Concordance for A new treatise on the duty of a Christian towards God : being an enlarged and improved version of the original treatise / written by J.B. de La Salle ; translated from the French by Mrs. J. Sadlier.

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17. ded in one expoaure are filmed beginning in the upper left hand corner, left to
18. s many framea as required. The following diagrama illustrate the method: Lea car
19. y DUTY OF A CHRISTIAN 1 I TOWARDS BEING GOD. AN ENLARGED and IMPR OF THE, ^ ORI
20. press of Poussielgue, This work, having been submitted to our inspection, appoa
21. OLINIER, *. Secretary. Entsrbd according to Act of Congress J. in the year 1860,
22. s to place also in the hands of speaking and studying the English language. The
23. so in the hands of speaking and studying the English language. The very educatio
24. whole Duty of a Christian. Here nothing is unexplained — no point unnoticed
25. to produce once the effect of rivetting attention, and inducing the mind rest,
26. ect of rivetting attention, and inducing the mind rest, the to dwell on these al
27. not reflect on the formei wilhoiil being struck by the Nothing iiiin liiat exist
28. mei wilhoiil being struck by the Nothing iiiin liiat exists, except by Him who i
29. , and is by himself; it in we have being, motion, life, and reason. He has creat
30. eligion. all that with the hope of being useful to we publish New Treatise fitly
31. reatise fitly on the Duty of discharging it. the Christian towards God, an. the
32. and the duties of religion, that nothing is impossible to him who wis enc M well
33. " to men of good will.** Far from taking to ourselves an honour which belongs no
34. IGA- e latter. it in in TION OF STUDYING I created 18 , U8 by honour God, a 1.
35. d who regulates divine wisdom. according to the eternal laws of His created bein
36. berty; he alone capable of faith knowing, willing, and loving; nevertheless, God
37. alone capable of faith knowing, willing, and loving; nevertheless, God, who is
38. le of faith knowing, willing, and loving; nevertheless, God, who is I 1 who ia w
39. d that they may be employed in promoting His glory. These truths, unquestionable
40. edience and love from the rational being to hii Creator. it the body be said tha
41. tude to Him who has called him mto being. Can a father possibly dispense wd;h th
42. ship ought to be internal, comprehending faculties of our soul ; all the should
43. to God ; and has because that men, being destined to live in society, should ass
44. l. Him who Without a fixed and unvarying system of worship, f reli- gion could n
45. uld not long subsist amongst men, seeing that they have so great need of mutual
46. d of mutual edification, and of exciting each other to the practice of their fro
47. ractice of their from the very beginning of the world, gether to render find hom
48. eveals man the existence also of a Being oi whom he entirely depends, shows him
49. he form of this the obligation of paying 's Him all honour. that the earth, but
50. same, to say, the necessity of honouring a supreme power, respect a creator ant*
51. reator ant* conservator an all-disposing Providence. Bo true it is that man ceas
52. " Ives to 2.-i-THB NECESSITY OF STUDYING RELIGION. werful, vas all H» the To be
53. d punishments of the other world, having nothing satisfactory to say against the
54. ments of the other world, having nothing satisfactory to say against these d fro
55. ne were persuaded of Llie contrary being the case, is an inconsistency which can
56. it cow- are so many witnesses attesting the existence of God. at they xciting '
57. ng the existence of God. at they xciting 'fhus, Thethought, the to prove will, a
58. onsequently, are immortality. Such being the fear, case, how we to account for t
59. become of me all day die, and on leaving 18 to ; that I can say this is that I s
60. h moderates him and sustains him nothing, in adversity, ; teaching him that time
61. ns him nothing, in adversity, ; teaching him that time and eterhity all it is it
62. res the tranquility of States, by making established if man submissive to the au
63. d revile us, and to praj ! " Astonishing fact '' sayi Montesquieu, struck with t
64. t fai& Let us then conclude that nothing is in its mysteries, it also ordains th
65. en, to him wh# most certain, blaspheming that of which he knows nothing, dares t
66. aspheming that of which he knows nothing, dares to des pise as popular prejudice
67. of those Christians who have it, nothing his of Christianity but Baptism, and wh
68. umility of his heart) that the following : epitaph might be engraved on his tomb
69. departed from this world without having sought know why he came into it/' EoOra
70. S TOWARDS GO AND THB MEANS OP ACQUITTING HIMSELF THEREOF. Part I'wBt CF THE KNOW
71. nguish the Christian made while reciting it serves from all others, and because
72. of the second takes in the six following articles, the world and treats of the S
73. ved for men after their death, according to the good or the evil they shall have
74. sal judgment; and the : three concluding articles it done in the flesh. recite t
75. e especially when we rise in the morning, so as to testify to God that we propos
76. a Christian ought ; and also when going to bed at night, in order to dispose ou
77. Church, should death surprise us during our sleep: this is the reason why the c
78. believe One of the tyrants of old having sought, by and promises, to induee the
79. n one of them replied: "Listen! am going to make my profession of faith," and he
80. ssion of faith," and he commenced saying aloud, in a firm tone " I believe in Go
81. a very old Greek manuscript, containing the Apostles' Creed divided into twelve
82. acta t is good when we propose Bn going lie THB NECESSITY OF REVELATION. Man's
83. ter his death ; his mind, however, being so limited in its cais in the ring our
84. being so limited in its cais in the ring our i that all it can but imperfectly c
85. postles and some of their Of are n going [1 disciples. saying Imighty, AUSSE. ut
86. heir Of are n going [1 disciples. saying Imighty, AUSSE. ut, ration, and All the
87. o the slightest change, without exciting the clam rous oppo« m /I 4 ; ; i'MniHt
88. on that book The Pentateuch, comprising the five Bible, have ^^ ; dispute the f
89. ave ^^ ; dispute the fact of Moses being its author, without disputing tlie exis
90. oses being its author, without disputing tlie existence of that people, which wo
91. se the events described in the preceding accounts. The writers of these books ha
92. ll proved their divme mission by shining miracles and by prophecies which time h
93. it was an entire sibility of their being doubted. kingdom stricken at different
94. shaded by a thick cloud from the burning heat of the sun, and their nightly path
95. flame again, it was the Jordan dividing its waters to lei: tlie people pass at
96. hty-five thousand men struck dead during the night, under the walls of Jerusalem
97. red men who speak not as though doubting, hesitating or conjecturing, but who, i
98. speak not as though doubting, hesitating or conjecturing, but who, in an assured
99. ugh doubting, hesitating or conjecturing, but who, in an assured tone, publicly
100. the most important, the most interesting to all the nations, and yet the most im
101. fhey were foretold such are the carrying away of the Jews to Babylon, after the
102. to be revered as divine, and containing the true word of God. The authority of
103. s heard and saw. From the very beginning of Christianity, the books were cited a
104. nowledged their authenticity, contenting themselves with endeavouring to pervert
105. contenting themselves with endeavouring to pervert their sense. The Church has
106. ound veneration for these books, causing them to be publicly read in aU Che asse
107. d them as the word of God, and emanating from the Holy Spirit, and as such that
108. to, or diminish them without committing a sacrilege. If these books, then, are
109. urn in eight days." The eight days being past, the deputies called again, and he
110. e same answer. The deputies were hearing from the philosopher only the same word
111. d to know how long he would keep telling them to return in eight days. He replie
112. GOD. nth. 17 So the au- wledged avouring ineration id in all, he hear St. Ambros
113. octor said " Oh, my God there is nothing in the world affects me so deeply as to
114. so deeply as to hear thy voice speaking through the divine books of thy Sacred
115. ither deceive myself or others by taking the words of Scripture in a Scripture i
116. ch af has suspended in air those shining spheres: the sun, diffusing light and w
117. hose shining spheres: the sun, diffusing light and warmth on all around; the moo
118. t out; when we look upon a fine painting, we know that an accomplished artist ha
119. shall find a body composed of an amazing multitu<^! of springs and o.gans placed
120. and arranged with the niust astonishing regularity throughout the whole we perc
121. we see that He who called man into being has thus given him a manifest proof of
122. ial, for matter is incapable of thinking Nevertheless, the soul is it is then of
123. eight be- n we lint ful some work- nting, »e I we design was had cut Qture had
124. and us given jut God that is 'ul ; nking soul ;vl: n 5t« I'p. ited are, and and
125. ^eds not )f a soul frri'ii 'ti I., being the involuntary "testimony ii naturally
126. ony ii naturally (Jh -istian," according to the words of Tertullian. therefore,
127. d each felt the necessity of recognizing a divinity. Tliis universal consent and
128. ment of all nations and of men differing l»om each other in genius of all ages,
129. shines on all mankind, light proceeding from God himself and which even the mos
130. e wonders of his power. What other being could have said to the sun " Go forth f
131. said to the sun " Go forth from nothing," and illumine the day ? Who but He cou
132. of dav8 ai^ nights, or fix the unvarying order of the seasoi s ? All tl\en a mou
133. eanor as he was shallow in his reasoning, one diy presented himself at the house
134. n of God drew back in horror; and taking hold of a spy- glass which lay near, he
135. ic : Sir," said he abruptly, " examining that strange being which they call athe
136. abruptly, " examining that strange being which they call atheist, for I have nev
137. ause there cannot be more than one being who exists of himself, and depends on n
138. cause. And is it not evident that being supremely great, he must be alone in hi
139. l he should be no longer a Supreme Being ? i'» All the perfections of God prove
140. there ill" can be but one immense being that is to say, who pervades and fills
141. space, and beyond whom there is nothing more. There can only be one being wl^o
142. othing more. There can only be one being wl^o is infinitely perfect that is to s
143. itely perfect that is to say, possessing all perfection, and beyond whom there i
144. greatness. It is, doubtless, surprising that a truth so evident should have bee
145. all presentto was but one Supreme Being, on the Creator of things, and ind piou
146. day greater that ERAVLT. thus according as they receded from the origin of thin
147. which they could hope or fear any thing. The stars were the first objects of th
148. of mankind worshipped almost every thing, save ; \\ — ty: there who s God hims
149. y: there who s God himself. per- nothing perfect nd whom con* 36 it nt should it
150. es^ nations surpassed others in learning and civilizatioi^ I: '• ^^1 'i'tii I
151. w. We ; ii :'iU Example. Epictetus being asked what God is, replied " If I were
152. uffices for 29 man in this life. Nothing gives us a grander than that which he h
153. dea of God AM," that is to say the Being of beir.g^the principle of From this it
154. form, nor colour. God resembles nothing of all that surrounds us, and striken o
155. erial, in the highest God is and a being infinitely perfect is not material. The
156. ever had a beginBefore the birth of ning, and shall never have an end. ages, God
157. s drawn all creatures forth from nothing, and He might create a thousand other w
158. o Him 'eplied should God If then nothing is impossible, and nothing difficult gl
159. then nothing is impossible, and nothing difficult globes are suspended in empty
160. e, who annually presents to our admiring gaze, the resurrection of >entire The c
161. at exists, hft holds from no other being than himself. The inexhaustible source
162. mely happy, he has need of no onc^ being sufficient for himself, and being Jie a
163. being sufficient for himself, and being Jie absolute mastef of all things, he h
164. ust fall again into our original nothing, and with* out his assistance, we could
165. out his assistance, we could do nothing. God is immutable. What he is, he has e
166. nd permanent condition ; his body, being subject to the revolutions of the diffe
167. or because he finds a reason for seeking at one time that which he had before ne
168. ith all the other perfections us nothing has had power tf) limit their number^hS
169. mortal eye. Hence the keen uipiercing reproaches of our own conscience. la va
170. from his own thoughts, fearful of being overwhelmed with shame before a judge w
171. le monitor, who is incessantly reminding him oi' the enormity of his crime, to t
172. h us, and that we are never alone seeing that how far soever we may be from the
173. Jiis care is called providence. Nothing happens in this world without His order
174. himself tells us. It is this overruling providence which annually covers the ea
175. isturb His unalterable repose. If a king only occupies himself finite power and
176. om. with great affairs, without stooping to attend to all the minor business of
177. his kingdom, it is because that, having but a up — not, for Bel — m -if' li
178. ||b could not matters without neglecting the greater: but the wisdom of God, bei
179. he greater: but the wisdom of God, being infinite, embraces all without any trou
180. bundance, it is because and in suflering as in health : ; test, so that he may m
181. , and because he knows that this passing aflfliction will aid in securing his et
182. passing aflfliction will aid in securing his eternal salvation. The second duty
183. >ies II easy to inhimself the minor ving but a to smaller wisdom of uble or the
184. n to commit sin. The holy woman blushing at their shameless proposal, raised her
185. is tt because he may »ecause he curing his 3 wretched old men ; but God knew h
186. f God. Certain flatterers were extolling the power of Canute, king of England, a
187. were extolling the power of Canute, king of England, and how did that wise princ
188. se he was not obeyed, whereupon, turning to he said " See now the extent of my p
189. avid, " I have no thought of complaining I have no voice but to hless the Lord a
190. no voice but to hless the Lord and sing His praises, knowing that all comes fro
191. s the Lord and sing His praises, knowing that all comes from Him who is the sour
192. willed it." : t> < M. de Chantal, having been mortally wounded in the by the imp
193. self the consoler of that friend, saying " My friend, the arrow was chase, L>'i
194. he cannon which all de Sevigne, speaking of Turenne, said thai killed that great
195. e Father was heard, publicly recognising him as His beloved Son, and the Holy Sp
196. the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, showing thereby that tJiese festly declared thr
197. is beyond the reach of our understanding, but yet it is not contrary to reason,
198. one God" but only "Three persons forming but one God." Neither are we to figure
199. figure to ourselves three persons having body and soul like unto us, for the thr
200. F THE CHRISTIAN and stru !:;. .i Nothing, in fact, is more reasonable than that
201. ot understand him; nevertheless, knowing that they are yet but children, they be
202. rate nor comprehend. " To attempt diving into this mystery is rashness," says St
203. he Trinity like the Father, it has being ; like the Son, it : il'V and like the
204. and the Holy Ghost, it has in its being, its intelligence, and its love, one an
205. ligence — one and the same all Nothing can be taken frorri it unless life. be
206. ess life. be taken. Perfect in its being, its intelligr;nce, and its love, it un
207. oves all tliat it understands, its being and its operations are insepai «ble ha
208. rom their birth, were one day conversing: one of the two was ignorant — r.-) W
209. I should like to know what was God doing for all eternity, before he created the
210. d with himself, and it might be thinking of creating a hell for the future punis
211. lf, and it might be thinking of creating a hell for the future punishment of tho
212. persons in God, each of the three being God, although there is but one God ? Tr
213. ut one God ? Truly it is a strange thing, and I think one is very foolish to bel
214. s, each of whom is God, and in believing thus, I act not as a fool, assuredly, b
215. ibitable I inquired what you were doing all your lifta com knew lers? or 5 vari
216. eign sflex ) of Son, it 3. Like ts being, unlesi its ppiuess, it and ; under-
217. e blind can realize to ourselves nothing ? Who could make us understand of what
218. " we have so many reasons for believing it all men who are not blind tell us so
219. d learn them of her If we believe during life, and die as Christians should, we
220. his fact is sufficiently manifest, being proved in various ways. In going back t
221. , being proved in various ways. In going back towards the period of creation, us
222. Holy Scriptures, we see that every thing commences arts, sciences, nations and e
223. st word of that book is In the beginning God created the Jieavens and the earth,
224. say, that he made all things of nothing. God had existed of himself, and nothin
225. God had existed of himself, and nothing existed but only himself. At the moment
226. ns and the earth came forth from nothing he created them solely by his word and
227. ld we not have beerx struck on beholding at every word ot the Almighty a multitu
228. Almighty a multitude of creatures spring into existence, each fair and the ; per
229. ere, and He commanded the earth to bring forth her plants and trees. At his won!
230. terile surface became suddenly a smiling land> : made" mM '•1 of creasee that
231. icli e is itself (rtions of of beginning •'orthy meadows, rich vallies, hillti
232. hen from d by his " Let the waters bring forth the creeping creature having life
233. Let the waters bring forth the creeping creature having life, and the fowl that
234. bring forth the creeping creature having life, and the fowl that may fiy over th
235. eated the animals *' Let the earth bring forth the living creature, in its kind"
236. *' Let the earth bring forth the living creature, in its kind" and thus were cr
237. imperceptible animalcule to those living mountain! which agitate the seas. What
238. e qualities necessary ; ! for fulfilling their destiny. irth, and being formed,
239. ulfilling their destiny. irth, and being formed, God Finally, resolved to give a
240. t man whom He named Adam. can be nothing more ridiculous than on the origin of t
241. trrbed by the conversation of the living, attributed the creation of the world a
242. liberty of man to the accidental meeting of atoms. This system, which was also t
243. a disgrace to the human mind. According to Thales, the origin of all things is
244. ales, the origin of all things is (uving to water according to Anaximenes, it is
245. all things is (uving to water according to Anaximenes, it is to air, while Hera
246. that he came of the oyster, which being matured, became a fish, the fish became
247. ith intelligence, and capable of knowing and loving their Creator, and also beca
248. gence, and capable of knowing and loving their Creator, and also because they ar
249. ined to be eternally happy in possessing him. ARTICLE Although on count of the c
250. ay, is I OF THE ANGELS. there is nothing said of the angels in the acit is belie
251. o smote and overthrew the rebels, crying, " Who is like ; v>i I 1^ unto God?" Wh
252. at we may have an opportunity of proving our love for him, and of earning a grea
253. proving our love for him, and of earning a greater reward, God permits us to be
254. gois their aid. is to adore God and sing his praises ; also, to present to him o
255. o IS at all times desirous of conducting us onward in the way Uiat leads to heav
256. e Jews from captivity, Tobias, believing himself near his end, and desirous of r
257. near his end, and desirous of recovering for his son a considerable sum which he
258. relation lived. The young Tobias having gone out for this purpose, encountered
259. l Raphael, under the form of a wayfaring young man, who immediately offered to b
260. el, one of hia own relatives. On hearing this, the young man was struck with fea
261. ng man was struck with fear, remembering that Sarah had already been tlie The an
262. ll dead. assured him, however, promising that no evil should befall him if he wo
263. After the man fiiUy did. Gabelus, being invited to the wedding, brought with hi
264. d. Gabelus, being invited to the wedding, brought with him iij : TOWARDS GOD. s;
265. to retrace their way to Palestine. Being returned to the paternal house, the you
266. , the young Tobias adored God, according as he had been admonished by the ungel
267. admonished by the ungel then approaching his father who was blind, he nibbed the
268. which he bad caught in the Tigris during his journey, whereupon the holy his iif
269. on, the angel made himself known, saying to the elder Tobias: "The Lord hath sen
270. ayed and wept, and when you were burying the dead, 1 presented your prayers to G
271. herefore, and be cause you were pleasing to God, it was necessary that yon shoul
272. y that yon should be tried by sufl^Bring." He then said " Peace be with you!" an
273. visible crea- m advised Ecbatana, iving 1 gone man from Raphael, God seemed to
274. ed to re-collect himself before creating hira (imediately Bar Rages, od willed o
275. m an intelligent soul, capable of loving, willing and thinking and it is in this
276. lligent soul, capable of loving, willing and thinking and it is in this that man
277. capable of loving, willing and thinking and it is in this that man roBembles Go
278. embles God, and is capable of possessing him for all eternity, if he render hims
279. form but one and the same family, loving each otlier na the children of a common
280. y only he has a soul capable of thinking and of loving, a soul whose — ; natur
281. a soul capable of thinking and of loving, a soul whose — ; nature is incorrupt
282. e forevor "fm emperors had a slag taming, He was fed at the palace, whither he r
283. ther he returned every day, after having visited the neighbouring forests. This
284. y, after having visited the neighbouring forests. This animal was highl}? prized
285. hl}? prized by the emperor, who, fearing that he might stray away where some one
286. ht stray away where some one not knowing to whom he belonged, might give chase t
287. it of malice, our great adversary acting through the medium of our passions. of
288. stil! survives to himself, after having undergone that final stroke, which is,
289. nal stroke, which is, in reality nothing more than the separation of the two sub
290. the soul, which constitute — his being. And in fact, we can no more doubt that
291. evor had a stag ! was fter fed at having highly most assuredly that which thinks
292. owB foundations of a truth as consoling for the good, as it is dreadful for the
293. body if that principle of life emanating from the Creator was to be annihilated,
294. e of a Redeemer was absurd and unmeaning. So the dogma of a future life, and the
295. the world; idolatry, far from destroying it, had given it new strength, or rathe
296. s of great men, and the custom of paying them divine honours after their death w
297. nded all both soul and body. In creating a being of such vast capacity as our so
298. both soul and body. In creating a being of such vast capacity as our soul, God
299. had no other part than that of rendering it happy in the possession of something
300. it happy in the possession of something worthy of it, and of its works. Is happ
301. nd rends his very heart, notwithstanding The free course which he all his effort
302. that eternity from which he has nothing good to expect; he would fain not he do
303. ilty soul. arises before the unbelieving," says Young, " they shrink they trembl
304. author of The Studies of Nature, seeing his children weeping around his bed, ad
305. s of Nature, seeing his children weeping around his bed, addressed to them these
306. is bed, addressed to them these touching words: "This is no more than a separati
307. me. Farewell, [ feel that I am quitting the earth, but not life. my beloved one
308. orned with many excellent his mind being also illumined with a divine light, re*
309. on nations, all pursues him withstanding se eternity which he from )uld fain not
310. - B for eternity. lemardnie de 3, S9eing his these ;o tlioni eparation of >ainfu
311. nd without any tendency to evil; nothing disturbed the trancjuillity of his soul
312. obedience hence it was that when placing him in the teirestrial paradise, he for
313. im to touch one particular fruit, giving liim, however, the use of all the other
314. n was still innocent, and had no leaning towards evil, being on the contrary, ra
315. , and had no leaning towards evil, being on the contrary, rather inclined to goo
316. nied by the most fearful menace, nothing less, indeed, than the penalty of death
317. he penalty of death. But notwithstanding all the favours which they had received
318. had received from God, and disregarding his threats, the woman allowed herself
319. taken the form of a serj^ent and having herself eaten of the forbidden fruit, s
320. inclinations became ^^orrupt and tending to evil. iln losing their innocence, an
321. ^^orrupt and tending to evil. iln losing their innocence, and separating themsel
322. n losing their innocence, and separating themselves from •pod they exposed the
323. in the Sacred Scripture. Tlie holy King David says himself that he was born niq
324. t wis first created, like the mouldering remains of some nobl? building, beautif
325. ouldering remains of some nobl? building, beautiful even in 'decay. Ifi^norance
326. justice w« behoW an example when a king punishes a rebellious Aubjeo* by degrad
327. nishes a rebellious Aubjeo* by degrading TOWAUnS GOD. refers, beI'ils, L 4 is al
328. it them to his descendants, by remaining faithful to Had he but persevered in ri
329. d his own happiness to all his offspring and ensured to them a happy eternity bu
330. a remedy for our misfortunes by sending a Redeemer. himself nnd ; ':.V^ V J t.
331. re work of I scarcely, example degrading because I was naked, and I hid myself."
