the admirably. It is final letter would
495. s I think from have seen there no- thing very objectionable to a union be- tween
496. e such disparity A few years are nothing let I man. However and the matter rest
497. e Eva from her resolution by pro- posing to her consideration Jean Baptiste's ag
498. rticu- Weighed and larly his not Wanting. 141 nationality, and religious per- su
499. as I can ; but if Eva persist in having her it own way, 'tis better let her hav
500. liantly on the frost-dried roads, giving promise of an afternoon of pleasure, of
501. arelessly from their shoulders, hurrying to the ferent ponds to partake in the h
502. ake in the healthful exercise of skating, while those of maturer years moved thi
503. Weighed and were now content not Wanting. 143 to look upon. Grace and Evalina wo
504. er to adjust with their father regarding cousin Evalina. fore They there- calmly
505. gned themselves to the ordeal of weaving out plausible excuses, or palliatives,
506. come to his aid occasionally by throwing in their confirma- tory evidence of the
507. assevera- 144 tions ; Ev aline ; bowing on or, their assent to his superior ; w
508. ; wisdom and prudence pantly descanting flip- nationalities and forms of worshi
509. lities and forms of worship, and racking every nerve of the brain to keep their
510. own treachery in the back-ground. Having arranged their plan of attack and manoe
511. wever, with mis; givings of a depressing character for Mrs. Dorset, but as who h
512. and look of the Weighed and not Wanting. 145 one long before the time. By a cas
513. closure Ev aline ; or> letter, regarding the ; as the time was so short and they
514. felt she was only for uneasy not having heard of within a few weeks from the ob
515. a heart that its is warm and unswerving in attachments. After the usual interch
516. e usual interchange of friendly greeting, Mr. Dorset, who sat beside his niece o
517. ," he said, " you must not feel trifling any way discontented revelations I at t
518. you thereof." : Weighed and not Wanting. little 147 The is it girl did feel a p
519. wisdom. But papa, we " are interrupting you." My I ; dearest Eva," he said, " t
520. do you call him, Eva- he asked, feigning a forgetfulness of the name which, by t
521. ve got such a bad memory - for retaining foreign names ,, —Well, my dear Eva,
522. tleman was here a few days ago inquiring for you. " Indeed! uncle. Fm so sorry I
523. uld say he — Weighed and " not Wanting. is ! 149 ; Why, is Eva, the call man o
524. you he him young gray Moreover, turning —which makes hairs it worse/' " What
525. et, pair. ever I've seen such a spouting ; He's old suite forever passages from
526. ey have eration! I all taught the rising genthen, no, that it — suppose Miss,
527. my objections, I Weighed and not Wanting. i5i may conclude that you love the Fre
528. ght this have no difficulty in answering — do you not love Charles, my partner
529. him Weighed and Impossible ! not Wanting. 1 53 I regard him as a friend I and hi
530. ke change." mischief these changes bring What !" about " Mischief!" interrupted
531. y word or action. " I He resumed telling : was you about the letter. It Weighed
532. ddressed, as which name is I not Wanting. i55 have said, to Evaline, easily conf
533. uently, it gave it your cousin, thinking was it for her. She found upon reading,
534. g was it for her. She found upon reading, for her, that was not and returned it
535. was not and returned it to me, observing, same time,— I now see how correctly
536. spondence. A sheet of note-paper bearing the ; name it Evalina turned up by chan
537. chance and as wasy our own hand- writing, by changing the final letter, I though
538. wasy our own hand- writing, by changing the final letter, I thought that it wou
539. l weight 1 56 Evaline ; or, of appearing to have come from yourself. This I thou
540. n deadly pale, which her uncle observing, pressed her fondly to his breast, and
541. ind heart withal —but he was caressing an unconscious being. She had were asti
542. ut he was caressing an unconscious being. She had were astir fainted off. The wh
543. ed about wildly. Weighed and not Wanting. 1S7 She attempted had lips to speak, b
544. parched. presented a little A trembling man wine and water. She sipped the tere
545. She sipped the tered philtre, and fixing her eyes steadily on him it, who had fa
546. e die said, The all yours," she glancing rapidly and reproachingly daughters. st
547. e able to return take her to all evening. for must my bed-room, she needs her pu
548. case. See, the color is again is coming not to her cheeks, and her pulse much o
549. , we have had," said Evalina I trembling. Grace and have feathered the arrow, an
550. e. Evalina had been gradually recovering, Weighed and not Wanting. i59 his which
551. ally recovering, Weighed and not Wanting. i59 his which was noticed by her uncle
552. ," said he in cheerful tones, addressing his wife and daughters, " you can now t
553. ned, his The sun ?" still flings evening beams against the window,—and— I am
554. ndow,—and— I am in bed " Oh, nothing has happened, my dear; 160 nothing Eval
555. thing has happened, my dear; 160 nothing Evaline ; or y —a little I headache y
556. ell " Don't trouble yourself by speaking ; further just try to sleep." In a few
557. eighed and ings of the mind, not Wanting. 161 in which she lisped very much reco
