Concordance for Dalaradia; or, The days of King Milcho / by William Collins ...

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1.   ; :i5. H DALARADIA; OR, THE DAYS OF KING MILCHO. BY M^ILLIAM COLLINS, Author of 
2. J. KENEDY, EXCELSIOR CATHOLIC PUBLISHING HOUSE, 5 Barclay Street, 1896. ,C55 Dig
3. he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh
4. oOOcoll DALARADIA; OH, THE DA YS OF KING MILCHO. CHAPTEE I. 6YBILLA AND HER FOST
5. es of shade were flung upon the sleeping sea, which reflected them in its waters
6. e skies that smiled down upon it, mnding in many a silver coil, and laughing and
7. ding in many a silver coil, and laughing and leaping in the sun as it pursued it
8. a silver coil, and laughing and leaping in the sun as it pursued its joyous way
9. nless upon the stilly atmosphere, giving evidence of animation and life in that
10. rom the sunamit of Slieve Mis, impending in awful state over the lovely scenes b
11. er the lovely scenes below, outspreading far and wide, and basking in the Summer
12. , outspreading far and wide, and basking in the Summer sun, the sight was indeed
13. overs of Scandinavia and the surrounding nations, Oriental and Occidental, had l
14. sometimes dangerous pleasure of hunting; the red deer and wild boar that throno
15. age of Iris absence, and, while awaiting his return, take a glance at his statel
16. venient distance from the castle, rising on a sloping knoll, beside a stately ro
17. nce from the castle, rising on a sloping knoll, beside a stately round-tower, ev
18. d retainers of the chieftain dwelt dming the Summer until their lord's return. g
19. them and date,w e A Bolstice. the fading day streams down upon the castle and it
20. r glisten in the light, and the exulting and abounding river rushes by, as two y
21. he light, and the exulting and abounding river rushes by, as two young maidens,
22. aidens, arrayed in the costume befitting their rank, emerge from the castle and
23. ose against the rough stone work, giving forth a tinkling sound every time the f
24. ough stone work, giving forth a tinkling sound every time the fail studeii*. It
25. ry time the fail studeii*. It is nearing simset. The glory of inovos or even tur
26. rl who holds the book seems to be musing over its pages, rather than admiring th
27. ing over its pages, rather than admiring them. As she bends downward her long bl
28. and there is a look of holy and melting charity in the sweet face which reminds
29. and the snow of her The face is beaming with intellectual beauty. forehead. Her
30. excited or when an enthusiastic feeling takes possession of her soul. In repose
31. n stature, and of a grand and commanding presence which can readily be perceived
32. attention is a precious volume relating to the mysteries of Druidism and Sun wo
33. ry, was of a playful and mirth-provoking nature. Her mii'th, however, was innoce
34. rl about her face. Her blue and laughing eyes, seldom at rest, sparkled and shon
35. ne with a beauteous brilliancy, pleasing and attractive. While Sybilla pondered
36. ned beside a fragrant rose tree, picking the roses to pieces, one by one, and sc
37. es to pieces, one by one, and scattering them around her. As she demolished the
38. object ; around her. Noiselessly rising from her reclining posture, Una stole t
39. r. Noiselessly rising from her reclining posture, Una stole to her side, and thr
40. ure, Una stole to her side, and throwing her arms around her, kissed her cheek.
41. d the caress. " Of what are you thinking, dear Sybilla?" asked Una, seating hers
42. nking, dear Sybilla?" asked Una, seating herself by her side, and toying with he
43. seating herself by her side, and toying with her long tresses. "To judge by the
44. Oonra's himself." "I have been pondering, Una, on the great truths contained in
45. d to penetrate the mysteries sun-ounding the Sun-god? 9 others wlio serve at the
46. ie sun, whose last beam was disappearing behind the hill, and prostrated herTlii
47. followed her example, and the rite being over, again seated herself by Sybilla's
48. nce followed. Una, who had been thinking over the last words of Sybilla, turned
49. a, turned to her companion and reclining her head on her knee, looked up into he
50. es a Dalaradian chieftain on the morning of battle," and the proud lip of the fa
51. Gaul, in his last expedition under King Nial; but I know not whether they belon
52. usiastic girl, a brighter flush lighting up her flowing features, " the prayers
53. a brighter flush lighting up her flowing features, " the prayers of our holy Dru
54. heart a fiery flame of hope, a throbbing ecstasy of joy, that Laegari,the succes
55. so gentle of nature, so sweet and loving, and so gifted with all the graces beco
56. d so gifted with all the graces becoming a maiden, do not wish for war! Would yo
57. do not say this because my w^ars of King Nial were just. father was one of his t
58. Kial and his brave I)alaradians, issuing from their ships, burst upon them in th
59. eae:le has never soared in Erie Looking back on our past liistory, and hearing
60. g back on our past liistory, and hearing it repeated mv father's halls bv tlie D
61. bards and Brehons, I cannot help feeling a glow of pride within my heart at ment
62. I meant not to charge you with anything unbecoming yom- sex. You are too good a
63. t to charge you with anything unbecoming yom- sex. You are too good and kindhear
64. and forgetful of the qualities becoming my station. The waywardness of my natur
65. dear, good creature, Una, and as loving and fond as you are blythesome and merr
66. t and welcome Fergus. I see him entering the castle gate." Like a young fawn, Un
67. Like a young fawn, Una rushed, bounding from her side, and ran toward the gate.
68. walked erect, wdth iirm and unfaltering step. harp was siung over his shoulder,
69. gus, the chief bard of Milcho, retm-ning from the annual musical festival of Tar
70. annual musical festival of Tara. Laying a hand on the fair head of each, a brig
71. ," said Sybilla, " and we were beginning to fear that the beauty and attractions
72. longer." " I am in haste to see the king; has he returned yet from the chase?" "
73. ve Mounted on strong-limbed and prancing steeds, with bronze spears and helmets
74. spears and helmets polished and shining as the sun, and with green plumes danci
75. s the sun, and with green plumes dancing in the evening air, Milcho and a hundre
76. with green plumes dancing in the evening air, Milcho and a hundred Dalaradiaa wa
77. e. ; u CHAPTER THB OATH AGAINST The king n. PATBIOK* BT. sate at the feast that
78. ry, where the quiet lake and the gushing rock-fountain sparkle in the sunlight,
79. s freshness of thought, and the striking heart-warmth or a people tliat sufferin
80. heart-warmth or a people tliat suffering does not seem to dispirit, penury rende
81. n, were cherished and cultivated by king and peasant, and the hospitable doors o
82. er pride has gone by." The soul-stirring strains of a Davis or a Moore can only
83. minated in English Blavery After gaining the castle, Milclio, preceded by his fa
84. a, entered a chamber in the eastern wing the king's dress-chamber it was called
85. d a chamber in the eastern wing the king's dress-chamber it was called and disro
86. ress-chamber it was called and disrobing himself of his hunting suit, donned a l
87. led and disrobing himself of his hunting suit, donned a less warlike and more ap
88. e for the banquet hall. His toilet being completed, he hastily quaffed a goblet
89. e, and seated liimself on a convenToying with the golden-hiLed dagger or skein i
90. ey knelt before him, and gently stroking their long and beautiful tresses, he st
91. nately kissed them on the cheek. Seating tliemselves in a half-circle before him
92. axation, when the grim warrior, throwing sterner thoughts aside, sought repose i
93. death of their mother, a softer feeling seemed to have crept into his heart, an
94. ith eyes of love upoi; a fond and doting father; the king and all his pomp were
95. upoi; a fond and doting father; the king and all his pomp were laid aside; in hi
96. passed away and they w^ere still plying him with questions, w^l)en a trumpet so
97. als and a retinue of slaves. As the King entered the court, his nobles, and chie
98. drawn up ready to receive him. Saluting them, he passed into the banquet hall,
99. one, in his accustomed place. according to his rank, took his seat next the kin
100. to his rank, took his seat next the king. Above each chair, fastened in the wall
101. rlike guests. Gn either side of the king sat Congal and Cathal, his two Both wer
102. nd bore a marked resemblance to the king, their Fergus, the bard, sat next to Co
103. ous apartn eat, with long tables running the whole length, each table capable of
104. le length, each table capable of seating a hundred guests. The king's was in tbe
105. le of seating a hundred guests. The king's was in tbe centre, and, seated on an
106. m almos' every nation known, and wearing their national costumes, wej distribute
107. o thin as to be transparent, and resting on silver feet, stood beside each guest
108. from which they quaffed the invigorating mead and ale of their own country, or t
109. se, which they had pursued since morning, had given an impetus to their appetite
110. etus to their appetites and the tempting and dainty morsels so plentifully place
111. as at length over, and the slaves having cleared the tables of the debris that r
112. r tlie guest whom he tended, a sparkling beaker of Iberian wine. The king was fi
113. arkling beaker of Iberian wine. The king was first served, and rising to his fee
114. e. The king was first served, and rising to his feet, with the drinking horn stu
115. nd rising to his feet, with the drinking horn studded with gems and gold in his
116. l, the Ard Kiagli of Ireland, exclaiming as lie did so: ^'May he follow in the f
117. fully responded to the toast of the king. The latter noticed him, and wliile a s
118. radian kings," answered the bard, rising and bowing with graceful dignity to his
119. s," answered the bard, rising and bowing with graceful dignity to his chief, " I
120. iercest hosts fell before his conquering sword. I have sung his dirge and wept o
121. found an echo in his heart. And looking around upon his followers, he observed
122. hast visited Tara. What news is stirring? Do our kinsmen contemplate any new con
123. in idleness, And wild boar?" " fo*:)ling tlieir time in tlie cliase of the wolf
124. hen the spears of the nobles are rusting, and the sickle is the only weapon used
125. ilcho with aroused passion, and grasping the hilt of his dagger. " And worse tha
126. ard, " the men of Leinster are listening to the whining croon of a foreign an J
127. of Leinster are listening to the whining croon of a foreign an J outlandish prie
128. y the soul of Nial!" exclaimed tli eking, excitedly stamping his sandaled foot u
129. exclaimed tli eking, excitedly stamping his sandaled foot upon the floor, " Can
130. st of Dari, of Kildare." "The drivelling dotard! As his years creep on, his mind
131. great Bel " exclaimed Milcho, springing to " But this is monhis feet, and gazin
132. to " But this is monhis feet, and gazing sternly at the bard. strous. But that i
133. of Sicur!"* "Sicur !" exclaimed the king, falling back in his chair and covering
134. "* "Sicur !" exclaimed the king, falling back in his chair and covering his face
135. , falling back in his chair and covering his face with his hands. The name was p
136. le, sat wrapped in a deep and {\bsorbing reverie. "it is of him," said Congall,
137. said Congall, his eldest son, addressing a Patriciiis " He's called grey-l)earde
138. e JJruids prophesied that he would bring woe and disaster on Erie." " It is even
139. Milcho rose from his chair, and pointing toward Fergus, who sat silent and abash
140. do battle against the Ronum Outnumbering all others were our Dalaradians in in B
141. rmor, their spears and helmets fljishing in the Bmi and where Nial stood, our ca
142. d their white wings, spead to the wooing breeze, looked like a flock of sea bird
143. e stroke of a thousand oars. As the king sat on his golden chair on the deck, hi
144. rd, seated in the prow beneath, striking his harp, chanted a battle song of I^ri
145. e upon the waters, the warriors, raising their voices and beating on their shiel
146. rriors, raising their voices and beating on their shields, made the coasts which
147. coasts which were lined with a shouting multitude, re-echo with the fierce musi
148. seemed relieved of his fear; and taking the harp from th-e hands of a slave, ch
149. rst the notes were soft and low, melting and tender as the farewell of lovers, o
150. and higher, until the tramp of marching men could be heard, the fierce cry with
151. ed in triumphant tones, and the swelling chorus of the victors filled the hall,
152. of the victors filled the hall, boimding in measured melody from the enchanter's
153. enchanter's harp. Then rose the piercing caione^ the wail for the dead, whose so
154. l, they grasped their daggers and waving them above their heads, joined in the r
155. he bard. the darkened visage of the king. As the bard concluded and put aside hi
156. Among them was one, a pale and trembling boy, unfit to bear a spear or shield, a
157. inued Milcho, his fierce nature gleaming in his eyes, "Will you forsake the gods
158. rs." " swear," they shouted, brandishing their skeins and shouting in such loud
159. d, brandishing their skeins and shouting in such loud tones as made the rafters
160. It is well," ansAvered Milcho, resuming his seat, " Leinster may forget her glo
161. ll remain the god of Dalaradia." Calling to a slave to replenish his wine cup, h
162. ng and deep draught; and alter listening to a few airs from Fergus' harp, left t
163. o words to tell The loveliness of loving well.** —Edgar Allan Po$. After the d
164. lan Po$. After the departure of the king, many of the guests, wearied with the f
165. with the fatigues of the day, following his example, left tho banquet hall but
166. y of the young chiefs remained, quaffing the sparkling wine and mead, clinking t
167. chiefs remained, quaffing the sparkling wine and mead, clinking their drinking
168. ng the sparkling wine and mead, clinking their drinking cups and pouring generou
169. g wine and mead, clinking their drinking cups and pouring generous libations to
170. clinking their drinking cups and pouring generous libations to the sun-god. The
171. fiery touch, the grand and soul-stirring melody of his impassioned heart. Now fi
172. dy of his impassioned heart. Now filling them with vrild and warlike yearnings f
173. tumultuously for the strife anon melting them to tenderness and tears, as his sy
174. d it with his voice in the soft, flowing language of ; ; warriors paid him the h
175. h the exception of the Arch Bard of King Laegari, Fergus was considered the grea
176. of war was undertaken without consulting them. They sat in the chair of honor at
177. harp in hand and sword on thigh, singing the hymn of war, and many a swinging bl
178. ing the hymn of war, and many a swinging blow they struck too. the Grael. The 24
179. apartments in the eastern tower. seating himself where he could obtain a view of
180. obtain a view of the river, now flashing in the silver moonlight, with his harp
181. ndmaidens, twinkled with joy at standing sentinel over that fair and enchanting
182. g sentinel over that fair and enchanting valley, and smiled upon it in all their
183. ightness beams, a man, suddenly emerging from the thickest part of the wood, his
184. ent downwards, with a slow and lingering step, gained the bank of the river, and
185. ined the bank of the river, and standing in the moonlight, gazed upon its waters
186. ce and meditation. His dark and flashing eyes, brilliant as the stars that slion
187. at tlie Taltain Gares of Tara. Communing with his thouglits, he stood for some m
188. he stood for some moments on the sloping banks, gazing dreamily on the stream be
189. ome moments on the sloping banks, gazing dreamily on the stream below tlien, as
190. still hear the sounds of revelry ringing from the banquet hall, and the loud lau
191. of a harp fell upon his ear, and pausing to listen, tlie voice of Fergus was hea
192. tlie voice of Fergus was heard blending with his instrument, singing a song in
193. rd blending with his instrument, singing a song in praise of his chief, the Lord
194. e write, 9vas ancient ; its origin being lost in the twilight of antiquity. stro
195. ongest of arm and SONG. ** of conquering name, will sound the loud-harp to his g
196. he last prolonged note was yet vibrating on the air, a hand was gently laid on t
197. the shoulder of the youtli and starting from the trance, in which the melody ha
198. of Sybilla, her eyes laugliingly looking into his, and the rosy blushClaspes pla
199. o his, and the rosy blushClaspes playing and dancing on her love-lit, dimpled fa
200. he rosy blushClaspes playing and dancing on her love-lit, dimpled face. ing the
201. ncing on her love-lit, dimpled face. ing the maiden in his arms, and lovingly ki
202. maiden in his arms, and lovingly kissing her cheek, ho led her to a rustic seat,
203. tic seat, under the shade of a spreading oak, overlooking the river and seating
204. he shade of a spreading oak, overlooking the river and seating her beside him, g
205. g oak, overlooking the river and seating her beside him, gazed long and earnestl
206. azed long and earnestly upon her glowing fjice. This was their first clandestine
207. This was their first clandestine meeting; and though in itself it was harmless,
208. elt embarrassed, in their joy at meeting, their hearts felt too full for utteran
209. pon the river, the deep blushes mantling her bright f ac^e, and mingling with it
210. mantling her bright f ac^e, and mingling with its snowy whiteness; while her lov
211. snowy whiteness; while her lover holding her fair hand in his, toyed gently with
212. break the silence. Timidly, half-raising her eyes to his, and in a voice that th
213. !" flower in Dalaradia Sybilla, blushing deeply at what she considered her unmai
214. ped her to his heart. Gently disengaging herself from Ids ardent embrace, she re
215. heart tlirobbed with a tumult of glowing love, flung back the truant tresses tha
216. only wandered over her fair face. Taking her hand again in liis, and encircling
217. g her hand again in liis, and encircling her waist with his arm, they g^ized int
218. us of all the world beside, and dreaming those bright dreams that come but once
219. f laughter 28 the banqnet hall, breaking on the stillness of the night, and fall
220. the stillness of the night, and falling with discordant sound on tlie ears of t
221. carouse." " But there must be something to cause my father to retire so early,
222. e wine cup." " 'Tis scarce worth talking about, though your father did take it m
223. ather should fear him and is he marching on Dalaradia ? " enquired Sybilla, beco
224. Dalaradia ? " enquired Sybilla, becoming interested, for she, as we have seen, w
225. ach in Erie " exclaimed Sybilla, raising her hands on high, and looking upward t
226. , raising her hands on high, and looking upward to the ! ; ! ! ; 29 death-like p
227. esolute for a moment or two, not knowing what to do under the eircumstances, and
228. gently took her in his arms, and running down the steep bank of the river, bathe