332. pent: "Because thou hast done this thing, thou art cursed among all cattle, and
333. y conceptions in sorrow shalt thou bring forth children, and thou shalt bo under
334. ou shalt eat the thistles shall it bring forth to thee herbs of the earth. In th
335. him the hope of h Mediator while cursing the serpent of whom the devil had made
336. hat from the woman should one day spring him who was to crush his head, that is
337. l for its development, and for repeating it more clearly, and in a more explicit
338. above, predicted more clearly the coming of the Liberator promised from the begi
339. he Liberator promised from the beginning of the world; he even pointed out the p
340. period of that great event, when, being on his deathbed, and amiouncing to ins
341. n, being on his deathbed, and amiouncing to ins twelve sons assembled around him
342. s after the death of Jacob, God, wishing to deliver his people from the yoke of
343. nd endowed him with the power of working miracles. That holy man, having guided
344. working miracles. That holy man, having guided the people even to the borders o
345. orders of the promised land, and feeling himself at the point ©f death, assembl
346. ple. — One day when Daniel was pouring out his Boul before the Lord, and prati
347. ut his Boul before the Lord, and prating with fervour for his peo])lej the angel
348. had been secured and strengthened during a long course of ages ; all the pa9«-
349. sen«ible characteristics of his coming wasj that by enlightening all nations h
350. of his coming wasj that by enlightening all nations he was also to con» vert t
351. d had not concealed this future blessing foi the Gentiles, for all the propcstf^
352. then, ; heralds iig whom the great King sent before his Son, to apjjrise • ou
353. out his his |)0O])lej men of his coming. God pointed out all pro|)hets, all the
354. orld. David, that holy and inspired king, is one of those who foretold him in th
355. *spring from the root Jesse, and receive his bi
356. ain the : ; ! i.*l' Messiahi is 5 coming to con» same prophet, " all nations sh
357. dead shall come to life ngain." ; essing fof I a divine s, several ime when But
358. ine s, several ime when But after having spoken of the glory of the Messiah, he
359. e prophet represents him to us as a king, though a poor one, he being to enter J
360. s as a king, though a poor one, he being to enter Jerusalem seated on an ass, ev
361. period of his Wm. mm It •".I'S- coming that prophet being occupied with the ca
362. m It •".I'S- coming that prophet being occupied with the captivity of his peop
363. his people and the seventy years during which it was to continue, he was sudden
364. the ancient sacrifices, a pure offering shall be presented to the Lord, not alo
365. temple of Jerusalem, hut from the rising to the setting of the sun ; not only am
366. alem, hut from the rising to the setting of the sun ; not only amongst the Jews,
367. Christianity, who cannot help respecting them, although they find therein their
368. be sold and even ey. fh a s, The willing testimony to the authenticity of the Sa
369. he events which took place at the coming of Christ. have only to bring together
370. the coming of Christ. have only to bring together the' prophecies and their fulf
371. prophecies and their fulfilment, keeping oive Land on the Old Testament, and the
372. se that there is no possibility of being mistaken. In the first place there can
373. e world." Tacitus relates the same thing. were persuaded," says that historian,
374. hecy, siah with the sway of a conquering prince. however, is none the less real,
375. and the fact is that the Apostles, going forth from Judea, did subdue the nation
376. Judea, did subdue the nations, and bring them under the law of Jesus Christ. The
377. es which were to characterize the coming of the Messiah he was born in Bethlehem
378. of laws; he wrought the most astonishing miracles; he sanctified the temple by h
379. nister was on his way back, after having done his errand, when as he journeyed a
380. and, when as he journeyed along, reading the prophecy of Isaiah, it pleased the
381. after him. The officer was just reading that saying of the prophet: **//e shall
382. The officer was just reading that saying of the prophet: **//e shall be led like
383. " unless some one show me ? " and having inviteu Phillip to mount beside him, he
384. hat he had heard, and the chariot having reached a spot where there was water, h
385. officer continued his journey, admiring what had happened, and giving praise to
386. , admiring what had happened, and giving praise to God for the great It is said,
387. sy chap. viii. 'H )mpliphmenl the coming i gave new CHAPTEa IV. he mid the tor >
388. ther be conceived ; thou under;aid t'ing the of inviteu which this mystery was a
389. is what the Gospel teaches us concerning When the time appointed by divine wisdo
390. or of mnounce to The riot officer having ded of PhilPhillip anil e believed Bed
391. e should become a mother without ceasing to be a virgin, and that He who was to
392. Son of God. became man, without ceasing to be God, and thereby operated the Mys
393. rgin is really the Mother of God, having Mary, although conceived and brought fo
394. a virgin, Jesus Christ, her son, having een cor.ceived by the operation of tlte
395. is ma n like unto ourselves, possessing all the qualities proper to our nature.
396. es proper to our nature. Notwithstanding that this mystery is infinitely beyond
397. bstances, different as they are, forming but one single man, who is thus at the
398. the nature of man, united without being confounded, form but one single Jesus C
399. : TOWARDS GOD. ftS God, without ceasing to be all that He is of himself, vouchs
400. f with human nature, but he lost nothing by that union his humiliations and his
401. "heretic, of the sect of Eutyches, being p-esent in a company where there was a
402. nd true man, who was capable of offering that satisfaction by suff*ering as man
403. offering that satisfaction by suff*ering as man and By as God imparting to his s
404. uff*ering as man and By as God imparting to his sufferings an infinite value. ir
405. us by his humanity capable of suffering like us, because he has a nature like u
406. us with God by his sufferings, he being himself God a mediator who, by his perf
407. erfect holiness, is infinitely j)leasing This to Him whom He would propitiate in
408. derstood by comparison then, that a king has been insulted, nay, outraged by one
409. minal, nor any other subject of the king can offer to the majesty of the soverei
410. e neath the magnitude of his crime. king, the presumptive heir of his crown, and
411. own, and the sharer of his throne, being touched with compassion for that man's
412. aside his regal adornments, and covering his head with ushes and his body with s
413. ed th it such profound humiliation being a . : ; ; ; ; *# S'l i'i satisfaction o
414. ly covers the offence, and that the king, without departing from the way of stri
415. ce, and that the king, without departing from the way of strict justice, may ext
416. y he has a o reconslf God; This pleasing r. suppose, by one nor any Y of the nee
417. y ad with f before lent it due may being a e greatice, and incomprehensible favo
418. rch of Constantinople, far from allaying the grievous scandal which had been rai
419. tlianasius, who declared against calling Mary, the Mother of God, publicly appro
420. eld at Rome in 430, and in the following year Nestorius and his heretical doctri
421. , and for thine obstinacy in maintaining the same, thou hast been deposed from e
422. dignity, by the Holy Council, according to the laws and rules of the Church." N
423. e wicked member to its very root. Having wandered for a loijg time from place to
424. F JESUS CHRIST. '' Augustus C^sar having commanded a census .i' 't' to b fir V'
425. e, the poverty of Joseph His birth being too great to pay for admission to an mn
426. gels to some shepherds who were watching their flocks by night. " Glory to God *
427. ** sang the heavenly messengers, making known the joyful tidings, " Glory to Go
428. ed, he was recognised as God and as king by three Magi, who guided by a star, ca
429. came from the East to adore him. Having reached Jerusalem, they lost sight of t
430. of the star, and went about ii>. quiring for the new-born king of the Jews. The
431. about ii>. quiring for the new-born king of the Jews. The doctors of the law, be
432. the Jews. The doctors of the law, being interrogated by Herod, king of Galilee,
433. e law, being interrogated by Herod, king of Galilee, made answer that the Messia
434. as to be born in Bethlehem, Herod, being alarmed by this announcement, and alrea
435. his announcement, and already meditating the death of the divine infant, engaged
436. the chil was to be found, falsely saying that he, too, would wish to adore him.
437. ld wish to adore him. The Magi, resuming their journej', found the child, to who
438. gold, frankincense, and myrrh but being warned by an angel that Herod only soug
439. emple, to present him icj God, according to the custom of the Jews, he being the
440. ding to the custom of the Jews, he being the The Blessed Virgin at the same time
441. herself, a [)uir of what exloves, being the gifts usually made by the poor mple
442. nd of obedience to the law Herod, seeing that the Magi returned no more, conceiv
443. no more, conceived the design of putting to death all children under two years
444. r vicinity, by an Sa- sure of destroying the Saviour. But St. Joseph, apprized o
445. his design by an angel, fled into hoping make Egypt with Jesus and Mary, where h
446. ate the festival of the Pasch, according to the custom of the Jews, when he rema
447. le, seated amidst the doctors, listening to them and proposing to them questions
448. doctors, listening to them and proposing to them questions in a manner so astoni
449. hem questions in a manner so astonishing that all who heard liim were surprised
450. r children to pass no day without asking the child Jesus for his bless "When" sa
451. en" said she, "you are at 3'our mor.iing an Ing. — l-i^' evening prayers, pict
452. d she, "you are at 3'our mor.iing an Ing. — l-i^' evening prayers, picture to
453. 3'our mor.iing an Ing. — l-i^' evening prayers, picture to yourselves the Bles
454. yourselves the Blessed Virgin, carrying in her arms the Infant Jesus. Bow down
455. he hand of thy divine Son, so that being blessed by him, I may avoid the evil wh
456. may avoid the evil which is displeasing to him, and practise the good which is
457. that I may become worthy of possess- ing him with thee in heaven ARTICLE THE DOC
458. IST. i^:0^ m p. Jesus Christ on quitting the desert began immediately to promulg
459. to the world is truly admirable, forming a body of doctrine so perfect tha it ca
460. r as ns great children his Lless or:iing an ised Virgin, ivn respect- "OMary! ^o
461. t them but one heart anA one soul having all the same object in view, and journe
462. the same object in view, and journeying all towards the same end, which is heav
463. .J ( — * ; agreeable and in all making good to up his far right subservient to
464. t subservient to passion, or sacrificing the public his ;H own of possesa- own p
465. e interest, but, on the contrary, giving happiness to promote that of others, sy
466. promote that of others, syrnpathiz- ing in their troubles as in their and misfo
467. n their and misfortunes, and alleviating them a& power lies surely such a societ
468. d. The mysteries of of our understanding •i •• ' il. to .111 •• DUTY I
469. ore my Father in heaven. Beware of doing thine actions to be seen by men. If thi
470. ! solicitous as to your food or clothing; "consider the birds of the air, thy he
471. hat manners and morals — what touching beauty and grace maxims! — what —wh
472. ture, and the resemblance is so striking that all the Fathers have felt its forc
473. hat thou luo before in heuvuti. If thing hee, pluck roni . thee. Be not the bird
474. surable distance is there Socrates dying without pain, without ignobetween them
475. s, with all his intellect, was any thing uioie tliaii a sophist. It is true he i
476. e? The death of Socrates, calmly talking philosophy with his friends, is the swe
477. maginable that of Jesus Christ, expiring atnid torments, jeers, and revilings, a
478. e he wept for him Jesus, while suffering the most cruel torture, prays for his r
479. impress of truth, so grand, so sti'iking, so every way inimitable that the inven
480. rates, whit' .,^ ' Tk thinks of doubting, le, he do* emblance ce, for in it if i
481. ISTIAN —Diderot was The he was hearing tion of the Gospel. his by the visit of
482. a po»> friend could not help expressing surprised his astonishment " Well, afte
483. four thousand years foretold his coming, but also by a great number illlli \L.
484. ivine intervention, the power of working miracles is no less convincing. If we s
485. f working miracles is no less convincing. If we saw a man wield contronl over th
486. he laws of nature, for instance, walking on the surface of the water, restoring
487. g on the surface of the water, restoring sight to the blind, or bringing back th
488. estoring sight to the blind, or bringing back the dead to life, we should have n
489. he restored sight to the blind, hearing to the deaf, motion to the paralytic he
490. ord, and sometimes without either seeing or If — We ; ; ; ; even approaching t
491. ng or If — We ; ; ; ; even approaching the sick. Be it remarked that all the m
492. D. of one cite o) ; 63 a poik expressing tiilosopher, i 8yron, too, ) have his s
493. ed in no one instance did he do anything extraordinary to gratify curiosity, but
494. of; the chiefs of the synagogue becoming alarmed, interrogated the man who had b
495. i ; own name. ) the miracle and to bring it still more before the public. y:.ri
496. blic. y:.ri : power nature, —restoring to life, we mbassador 'ar beyond can su
497. ld " said they, " this is truly ! seeing or Liord who was to come into the world
498. gelized state is a manifesi ami enduring proof of the miraculous deeds of the Ap
499. n a firh?Gi basis its proofs, consisting as they do, of both prophecies and mira
500. even the most ei}hg'htened understanding. God raised up a host of inspired mon,
501. lief? Example. A certain young man being present where some one was exclaiming a
502. ng present where some one was exclaiming against miracies, considered it his dut
503. Celsus, Julian, and Porphyrus, as being unimpeachable witnesses, all of whom co
504. ltaire. But how great was his on finding that his auditors were more incredulous
505. e in the disbelief of miracles. Resuming his discourse, he went on thus " It apo
506. cedulous. I ask of you now but one thing, which I am sur<^ ^ov vv^ill grant you
507. t progress does l>e not make in learning and in virtue Jesus Christ was pkji»."
508. uised reed, nor extinguished tho Bmoking flax." Never was he known to repulse a
509. im again. He caressed little and placing his hand on their heads, he blessed the
510. on their heads, he blessed them, saying to his disciples, " Let them come unto
511. f his conduct we behold ihe most winning gentleness, and a mildness calculated t
512. hold him in pain, and in sorrow, toiling and suffering. He endured hunger, thirs
513. in, and in sorrow, toiling and suffering. He endured hunger, thirst, the fatigue
514. unger, thirst, the fatigue of travelling, and all the inconveniences of extreme
515. verty; he was pleased to possess nothing while here on earth he had not even a s
516. rmur the annoyance of the crowd pressing around him ; and the importunities of t
517. and fortitude truly divine withstanding the extreme torments inflicted upon him
518. hat he reproached the Jews for rejecting the truths inculcated by him, since his
519. eon to lay his head if you are suffering, behold his wounds it your enemies pers
520. forth in Jesus Christ, the propitiating purity of his doctrine, w from and the
521. plendour of his miracles, so and winning over the Pharisees and the es inspire D
522. ir envious hatred, and design of putting him to death. The time being at hand wh
523. of putting him to death. The time being at hand when Jesus Christ was to give h
524. pr9< pare the Pasch, and in the e vening he repaired to the spot Having eaten th
525. e vening he repaired to the spot Having eaten the PaK^,hal Lamb, with his other
526. w, he arose from the tablgirding himself with a towel, began to wash the
527. n to wash the fpet of his Then returning to the t:?.ble, he took breatl, which d
528. hich disciples. he b]< sf^ed, and having returned thanks, he changed it into his
529. ng srd'lress to his Apostles, testifying to them the fervour of his love for man
530. fervour of his love for man, announcing to them tlieir approaching flight, and
531. n, announcing to them tlieir approaching flight, and promising to appear to theu
532. tlieir approaching flight, and promising to appear to theui again chiefs of the
533. ed to the garden of Olives, where, being arrived, he withdrew a little from his
534. e from his disciples to pray. Reflecting as he prayed, on the eiiormity of sin,
535. bathed with a bloody sweat. Approaching his disciples, he found tlierc asleep,
536. found tlierc asleep, whereupon returning to the place of his prayer, he prostrat
537. ectly up to Jesus, and kissed him, being the ognal on which he hai agreed with t
538. as, who mob after sup- of a , wily being the The whom he even then he addressed
539. , aivX' contented himself with reminding him of the enormity of He th« crime wh
540. crime which he committed" in betraying him thus. tlien inquired of the people
541. e ground, without any intention of doing so, and this fall, as extraordinary, as
542. them to reflect on what they were doing, and to hecoiiit sensible of the power
543. they hastened to seize him, and binding him with cords, they brought him into t
544. of Caiaphas, who examined him concerning his disciples and his doctrine, to whom
545. inst all. The chief priests well knowing that they could not accuse Jesus of any
546. sus of any real crime, set about seeking false witnesses, so as to have a pretex
547. , so as to have a pretext for condemning him to death nevertheless, their design
548. should be one day seen by men On hearing seated at the right hand of God, his Fa
549. ontiff arose from his seat, and, rending his garments, cried out that Jesus had
550. began to spit upon his face, and having blindfolded him, they slajped and buffe
551. m, they slajped and buffeted him, saying: " Pro; ! . VJ I : : If'. *,' • — ;
552. d they revile and abuse him, blaspheming ,1 \ Iin :, .; f. • fHi" ji* '-,*f(|i
553. j holy name. Whilst Jesus was undergoing all this outrage, a much more sensible
554. d on him by Peter. That disciple, having followed him at a distance, had entered
555. upon a maid servant taxed him with being a follower of Jesus, and Peter denied t
556. Peter denied that he was. Others having insisted upon his being a Galilean, he
557. s. Others having insisted upon his being a Galilean, he again denied and a serva
558. nied and a servant of the pontiff having affirmed that he had seen him with Jesu
559. told him all this beforehand, and going forth from the placd, he wept bitterly.
560. that aaaUce could devise. In the morning the chief priests and the elders held a
561. in order to concert the means of having him put to death they sent him to Ponti
562. tius Pilate, governor of Judea, accusing him of seeking to instigate their natio
563. vernor of Judea, accusing him of seeking to instigate their nation to rebel, of
564. ate their nation to rebel, of forbidding the people to pay tribute to Caesar, an
565. le to pay tribute to Caesar, and calling himself the Messiah and the king. Pilat
566. calling himself the Messiah and the king. Pilate having questioned Jesus, and fo
567. the Messiah and the king. Pilate having questioned Jesus, and found him perfect
568. ewed their clamorous entreaties, Sc-ying that Jesus had excited the people by hi
569. om Galilee even to Jerusalem. On hearing that Jesus was a Galilean, and therefor
570. d therefore a subject of Herod, the king of that country, Pilate was very glad t
571. glad to get rid of the affair by sending him to that prince who was then in Jeru
572. who was then in Jerusalem. Herod having interrogated Jesus on the principal cha
573. e scribes and chief priests, and failing to draw from him any eort of answer, tr
574. swer, treated him with contempt as being a fool, and having clothed him in a whi
575. ith contempt as being a fool, and having clothed him in a white robe by way of m
576. OWABDS OOD. ?e!" In hi» 71 '>«vi' ming a much r. That terod the lit taxed nied
577. ld have wished to set Jesus free, seeing that it was envj alone which instigated
578. s to deliver him up nevertheless, having no mind to displease the Jews by libera
579. mind to displease the Jews by liberating a man accused of advising the people no
580. by liberating a man accused of advising the people not to pay Bringing tribute
581. advising the people not to pay Bringing tribute to Caesar, he endeavoured to pa
582. ws would not hear of any merely trifling punishment, so that Pilate was obliged
583. t just then occurred to him that storing Jesus to liberty. for the Koman governo
584. e Pasch, to liberate one prisoner giving the There being then in prison a noted
585. rate one prisoner giving the There being then in prison a noted choice to the pe
586. im liberate Jesus or Barabbas, supposing that they would never think of preferri
587. hat they would never think of preferring a public malefactor before the meek Jes
588. vour of Barabbas, which they did, crying out all together, " Let Jesus be crucif
589. er Barab '* has unto us ! Pilate, seeing that every expedient had fail590. hed to do, took the resolution of having him severely scourgad, in order to exci
591. the compassion of the people by showing him to them covered with blood. He gave
592. to the fury of the soldiers, who, having mangled him all over with their heavy b
593. his head a crown of thorns, then putting a reed in his hand, they bent tlie knee
594. ey bent tlie knee before him, exclaiming in their cruel mockery " Hail King of I
595. iming in their cruel mockery " Hail King of I'he Jews!" And spitting on his sacr
596. " Hail King of I'he Jews!" And spitting on his sacred fuco, they took the reed
597. everal stroke! on the headPilate, seeing Jesus in this pitiable condition, led h
598. ed him out of the pietovium, and sitting down on his judgment seat, he it foreha
599. ea, •s I I :''''' to rebel, td calling A aestioned Ime, told wn laws. put any
600. d to the Jews, '^ BehoM the man/" ndding, that though he had thus punished him,
601. hey answered that thoy had no other king but Cassar, and that heir hiw required
602. us slioiild be piJit to death, fox Being still more having styled himself the So
603. it to death, fox Being still more having styled himself the Son of God. alarmed
604. ct, and Pilate ene-nay of Cajsar. having caused water to be bronghf,, washed his
605. his hands before all the people, saying tliat he was innocent of the blood of t
606. y of his implacable enemies, who, having stripped him of his purple garment, put
607. to crucify him. Exhausted with suffering and fatigue, Our Saviour fell several t
608. old of a man named Simon, who was coming in from the fields, and compelled him t
609. and compelled him to assist in carrying We can scarcely understand why they did
610. prive them of the pleasure of crucifying kirn, for we cannot suppose that they w
611. y any agai':, ** ; them Behold your king!" btjr/dment of compassion. It was at a
612. the inscription Jesus of Nazareth, King cf the : Jews, Those who passed by, bla
613. e who passed by, blasphemed him, wagging *>i their and T(iinple of God, and head
614. ed the Son of God, come down now saj'ing, " Thou who fiom the cross." (H^ IMiari
615. the Scribes, and the mocked him, saying, " He hath saved others, !> and, lo ! c
616. ds by his own bruises. said, ])()iriting to Sf. — blood the Jews " ildren ! 18
617. 3 im. 11 I Ei- several that the s coming carrying y did so, it die on rucifying
618. I Ei- several that the s coming carrying y did so, it die on rucifying d by any
619. g carrying y did so, it die on rucifying d by any of Jeruthe cross ma cf the :mg
620. erior of a convent of The latter wishing to try the vocation of the her intentio
621. s to be spent in prayer^ not only auring the day, but a part of the night she th
622. ature has much to suffer here; one thing, see plainly however, consoles me, and
623. d a crucifix things hard to bear, having such a spectacle before our ; ; : — :
624. '»." Bstroy the now thy- ARTICLE During cruciating torments ' II. •.'Vl DEAD
625. y the now thy- ARTICLE During cruciating torments ' II. •.'Vl DEAD AND BURIED.
626. the two wag mend my Spirit!" and, bowing down his sacred head, a» exjiifet! 'M0
627. exjiifet! 'M0 ''>:* •• though giving permission for denth to strike him, he
628. AJf •^" H '.' Whilst Jesus was hanging on the cross, many extraonli* nary thin
629. t eithe: the God of nature was Buffering, or tha J! -•* 4 i: ^ end of the worl
630. minds of tlw Jews a few only, following the example of the Roman centurion, str
631. God." Meanwhile, the Jews, not choosing to have the bodies hanging on the cross
632. not choosing to have the bodies hanging on the crosses on the Sabbath day, requ
633. e the legs of the two thieves and seeing that Jesus was already dead, they Even
634. pierced." But Joseph of Arimathea, being desirous to bury the body of Jesus, ask
635. o take it down from the cross, and being joined by Nicodemus, they embalmed it w
636. has merited for us the favour of liaving diut penalty of sin converted into a vo
637. ds it, and to fill us with the consoling hope o( tlie future resurrection of the
638. of his sufferings, and of his surprising charity towards those who tortured and
639. fices to cover me with confusion, seeing that I suffer nothing for liim. SuRius.
640. confusion, seeing that I suffer nothing for liim. SuRius. 'rii CHAPTER VI. V^y-
641. DESCENDED INTO HELL. Jesus Christ being dead, his soul descended into Limbo, th
642. saints who had died since the beginning of the^ worl were kept in a state of ex
643. ly souls lovec. and praised God, looking forward to the coming of the divine Lib
644. aised God, looking forward to the coming of the divine Liberator, but they were
645. of the ascension, because it was fitting that he who by his death, throw open it
646. • • f' .-.•-. you are preparing yourself for the holy communion," said
647. our thousand years sighed for the coming of the Redeemer. Who could express thei
648. the favour he did them in thus revealing to them his beatified presence They wer
649. wero solely occupied with contemplating him. Renounce ir like manner all other
650. RD DAY HE AROSE AGAIN FROM and repeating to DEAD. the morning of the Sabbath (Sa
651. FROM and repeating to DEAD. the morning of the Sabbath (Saturday) ae Jews went
652. at Jesus and '"'• III -• i^; cerning his resurrection, they requested that i
653. as you 1' low." The chief priests having ascertained that the bot^.y of Jesus wa
654. more than twenty-four liours after being hiid there, the Jews migiit have said t
655. ight have accused the Apostles of having gained over the llotiian soldiers to le
656. '•i^;••'i!t li^^t . •J 1 having arisen from the dead, (that is to say,
657. ards were so terrified that they rolling sat fell to the giound, apparently dead
658. antime, Mary Magilalen, who knew nothing of what was passing, or even that the s
659. en, who knew nothing of what was passing, or even that the se])ulchi'e was guard
660. d St. John hastened thithe", and finding only t!ie graveclotijes, tiiey returned
661. s, tiiey returned to the city, wondering at what had happeuetl, but still not be
662. t had happeuetl, but still not believing that Jesus was risen. Magdalen, going b
663. ng that Jesus was risen. Magdalen, going back alone to the se[)ulchie beiuld the
664. to two of tlie disciples who were g^'ing to Enimaus, and these two, hastening ba
665. ing to Enimaus, and these two, hastening back to inform the Ap(jslles i)f what h
666. t of the resurrection, and oihlsi having appeared to St. Peter. Immediately Jesu
667. them with their incredulity in refusing to believe who had told them of his res
668. ore appeared to them all, and addressing himself to Thomas, ordered him to draw
669. ample. Jonas is one of the most striking figures of our Saviour's resurrection.