558. ered her that her uncle had been telling her of the letter he had sent in name t
559. ubject which had caused you so suffering. part, let ' much You have ; heard the
560. mind at ease by refuse to do so telling* her all. To would only trouble her mor
561. st intentions, my dearest, I in adopting this course, " said her uncle, to hear
562. n, the letter was the Frenchman's coming learned his business, to see me. I Havi
563. earned his business, to see me. I Having I told I him was your guardian, and tha
564. e. you promise ; Weighed and not Wanting. 163 me, darling," here he pressed her
565. Weighed and not Wanting. 163 me, darling," here he pressed her to his heart, " t
566. he could not seriously think of marrying a Frenchman. " A Frenchman/' added wors
567. raises no objections. As is for breaking off the intimacy, there not much need i
568. intimacy, there not much need in asking me to do that, as the contrivance enter
569. im and to myself Weighed and not Wanting. i65 to put come what way the of our in
570. s you are a Protestant. belief According to you and the whole crowds nonbe lost.
571. man who to must look upon you -according the teaching of his Church, as a child
572. st look upon you -according the teaching of his Church, as a child of the devil
573. believer of any denomination from being a child of God." " I don't see the logi
574. the individual : Weighed and not Wanting* 167 may will not be aware of his error
575. is own." " That's just the lina. meaning," said Evaa Catholic, has the : " Pope,
576. lic, has the : " Pope, who was following beautiful lines apropos of this ' For m
577. all nourished in matter the life-giving by streams of which spring from one com
578. e life-giving by streams of which spring from one common I Christianity." " You
579. must confess," said Mr. Dorset. leaving points of belief to reasoning fools, as
580. t. leaving points of belief to reasoning fools, as the poet says, I think it oug
581. Wighed and with those trial not Wanting. 169 we do not love, is a harder love ;
582. e act the second only a negative. saying has it, ' Now, as the old fish in I the
583. Dorset still every one's mind is a king- dom to him/ which he wishes to govern
584. down beneath such opprobrium, a grieving but unconfessing penitent. to must reve
585. opprobrium, a grieving but unconfessing penitent. to must reveal the truth tear
586. he truth tears flooded her in refreshing ; Jean." Here the beautiful eyes, and r
587. cle clasped her to his heart, exclaiming My dearest, ! oh, for pity's sake, ! we
588. o Seek him to find him! reveal all bring him well." me, and may yet be Weighed a
589. , and may yet be Weighed and not Wanting. 171 Chapter. X. The interview recorded
590. t within dic- oppose his views by tating for Cousin Evalina a course of con- duc
591. sed, in probability, by their not having been in made affair, confidants rather
592. iety, inherited or acquired, re- garding national and religious estrangement. Ou
593. a professor of Weighed and sess sterling merit truthful ; not Wanting-. 173 that
594. ss sterling merit truthful ; not Wanting-. 173 that he could be a reli- man, an
595. man in name and gious life. of sterling piety in reality, unswervingly dethis v
596. to the Holy See — was his reli- Having found him more than he had anticipated,
597. at of the opposition he had shown during the interview was more feigned real. We
598. estant, anymore liberal how ; but having seen the liberal notions of his wife
599. ; or, impulse his —and the unswerving devotion of had had upon it niece to he
600. elessness We may add that the of uniting in the bonds of matrimony the hearts of
601. might have much quired to do in moulding his newly-ac- liberality. He had long k
602. and that she had Weighed and not Wanting. 1 75 designated him as a worshipper of
603. ran in debt. Vanity, in a word, failing was his predominant —a in failing, wh
604. ling was his predominant —a in failing, which, however pardonable sex, is the
605. he perceived she was not a kindred being which he never acquaintance ciprocate h
606. by Weighed and nature ever. not Wanting. 177 formed to be true to her for Jean
607. by an awful convulsion of nature leaving sad traces of its existence behind. Suc
608. the her mind was far from for she being at ease, had yet a great — Ev aline ;
609. ould be the glance of his black piercing eye on seeing her Would vile it be a lo
610. ance of his black piercing eye on seeing her Would vile it be a look of con- tem
611. hought Weighed and she, " he not Wanting. well to doubt 179 knows me too my ! wo
612. ws me too my ! word of honor." Consoling reflections ? Ah left ! but was she sur
613. and no clue to his discovery, preferring to nurse his grief alone in a sequester
614. e the sick bed of an only child, knowing to that only one chance reto mained you
615. chance reto mained you of ever clasping him your breast again a sentient being,
616. g him your breast again a sentient being, while a thousand thronged around your
617. poorly balances against the ? chrushing weight of present separation Have you e
618. hance, realize 1 Weighed and not Wanting. 1 8 the state of Evalina's mind. are A
619. tive fear. Time will is ever on the wing and the sun shine on the just and unjus
620. r- Evaline sets out in hopes of hav- ing an interview with her lover. arrives at
621. she learns that he has his left, having given no intimation of abode. new Oh !