229. on restored to consciousness, and seeing Malion bending over her, smiled upon hi
230. consciousness, and seeing Malion bending over her, smiled upon him with gratitud
231. nd yom* father so much fear is something I cannot comprehend." " You know not wh
232. oceed, for I am faint and weak." Leaning on his arm, he gently led her up the ba
233. ights of love and the joyful commingling of souls. " Here rest for a while, my b
234. s not late, the lights are still burning in the castle, and while the breeze, wh
235. d while the breeze, which is now fanning the river, brings back the roses to you
236. Know then, Malion," she replied, drawing a long sigh, and speaking in slow and m
237. plied, drawing a long sigh, and speaking in slow and measured tones, as if fearf
238. d measured tones, as if fearful of being overheard, " know tlien, that this Sicu
239. nd Brehons foretold, that he would bring danger and evil to Erinn. Among a multi
240. hough of a strange faith, and worshiping strange gods and uncouth idols, my moth
241. my father that his presence would bring a murrain on the cattle and a pestilenc
242. stilence into the land, if not something worse, were he not destroyed or banishe
243. the answer was the same. With her dying breath she warned my fatlier to beware
244. that in his heart lie dreads the coming of the Christian. Of late he has grown
245. od of our fathers, cannot help believing that some great calamity is about to fa
246. hetic tones, gave utterance But rallying himself in a moment, and wishto the tho
247. n a moment, and wishto the thouglit. ing to dispel the gloomy and foreboding pro
248. ing to dispel the gloomy and foreboding prophesy from her iiiind, he answered i
249. outh, as the warlike and familiar Rising from his seat, he called strains burst
250. riors to drink to Bel, and swear imdying homage !" to their sun-god "Ila!" excla
251. xclaimed Sybilla, her enthusiasm getting the bettei of her fears " my brave fath
252. l," answered the young chief, hesitating, and withdrawing his eyes from hers, wh
253. young chief, hesitating, and withdrawing his eyes from hers, which were now blaz
254. s eyes from hers, which were now blazing with excitement, as she conjured up the
255. ed, might be lost to Imn forever. Rising before him and staudiag erect in the mo
256. e moonlight, her dai'k eyes 33 flasliing upon him, slie looked like the very gen
257. ch had died away from his face returning, "the chief who did not join ia the noi
258. handsome and manly countenance, glowing witli love and fervor before her, a min
259. and fervor before her, a mingled feeling of doubt and certainty took possession
260. r bosom. But love conquered. Controlling her emotion, and laying her hand gently
261. red. Controlling her emotion, and laying her hand gently on his shoulder, she as
262. from my reverie, stirred by the clanging of their dagger hilts, as the chiefs po
263. ed forth tlieir voavs to Bel. liealizing my forgetfulness, and shamed at my rude
264. hamed at my rude conduct before the king,l stole unperceived from the hall, and
265. impulsive gii-l, her ' 33 eyes brimming witli tears, and a sweet look of love a
266. nd a sweet look of love and hope beaming on her fcice; '' O, Mahon can you forgi
267. O, Mahon can you forgive me for doubting you? I have erred, but be not angry wit
268. I shall never doubt again, but trusting in thy noble heart, ''I am me not angry
269. pened to receive lier, and with paiiting and throb]>ing bosom hid her face on hi
270. e lier, and with paiiting and throb]>ing bosom hid her face on his breast. Sudde
271. face on his breast. Suddenly a rustling among tlie boughs was heard, a dark sha
272. ir lives to tlie sun-god, this fledgling of Tirowen shrank from the vow and hid
273. stal of Bel. The gods have given warning of the approach of the Christian dog, a
274. aiden gazed upon the dark and forbidding face of the Druid, whose long beard hun
275. its very core. The awful charge of being a traitor, and a confederate of the Chr
276. rned with redoubled force ; and spurning him from her with a wild and fierce ene
277. sudden appearance of the Druid, breaking so unexpectedly on his happiness, the v
278. th and vigor of its bloom; and annulling it the changeful and precarious moods o
279. d to fill his mind with a gloomy feeling bordering on frenzy, and rendered him,
280. his mind with a gloomy feeling bordering on frenzy, and rendered him, for the mo
281. disappeared. fearful forebodings tugging at his heart, the young Chieftain of Au
282. ep, toward the cai^tle. m ; CHAPTEE King Dathi assembled his *' IT. THE DRUID^S
283. assembled his *' IT. THE DRUID^S WARNING. Druids and Sages, — Druids and Sagei
284. ? What —Mangan, Milclio, after leaving the banquet hall, paced up and down the
285. and bold as he was by nature, unknowing human fear, and reckless in field or fo
286. e from his heart the fear and foreboding which the name of his former slave arou
287. ur was his slave returned with startling vividness now, and he shuddered He had
288. if tliese words were branded in burning characters upon Ills lieart ; he tried
289. ut they would not down. Angrily stamping his foot, he cursed the hour that iirst
290. ve; and upbraided himself for not having translixed him with a spear for giving
291. g translixed him with a spear for giving them utterance. is it," said he aloud,
292. vote ever first in tiie councils of King Kial, and at wliose call a thousand bra
293. of tliis slave, this Tiiere is a feeling in my breast Bwine-herd, this Sicur ? M
294. esence. I fear there is a shadow hanging over my house which bodea The gods are
295. hathe has returned, I feel the darkening shadow on my head with ten-fold force a
296. name by night, and every hour of waking life is haunted by it. I am encompassed
297. ened scream of the Banshee." 37 Striking liis forelicad with his hand, and pausi
298. iis forelicad with his hand, and pausing abruptly in Ills walk, he remained moti
299. tment was in close proximity to the king's, now touched the harp, and its It was
300. ars. sorrow for the dead, whose piercing tones fell upon the heart of Milcho, wi
301. ul emphasis, and sounded to Imu Brushing the cold moisture from like his own fun
302. gh the weary hours of the night, waiting and watching for the flrst glimpse of d
303. hours of the night, waiting and watching for the flrst glimpse of dawn. And when
304. st glimpse of dawn. And when the morning sun slione at last on the mountain tops
305. ish, wearied and unrefreshed. Descending from the tower, and summoning one of th
306. Descending from the tower, and summoning one of the sentinels, who kept watch an
307. led behis horse. fore him, and vaulting on his back, he plunged the spur into h
308. . Two slaves waited on his call, bearing refreshments, of which he sparingly par
309. which he sparingly partook ; and having dismissed them, rose from the table ; a
310. tient manner, as on the previous evening, commenced pacing up and down tlie floo
311. n the previous evening, commenced pacing up and down tlie floor. Two hours passe
312. the long and rugged ride of the morning, and the sleepless vigil of the night,
313. felt hi» eyes grow heavy, and, seeking his couch, found at last a solace A Iro
314. d the wind ia- The 88 creased, whistling drearily tlirough the woods, a dark, mu
315. , entered the court, and quickly gliding through the gloom, passed the sentinel
316. and stepped into the darkness. Pursuing his way along the river bank with famil
317. far behind ; and the noise of a brawling torrent fell on the ear of the wanderer
318. by quick and vivid flashes of lightning ; and as they played momentarily, and i
319. flash succeeded flash, and the rumbling thunder echoed and rolled fi'om cliff t
320. d rolled fi'om cliff to clift", drowning the noisy roar of the torrent and the w
321. to an immense heiglit, presented nothing but inejulai- masses of naked stone, fo
322. from the acclivities above, and, falling from a fearful lieiglit, over a ledge o
323. of nature, suddenly burst into a foaming basin below, from whence, after frettin
324. basin below, from whence, after fretting and chafing on the pebbly shore, it fou
325. from whence, after fretting and chafing on the pebbly shore, it found an outlet
326. tically over its waters, proudly raising theii* giant forms to the clouds, as if
327. if in defiance of the elements. Drawing the folds of his cloak closer around hi
328. s cloak closer around him, and following a path which suddenly diverged toward t
329. m became hushed and still; the lightning ceased to ; play ; the thunder died awa
330. and once he was startled by the piercing cry of the Banshee. By a violent effort
331. ation stood upon his brow; and believing that he was surrounded and entangled by
332. a light burst on the darkness, revealing to him the path which he had been vainl
333. ath which he had been vainly endeavoring to pursue. torch held by some one whom
334. vite him to follow; and eagerly starting after it- he muttered as he went " Thri
335. acrifice!" The midnight star was setting over the grove, as foUowng the friendly
336. disappeared within its recesses. Drawing from his cloak a small trumpet, he blew
337. e Celts. 40 "I am Mi^•.l:?o, tlie king of Dularadia/' " What doiii Cliou seek
338. a hand^ cold as deatli, and, submitting to the direction of his invisiseize his
339. es of As and he found him.self advancing alone, between two rows of huge, uprigh
340. Then, as the light, 6ometim.es radiating from above, sometimes flashing in litf
341. radiating from above, sometimes flashing in litf ul glares from the silent deptl
342. erceived now some hideous shape swinging from the trees anear now some avvd'ul f
343. rees anear now some avvd'ul face, taking form for an instant on the back ground
344. k ground of gloom, and then disappearing in the darkness; and heard, far away, m
345. e trees ; ; those of judgment, miingling witli Vvdld cries of cntliusiasm,the cl
346. of cymbals, and sound of feet careering in dances, whose fury seemed to quicken
347. my siglits and sounds, tlie warrior king advanced, not undisturbed by supernatur
348. 41 which a sacrificial fire was burning, wliich slied its sombre illuminations
349. t spoken truly, Druid," replied the king. "Await thou here, and when yonder star
350. us secret," returned the Druid, pointing to a bright star, which was slowly tlie
351. tlie w^oods, thou shalt learn descending through dark clouds, toward the distant
352. In the interval which elapsed, the king, who remained alone, leaning against th
353. d, the king, who remained alone, leaning against the gigantic portal of the temp
354. e gigantic portal of the temple, looking sometimes to its interior, and again to
355. , and still louder, when the ministering figures transfixed the doomed man with
356. igures who, with wild eyes and streaming hair, danced round the neighboring alta
357. aming hair, danced round the neighboring altar fire in mad timiult singing songs
358. boring altar fire in mad timiult singing songs of incantation and death, and wil
359. cantation and death, and wildly clashing brazen cymbals over their heads. At len
360. tion ; ; 42 of the dread rite sometliing like a black screen or mass of rolling
361. g like a black screen or mass of rolling cloud suddenly hid the altar lire, and
362. enly hid the altar lire, and surrounding scene from his eyes ; darkness filled t
363. ; darkness filled the temple hut looking beyond it he perceived the star had set
364. s brief in the land ? " Oh, Milcho, king of Dalaradia," exclaimed the Druid, " t
365. the Christian shall undo thee, and bring calamities upon thy house, if thou dost
366. o his mil. Even now the spell is working, and she, who should be the bride of th
367. e banquet hall. The Christian is wending his steps hither, and will soon confron
368. kle reaps the corn, that is now ripening above the ground, thy spirit shall have
369. t tlie anger of the Gods, by sacrificing Mahon, and delivering Sybilla to the Dr
370. ds, by sacrificing Mahon, and delivering Sybilla to the Druids on the morrow, de
371. rts, Than mirth can do with her enticing parts. —Dowland's Book of Songs (1600
372. the angry Druid, frightened and panting she reached the gate of the Tlie sentry
373. and eagerly demanded admittance. nizing her voice, immediatelj^ undid the faste
374. nchallenged aiid unquestioned; believing that, being under the special protectio
375. aiid unquestioned; believing that, being under the special protection of the god
376. She was much given of late, to wandering alone by the banks of the river Jo/ig a
377. uted it to some more tlian human feeling preternaturally imparted to her by the
378. d to her by the gods. and if 44: Placing her hand on her heart to still its tiim
379. ed as she gained tlie court, and looking toward her apartments beheld a li2!;ht
380. partments beheld a li2!;ht still burning. She knew it was left there by the" fai
381. left there by the" faithful Una awaiting her return and she blushed to think wha
382. the heart of her friend, while wondering at her long absence. She soou felt calm
383. . She soou felt calmer, however, knowing that slie was safe from the pursuit of
384. he liad gained the castle; and smoothing back the long ringlets, which liad beco
385. , her face flushed and her bosom heaving tremulously. gentle knock announced her
386. m from her seat, and gaze with wondering eyes around Softly whispering her name,
387. wondering eyes around Softly whispering her name, she approached, and Uuca her.
388. r spoke, and each could hear the beating of the otlier's Sybilla, gently disenga
389. the otlier's Sybilla, gently disengaging herself from her loving heart. embrace,
390. ntly disengaging herself from her loving heart. embrace, fastened the chamber do
391. her friend, and, though shame was eating at its core, and it was now again beati
392. t its core, and it was now again beating rapidly with excitement, conflde to her
393. d kept a lonely vigil anxiously awaiting and praying for her return. But before
394. ely vigil anxiously awaiting and praying for her return. But before she could sp
395. But before she could speak, Una, taking her hand in hers and looking timidly in
396. Una, taking her hand in hers and looking timidly in her face, wliile her voice t
397. swer. Her foster-sister, misinterpreting her silence, dropped the hand slie held
398. dear Una?" slie at length said, subduing her astonishment and passing her arm ar
399. d, subduing her astonishment and passing her arm around the young girl's neck. "
400. ded not tlie lapse of time, and liearing the lioneyed words of liimwliom my soul
401. re extinguished, and the moon was waning far in tlie west. Even then his fond so
402. ven of you, Sybilla, wlio were suffering an agony of suspense at my un maidenly
403. red Una in her ear, her he^rt fluttering with emotion, and hiding her face on Sy
404. e^rt fluttering with emotion, and hiding her face on Sybilla's breast to conceal
405. me as a pledge of his love;" and taking from her bosom a golden brooch, studded
406. illa ; and were it He 46 not for keeping the secret so long hidden from you, not
407. would cross my heart. To-night, missing you from the castle, I went in search o
408. e, I went in search of you; and thinking you had gone to tlie cairn beside tlie
409. r, but could not find you. Then fancying that you were loitering on the river's
410. u. Then fancying that you were loitering on the river's bank, I tiu'ued to seek
411. your heart to me, I will be as confiding, and tell you that 1 also have been abs
412. and most miserable of my life;" shading her face with her hands as she spoke, t
413. t words. By a violent effort controlling her emotion, and brushing her tears asi
414. rt controlling her emotion, and brushing her tears aside, Sybilla again addresse
415. ed him, Una, with all a woman's trusting? tieacherous. love, and gave to him my
416. oulless perfidy." Una cried Una, leaping to her feet, forgetful of all her hopes
417. ll her hopes and liappiness while gazing on the agonized face of her friend. "Wh
418. s true, Una," continued Sybilla, reading the thouglits " It is true. I, who expr
419. s true. I, who expressed in lier varying countenance. was ordained to be a vesta
420. mise to the Druids, and my own ; burning with a love I never felt before, gave m
421. he river's bank to-night, and in bm^ning words he reiterated his vow^s to me. My
422. d to a chair, for both had been standing for and burying her face in the folds o
423. r both had been standing for and burying her face in the folds of hel tlie last
424. , dear until ; ! me Una, ; ' . 4^ loving nature of Una was toncliecl, and, fling
425. ture of Una was toncliecl, and, flinging her arms around Sybilla's neck, she rai
426. and fondness of a si.^ter. After giving vent to her passionate grief, tlie tear
427. and she repealed in detail tlie m.eeting with her lover, the appearance of Conra
428. lean some hope for her friend by casting doubt on the words of the Druid. Sybill
429. , disguised for the purpose of thwarting their love and annulling their happines
430. se of thwarting their love and annulling their happiness. But Sybilla was convin
431. red groves, and all her doubts regarding lier lover's perjury were confirmed, by
432. , by his suspicious conduct in shrinking from the oath in the banquet hall. "No,
433. illa, Sybilla!" exclaimed Una, tlirowing herself into her arms, while tlie blind
434. rself into her arms, while tlie blinding tears almost choked lier utleriinco, ''
435. a prii cely house, and she That scowling Conra the purest and brightest in Emani
436. hesies nought but evil, if from the king he gets not gold aud jewels for his alt
437. possession. He cannot force an unwilling bride ; and even if he could, your fr-t
438. trength and power to oppose him, as King N'ml did." " Oh speak not thus, Una, of
439. ed Una with passionate energy, nd rising to lier feet, "I also am rejidy. i'lier
440. th your lieart. Would you, after gaining my brother's love and pledging to him y
441. r gaining my brother's love and pledging to him your vows, scatter these vows to
442. onra nuglit not approve of your entering the holy sisterhood." The thought dampe
443. to mind the many occasions when straying near the groves, she had been seen by C
444. oves, she had been seen by Conra romping amoni^ the trees and cluising butterfli
445. ra romping amoni^ the trees and cluising butterflies with child-like laughter an
446. ile the moi-e pensive Sybilla sat gazing on the river, or qnictly rested under t
447. o dasli it and our liopes to The evening brought us love and liappiness, but the
448. will And love and happiness ; ; in being the bride of Eel." " I feel weary, Sybi
449. t it, or at least deaden it of its sting. But do not tell my l)rother of my unho
450. and then good night." They knelt facing the east, and poured out their hearts i
451. in prayer to their sun-god, Una praying for a surcease of sorrow, and Sybilla a
452. ease of sorrow, and Sybilla again vowing her life at his shrine. Little did they
453. rated around it. The bright and dazzling hope of Sybilla's love, wliich, but a f
454. is own lack oi energy in not confronting him to his face, and hurling back tlie
455. confronting him to his face, and hurling back tlie dark and bitter lie in his te
456. ; with a iirm resolution of vindicating his character to Sybilla, even if he sh
457. the precincts of the castle, and gaining his chamber, flung himself on a couch.