670. ch penance to the Ninevites, but fearing that barbarous people that they might k
671. he embarked for Tharsis. The Lord, being angry with him for his disobedience, pe
672. rs were struck with terror, and thinking that there was something supernatural i
673. r, and thinking that there was something supernatural in this fearful storm, the
674. that it was the wrath of heaven pursuing some criminal whereupon they cast lots,
675. t lots, and the lot fell on Jonas. Being thus made sensible of his fault, he con
676. ied away; nevertheless, the Lord wishing at the same time to save the prophet's
677. omited forth on the sand, without having sustained the slightest injury. Thereup
678. d day. David also had anniystery, saying in the name of the Messiah: " Tliou wil
679. The testimony of the Apostles regarding this great event can only be contested
680. ays, that is to say, either by asserting that they were themselves deceived, or
681. eem quite sure of what they record being true, and relate it with the utmost acc
682. l', for example, they really saw nothing when they imagined tliat they saw Jesus
683. Let any one who could fancy such a thing possible, go into a lunatic asylum and
684. hether he can find two persons labouring under the same kind of insanity. But as
685. ^ sighted or with a better understanding, so as to discover and show up the erro
686. up the error of the rest, then the thing is altogether improbable may easily be
687. s now Jesus Christ whom they knew having been for three years his followers, app
688. women, to Peter, to the disciples going to Emm;ius, then to all the Apostles in
689. literate witDo they ever think of asking a witness whether he nesses. has been a
690. gain be objected that the Apostles being persuaded that their master was to rise
691. not have been deceived, and that having seen and heard more than enough to conv
692. arose from the dead. But even supposing that they did not believe it, let us ex
693. mposed on the entire world by announcing facts in which they themselves had no f
694. oubtedly be exceedingl}^ base, who being determined to deceive both the world at
695. e and theii" own conscience, and joining hypocrisy to falsehood, would have us a
696. ed the human heart, instead of attacking as they did the customs, the passions,
697. ath of Jesus Christ, commenced preaching even in Jerusalem itself, nd feared not
698. rsaries interested not only in disputing these facts, but in publishing tlieir v
699. disputing these facts, but in publishing tlieir victory to the world, if victory
700. when the Apostles persisted in preaching the resurrection of Christ, it was utte
701. ruits of their obstinacy ? But supposing even that the Apostles uad wished to de
702. amongal five hundred witnesses regarding the resurrection is a manWWhat would th
703. Iw sustained and carried out everything mug be so well concerted, that not the
704. iscrepancy shall appoar the ever-varying interest of so many persons must become
705. emselves to tlie executioners, demanding as a favour that they should be permitt
706. that of the guards agree in establishing this fact, that the body of Jesus which
707. visited in the tomb on Saturday evening, was not there on Sunday mornbg. The Je
708. eath of theif master they had everything to fear from the chiefs of tlio Ryiiago
709. ulil they account for what passed during their sleep? Such is, nevertheless, the
710. n which th« synagogue rests in deciding the most important question ever moot(*
711. ugh bound to remain wakeful and watching at their post; they acknowledge that th
712. guilty then, t^ven on their own showing of culpable negh}ct, and every one know
713. were put to the torture, notwithstanding that they were found at their post, and
714. the people that the greatest .1 i- bring much greater ? How is it, then, enemy o
715. No supposed trick of theirs ? such thing. What! there had been so many precautio
716. onverted to his faith, there was nothing said of this pretended carrying otT; pe
717. nothing said of this pretended carrying otT; people were only prohil)ited from
718. ople were only prohil)ited from speaking in the name of Jesus. Wherefore tl.is s
719. it false and that they would thus bring renewed disgrace uj)on themselves. ;
720. e any others. better for the light being- made brighter around him ? And then, s
721. brighter around him ? And then, speaking of the skeptics of our own times? Does
722. , and reject moral certainty maintaining that evidence which would be more than
723. may choose to demand be not forthcoming? What matters it, then, if the resuneet
724. the entire reform which men in embracing the Christian faith have had and still
725. i] :..•.. •;•' really asleep ing witnesses when you bring forward as evi
726. ally asleep ing witnesses when you bring forward as evidence, sleep CHAPTER *, V
727. s on the of Mount Olivet, where, raising his *^,^,, ail"-.' •.»' •ri II han
728. ternal throne of his empire. When a king associates his son in his royal power,
729. epresents God seated on his throne, king of heaven and earth pf'-f so, when we s
730. od, it is to be understood that he being, as God, equal to his Father, he is, as
731. ty has the y;b)rioui jirivilege of being united to the Word. '^'^^•• '• i
732. fills the part Mediator, ever presenting to his Father the wound which he receiv
733. ather the wound which he received during his passion, to propitiate him on He is
734. shall be ever more powerAi' % in our ing njorcy for us, if we only labour to app
735. ouls, than that of our crimes in drawing duw Uut chiistisemcnts of divine justic
736. e. Jesus Christ is in heaven as our King and our mm; -le has B supreme dominion
737. re then the heritage of Jesus his having redeemed us. Christ, his conquest, purc
738. that function on the cross, by olfering hi iself to his Father as a victim of p
739. roach God through [lis mediation. Having then for our high-priest Jesus, the Son
740. '^ge of the Holy Land in a most edifying After having confessed, and received wi
741. oly Land in a most edifying After having confessed, and received with pious made
742. of Mount Olivet, whence, after blessing his In each of the Apostles, he ascende
743. h love, which broke out in the following prayer " Oh Jesus Jesus my most amiable
744. tence which we daily see carried Nothing is more certain than our death, it and
745. e certain than our death, it and nothing more uncertain than when that is is to
746. h they have known ! — despise Notliing is ; more uncertain than shall the time
747. nd the manner suddenly or of a lingering disease ? Shall we have time to prepare
748. ie ••.V';-'v- ./i.i ml — ! ; thing that is certain is that bability in we
749. tainty is, that the destiny of the dying is imrnuthat if we die in a state that
750. world" said Septimus Severus, when dying, "I have been all that mortal could be,
751. ll that mortal could be, and yet nothing remains to me at the present moment not
752. ains to me at the present moment nothing which can avail (ue anything." A herald
753. ent nothing which can avail (ue anything." A herald, carrying the shroud destine
754. avail (ue anything." A herald, carrying the shroud destined to wrap up the body
755. *:" I * j' -U))^ ^ ' . if ^^* Triffling affairs are dispatched without much app
756. mploy the few years of life in preparing for eternity ? Does a man condemned to
757. e moment when we least expect his coming. Let us, therefore, make a daily prepar
758. ho hath promised pardon to the repenting sinner, hatn not promised him the morro
759. able to attend to even the most trifling concern, how can he acquit himself of a
760. when he scare; ^ Knows what he is doing ? How can he cletir up the dark mazei o
761. nable lumption to expect it while living on in a state of sin. 3i pre* "t tit ^'
762. treaties, was at length admitted. During is noviciate, he wrote as follows to hi
763. e our lot with that of an emperor, being well aware that death will speedily "V
764. his subjects. Each individual, in going hence, bears with him only hia works; a
765. h after four months of tedious suffering carried him to the As he lay on his str
766. to me the gates of heaven by a Emitting me into your house oh! how happy I ani
767. d a young lady of Lyons to her sorrowing relations, when after having long suffe
768. r sorrowing relations, when after having long suffered the of death. We most cru
769. nd she died pro- >* it '•"• nouncing those words. : superb monument was rais
770. whereon she is represented in a sitting posture writing on a pillar We shall me
771. represented in a sitting posture writing on a pillar We shall meet again ! i'U A
772. e shall meet again ! i'U A child, having but a few moments to live, and seeing '
773. ng but a few moments to live, and seeing '>• li'.i. i'.n 9Z his DUTY OF THE CH
774. his DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN mother weeping, said to her " Have you not often told
775. dergo immediately after death, regarding the evil which it has. committed, and t
776. which are only found guilty of trifling faults shall be sent to pur. gatory, in
777. mortal sin are cast into hellj awaiting the general resurrection which shall ta
778. n the earth. Then the final moment being arrived, in the twinkling of an eye the
779. l moment being arrived, in the twinkling of an eye the dead shall arise at the s
780. to reri'lcr to «» ovory on? according to his works. Tk' ^IkiU be uttotulod by
781. a deaf ear in this life to the seducing discourse of the wicked, and resisted t
782. ! how just shall ! ''-1 ! M — seducing But that is only the array, and the pre
783. entence of the Sovereign Judge All being profoundly silent, the Son of God shall
784. those on his right hand these consoling words: " Come! ye blessed of my Father!
785. gdom prepared for you from the beginning of the world!" Then shall He turn to th
786. rt from n^e, ye cursed! into everlasting fire !" No sooner shall the final word
787. out the slightest hope of ever repairing the fatal error of their mortal lives.
788. ous principles, a virtuous mother having taken pains Thanks to the Christo form
789. lost his Faith. One night, after having spent the day in the excess of wickedne
790. God!" His debauched companions, hearing that he was sick, and in despair, came
791. in the form of tongues of fire, filling them thus with courage and strength to
792. of the Holy Ghost, and it can do nothing available for its salvation but through
793. tles with intelligence and understanding, and com* municated to them the most su
794. who had been converted by the preaching and the numerous miracles of St. Philli
795. nd was baptized. Nevertheless, beholding the prodigies operated on those who rec
796. dared to aspire to the power of imposing hands, and to turn to his own glory the
797. and do penance !" Very far from obeying, Simon turned himself : became again to
798. cret enemy of the Apostles. After having infected all Samaria with the most extr
799. gant errors, he came to Rome and seeking to persuade the emperor Nero that he wa
800. y, that there were always meiwho, making profession of believing in God, of ador
801. s meiwho, making profession of believing in God, of adoring and serving him, exp
802. ofession of believing in God, of adoring and serving him, expected the Messiah,
803. believing in God, of adoring and serving him, expected the Messiah, and hoped fo
804. salvation through his merits, according to the oracle of the prophecies. Nevert
805. es of religion. But Jesus Christ, coming into the world to save all men, gave un
806. s the Law of grace. The Apostles, having received the Holy Ghost went forth from
807. converted by St. Peter's first preaching, and five thousand when he preached a s
808. e. The Apostles afterwards preached ning of the world, that : There was always !
809. part of the then known world, announcing the Gospel, that is to say, the glad ti
810. st the new religion but, notwithstanding the fury of the Jews, the opposition of
811. ociety, without wealth, without learning, without human support, and to whom the
812. m their master had even promised nothing in this world but persecution, torment,
813. How could they have set about converting the nations, Greeks and Romans, Jews an
814. s and Pagans, and that too, by proposing for their acceptance mysteries the most
815. titute as they were of human aid, having no other arms than the cross, no other
816. on to the new doctrines, and every thing was done to stitHe Christianity in its
817. ourse to their passions, this is a thing easy to understand but to forsake a rel
818. and a life of penance, thereby exposing one's self, moreover, to the loss of al
819. nsidered, how can we forbear from saying The dnger of God is there ! For, in sho
820. e contrary, they succeeded in convincing the whole world without miracles, the p
821. s, and had had the honour of instructing all the most distinguished of the Roof
822. employed all hia eloquence in persuading others to adore them as he did. What ex
823. ld the means which God employed in doing so. Victorinus began to read the Holy S
824. to read the Holy Scriptures, ajid having for some time applied himself to that s
825. he said one day to St. Simplician thing to tell you which will interest you ver
826. forth, and this risk he could not bring himself to incur. But after a time cour
827. an enormous crime to blush for believing the mysteries of Jesus Christ, while ap
828. steries of Jesus Christ, while appearing to glory in the Bacriligious superstiti
829. , when that holy man was least expecting hinj " Let us go to the church," said h
830. an, nor content myself longer with being one hi heart." Simplician, transported
831. rsons but Victorinus declined, declaring that he would proclaim aloud, in presen
832. art overflowed with the joy of beholding him a Christian. This splendid conversi
833. x.'' "•T. J — : Wi ; ; \A^ answering to the divine grace when Oe entirely ;
834. ^nful to its we have been long resisting its inspirations. dictatef, ARTICLE Tli
835. continued to make war against it During that time there are on record ten perse
836. are on record ten persecutions following the edicts of the Roman emperors, and T
837. ib most infectious and unwholesome being reserved for them; into these dungeons
838. ved, with their feet shackled, and being made to lie down on the broken stones w
839. oldiers who guarded them. The concluding punishment was either to be beheaded, o
840. rings very torments they endured seeming to give them fresh to to the be c? om w
841. e of the Lord Jesus Christ In fortifying their hearts and souls. We find in Eccl
842. s to turn him on the other side, wishing that the fire might catch his whole fra
843. martyrs was as H fruitful seed bringing forth now Christians, so : : ; f ' ,' \
844. - \M^ that the whole world, after having furiously persecuted the disoules of Je
845. hen it embraced the faith for professing which, it had slain the martyrs Example
846. Edessa, where he then was, from making any public display of th^ir religion, u
847. n, under pain of death. Far from obeying this command, the Catholics aseembled a
848. heir accustomed place. The Emperor being informed of this, ordered the prefect t
849. dared neither put off nor evade. keeping them at home on that day, this intimati
850. his intimation only They served to bring them together in greater numbers. rejoi
851. ed in so favourable an opportunity being given them to shed their blood in defen
852. refect set In one of the streets leading to the out with his soldiers. Catholic
853. his soldiers. Catholic place of meeting, he met a young woman, holding a little
854. f meeting, he met a young woman, holding a little child by the hand "Where are y
855. e child by the hand "Where are you going so fast V* he asked. " I am going," she
856. going so fast V* he asked. " I am going," she replied, " where all the other Ca
857. where all the other Catholics are going." " Stop, then !" said the prefect, " d
858. nd that is the reason why I am hastening 'T^% '^h.:''. IP. 'il- O '^-^ with my c
859. he and I may have the happiness of dying for the faith of Christ." The prefect,
860. faith of Christ." The prefect, admiring her constancy, turned back again, and s
861. ly confused by this incident, and, being unable to withhold his admiration for t
862. Pope, the successor of St. Peter, being his representative on earth.— Neverth
863. till the consummation of ages, according to the promise of her divine Founder. A
864. faithful, of whom she is composed, being spread over all the countries of the ea
865. than any of the other societies, calling themselves Christian hence it is, that
866. p: -/ The other societies, In separating their successors. themselves from the t
867. belongs to the true Church, by examining whether he is united to the Pope, throu
868. he appears as one great body, professing the tlie same faith, believing same sac
869. rofessing the tlie same faith, believing same sacraments, and true in the same m
870. nd true in the same mysteries, receiving implicitly confiding in the divine orig
871. ysteries, receiving implicitly confiding in the divine origin of the authority o
872. isyou, ir *. ,.•',• '-"-I seminating doctrines contrary to those of the Cath
873. tors of the Church the power of teaching and of governing the faithful in matter
874. h the power of teaching and of governing the faithful in matters appertaining to
875. ing the faithful in matters appertaining to salvation. 1 " Go ! " said he to his
876. • 107 Go, teach all nations, teaching them to do all things whatI have comman
877. lroadlj ,',» ', • f i w;ii JV' having with her Jesus Christ, who is the Fount
878. Christ, who is the Fountain of al! being ever enlightened and directed by his sp
879. h she pro; nounces, whether in proposing to the faithful the truths of religion,
880. the truths of religion, or in condemning the errors which rise up against the fa
881. , and the faithful would remain wavering and uncertain, exposed to be carried ab
882. ed to his Church th» privilege of being preserved frsm all erroi in her teachin
883. preserved frsm all erroi in her teaching! of ihey — : I I^V:1 .V. > )3 ., r,--
884. ved at their consecration, oi" remitting sins, and of transmitting to priests th
885. oi" remitting sins, and of transmitting to priests that same power, with whatev
886. deem proper 2nd, in the power of binding and unloosing, that is to say, retainin
887. d, in the power of binding and unloosing, that is to say, retaining and forgivin
888. and unloosing, that is to say, retaining and forgiving sins, and remitting the p
889. that is to say, retaining and forgiving sins, and remitting the penalty incurre
890. aining and forgiving sins, and remitting the penalty incurred by sin 3rd, in tha
891. ncurred by sin 3rd, in that of governing the faithful according to the doctrine
892. that of governing the faithful according to the doctrine and discipline of the c
893. the (Ulels. l^.^ • .- Example. During the schism of Antiochus, St. Jerome was
894. ome was very uneasy in his desert. Being asked with whom he was in communion, wh
895. or Paulinus, who were all three rending the flock asunder. On that occasion, he
896. e St. Damasus in these terms " Following no other chief but Jesus Christ, I am a
897. m — I ' . *^. iL'? TOWARDS OOP. frring ir. 100 matters of Faith, is to decisio
898. losophers. There is one God : man, being his creature, is obliged to obey him, t
899. salva in other words, a truth comprising all truth, a light tion containing ail
900. ising all truth, a light tion containing ail light, and a virtue beyond which th
901. in the right who \* whom they see going astray: *• You are in the '•iv; '"
902. e false, by way of pretext for following, none ? But he who would •ay so must
903. ould exist between the intelligent being and his Creator secondly, he must be ra
904. eator secondly, he must be rash, denying incontestible facts, believed throughou
905. which is true only one which is pleasing to God, or can lead to everlasting happ
906. asing to God, or can lead to everlasting happiness how can it be supposed that h
907. d that he who despises the Supreme Being who has created him, or who insults him
908. mm a '• . Church, she alone possessing all the marks which manifest the divini
909. vation for liira who lives not according to her doo* the Catholic ^.*: . ..•(
910. enitent no salvation for bini who having it in his power to see the truth, will
911. , will not take the trouble of* adopting it; no salvation for any sectary who, h
912. no salvation for any sectary who, having just reason to doubt the divinity of hi
913. rays for their conversion, acknowledging while she does so that it is only He wh
914. avages ? The Holy Scripture says nothing as to the fate of children who die un b
915. ignorant, or had no means of discovering the truth, then we might reasonably hop
916. faith ? How is it that, while affecting to pity their condemnation, they imprud
917. tions who are not of the faith ? rooting up the evil which is in you, and which
918. ail !" cries Mr. Moore, after hesitating several years in his choice of a religi
919. epth." will ileal lose time in examining how God — ! ! — ' — — — > The
920. ved rt that out of their Cli oh the king said: " The 'ishojo . there to is no sa
921. ' '<; ' :t ' *'' of the faithful having his share according to his dispositions
922. the faithful having his share according to his dispositions. of grace have a fu
923. ful, animated by the same spirit, living the Church, all the under the same \ >.
924. and blessings, one must even be a living member of the Church, or in other words
925. e, salvation, and the means of attaining it. A sinner is dead it is true but whi
926. branches the Church militant, comprising all those who still wage war on earth a
927. vation the Church Triumphant, consisting of the blessed in heaven and the Church
928. essed in heaven and the Church Suffering, which is composed life The : ; ; of th
929. : ; ; of the souls who are yet expiating their faults befoie they eau enter Para
930. ves, but also with the Saints triumphing in heaven, rejoice in and with the suff
931. eaven, rejoice in and with the suffering souls in purgatory. •,; ' r- We what
932. he third century, prayed without ceasing for all the Church. When about martyrdo
933. the Church. When about martyrdom, being condemned to be burned alive for the Fa
934. ted to his Church the power of remitting sin " Receive ye the Holy Ohosl" said h
935. misfortune of a person who, after having offended God, could never recover the g
936. he weight of his iniquity, while feeling himself hurried on by time towards the
937. ; — — Example. k servant, returning from Catechism, was interrogated by his
938. trine of the Council of Trent concerning " Do you not perceive contrition, in th
939. ot perceive contrition, in the following manner that the uorrow which we feel fo
940. that the uorrow which we feel for having offended God, is of a nature entirely d
941. entirely distinct from the grief arising from the The former is a hatred and dea
942. row ^you have, in short, true On hearing this, the worthy man began to contritio
943. sincerely thanked his master for having so far enlightened him, and drawn him f
944. t the resurrection will be the beginning of a hfe which shall never end. There i
945. s believed, too, from the very beginning. " I know," said the holy man Job an ar
946. r| ••"if ' ' -"if " in the twinkling of an eye, at the sound of the last tru
947. have lived before us from the beginning of the world, they who are now on the e
948. As he has drawn all things from notliing by his will alone, so shall he with as
949. re not the trees as it were, dead during the winter, and do they not appear to r
950. not appear to resuscitate in the spring ? The grain and other seed which is cas
951. the skin torn off his head, and he being still alive he was cast into a caldron
952. r a huge fire. The second, when expiring, said to the king: "You now put- us to
953. second, when expiring, said to the king: "You now put- us to death but the Rule
954. ith confidence " I have received lasting." these members from Heaven, but I now
955. m Heaven, but I now hold them as nothing in defence of the Laws of God, because
956. s better for us to Jbe slain for obeying God, these terms then to preserve our l
957. then to preserve our lives by disobeying him we hope that ; : : •«.•, ;.p-u
958. d he also sent him to his mother, hoping that she would persuade him to sacrific
959. «.', XIII. BELIEVE IN LIFE EVERLASTING. •b' ' J, -* 1: : «•-.; V ''z;!^-
960. oul, immortal in its nature, on quitting the body, from this life to another, fr
961. to be punished or -^compensed according to his works. The expectation oi a futu
962. happy or eternally miserable, according as God has found us Just •>r wickcu a
963. for a time, yet do not make it deserving of hell, it follows that besides the pa
964. ^^,Av • '*• -: - Bernard, quitting the paternal roof, to his tfrethren in
965. r inheritance as thine own v>e are going to enter religion." " That is to say,"
966. assuredly our shares are far from being equal," and he soo after followed their
967. RDS GOD. it ; 12i by penince for nothing defiled can entef recovered But human w
968. entef recovered But human weakness being so great, it is very heaven. difficult
969. st wherein they were to await the coming 4 *,. . '. . •. -, .% « •V'"* •
970. to Jerusalem, for the purpose of having prayers and sacrifices offer" because,"
971. battle " it is a good and salutary thing to pray for the dead, to the But this
972. lect, friends of Jesus Christ, and being destined to reign vith him, they will b
973. the depth of their dungeons, beseeching us in piteous tones, " Have pity on me
974. privation, may have cfToct in delivering us from the torments we endure, and in
975. and in p'-^curAh! can you be ii;sonsiing for us the glory of heaven! ble to our
976. necessity ? we are plunged in devouring flames V* What! a stranger, even an ene
977. nd we could not refrain from stretcjiing forth a hand to assist in drawing him f
978. cjiing forth a hand to assist in drawing him from the fiery furnace. Well in pur
979. satisfy the justice of God but by paying they are as prisoners retained for debt
980. s retained for debt to the last farthing in that place of torment; nevertheless,
981. satisfaction for them by prayer, fasting, alms-deeds, indulgences and communions
982. d communions, and particularly by having the Holy SacCharity makes it a duty rif
983. relieve these faithful souls, commanding us to do unto others what we should wis
984. may be there retained either for having been too indulgent to us, in flattering
985. been too indulgent to us, in flattering our passions, or otherwise for having o
986. ng our passions, or otherwise for having offended God on our account it may be a
987. t * • . for them, which we neglecting :.< .-•?' their dreary prison. ''%•
988. s, and other sorvanta of Ciirist, having been arrested for the faith, wore confi
989. ts that he was tortured with a devouring thirst, without ever being able to reac
990. h a devouring thirst, without ever being able to reach the edge of a basin or po
991. cessantly tried to The Saint, perceiving by this vision tliat her accomplish. yo
992. ther was in purgatory, commenced praying for him with h companions. Some days af
993. eared clean and conifortable, refreshing himself, and roaming at will over the p
994. ortable, refreshing himself, and roaming at will over the plain where the basin
995. the glory and magnificence of God, being the dwelling-place prepared by him for
996. magnificence of God, being the dwelling-place prepared by him for his angels, a
997. et us imagine, if joy of a soul entering into heaven we ! m Oh what a moment is
998. at, when the miseries of this life being for ever at an end, an eternity of happ
999. the protracted exile, and the lingering pains of this Yale of tears, enters at
1000.en of safety, and the land of the living, there to dwell for ever, amongst the e
1001.ith God himself, the Author cf its being, the term of its desires, the centre of
1002.pose, vitliout any assured of possessing him for aU fear of again losing him ete
1003.ssessing him for aU fear of again losing him eternity, and to be a partaker in h
1004.ts to obtain that end, they are trifling when compared with what we seek. What s
1005.nd of their very health for the fleeting breath of honour they labour all their
1006. lives to amass a little wealth, knowing, nevertheless, that they must give it u
1007.s, that they must give it up when ('ying and yet they would do nothing for that
1008.hen ('ying and yet they would do nothing for that heaven which is to be " To sec
1009.even a moment." A short p rayer, morning and evening, is considered too much ; c
1010.t." A short p rayer, morning and evening, is considered too much ; confession is
1011.t, and are, therefore, unworthy of being admitted into heaven. Ah how consoling
1012.g admitted into heaven. Ah how consoling it is for the virtuous Christian to kno
1013.tuous Christian to know that every thing he does for God shall be abundantly rec
1014. he receives them, and the hope of being indemnified for them in heaven, which h
1015.ld be the truest and best way of proving our love for them. We can do nothing mo
1016.ing our love for them. We can do nothing more advantageous to our neighbours or
1017.who gains a soul for God it is something greater to save one's brethren than to
1018. " Ah if I were only worthy of obtaining that favour from my (iod! I every day b
1019.e my life, either while I aro announcing his gospel in the chair of truth, or ex
1020.pel in the chair of truth, or exercising !" in the sacred tribunal the ottice of
1021.parish of Rennes, where, notwithstanding his great age and numerous infirmities
1022.s gestures so animated, that his meaning was understood almost before he had giv
1023.t, after the liveliest and most touching description of the beauties of Paradise
1024.o, my brethren painful task of presiding at : ! — 1,1 > 1 '* V>j- ; •^/^» .