622. Oh ! what a fresh pang of keen suffering! Much though it she had suffered previo
623. sink like the noble Caesar after having received a 1 82 Ev aline ; ? or, stab f
624. bear ; be wounded by others this galling but can she bear dagger of abandonment
625. to efful- Grim winter has given smiling spring, and spring to the gence of summ
626. ul- Grim winter has given smiling spring, and spring to the gence of summer-—t
627. ter has given smiling spring, and spring to the gence of summer-—that season o
628. rrayed Weighed and eir leafy not Wanting. ; 183 costume soft the beauty of the f
629. ; the murmurings of the zephyrs passing gently over the rippling meadows ; the
630. zephyrs passing gently over the rippling meadows ; the playful amblings of the ;
631. sensation of plea- sure. true that owing to his inter- view with Evaline's uncle
632. y reason of the dissimilarity of writing in the letter, an occasional gleam of s
633. ng pieces. hope, was shivered to Nothing but a dark picture, without a solitary
634. l on a beauti- afternoon in July, gazing out vacantly in Central Park. on the la
635. The boatits men are gracefully skimming over glassy bosom, giving the gay, plea
636. fully skimming over glassy bosom, giving the gay, pleasure- seeking passengers a
637. bosom, giving the gay, pleasure- seeking passengers a survey of its size and sur
638. ers a survey of its size and surrounding scenery. The stately swans are proudly
639. The stately swans are proudly disporting on the sunlit surface of its waters, wh
640. ldren. The children's maids are wheeling, some — Weighed and not Wanting. i85
641. eeling, some — Weighed and not Wanting. i85 the baby-carriages near by, while
642. carriages near by, while others, seeming tired of such service, are enjoy- ing t
643. ng tired of such service, are enjoy- ing their dolce far niente^ of which we rea
644. will be pardoned lish, for not rendering into Eng- tranquilly seated on the benc
645. hes. But while these scenes were passing like a dissolving view, all unnoticed,
646. se scenes were passing like a dissolving view, all unnoticed, be- fore the eyes
647. rom her reverie by a sweet voice singing behind a thick-set cluster of touching
648. g behind a thick-set cluster of touching Griffin for little trees, that song com
649. which little she had taught him to sing, it thinking should ever contrast unple
650. she had taught him to sing, it thinking should ever contrast unpleasantly with
651. fessions of love Weighed and not Wanting. 187 side. unbroken were needed on eith
652. ul, this its very provi- dential meeting, from gloomy throne. The mystery of the
653. told aunt — all was while the crowning-point of the whole proceedings, which,
654. ne to "seek him! and all find him! bring him me, may yet be well Jean escorted E
655. dship. There was joy in the that evening. The attachment lovers was sanctioned b
656. Dorset, and Weighed and its not Wanting. 189 progress was henceforth unimpeded
657. we find Evaline — lady employer having been, meanwhile, notified of her intent
658. s for centuries, Weighed and not Wanting. 190 Great, thou canst paint in a few w
659. d, is thy magic power ! Without entering will into particulars, we use this dash
660. ll into particulars, we use this dashing power of the pen, briefly say that five
661. ove." "love heaven, and heaven teresting children their union, Two in- were the
662. n their union, Two in- were the blessing of lispings and the little and gam- bol
663. e a father, or a mother. So were passing on Eden-like happiness ; their days, in
664. e tranquil- Weighed and lity not Wanting. 191 of their existence was partially c
665. essed the —the only wish of her aching heart little —that Jean, her only one
666. ; married, thought that his of returning home but now mother needed him, he must
667. arture was fixed ; The their and parting with Mr. Dorset and his family was touc
668. h Mr. Dorset and his family was touching, and was keenly ticularly felt, par- by
669. line a no less the warm embrace, calling her by sweet name of daughter. She kiss
670. " unknown " tongue. said she, addressing her son and daughter-in-law, they will
671. language she was overjoyed at not having been necessitated to commune with her,
672. pleasure to take Weighed and not Wanting. 193 Evaline out to see the many places
673. their gilded ceilings, and the imposing tone of the Catholic ceremonial. Her re
674. eremonial. Her reflective mind was being gradually all impressed with of Paris ;
675. ltars, and pillaged and is and crumbling cloisters, say, in soliloquy, "What Fra
676. , " mother-in-law, — she, " addressing her What a difference be- tween the poo