458. eep But it was troubled and um-efreshing. settled on his ejelids. In his di-eams
459. s. In his di-eams he saw Sybilla waiting on the river's bank snd, as lie appi'oa
460. her to his heart, the black and frowning face of Conra intervened but w^itli one
461. intervened but w^itli one arm encircling the waist of Sybilla, and, raising the
462. cling the waist of Sybilla, and, raising the other with menacing gesture, he in
463. la, and, raising the other with menacing gesture, he in an angry manner, bade hi
464. one. The Druid, his countenance writhing with malignancy and scorn, pointed in a
465. d into his ear, the word " traiAwakening with a start, he leaped from his couch
466. leaped from his couch tor." and, looking at the sun, was surprised to iind that
467. over the mountain peaks, and was beaming almost in meridian splendor on the vall
468. ang sliot through his heart and, seating himself at a table, and covering his fa
469. seating himself at a table, and covering his face with his hands, he endeavored,
470. , he started from his seat, and quitting the chamber, descended to the court, an
471. ber, descended to the court, and passing quickly through the gate unconsciously,
472. ead and fearful deIt nunciation, beating himself beneath its sheltering shade, l
473. , beating himself beneath its sheltering shade, lie gave a loose rein to his tho
474. s, with which the breeze, with throbbing undulations, begemm^ed its breast. All
475. to care and melancholy, when a rustling among the bushes behind him suddenly fe
476. hind him suddenly fell upon his Brushing the damp dew from his forehead, which t
477. d, he started to his feet ; and, looking around, beheld, within a few paces of w
478. , and placed his hand upon his throbbing brow, as if to collect his distracted t
479. etry of her w^ell-deflned and commanding ligure enhanced by the absence of the r
480. nmliied her form on the previous evening, and looking more bright and lovely tha
481. orm on the previous evening, and looking more bright and lovely than ever. The b
482. ed her fair cheeks at their last meeting had fled, but in its place a snowy whit
483. and then as suddenly died aw^ay, leaving behind a more snowy and pallid wlutenes
484. more snowy and pallid wluteness. Uuwing, until the eagle plume in his hat touch
485. ffort, approached her. lute, her varying color betraying the lickle promptings o
486. d her. lute, her varying color betraying the lickle promptings of her heart, whi
487. heart, which came and went, now clothing her face in sunsliine and then darkenin
488. her face in sunsliine and then darkening it in shadow. Mingled feelings of love
489. ove «nd distrust, swept, with lightning rapidity through her heart, as they sto
490. er heart, as they stood thus confronting each other ; but so strong and ] owerfu
491. he was on tlie point of again forgetting her vow, and letting love obtain the ma
492. of again forgetting her vow, and letting love obtain the mastery. But suddenly r
493. in the mastery. But suddenly remembering the scene of tlie preceding night, and
494. remembering the scene of tlie preceding night, and the awful words of the Druid
495. ul words of the Druid, the smile dancing on her lip died away ; a look of scorn
496. ossession of her features ; and, drawing back as if she feared pollution ia his
497. nce. "Leave me!" she exclaimed, throwing up her arms, her eyes flashing mth indi
498. throwing up her arms, her eyes flashing mth indignant scorn, " Leave me, base w
499. nd gazed timidly upon her. The withering denunciation with which she greeted him
500. circle the head of a traitor 1 summoning all his resolution for For a moment she
501. he stood irreso- 65 stood, and, flinging his arms around in his excitement, almo
502. most touched her shoulder, but, stepping back with a shudder, she shrank from hi
503. ld be fierce and sudden as the lightning of Go, while it is yet time, for be ass
504. th haughty and defiant mien, and casting a glance of scorn as she passed, took t
505. rom his siglit among tlie trees. Turning in the direction which she had gone, he
506. t is lost to me forever. soothe my dying father, and then, in solitude, forget t
507. scaped his lips and, hurriedlj^- passing between the trees, he emerged from the
508. glory of the noon-day sun; and, heaving a deep sigh, as the tall towers of her
509. felt the with a purer love when kneeling at the holy thee. No ; 50 cloudod and m
510. t, and silently wended his way Summoning his retainers, he ordered them to to th
511. mmediately; and none of the chiefs being present in the court, the effects of th
512. s of the late revel, probably, detaining them in their chambers, he mounted his
513. he mounted his horse, and without taking leave of any of the inmates, in silence
514. , in silence took his departure, leaving behind him his hopes, his happiness, an
515. a returned she met her after ^ms morning ride, but a frown father, as we have se
516. he cloud had passed away. Toward evening she stole softly to his apartment, and
517. him asleep on his couch. Again deferring her interview until the morrow, she rej
518. unted to her her second and last meeting with Mahon, but even while they blamed
519. the abodo oi tUe Druids. lessly entering, CHAPTEK XTL STBIIXa's INTEEVIEW ** WIT
520. bedience 1 Shakespeare, — Tlie meaning, then, of country, virtue, faith, Flash
521. , virtue, faith, Flashed on me lightning-like I pressed my brow Down on the way-
522. le house, and A had a powerful following of clansmen, who would be no way tardy
523. n, who would be no way tardy in avenging the insult cast upon his name by this h
524. this highhanded and despotic proceeding. The old chief of Tir-owoii, his father
525. alaradian warrior, he shrank from giving pain to his ancient friend, and embitte
526. n to his ancient friend, and embittering his last days on earth by publicly proc
527. st days on earth by publicly proclaiming the perfidy of his son. These thoughts,
528. not avenged, and speedily, would I ring doAvn upon his house a terrible retribu
529. an ennigod tiger in his cage, muttering fierce maledictions against; the author
530. t; the author of all this wrong Stamping angrily on the floor, he stood for a mo
531. stood for a moment impatiently awaiting an answer to his summons. slave immedia
532. e fearful expression of rage on the king's face ; but an angry gesture soon reca
533. alled him to a sense of duty, and bowing lowly, he tremblingly approached his pr
534. is loudest note from the walls, and ring the loudest bell, to muster " the clans
535. to muster " the clansmen around the king Frightened and appalled, the slave fled
536. of the inmates of the castle. Springing from their beds, tlie warriors rushed f
537. ors rushed for their arms; and wondering at the untimely and unwonted summons, C
538. court. faMier, took command, and sending Oathal with a chosen band of followers
539. ion of the next event to occur, the king, All eyes were wjrli grim and scowling
540. g, All eyes were wjrli grim and scowling visage, appeared. I'iveted on him, and,
541. d cruel look on his face, that something extraordinary was about to occur. Their
542. ad in his countenance no signs of coming strife, either foreign or domestic, for
543. t awoken from his slumber, and following in the footsteps of his father, Nial, m
544. to the centre of the troops, and raising his arm, addressed them in his own tier
545. ssioned manner. He commenced by reciting the wars of Nial, of his raids and fora
546. the prophecies of the JDruids regarding him how they foretold of his coming and
547. ding him how they foretold of his coming and of his second visit to Erie ; and t
548. d sacrifice to Bel to stay the impending wrath which was threatened on the land,
549. and the oricles of the gods gave warning that Sicur and one who was There was a
550. iations than Congal and Cnthal, the king's sons. The former, at his own request,
551. ahon's apartment and with a guard, bring him and his retainers to justice. But c
552. ce. But consternation fell upon the king and his followers when Congal returned,
553. rs when Congal returned, after searching every nook and cranny of his chamber, a
554. through Milclio's breast aa eo sickening and opprestsive thonglit flashed upon h
555. an hour. '' 'Tis well," replied the king, a grim smile passing over his face, "a
556. " replied the king, a grim smile passing over his face, "and now, warriors of Da
557. , to you belong the task of intercepting this renegade ere he readies Tir-owen.
558. e he readies Tir-owen. Follow, and bring him back alive or dead. If alive, the d
559. be on his father's threshold !" Choosing a picked band of spearmen, and taking w
560. ng a picked band of spearmen, and taking with them a pack of blood-hounds, the t
561. ce; while their father, after dismissing his followers, with dark and gloomy bro
562. a to his presence. The dark and lowering look on Ids face changed to a softer hu
563. ked with the traces of recent suft'ering. His stony heart began to thaw, and tak
564. is stony heart began to thaw, and taking her hand, he led her to a seat, but did
565. e, nor did he show any further endearing demonstraHis searching look seemed to t
566. further endearing demonstraHis searching look seemed to tion of kindness towards
567. Her cheeks were overspread with burning blushes, as the thought gained cred(iuc
568. tlirown lierself at his feet, confessing her fault, and begging for his forgiven
569. feet, confessing her fault, and begging for his forgiveness; but slio seemed ri
570. een faithful ; and now, Sybilla, knowing all this, and being educrited from chil
571. ow, Sybilla, knowing all this, and being educrited from childhood to consider yo
572. s ? "Father," she answered, now starting from her seat, and drawing herself up t
573. now starting from her seat, and drawing herself up to her full height, while he
574. Sybilla," exclaimed her father, clasping her in his arms, " your mother's soul s
575. t evil to mine and me." " If, by obeying your will," she answered, kissing his c
576. beying your will," she answered, kissing his cheek, heart, ; "this can be accomp
577. Sybilla." daughter, and to thee I cling for succour and support. Last night I d
578. rious destiny that is thine." Imprinting a kiss upon her cheek, he gently diseng
579. sengaged her from his arms, and throwing himself on his couch, relapsed Sybilla
580. duty (lone to find content Each dawning day wakes nie to shrink From life, from
581. e com*st thou ? To comfort you and bring you joyful news I" Harlow's Edwa/rd II.
582. f his dejection, believed that something sinister had occurred at the They had c
583. and abrupt departure. marked at starting the sorrowful and care-worn look that o
584. y conversed in whispers, vainly striving to unravel the mystery and indulging in
585. ing to unravel the mystery and indulging in a hundred con- As jectures as to its
586. golden-haired Cailin^ Una, has something to do with our journey this evening, an
587. hing to do with our journey this evening, and with our chieftain's gloomy thougi
588. n the right, "but Carbre, to my thinking it was something more dreadful still."
589. Carbre, to my thinking it was something more dreadful still." " And what mvj th
590. dse Feilim ?" questioned Carbre, kughing at the gravity with which he spoke. " H
591. tlie gronp, "for thou art always prating of goblins i:tA fairies, and banshees,
592. nd banshees, and spirits, and extracting evil from every omen that appears. The
593. ," eaid Carbre, petulantly, and bringing his horse nearer to Feilim. "Were his f
594. ung chief Congal looks not with favoring eye on the gallant that would dare to a
595. sides " Which way is the chieftain going," exclaimed Carbre, interrupting Feilim
596. n going," exclaimed Carbre, interrupting Feilim, utterly carekes of the jiojhecy
597. n as Carbre beside him, to speak nothing of our own prow^ess, he need not fear a
598. ver he may lead," replied Carbre, urging his horse forward. They quickly followe
599. o, still absorbed in reverie, was taking no note of the way he was purnarrow pat
600. ed into a dark wood whose huge and suing. tall trees seemed, by their size and s
601. centuries before. The sun was declining in the heavens, and his last faint beam
602. eavens, and his last faint beams tipping the mountain tops with gold, as they en
603. thwart his path as he passed the opening in the woods and came underneath the tr
604. and came underneath the trees. Recalling his scattered senses, and banishing for
605. ling his scattered senses, and banishing for the moment the thought of Sybilla f
606. heart, he gazed around in doubt, deeming that he had lost his way ; but seeing h
607. ng that he had lost his way ; but seeing his retainers following close behind, f
608. way ; but seeing his retainers following close behind, felt convinced that he wa
609. ind, felt convinced that he was pursuing the right direction toward his home ; a
610. were the thoughts of his companWondering at the cause which impelled him to trea
611. n silence ; and as the shades of evening fell, and the twilight came, hushing th
612. ing fell, and the twilight came, hushing the song of the birds, and casting a we
613. shing the song of the birds, and casting a weird and dreary stillness over the s
614. nd dreary stillness over the surrounding woods, they felt a dread steal over the
615. d steal over their spirits, a depressing and dejected, feeling which, in spite o
616. rits, a depressing and dejected, feeling which, in spite of all their efforts, t
617. 66 and dart acrc-ss tlieir path, causing their horses to plunge with restive and
618. at brief intervals. They were journeying far from the haunts of men, and every s
619. on, and were on the point of questioning the young Prince in regard to his desti
620. hey obeyed, and tance, was heard calling on them. coming to his side found thems
621. tance, was heard calling on them. coming to his side found themselves on the ban
622. led his followers astray, and in trying to secure safety from Milcho and the an
623. to extricate himself without consulting his companions, and, after a pause, aga
624. *' Dos't think, Carbre, that by crossing this stream we would be in the territor
625. and await the dawn of monjii^ir 67 being assented to, tliey led their horses to
626. n some places, impetuous and viob Having at length obtained what they sought, tl
627. midway in the current, without m.eeting with any accident, when a tree, which l
628. olence of a recent storm, camiC drifting down the river, and coming in collision
629. amiC drifting down the river, and coming in collision with Carbre's horse, which
630. unhurt; but the horse, with an expiring sln-iek, which echoed fearfully on the
631. the darkness, while his master, grasping the stirrups of Mahon, swam ashore in s
632. y landed, when a light was seen gleaming from a rock that rose high above the ri
633. igh above the river's bank ; and looking up, they beheld an old and venerable ma
634. venerable man, with a pine torch blazing in his hand ; and by its light trying t
635. ng in his hand ; and by its light trying to penetrate the darkness below. His be
636. guishable, for the inconstant flickering of the torch, sometimes fanned by the w
637. and at other times nearly extinguishing it, rendered it impossible to judge by
638. light of Bel !" exclaimed Mahon, shading his eyes with his hands, and peering th
639. ing his eyes with his hands, and peering through the darkness at the object befo
640. ve he is a Druid, and we are trespassing on liis holy ground. This river may be
641. deity, and yonder groves be the abiding places of holy priests and vestals.'' "
642. ad better use no laggard pace in leaving them behind." "I knew there was some ev
643. e evil over us," said Feilim, in whining tones, all his superstitious fears gain
644. nes, all his superstitious fears gaining the ascendant; " did I not tell thee so
645. ve in such darkness as this, not knowing which path to Let us remain and see wha
646. th to Let us remain and see what morning will bring pursue ? lorth? The water ha
647. s remain and see what morning will bring pursue ? lorth? The water has stiffened
648. ever disregarded." ''The light is coming hither!" exclaimed Malion, "he sees us
649. med Malion, "he sees us and is decending the cliff. Let us wait and meet him." G
650. group, who stood silent and wonder- ing at his unexpected appearance in such a
651. he fears of Feilim, who for once, during the day, ceased to prognosticate evil.
652. ," answered Mahon, respectfully saluting him, " and have lost our way. left King
653. him, " and have lost our way. left King Milclio's castle this evening, intendin
654. left King Milclio's castle this evening, intending to sojourn in Tirowen, but b
655. Milclio's castle this evening, intending to sojourn in Tirowen, but by some mish
656. es for all. at my devotions ere retiring for the night, when I heard a shriek co
657. the night, when I heard a shriek coming up the valley; and praised be our God i
658. e still in ! 69 poor creature struggling in the water. current and dijffiicult I
659. phere." be it," answered Mahon, catching " Lead the bridle rein of his horse and
660. e bridle rein of his horse and preparing to depart. on, for I confess I am weary
661. The old man made no answer, but walking before them, led them by a different pa
662. it, and at its base saw a light burning in a small cabin, almost wholly conceal
663. a/rnell. where you see the light burning," ol>served theii* guide, as he slowly
664. w me, and be not afraid, Owen is waiting for us and will give us kindly greetmg.
665. ed in a saffron-colored shirt, he having thrown is " That my hut, off liis mantl
666. rs, and was dai k and glossy as the wing of the raven. His crommeal and beard we
667. hue, and gave to his features a pleasing and beautiful expression. Mahon paused
668. ers; "Owen, though drew back,ljeliev^ing him "Do j my gentle and harmless as a E
669. after the fatigues of the day. Disposing of their arms on tlie antlers M'hich hu
670. ers M'hich hung on the Willis, and being seated, their kindly hosts brought from
671. r kindly hosts brought from an adjoining apartiiient, two husce dishes of lish a
672. antity of oaten cake. Carefully removing the book, Owen spread before them the r
673. le his older companion hastened to bring fi-esh water from a spring that bubbled
674. ened to bring fi-esh water from a spring that bubbled close by the hut. Having r
675. ng that bubbled close by the hut. Having returned, he desired his guests to part
676. y of the scanty fare, humbly apologizing for its rude and meagre proportions ; b
677. and meagre proportions ; but expressing a hope that he would be able to provide
678. ollowers immediately set about following Their appetites were keen, and the savo
679. had guided them to the hut and bringing from a recess a harp, he seated himself
680. strings of his harp, and without looking from the instrument or noticing its eff
681. looking from the instrument or noticing its effect on his guests, began, in a s
682. laden with sorrow, then gradually rising, swelled into ^ loud acclaim of praise
683. loud acclaim of praise and thanksgiving, ending in a raptur ous outpouring of p
684. claim of praise and thanksgiving, ending in a raptur ous outpouring of prayer an
685. iving, ending in a raptur ous outpouring of prayer and joy. Owen, aa the first n
686. bent his head on his bosom, and clasping Ids hands as if in supplication, bowed
687. akened by Owen's attitude, and, glancing at Conall, he beheld his face glow with
688. t of Bel. While an imaccountable feeling of awe, blended with admiration, crept
689. and mode of life. That he was something other than what he seemed, he readily s
690. ocation, which he believed he was making to his God, tended to confirm Mahon's s
691. longer *^,m-b his desire of questioning him: " Methinks, good Conall, thy melod
692. never before have I heard such witching Was not that last strain of your harp a
693. Druids, but to the only true and living God, to whom be all praise and glory !"
694. . A momentary silence ensued, and during tlie interval a host of strange thought
695. conjured, up he gave expression, looking Conall intently in the tace "Your words
696. s of the Tutlia-de-Danaans are crumbling before the glorious light of the Sun-go
697. lts, who came to Ireland from the mining regions of the Pyrenees.— i/'tt/^'«
698. ngs sliall bow down and worship, deeming themselves but w^orms before tlie majes
699. ory. He is the God I worsliip, the liing whom I adore! His light is already on t
700. imed Mahon, his impetuous nature getting the better of his judgment and courtesy
701. ment and courtesy, and fiercely stamping on the earthen floor: "What is His name
702. shatter the false idols of Bel." Drawing a crucifix from his bosom he devoutly k
703. ld not have felt a more poignant feeling of dread and lioi ror, than took posses
704. d on the floor. bued with the prevailing ideas of the time, were not sunk so dee
705. hen they saw their young chief, standing unharmed and fearless, before the Chris
706. earless, before the Christian. Springing to the wall, Carl)re hastily snatched h
707. r and leaped to Mahon's side, exclaiming, "Fear nothing, my Prince; the idol ot
708. Mahon's side, exclaiming, "Fear nothing, my Prince; the idol ot a Christian dog
709. d. said Conall in a calm and unfaltering tone, without the least hesitation or f
710. ulse was to lly, but there was something so commanding and fascinating withal, i
711. y, but there was something so commanding and fascinating withal, in the manner a
712. something so commanding and fascinating withal, in the manner and countenance o
713. cited to know more of the singular being with whom he had so unexpectedly been t
714. e, extract from him his history. Telling his followers to remain quiet, he again
715. heard BO many fearful stories concerning these Christians, that I am not surpris
716. ospitality I had shown him, by imparting to me the faith of his divine master. B
717. me the faith of his divine master. Being of a religious disposition, I had long
718. ad long entertained the idea of entering the Druidical priesthood, and was being
719. the Druidical priesthood, and was being educated for that high office by one of
720. e of their most learned scholars. Seeing me poring over my books, the stranger i
721. most learned scholars. Seeing me poring over my books, the stranger in my house
722. and, one by one, by his subtle reasoning and eloquence, persuaded me of the fall
723. he had as yet but seldom spoken. Finding my mind prepared for the goodly seed wh
724. vation of sinners. feel happy in reading to you the words of our divine Saviour.