1025.ur of the divine Majesty " then lowering his voice, " It is in heaven that we sh
1026.words were spoken in a deep, penetrating tone, and he repeated th^m again ia Lat
1027.aloud, " He is a Saint, he died speaking of the happiness of heaven." A child wh
1028.nt was heard to !" gay " He was speaking of paradise and he has gone there it wi
1029.where there shall be nou<^ht but weeping and gnashing of teeth. They who doubt w
1030.hall be nou<^ht but weeping and gnashing of teeth. They who doubt wiiether tlier
1031., as though it were conscious, according to the expression of St. Augustin, " wi
1032.o to the intellectual faculties, preying incessantly on all without ever destroy
1033.cessantly on all without ever destroying them." All the damned are deprived of t
1034.A The pains of hell shall be everlasting a belief which is founded on the Script
1035.o a ; *xr- :,.'r \M place of everlasting torment." •••'>• ' .: .A- W -Ji
1036.d; is in some measure eternal, according to his present disposition, since he ch
1037.at least eternal in its duration, seeing that mai being '^nite is not capable of
1038.l in its duration, seeing that mai being '^nite is not capable of sustaining a t
1039.eing '^nite is not capable of sustaining a torment that is in its nature infinit
1040.imself out from heaven by wilfully dying in a state of final impenitence ? Young
1041.ent take the firm resolution of avoiding sin which would inevitably lead you to
1042.Examples. Some young libertines, finding themselves in company with a monk of a
1043. ! — heaven." — if monk, " of living, and at last said to him " Ah will be w
1044.e Gospel relates that the rich man being in hell, and seeing Abraham in glory, a
1045.t the rich man being in hell, and seeing Abraham in glory, addressed him in thes
1046.gue, for I am ! ; TOWAKDS GOD. Buffering in these 129 " ! son/' said flames the
1047.—" My :'„ %• -Si ^- \ , • during thy ly . now he is in and Lazarus, on t
1048.those who have been ashamed of belonging to him, andshjaiik from declaring their
1049.onging to him, andshjaiik from declaring their faith openly. One of the best mea
1050.openly. One of the best means of showing that we are Christians, sential duties,
1051. the cross. There are two ways of making the sign of the cross: llie fiist is by
1052.gn of the cross: llie fiist is by making with the thumb a cross on the forehead,
1053. is thus that the priest makes it during tlui Mass when he begins to read the Go
1054.er ready to make profession of believing in God and in Jesus Christ and on the b
1055.,': •,(• r -. » •...''. glorying in that the f-''SCl',f ; r r- ; ; what
1056. we profess. The second method of making the sign of the cross is by olacing the
1057.king the sign of the cross is by olacing the right hand on the forehead, then on
1058.f the Father, and of the Son, and of ing Uie Holy Ghost." When making the sign o
1059. and of ing Uie Holy Ghost." When making the sign of the ^ross we profess the un
1060.ss we profess the unity of God by saying these words in the namey in the singula
1061.number the Trinity of persons, by naming each in turn the mystery of the Incarna
1062.ion and that of the Redemption by making the form of the cross on which the Son
1063.s "In 'ifl name of >-, , . ** 1 am going ; ; to perform this action I will the F
1064.e of the Most Holy T)inity acknowledging that I can do nothing without the stren
1065.nity acknowledging that I can do nothing without the strength which comes from t
1066. honour of the Blessed Trinity, desiring to I am the homage of which I am capabl
1067.he homage of which I am capable. morning and evening, before and after meals, at
1068. which I am capable. morning and evening, before and after meals, at the beginni
1069.before and after meals, at the beginning and end of our prayers, and when settin
1070.and end of our prayers, and when setting al)0ut any important action it is a gre
1071.nt action it is a great means of drawing down upon ourselves and upon our undert
1072.s and upon our undertakings the blessing of God. ; » We should also make it, at
1073.ptation, to the end find that we may ing God. • . be delivered therefrom, and
1074.Example. young girl blushed while making the sign of the cross on an occasion wh
1075.at in future you will glory in belonging to your adorable Mas May the Father, So
1076.E COMMANDMENTS IN GENERAL. the beginning of the world engraved hia f , .'4 • ,
1077.t purpose , fifty days after their going forth from Egypt he called to the top o
1078.e known to him his design of contracting with his peoSinai, an everlasting coven
1079.acting with his peoSinai, an everlasting covenant. Moses, having then assembled
1080., an everlasting covenant. Moses, having then assembled the chiefs of the nation
1081.d with a thick cloud there was lightning and thunder, and a great noise, like th
1082. filled the air around. The people being struck with terror, hid themselves in t
1083.the voice of God, distinctly pronouncing the ten "/ am the Lord thy God, ^c, tS^
1084.stone. Thus it was that the Lord, having made known the right which he had to co
1085..v. Example. A venerable old man, seeing a number of children pressing around hi
1086.an, seeing a number of children pressing around him, said to them these memora.
1087.rofited the possessor 4lh., tliai giving alms has never made any one the poorer
1088.de any one the poorer 5th., that morning and eveiiing prayer has never retarded
1089.e poorer 5th., that morning and eveiiing prayer has never retarded any work ; an
1090.t the word of God, which, without Laving been penned down by those to whom it wa
1091.rror, and to be with her in her teaching, even to the end of the world. ought, t
1092.ved. Faith does honour to God, rendering homage to Him as the supreme truth it i
1093.Paul says, a sacrifice, and an oflTering which we make to Him, by subed, '^ "'Al
1094.» ;/».-.' ,* • . word, and silencing all our objections, our prejudice and r
1095.e to the word of God and to the teaching of the Church, is so much the more reas
1096.ies are in themselves so limited Nothing, then, is more rational than to believe
1097.unded on the word of God, and 12 mitting our to his infallible 'i mind :••:.
1098.as also provided means of as. certaining it, means which place it within the rea
1099.gest, and the most capable of convincing a rational mind. Public facts, and shin
1100.rational mind. Public facts, and shining miracles are incontestible proofs which
1101.of, he himself reminded the Jews, Baying to them " The things which I do in my F
1102.e abundance of divine untism derstanding which we obtain by the practice of virt
1103.several young certain >r :•• playing the skeptic, and retailing with infinit
1104.• playing the skeptic, and retailing with infinite Rousseau against the divi
1105.^••' • ' • : • '^"i: ! Nothing less than the eternal possession of God
1106. ; but God, who loves "s notwithstanding our misery and our unvi^orthiness, enga
1107.' . ,1 «... , V • Vent us from hoping in God, and looking for the possession
1108. Vent us from hoping in God, and looking for the possession of the promised })lo
1109.the possession of the promised })lossing!5. His Ahnighty power, to wiiich nothin
1110.5. His Ahnighty power, to wiiich nothing is impossible his mercy which is infini
1111. his grace, his promises, and his having commanded us to hope in Him; these are
1112.ence ought to be absolute and unchanging. No, Christian hope is not wavering or
1113.ging. No, Christian hope is not wavering or uncertain it is a firm confidence, f
1114.en it is humbh, sincere, and nersevering, for God never breaks his promise. Heav
1115.on such was the sin of Cain, who, having killed his brother, said: " My iniquity
1116. alsu Bill agtiinst of (^orelying on our ; conversion ti such is Hope whe
1117.onversion ti such is Hope when presuming on tfie mercy own ctrength, we postpone
1118.ostpone our the ma of those who, forming for them])l'I1ovo false idea of the mer
1119..- may save their "souls without ceasing to offend liim or who, counting on a lo
1120. ceasing to offend liim or who, counting on a long life, persuade themselves tha
1121.f salvation when the seaBeware of saying 6011 of youth shall have passed away. "
1122.future for them. let us not defer giving ourselves to God, for we illusion know
1123. in the affairs of this world, believing ourselves unhappy when we sustain losse
1124.ustain losses, or afflictions, murmuring against God, or wishing ourselves dead,
1125.tions, murmuring against God, or wishing ourselves dead, which is in itself a gr
1126.so let us also be persuaded that nothing is yet lost for us whilst it is still p
1127.ainful temptation. When he was finishing his studies in Paris, being then but si
1128.as finishing his studies in Paris, being then but sixteen years of age, the enem
1129.-•^ ' u , f f ., * .- preceptor seeing him iall away so, and perceiving that h
1130. seeing him iall away so, and perceiving that he ceased to taite pleasure in any
1131.he ceased to taite pleasure in any thing, repeatedly inquired as but the devil,
1132.urished me with the expectation of being one day replenished with the delights o
1133.is world. His days were spent in sighing and groaning, and by night he watered h
1134. days were spent in sighing and groaning, and by night he watered his couch with
1135.his couch with his tears. At last having, by a divine inspiration, entered the C
1136.of his miserable condition, and throwing himself on his knees before an image of
1137.rnity, he might at least love him during his life with all his heart." A prayer
1138.n do they not all engage us to attaching ourselves to him He has created us he p
1139.ather ? Is there any parent so deserving- of that name as he, or was there ever
1140. what pure and perfect joy what soothing consolation does it not diffuse through
1141.ted to him cannot be happy but in loving him, and the more we love him, the happ
1142.happiness : a man to whom God is wanting is unhappy, even iii the midst of riche
1143.lory and pleasure he desires every thing, and is never content. But he who loves
1144.ied, his lioart is tranquil, and nothing pan trouble the calm of his soul even i
1145., J our heart; he is our first beginning and our last end. That great Master wil
1146.ther than his grace, and to love nothing but through and for him. It is to sin a
1147.nt to make a su* preme good of any thing else but God, as the ambitious do of ho
1148.those whom we and the means of pleaf?ing them is to do their will, to CI:' '. >
1149.t is indeed extinct But it is not loving God enough, merely to observe the first
1150.e shall be very unlikely to do any thing in his re ard that is forbidden by the
1151.God commands it, and he commands nothing impossible; but it is his will that w.
1152.e spiritual works of mercy are, to bring back to virtue those who ^are wandering
1153. back to virtue those who ^are wandering away from her paths, to instruct the ig
1154.ith patience, and to pray for the living and the dead. The corporal works of mer
1155. the perfect love of Christ, who, having destined him for a great work and to su
1156.us," says he in one of his " considering that he died for all that they also not
1157.ath, nor life, nor powers, nor any thing created shall ever separate us from the
1158.nsiderable wealth (even to impoverishing himself), in relieving the necessities
1159. to impoverishing himself), in relieving the necessities of the poor, and having
1160. the necessities of the poor, and having no longer any thing to give, he sold hi
1161.the poor, and having no longer any thing to give, he sold himself for a slave, i
1162.ave in a garden, until his master having discovered his merit, set him at libert
1163.compris'^d in the first command- adoring God, or rendering to him thathomHge aud
1164.first command- adoring God, or rendering to him thathomHge aud worship which we
1165.chains them down again when On beholding the greatit seems good to him in his me
1166.m in his mercy. ness of God, the adoring soul humbles itself, is confounded^ and
1167.urs it has received from him, beseeching him for all that it still requires, and
1168.lay themselves in the exby corresponding actions, such as genuflections, prayers
1169. as genuflections, prayers, the offering of our actions, and above all by the sa
1170.y day, particularly moi'niug and evening, the tribute of praise and adoration wh
1171.e homage which wo offered in the morning to our God. Let us then hutnblo ourselv
1172.afed to grant us. his bountiful blossing ; — ; '•i .•,'• • 'It- ^. ' -
1173.ie interior sentiment of adoration being the soul thereof, Without this disposit
1174. all exterior acts must fail in pleasing God, and would but draw upon OS that re
1175.p which is only remember notwithstanding, t)ther exterior acts : 111 .,1. *' ^
1176.m no other virtue than that of recalling to our due to God; vants. It is : minds
1177.ry of their originals. Thus, in kneeling before the image of Jesus Christ, the B
1178.irreverence. Idolatry consists in paying to creatures the worship due to God alo
1179.es of idolatry which is abominalavishing saoriI)le in the sight of God, and it c
1180. authorized by the Church, or in putting our trust in words or deeds of which sh
1181.ch she does »ot approve, and pretending to ootain particular ends by their mean
1182.nowledge of the future, of hidden taking note of lucky and unlucky days, dec. ti
1183. days, dec. tilings, &c. all these being only fit to draw down the malediction o
1184.them. We sin by irreverence in profaning churches, the relics * ^"'nts, their im
1185. by the sacrilege committed in receiving the J ..v».iHments without the necessa
1186. a sacrilege to purloin any sacred thing belonging to the Church, or to strike a
1187.ge to purloin any sacred thing belonging to the Church, or to strike a person co
1188.vour. Some there were, who, prefer; ring their fortune to their eternal interest
1189.his person. One of his confidants having inquired the reason of this conduct, wh
1190. reward to those Christians who, soaring above all temporal views, had persevere
1191. open profession Not content with having Med the apostates, the prince thought ;
1192.iginals of these pictures." Then drawing from his bosom a piece of coin, having
1193.g from his bosom a piece of coin, having on it the emperor's image, he demanded
1194.round and trampled it under foot, having on it the image of the monarch they ans
1195. trample on the image of an earthly king, who is but a mortal like yourselves, y
1196. the likeiiess of Jesus Christ, the King " of kings ! Ecclesiastical History, :
1197.ere where the assemble to pray, t© sing his praises, and to celebrate the Sacre
1198.t dwells in the body, and ofIs any thing more wantfera himself to his Father for
1199.s attention ? Should we not, on entering that iioly place, be seized with fear,
1200.ly Ghost. Should not objects so touching fill our minds with holy thoughts and o
1201.and while there feel only disgust, being occupied solely with vain fancies, even
1202.did not alight from his horse in passing a mosque} they never encer them but wit
1203.hemselves on thegiound, to humble During the whole tim« themi|elves in the pres
1204. speak to another, so that it is a thing unhe&rds see two Turks converse at the
1205.e at the time of prayer. If i, any thing is said to a Mussulman while he is at p
1206. and the Saints. forbids us all swearing giving ju ratified v, as though the Lor
1207.e Saints. forbids us all swearing giving ju ratified v, as though the Lord said
1208.e; forbid you to profane it by employing it to authorize falsesufficient certain
1209. us( selves to what we promise. Swearing may be either an act of religion or a s
1210.r an act of religion or a sin, according to the circumstances and dispositions b
1211. oath, although meant to confirm a thing in itsalf * and becomes perjury; an unj
1212.may be greater or lesser sins, according to the degree of malice with which they
1213. oath which is called promissory ; being used to make more ce*tain the execution
1214. promised. He who swears to do an} thing, which he has no intention of doing com
1215.hing, which he has no intention of doing commits a grievous sin, and is, in fact
1216.ous sin, and is, in fact, guilty and ing to We v» • 7 •i: ;,fc- - ,'• i^f
1217.mstances wherein the oath is not binding itself : these are, 1st, when the thing
1218. itself : these are, 1st, when the thing promised is evil in and forbidden to be
1219. sinful in its nature; 2nd, when a thing which was practicable when promised, be
1220. authority, lest one might err in giving judgment in his own case. If the thing
1221.g judgment in his own case. If the thing promised, or ratified with an oath, be
1222. promise is an enormous sin. .. Swearing, without necessity, is very often crimi
1223. ".* There are three ways of designating swearing «y, imprecation, ; blasphe:t^
1224.e are three ways of designating swearing «y, imprecation, ; blasphe:t^^ and dis
1225.on, ; blasphe:t^^ and disguised swearing. a word, or a discourse injurious to Go
1226.belong which do not, him, such as taxing him with pardefects ' God tiality, inju
1227., or the ; ^* * • like. v; blaspheming God to deny to him that which is his du
1228.hat which is his due, such as pretending that He disdains to take care of liii I
1229., or through contempt. It is blaspheming God to join to his adorable name certai
1230.m by the Church, <&;c. It is blaspheming Religion, to turn it into ridicule, to
1231.orrible, an execrable sin, and deserving of the most terrible punishment. Blasph
1232.ation, 6ie., «kc., whether in promising, denying, or assuring of any ; ; thing.
1233.e., «kc., whether in promising, denying, or assuring of any ; ; thing. Disguise
1234.ether in promising, denying, or assuring of any ; ; thing. Disguised oaths are o
1235.g, denying, or assuring of any ; ; thing. Disguised oaths are of two sorts 1st.,
1236.ds which, though not exactly pronouncing the real oath, relate to it in some way
1237. is >« GOD. injut'.o'js l&l not cursing, to call any one hy His outraging that
1238.ursing, to call any one hy His outraging that person, and exposing which is neve
1239. His outraging that person, and exposing which is never, in any case, allowabU^.
1240., ••.»• i. Neither is it swearing or cursing to give utterance to immodes
1241.• i. Neither is it swearing or cursing to give utterance to immodest words or
1242.are never to express, but it is speaking obscenely, which is bad, and often give
1243. an oath, we secure or promise something to our fellow men, by bringing in the n
1244.something to our fellow men, by bringing in the name of God ; but it sometimes h
1245.form things which they know are pleasing to him. promise made to God is called a
1246.erate promise made to God, to do a thing which may be supposed agreeable to him
1247.e said to make a vow. A vow is something more than a simple resolution. By a vow
1248.nd ourselves towards God to do the thing promised, under pain of committing sin.
1249.thing promised, under pain of committing sin. The obligation of performing what
1250.itting sin. The obligation of performing what we have promised to God rests on t
1251.ht by virsome years ago, a most touching proof of his faith. He had delayed, it
1252. his father began to scold him, swearing, moreover, by the holy uame of God. The
1253. poor lad, shocked at himself for having given occasion for such blasphemy, thre
1254. swear, I implore was confounded, seeing the boy*s horror ' ' of the crime he ha
1255. the wants o life prevent us from giving ourselves up entirely to the exercises
1256.hich he commands us to employ in adoring and serving him. This precept is as old
1257.ands us to employ in adoring and serving him. This precept is as old as the worl
1258.epose into which he entered after having finished that great work. That day wher
1259.at they prepared on the previous evening even the food which they required for t
1260.hich are called liberal, such as reading, writing, drawing, 1261.called liberal, such as reading, writing, drawing, 1262.beral, such as reading, writing, drawing, 1263.work or labour : i A'. :>. nor any thing that might tend the service of God. It
1264.ed by actual necessity or requir* living, whereby we earn our to turn us away fr
1265.on that day, under pretence of finishing ^ job, or for fear of losing a customer
1266.f finishing ^ job, or for fear of losing a customer, commit a But it would be ev
1267.ch, instead of Actions which sanctifying, would profane the Sabbath. are at all
1268.oy the Sunday in the of God, by applying ourselves to acts of piety and devotion
1269. labours, it is that we may have nothing to withdraw us from attending to his se
1270.ve nothing to withdraw us from attending to his service. Would God be at all hon
1271.sanctified if it were passed in gambling, at table, or in visiting ? No, certain
1272.ed in gambling, at table, or in visiting ? No, certainly not that which really s
1273.t apart : '• for himself, is assisting at the divine offices, structions ; in
1274.es, structions ; in and public inreading pious and useful books, or by em- ployi
1275.ious and useful books, or by em- ploying ourselves in of any good work tending t
1276.ng ourselves in of any good work tending to the service •|H"'vi-i;^" :4" u'\ -
1277.tiie time allotted lo prayer, to linging the praises of God, or to our own instr
1278.own instruction. Would it be sanctifying the day to give to God but a small port
1279. X':-'' ^/r^^ ''W*. ':f«^V;>:^: — ing at Mass as the principal part of the da
1280.-•:•#>;? -^ for not only did picking up wood in the desert on the Sabbath sh
1281. was found : ; ; ; ; ExoduSf xxxi. being in one of the Marian One Sunday, Father
1282. Marian One Sunday, Father C was passing along on the sea-shore, on his way to H
1283.-''--.'''"''***-' P Pi baptised, working very busily at some boats they were mak
1284.ry busily at some boats they were making, and asked them if there were not other
1285.t came that they were thus transgressing the divine precept which commands the k
1286.ivine precept which commands the keeping holy the Lord's Day, by abstaining from
1287.eping holy the Lord's Day, by abstaining from all servile work, and employing it
1288.ing from all servile work, and employing it in the practices and exercises of Ch
1289.ew hours pleasure. after, when returning from his visit, he passed by the sanoe
1290.ely and sin ; «era repentance. Edifying letter*. 11. ^••vv. •'•• : !
1291.• . That respect consists in receiving with docility *'^eir advice and their c
1292.and their correction, in always speaking to them n a respectful tone, in fearing
1293. to them n a respectful tone, in fearing to displease them, and in concealing an
1294.ing to displease them, and in concealing and excusing their faults. A father and
1295.ase them, and in concealing and excusing their faults. A father and mother are t
1296. remind any child with ordinary feeling of all that his parents have done and s
1297. they have taken care of him, and during his infancy, when he required continual
1298.hard they work in order to earn a living for liini A chilfi who does not iove hi
1299.y, to find a sensible pleasure in paying back to a father or a mother even a por
1300.ved from them, and to fail in performing that duty would be a monstrous piece of
1301.monstrous piece of ingratitude, stifling, as it were, obligation cannot but be W
1302. he who grieveth his mother, by refusing to take care of her." But if a child ou
1303.s to the dutiof their children in having them receive the their death. Children
1304.hey are bound to feed, clothe, and bring them up ac* oording to their condition,
1305.d, clothe, and bring them up ac* oording to their condition, and to give them a
1306.truction, correction, or means of living. duty either to teach them, or have oth
1307.any parents will be condemned for having been the cause of their children's sin
1308.of their children's sin ; for not having brought them up in a Christian manner,
1309. up in a Christian manner, or for having given them bad example. in ; m^. -'^^ M
1310.nour to whom honour." It is then binding on us to obey the laws of those who are
1311.l manner the laws of the Gospel relating to chanty. To utve into the depths of t
1312.:; Masters who are charged with bringing up children have the first claim to the
1313.ir pupils in religion and human learning to watch over their conduct, and to for
1314.ttention, and his health, to the forming of his pupils in knowledge, arts, and i
1315.sacrifices to them his liberty, reducing himself to a sort of slavery he endures
1316.ce the weariness and tedium of listening for ever to the same sounds. What claim
1317.es them ; his advice is as a restraining bridle, which arrests them in their evi
1318.y liked, and took pleasure in magnifying even their most trifling faults ; they
1319.e in magnifying even their most trifling faults ; they never overlooked or excus
1320. never overlooked or excused any failing of theirs, anr^ amused themselves in sp
1321.eirs, anr^ amused themselves in speaking ill of them, and in prejudicing others
1322.speaking ill of them, and in prejudicing others against them,, What is the conse
1323.or the importance of what they are doing for you but a day will come when you sh
1324.on is beyond all price, and the trifling remuneration made to your teaoh^ ; «'.