677. red of our churches. English Every thing is so cheering to the senses in these,
678. ches. English Every thing is so cheering to the senses in these, while every Epi
679. re what you churches/ in them I chilling For my part couldn't pray one of them,
680. great many and expla- nations regarding the Catholic formula of worship —abou
681. mother-in- Weighed and law, not Wanting. 195 much to her apparent read " satisf
682. owerful work and ; was constantly having her difficulties re- moved by the old l
683. for Rome. Though But we are anticipating. Evaline's comprehensive mind saw the b
684. ugh she un- derstood that incense rising in graceful clouds above the heads of t
685. the throne of God; that candles throwing out their pure flames, were typical of
686. ies and triumphs of centuries encircling her brow, and linking the Christian of
687. nturies encircling her brow, and linking the Christian of to-day with those of e
688. s have forfeited Weighed and not Wanting. 197 her right to be called the true sp
689. t changes/' thought she, occurred during the Dark called. ; may have Ages, as th
690. e, have got each his own way of thinking. We now ; have no divinely inspired tea
691. orld separately his reason for believing any doghis ma, each would assign the te
692. oghis ma, each would assign the teaching of Church as the is efficient cause. An
693. diviI duals. can't see what the teaching of this, the Church means except their
694. ts. I judgment of Protesthusband evening ; will get my this to explain Infallibi
695. ility to me and if he succeed in showing me I the reasonable- ness of this singu
696. st decidedly. It Weighed and not Wanting. flows from her natural constitution. 1
697. r least will understand what was passing. We we not trespass on our readers by e
698. ot trespass on our readers by enter- ing into the details of the dialogue, as ha
699. aniz- ed body, animated by an indwelling soul, which is Christ, and directed by
700. words, this : if they mean life anything, must mean that as the vine diffuses th
701. nd through the causes them to dif- bring forth fruit ; so, too, does Christ life
702. ual through the Church, thereby enabling her to bear fruit unto salvation. Such
703. is the Church Weighed and in not Wanting. is 201 her nature. She an organism, a
704. organism, a moral person, ever of living, and composed body and with you soul, w
705. " Go preach to the nations, all teaching them to observe things what- soever I h
706. ostles discharged their mission, relying on the promises of Christ to remain wit
707. , Many dif- which they knew would spring they did not provide assured that the u
708. most unlettered stands on equal footing Again, Christ " And whosoever Weighed a
709. whosoever Weighed and shall not Wanting. 203 not receive : you, nor hear your c
710. e : you, nor hear your city, words going forth out of that from your feet. shake
711. ue Church, the Catholic Church, fighting fight, against all heresies : she can b
712. hurch Infallibility logically convincing to Evalina. The seemed She began to und
713. Lord forth into was under, when sending her the world to continue the work He h
714. gs, Weighed and of God, he " not Wanting. settle 2o5 hoped would her mind. And,
715. And, dearest Evaline," he said, pressing her to his heart; " the day you kneel a
716. uire after the truth ; oh be not wanting now to correit. spond with May holy mot
717. a faithful child to receive the blessing of the Holy Father. Gentle reader, to w
718. del Monte, with vent, occupied adjoining con- by a French Sisterhood. far Let us
719. ion a Weighed and of the let not Wanting. 207 Next, Immaculate Conception. us sa
720. leasure-grounds, and inhale the perfling fumes that countless flowers the air ;
721. beasts, the groans and sighs of pitying Christians ; it is now resonant to the
722. erform the Via Cruets, and the preaching of the Religious. priest, and the Let u
723. d from — Weighed and city. not Wanting. as the 209 Two ; churches, known "Twin
724. istinguished convert, Archbishop Manning, has sometimes given discourses. Lenten
725. e always gathered to hear his convincing logic, his irrefutable arguments, and t
726. nt there just merely to hear Dr. Manning ? It is How many went to not for us ven
727. ternal Book. Amongst the many convincing proofs of the genuineness of the Cathol
728. trious preacher. Weighed and not Wanting. : 211 " They were English in substance
729. and with her God. Lent had been passing on, and no sermon by the English preach
730. t a of every tribe stran- of the washing of the feet. crowd was there, made up !