725. ivine Saviour." companions were becoming deeply interAll fear and dread had pass
726. Then, in a sweet, imforetold tlie coming of the man-God. passioned voice, he rea
727. e exercise, and eyes. Conall, perceiving the effect of his teaching, closed the
728. l, perceiving the effect of his teaching, closed the volume for the night, in or
729. this secluded spot, to await the coming of him who shall vanquish tlie idols of
730. he scene in Milcho's banquet-hall rising like a vision before him. " He is one w
731. s one who was a former slave of the king of Dalaradia, known by the name of Sicu
732. , will the land be humbled by the coming of Patrick; that he will root out Druid
733. ** A Tailcenn will come over the raging sea, With his perforated garment, With
734. d other rich gifts, is over- and bearing the standard of the cross, he hies him
735. f salvation. Even now, he is approaching. Perhaps, to-morrow's sun will see the
736. ll soon return and warn me of his coming. gether we shall meet him, and bear him
737. The name signifies the bent or stooping monument. It was the principal idol of
738. s argument was more effective in gaining the consent of Mahon to prolong his vis
739. recently left Dalaradia, and was fleeing from the vengeance which he believed wa
740. d truth of his expressions by witnessing himself the great missionary whom the D
741. ou and your retainers as soon as we sing our evening hymn, and pray that the lig
742. retainers as soon as we sing our evening hymn, and pray that the light of truth
743. ow with the love of the true God shining in your souls." Making the sign of the
744. true God shining in your souls." Making the sign of the cross on his forehead,
745. forehead, he took the harp, and kneeling with Owen, sang a hymn of praise to God
746. Virgin Mother. Then, devoutly repeating the Lord's Prayer and the Angelical Sal
747. en wood, the mavis and merle are singing, —8coU. Anxious, restless and uneasy,
748. and uneasy, with a thousand conflicting thoughts flitting through his brain, Ma
749. a thousand conflicting thoughts flitting through his brain, Mahon lay on his cou
750. As his thoughts recurred to his meeting with Sybilla in the grove, and the drea
751. of the Druid who charged him with being a Christian, and which accusation was t
752. owed to himself to return in the morning and confront him with the lie. But reme
753. nfront him with the lie. But remembering how abruptly he had left, and that Conr
754. iped. He wislied to hear more concerning him ; and the words of the Holy Book, s
755. e to fulfil the prophecies con» ccrning him, and break the idols of Bel. He wou
756. matter in his mind, the more perplexing he found Grown wearied with the gloomy
757. him, and jaded by the long and fatiguing journey of the day, he at length succum
758. til the 6un was up and the birds singing on the trees. savory odor of venison wa
759. , Carbre, Ibar and Feilim, were awaiting him, and as soon as he entered, all sat
760. he entered, all sat down to the morning repast. The meal being finished, Conall
761. wn to the morning repast. The meal being finished, Conall reminded his guest of
762. is guest of Lis promise of the preceding night, to remain with him until tlie ar
763. o go on a walk through the woods fishing excursion to Lough Neagh. in the mornin
764. excursion to Lough Neagh. in the morning would be delightful, and they might hav
765. might have im opportunity of displaying their skill with the bow on a deer or T
766. d by the company; and wolf. after making preparations for the day's sport, they
767. d bow. The chase was the pastime of king and In peace they folpeasant at the per
768. ared them to withstand tlie stern During the intervals of peace, sliock and dano
769. deer; and courted its dangers, "waiting for nobler game But the forests are gon
770. they put out into the lake. So exciting and so numerous the linny victims, that
771. Mahon, whose watchful eye had been ning the bank, and who suddenly observed a d
772. the forest with head erect and sniffing tlie air. niC your bow, Ibar; a slice o
773. d acquisition to our meal if I can bring him down." Ibar silently handed him the
774. handed him the bow, and carefully fixing an arrow to the string, the fatal shaft
775. carefully fixing an arrow to the string, the fatal shaft sped with lightning ra
776. ing, the fatal shaft sped with lightning rapidity and lodged deep in the heart o
777. s] rang into the air, and fell writhing in his blood. Ibar and Ciirbre immediat
778. to bkin and dress him with their himting knives, while Owen and Feilim were busy
779. the business of catcliiiig fisli during the hours of the morning. He had been r
780. ig fisli during the hours of the morning. He had been reciting to his companions
781. urs of the morning. He had been reciting to his companions, the manner of his co
782. f the redemption of Erinn, on the coming of Patrick. Thus were their minds f:;ra
783. e love of the true God which was burning in Ids own. As yet he could not tell if
784. if the seed had ttJvcn root but trusting in the mercy of the Saviour, he hoped a
785. enewed tlie conversation, when returning in the evening, laden with the spoils o
786. versation, when returning in the evening, laden with the spoils of lake and wood
787. ils of lake and wood and before retiring for the night, joined with Owen in ] ra
788. glit. passed away. On the tliird morning, Mahon requested Conall to accompany hi
789. ompany him through the forest, and bring witli him his book. Having arrived at a
790. st, and bring witli him his book. Having arrived at a secluded spot about a mile
791. d. Keadily he complied, and in a feeling and tremulous voice, read for him the p
792. , and Conall, at the conclusion, looking up, found him bathed Two dfiys in tears
793. tian's soul to find him his and throwing arms around him, he hung on his neck 85
794. th praise and love. Their emotion having subsided, Mahon opened liis lieart to h
795. ed liis lieart to his friend, disclosing to him its innermost secrets. Ho re- co
796. and fears, and tlien in a tone soothing as that of the mother to the babe, told
797. eart, and created a more intense longing for the hour to come, when he would beh
798. all, " on the night of our first meeting. 1 had dispatched Bratha, a friend of m
799. , a friend of mine, to Lagenia, to bring tidings uf Patrick ; and, after secijig
800. ned in tongues, and skilled in reasoning are beloved by tlie people, and obeyed
801. obeyed by them in all matters concerning religion, and it will be a hard task, m
802. so, Mahon?" II agitated with conflicting feelings, and opposing thoughts are tug
803. with conflicting feelings, and opposing thoughts are tugging at my heart." '' Y
804. lings, and opposing thoughts are tugging at my heart." '' You are lighting the b
805. ugging at my heart." '' You are lighting the battle against the evil one. In my
806. prayers shall ascend with, lis l)lessing and His love. your's, and it may please
807. place, shall rise temples to the living God, bearing on tliousand bells tlieir
808. rise temples to the living God, bearing on tliousand bells tlieir front the emb
809. lem of man's salvation. A in celebrating the jubilee of peace; and aromid the ho
810. not see them all realized." " Something tells me I shall. But if I do not, they
811. er,for whocan prevail against the living God ? None." Mahon lapsed into silence,
812. irds sang sweeter, than on the preceding morning. The forest was, indeed, glorio
813. g sweeter, than on the preceding morning. The forest was, indeed, glorious. Clot
814. to the sky, and extended their spreading wings as if to woo the traveller to the
815. startled fa^vn would skip, and crossing their path, plunge into the unbroken fa
816. the dove was softly heai*d A 88 mingling with the song of the thrush ; or the mo
817. she soared aloft, and poured her morning orison to heaven. Beneath their feet, t
818. eneath their feet, the soft and yielding moss, bespangled with flowers of a tlio
819. nature's fairest embroidery, as pleasing and delightful to the eye, as luxurious
820. r tendrils among tlie brandies, clinging in fondness to their great protectors.
821. attention was arrested by the crackling of They branches, and the voice of some
822. s, and the voice of some one approaching. paused to listen, and as the sounds ca
823. he voice of Owen. Breathless and panting, he rushed toward them, his face perspi
824. rushed toward them, his face perspiring and florid with the exertion he They ha
825. death. He trembled, and, in a faltering voice, asked Owen what tidings had he t
826. 89 praised!-" exclaimed Conall, falling on liiia knees and raising his hands to
827. nall, falling on liiia knees and raising his hands to heaven. •* The people ar
828. to heaven. •* The people are flocking in thousands to hear him," continued Ow
829. by his staff; and the Druids are flying from their groves and temples, and hidi
830. rom their groves and temples, and hiding themselves in the mountains." "Now, God
831. ns." "Now, God be not the prophecy being fulfilled, Mahon?" exclaimed Conall in
832. rsed with him, but received his blessing. He brings to you a token from the Sain
833. f the Braid, where he awaits your coming. Bratha shall tell jon all when you rea
834. h the great soldier of Christ." Grasping Mahon by the arm, he hurried him along
835. appeared to view, witli Bratlia standing on the threshold. now ?" " At 90 CHAPTE
836. hold. now ?" " At 90 CHAPTER THE MEETING WITH II. ST. PATRICK. ••Then round
837. at hoary reverend man. But soon the king his aspect changed * the Saint said, sc
838. e as Mahon entered ; and Conall, turning to Bratha, and pointing to Mahon, said
839. Conall, turning to Bratha, and pointing to Mahon, said : "Bratha, this is Mahon
840. ung Prince of Augher. He been sojourning with us for a few days, waiting, like l
841. journing with us for a few days, waiting, like lir.s ourselves, for the approach
842. e as he looked on his bright and beaming face. Bratha told his eager audience of
843. audience of his adventures since leaving the hut, and his meeting with St. Patri
844. s since leaving the hut, and his meeting with St. Patrick. The last event occurr
845. d Emania, as the Saint was about setting foot in the latter, and journeying towa
846. tting foot in the latter, and journeying toward Dalai-adia, to visit Milcho, his
847. , to visit Milcho, his old master. Being seated, 01 so nnir.oroiis wore tlie mTi
848. ded to see him. until the second evening, that Bratlia was permitted theluippili
849. fore him as he appeared. Patrick, seeing him, asked him if he believed; whereupo
850. an, and had been sent by Conall to bring tidhigs of ]m The Saint was well please
851. Bratlia, and gave him a cross, charging him to deliver it to Conall, and bring
852. g him to deliver it to Conall, and bring his master to him. He would meet him by
853. n performed, he never wearied in telling. The little silver crucilix, the gift o
854. nall placed it next his heart and taking eration and love. the one he had former
855. e gave it to Malion. The latter, kissing it, as he had seen Conall do, placed it
856. val, looked at his master with a feeling of dread and horror. That the spells of
857. ifix from the hand of Conall; but, being afraid to utter a remonstrance, wisely
858. d adverse news tc tell." 92 " Concerning whom ? " Concerning all of us, but espe
859. ll." 92 " Concerning whom ? " Concerning all of us, but especially the Prince of
860. father's followers, urged on by the king and his I saw them, to-day, pass throug
861. I was told, distinctly hear the yelping of their bloodhounds. when I reached th
862. ht." " In what direction were they going ? " inquired Mahon, calmly. "The path t
863. n, calmly. "The path they w^ere pursuing led toward the Braid, and my presumptio
864. presumption is, that they were returning from Tir-owen." "So much the better for
865. aimed Conall, enthusiastically, grasping Mahon by the hand, "and, until then, le
866. tlie song of praise and and thanksgiving, which was wafted heavenward on the win
867. was anxious inmates were up and stirring. prepared, which was scarcely touched ;
868. ins on foot; and in the event of meeting Milcho's soldiers, tliey could easily h
869. the broad expanse of forest, and shaking the mists from his mane, touched witli
870. as lost in the distance ; dark, frowning mountains rose before them, — — and
871. e to summit. Beautiful glens lay smiling in the rays of the morning sun, nestled
872. s lay smiling in the rays of the morning sun, nestled between the hills, where,
873. er gambolled and browsed. Now, following the course of a stream that wimpled dro
874. tangled grove ; now cautiously climbing the sides of a precipitous rock, wliich
875. deep and darksome gorge ; again plunging into the dense and pathless forest, or
876. he dense and pathless forest, or scaling the slopes of tlie numerous hills that
877. ceeded on their journey, without halting, until the sun gave token of the noon-d
878. gave token of the noon-day hom\ Resting on the banks of a streamlet, that wound
879. l, which was most welcome and refreshing, after the toilsome and fatiguing march
880. eshing, after the toilsome and fatiguing march of the huge nature's brightest ve
881. nature's brightest verdure, and morning. Though burning with impatience to reac
882. est verdure, and morning. Though burning with impatience to reach tlieir destina
883. not be accomplished before the following day; and, being under his guidance, wer
884. hed before the following day; and, being under his guidance, were obliged to cm-
885. nd Mahon had kept together since morning; the latter helping his aged friend thr
886. gether since morning; the latter helping his aged friend through the most diffic
887. d a chance for conversation, instructing and enlightening his young protege hito
888. nversation, instructing and enlightening his young protege hito the dogmas and m
889. would loom up before them in the morning light, and the waters of the Braid murm
890. n had reached the meridian. Next morning, with light hearts and buoyant footstep
891. d their march. Their hearts were beating in unison with the songsters of the for
892. e songsters of the forest, and throbbing with anticipated joy. With feelings of
893. of delight they found themselves nearing their destination, encompassed by the s
894. ore them, and loomed aloft, sentinelling the pleas ant valleys of Dalaradia. The
895. ey looked brilliant in the sunthe living green of shine, with crimson and gold,
896. a glory like a rainbow, while the coming haze of autumn hung its soft illusions
897. illusions over them, vainly endeavoring to subdue their Soon the flowing, silve
898. avoring to subdue their Soon the flowing, silver-voiced Braid murbrilliant hues.
899. ey observed people of both sexes, coming from all directions of the compass, and
900. l directions of the compass, and wending their way toward the goal to which they
901. the road that led to selves, journeying. the valley, vast throngs were in motio
902. le, were lilled with a dense and smiling crowd. From the grey and grizzled veter
903. oy, all were there, and eagerly pressing forward to meet the man of whom they ha
904. o much. Our travellers joined the living stream that was impetuously surgiug tow
905. ley, whereon St. Patrick stood, teaching and preaching to the people. They seeme
906. t. Patrick stood, teaching and preaching to the people. They seemed to hang, spe
907. whose hearts were moved l^y his teaching and pathetic eloqueiice, flung themselv
908. re him, ind smote their breasts. Wishing to obtain a nearer view of the great Ap
909. gh the crowd, and succeeded in obtaining a good position in front of tlie Saint.