1325.ion. The benefits remain with you during jour whole life the gratitude of the pu
1326. ean filial love bo thwarted by trifling obstacles No !>— Ai1327.ein ha on, league after league, watching over all his wants, until he arrived in
1328.od the anguish it caused him, entreating him to have mercy on him, and forgive h
1329.is accessory to it, either by commanding, advising, or in any way assisting the
1330.ry to it, either by commanding, advising, or in any way assisting the actual tra
1331.nding, advising, or in any way assisting the actual transgressor. The law of God
1332.self who stretches the violence. meaning of the precept thus far, wishing us to
1333.meaning of the precept thus far, wishing us to stifle in our and hearts all emot
1334.er, and all desire of revenge denouncing all the effects of those feelings, such
1335.ve words, bad treatment, all these being in themselves a species of homicide, an
1336.barous. They were ambitious of obtaining glory, but they knew better than we do,
1337. ; they understood it to lie in shedding their blood for their country, and in d
1338. blood for their country, and in drawing their sword against the foreign enemy,
1339.inst their own fellow-citizens. Duelling is then a crime as opposed to humanity
1340.on, is to usurp his prerogative He being the sole arbiter of life. What renders
1341.ess uf hell it is then to shun a passing care or sorrow, by rushing wilfully int
1342.hun a passing care or sorrow, by rushing wilfully into the frightful and never e
1343.ully into the frightful and never ending tormentg But God does not content himse
1344.bour. Scatvl-il cccssihi evl m disposing others to sin, or in turning them away
1345.m disposing others to sin, or in turning them away froni viitue. It is a second
1346.ive to all his duties, he was a pleasing object in the sight of God. But he had
1347. — who libertine who gloried in having no piety gave to virtue an odious and r
1348.ed to observe its preOur young man being moved* by his discourse, be- and censur
1349.oul, for which gins to fear his scoffing ed of virtue. The libertine : ; '>•
1350.r '' -r-rir' '. • • into everlasting misery. What punishment expect ? or is
1351.e would shrink with horror from steeping his hands in a brother's blood, yet the
1352. of whatsoever sort it be, or who, being able to prevent scandal, fails to do so
1353.'' i . Israelites, Adonibesech, having been conquered by the they cut off the
1354. hands and feeL Then that barbarous king, recalling the cruelties which h» Exam
1355.feeL Then that barbarous king, recalling the cruelties which h» Examples. — *
1356.off, eat under ray the Lord is now doing table the crumbs that fell therefrom un
1357.rce- I .ft: >(^' ''T»-t •'«.. having put an end to his had become disgusted
1358.at could have led him to commit that ing on its career. unbelief. rash act that
1359.me a confirmed In vain did his sorrowing friends beseech him to libertine. retur
1360.... night in dreadful pain, and uttering the most crowded around, doing all they
1361. uttering the most crowded around, doing all they could to calm him, and a pries
1362.exhorted him to return to God. The dying youth could only look at him with a wil
1363. God, for I see hell open to And turning h mself on his bed, he expired in recei
1364. Commandmcut God 1 prohibits eveiy thing .' • V 4 . , • • . ' contrary to
1365.most abominable; and St. Paul, comparing to idolaters, those who give themselves
1366. this Commandment to say or do any thing contrary to public decency, or against
1367.us sin to speak obscene words or to sing lascivious songs, or even to hear such
1368. letters, or to give advice tendsure ing to impurity; to fix the eye on immodest
1369. enlightens them, because that in giving way to it man degrades himself, for tha
1370.it man degrades himself, for that, being in his own nature elevated above the ot
1371.been regenerated in Christ Jesus, seeing that nothing can be more contrary o the
1372.ted in Christ Jesus, seeing that nothing can be more contrary o their vocation,
1373. this shameful vice can think of nothing solid: his passion follows him every wh
1374. and will permit him to think of nothing else ; every kind of work is wearisome,
1375.s wearisome, and tedious, and irritating to him. The heart is still more disease
1376.m St. Paul speaks, who conceives nothing of the things of (iod ; even the sight
1377. all is sacrificed, all goes for nothing. He forgete both what he owes to others
1378. tranquilly crime, he begins by doubting the moot certain truths, an ends by dis
1379.ot certain truths, an ends by dismissing all belief. Thenca ip^lows final impeni
1380. the guilt of ar* entire life, according to * Tne disorders of youth shall tliat
1381.ne disorders of youth shall tliat saying of Scripture penetrate even his bones,
1382.n of impurity are, 1st, excess in eating and drinking, because it brutalizes the
1383. are, 1st, excess in eating and drinking, because it brutalizes the •oul, rend
1384.. '4jud, Luxury in drees, which becoming to one's self and *'.'. cause of sin an
1385. the sign that olmstity is dead or dying in the soul. 3i'd, Idleness, for to liv
1386.i'd, Idleness, for to live withou* doing any thing is to exidleness being the po
1387.ess, for to live withou* doing any thing is to exidleness being the pose one's s
1388.* doing any thing is to exidleness being the pose one's self to continual tempta
1389.ry vice. 4th, Bad company, since nothing is p .re pernicious than the society of
1390.to you Come with us, beware of following them if you keep their company you shal
1391.shall soon become like unto them." Being thus oUiers a ; ; >• -* ; instructed
1392. who approach them, tliat by associating with them we soon learn to think, speak
1393.do, we should sin grievously by exposing ourselves to so great a danger the dang
1394. great a danger the danger of resembling them. Should you like to live with infe
1395.rsons i Doubtless you would not; fearing least you might speedily catch their di
1396.estraint ? Alas they talk of every thing that can flatter the passions; every bi
1397.rage to reuruve tliose who are offending God, or oppose the evil they are commit
1398., or oppose the evil they are committing he is afraid of displeasing thou^,. or
1399.e committing he is afraid of displeasing thou^,. or of being mocked and derided
1400.fraid of displeasing thou^,. or of being mocked and derided if he do not as Ihey
1401.to the same disorders, and ends by being ashamed of his former modesty. 5th, The
1402. of his former modesty. 5th, The reading of bad books, which fills the mind with
1403.ples of irreligion capable of destroying the fear of God, and shaking the founda
1404. destroying the fear of God, and shaking the foundations of Faith. That barrier
1405.e of ! •*'*' •J TOWARDS OOD. reading tliejr 160 pernicious books; reject the
1406.ot that you re»d it only for olitaining iuto adorn your mind or to improve your
1407.mon of impurity many charms and seducing graces, it. the most solid virtue could
1408.! There •.-.,-«., '•• every thing around breathes voluptuousnei^s the dec
1409.dress, all is adapted to ensnare nothing, in short, is more opposed to the spiri
1410.•« 4.'. . -<'' 'lir U: Wam i avoiding these occasions until one goes to confe
1411.oper to leave them off before presenting one's self at the tribunal of penance,
1412. no more. must also beware of concealing or glossing over these sins in confessi
1413.st also beware of concealing or glossing over these sins in confession, or even
1414.ven commit a sacrilege> thereby exposing one's self to utter perdition. It will
1415.ed in the waters of the deluge excepting only the just Noah and his family, beca
1416.od, by his praises and rewards declaring his approval of that fearful slaughter,
1417.regard the rules of justice in depriving him Without justice society could not s
1418.nce, or fraud, that is to say, deceiving our neighbour either by the weight, the
1419. their parents from strangers that being a real theft which is severely censured
1420..i.v'- .'. : void of all natural feeling. It is also an injustice to retain the
1421.n the gcG^'s of our neigh- by not paying him what we owe him, such as the wages
1422.wn which have been found, without making any inquiries after the owner thereof,
1423.e to our neigh* hour, such as destroying or spoiling what belongs to him, whethe
1424.gh* hour, such as destroying or spoiling what belongs to him, whether the injury
1425. ,, •• When we have taken any thing belonging to our neigh, hour, or done h
1426. When we have taken any thing belonging to our neigh, hour, or done hitn any in
1427.st in order to obtain the means of doing it. This commandment obliges us also to
1428.ges us also to give alms, each according to his means and the wants of the poor
1429.s. St. John says that if an} one, having wealth, closes his heart against his br
1430.re blessed with a superfluity, according to our state and condition. Although th
1431.meritorius, and it consists in relieving our neighbour in his necessities and in
1432. : ; a spiritual manner, in contributing to their salvation, either by giving th
1433.ing to their salvation, either by giving them good example, by procuring it for
1434.y giving them good example, by procuring it for them, or by giving them instruct
1435., by procuring it for them, or by giving them instruction. This obligation is es
1436.n. This obligation is especially binding on pastors, and on all those who are ch
1437.ll those who are charged with instmcting others and labouring for their salvatio
1438.ged with instmcting others and labouring for their salvation and sanctification.
1439.e life of a poor man danger of perishing with hunger but to contribute to the sa
1440.in a street in Pekin a purse contaijiing twenty gold he looked around to see whe
1441.• --^'r^ >: -A'<''*.; ." and supposing that it might belong to a gentleman who
1442.ht belong to a gentleman who was walking some paces before him, he called to him
1443.d to him have you lost any and hastening after him, said " Sir The gentleman thu
1444.hurst his hand into his pocket and thing { " " I have lost," he rej)lied, found
1445.Christian church in order to be Edifying in- |)our in structed in the Piysteries
1446.s, e not letii in A famous usurer, being at the point of death, sent for a (•
1447., or cially confessor. The latter having found that all his wealth had been acqu
1448. to do what you require," said the dying man, " and I must only run the risk.''
1449.n repeated in Scripture against uttering not true. This vice is in fact most str
1450.ongst them it was scrupulously pracLying is so odious that we are not even permi
1451. than under use of it make in expressing the opposite of ••t .'. -, pretence
1452.site of ••t .'. -, pretence of being useful to ourselves or our neighbour; i
1453.to defame him, for instance, attributing to hira a vice which he has not, or a f
1454. calumny. This crime has in it something so black and so malignant that it is tr
1455.truly re" The tongue of the calumvolting to an upright mind niator " according t
1456.ng to an upright mind niator " according to the expression of Scripture " is a t
1457.ripture " is a twoedged sword inflicting mortal wounds." It is not only the fort
1458.d confirmed by an oath, which is nothing less than deposing against the known tr
1459.ath, which is nothing less than deposing against the known truth. The false witn
1460.; they must re-estab- profaneb by making iquity. They honour which they have tak
1461.der passes from mouth to mouth, kindling as it goes, and scorching, at least, wh
1462.outh, kindling as it goes, and scorching, at least, what it cannot consume it is
1463. creates dissension in families, filling all with confusion and disorder it is t
1464.nd revenge, and therefore the mainspring of numberless crimes and iniquities. Th
1465.st fatal its results, is that of telling one person in secret what ano« ther ha
1466.ucileable enmity. The accused, unknowing what has beeu Haid of hiiu has no means
1467. Haid of hiiu has no means of justifying himself, or explain all : Of m ••
1468.F THE CHRISTIAN ' * . :.0-iS.. or giving satisfaction. The character of him who
1469.rt abhors the seventh this seventh thing is the crime of hlra who soweth discord
1470.ose who and to save others from wounding charity, we do but fulfil one of its mo
1471.nd most urgent duties it is really doing good to our neighbour, when we endeavou
1472.ndeavour to prevent him froin destroying himself and others it is doing him good
1473.estroying himself and others it is doing him good, when we prefer to his reputai
1474.r power to remedy the evil, from falling into it; in that case, so far ; ; H ' ,
1475.then he cannot retract, without uttering a falsehood, which is, of course, stric
1476.that he can to that effect by publishing all the good that he knows of the same
1477.external conduct is regular and edifying. Yet nothing is more common than to see
1478.uct is regular and edifying. Yet nothing is more common than to see malignity br
1479.r semblance of virtue, and are unwilling to believe that such appearances can co
1480.prevent detraction, which is more during meals, had two Latin verses, of which t
1481.two Latin verses, of which the following is the meaning, inscribed on the walls
1482.s, of which the following is the meaning, inscribed on the walls of the apartmen
1483. Saint immediately reproved them, saying that if they went on so, he must either
1484.able. So firm should we be in preventing slauder by every means in our power.
1485.covet thy neighbour's wife. After having external acts of impurity, prohibited b
1486.Law under this head %y merely abstaining from the ciiminal action. No, that is n
1487.ery ' i»f • lis- 1,\ thought of doing evil renders us guilty in hia eyes when
1488.liberate, that is to say when we knowing* Evil thoughts/' ly dwell upon it, and
1489.parate from God." Thev, therefore, bring death to our soul if we are not careful
1490.them. The tions evil begins by a passing thought which is allowed to remain in t
1491.eir source. The true means of repressing the desire, is to reject the thought, a
1492.hought, as the })est means of preventing the bad action is to stitle the desire
1493.em we cannot prevent them from occurring to our minds, but it is in our power to
1494.s, but it is in our power to shun giving occasion to them or Bays the Scripture
1495. unbroken peace in this life, for taking pleasure in them, one of warfare. Virtu
1496.re. Virtue does not consist in not being but in manfully resisting all the evil
1497.t in not being but in manfully resisting all the evil suggestions of our passion
1498.gestions of our passions, and in keeping clear of the occasions of temptation. I
1499.will Let us be faithful and fear nothing W the ! importunes, and seeks to fright
1500. liich wt have struggled, far from doing us harm, will he«;ome ijie isau " of o
1501.Bernardine of Sienna horror of any thing contrary to chastity, his companions sp
1502.use, not permitted to purchase any thing. or a farm, it is because we desire to
1503. is perfectly legitimate when, in making our purchase, we only make use of fair
1504. take or to retain the ! ; ; God, having forbidden us by ; mandment prohibits is
1505.ent prohibits is the desire of obtaining unjustly which belongs to our neighbour
1506.d an unjustifiable eagerness in amassing wealth it is, in short, that cupidity,
1507. were to inhabit the whole earth Nothing is more opposed to the spirit of the Go
1508.ent with what it has, and always fearing to lose any portion thereof going on he
1509.earing to lose any portion thereof going on heaping together, and accumulating n
1510.ose any portion thereof going on heaping together, and accumulating ns A man who
1511.ng on heaping together, and accumulating ns A man who is given up to though one
1512.o commit! violence He counts for nothing his conscience and his salvation, provi
1513.ke .^ur happiness consist in possesvsing them it is not wialth that ue condemns,
1514. only the immoderate desire of obtaining it. And, after all, how could the posse
1515.nescent are they and perishable, costing a thousand troubles and anxieties ere t
1516.an such things render us happy ? Nothing can be wiser than the advice given us b
1517.han the advice given us by the holy king David " If thou hast riches, fix not th
1518.his heart also." Example. Tobias, having lost his sight, heard the b.eathig of a
1519. not permitted for us to touch any thing that has long. been stolen." Finding hi
1520.ing that has long. been stolen." Finding himself near his end, he gave this advi
1521.we are bound to obey her, because, being guided by the Holy Ghost, she speaks to
1522.e book of the x\cts that St. Paul, going from city to city, commanded their obse
1523.ect them. I' would be invleed disobeying God if we refused to submit to those wh
1524.bthese we shall explain in the following articles. serve — .•. -y ..'-. V-.f
1525.ve — .•. -y ..'-. V-.f >,'< .. being supposed to have a pre* Holy See, a fri
1526. which she has instituted, by abstaining from servile works, and applying oursel
1527.taining from servile works, and applying ourselves to acts of piety and religion
1528.ivine Eucharist. These ni^^steries being the source of all the graces v/e re cei
1529.e, adoration, .and confidence, animating us to gather the fruits thereof by an i
1530.encourage us U) imitate them by pointing out to our view the ineffable hap> At t
1531.These grand objects, thus really passing before our eyes. made present by faith,
1532. Is* by their children raelites ; having commanded them to sacrifice every year
1533.f the passage of the Lord, when striking the first-boro of the Egyptians he pass
1534.tand in need. — impious Nicanor having taken the reJews on the Sabbath day, a
1535.'...^^ Jews modestly, " He is the Living God and the Omnipotent Master of heaven
1536. the — ! ' ^ v/^. - ": *..' • . king." —Nicanor gave battle, was defeated,
1537.nd the most essential is that of hearing Mass, and the Church makes it an expres
1538. honour ; so the obligation of assisting thereat on every day consecrated to His
1539. the faithful assembled for the breaking oif bread, which signifies, the offerin
1540.oif bread, which signifies, the offering up of the holy Sacrifice « '•-.*.. V
1541.ce, they content themselves with hearing a Jow Mass. In the first ages of the Ch
1542.on, piety, and respect, not merely being present in the body we must also join w
1543.old any conversation, is neithei hearing Mass nor fulfilling the precept of the
1544., is neithei hearing Mass nor fulfilling the precept of the Church it is to arri
1545.Church it is to arrive the ; ; outraging Jesus Christ, renewing the opprobriuno
1546.the ; ; outraging Jesus Christ, renewing the opprobriuno of Calvamust then apply
1547.ust then apply o\» ry, and dishonouring Religion. selves to prayer during all t
1548.ouring Religion. selves to prayer during all the time of the holy Mass, ma* We *
1549.ma* We *',;H?j.-»-, ! TOWARDS GOD. king use either of a 187 .,1 book, or beads,
1550.ds, or some other means of >. » keeping the attention fixed. It is not enough t
1551.head of the acts ol piety, the assisting at the holy Mass, does not thereby oxem
1552.. A Christian virgin named Anysia, being on her way to the assembly of the faith
1553.ho was much struck by her modesty. Going up to her, he said: "Stay! where art th
1554.er, he said: "Stay! where art thou going?** vent the faithful festivals from cel
1555. the faithful festivals from celebrating the ^^^:* jI >'•'' > *'. •.< :"y *'
1556.rom God strength to withstand the coming ten^ptation. The soldier was offended,
1557.m no other answer than that sign. Laying hold of her who art he said angrily " A
1558. " Answer me thou ? where art thou going ? " She replied courageous" I am a serv
1559." Thou shalt not go iliere I shall bring thee to sacrifice to the gods to day we
1560.rifice to the gods to day we|ire adoring the sun, and thou shalt adore him with
1561.ysia tried to prevent him, and, slapping him on the face, " Avaunt, thou wretch
1562.Ecclesiastical iUUttr^. .\nysia, fearing that of the cross jr:ir^--'^ ' — —
1563. in the course of the year, after having attained the age of discretion, that is
1564. to say, when once capable of discerning good from evil, and cense* quently, of
1565. evil, and cense* quently, of committing mortal sin ; the second is to confess B
1566.passed several years without approaching the tribunal of Penance, standing still
1567.aching the tribunal of Penance, standing still in their old habits of sin. In th
1568. prevent the abuse of per. sons applying to strange priests who knew nothing of
1569.ying to strange priests who knew nothing of them, in order more easily to obtain
1570.sily to obtain absolution, without being obliged to renounce their sins or refor
1571.ny one has had the misfortune of falling into mortal sin. God obliges all who fe
1572.ecept of the Church, far from dispensing with this obligation, has no other purp
1573.purpose than to prevent us from becoming fixed in a state of sin, to the utte ru
1574.in, life ? of our For those by remaining in it for the greatei the rest, experie
1575.s that one is not sufficient for keeping up confine themselves to that, art gene
1576.mandment of the Church, who, by imposing on her children the law of innual confe
1577., obliges them at the same time to bring to the Sacrament the dispositions neces
1578. or a true contrition, is not fulfilling th« precept of the .Church, but only a
1579. precept of the .Church, but only adding a new sin to those In a word the Comman
1580.ommitted. Church is not obeyed by making a bad confession. The Church has not fi
1581.the advice of our Confessor in preparing for that important act Examples. The ve
1582.great services, but who, notwithstanding th j earnest entreaties of the prince,
1583. a dangerous illness, whereupon the king went to see him, and confession in the
1584.nfessor, but even then he would The king went again to visit him, and finding hi
1585.ing went again to visit him, and finding him in the last extremity, implored him
1586. that state. But the unhappy man, having remained some time " It if silent, fixe
1587.f silent, fixed a wild stare on the king, and exclaimed " and with thetie too la
1588.in preacher A commenced in the following manner, : " My brethren," on the delay
1589.I was called upon to witness a harrowing spectacle, a infltniction n young man w
1590.a infltniction n young man was i driving furiously alonff the street, and hig ca
1591.thy and con>> passion, and talk of going to fetch a doctor " A doctor" he criesr
1592. not this fool you yourselves?" Hurrying on in the'career of vice are suddenly c
1593.e tribunal of Penance. Merault. Teaching of Religiony vol I ! — ! ' P.r, ARTIC
1594.r this august Sacrament, notwithstanding that Jesui Christ threatens to deprive
1595.faithful ; >• n' • \ ont approaching the holy Trtl)le. It is, then, to preve
1596.most profit from the Hence, by receiving only at Easter, we do indeed accomplish
1597.v:. »••. ' v.rf * '. . • with ing aJ respect, and that respect consists p
1598.cause. There is no reason for postponing it, so just or rational as the need of
1599.so just or rational as the need of being perfectly purified ; but it to us this
1600.delay is to be made use of for preparing one's self, and should be curtailed as
1601.IlTIAIf is Uie oY>ligatioii of receiving rloos not pass, but iiig it is fulflllo
1602.d Vigils thou shalt feut. to fast during the Tub Church commands us whole Lenl^
1603.re named Emb irdays. consists in talcing but one meal ^nd in abstaining from cer
1604.n talcing but one meal ^nd in abstaining from cer* tain things, such as meat, 6c
1605.nk till after the hour of Vespers, being six o'clock in the evening. To this rig
1606.espers, being six o'clock in the evening. To this rigorous fast the primitive Ch
1607.ristians added long prayers, even during the night they spent the time, moreover
1608.ndant alms. But the first fervour having decreased, the repast was then ')^aken
1609.a little nourishment towards the evening so as to enable them to bear the fast t
1610.them to bear the fast till the following day.. The Church tolerates this collati
1611.s of the year, to draw down the blessing of God on the gifts of the earth, and t
1612.good ministers to his Church, that being the time when those who are destined fo
1613.there a portion of the night in praising God by the singing of psalms and readin
1614.the night in praising God by the singing of psalms and reading of piout fast on
1615.God by the singing of psalms and reading of piout fast on liooks, as we still do
1616.spose ourselves to celebrate the com ing festival in a proper manner, and to der
1617.m its due observance. The law of fasting is obligatory on all the faithful, and
1618.other infirmities, or hard and fatiguing labour renders ft impracticable ; any o
1619.t any reason, violate the law of fasting ; but the law is none the leas binding,
1620.g ; but the law is none the leas binding, and the multitude of prevaricators can
1621.rtion to theii- strength, by retrenching something of their ordinary meals, and
1622.heii- strength, by retrenching something of their ordinary meals, and denying th
1623.ing of their ordinary meals, and denying themselves certain trifling gratificati
1624. and denying themselves certain trifling gratifications, the privation of which
1625.nt, they ought to do it in part, uniting in mind and heart with the Penance of t
1626. Penance of the whole Church, and making up in other good works for ; We that wh
1627.d a book entitled the History of Fasting. He was struck by the rigour with which
1628.letter, how many years of strict fasting would have been imposed upon me for man
1629.they take that one meal till the evening was come." What he read made a lasting
1630.g was come." What he read made a lasting impression on his mind, and gave rise t
1631.nd where they fast continually, sleeping only on a hard couch, and interrupting
1632.g only on a hard couch, and interrupting their short repoae to ring the praises
1633. interrupting their short repoae to ring the praises of God during the night Las
1634.repoae to ring the praises of God during the night Lasaubsb u ""' •••• -
1635.der to weaken the passions by mortifying the body ; also to make us expiate our
1636.and that can only be done by retrenching all that tends to flatter them. The Chu
1637.ends to flatter them. The Church knowing our need of this remedy, and how unwill
1638.r need of this remedy, and how unwilling we are to make use of it, comes herself
1639.is general view, the Church, in imposing on us the law of abstinence, has other
1640.le abstinence, that is to say abstaining from the use of meat, and the Church ma
1641. then be deceived by the false reasoning of the who making a wrong application o
1642.by the false reasoning of the who making a wrong application of the words of the
1643.s to bewail it, and to beware of be* ing carried away by the torrent of example.