731. f Weighed and the youug, the not Wanting. 213 weak and the robust — all strain
732. 13 weak and the robust — all straining their eyes to see the Pope. He has susp
733. commemoration of and our Lord's washing the feet of the Apostles, and dries the
734. on his thirteen guests at table, serving them to soup, fish, and such dishes as
735. at such a moment, consecrated breathing, as she was, the atmosphere of the Basi
736. e atmosphere of the Basilica, and gazing with reverence upon the Supreme Pontiff
737. um. Besides, faith had long been budding in her heart, and now needed blossom. b
738. rth a beautiful And to I gently pressing her hus- band's arm says, "Jean, gain h
739. he Basilica of St. John of Laofficiating prelate, the Cardi- tern, by the nal Vi
740. miraculously. O, happy journey embracing to Rome !" he exclaimed, his wife, when
741. he had ever felt Weighed and not Wanting. 2i5 knew that her heart had received i
742. ver cold —seldom too warm. — smiling, as it usually sheds his mildest The su
743. ty. a day of general jubilee and joicing in the city of the is spiritual re- Pop
744. aline ; every church has or, bells fling their air ; gladsome tones upon the its
745. ther persons ; St. Peter's. are hurrying equestrians, and ; on foot cardinals in
746. . in pic- turesque costume, are hurrying on foot Thirty thousand have assembled
747. led in St. Peter's to hear Pius IX. sing Mass. His It voice is clear, sweet, and
748. t, and powerful. Weighed and not Wanting. 217 echoes musically through the lengt
749. Pope At the Elevation they cease singing. The troops, at a given signal, floor,
750. d with arms presented to salute the King of Heaven, who is about to descend upon
751. d upon the altar. Thousands bow down ing His presence. if in adoration, awaitis
752. honor their God upon earth, by striking up a new hymn on instruments not made b
753. elow. A hundred and thousand are looking up anx- iously to see a figure clothed
754. brace the world, Weighed and and raising his not Wanting. 219 sweet eyes to heav
755. Weighed and and raising his not Wanting. 219 sweet eyes to heaven, pronounces t
756. n her knees receive her Fathers blessing. On his his Holy Thursday, when she got
757. usion. The most the year are interesting ceremonies of now over far — if we ex
758. ce into which the see, summer, but owing to the which few remain to excessive he
759. ster, do we notice strange faces getting scarce. Kings, and queens, and princes,
760. s, and queens, and princes, are hurrying back to their thrones and palaces lords
761. ts and their enjoy- ments, are preparing to set out for their happy homes across
762. mbered. tion to ask further. not Wanting. it 221 But is not our inten- our reade
763. e thousand things of that turn up during such voyages but this lack of observati
764. n can be attributed mainly to our having one, only one, object in view — to te
765. nd even as the Atlantic cable, quivering with electric shock, con- veys but one
766. one message to or from our shores, being altogether indifferent to the mighty oc
767. r readers a view of the most interesting feature in our narrative, the conversio
768. ion of Evaline. And to now, after having beat about through Paris, and conducted
769. or tread the Via Weighed and not Wanting. 223 Sacra, along which the poet to str
770. deed, tourists might be found journeying thither, guide-book ; in hand, having s
771. ng thither, guide-book ; in hand, having such object in view as those but they w
772. eat they had accomplished its of looking into smoking jaws. And why leave shrine
773. accomplished its of looking into smoking jaws. And why leave shrine, leave you i
774. th the weight of eighty winters pressing on his shoulders. to visit We him it is
775. ever be, but Weighed and it not Wanting. well, for the 2 25 now Is a prison as

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/