910. the joy and delight of Conall Trembling on the verge of mental rapture, and and
911. Propliet of God. Appointed One, holding in liis hand the ross of Christ and 'i
912. Christ and 'i ( ; fearlessly proclaiming the creed of the Saviour in the very th
913. hand of God, whose destiny as one coming from was, to ciu'b tlie licen- ; $)0 ti
914. with his rare eloquence and fascinating expression, told favorably for him, in
915. te as the driven snow, attentive hearing. fell over the sacred vestments w^hich
916. s form was erect, and tall ; the bearing fearless ; and the brilliancy of his ey
917. voice of the saint rose high in ringing cadence, and lilled the valley with its
918. i-ed and musical tone. He was explaining to them the melancholy and sublime deta
919. his companions had succeeded in gaining a closer proximity to the Saint ; and,
920. mpassioned words he had heard, following the example of Conall, removed from his
921. loud murmur, which soon swelled Swaying backward and into a cry, arose from the
922. tude suddenly broke and fled, scattering in all few, however, remained on and ar
923. conjecture, at this strange proceed ing of the people, the blast of a trumpet r
924. e latter stood a tall and savage looking Dalaradian, holding in the leash a pack
925. l and savage looking Dalaradian, holding in the leash a pack of bloodhounds, who
926. nds, whose fiery eyes and red protruding tongues, betokened their savage thirst
927. heir keeper restrained them from leaping on the terrified followers of the Saint
928. gazed calmly on the intruders. Singling out Congal, as their leader, he slowly
929. d, and fearlessly confronted him. Fixing his eye on the young Prince, who haught
930. s glance, he, in a solemn and commanding manner^ addressed St. mound where Patri
931. rinn, and of Milcho, my father, the King of Dalaradia, to drag you and all your
932. bear him to •'^ You will find the king." Mahon, beckoning to his retainers, wh
933. ou will find the king." Mahon, beckoning to his retainers, who immediately fol-
934. it not, but silently looked on, awaiting the issnft — — 98 — " There is th
935. er. But the Saint restrained him. Laying his hand on his shoulder, he said "Peac
936. have power to liarm you.'' Then raising in his hand the cross, he held it befor
937. to teach to Erinn the only true I bring with me the truth that shall faith of t
938. the truth that shall faith of the living God. illumine your soul, and raise you
939. thy blasphemies deserve." " Let us bring him to the king," shouted several in a
940. deserve." " Let us bring him to the king," shouted several in a breath, clanking
941. ," shouted several in a breath, clanking their spears upon their shields, and mo
942. ir spears upon their shields, and moving toward 99 Let us let the dogs on him, a
943. shouted Congal in a loud voice, pointing to Mahon. The latter was about to resis
944. red them; and Mastruggle. hon, sheathing his weapon, suffered himself to be arre
945. him a few paces in advance, one standing on each side to guard and detain him un
946. s, who bounded toward the Saint, yelling and yelping as if they sniffed blood an
947. ed toward the Saint, yelling and yelping as if they sniffed blood and were impat
948. atter did not run, in fear and trembling, when the dogs were loosed, and turned
949. loosed, and turned upon him; but turning his back on the path which he was expec
950. pain, and feared to touch him. Uttering a fearful malediction, and striking the
951. ring a fearful malediction, and striking the animaU with the whip he carried, Le
952. ed to the foremost houiia, ! ! ! patting him on the back. But the hound drew bac
953. own head !" exclaimed Patrick, (Stepping to the side of Leury, and speaking in s
954. pping to the side of Leury, and speaking in solemn and measured tones. *' Your u
955. . Prince spectators. Oongal, remembering his scornful words to the Saint, trembl
956. possession of their hearts, and longing to flee, they still remained, irresolut
957. nall, the Christian, there was something in this unexpected interposition of God
958. their fright, was Feilim, who, breaking the bonds in which superstition had bou
959. , rushed towards the Saint; and, bending his knee, supplicated him to pray to hi
960. approached his ; A brother, and, taking his hand, led him to the Saint. Then kn
961. and, led him to the Saint. Then kneeling before him, asked his forgiveness and b
962. him, asked his forgiveness and blessing. They were quickly followed by the rema
963. the remainder of the band; who, casting their spears aside, prostrated themselv
964. rshipped the Christian's God, renouncing their idols, and the service of Bel. St
965. Cathal, and Congal," he said, addressing the 101 two young princes, " liie you t
966. m that liis former sLive is approacliing, bringing to him the word of life. Acqu
967. s former sLive is approacliing, bringing to him the word of life. Acquaint him o
968. e sun.'' Congal, whose heart was burning with the new faith,, so wonderfully mad
969. st to him, approached Mahon, and rushing into his arms, hugged his head on his b
970. eart of Mahon was touched, and returning the caress, whispered in his ear that h
971. depart, and convey the news to the king. Receiving two young princes and their
972. d convey the news to the king. Receiving two young princes and their followers,
973. ppeared from sight, the Saint, beckoning the Prince of Augher and his companions
974. m he had invited to his preshis blessing, the ence. loa CHAPTER TffE XII. EVE OF
975. TUBB FOR THE BACBED QEOYES. I am a thing of feelings, And have of late been sick
976. gs more than mine, love my I In watching me. — Werrur, on Milcho's tower, and
977. nd alone, paced tlie battlements, gazing, with eager eye, on the dim and distant
978. gh the gloom, and see beyond, the coming of his deadliest foes. Since the depart
979. . ish impatience, and cursed the lagging hours of their absence. On the second e
980. of their absence. On the second evening after their departure, he was visited b
981. ly usurped the place of the rose, adding a more fascinating charm to the wondrou
982. e of the rose, adding a more fascinating charm to the wondrous beauty slione bri
983. d within. could not hide from the loving gaze of Una, the pain and misery tliat
984. , the pain and misery tliat were gnawing at her heart. The latter knew, too well
985. The Druid and her fatlier were preparing their character. her mind for the great
986. to take place in lier life, and buoying her with hopes of happiness and peace,
987. tliat w^as once elastic as the bounding fawn's, become slow and measured. The o
988. it was evident that her heart was being blighted by the dread sacrifice she was
989. er's love for her, frequently expressing a wish that their union would occur bef
990. tion with her foster-sister, or the King, she w^as the linl)it of seating hersel
991. he King, she w^as the linl)it of seating herself on the bank of the river and po
992. elf on the bank of the river and pouring over the book which Conra had given her
993. k which Conra had given her. One evening Una stole unperceived upon her, and as
994. hat moment, Sybilla unconscious of being observed, began to sing, in a low, swee
995. nscious of being observed, began to sing, in a low, sweet voice, a plaintive and
996. concluded, felt the hot tears trickling down her cheeks ; Rest, weary heart, an
997. b irque engulfed at sea, The storm-king's wrath has vanquished thee. 'Tis vain
998. ezes sweetly blow The wild and wandering bird and bee, Sip honeyed sweets from f
999. o more, its Sybilla," cried Una, rushing from her hiding plfice, are you so mela
1000.lla," cried Una, rushing from her hiding plfice, are you so melanand throwing he
1001.ing plfice, are you so melanand throwing herself into her arms, " " choly, and w
1002.her arms, " " choly, and why do you sing in such a sad and tearful strain ? " Be
1003.answered Sybilla, re- "O! Why my turning Una's embrace and burying her head in h
1004.Why my turning Una's embrace and burying her head in her bosom. '' Do not give w
1005.w, Sybilla, it is but a dark and passing cloud which appears in the sky at night
1006. and disappear in the rays of the rising darkness has eclipsed your heart for a
1007.eart for a moment but dissolve ; morning ; will dissipate its murky sliadows and
1008. a smile, the painful sensations preying on your heart ? Has your Una been so wa
1009.o confide in her?'' I have been yearning to open my sorrows to your heart, dear
1010.t rebel against the decision of the King and Conra?" asked Una. " replied Sybill
1011., the sunshine of youth's happy n.orning dimmed, wliy should I linger amid scene
1012.ou depart," said Una mournfully, shading her eyes witli her hand to conceal lior
1013.a's heart had known, this sudden parting from her sister, as she fondly styled h
1014.he separation, brought with it a feeling fraught with unmitigated sorrow. " I ca
1015.ured " Congah' Una blushed, and catching Sybilla's dark ringlets, held them to h
1016.held them to her face to hide the rising color on her cheeks. ''He has now been
1017.a fruitless one," returned Una, watching her looks as if to read there the unspo
1018.is liberty, at any man's beck or bidding; and I fear me, their meeting will lead
1019.or bidding; and I fear me, their meeting will lead to blood." "And I am the unha
1020.se of it all," exclaimed Sybilla, hiding her face in her hands, as if to shut fr
1021.mine, Una. the gods are already wreaking am resolved, if penitence and I was fal
1022.y future life shall atone for the erring and sinful past. As a daughter of Bel a
1023." Una was about to reply when a rustling among the brandies suddenly startled he
1024.ndies suddenly startled her, and looking up she beheld the dark face of Conra th
1025.he dark face of Conra the Druid standing before tliem. The semblance of a smile
1026. well, my daughter," he said, addressing Sybilla, as soon as she had recovered f
1027.s prepared for thee; thy fire is burning on the altar, and the holy priests shal
1028.all sound the harp to welcome thy coming. The sacred maidens who throng the grov
1029.aidens who throng the groves are weaving for thee, a chaplet which shall adorn t
1030.or thee as tliou deservest." Tt^ rapping his long mantle around him, and bowing
1031.g his long mantle around him, and bowing lowly to Sybilla, he departed, taking t
1032.ng lowly to Sybilla, he departed, taking the path that led to the castle. His wo
1033.od, served to allay her grief at pairing fiom tiie 108 world but despite her utm
1034.t efforts to shake it off, a forbod* ing of disaster and evil brooded over her s
1035.peared; and Una, who was also coramnning with her own thouglits, uttered not a w
1036.d not a word. At length Sybilla, heaving a deep sigh, picked up the book which l
1037.e book which lay at her feet; and waking her companion from her reverie, walked
1038.y towards the castle. Early next morning, as tlie sim was rising over the easter
1039.rly next morning, as tlie sim was rising over the eastern ; hills, was awake and
1040. eastern ; hills, was awake and stirring. A frown was on Jiis brow, and his sunk
1041.th that led to the But no sign of living thing was to be seen ; no sound forest.
1042.t led to the But no sign of living thing was to be seen ; no sound forest. was h
1043.ers who remained, fearful of displeasing their gloomy lord, busied themselves in
1044.ie and Ova, was in the habit of straying through the woods, or wandering on the
1045.straying through the woods, or wandering on the river's banks during the greater
1046.or wandering on the river's banks during the greater part of the day, in order t
1047.in the castle. Sometimes, Fergus, taking his liarp, would seat himself beneath t
1048.ath the walls, and try to amuse the king with some of the old ah-s lie formerly
1049.ne could heal. There was a demon tugging at his vitals, which would never be app
1050.swine-herd, whose figure was ever rising up before him, and who, even in his dre
1051.as it were, with a naked sword, pointing to his breast. He cursed the Christian
1052.ites. ; lis hands. longed for the coming of Congal, and with burning brain, watc
1053.r the coming of Congal, and with burning brain, watched, unceasingly, for the gl
1054.beat, in the lone silence of the morning. Grown tired at length, and heavy with
1055.hat oppressed him, he was about retiring to his chamber, when he observed SyTend
1056.uted her, and bade her billa approaching. welcome. Seating themselves, with thei
1057. her billa approaching. welcome. Seating themselves, with their faces turned tow
1058.they remained silent for a moment gazing on the Btream. But their hearts were fu
1059.. — 110 Sybilla," began Milcho, taking her hand in his and loofc ing with a fa
1060.ho, taking her hand in his and loofc ing with a father's pride into her beautifu
1061.orgotten. If Congal returns this evening, thou shalt be borne in triumph to thy
1062."No " he replied, a dark frown returning to his face. "No, I have sworn on the a
1063.ot a sacrifice, for I know it will bring to you peace, dear father, and to me re
1064.ther, and to me repose." " It will bring to us happiness, Sybilla, and continue
1065.s, and nerve me to become more deserving the favor of the gods." "The day on whi
1066.o but there are others equally deserving to share thy Sybilla, much as she desir
1067.no heed of them." "See! they are leaving the castle and going to the woods," exc
1068.e! they are leaving the castle and going to the woods," exclaimed Sybilla, tooki
1069.o the woods," exclaimed Sybilla, tooking over the battlements and pointing to Un
1070.ooking over the battlements and pointing to Una and her sisters as they passed t
1071.wered her father, affectionately patting her clieek, and gazing with delight int
1072.tionately patting her clieek, and gazing with delight into her dark, dancing "Th
1073.zing with delight into her dark, dancing "Thou art worthy of thy proud race, as
1074. noble as thou eyes. sorrow." art loving, and in tliy presence I forget my on be
1075.nd in tliy presence I forget my on being perceived by those below, beckoned them
1076.elight they rushed to her presBut seeing the king they involuntarily drew back;
1077.ey rushed to her presBut seeing the king they involuntarily drew back; ence. his
1078.uld Sybilhi, love to delineate. The king, forgetting for the moment the tliougli
1079. love to delineate. The king, forgetting for the moment the tliouglits tiiat tro
1080., as it was presented to him; and laying his hand lovingly on each, gave to them
1081.ingly on each, gave to them his blessing. Then, as he stood erect, his tall and
1082. to its full height; his Ion and flowing beard falling over his bosom ; his eye
1083.eight; his Ion and flowing beard falling over his bosom ; his eye sparkling with
1084.lling over his bosom ; his eye sparkling with the momentary pleasure that filled
1085. soul; and his noble countenance beaming with a smile; this, added to the peculi
1086.his, added to the peculiar, but becoming and magnificent costume which he »•
1087. wore, proclaimed him "every inch a king/' The queenly form oi Sybilla, in statu
1088.o grand and impressive in its surpassing symmetry and beauty, presented a v^ery
1089.y and beauty, presented a v^ery striking contrast to those by whom she was surro
1090. to portray, and which the most aspiring of her sex would wish to imitate. Ova a
1091. were gifted with the sweet and pleasing expression of countenance which we see
1092.hey were children in thought and feeling; and the girlish pleasures they indulge
1093.re pure. Like Una, they were overflowing with mirth and cheer fulness; but when
1094.rth and cheer fulness; but when anything occurred to mar their mirth, or a passi
1095.ccurred to mar their mirth, or a passing cloud came between them, they always ra
1096.ive that, physically, they were blooming into maturity. He permitted them to rem
1097.at their frolics, and Sybilla, believing that her heartily mingled in their spor
1098. loth to depart, again embraced the king and Sybilla, and following Una, hied aw
1099.aced the king and Sybilla, and following Una, hied away toward the banks of the
1100. to the stars I" Sardanapalu$, softening influence of Itis daughter's conversati
1101.uffled the tree-tops, waited its cooling freshness to their senses. The peaceiul
1102. of ligtit of the birds and the rippling of the stream. hung over that quiet val
1103.ead before tlicm, i.i all its enchanting loveliness, infused a brighter gleam of
1104.ed to practice tlieir base and degrading doctrines." ''But surely he hearkens no
1105. words ; and tremBy an effort, she bling, leant on the battlements for support.
1106.tlie rest, who was called the great king (Ard Kiagh), or king of the count r\% a
1107.lled the great king (Ard Kiagh), or king of the count r\% and who was chosen by
1108. tribes— that observing tlie ancient Itiws and Thijenyis ^orrti
1109.ave and noble others weak and vaciUating. But as you appear before me now, I fee
1110. heart w^ould be at peace did they bring with them the traitor Mahon, and the Ol
1111.by the liver's bank. I see them emerging from the trees." " It must be they. We
1112. is Una and my sisters. They are running." "They come to tell of Oongal's near a
1113.ach. Their long hair, loose and floating around them, their dresses torn and in
1114.bore unusual tidings, and that something of an extraordinary character had occur
1115.haracter had occurBreathless and panting they flung themselves on tlieir red. kn
1116.ves on tlieir red. knees before the king, unable in their excitement to utter a
1117.er. Biagh himself," replied Ova, raising her clasped hands to give emphasis to h
1118.m into the dust," exclaimed Elie, bowing her head. "What means tliis, Una? Has t
1119.nted!" "They but speak the truth, O King! What they have seen I myself have witn
1120.his be true ?" exclaimed Milcho, smiting his forehead with his hand and staggeri
1121.is forehead with his hand and staggering against the unwonted behavior?" impatie
1122. terror. Her (iisteiided 117 and heaving bosom told plainer tlian words, of tlie
1123.the Braid. Vast maltitudes were flocking around him, and in the face of open day
1124.ht us the precepts of his raith. Casting forever from us, the spells istened and
1125.d were baptized Cliristians. And, O king Milcho! thou who hast been to me a frie
1126.red thee," exclaimed Sybilla, recovering from her stupor and taking her place by
1127.a, recovering from her stupor and taking her place by " her father's side. " Get
1128.. " Get thee hence !" thundered the king. " There is pollution in thy touch. As
1129.atingly. But they would listen. Spurning them from him, Milcho turned to Sybilla
1130. Milcho turned to Sybilla, who, bm'sting into tears, flung herself or his bosom.
1131.ybilla," he exclaimed in agony, pressing her to his heart. ^* We are here, fathe
1132.o son of mine at least, shall ever bring disgrace upon my name. Where is this Si
1133.s of Erie !" Milcho stai-ted. Not daring to believe his ears, yet fearful — no
1134. not 118 of the truth, and withal hoping tliat lie misinterpreted the words of h
1135.ke nor moved. "Didst thou not proaeliing ?" " Sicur and They oners. say, Congal,
1136.t the prisoners are ap- are approacliing, father, but not as priscome as lil^era
1137.to w^hom is given tlie power of crushing the Before him they are dumb, and crumb
1138.countenance. Sybilla, weak and trembling, pressed her hands upon her bosom, to s
1139.umult that tugged at her heart. The king's rage was fearful. With an angry maled
1140.n he approached his son, and brandishing his dagger, fiercely exclaimed "Base so
1141.a. Even now, you can hear them advancing to crush them with their hands." Milcho
1142.murmur of a mighty multitude approaching. No warrior answered to his call. They
1143.reachery smott him to the heart. Dashing the dagger, in anger, against the battl
1144.Saint in anger, but accord him a hearing. They prayed and besought him to curb h
1145.d Una, silently left the castle. Turning to Sybilla, who now stood calm and erec
1146.e the castle, and together we shall wing our flight to the gods !" *' Praise be
1147. and treachery of my children." Clasping her to his bosom, father and daughter r
1148.and daughter remained Gently disengaging for a moment in a last, loving embrace.
1149.sengaging for a moment in a last, loving embrace. himself from her arms, he kiss
1150.r arms, he kissed her cheek, and leaving her alone on the battlements, hastened
1151.d desperate deed he had planned. Bolting the large iron gates which barred the p
1152.ich barred the progress of the advancing enemy, and gathering all the inflammabl
1153.ss of the advancing enemy, and gathering all the inflammable matter within his r
1154.r within his reach, he applied a burning pine torch, and, in a moment, the castl
1155.in oi priests, could be perceived moving, in another direction, toward the castl
1156.LIEVER, the loud flames upward springing I O that fierce yell within And, withou
1157.ter I Like rooks across a sunset winging, Dark they dashed through glare and din
1158.h I that death-shriek heavenward ringing that wondrous silence after. 1 ! She st
1159.and tortured him, since his last meeting with Sybilla. The extraordinary power d
1160.l was ever by his side ; and liis loving promptings, and wonderful faith and hop
1161.oothed and inspired him, until a glowing ardor burned within him. As they entere
1162.or hours they sat spell-bound, listening It seemed as if a ray of the divine lov
1163.sappeared like tlie mists of the morning, and a burning rnd consuming love tille
1164.tlie mists of the morning, and a burning rnd consuming love tilled their veins.
1165.the morning, and a burning rnd consuming love tilled their veins. Before that ho
1166.castle. Their road lay along the winding banks of the river. The Saint, dressed
1167. proceeded, hundreds of people, bursting do^vn from the hills, or swarming from
1168.rsting do^vn from the hills, or swarming from the valleys, joined them on the ma
1169.eath of Leury, had spread with lightning rapidity ; and, the people, astounded a
1170.o see and hear him. Malion, with beating heart, gazed upward to Slieve Mis, as i
1171.appeared to view, above tlie surrounding plain. He had often trod its wooded sid
1172.d wolf, and on his return, with bounding heart, looked upwards to the battlement
1173.f the river, and he would be approaching the woods where he had often sighed her
1174.n day-dreams of hope and love. Breathing a prayer to God and His Blessed A 123 M
1175.currence. The crowd was eagerly pressing forward, and exclamations of wonder and
1176. and exclamations of wonder and Crushing his way through delight were heard amon
1177.children of !'' the only true and living God The voice of the multitude was hush
1178.a solemn and mysterious rite was pending. They held their breath, and, with bowe
1179.man might work in Erinn.* The rite being concluded, St. Patrick blessed them, an
1180., St. Patrick blessed them, and pointing in the direction of Slieve-Mis, said "
1181.e castle, and tell your father, the King of Dalaradia, that Sicur, his former sl