1644.olly destitute of piety, was prepa> ring to approach for the first time to the h
1645.edily presented itself. On the following Friday, meal was put, as usual, on the
1646.d not be prevailed upon to eat any thing better than a piece of dry bread. But t
1647. him seeat, at the same time reproaching him What was her surprise for disobeyin
1648.him What was her surprise for disobeying his father and her. when the dear child
1649.lied! "If papa had comhusband, something to manded me to do any thing that I cou
1650., something to manded me to do any thing that I could do, I should at once have
1651. stay hero till to-morrow without eating any thing, and in that I can obey him w
1652. till to-morrow without eating any thing, and in that I can obey him without goi
1653.and in that I can obey him without going against my conscience, so I hope you wi
1654.not accept what you are kind as to bring me " The mother, amazed to hear him exp
1655.rs with those of his wife, both agreeing that their son was more reasonable and
1656.ame to himself for his injustice, asking him at the same time who had given him
1657. given him such prudent advice. Learning that it was his confessor, he hastened
1658.hild ^ who was nmde the means of opening the eyes of his parents and leading the
1659.ning the eyes of his parents and leading them back from the way of sin and error
1660.• '^ •;•• . ^ ''At the beginning of last Lent,'' . *1^',. «.,' '" . **.
1661.onths her father and I have been killing hei by inches ** here she Htopped, unab
1662.y overcome by sorrow and remorse. Having recovered herself a liitle, she thus re
1663.self a liitle, she thus resumed " During the time I have mentioned, there has no
1664.he bed, and gave her work to do, leaving beside her for food nothing but bread a
1665. do, leaving beside her for food nothing but bread and meat ; this he had done t
1666.eat ; this he had done this very morning, and then we both quitted the house. Ch
1667.then we both quitted the house. Chancing to go in again, I found her sad and dej
1668.me she was sick and in pain, and falling on her knees she said to me " I know I
1669.ther than men, so that I can never bring myself to do what you require of me ; n
1670.f me ; nevertheless I am afraid of doing wrong by resisting your will so long. M
1671. I am afraid of doing wrong by resisting your will so long. My dear mother, I be
1672.ur pardon, but I can promise you nothing, nor do nothing more than to beg of God
1673. can promise you nothing, nor do nothing more than to beg of God that he may mak
1674.other, and you shall see " She was going on, but I threw my arms around her neck
1675.ew my arms around her neck, and pressing her in my arms, promised to follow her
1676.nd you in the church. My child in eating may — ^^r bound, for when I would hav
1677.rly similar took place in their dwelling evening. .•^A..VT.«.;._K. when the f
1678.lar took place in their dwelling evening. .•^A..VT.«.;._K. when the father re
1679.e why also came to confession, following the oxamtreat- pie of his wife. daughte
1680.e of the bad ment she had been receiving. Her answer was that she would not say
1681.wer was that she would not say any thing bad of her parents, which reply inoreas
1682.i';n^ TOWARDS GOD. the soul. 100 working of divine grace in that innocent and fa
1683.rein we are born. All mankind, excepting only the BMssed Virgin, have been stain
1684.t which we wilfully commit, after having attained the use of reason. Actual sin
1685. but even the thought or desire of doing it ; it not only restrains the hand and
1686.evils, for it deprives us of ianctifying grace, and of all claim to the celestia
1687.it gives death to the soul by separating it from God, as the soul is the life of
1688. hatred who is its life, his everlasting vengeance. Can there be any evil What h
1689.d we not avoid it ? No, there is nothing that we should not be disposed to suffe
1690. serpent, and bad reason to expect being devoured by him, with what haste we wou
1691.ast as our limbs could carry us, fearing at every step lest he might overtake us
1692.ve of God, and to prepare for confessing as soon as possible. should also take c
1693.ent ; but rather let us avoid, according to the precept of the Apostle, even the
1694.•£>'> . tcotUd induce to sin. sinning, I shall disobey God, ! and obey the de
1695.DS OOD. 201 ' * God rather than the king." (Maccabees.) " In proposing to me to
1696.n the king." (Maccabees.) " In proposing to me to offend God. and to ruin my sou
1697.is enemy, and run the risk 'of incurring his anger, his wrath, his vengeance " "
1698.e the fool to poison my soul by enjoying for a few brief moments, the deceitful
1699.ld very soon cause me grievous suffering, and which would render me deserving of
1700.ing, and which would render me deserving of eternal death, nay, inevitably bring
1701. of eternal death, nay, inevitably bring it upon me, if I did not wipe away I
1702.Qivy, anger, and sloth. young man, going through a forest, was attacked by a fri
1703. attacked by a frightful monster, having the body of a lion, surmounted by seven
1704.ike that of a serpent The beast, darting forth from his den, came right upon him
1705.'; ^^t-' •••.-'; '>'! with flaming eyes, rearing up his seven heads, and p
1706.•.-'; '>'! with flaming eyes, rearing up his seven heads, and protruding his
1707.aring up his seven heads, and protruding his seven tongues, while he filled the
1708.filled the air with his horrible roaring. The young man, being strong and couraH
1709.s horrible roaring. The young man, being strong and couraHe geous, was not disma
1710.o other arms than an axe which according to the cus- .."!• '.., !!"" -S • .*
1711.hung susp* >ded from his girdle ; laying fl .«.'.,..<. .**.•-• 202 DTTTr OP
1712.the ground, and our traveller, believing him dead, pul up his axe, and resumed h
1713.s axe, and resumed his journey, thinking it quite unnecessary to cut off the sev
1714.a few paces when the monster, recovering himself, arose, and again sprang toward
1715.h to devour you or whether in correcting your passions, you do not spare one dar
1716.r passions, you do not spare one darling propensity which may be quite enough to
1717.nd struggle on till death never wearying in the combat, nor seeking rest, until
1718.ever wearying in the combat, nor seeking rest, until we have defeated all our en
1719.e love and esteem of one's self, .ausing us to prefer ourselves before all other
1720.nd to refer ill to ourselves and nothing it to God ! pride is offensive to •jr
1721.lves for his gifts, instead Df referring all the honour to him: thence proceeds
1722.ence proceeds vanity and the overweening desire of praise and esteem. The proud
1723. him to look down on others; considering himself far above them, he demeans hims
1724.heir advice all authority is displeasing to him, for he fancies that he was not
1725.r of his salvation, his whole care being to ornament his body with the trappings
1726.gh the gay circles of the world, drawing around him a crowd of adorers decency,
1727.at cause shall we 'not find for humbling ourselves Not to speak of the infirmiti
1728.nothingness and sin if we have any thing in us good or estimable we have it from
1729. is far removed from pride, from seeking for praise, oi hunting after vain honou
1730.ide, from seeking for praise, oi hunting after vain honours if he finds himself
1731.on. Example. A certain nobleman, priding himself on a name which he dishonoured
1732.singu* and he reproached him with having no ancestors boast The other, far from
1733.ncestors boast The other, far from being irritated, " If my origin disgraces me,
1734.ss, to place our happiness in possessing them, and to us9 unjust means of obtain
1735.em, and to us9 unjust means of obtaining them. Avarice produces forgetfulnoss of
1736.oduces forgetfulnoss of God, by inducing man to make his treasures the object of
1737.whole thoughts are given to the amassing of wealth; they are but little affected
1738.much taken up with the care of acquiring those which are but temporal, and it is
1739. in* fected with the passion of becoming rich, can no longer be •onsidered a C
1740.up riches gaiies for fear of diminishing his treasure without making use of them
1741. diminishing his treasure without making use of them, he is poor with all his we
1742.sion g-vows stronger with age. Advancing years, and reflection reduce and weaken
1743.he more tenaciously does his heart cling to his wretched hoards the nearer he se
1744.rds the nearer he sees death approaching, the more closely does he clutch his go
1745. himself shall retain but a worn winding-sheet, a coffin, and a grave. Beware, t
1746.perishable things, so far from satiating our desirr \\\y The iust man is lKi;>{)
1747.n are the wicked with nil " Fear nothing," s. id Tobias to his 8on, their treasu
1748.lth remem))or that they can take nothing with them to the other world ">! them p
1749.ecord the f'ory .>'* a miser, furnishing a very singular fact, together witu a m
1750.tu a most traijicai end. This man, being possessed by the demon i)f avarice thou
1751.the demon i)f avarice thought of nothing but how he'wps to accumulate treasure,
1752.his cellar a subterraneous place, having an iron door so contrived that it was i
1753.there, and his delight was to sit gazing at his leisure on his gold and silver,
1754.ke the key from the outside, and closing the door upon himself, he commenced rec
1755.oor upon himself, he commenced reckoning his hoarded treasures. When he had amus
1756.'.u p.'."* ho wo . ever think of looking for him in such a ^ ).. 'o^ Meanwhile h
1757.a ^ ).. 'o^ Meanwhile his family, seeing that he did not return, became seriousl
1758.ddenly a locksmith in the place, hearing the event mtwh talked of, began to reme
1759.make secretly an iron door with a spring lork, and hat he might unfortunately cl
1760.r when t. 'y dis* covered the putrifying body ol he wre ched miser It was easy t
1761.ection for plerxsures opposed to Nothing is more uegm 'iing to man than this sha
1762.es opposed to Nothing is more uegm 'iing to man than this shameful vice nothing
1763.g to man than this shameful vice nothing more o|5posed t the sanctity of our voc
1764. and he conceives in his heart a feeling of hatred towards him who is one day. t
1765.they too are abandoned. By thus stifling 'iie voice of conscience, the sinner fa
1766. state of insensibility in which nothing any mor« affects him he becomes blind
1767.ear neither he thinks only of gratifying hia brutal appetite, whatever may be th
1768.ay be the consequence, and fears nothing but being disturbed in the enjoyment of
1769.consequence, and fears nothing but being disturbed in the enjoyment of his guilt
1770.es us, with respect to purity, according to the state in which Providence has pl
1771.ls thiMuselves it is infinitely pleasing to God, and he rewards it in a munifice
1772.ecessity to eternal death." By rejecting immediately and with force, all dangero
1773.ery first motion of this passion, saying with confidence, as did tlie Apostles "
1774.e advantage from temptation, by becoming firmer in the path of virtue. Example.
1775.odel of virtue, and who frequented Going one the Sacraments in the most edifying
1776. one the Sacraments in the most edifying manner. Sunday to church to perform his
1777.vited him to breakfast in a neighbouring inn, was. and he refused for some time,
1778.py companions of this poor wretch, being seized with terror, immediately went to
1779.• . r -,.% . f — O ! crime of having plunged a soul into hell Collet. ARTICL
1780.e, inspired only the desire of imitating them, then the feeling it would be a no
1781.sire of imitating them, then the feeling it would be a noble widely different fr
1782.sposition of the heart is like a gnawing worm son which consumes in secret, so t
1783. he takes a malignant pleasure in seeing him humbled, though at the same time, h
1784.ve them spoken of less favourably giving malicious interpretations to all their
1785.etations to all their actions ; twisting selves, the success : ! — ! ; the fai
1786.fairest virtues into vices, representing piety as only dissimulation and hypocri
1787.envy is the actual intention of injuring one's neighbour. ; From words 1^1^; ./^
1788.m trouble, to prevent him from obtaining what he desires, or to deprive him of i
1789.ren of Joseph with the design of putting him to death, and induced them It was e
1790. J," ..•>•- Ti' I,: . • is nothing more or less thar charity he animated b
1791.hren in all that befalls them, rejoicing in their joy, and mourning with them in
1792.em, rejoicing in their joy, and mourning with them in their sorrow, and in short
1793. near ' • I other in a city, and being mutually jealous they It chanced, howev
1794.s enmity. that one of the two, beginning to reflect, on his state, listened to t
1795. followed, and the other merchant, being told who it was that sent him so many c
1796.ousy had kept asunder. Christian Reading. «iif.>^ - , m::*: ••' .?'.'** ART
1797.LUTTONY, is an inordinate love of eating and drinking. are not forbidden to feel
1798.n inordinate love of eating and drinking. are not forbidden to feel pleasure in
1799.ght that God has seasoned with a feeling of gratification the use of the food 4
1800.-- But we abuse necessary for pieserving our health and life. wa this blessing w
1801.ng our health and life. wa this blessing when we seek only the pleasure alone mu
1802.s of our duties and serve God, according to the words of the Apostle " Whether y
1803. in our repasts, think not of gratifying the body, but of following the order To
1804.of gratifying the body, but of following the order To seek of God, who wills tha
1805.oduces drunkenness, and excess in eating. This detestable vice degrades man, and
1806.t. sensuality, which consists in seeking exquisite and delicate meats, or in mak
1807.quisite and delicate meats, or in making use of things which we know to be injur
1808.fy the appetite ; and finally, in eating too greedily of even ordinary food. Wha
1809.ned by sensuality, instead of repressing its first motions ? Gluttony gives rise
1810.rch ordains; he thinks not of mortifying himself; the laws which prescribe certa
1811.se. AVe have in the Scripture a striking picture of it, traced by the Holy Ghost
1812.or those who pass thojr time hi drinking, and who take pleasure in emptying cups
1813.nking, and who take pleasure in emptying cups ? We ought, therefore, to have a l
1814.e a lively horror of a vice so degrading to a man, and still more so to a Christ
1815.213 i^ which regulates the use of eating and drinking accordi: to which makes th
1816.regulates the use of eating and drinking accordi: to which makes the body more r
1817.hlUg; thai flatters the senses imitating Jesus Christ, who chose to subject hims
1818.e to subject himself to this humiliating action, in order to leave us a model he
1819.." The most efficacious means of keeping in mind the rules of temperance, and ob
1820.d the rules of temperance, and obtaining strength to follow them, is to say, pio
1821.'\ and after meals. selves the blessing By this we shall draw down upon our-
1822.cords of crime, disorders and is nothing so horrible or tragical as St. what hap
1823.Cyril ; he was much addicted to drinking, and spent a great part of his time in
1824.on, and commenced operations by stabbing one of his sisters. Alarmed by her crie
1825. heart, to relate to his hear On hearing what had happened, the whole assembly b
1826.nto cries and lamentations, never having thought it possible that a man could go
1827.to such lengtlis in iniquity and fearing that the wrath of Heaven might fall on
1828.ven might fall on their city, for having given birth to such a monster. St Augus
1829.e whom our mildness failed in correcting such is the anger of a father, or of a
1830.r of a father, or of a master, on seeing the disorders which he is bound to prev
1831.l sin is of a very different kind, being an impetuous emotion of the soul which
1832.es us to spurn, with violence, any thing that offends us. It springs from an evi
1833.bition a miser is excited when any thing disturbs his schemes for making money,
1834.ny thing disturbs his schemes for making money, and a voluptuous man is angry wh
1835.in upon. This anger IS neither according to God, nor to good sense it causes con
1836.r excited by meanor of the person giving way to it ; his eyes are inflamed, whol
1837.er knows himself, nor respects any thing thence the abuse which he heaps on the
1838.^rrible blasphemy against every He thing holy ; nothing is sacred for that impio
1839.my against every He thing holy ; nothing is sacred for that impious tongne. . so
1840.cess of violence, and the most revolting cruelty scarcely suffices to satisfy hi
1841., and enables us to refrain from showing any symptom of impatience or of bittern
1842.atience or of bitterne«s, from allowing any expression of contempt or of compla
1843.Ruffin relates that a solitary, feeling himself ...f monastery, said within him
1844. will go into the desert, so that having no one with whom to quarrel, I' may hav
1845.vern. One day when he was congratulating himself on having esca^ ped from the oc
1846. he was congratulating himself on having esca^ ped from the occasions of anger,
1847. broke it in a fit of vexation. Entering immediately into himself, " The demon o
1848. its evil it is prevented from resisting tirst, propensities Its the njother of
1849.eness is called most immediate offspring is: : ^1&!I^-'^^^'^-" ;,&• '.-' '4'..
1850. pass days, iDonthsi, and years in doing nothing, or in frivolous amusements the
1851.ys, iDonthsi, and years in doing nothing, or in frivolous amusements they think
1852. amusements they think not of fulfilling the duties of Religion player is either
1853.young man, fr: instance, profits nothing from the education given him, doing not
1854.hing from the education given him, doing nothing of what is prescribed for him t
1855.m the education given him, doing nothing of what is prescribed for him to do, or
1856.at is prescribed for him to do, or doing it in an imperfect manner, without atte
1857.is given any important office, requiring intelligence and extensive information,
1858.ow great is then his regret for iiiaving lost the time of his youth vain, vain r
1859.th they are stopped by the most trifling obstacle, and every thing appears impos
1860. most trifling obstacle, and every thing appears impossi" Wo !" says the ble, be
1861. they conceive liny desire of correcting tliemselves, that desire is leeble, and
1862. not V* ill ; to-day they will one thing, to-morrow another today they will do w
1863.ch accompanies jiil their actions, being a lassitude of the heart which leavea n
1864.ho would arouse hh. from his lethnothing animates, nothing affects him neither t
1865.. from his lethnothing animates, nothing affects him neither the argy reproaches
1866.t, yet has care to make provision during summer, and to pick up in the harvest w
1867.rtain director of souls, when addressing liis " This life is the harvest time, a
1868.SITY OF GRACE AND THE MEANS OP OBTAINING IT. If / • ,3L*4\, '* i• !l 'MS ' '
1869.wn souls. assistance we could do nothing in the order of salvation, and this we
1870.ce is of two kinds: 1st, the sanctifying grace, whereby we are justified, that i
1871.s it n^akes us children of God, pleasing- in his sight, and heirs to the kingdom
1872.abitual, when we preserve it by shunning mortal sin. 2d. Actual grace, which con
1873. consists in a holy thought enlightening the mind, and ill a good inclination, w
1874. will is to do good. Original sin having cast a thick darkness over the mind, an
1875.e ignorant of our duty, or that, knowing it, wc prefer following our own evil pr
1876.or that, knowing it, wc prefer following our own evil propensities. We could nev
1877.d not open the 3yes of our understanding, and imprint on our heart a leaning tow
1878.ding, and imprint on our heart a leaning towards virtue. Grace enables us to kno
1879.ables us to know what is good, inspiring us with the desire, and giving will ; :
1880.inspiring us with the desire, and giving will ; : We ; : ; ns the strength to n\
1881.l tenaency to evil his Avonkness, seeing that m joined by the temptations of iti
1882.ay of its illusive' pomps and glittering baubles, in tiocf rtid in is ! not assi
1883.and, incessantly attacks him, presenting to his view all manner of seducing obje
1884.nting to his view all manner of seducing objects, exciting his imtgination by a
1885.all manner of seducing objects, exciting his imtgination by a thousand fancies,
1886.by a thousand fancies, and ever exciting the flesh No, ho could never resist so
1887.tain Hence it is, that in daily reciting the Lord's prayer, him. we beg of God t
1888.vil, . » • evil. then true, according to the doctrine of Jesus Christ, neithe
1889.th grace we can do all things, according to the same apostle " I can do all thro
1890.ce we have no right to it, God bestowing it upon us in his pure kindness, and by
1891.e have two infallible means of obtaining grace, and these are the Sacraments It
1892.is commandmonts for God commands nothing impossible, but only enjoins us to do w
1893.St. Augustine resisted grace when, being pressed to return from the ways of sin,
1894.e soon to-morrow, to-morrow " But having heard of the soon conversion of two of
1895. nounced the world merely from reading the life of St. Anthony, and having bes
1896.ding the life of St. Anthony, and having besides, heard a voice saying " Take ;
1897.and having besides, heard a voice saying " Take ; — — — ; ! V ^ A^•t.^;.
1898.sensible signs to eates to us his saving grace. . .. .1 .V,v, The Sacraments are
1899.er, the form, and the intention of doing as the There arc i> eiiance, Eucharist,
1900. 1 ' — • ; , f k .•• by giving a new life. iLe matter of Confirmation
1901. Unction delivers us from tlie lingeiing weakness caused by sin. Holy Orders pro
1902.,i-.'' DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN the living, seeing that life •„* named sacrame
1903.DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN the living, seeing that life •„* named sacraments of r
1904.m worthily, we must live the means being free from mortal sin. Secondly, there a
1905.ped with an indelible mark, consecrating it to God, in an especial manner. They
1906.with bad dispositions do not sanctifying grace, but their souls are stamped with
1907.e not absolutely necessary for producing the effect of the sacraments, yet they
1908.uity; the greater part of them appearing to have been established by the apostle
1909. how many invalids do we behold crowding, during the summer months, to the water
1910.y invalids do we behold crowding, during the summer months, to the waters of Bou
1911.ch, or draw water from these life-giving fountains ? and how is it, too, that so
1912. that so few of those who do come, bring is it —how who then apply to them wit
1913.mv --L" •^•»'.- when he said tizing to his apostles " Go, teach nations, ba
1914.o other merit than that of corresponding with grace, since the practice of virtu
1915.practice of virtue would cost ua nothing. Baptism stamps upon the soul a spiritu
1916.we can receive baptism only once, seeing that what ia once consecrated to inalie
1917.r after to Him by an she II woulc tiling '•.V Fi**'-' . ^•5"if>-'r-.'il' •
1918.r-.-.\vT;'< •".•; ,ii,..t. . being given with water. The second is called
1919.e of this sacrament, when, without being able to obtain baptism, one dies with a
1920.sts in God and for the faith ; suffering martyrdom i . Nil •f '•*'',••'
1921., was rich in the sight of Heaven, being full of the spirit of Jesus Christ, and
1922.however, to whom expense of the building. phe made her offering, refused to rece
1923.e of the building. phe made her offering, refused to receive it, saying that he
1924. offering, refused to receive it, saying that he would much rather give her some
1925.her some assistance than take any tiling from her, for he saw, by her clothes, t
1926.h' I poor, father ? ter of a mighty king, and heiress of a great kingdom ! —
1927. priests who have the right of baptizing, and that children must be taken to the
1928.n baptized, at the same time pronouncing " I baptize you in the name of the Fath
1929.tful, and the child is to be again being, as Christ, in instituting it, -j^iSf '
1930.e again being, as Christ, in instituting it, -j^iSf '.•-; ; l^.. : '* baptized
1931. you can the form then is, while pouring on the water receive baptism, or have n
1932.aptize : •" / you, &;c." Baptism being absolutely necessary for all men, it is
1933. converted to the Catholic faith, having the use of reason, to receive this sacr
1934.a *• '' ' • .''!,; ' • .UV^i being incapable of receiving instruction, she
1935.' • .UV^i being incapable of receiving instruction, she admilo any disposition
1936.nt themselves for baptism without having the purest intentions, with a heart ent
1937.r.iiJ. —A certain missicnary was going about to in a remote region of the •
1938.e region of the • ' New World, seeking win over souk .• •'* • • A.v'.