1182. The maidens bounded away at his bidding, and soon disappeared among the trees.
1183.eard the words of the Saint, and looking toward the spot wliere the maidens stoo
1184. of Sybilla and her father; and yielding to the influence of the thought, he inv
1185.was laid on Mahon's shoulder and turning, he saw beliind him a re; ** While he s
1186.lahs side, O'er the green margin bending forbore to drink; Tliat the Brandon eag
1187.ms,** hy Aubrey de Vers, 125 was panting and brcatlilcss, an(/ by lu8 eagerness
1188.riests and followers, is now approaching Milcho's castle, to bring his daughter,
1189.ow approaching Milcho's castle, to bring his daughter, Sybilla, to the sacred gr
1190.elf, dare nut approach lier. Endeavoring to smotlier the iierce thoughts that ru
1191. liim, and wish to be a Christian. Being on guard on the battlements I was th-<
1192.ments I was th-< last to leave. The King and the Princess Sybilla were there, wh
1193.s Sybilla were there, while I was pacing my rounds and from some words which dn'
1194.after, I deserted my master, and fleeing to tlie woods, unobserved, sought to cr
1195.n liis way. For I was told he was coming by a different patli than that which le
1196.d of voices fell on my groves. Secreting myself behind a rock, where I could not
1197.train of Druids and attendants, hurrying to tlie castle. Fie walked at some dist
1198.r tunics were concealed by long, flowing mantles whicli completely covered them,
1199.all speed to join the Christians, hoping to find you A ; 126 among them, " for w
1200.hes of that evil Druid, there is nothing in all broad Tirowen that you may not c
1201. is this, How long A precious." Bounding through the dense crowd before him, and
1202.he dense crowd before him, and brusliing them aside like dew from heather, he pa
1203.Ibur. His comrades and Owen were walking together, close behind Conall and the S
1204.nall and the Saint, who were discoursing on the journey. Hastily communicating t
1205.ng on the journey. Hastily communicating the intelligence, Mahon, followed by hi
1206. broom ; over rocks and mounds, clearing every impediment in his way, he ran. I'
1207. he shouted as he went, and the rustling of the branches behind told him they we
1208. reckless way, until, through a clearing in the trees, the towers of the castle
1209.bruptly confronted by the Druid. Pausing a moment as he reached the bank, to see
1210.k, to see if his comrades were following, he turned to Ibar and Owen as they app
1211.rest way to reach the castle !" JKunning down the bank with headlong speea, the
1212.a moment the bold swimmers were battling with the current. They reached the shor
1213.hed the shore in safety, and f ollov/ing the well-known path that led to the pri
1214.ll on their ear, but the piteous whining of the chained hounds in tlieir kennels
1215.n tlieir kennels, and the wild shrieking of the steeds in their stalls, were hea
1216.s, were heard with fearful and startling vividness. The smoke in dark wreaths wa
1217.. The smoke in dark wreaths was bursting from every window in the castle, and fo
1218.and forked tongues of flame were leaping and hissing in circles round it. The ca
1219.ongues of flame were leaping and hissing in circles round it. The castle was on
1220.d by a cry from the battlements. Looking up his blood almost froze with horror w
1221.he beheld Sybilla and her father, facing the advancing flames, which were now ne
1222.lla and her father, facing the advancing flames, which were now nearing the plac
1223.advancing flames, which were now nearing the place on which they stood. Congal a
1224.e from their lips. They had been waiting in one of the gardens of the castle, si
1225.heir dismissal from their father, hoping that as soon as the Saint appeared, his
1226.es, paralyzed them with fear. at finding Sybilla Sybilla !" cried Mahon in entre
1227.lla Sybilla !" cried Mahon in entreating tones, but his voice was drowned in the
1228.but his voice was drowned in the mocking and derisive laugli of Milcho. Looking
1229.g and derisive laugli of Milcho. Looking down from his airy height, and waving a
1230.ng down from his airy height, and waving a blazing pine torch over his head he a
1231.om his airy height, and waving a blazing pine torch over his head he answered "
1232.wen !" " There," cried Sybilla, pointing to the sun, " There is our Bolus to the
1233. of our fathers. '' ! O I 123 A piercing shriek went up to Heaven from the littl
1234.moments all would be over. The crackling of the flames increased, and the smoke,
1235.es increased, and the smoke, now growing denser near the battlements, hid them f
1236.e, with bowed heads, and tears streaming down their cheeks, knelt in prayer. Con
1237.astle. This Carbre perceived, and taking in the situation at a glance, rushed to
1238.ey raised it from its bed, and summoning all their strength, with one united blo
1239.lowed, and with a crash it came tumbling down, bringing with it, splinters of th
1240. a crash it came tumbling down, bringing with it, splinters of the oak pillars t
1241.e, till he and his comrades were rushing up the steps that led to the battlement
1242.eachings of his former slave. He, a king of lordly Dalaradia, to bend in abject
1243.d in abject homThe thought was maddening, age to a slave and swine-herd and with
1244.ould appear, to plunge into the seething and boiling mass of flames that would s
1245. to plunge into the seething and boiling mass of flames that would soon be upon
1246. the Sun, and her long, dark hair waving aroi^d her neck, stood beside Ler fathe
1247.l his maledictions against his advancing foes, but gazed upon the sungod, and of
1248.y my example be the means of resto:> ing to thee, those misguided and erring men
1249. ing to thee, those misguided and erring men, who have taken Thou art anto false
1250.t not tlie gry with thy people for being led astray ; but glory of Eiie depart.
1251.y frown, those ignoble serfs approaching, who follow the banner of the foreigner
1252.oly hymn which his acolytes were singing. As Milcho embraced Sybilla, he turned
1253.eadlong, Witli a shriek into the hissing and roaring flames. 130 Sybilla, with h
1254.li a shriek into the hissing and roaring flames. 130 Sybilla, with her hands ele
1255.f Malion encircled her waist and bearing her in Ids arms, tlirough smoke and fie
1256. and rafter, fell with a crash. Hurrying with liis precious burden througli the
1257.i now thronged the scene, and commanding none to approach him, he Imrriedly made
1258.billa liad swooned. of a prince. Placing her gently on the bank, he looked on he
1259.s only swooned," said Owen, interpreting the piteous look on his face. " Place h
1260.e, wliile I rush down the bank and bring some water to bathe her temples." She w
1261.le he descended tlie bank, Mahon, taking her unyielding hand in his, bent over h
1262. tlie bank, Mahon, taking her unyielding hand in his, bent over her and kissed h
1263.e dark form of Conra the Druid, standing over him. Owen soon returned witli a cu
1264.ony beheld Mahon insensible and bleeding on the ground. flft was alone. Sybilla
1265. long, For your dear, dear sake. Praying many a prayer so wrong That my heart wo
1266., 'tis hard to part you, but I'm longing for the life, Far away from crowds and
1267. 1 led with thee With my own, my darling Una, by the mountains and the sea D. F.
1268.d of the Druids, returned with startling impressiveness, when they beheld the yo
1269.ld the young Prince of Augher, weltering in And the sudden and unaccountable dis
1270.served to heighten their fears regarding the great and mysterious powers of thei
1271.oment they stood irresolute and wavering, vacillating between fear and doubt, an
1272.ood irresolute and wavering, vacillating between fear and doubt, and, it is poss
1273.ed in the balance ; St. Patrick, reading their hearts, and knowing the thoughts
1274.trick, reading their hearts, and knowing the thoughts that moved them, suddenly
1275.rror through the multitude and believing that something dreadful had occurred, t
1276.e multitude and believing that something dreadful had occurred, they rushed towp
1277.ed. When they saw the young Prince lying pale and ghastly on the ground, they be
1278. he sprinkled over Mahon's face. Heaving a deep sigh, he opened iiis eyes and lo
1279.St. Patrick who tlien approached. Taking his hand in his, the good Saint helped
1280.ped to raise him from the ground, saying " In the name of God, Arise Blessed are
1281.ar not Mahon arose. A bright and burning love illuminated his bosom, and with a
1282.d for his throat, but the sudden turning of Malion's head, had diverted the Drui
1283.nced it only a flesh wound, and applying some herbs to the sore, bandaged it, an
1284.ayer for his speedy recovery. In glowing tones, with St. Patrick then addressed
1285.ds, knelt down to re; ceive his blessing. Bestowing on them the Papal benedictio
1286.own to re; ceive his blessing. Bestowing on them the Papal benediction, which he
1287.he concourse did not disperse. Gathering around his ttnt they knelt and prayed,
1288.th the stars of the summer night smiling down, tliey lay upon the mossy sward, a
1289.ss as their own shadows, The smouldering ruins of for not a breeze disturbed a l
1290.n tlie ivy-covered round tower adjoining, and at intervals cast, a sickly light
1291.ngth succumbed to sleep. Softly stealing from ilie tent, Conall, with noiseless
1292.e moonlight. He looked upon the sleeping thousands scattered over the sward, wai
1293.usands scattered over the sward, waiting for the morning bell to summon them to
1294. over the sward, waiting for the morning bell to summon them to Mass, and blesse
1295.ed his God for such a sweet and edifying sight. Kneeling on the ground, he poure
1296.uch a sweet and edifying sight. Kneeling on the ground, he poured forth his than
1297. depart from her. He was about returning to the tent, when the melancholy tones
1298. came Iroin the direction of the smoking ruins. Advancing, he beheld Fergus with
1299.irection of the smoking ruins. Advancing, he beheld Fergus with his htirp, seate
1300. he touched the strings. He was chanting a dirge for his late master, Milcho. Th
1301.ty of the hour, coupled with the wailing, death-like dirge which fell in such sa
1302.m end to end of the isle, cross pointing to Heaven the incense from a thousand a
1303.soundmg the glories i.)f the ever living and true God. Blessed be His name, for
1304.Fergus ceased his song of sorrow. Bowing his head on his breast and shading his
1305.owing his head on his breast and shading his eyes with his hand he remained for
1306.ess. Conall approached and gently taking his hand in his, led him away from tlie
1307.they w^ere met by spot. Congal. Entering, they found the young Prince still asle
1308.g Prince still asleep, and Owen watching by his bed. Congal s features betrayed
1309.res betrayed the grief that sat brooding on his heart. The fearful death of his
1310. a brief respite from them, in listening to the holy conversation of Conall and
1311.to bear, assumed a more cheerful bearing in the presence of his Prince. Whether
1312.med or not, it had the effect of rousing him from his stupor, and reminding him
1313.using him from his stupor, and reminding him that he had to live and act for a n
1314. know what your intentions are regarding ybiUa." " I shall be guided by Patriciu
1315.e the task." " His wound is but trifling, to-morrow he will probably re^ turn to
1316.bably re^ turn to Tir-owen, to his dying father. But where dost thou has pleased
1317.to reside Congal ?" " I've been thinking of leaving Dalaradia for a time, and so
1318.ongal ?" " I've been thinking of leaving Dalaradia for a time, and sojourning wi
1319.ing Dalaradia for a time, and sojourning with our brothers in the colony, we hav
1320.s."* "What !" exclaimed Fergus, starting to his feet, "Woild you leave tlie plea
1321.eland, those at least, of the conquering and predominatcolony of these Irish Sco
1322.f these Irish Scots distinguished by ing caste, were called Scots. the name of D
1323.my Prince, and though my hand is jrowing feeble, it can still strike the strings
1324.ur fervor for tlie new faith is pleasing to me, Fergus, and sliows the sincerity
1325.t the lialls of Kilcurran shall yet ring with the voice of thy harp, and Prince
1326.ity Avhicii ! endure through tlie coming centuries. Aye, and the songs of the ba
1327.labor among my people, and hold a loving rivalry with Prince Mahon, for well I k
1328.ordained him. Patricius ; and a blessing has descended on his house. But see he
1329.neasy. The dreadful scene of the burning was present in his dreams; and he again
1330.a about to plunge into the fire. Raising himself in bed, as if to rush to her re
1331.e fire, The roar of men the earthquaking ; Fall of vast bastions and precipitous
1332.last Of trumpets and the neigh of raging steeds, And shrieks of women whose thri
1333.epers to Mass. Lights were soon gleaming in the tents, and from every tree, and
1334. knoll upon which the Saint was offering up the holy sacrifice. The Mass being c
1335.ng up the holy sacrifice. The Mass being concluded, he spent an hour in exhortin
1336.concluded, he spent an hour in exhorting his hearers to remain faithful to the c
1337.l to the creed they professed, promising to leave among To test tliem, priests w
1338.ve. Another hour was spent in l)aptizing those who had not, as yet, been touched
1339., as yet, been touched by the This being done, the Saint, taking w.iters of rege
1340.y the This being done, the Saint, taking w.iters of regeneration. with him Con d
1341.ntention entered his tent. of proceeding through Ulster, until he had converted
1342.nne,* meet him at Tara. idea of rescuing Sj^billa from the groves, and was advis
1343., and received from Patrick his blessing. As the moment for departure came, the
1344.stepped forth from his tent, and raising the Cross in his hand, dispensed his bl
1345.ross in his hand, dispensed his blessing to the assembled thousands, liaising a
1346.ing to the assembled thousands, liaising a iioiy hymn on the morning air, he and
1347.ds, liaising a iioiy hymn on the morning air, he and his followers resumed their
1348.a lai'ge body of men engaged in clearing away the rubbish. Cathal and Owen were
1349. rubbish. Cathal and Owen were directing the operations, and with their own hand
1350., and with their own hands were removing the beams of timber which had '' fallen
1351. '' fallen. Tliey are already fulfilling their promise to you," observed Conall,
1352. friends, and receive from me a blessing which shall never depart from you." The
1353.ltitude knelt on tlie green sod, leaving St. Patrick Uplifting Ids iiands to hea
1354.green sod, leaving St. Patrick Uplifting Ids iiands to heaven, lie blessed stand
1355. their stores. He prayed that a blessing might descend from heaven, as the first
1356.d jieroes, and that, through tlie coming centuries, the faitli would remain triu
1357. sent to their kindred, the neigliboring Scots, and gave to Britain learning, bo
1358.ring Scots, and gave to Britain learning, both human and divine. The JS^orman, a
1359.emale demon, The Sainc departed, leaving behind many a happy heart, and many a j
1360.t from Conra.'* said the Saint regarding her ?" questioned Congal. said as her b
1361.y you," said Mahon, with a sigh, looking at his bandaged arm. " But though I be
1362.e one approaches," said Cathal , drawing the curtains Welcome Una, Elie and of t
1363. of recent They were pale, but suftering were visible on their faces. looked, in
1364.utiful than when the glow of After being saluted tlie roses was tinctured on the
1365. the couch of Mahon, and tenderly taking his hand inquired after his welBeing se
1366.ing his hand inquired after his welBeing seated, Congal explained to them his de
1367.them his determinafare. tion of entering the sacred groves and rescuing their si
1368. entering the sacred groves and rescuing their sister. They were delighted at th
1369.ke, " I fear Conra, the Druid. listening to Patricias, and while my soul was mel
1370.is looks portended evil. I face, glaring at the apostle. fear me he bodes no goo
1371. an incredulous smile. seen his frowning face," said Una, " when Pa* tricius pro
1372.tubborn of heart to listen to any tiling defamatory of the ancient creed of Erin
1373. " God, in his own good time, will bring it about," said Conall, " and in the me
1374.gh The men who wei*e engaged in removing the quiet valley. the debris of Milclio
1375.valley. the debris of Milclio's dwelling, knowing well the portent of the soundj
1376.he debris of Milclio's dwelling, knowing well the portent of the soundj soon gat
1377. lances and broad shields, their shining helmets glittering in the morning light
1378.hields, their shining helmets glittering in the morning light, they presented a
1379.hining helmets glittering in the morning light, they presented a grand and noble
1380.he Druids. by a sentinel. Before opening the wicket, he demanded of Prince Conga
1381.choed by a hundred voices. The trampling of feet was heard, and a wild and fearf
1382.oors, mj^ men !" shouted Congal, rushing wth all his strength against the barrie
1383.al, Ibar and his folferociously, rushing again toward the door. lowers obeyed. T
1384.or was sundered from its hinges. Rushing in they beheld before them an enormous
1385.l in the dust," sliouted Owen, snatching a spear from one of the soldiers and st
1386.ar from one of the soldiers and striking the god. But a moment sufficed to tumbl
1387.und. " Follow me !" said Congal, leaping in the direction which he supposed led
1388.mes were fiercely and steadily advancing. Even now the soldiers could feel tlie
1389.ow of fire, borne on the breeze, burning their brows. To advance was impossible,
1390.d heart Congal gave the order to Falling back, the men took their station on a r
1391., the men took their station on a rising retreat. knoll overlooking the Braid. F
1392.n on a rising retreat. knoll overlooking the Braid. From their position they cou
1393.ion they could plainly see the advancing flames. Almost stupefied with terror, t
1394. cranib'ed before it. In its devastating march, the giant oaks of the forest fel
1395. Owen, in your castle. Bratha will bring me intelligence of Let us re the Saint,
1396.d comfort those who are eagerly awaiting us. Think vvluit fearful thoughts fill
1397.and slowly returned to his horn, Winding the valley of Dul<»rsidia. lid CHAPTER
1398.green, and heaven is blue, Lovely spring, which makes all new, Lovely spring dot
1399.ring, which makes all new, Lovely spring doth enter Bweet young sunbeam do subdu
1400.s all her riches : Harmonious birds sing such a psalm As ear and heart bewitches
1401.ry strain as they sped on their bounding course to the ocean. The icy fetters of
1402. around the towers of Kilcurran. sinking into darkness. Tlie tall trees are cast
1403.to darkness. Tlie tall trees are casting their shadows atiiwart the paths thut l
1404.s swiftly past the castle. It is evening. The twilight is U9 the base of a mossy
1405.i, tall in stature, guisli in the fading twiliglit. and of noble and distinguish
1406.n answer to a question of hers regarding Sybilla, as ti-.y seated themselves on
1407.nherits my father's noble and unyielding spirit, along with her mother's beauty.
1408.as taken the helm and laughingly braving the wrath of Manannan^* brought us safe
1409.s always know not w^liat a day may bring forth. If before dawn. Sybilla once mee
1410.her warm heart," replied Una, struggling against the overpowering rush of early
1411.Una, struggling against the overpowering rush of early r^ collections which thro
1412.ou ?" " Yes, Congal, as true and lasting as ever man's love for " Was Mahon woma
1413.he books of their order, and was willing to become a member of the Sisterhood, u
1414.lienated her heart from Mahon. Believing that she had comniitted a crime in lovi
1415.hat she had comniitted a crime in loving him, she offered herself as a sacrifice
1416.was due to the bravery of Mahon. Knowing her heart as I do, Congal, I cannot but
1417.w happy would Congal feel on the morning he led you to I tlie altar as his bride
1418. not been inaugurated yet. He is waiting forPatricius to put thew^andof chieftai
1419.my bride, with Patricius the officiating priest, and Mahon, my brother, by my si
1420.nd hope that your words may "I Something within my heart tells me Some one appro
1421. one approaches !" But hark so. rustling among the leaves was heard; the branche
1422. branches were swept aside, and emerging from the gloom, a man appeared who, per
1423.he gloom, a man appeared who, perceiving Congal, saluted, and with bowed head st
1424.ador of Conall. " What news do you bring from the banks of the Braid ?" " Good n
1425.nce that the good Patricius is advancing on Tara, and he summons you and your fo
1426.owers to ! 153 be present to approaching. I rince witness the overthrow of Bel.