1939.' r Z'M' -':: . f'^H.--'-"- after being baptized, •-'.•'. ? .t] .>-•' Av
1940..•'. ? .t] .>-•' Av • r and having received the body of Christ, would outr
1941. Christ, would outrage Him by committing mortal sin ? Thanks be to God, I do not
1942.ilty of any such sins !" And he trifling faults. burst into tears while accusing
1943. faults. burst into tears while accusing himself of some The priest was struck w
1944.with admiration, and blessed God, seeing thus that he was served and honoured by
1945.he cross is very often made in receiving it. administering baptism, to show that
1946.ften made in receiving it. administering baptism, to show that this sacrament de
1947.gainst the passions. The person awaiting baptism remains at first at the enthat,
1948.e of the church, to indicate that, being the slave of the he has no right to go
1949.Son, and in the Holy Ghost. Then, having asked the child if it will bo baptized,
1950.child if it will bo baptized, and having received an affirmative answer from the
1951.e life it ought to lead on earth. Having baptized the child, the priest places o
1952.U ^ name on the parish registry, showing that it is now num. bercd amongst the c
1953..S Example. Great festivities were going forward in Rome, and the emperor, Diocl
1954.eremonies of baptism. He appeared, lying on the stage as though he were sick, an
1955.nd the other as an exorcist. Approaching the bed, they said to Genes " My child,
1956. received as in the most perfect keeping with tlie part he I "if ', Ti .:' • i
1957.est heavens, and radiant angels hovering above me. I saw them read in a terrible
1958.d soul a thousand lives to lose, nothing sould separate me from him, no torment
1959.ieved in God, if we would live according to the precepts of the Gospel, and if w
1960. also confirmed them every day by making on ourselves the sign of the cross, by
1961.elves the sign of the cross, by reciting the Lord's prayer, assisting at the hol
1962.by reciting the Lord's prayer, assisting at the holy sacrifice of the mass, and
1963.rifice of the mass, and by participating in the sacraare not, therejpre, our own
1964. of death. On our fidelity hi fulfilling them depends our salvation and our eter
1965.inceesantly to thank the Lord for having snatched us from the thraldom of the Ev
1966.ory of the Church that a Murrita, having answered at the sacred : \* T0WAKU8 GOD
1967.One day, when he was publicly tormenting tlie ChristianR some Christians in the
1968.n covered at his baptism, and presenting it to him, he cried out in a loud voice
1969.in us the grace of Baptism, by imparting and makes us perHoly Ghost, with all ab
1970. man, and renders us capable of fighting and oveiw coming in bearing testimony t
1971. us capable of fighting and oveiw coming in bearing testimony to Jesus Christ, e
1972. of fighting and oveiw coming in bearing testimony to Jesus Christ, even at the
1973.onganimity, which prevents us from being disturbed by the various trials of life
1974.reby our exterior is regulated according to the maxims of the Gospel Continence
1975.les of the Holy Ghost. Bishops, as being the successors of the Apostles, are the
1976.roduces in the soul. The bishop, turning towards those who are to be confirmed,
1977.race. He then recites a prayer, invoking the Holy Ghost, and imploring him to re
1978., invoking the Holy Ghost, and imploring him to replenish with Ho next takes the
1979.plies it to the forehead of each, saying " I mark you with the sign of the cross
1980.tutes the form of Confirmation, teaching us at the same t'me Imw precious are th
1981.e which then fills the soul, penetrating and strengthening it, even as oil penet
1982. the soul, penetrating and strengthening it, even as oil penetrates and strength
1983. the unction with the holy chrism, being the matter of Confirmation, are equally
1984. for salvation, still any one neglecting to receive it, is guilty of a considera
1985.ndour to the impious ceremony. All being ready, the emperor made a sign for comm
1986., the emperor made a sign for commencing. But what was the astonishment of the p
1987.d not penetraie the fliesh of the ficing to the idols in ! « 2ai victitii, DUTY
1988.y some great invisible power obstructing • 'I our ceremonies !" And he entreat
1989.h water, or an. ointed with oil (meaning baptized or confirmed.) 'rhcri* was, in
1990.ut a few days before. The emperor having called out " Let the search be made !"
1991., or rather the God I glory in belonging to him. whom I serve, who has put a sto
1992., he quitted the temple without uttering a word. The courageous soldier of Jesus
1993.once, it is of great Importance to bring to its reception the necessary disposit
1994.irs\ disposition necessary for receiving Confirmation, ii to be pro terly instru
1995. to thoronyiily understand its niejining, as well as what regards tiie Sacrament
1996.innocence and tender age. When receiving a Sacrament, we cannot be too well inst
1997.fault, we are deficient \n understanding. The second disposition is, to have the
1998.ConHrmation is a Sacrament of the living, and consequently spiritual life is sup
1999.osition is an ardent desire of receiving the Holy It was by this Ghost with the
2000. Apostles prepare( selves for the coming of the Holy Ghost; and it is bv rniitat
2001. the Holy Ghost; and it is bv rniitating their fervor that we shall draxv him do
2002. in ; . ' .S'fiii'"'** Jfl5*-*';'M being dispersed by the perseJerusalem after t
2003.ven deacons, went to Samaria, and having converted and baptized a great number o
2004.o ; principal obliga- that of confessing the faith of Jesus Christ even at the p
2005.hose by whom it is attacked, us, fearing neither raillery nor the threats of men
2006.. Example is much more persuaand nothing is more honourable to our holy religion
2007.tuous life. The bishop, in administering Confirmation, makes the Sign of the Cro
2008. oughi never to be ashamed of practising the law of Christ that his doctrine. wh
2009. Christian, which hinders him from doing good, and prompts him to do evil rather
2010.; course tlie he sees that by fulfilling his duties, he will become n, nor even
2011.hat is quite sufficient to How insulting is such conduct make him do as they do
2012.I"" ;• sn, oppose a ashamed of obeying his precepts What cowardice Shall we fe
2013.eas is this! How opposed to the teaching of reason, and to all our natural feeli
2014.o goes with them everywhere, empoisoning every moment of ;>,". 238 their lives ;
2015.is wealth, was on the point of obtaining a vacant post of considerable importanc
2016. importance, but he was accused of being a Christian, and his religion excluded
2017.ect ou offices. what he would do. During that time he was visited by the bishop,
2018.e was visited by the bishop, who, taking him by the hand, led him to the church,
2019.and made him enter the sanctuary. Having reacbeJ'-^ foot of the altar, he pointe
2020.im the book of tuc holy Gospels, telling him to choose between one and the The o
2021.u have chosen. Go in peace !" On leaving the church, the officer presented himse
2022. himself before the governor, and having generously confessed the faith of Chris
2023.tain a remission thereof, either ceiving by means of this Sacrament, or an in pr
2024.te, act of perfect contrition, including the ardent desire of reit. Let no one s
2025.painful and laborious baptism, requiring tears, — : " I do penance — :f!ffif
2026.toil ; while, in the first, God, wishing all .stains to manlfL^i his exceeding g
2027.ng all .stains to manlfL^i his exceeding great mercy, blots out ein of . from th
2028.ein of . from the soul without demanding any exertion on the ; in the second, by
2029.lfilment of certain hard and humiliating conditions. Besides the holy severity o
2030.t is also a sort of restraint, arresting th« part of the sinner — ! Mm ^M "f^
2031. OF THE CHRISTIAN course of sin, curbing the passions of man, and obliging him t
2032.urbing the passions of man, and obliging him to be for tho future more firm and
2033.e had merited, in the nidst of devouring and everlasting fire, and in the societ
2034.n the nidst of devouring and everlasting fire, and in the society of deh.ons and
2035.ouls. He thanked the Lord for not having cast liiiii in there, and implored his
2036.n there, and implored his mercy, begging of Hitn all those graces necessary for
2037.all those graces necessary for obtaining his salvatio/.. He then ascended in spi
2038. to open them, at the same time invoking the Saints to intercede for him. He nex
2039. imagination to Calv;irv there, dwelling attentively and lovingly on his crucifi
2040.rated with all other sinners in mangling the body of a man- God, in crucifying,
2041.ng the body of a man- God, in crucifying, and putting Him to death. 0, Jesus wha
2042.f a man- God, in crucifying, and putting Him to death. 0, Jesus what harm have y
2043.that I love you, and am sorry for having offended you !" What fruit should we no
2044.disposition is Orm resolution of sinning no more. so necessary, that, without it
2045.tion, at least in this life, but nothing can dispense with Contrition. God only
2046. and not by the impulse of nature seeing that to detest sin because it has given
2047.ended him, and is infinitely displeasing to Him. tion must be sovereign, that is
2048.e depth of the heart without manifesting itself exteriorly, otherwise than by th
2049. be universal, that is to say, extending over all There is no true the mortal si
2050.t sin exposes us ; it makes us deserving of hell, that place of tears, of rage,
2051. seriously on these truths without being moved to hatred for sin. Contrition is
2052.erfect Contrition is a sorrow for having offended God, because He is supre»Aiel
2053.ely amiable, and that sin is displeasing to him its motive is, then, the love of
2054.e desire and the intention of confessing, supposing it cannot be exactly at that
2055.d the intention of confessing, supposing it cannot be exactly at that moment. Im
2056.on, or attrition, is a sorrow for having offended God, caused by the shame of ha
2057.ended God, caused by the shame of having sinned, the fear of receiving the punis
2058. of having sinned, the fear of receiving the punishment it deserves, or the forf
2059.e of eternal bliss. Attrition, not being produced by motives sufficiently elevat
2060. people were assembled there, not daring stand before Jesus Christ, she humbly p
2061.hem a vase of rich ointment, thus making use, in order to expiate her sins, of a
2062. formerly been instrumental in offending God. Eventually, by the liveliness of h
2063. from the lips of Christ these consoling words: "Many sins are forgiven her, bec
2064.t disponounce eition which the holy King David expresses in these words ; " Yea,
2065.essarily embraces the purpose of sinning no more; for would it not be mocking Go
2066.ing no more; for would it not be mocking God to ask his forgiveness of a sin whi
2067. H-.-, ;>'• ' *«.',,• - ..«, lying, negligent in his duties, dissipated in
2068.ut which give occasion for olTeiicl. ing (yod, to those who have not enough of s
2069.strength and of K< 'wi-*') understanding to fulfil their duties. We are obliged
2070.eternal destruction. Such is the meaning oi " If thy right eye, or thy rlglu the
2071.s not to shun the occasions of relapsing into it, if his relapses are as frequen
2072. the if' ' ' ';,» .- - Persians, having become a persecutor of the Christians,
2073.or exhorted him to adore the sun, making him the most magnificent promises in ca
2074.ses in case he obeyed, and threiiteiiing him if he obeyed not, that he himself s
2075. I cannot adore the sun, for by so doing The emperor had him put in I should bet
2076.ould betray my religion." prison, hoping that the hardship he was there made to
2077. ; but the saint was very far from being gratified by this mark of respect, and
2078. of contempt how guilty he was in having adored the sun, and thereby renouncing-
2079.g adored the sun, and thereby renouncing- Christianity, for the man had been a C
2080.e of my apostacy !" The emperor, hearing that his ; : M'^ • -'* . ;^*-' M^:-;-
2081.cause I am not dead, but am still living to behold that sun which I have been so
2082.ate as to adore, for fear of displeasing you I am deserving of a double denth, o
2083.r fear of displeasing you I am deserving of a double denth, one for having betra
2084.erving of a double denth, one for having betrayed Jesug Christ, my adorable Savi
2085.orable Saviour, and the other for having deceived you !" Ustazade then swore, th
2086.gnirod and adored as his God. On hearing this, Sapor became furious and swore in
2087.supreme worship which The emperor seeing his con^ is due only to the Creator." W
2088.eath for any crime, but only that, being a Christian, he had refused to betray h
2089. intimidate the other Christians, seeing that he showed, no mercy even to an old
2090.t his ordination, the power of remitting sins ; but he cannot exercise it save b
2091.by Christ to his disciples, of remitting and retaining sins in his name, fjr the
2092.is disciples, of remitting and retaining sins in his name, fjr the state of the
2093.n against tlie divine majesty, as having thereby for i ' - • and as prostratin
2094.thereby for i ' - • and as prostrating himself before of Jesus Christ, to make
2095.tly as he knows them, without permitting himself to lessen their greatness or en
2096.ances of his sins the number, by stating as nearly as possible, how many times h
2097.y muke the sin greater, without changing its nature : for example, to steal from
2098. of hi^ wife, whom he suspected of being unfaithful to him. One day when she had
2099.t were still unknown. The emperor, being exceedingly angry, maintained a gloomy
2100.anner, but still he could obtain nothing. Finally, he threatened him with death,
2101. This necessity ii on that of confessing all the sins that one has com- ,i *.
2102.is but little danger of their forgetting it when they go to confession. The obje
2103.' be not well-instructed) in discovering the they may make use, with advantage,
2104.ce for that <*< 1 purpose, and following a good method in their examination, the
2105.ence. • .» -^ • •' * *. examining themselves for a general confession, or
2106.r a general confession, or one embracing several years, it will be useful for ce
2107.guilty such persons will do well, during the course of their investigation, to r
2108.general confession commence a reguduring which she wrote and, at a moment when s
2109.moment when she had just been meditating on and was still penetrated the salutar
2110.whereon she had written her sins. seeing there the sins of all her past life, he
2111.-doubled, and she took the paper, saying : " Alas what fuel for the eternal fire
2112.rnal fire ? Are there no means of having it On ! quenched ?" for ever the frivol
2113.ounce and to lead a retired and edifying life. ARTICLE To tions, is VI. OF SACRI
2114.null and void, but it is also committing a new sin, which is nothing less than a
2115.o committing a new sin, which is nothing less than a sacriThen, instead of apleg
2116., since it profanes a sacrament. peasing the wrath of God one does but outrage h
2117. blood of the Son of God, which, falling on an unworthy object, is profaned in a
2118. cases, it is the shame •i' confessing certain faults. The devil, that spirit
2119.mity when they would confess it. Nothing is more unfounded than this false shame
2120.e to aid and assist you in your pressing necessity. Say, would you let shame pre
2121.u let shame prevent you from acquainting a doctor with any secret malady or dise
2122.if death were to be feared from kv.eping it concealed ? Does not the love of lif
2123.o revealit to him who can apply a saving remedy ? Moreover, what is there to be
2124. is there to be gained by now concealing sins from one's confessor ? Can they be
2125.re are others whom the fear of not being permitted to make their first communion
2126.schal communion, hinders from confessing all their sins but nothing is more sens
2127.om confessing all their sins but nothing is more senseless than to profane two s
2128.giveness they think no more of repenting for those sins, consequently profane al
2129. 25'^ DUTY OF THE CHRISTlAIt reproaching themselves all their lives for a crime
2130. availed himself of the time for proving himself, is well recompensed for the sl
2131.e; peace reigns in his heart, and during his whole life he will bless the happy
2132.e. Examples. —" Take care of rendering yourself !" guilty of ihe blood of Jesu
2133. him who would trample upon it by making a confession without sincerity or witho
2134. true contrition, and then communicating in the state of sin Oh how well he dese
2135.aths Lasausse. whon fearful of profaning that precious blood. — ! ! — ! !
2136.us blood. — ! ! — ! ! — — During the fortnight of the Paschal term, a pr
2137.ich he never thought of When opexpecting, being money received in restitution. p
2138.never thought of When opexpecting, being money received in restitution. portunit
2139.ered, the minister could not help saying " Well, : TOWARDS ROD. after all, it 35
2140. that confession !" is a very good thing St Augustine has had the courage to wri
2141.rcy which God had shown him in pardoning so many crimes. His humility and herois
2142.s humility and heroism in thus unveiling his iniquities drew down upon him such
2143.Wb VII. l:X- ON THE MANNER OF CONFESSING. kneel during our confession, in order
2144.N THE MANNER OF CONFESSING. kneel during our confession, in order to express by
2145. in order to express by that humiliating posture, that we are confused and penet
2146.sed and penetrated with grief for having offended God, whose minister we We are,
2147.to the priest the name of Father, saying " Bless me, father !" Your confessor is
2148. sacred tribunal is that of establishing Jesus Christ in your heart, of reviving
2149. Jesus Christ in your heart, of reviving in your soul the life of grace, if unha
2150.en it within you if you are still living in the sight of God by justice. Regard
2151.ve sinned \" It is not because of having sinned that we deserve to be blessed, f
2152.we deserve to be blessed, for by sinning we rendered ourselves unworthy of being
2153. we rendered ourselves unworthy of being blessed by God through the medium of hi
2154.ace of conversion, and that of receiving absolution, being well disposed, for th
2155. and that of receiving absolution, being well disposed, for that, having had the
2156.n, being well disposed, for that, having had the misfortune to sin, I repent : ;
2157.f Contrition; ' r»*. V" while repeating we are to enter into the thereby, in co
2158.nto the thereby, in contains. We meaning of the a general way, confess ."'.'1. 2
2159.ul, and to all the saints, acknowledging our elves guilty, most guilty, and conf
2160.lves guilty, most guilty, and confessing that the sins which defile our soul are
2161. had been imposed upon us. In confessing our sins, we are to bear in mind that w
2162.to speak in a tone of humility, denoting that we are sensible of having offended
2163. denoting that we are sensible of having offended God, and are sincerely sorry f
2164.ely sorry for our offences. After having made a sincere confession of our sins t
2165.in the person of his minister, by saying that he begs God's pardon and lying to
2166.ying that he begs God's pardon and lying to God, is it not mocking him? VVe ask
2167.rdon and lying to God, is it not mocking him? VVe ask of the minister of the Lor
2168.hings, penance and absolution. By asking a penance of him, the penitent prays th
2169. he may order him to say or do something to punish himself for tlie sins he has
2170.fessed, and to preserve him from falling again into similar faults. He knows, or
2171.em. we are to He who, ; ; by an avenging God. By asking absolution he acknowledg
2172.e who, ; ; by an avenging God. By asking absolution he acknowledges that the pi^
2173.rom Christ the divine power of remitting siiis; he prays him to grunt liiin that
2174.ence, and can never, without ; betraying his ministry, pronounce a favourable se
2175. certam person who had the name of being and did pious, was, nevertheless, too c
2176. had lat we do in a peak ices. of having she had the weakness to fall into one o
2177.out on the instant, but as she was going, it seemed to her that she heard the de
2178.d to her that she heard the devil asking her, " Where are you going ?" confess t
2179. devil asking her, " Where are you going ?" confess to on of his and lying 1 we
2180. going ?" confess to on of his and lying 1 we have tion. it By tlie which she co
2181.ch she courageously replied " 1 am going to cover myself with confusior, and con
2182.er like one who has succeeded in casting' off a heavy burden. Lasausbf : tfi he
2183.ay elf for ARTICLE VIII. '%''.':' , ling again "«. iw that her in • all OF SA
2184.cur sins is to do or to suffer something in order to apjjease his wrath excited
2185.our penanco and thg desire of performing it, h absolutely necessary for obtainin
2186.it, h absolutely necessary for obtaining through the Sacrament of Penance the re
2187. when one has no intention of satisfying God, he cannot obtain the remission of
2188.d works with the intention of satisfying the justice of God. They who die withou
2189.tice of God. They who die without having i:ndergonp thi temporal punishmer.t, ha
2190.hould have so!ne difficulty in obtaining a reeonciliiition and that they who hav
2191.ost; woo have treated as a profane thing the adorable blood by v/hich they had b
2192.r avarice or covetousness, alms, fasting for intemperance, and mortification of
2193.say, they should be greater or according to the magnitude and number of the sins
2194.iest, the most usual are prayer, fasting, and alms-deeds. By prayer is meant all
2195.cts of reh« gion, such as pious reading, and assiduity at the divine TOWARDS of
2196.0D. ; 257 and ffasting, all that mortifies the senses alnijs«
2197.be borne in a spirit of penance, uniting them to the sufferings and satisfaction
2198.from God the pardon of our sins by being reconciled with our neighbour if we hav
2199.ave in any way injured him, by repairing his honour if we have blackened his rep
2200.ackened his reputation, and by restoring to him what we have takeu from him, and
2201.at we have takeu from him, and repairing any damage we have done him. ; ; 'ff-:
2202.s who followed their example, renouncing all that they possessed on earth, to bu
2203.y themselves in dreary deserts, covering And themselves with hair-cloth, and liv
2204.d themselves with hair-cloth, and living on wild roots. all this was done to sat
2205.mporal chastisement due to sin nccording to the rigor of the ancient canons, but
2206.uch and often, pass the days in mourning, and the nights in watching and in tear
2207. in mourning, and the nights in watching and in tears, to lie on a hard couch, t
2208. the same, and sin is slill as deserving of punishment as it was in the primitiv
2209. of our sins, and also that of remitting those penalties when it is consistent,
2210.ommendation of the martyrs, and yielding to their prayers, she treated with indu
2211.on of whioh r that punishuient according to the intention of the giver the dispo
2212. each supreme Pontiff. 'J'he Pope, being the head of all the Church, can grant i
2213.t indulgences to all and his power being unlimited, he may gii'6 them plenary or
2214.gii'6 them plenary or partial, according as he thinks proper and useful for the
2215.rtial indulgences are gained by reciting certain prayers, and by performing work
2216.iting certain prayers, and by performing works of piety to which ; •'7. ! pi,
2217.ces free us from the obligation of doing penance, and that it suflices to have t
2218.uflices to have the intention of gaining them, in order to be dispensed from wor
2219.s them only to remit whatever is wanting in -the penance that should have been d
2220.r ; We sinners tlian entirely dispensing with it. It is, doubtless, for the same
2221.ouncil of Trent declares that, according to the ancient and approved custom of t
2222.r, by alms-deeds, and usually by fasting and other good works. P: • . • . 'i
2223.condemned hersome mortifications, giving alms in proportion to yy.V':, « : . 26
2224.HE CHRISTIAIf means, and often repeating these beautiful worda " Lord h.'ive mer
2225.she replied little in this life, fearing lest I should have much to suffer " in
2226.th chapter of the Gospel of After having said to the Jews " I am the living St.
2227.aving said to the Jews " I am the living St. John, ; : bread which came down fro
2228. And as the Jews murmured at this saying, he repeated it again, and still more f
2229.t again, and still more forcibly, saying " Verily, verily, I say unto you, if yo
2230.schal lamb with his disciples. returning thanks to hJM Father, he broke, and gav
2231. eat ; this is my body disciples, saying : «« ,» -, . which shall be delivere
2232.u ; do this in remembrantj* Then, taking the chalice, he said " Drink ye tat of
2233.nd wine the substance of the bread being changed into that ot tb«» body of Chr
2234. it really has become. As it is a living and animated body, it follows that Jesu
2235.refore, receive as much by communicating under one in both. single form, as if w
2236. changed water into w»re at the wedding of ; " ^ . .. • ^^iis 203 Chanaan ; D
2237.CK"l)i 'TIA'V and the him who of nothing has made the heaveni it is just as easy
2238.ther, as to draw all things from nothing by his word alone. It is true we cannot
2239.operated, but dot's we know that nothing in is is impossible to God, and we beli
2240.erate God that surpass our understanding. miracle, for our favour things able to
2241.ct, and not attempt to reason on a thing which is beyond our comprehension, nor
2242.ucharist let us believe, notwithstanding the counter-evidence of our sensep, tha
2243.od !" fJiat flows in your veins dressing himself to ! ! ! Example. — St .>.V j
2244. . II. ON THB DISPOSITIONS FOR RECEIVING THE EUCHARISU with There God is nf sacr
2245.tliere is oi It is not for man, bringing holy dispositions to receive it. Of the
2246.abut lor (lod that we prepare a dwelling. Bary dispositions, some regard the 8ou
2247.nce. VVu must prove ourselves, according to the [)recoj)t of the Apostle, before
2248.nourished by it, the soul must be living: it is the (iod of purity who gives iii
2249.the Primitive Church, the deacon turning to the people before the consecration o
2250. which none are to appear at the wedding feast. That innpcence, tliat purity, is
2251. Father. firm hope consists in expecting with confidence from Jesus Christ all t
2252.s Christ all that we ask of him relating to our salvation what can He refuse to
2253. ourselves before our God, acknowledging with the lions are infinite centurion,
2254.ained it so, from the primiit be fasting tive times, through respect for this di
2255.h this law in favour of those who, being dangerously ill, receive it as the viat
2256. viaticum. The second is, to be kneeling, and to have the exterior as modest and
2257.he Supreme Majesty. ; : ; ExAMPLK. Being irritated by the hard-heartedness of Ph
2258.ecrees had arrived, he sent a destroying Angel, who killed in one night all the
2259.sacrifice a lamb on the previous evening to eat it in every family, and to mark
2260.Eucharist The various relations existing between the 1^". . Vi ' t " •• .