1427. of limb about an hour ago. He is coming, and than he, I was sent forward to mee
1428.h ever had. Meanwhile, Conall is waiting for you. He expects you to meet him nea
1429.Prince Conto accompany him. gal, I bring you/' " It is good, Bratha. I would not
1430.sauntered in the direction of his coming. Soon his voice was heard chanting a hy
1431.oming. Soon his voice was heard chanting a hymn of praise to God, in sweet and i
1432.to meet him, and saluted him with Giving his harp to ail the ttndei*nc88 of lovi
1433.is harp to ail the ttndei*nc88 of loving children. Bratha, Congal and Una taking
1434. children. Bratha, Congal and Una taking his arm, supported the aged Cathal, Eli
1435. Cathal, Elie and Ova, who were watching on the battlements for his coming, rush
1436.tching on the battlements for his coming, rushed down to embrace and welcome him
1437. In me, comnmnion with this purest being, Kindled intenser zeal, and niade me wi
1438.edge, which in hers mine own mind seeing, Lett in the human world few mysteries:
1439.t once were poured In streams of gushing melody the kingly board. 8ilent and col
1440. chivalry, Around Who And proud enduring fame. ni. The foeman*s hand has dimmed
1441.ghtly slione; And Bard and Minstrel sing in vain Of glories past and gone. But h
1442.hat fluttered round their masts, keeping watch and ward for sight of sail or gli
1443.ight of sail or glint of spear of coming foe. Her cliariotccrs and horsemen, led
1444.ain; and, thougli he looked with longing eye on the green mountains and fidr val
1445.es and spires then proudly lay, covering thousands of acres in its broad proport
1446.proportions. It was the seat of learning, art and The * Agricola, at the time of
1447.la, at the time of St. Patrick's landing, was in BritaiiL 157 These were fostere
1448.fs, and, science. under then* protecting banners, flourished to an extent which
1449.alace was situate, a grand and ennobling scene was presented to the view. The ey
1450.ience that was instructive and ennobling His court was gorgeous in the extreme,
1451.or Tailltin, now known as Teltown, lying midway between Kells and Navan, in the
1452.y Lugaid the long-handed, aDedanann king, and called after his foster-mother, Ta
1453.Lugaid's Festival, from the ancient king above mentioned. Our legends inform us
1454. tlie companion and champion of the king ; the office of the brehon was to exphi
1455.d customs of the countiy before the king ; the Druid's office was to offer sacri
1456.s duty was to perform cures for his king, and queen, and the royal household; th
1457.s maintained for the purpose of praising, or of satirizing every one, according
1458.he purpose of praising, or of satirizing every one, according to his good or evi
1459.g, or of satirizing every one, according to his good or evil deeds ; it was the
1460.to chant poems and songs before the king ; and the three stewards had to wait up
1461.three stewards had to wait upon the king, and supply his personal wants, for whi
1462.^ere retained in the service of the king and lords of to his title. accordmg ran
1463.n the occaBesides sion of its assembling in the year of grace 433. being Bealtin
1464.sembling in the year of grace 433. being Bealtinne-time, it was also tlie Ard-E-
1465.ipers were stationed, who made unceasing music the live-long day. It was the fir
1466.e thronged with other thousands hurrying to the scene. They tlironged around tli
1467.e Banquet Hall tney poured into the King's Kath, and the House of Cormac ; and f
1468.f Hostages, a multitudinous and swelling throng pressed, gay in their pictm*esqu
1469. pictm*esque costume, and with flaunting flags and banners. While the king was e
1470.unting flags and banners. While the king was entertaining his nobles and chiefs
1471.banners. While the king was entertaining his nobles and chiefs in the great hall
1472.the great hall, and his harpers chanting his praise ; while the sound of the war
1473. of the warriors' bronze spears, beating on their shields, kept measure to the m
1474.crifice, that stood on a knoll adjoining the Banquet Hall, and hurriedly passed
1475.ts." The crowd made way for them, bowing as they passed, and, turning in the dir
1476.hem, bowing as they passed, and, turning in the direction of a large and stately
1477.irection of a large and stately building, half hid among the trees, tliey procee
1478.assed their novitiate, previous to being admitted to join the Order. As the Drui
1479.trance, the eldest pauses 1, and seating himself on a rock, en« graved with Ogr
1480.urn at such a festive time. The croaking of the ravens around this gloomy house,
1481.permitted an audience." " Take this ring, Conra, it is more potent than the comm
1482.u. You will find me here. I am preparing my mind lor the great encounter which I
1483. thoughts. Go I will await you." Placing the gem on his finger which he received
1484.he received from the ! Druid, and bowing with profound respect, Conra left him t
1485.cenes he had so recently left. No living object was visible No sound was heard t
1486.it had been used for a century. Applying it to his lips, he blew a loud and shri
1487.y answer he received, and, after waiting until his im!)atience tui'ned into ange
1488.i'ned into anger, he was about repeating the chal enge in a more decided tone, w
1489.ou must grant to this." He held the ring before her eyes, and as the gem flashed
1490. a tcream from the wicket. But returning inunediately in an altered and humble t
1491.nd his guide, muffled in a long, flowing white veil, beckoned him to follow. She
1492.llum; chairs of curious make and cunning workmanship, the spoils of the Komans a
1493.tempted to look at them, and was seating himself at the table for that purpose w
1494.autiful in iter : A A ; 162 and becoming costume, as the fairest of the daughter
1495.y the Evil one, and darkness is brooding over Erinn!" " Your words are enigmatic
1496.me, are now I do not catch their meaning." " Sybilla, wilt thou become a vestal
1497.e the efforts of the weak and drivelling dotards of my house, ^' ; ! Aye ! becom
1498.assage in this book a prophecy regarding this Sicur, which I would fain have thy
1499.I would fain have thy aid in unravelling, if thou hast time." " I have not, daug
1500.And so farewell." Affectionately kissing her hand, and bowing respectfully, he l
1501.ectionately kissing her hand, and bowing respectfully, he left the apartment and
1502. old Druid. He found him uneasily pacing up and down the emerald sward before th
1503.Conra; Til the Banquet Hall, to the King. follow thee." im CHAriER * XIX. TABA.
1504. reveal ings. It wakes within my glowing breast, warmth ^^ hich words have ne'er
1505.r many an age in hall of kings listening patriots blessed the lay That bade enra
1506.held royal revel. There was much running to and fro of squires, pages and filave
1507.of squires, pages and filaves, attending to the wants of the guests, hllmg their
1508.s vintage of Iberia, and eagerly waiting on The Jiing hospitably ordered a thous
1509.Iberia, and eagerly waiting on The Jiing hospitably ordered a thousand their sli
1510.ese, thousands were congregated, sipping the native otlier, ales or mead, merril
1511.ive otlier, ales or mead, merrily joking with each or listening to the songs of
1512.d, merrily joking with each or listening to the songs of the bards. The people w
1513.moiTow. excited by some jest of the king or his cliiefs, could be plainly heard
1514.hills seemed to tremble at the deafening shout, raised by tlie vast assemblage.
1515.i-e as decorous as such a vast gathering could well be. merry group, composed pa
1516. of civilians, tlie latter predominating, was seated on the sward, clinking thei
1517.ating, was seated on the sward, clinking their cups and quaff hig their brown al
1518., those sally, seemed at once enlivening and contagious. nearest them, but outsi
1519.but outside their circle, as if catching the mirth-provoking infection, laughed
1520.rcle, as if catching the mirth-provoking infection, laughed oftener and louder a
1521.s much as to say, " You are not enjoying yourselves a whit better than we are."
1522.merriment A ! fury!" " They are laughing at my jest, Dima. They have what you mo
1523.e point ?" " I, at least, feel the sting, Barrfinn. Your barb has pie^ 167 eed b
1524.a death of fire!" " But have his fitting death for such a warlike heart. childre
1525.ut methinks thou art mistaken concerning her brothers. They are noble youths, su
1526.nd logic, he is not content with keeping tiic mine of knowledge to himself, but
1527. — * In the twelfth year of this king's reign was born Oub Saviouk, Jcsud CuR
1528.d that lie was more fitted for governing men than herding sheep, and sueceeded i
1529.re fitted for governing men than herding sheep, and sueceeded in imbuing a few c
1530. herding sheep, and sueceeded in imbuing a few companions with this idea. For ye
1531.s tribe, and at last succeeded in making them as crazy as himself. He determined
1532. mingled among tliem. But on the evening of the third day, the Plebeians, at a ,
1533.d evil was the condition of Erinn during this time. For the earth did not yield
1534. that a general famine prevailed, during the live years that the herdsman was in
1535. became appeased, and striereignty. king Kinncait with death, agam made Erinn fr
1536.made Erinn fruitful. Now, to my thinking," he continued, seeing his hearers were
1537.w, to my thinking," he continued, seeing his hearers were interested, " it would
1538.trines are more pernicious and degrading." " Thou art a pidlosopher, Dima, and m
1539. should not make a raid on a neighboring nation, nor a foray on a f oeman's camp
1540.imed the impetuous soldier, interrupting, " who ever heard of such a doctrine A
1541. of the Deluge, were wrong in worshiping the sun-god, and that tliey arc now sul
1542.un-god, and that tliey arc now sulfeiing eternal torments in the bowels of tlie
1543.w !" said Kiarim, contemptuously turning his face from the river, and looking in
1544.ing his face from the river, and looking in an opposite direction. " The Gaels a
1545., of Dalaradia. Mr.ke way they are going- to the pahice." Tlie two Druids, with
1546. on each side to let them pass, standing with uncovered heads and The noise beca
1547. hushed at their aprespectfully saluting. proach, and the harpers struck up a hy
1548.sle. Barrfiim will now cease ids jesting, for the honor has been given too publi
1549.n loom, but rather bethink thee of using thy influence with thy holy friends, in
1550.ence with thy holy friends, in procuring me souiething better suited to my taste
1551.holy friends, in procuring me souiething better suited to my tastes than that of
1552. think I would be unequalled. By keeping on good terms with tlie butlers and bre
1553.nd be" Kiaran 172 truce to 3'our jesting, Bjirrfinn,'^ interrupted the bluff Bol
1554.ollege was an honor, which even the king could not obtain, without the sanction
1555.praise was in every mouth, was something so sudden and unexpected, that, for a m
1556.ok away their breaths. They stood gazing at Kiaran in mute astonishment. He enjo
1557.y hairs, to enjoy the privilege of being by her side, and gazing on her beauty f
1558.ivilege of being by her side, and gazing on her beauty for a moment. It was the
1559.ankly at me," he said smilingly, putting a hand on each of their shoulders. " Su
1560.earer of Milclio, the honor of escorting and protecting his daugliter for a tiai
1561.o, the honor of escorting and protecting his daugliter for a tiaie. IaX us enter
1562., with the light of the daygod streaming on us, to the pent-up heat and villaino
1563.d as he sinks to rest, and pour a loving libation to the Princess Sybilla." perm
1564. said an old and venerable man, stepping to Kiaran's side, and addressing Dima,
1565.tepping to Kiaran's side, and addressing Dima, " For never did summer breeze woo
1566. !" exclaimed the old soldier, embracing Fergus, for it was he, and seating him
1567.acing Fergus, for it was he, and seating him by his side on the sward. " Old com
1568.stories are told, (and they lose nothing when friend Dima repeats them,) of Milc
1569.knew it," said Kiaran proudly, mistaking the true meaning of Fergus's words. " T
1570.aran proudly, mistaking the true meaning of Fergus's words. " The jack-daw prate
1571.rze when he hears the rustle of his wing." " I told you his own loom clicked not
1572.ted. Like the raven, he is ever croaking," put in Barrfin, who wickedly enjoyed
1573.ran, " I am too happy to let any passing shadow chill my heart. Bring more wine,
1574.any passing shadow chill my heart. Bring more wine, for never was I in merrier m
1575.he wine was brought, and Kiaran, holding a sparkling beaker in his hand rose to
1576.brought, and Kiaran, holding a sparkling beaker in his hand rose to his feet. "
1577.ier lately, Fergus T' iie eiK|uired, ing his cup and resuming iiis gj'a-ssy scat
1578. iie eiK|uired, ing his cup and resuming iiis gj'a-ssy scat. 174 "Ko. It is nine
1579.smiled. The information he was receiving from Kiaran, was what he had for two da
1580.as what he had for two days been seeking in vain. And though he hated liypocrisy
1581. all the intelligence he could regarding her. If Kiaran mis-construed acknowledg
1582. a Christian, without the question being put to him directly, he did not conside
1583.e same time, would not smack of anything condemnatory of the faith he professed.
1584.ory of the faith he professed. Believing that St. Patrick would prevail, and on
1585.ick would prevail, and on the succeeding day not only change the heart of Sybill
1586.he fulness of his his his fault, meaning that was own and to ; heart's hope. ''A
1587.Never did its most ambitious flight wing so high, as on the day Sybilla becomes
1588., or else this hand has lost its cunning I" "Ah! Fergus, we were friends in yout
1589.rp the battle hymn, on the first morning we met the Armoricans, these dwellers o
1590.to save from the wrath of the conquering Roman. Our legions were outnumbered, an
1591.oman hosts 175 and vanquished his daring eagle. Dost reni ember, Fergus V^ " I d
1592.omrade, well," replied the Bard, warming at the recollection of the events thus
1593.t not forgotten thy deftness in touching the strings, and canst harp a lay of lo
1594.Dima, "that we have forgotten everything ! ! V We else." the day-god is sinking
1595.g ! ! V We else." the day-god is sinking low, which warns me that my master will
1596.rry away so long," said Barrfinn, rising. " Let us drink one bumper to the memor
1597. comrades meet," responded Dima, filling up a generous draught. "Thou wouldst ma
1598.y of thy great hero, and another meeting on to-morrow." " I must haste me to the
1599.to-morrow.'' They separated, each taking a different route, and elbowing their w
1600.h taking a different route, and elbowing their way as best they could, through t
1601.He did not go directly to it, but making a detour to the left, where the crowd w
1602.rsued his way. The breeze of the evening was laden with the tones of a thousand
1603.tance, fell upon his The sun was setting in a crimson cloud, and the spires ear.
1604.the emblem of man's redemption. Stealing unperceived to a thicket on the river's
1605.m tlience a small curragh, and launching it, struck boldly out into the stream.
1606.f Tara, and he perceived a crowd running to the banks. The words " renegade," an
1607.ore. He gained it in safety, and rimning up the sloping bank, paused not until h
1608.it in safety, and rimning up the sloping bank, paused not until he reached the t
1609.e ; him. ; - ITT CHAPTER XX. THE MEETING AT TARA. The monarch saw and shook, **
1610. It was also tlie birth-day of tlie king. the Pagans. To It celebrate his nativi
1611.f barbaric splendor, with — — waving banners and dancing plumes. Their cliar
1612. with — — waving banners and dancing plumes. Their cliariots, drawn by iiery
1613.hamped the bit in anger at the unwilling thraldom which they endured, and foamed
1614.d foamed with the cmbsome rein, scorning the gay trapping which fary caparisoned
1615. cmbsome rein, scorning the gay trapping which fary caparisoned them, passed in
1616.\t the*'iSlope of the Chariots," bearing with them the pride, the beauty, and tl
1617.ss crowd, whose many-colored and varying, but i>icturcsque costumes, added a bri
1618.e could reach, a sw^arm of liuthe rising sun. man bikings darkened the roads, fi
1619.eir banners shone proudly in the morning air; the blare of their trumpets woke t
1620.re of their trumpets woke the slumbering ecbojs to life, and the sound of their
1621.ous to the one appointed for the opening of the ceremonies, the people had been
1622.ceremonies, the people had been flocking tliither, and on this the first day of
1623.lie mountain sides, all eagerly pressing — — ^ Tara. Laegari, son of Nial, c
1624.Nial, convened this assemblj^, according to the usage of liis predecessors, amon
1625.er reasons, for the purpose of reforming the customs and laws of his kingdom, at
1626.cas ons, the ArdKiagh, or sovereign King ot Ireland, dwelt with his household, a
1627.nghold of the Hostages," w^iere the king kept his prisoners; and another, the ''
1628.ni lit and it was conmianded by the king, that no fire should be lighted in Erio
1629.ustoms of the nation. The third building was named the " Palace, or House of the
1630.but within the enclosure of the building. But when the Convention met to origina
1631.ation."* At the appointed hour, the king, attended by his chiefs, Brehons, and B
1632.the Irish Gaels were assembled, kneeling on the very verge of the mystic circle,
1633.flow into a stone basin below. Following the king and his retinue, came the prov
1634. a stone basin below. Following the king and his retinue, came the provincial ki
1635.o dared blaspheme his name. Her towering stature, her marvellous beauty, and her
1636.es were centered upon her ; the kneeling tigures, bowing to their gods, in what
1637. upon her ; the kneeling tigures, bowing to their gods, in what was to them the
1638.mmediate gaze. They rested for a passing moment on Mahoii, and their look of sco
1639.that fringed her eyelids, from trickling down lier cheeks, Slie saw before her t
1640.jeproach and love* himself. 181 The king priests sat on his tlirone. His warrior
1641.e god of their idolatry, was approaching meridian. In beauty and brightnes he sh
1642.res and domes of Tara. The scintillating rays of his beams danced in gladness up
1643. answer to the unpleasant and perplexing questions, which the presence of the Cl
1644.be vanquislicd. The Arch-Druid, entering the inner E circle of the temple, rostr
1645.nd invoked his assistance in Then rising, he proindling the holy lire of the Sac
1646.assistance in Then rising, he proindling the holy lire of the Sacred Isle. ceede
1647.hrown into the flames. Again prostrating himself to earth, he breathed a prayer,
1648. earth, he breathed a prayer, and rising to his feet, beckoned Conra to approach
1649., beckoned Conra to approach h m. Taking from his hands a piece of perfumed wood
1650.tion and homage to the sun-god. The king and his chiefs knelt mute and motionles
1651.absembled there, with fear and trembling waited for the power of their god to be
1652.e deep and profound reigned, and nothing, save tlie beating of tneir hearts, was
1653. reigned, and nothing, save tlie beating of tneir hearts, was audible. Hushed, b
1654.shed, breathless and still, the kneeling multitude looked in pious %vonder on th
1655. within the holy circle inr A i A voking fire from heaven. that moment a cry of
1656.y burst from Conra, so wild and piercing in feeling and intensity, that it seeme
1657.m Conra, so wild and piercing in feeling and intensity, that it seemed to freeze
1658.ch-Druid paused in astonishment the king frowningly grasped the jewelled hilt of
1659.lume of smoke, its spiral wreaths hiding tlie face of their boasted sim-god, and
1660.ople's blood with terror ; jind piercing to the clouds. It rose on the stilly at
1661.ce. Then, as if the breath of the living god had breathed upon it, leaped out a
1662.leaped out a flame of Are, whose burning darts soared upward to the heavens and
1663.m in tlie Island Filled with wrath, King Laegaeri and his warriors saw the ligli
1664.and his warriors saw the liglit flashing over tlie plain. Had the thunderbolts o
1665.d at each other in wonder. Then the king, with dark and scowling brow, standing
1666.r. Then the king, with dark and scowling brow, standing erect and nervously clut
1667.g, with dark and scowling brow, standing erect and nervously clutching iiis skei
1668., standing erect and nervously clutching iiis skein, demanded of the Arch-Druid:
1669., whose face was livid with rage turning toward the king, said : " The man who h
1670. livid with rage turning toward the king, said : " The man who has kindled this
1671.he man who has kindled this lii-e O King is one, who ! honor of the Saviour, tha
1672.shall die !" fiercely exclaimed the king, "This outrage must be avenged." Turnin
1673. "This outrage must be avenged." Turning from Conra his eye glanced around the c
1674.d. Sybilla followed the look ot the king. Congal and Cathal, believing that Conr
1675.t the king. Congal and Cathal, believing that Conra had informed the king of his
1676.lieving that Conra had informed the king of his conversion, trembled proud smile
1677. she listened to the command of the king. As he spoke, she shot a meaning glance
1678.he king. As he spoke, she shot a meaning glance at Conra, which was understood a
1679. witli you a band of spearmen, and bring before us this impostor, this blaspheme
1680. will be just and terrible Mahon, bowing lowly before the throne, departed on hi
1681.throne, departed on his mission, leaving behind him many hearts burning with dif
1682., leaving behind him many hearts burning with different impulses and convictions
1683.d convictions, but all anxiously waiting and expecting the arrival of him, who h
1684. but all anxiously waiting and expecting the arrival of him, who had caused such
1685.e them. Grim, silent and stern, the king and his follow^ers looked as the holy m
1686. none rose to do him honor; for the king had commanded them to show him no court
1687.touched the hearts of all, save the King; '' ! Then by A iS4 and Coiira. Alone,
1688.rotected he appeared among them. Relying solely on the God whom he adored, and t
1689.aused them to give him a patient hearing. gods for centuries he believed tliem t
1690.the insult given them, the noble bearing of St. Patrick, served to mollify for a
1691., and insolently denounced his preaching, especially the doctrine of the Tliese
1692.to reverto his ; ; The proud, unyielding monarch was wedded A ; ence. * It w^as
1693.s wedded A ; ence. * It w^as forthcoming. Of all those who opposed him none was
1694.o annihilate him. He harangued tlie king and his nobles, and reminded them of th
1695. must suffer death, and for this, O King we demand his blood !" murmur of approb
1696.ur accursed symbol," he shouted pointing, with a gesture of disdain, to the cros
1697.e, a fierce and malignant sneer mantling his dark and frowning face, and dared h
1698.ant sneer mantling his dark and frowning face, and dared him to the issue with J
1699.he had so easily achieved while the king was in the act of giving orders for his
1700. while the king was in the act of giving orders for his immediate arrest and dea
1701.ld it before the face of the blaspheming Druid. For a second he looked upon it i
1702.n scorn, and then quick as the lightning cleaves the oak of the forest, threw up
1703.e s^ettered," exclaimed Patrick, looking sternly at the king. The latter, thouir
1704.med Patrick, looking sternly at the king. The latter, thouirb« territied, was n
1705.dignant tone, when a shrill and piercing shriek aa::iin burst on their astonishe
1706.ale. Malion heard it, and wildly rushing to the spot, where the virgiub of the S
1707.ybilla in his arms, as she fell fainting and terrified to the ground. — im CHA
1708. loud and long, In your rapture flinging heavenward censers of triumphant song.
1709. rules the spheres Glance like lightning, through the clouds, and backward roll
1710.s, and backward roll the wi-ongful ISIng, ; ; years. —Aubrey Be Vere. The red
1711. woods are fair. The flowers that spring by Ann alee Might grace the proudest qu
1712. his footsteps nigh. brushed a trembling tear away, That dimmed her soft blue ey
1713.e Princess Sybilla," he shouted, bearing her in liis arms, and making frantic ef
1714.ed, bearing her in liis arms, and making frantic efforts to burst through t]ie "
1715.s now made their appearance, and casting those nearest them aside, with their st
1716.but a few paces thither, and its cooling and ref resiling waters will soon reviv
1717.hither, and its cooling and ref resiling waters will soon revive her." Quickly f
1718.will soon revive her." Quickly following this advice, so opportunely given by tl
1719. given by tlie ** old bard, and treading in the footsteps of Congal and his comr
1720.ers readily spread on the ground. Making a cup of his hands, he took from the bu
1721. of his hands, he took from the bubbling spring a draught of water, and sprinkle
1722. hands, he took from the bubbling spring a draught of water, and sprinkled her f
1723. young nobles, and a pure breeze fanning her temples, aided by the generous flui
1724.he generous fluid, soon restored Opening her eyes, she gazed wistfully lier to c
1725.around. Mahon; but immediately recalling the scene she had so lately witnessed,
1726.tnessed, she raised herself to a sitting postm^e, and eagerly inquired for tlie
1727. for tlie Saint. " Where is Sicur? Bring him to me. O God of the ChrisI believe
1728.Thy name, for Thou tians lielp an erring child how I have art truly the God of H
1729. " Mahon! I have been blind, and groping in the darkness but, praised be thy God
1730.arned them, that the Saint w approaching. Fergus, who had been dispatched after
1731.en dispatched after hi appeared, guiding him to the well. As he approached £ bi
1732.m. She kiss his vestments, and, throwing herself on the ground, clasp his knees,
1733.er !" tenderly replied the Saint, taking 1 hand, " arise, and be baptized!" Lead
1734.hand, " arise, and be baptized!" Leading her to the well, he was about administe
1735. to the well, he was about administering t sacrament when Kiaran, who had been i
1736.en Kiaran, who had been intently looking c stepped forwaixi, and professed his b
1737. was borne from the presence of the king, by 1 satellites, but though the power
1738.nook and corner of royal Tara, a surging throng pressed forward to meet and feas
1739. by thousands who surrounded it, wailing for the gray of morning, to light them
1740.nded it, wailing for the gray of morning, to light them again to his presence. S
1741. brothei'S and beautiful sisters g:izing upon her with tenderness and love, as w
1742.the sweet and entrano ed in tlie 190 ing melody of licr voice, ravirflied the so
1743.anks to his God, the hot tears streaming down his cheeks. The midnight moon cast
1744.er sisters, and on soft beds of yielding moss, they reposed for the night. Despi
1745.hey soon sank into a cahn and refreshing sleep. Kiaran and a few of his comrades
1746.and its tones woke to life tlie sleeping thousands. It was Easter Sunday, the fi
1747.i swell of his voice rose on the morning air, and he intoned the words of the Ma
1748. faith which can never die. The wavering and vacillating became convinced those
1749. never die. The wavering and vacillating became convinced those who through fear
1750.inced those who through fear of the King and his Druids had kept aloof, now came
1751.ept aloof, now came forward with burning ardor ; and those who from first had be
1752.ings were, by them, conveyed to the King. into his mind an intense hatred of the
1753.t by tlieir superior skill and reasoning, l)y murder. Poor Pagans They knew not
1754.power against which they were contending. " He shall die !" exclaimed the king,
1755.ng. " He shall die !" exclaimed the king, stamping in fury and ! brandishing his
1756.hall die !" exclaimed the king, stamping in fury and ! brandishing his skein. Bu
1757.king, stamping in fury and ! brandishing his skein. But the subtle Druids, chagr
1758.liation on the previous day, and wishing to inspire the people with a dread of t
1759.ater in the d^^y. difliculty in quelling tJie tierce storm they raised in his he
1760. to endeavor to paint here, that meeting on Tara's Hill. History recounts it. It
1761.icity of tlieir priests; how, in proving the doctrine of tn Trinity, lie picked
1762.trated the absurdity and false reasoning of the Druids of Bel; these and a thous
1763. of old Erinn Easter day.''* The evening sun was setting ere the Druids retired
1764.ster day.''* The evening sun was setting ere the Druids retired from the Foiled,
1765.d of the Saint ; others sougiit the king to remind him of his promise, to slay t
1766.promise, to slay the man who was working such evil in Erinn; while many, lighted
1767.his tent. Filled with hope, thanksgiving and love, the holy Patrick left the roy
1768.toward His heart was full to overtlowing, for the mercies tlie river. God had sh
1769. him, in liis hour of trial; and washing to be alone in communion with his Savio
1770.. 193 qnietly behind him, and eoncealing himself iii the grove, watched the Sain
1771.n prayer. While thus engaged, a rustling in the bashes behind him, fell upon Loo
1772.the bashes behind him, fell upon Looking in the direction of the noise he beheld
1773.soldier, clad in the uniform of the king's guard, with a spear poised in his han
1774.d in his hand, and in the act of hurling it at the heart of He stood under the s
1775.a huge oak, St. Patrick. whose spreading branches almost hid him from view. Kiar
1776.'s hand. 1dm, and instinctively throwing up his hand to ward oflF the Quick as l
1777.hand to ward oflF the Quick as lightning he fatal shaft, succeeded in clutching
1778.g he fatal shaft, succeeded in clutching it. reversed it, and hurling it with al
1779.n clutching it. reversed it, and hurling it with all his strength, pierced the h
1780. heart of the would-be assassin, pinning him to the tree. So certain was the aim
1781.wo accomplices hid in the bushes, seeing the fate of their comrade, fled in the
1782.mrade, fled in the direction of the king's palace. St. Patrick doubted not but t
1783.ubted not but they were sent by the king, and the unrepentant Druids, to murder
1784.ids, to murder him ; and again returning thanks to God for his delivei'ance, res
1785. voices blended in harmony and rejoicing, Sybilla, drawing the curtains of her t
1786. harmony and rejoicing, Sybilla, drawing the curtains of her tent aside, stepped
1787.ine than mortal mould. Mahon, as dotting his plumed liat, he approached and sat
1788.ows could never be effaced but, trusting to Him whom 1 have found, 1 feel an und
1789. feel an undetinable glow— a something that sheds balm upon my spii'it, and gi
1790.ll, with your sire and brothers. Knowing I would be sacrificed to his wrath, bec
1791.ht my own territory ; but my heart being weary with its weight of love and woe,
1792.tian " O Mahon the memory of our meeting then, will never be effaced from my poo
1793.stood, a church is erected to the Living Gjd 1" be, ; ; " It may Mahon of my fat
1794.en. The workmen were struck by lightning, and every stone demolAnd that thou, Ma
1795.er, who died with a broken heart cursing you, was elected chieftain in your plac
1796.is Cliristian enemies, and when leiiving the College of Sacred Virgins, to becom
1797.s, and how apparent God, when lie living lie, pleases, can make tlie truth appea
1798.make tlie truth appear !" and unassuming manner detailed tlie events which occur
1799.ght from Dalaradia, until tlieir meeting at Tara. Modestly he mentioned the part
1800.he played in her rescue but with feeling told of his joy on again beholding her.
1801.eling told of his joy on again beholding her. The treachery and perfidy of Conra
1802.of tlie blessed Patrick. His counselling gave hope and vigor to Boul, even befor
1803.wered, Mahon, and it will be one leading feature of my life to pray for tliose,
1804., and Congal and Una united, and swaying the wand of chieftaincy in Dalara^ dia,
1805. heart pines for thee. There are soaring mountains and fer tile valleys in Tir-o
1806. Sybilla! Congal and Una are approaching. How fondly she smiles upon him I O spe
1807.ul !" His impassioned manner and burning words sunk deep into her soul. She look
1808.as if to speak, unconsciously displaying the bright pearls within she hesitated
1809.sitated to utter her thought, but seeing A ! ! — — 198 Una and Congal draw n
1810.lasp her hand in his, when TJna, rushing forward, threw herself into tlie arms o
1811. with us. Patrick leaves in tlie morning I have consulted with Fergus and our fr
1812.e tuition of Conall, and Kilcurran being at no great distance, we can always com
1813. (complete. bearer, insists on returning with me; and his companions, Barriinn a
1814.who, until to-day, scoffed at everything the Cliristian holds dear, have been re
1815.hood, and Cathal at his ordinaAnd having nothing fm-ther to prolong our stay at
1816.d Cathal at his ordinaAnd having nothing fm-ther to prolong our stay at tion. Ta
1817.tion. Tara, let us depart at the morning's dawn. Does Sybilla consent ?" " Willi
1818.eptre and state, and the poets that sing, And the swords that encircle a true Ir
1819.e swords that encircle a true Irish king! 5 Thrice looked he to Heaven with than
1820.aze they above them ? a war-eagle's wing I *Tis an omen I hurrah I for the true
1821. omen I hurrah I for the true Irish King I Why was Summer, A. D., 434. Rosy June
1822.athed in the crimson glory of the rising sun. His bright beams fell upon the mou
1823.ams fell upon the mountain tops, kissing the red blossomed heather, and shedding
1824. the red blossomed heather, and shedding a flood of light and loveliness, on hil
1825.k caroled her jocund song to the morning; and the woods that fringed its rugged
1826.placed as an infant's smile the sleeping waters lay. The emerald foliage of the
1827.ial music pealed on the air, and issuing from the dense groves that surrounded 1
1828.a band of armed men was seen approaching. Their bronzed helmets and spears, poli
1829.ght, and throughout all And — flinging it aside in dazzling splendor upon the
1830.ll And — flinging it aside in dazzling splendor upon the tranquil surface of l
1831.ter, the Princess Sybilla, and following Una accompanied iier were fifty maidens
1832.last, long and loud, woke the slumbering echoes of the hills. Immediately a band
1833.r steeds gaily caparisoned, and prancing and dancing to the music of He A trump,
1834.ly caparisoned, and prancing and dancing to the music of He A trump, and harp, a
1835. bell, whose spire could be seen peeping througk the foliage, rung out a welcome
1836. rung out a welcome peal. Then, emerging from the green wood, with gay banners a
1837. green wood, with gay banners and waving plumes, Mahon aad his followSurrounded
1838.d opposite the coronation chair. Doffing his plumed hat, he bowed gracefully to
1839.out a gladsome peal, and slowly emerging from the sacred edifice, St. Patrick, r
1840. Coleraine, entially saluted him. taking the young prince by the hand, led him t
1841.'s At the same time, Congal, approaching Sybilla, led side. her to Mahon, and pl
1842. Dalaradian, as he gazed on the blushing face of his beautiful bride, and presse
1843.e&erve his sovereignty. Havlionor of ing given his adherence to ail which custom
1844. and proclaimed him " a truo Irisli King." Again the blare of trumpet and clank
1845.the rath ot TuUough-oge, and a deafening shout arose which startled the wolf of
1846. love." "My heart is full to overflowing, Sybilla, and joy and happiness possess
1847.m thee, and was the cause of his finding salvation. Thy smile would have detaine
1848.with thee, in the flames of thy dwelling. But God and his angels were watching o
1849.ng. But God and his angels were watching over thee, and guided Mahon to thy resc
1850., under God, was instrumental in guiding me also," said Mahon, pointing to Artga
1851.n guiding me also," said Mahon, pointing to Artgal, who now approached with Kiar
1852.l to see them as they entered. Beckoning Artgal to his side, Mahon paused, and t
1853.al to his side, Mahon paused, and taking a gold brooch, glittering with gems, fr
1854.ed, and taking a gold brooch, glittering with gems, from his breast, placed it o
1855.membered in my heart," he said, grasping his hand. " Thy words, gold." my prince
1856.own to me, and, though poor the offering, accept this from her thou hast so trul
1857.m her thou hast so truly served." Taking from her neck a heavy chain of gold, sh
1858.d reached the banquet hall, and hurrying forward, Mahon and his bride entered. T
1859.isdom in the counThey recited in glowing their gentleness in the hall. cil verse
1860. hall. cil verse the bright and enduring fame of their native land told of the a
1861.n an extemporaneous hymn of tnanksgiving to God, blessing Him for His mercies, a
1862.us hymn of tnanksgiving to God, blessing Him for His mercies, and supplicating H
1863.ng Him for His mercies, and supplicating Him to always look down with an eye of
1864.elt on the ground to receive his parting benediction. He was departing for Armag
1865.is parting benediction. He was departing for Armagh, to erect there a cathedral,
1866.ead over the world. on them his blessing, and affectionately taking leave of Mah
1867. his blessing, and affectionately taking leave of Mahon and Sybilla, and their f
1868. arms were laid aside, and the remaining time passed in mirth. It was an ancient
1869.iaries departed for their homes, bearing with them many presents from the young
1870.that ever bore the Cross. Their learning and sanctity were confessed in monaster
1871.f the faith that was in them by offering up From the hrst ravages of their lives
1872.en lived to a green old age, ministering to the spiritual wants of tlie Dalaradi
1873., Rich in unborrowed loveliness. Winning in every smile she wears, Winning she i
1874.inning in every smile she wears, Winning she is in thine own sweet airs. What to
1875.t airs. What to the spirit more charming can be Than the lay whose lingering not
1876.ming can be Than the lay whose lingering notes recall The thoughts of the holy,
1877. life and deplored in their fall ? Fling, fling the forms of art aside. Dull is
1878.nd deplored in their fall ? Fling, fling the forms of art aside. Dull is the ear
1879.me the full responsive sigh. The glowing cheek and the moistened eye, Let these
1880.s standard of delineation, wlien writing of Ancient Erinn, the fault lies not in
1881.ot in my will, but Under what depressing circumstances and adin my ability. vers
1882.ecame imbued in one day with t^^e saving truths of the Gospel of Christ, while i
1883.st, while it took centuries of preaching and teaching to instil the same truths
1884.took centuries of preaching and teaching to instil the same truths into One woul
1885.h as readily shaken off. were a thinking people. How they and their descendants
1886. » illus- paper covers ART OF SUFFERING AUNT HONOR'S KEEPSAKE. 8S 50 AUGUSTINE.
1887.py. The Mayor of W^lndgap and Canvassing. The Bit o' Writia*. The Bcyne Water. T
1888. 125 1 00 75 CANNON'S PRACTICAL SPELLING BOOK, CATECHISM OF SACRED HISTORY. By x
1889.1 , CATHOLIC O'MALLEYS CATHOLIC OFFERING. By Archbishop Walsh CARROLL O'DONOGHUE
1890.n half per set pagcsw FAIR FRANCE DURING THE SECOND EMPIRE FAIRY FOLK STORIES. F
1891.Agnes M. Stewart, xamo., cloth FOLLOWING OF CHRIST. By the Right Rev. Bishop 160
1892.ian calf, flexible gilt edges *<'oUowing of Christ with reflectiong, 34 mo., clo
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1895.60 KEENAN'S DOCTRINAL CATECHISM. KEATING*S HISTORY OF IRELAND. By Rev. Geoffrey
1896.ORY OF IRELAND. By Rev. Geoffrey Keating, D. D. 750 pages, gilt edges net 6 00 4
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1898.ges. By Madden LIFE OF WASHINGTON IRVING. Steel portrait LIFE OF WILLIAM CULLEN
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Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/