2261.or mistake. reality are far too striking to leave room The Israelites, who were
2262. mysterious lamb and the ex; terminating Angel spared reality side all whose doo
2263. the Israelites only ate it after having been delivered from the captivity of Ph
2264.s Christ himself tells us, is the living bread which came down from heaven ; it
2265. be united to him by faith, in believing all the HKm. truths that he has reveale
2266.o be united to him by charity, in loving him perfectly faith brings our mind in
2267.uch more intimate and more perfect being that which is effected by the participa
2268.ife of grace. Our divine Saviaur, having become the food of our souls, remains n
2269.h constant fidelity hence that unvarying sanctity which we so much admire in tho
2270.aintains that young man in such edifying piety, and in a regularity of life whic
2271.cimself who teaches to us this consoling truth ; : 11: Vj-I- ';,u,.s i^>^ i . :,
2272.all abide in us and shall be everlasting, if we do not voluntarily deprive ourse
2273.f immortality, which shall one day bring them forth from the dust of the tomb, a
2274.and clothe them with every glorious ning and the foretaste of tlie holy Eucharis
2275.Example. One day when Jesus was teaching in the synagogue of Caphernaum, this qu
2276.at upon the Jews rephed ; : — : seeing thee in we should believe it is ? : Our
2277. Our I^ord resumed his discourse, saying: " Verily, verily, \ saj into you, Mose
2278. drink their own condemnation, according to the dreadful sentence of the apostle
2279.eth his own condemnation, not discerning the body of the Lord." From these words
2280.divine Saviour with iniquity, by causing his adorable blood to flow through vein
2281.ost cruel enemies like him, after having been loaded with his favours, he violat
2282.is heart, as it were, petrified, nothing could stop him he quickly arqse from th
2283. conclude is that the crime of receiving unworthily is hard to expiate ; that it
2284.s but one ifn* unworthy communion, being that of Judas, who received his God int
2285.y occupied with the project of betraying him. Example. —The Satao ! 270 DUTJf
2286.friend by which he addresses him, having power to touch his hardened heart What
2287.OMMUNION. Apostle St. Paul, after having depicted in the strong- an unworthy com
2288. of that cup." The leaf of communicating- unworthily ought not, therefore, to de
2289.e Eucharist is necessary for maintaining and preserving t^^'le ^vlih is, doubtle
2290.necessary for maintaining and preserving t^^'le ^vlih is, doubtless, a ; the spi
2291.if it be not kept The means of effecting this is the divine Eucharist, esup. If
2292.t, indeed, every day, and feared nothing so much as the being deprived of it. We
2293. and feared nothing so much as the being deprived of it. We should endeavour to
2294.equently, fearful of thereby multiplying transgressions or sacrileges but »He w
2295.u come with confidence, and fear nothing coiiw fre'|uentJly,--as often, in pre»
2296. and ; I will give you the mogl touching pledge of my affection come to me, who
2297.s Christ to enter our soul, after having adored him in the most holy sacrament o
2298.Example. —The young Albini. not having attained the prescribed age for making
2299.g attained the prescribed age for making his first communion, contented himself
2300.ommunion, contented himself with sighing incessantly after the happy day when i3
2301.ucharistic veils, and he omitted nothing in preparing himself for so holy an act
2302.ils, and he omitted nothing in preparing himself for so holy an action. He had s
2303.but even to take in their entire meaning. The innocence of hia life, his extreme
2304.prepare for Jesui With Christ a dwelling not altogether unworthy of him. tliat i
2305.before the time of his communion, during which he made a general confession of h
2306.ld not console himself because of having otTended a God who vouchsafed even to b
2307.t, and he had the happiness of receiving his God but it would be impossible to e
2308. piety which uaimated him when receiving the communion. He ^vept and sighed, and
2309.ted yourself so closely with me, nothing shall henceforward separate me from you
2310. salu- Nor was this one of those passing t^^ ';:',![ vanish with the nourishment
2311.ew in virtue and Very far from satiating his desires, this celestial food served
2312.to receive every fortnight, well knowing that the divine Eucharist is as necessa
2313.f for us to not contented v»'i(h oaring 274 leave to his DUTY or THE CHR18TIA?f
2314.^^^ K^ S^T ' a sacrifice of thanksgiving, whereby we thank him for his blessings
2315.God to his infinite Majesty, and nothing can move him more ;!^' \''m^^^^ JS.^^it
2316.upon us with an eye of mercy, by placing before him the cruel death to which his
2317.* tion and love, in sight of so touching a spectacle ? Since ! -V •, -f". ! th
2318.n eternal life. This custom of oflfering up the holy sacriMoc for the dead is of
2319.er of a family, who had conday assisting at mass, heard it in this way on Sunday
2320.ged this delightful duty with in serving mass. touching piety and with such ange
2321.tful duty with in serving mass. touching piety and with such angelic fervour tha
2322.no one could look upon him without being moved to devotion. It may be truly said
2323.crament is called Extreme Unction, being the last unction that a Christian recei
2324.e be sick amongst you, let the following terms him call in the priests of the ch
2325.h, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord an
2326.which the priest pronounces while making the application " May the T^ord, by thi
2327.rt the desire and the hope of possessing God, and thus fortifies against the fea
2328.een forgiven, which produces a lingering attachment to the things of the earth,
2329.veflts : ; ; ; ; m ' 'r.-J * from having a taste for spiritual things this sacra
2330.ment removes that weakness, by detaching us from the world and making us desire
2331.y detaching us from the world and making us desire heaven. It also remits venial
2332.eme Unction is a sacrament of the living, and ought to be received in the state
2333. happens that they Besides, in deferring risk of it till it, who 24 dying withou
2334.ferring risk of it till it, who 24 dying without thus postpone it, are for final
2335.h this prevented by death from receiving it at all. sacrament be not of absolute
2336.or it is the ordinary means of obtaining a happy death those who neglect it less
2337.ons she had received at Catechism. Being alone with her father, she said to him
2338.y perhaps die to-morrow. Mamma is crying in her own room, and they are all tryin
2339.in her own room, and they are all trying to comfort her. 1 have heard the priest
2340.d next day. After : — ! — — having received the Sacraments, he several tim
2341.Martin, archbishop Tours, St Louis, king of France, and Louis the Tall, .another
2342.rance, and Louis the Tall, .another king of France, chose to receive Extreme Unc
2343.ction and yield their last breath, lying on haircloth, rifld with ashes laid upo
2344.pire the assistants with similar feeling& I in m >^tJWr«ffi^H ^f- '''^i CHAPTER
2345.rein they require such assistance lowing are peculiar to two states which, by th
2346.imposition of hands and the accompanying still •/.' • the faithful, A8AUSSE.
2347.t of and receive the power of announcing the Gospel, of administering the Sacram
2348. announcing the Gospel, of administering the Sacraments, and of offering up the
2349.istering the Sacraments, and of offering up the holy Sacrifice the power, in a w
2350.fice the power, in a word, of exercising the sacred ministry. Jesus Christ insti
2351.end you go, teach all nations, baptiring them in the name of the Father, and of
2352. retained:" and again, when after having established the Sacrifice of his body a
2353.ich ft is lawful to enter without having consulted God to know whether it be one
2354.beat The second disposition for entering upon the eccle fruit." siastical state,
2355.e M'ith merely human motives, consulting only in tercst or amiiition, and propos
2356.ly in tercst or amiiition, and proposing only to enrich thems^'Ivei* and be enal
2357.before recovered it, and led an edifying and blameless life. Finally, the fourth
2358. of his office, ; the friend, the living providence of all the wretched the cons
2359.lich actions, k,,' 281 it , ihe ievening comes, but brings not repose, — •us
2360.to theatres, balls, some one is hurrying for the priest a Christian ; as ro;iche
2361.the term of his existence, he ; is dying, and per- haps of a contagious malady i
2362.l to depart this world without imparting relief to its anguish, without investin
2363.relief to its anguish, without investing it with the consolations of Hope and Fa
2364.ations of Hope and Faith without praying beside the death-bed to the God who die
2365.CRAMENT OF MATRIMONY. from the beginning of the as a companion the woman whom he
2366.e of his ribs, and by a special blessing granted unto them fruitfulness. To rend
2367.to the dignity of a sacrament, attaching to it a peculiar grace to secure that i
2368.those who contract marriage after having consulted God, and with Christian inten
2369.duties of thtir state. Before de. ciding on embracing this state, we sliould add
2370.ir state. Before de. ciding on embracing this state, we sliould address our ferv
2371.hree principal dispo^tions for receiving the sacrament of marriage the first is
2372. all mortal sin, because matrmony, being a sacrament of the living, the spiritua
2373.atrmony, being a sacrament of the living, the spiritual life of grace is suppose
2374.o draw down upon themselves the blessing of Heaven. The second disposition is to
2375.o receive it with the intention of doing the will of God, and serving him in tha
2376.on of doing the will of God, and serving him in that state. We should propose to
2377. the most common but much more in making an engagement which " We are the childr
2378.f the sacrament, by carefully avoid- ing all that might infringe on the rules of
2379. most exact receive the nuptial blessing with an immodest demeanour, would be to
2380.children r Christian education, teaching thorn early to pray, to God and piously
2381.other duties of religion oftei repeating to them the maxims of the (xospel, givi
2382.o them the maxims of the (xospel, giving then good example in all things, and wa
2383.good example in all things, and watching over their con duct 80 as to remove the
2384. marriage 1829, under the m,ost edifying cumstances. He was introduced by a frie
2385.d to whose modesty equalled his learning and skill. ceremony was soon after to t
2386.r I have only had the pleasure of seeing her three or four times in company, so
2387. ^M ; " Youi sentiments, or ascertaining hers." entreaties are painful to me," s
2388.e," said the lady, " but reallv pressing my own — you cannot " And yet I have
2389. you cannot " And yet I have something see my daughter." of importance to say
2390.make I it distrust; but, far from having such sentipride and glory to follow in
2391. them. If I have insisted much on having a private interview with your daughter,
2392.ion of the holy Eucharist, for receiving with the nuptial blessing nil the grace
2393. for receiving with the nuptial blessing nil the graces attached thereto. On hea
2394. the graces attached thereto. On hearing this, the mother could not restrain her
2395.crifice offered up to ^obtain a blessing on his union. But the most touching sig
2396.sing on his union. But the most touching sight of all was to see, on the day of
2397.e marriage, the young couple approaching the holy table together, with the worth
2398. mother of the young man, (both shedding tears of joy,) and the mother and grand
2399. Prayer is the second means of obtaining grace it is an elevation of the heart a
2400. of the heart and mind to God, oflToring to him our homage, and begging of him a
2401.oflToring to him our homage, and begging of him all that is necessary for us. Pr
2402.ciples •' As yet ye have asked nothing in my name ask, and ye shall receive."
2403. Christ had certainly no need of praying for himself; but he would give us the e
2404.ve law to pray, and pray without ceasing, the sense of our own misery would alon
2405.at very desire more capable of receiving them. The desire of the everlasting tre
2406.ving them. The desire of the everlasting treasures is inflamed by the holy exerc
2407.nd sends those away empty who, believing themselves ricji, imagine that they req
2408.ricji, imagine that they require nothing from him. Were God to grant us his favo
2409. grant us his favours without our asking, we should be tempted to attribute them
2410.them to ourselves but when, after having folt our misery and our impotence, we a
2411.ed to acknowledge that we can do nothing without him, and that whatever we recei
2412.indigence, we are disposed for receiving his most abundant blessings. Let us app
2413.ss the rest of our time without thinking of God we must frequently have recourse
2414.ed, importuned he never tires of hearing us; the treasures of his grace are infi
2415.s of his grace are infinite, and nothing is more ; ; ; of the indigence seek are
2416.er cor.fidenco Would it not be despising his goodness if wo profited not hy the
2417.vour wliich he ever grants us of hearing us at all times, and of interesting him
2418.ring us at all times, and of interesting himself £xAMi>LEs. — " Prayer in all
2419. this. I had the misfortune *. of giving up mental prayer, and i became every da
2420.iously observed the practice of reciting every day the ottice of tli«5 Church,
2421.ice of tli«5 Church, and also of rising during the night to assist at Wiatins.
2422.tli«5 Church, and also of rising during the night to assist at Wiatins. A made
2423.ght to assist at Wiatins. A made sitting respectable author, who wrote under its
2424. of Christianity, has *• the following reflection Amongst down to table, the m
2425.nd after meals, to pray to God, thanking him for tne repast which they were abou
2426. and poured tions that in France, during the Inst fttty years, this so n'^tural
2427.epeated at almost obtains every blessing. every page of the Scri])ture, and the
2428.u." He is not even content with assuring — us that prayer, if well made, is al
2429.s very fit to revive the most desponding heart " Does a father give a stone to h
2430.t, who is truth itself It would be doing him an in: ; ! jury to let distrust ent
2431.y one," says the prophet, " wlio, having inhis infinite merits rt; No voked the
2432. her country is delivered the pious king Ezcchias prays, and God revokes the sen
2433. fidelity in his it promises: it nothing. Moses prays on ; had pronounced agains
2434.m God, provided i* be asked in a fitting manner, and if we obtain it not, the fa
2435.hat confidence which wins every blessing. ; ; ; : ; ; 'K ».i ; ; : Example. pra
2436.powerful than God himsucceeds in bending his will, and in making • ^ . • Mk
2437.ceeds in bending his will, and in making • ^ . • Mk ^^ u m$fx •• 1 B{S'.
2438.ounced against us. The Israelites having transOf this we have an example gressed
2439.t execute his intentions iu from cutting off that rebellious people." regard to
2440. that we do not pray at all, when during prayer we think of anything but Him. It
2441. when during prayer we think of anything but Him. It is true that distractions,
2442.far from Our ; Lord, this when promising fit** to hear our prayers, always annex
2443.for a cure to it dwe unto thee according thy faith." is Our confidence of 2Uii'^
2444. and goodness, sometimes defers granting us what we ask of him that delay is not
2445.ntinues to knock at the door, redoubling his entreaties; his perseverance is rew
2446.est exhortation, to pray without ceasing, together with a formal promise to gran
2447. one which God had appointed for hearing us. Remember this well it is prayer tha
2448.to offer his heart to God, every morning with much fervour, and this was like th
2449. " he exclaimed from time to time during his lasl have made an almost daily sacr
2450.e him in our hearts to God every morning, that we may die, as he did, an edifyin
2451. that we may die, as he did, an edifying death. Arviskkkt. jfferiiig can make."
2452.adily heard by the Father, by addressing him in the very words which his Son hat
2453.ter and our that prayer must be pleasing to God which comes from himself, and st
2454.hrMi it should recite it 'luily, morning and and recall often lo their minds thr
2455.n our prayers, but we are to ask nothing of God save what is contained in this m
2456.rds all that is most capable of engaging God to hear us, and of inspiring within
2457.ngaging God to hear us, and of inspiring within ourselves sentiments of respect,
2458.her by the grace of regeneration, seeing tiiat in Baptism he adopted us as his c
2459.l ! ! which he takes pleasure in hearing us address him ? What does He not grant
2460.ther," and not My Bays, wlien addressing God Father, because having all the same
2461.en addressing God Father, because having all the same father, and expecting ; :
2462.aving all the same father, and expecting ; : .C4 294 DUTY OF THB CHRISTIAN m fro
2463.ts the hope and the desire of possessing God. after having " It is now," said St
2464.e desire of possessing God. after having " It is now," said St. Francis of Assis
2465.oung shepherd had got a habit of praying Being asked if he did not somewhile he
2466.hepherd had got a habit of praying Being asked if he did not somewhile he tended
2467.his flock. times feel weary of remaining so long alone in the fields, he answere
2468.tly, because he founa it a never-failing source of consoling thoughts and good s
2469.a it a never-failing source of consoling thoughts and good sentiments, so that a
2470. week to meditate upon it from beginning to end. M. de La Palme. St. Hugh, bisho
2471.me. St. Hugh, bishop of Grenoble, having fallen sick, did nothing else for a who
2472.renoble, having fallen sick, did nothing else for a whole night, but recite the
2473. do him harm. He replied " No such thing the repetition of a : : prayer so sweet
2474. but on the con« trary, I feel it doing me good." Lasaussk. ::.v\' TOWARDS GOD.
2475.object^ If we are liis children, nothing should be dearer to us than the honour
2476.f our Father. commence, then, by begging that his name may be hallowed, that is
2477.esides, infidel nations who know nothing of God we pray him to draw them forth f
2478.but outrage him by their sins, profaning and blaspheming his awful name we pray
2479.by their sins, profaning and blaspheming his awful name we pray that they may be
2480.ven, begin to glorify him by an edifying life. for the just, who already honoui-
2481. hallow the name of God, by consecrating our entire life to glorify him and caus
2482.fied by others. our thoughts in humbling ourselves protbundly before the divine
2483.re the divine Majesty, in never thinking of God nor of the things of God but wit
2484.ons with a holy awe and fear. in leading an exemplary life, whereby we incite ot
2485.Hallowed he thy name have a sinrepeating these words cere desire of promoting th
2486.ing these words cere desire of promoting the glory of God as much as we possibly
2487.d as much as we possibly can of inducing others to honour him, and of inspiring
2488.g others to honour him, and of inspiring them by our discourse and example with
2489.o ask. How would it be if, while begging of God mat his name may be hallowed, we
2490.s to offend him We We — ; Example. ing the — A well-reared child cannot refr
2491. father ; all his pleasure is in hearing him praised ; as to see him despised or
2492.y reign with him in his glory. In making this petition, we ought sinceiely to de
2493.ible body, which prevents us from seeing God, and from What greatei joining the
2494.eeing God, and from What greatei joining the society of the blessed spirits? goo
2495.nd at every moment run the risk of being lost A good Christian has ever before h
2496. of heaven through ihe liveUnost sitting by the rwem of Babj of his faith and of
2497.itions of our superiors. Thus, in saying to God Thy will he done on earth as it
2498. obey him? Are we faithful in oi)serving hSii commandments ? Are we submissive t
2499. we submissive to those who representing him, have authority over us ? Yet this
2500.adopts as his children, thereby treating them as such for, " what child is not c
2501.rayei his Providence. well by renouncing our own will, or endeavouring to renoun
2502.renouncing our own will, or endeavouring to renounce it; nothing is, in fact, mo
2503. or endeavouring to renounce it; nothing is, in fact, more advantageous for us M
2504.will of God. fallen solely by preferring his own will to that of God, and be can
2505., and be can only be saved by preferring the divine will to his own. " Take away
2506.f he passed his youth a most humiliating obscurity, and his latter years in the
2507.e all before him as poor beggars, having nothing hut what we receive from his bo
2508.fore him as poor beggars, having nothing hut what we receive from his bountiful
2509.l creatures," says the prophet, speaking of God, " all creatures expect We Wm fr
2510. riches, not the our means of satisfying our sensuality or but merely our bread,
2511.cessary for our sub w-.tci-je, according to our state again, wo are only to ask
2512. morrow, which we are not sure of seeing He wills that we should repose on his P
2513.y we should have re course to him, being well assured that we shall every day fi
2514.'eif " as to where you shall find eating and drink pride, • ; ; • : : ' TOWA
2515.pride, • ; ; • : : ' TOWARDS GOD ing for the support of your life, 801 body;
2516.the Isi -lites in the desert, and during forty years it never once lailed them s
2517.the lov of tiie truths of salvation. ing the We ought, therefore, never to negle
2518.f man, and drink not hia I am the living bread blood, you shall have no life in
2519.to ^ommuni, cate with " Lord " said king Solomon, " give m« poverty nor riches
2520.ive me abundant wealth, lest, that being spair puffed up with pride, I might fan
2521.tant and inviolable fidelity and nothing can be more ; and the conduct of men sh
2522.e it is that our divine Saviour, knowing tie St. John. the weakness of our natur
2523.s we must at least commence by repenting of our sins, for it is a principle in r
2524.rdons those who are : 4 sorry for having offended him, and are firmly resolved t
2525.do But we must not dispense with praying, under 80 no more. m^: .!*>. pretence o
2526.o more. m^: .!*>. pretence of not having these dispositions we must, on th« In
2527. dispositions we must, on th« In saying to him " Forgive its contrary, ask it o
2528.sition we are sure of our sins. of being favourably heard, and of attaining to a
2529.being favourably heard, and of attaining to a perfect : : \< reconciliation with
2530.nged on them." This would be pronouncing the sentence of our own condemnation, b
2531.tence of our own condemnation, by asking for ourselves the treatment which we gi
2532.mple. — St. John, the almoner, hearing that a certain nobleman refused to pard
2533. saint made a sign to the person terving mass, to stop at the words : " Forgive
2534.ated them alone ; then the saint turning towards him, said with firm" What have
2535.is grace should preserve us from sinning again. We are every moment exposed to s
2536.that we implore the mercy of God, saying to him " Lead us not into temptasins w^
2537. : tion ; we supplicate him that, having respect to our weak- may ward off tempt
2538.axims the devil assails us by impressing our senses and our imagination with ima
2539.ll he prowls incessantly around, seeking to devour us. t'inally, concu piscence,
2540.which is born with us, is ever prompting us to sin it follows us everywhere it i
2541.temptation. If, by the fear of offending God, we repress the first movements whi
2542.ntly refuse to consent to the evil thing, there is no sin ; that resistance is e
2543.us, and give us strength to have nothing to fear with the help come otr victorio
2544.on of God he is powerful enough to bring us safe through every temptation, and e
2545.name. They will be attacked, but nothing shall have power to hurt them whilst Go
2546.whilst God is their refuge he will bring them victorious from the struggle tempt
2547.id St. Catherine of Sienna, after having lent assault of the tempter, ; but ob^
2548.undergoneLord you, O hear a voice making answer— " was I it the depth of thy h
2549.s I it the depth of thy heart sustaining thee; was I who w^. ' ch is a gave thee
2550.e so great a horror for the wicked thing that tho devil suggested to thee.'* !*
2551.tion, and from eternal prayer by begging of from evil, damnation. life ! To how
2552.icial to our salvation. There is nothing to be regarded as a real misfortune but
2553. because they disturb the soul, exposing it to impatience, murmuring and despair
2554.ul, exposing it to impatience, murmuring and despair because we hive not suffici
2555. which we bear patiently, far from being prejudicial to us, only serve to purify
2556. ment of sin, and the means of obtaining eternal happiness. ** He must pass," sa
2557.and useful for our salvatioiu By praying thus, and persevering in prayer, we sha
2558.vatioiu By praying thus, and persevering in prayer, we shall find the true remed
2559.will hear our prayers, either delivering us, or giving us strength to endure the
2560.prayers, either delivering us, or giving us strength to endure them, which is st
2561.rit of darkness, not content with having seduced our first parents, and drawing
2562.g seduced our first parents, and drawing down on their posterity a deluge of mis
2563.He may deliver us from pass. everlasting damnation, which is the height of all m
2564.n ill, the irreparable, the never-ending calamity. It is, in that abyss of wretc
2565.le eternity that there is no more asking to be delivered there the unhappy soul
2566.of Cesarea, than commit a sin by obeying the commands of the emperor Valens, who
2567.ou think to intimidate me by threatening me with death, know that I will receive
2568.are overcome ; Basil fears but one thing, and that is sin." Ecclesiastical Histo
2569. chosen before all ages to be the living tennple of eternal wisdom, and the glor
2570. and the holiest of all creatures; being exempt by a special Full of tenderness
2571.me her children when Jesus Christ, dying on the cross, gave her as amotherto St.
2572.er; what name more tender, more touching, more proper to inspire us for her with
2573. has any one invoked her without feeling the efl^*»cts of her protection." She
2574.Son, who is allpowerful, refuses nothing to the best, the tenderest of mothers h
2575.or us that powerful aid which will bring us forth from the slavery of the devil
2576.ably joins to the Lord'i example. living By thus we shall her true children, and
2577.r to excite our confidence by lerninding gin us of her great influence with God,
2578.d to the Blessed Virgin, when announcing to her the Mystery of the Incarnation.
2579.nd at the hour of our Amen." In reciting this prayer, we ought to have death. th
2580.to have death. the intention of thanking (rod for the Mystery of the Incarnation
2581.Mystery of the Incarnation, of honouring the Blessed Virgin, who has had BO grea
2582.great a share therein, and of testifying to her our confidence in her powerful i
2583.d : earth agrees with heaven in blessing you. The fruit of your womb is the sour
2584.your womb is the source of that blessing which was shed Holy over the earth, and
2585.may expire while propresent iry nouncing the sacred names of Jesus and of UP you
2586.ractice to repeat every ; without having said these prayers, he immediately reme
2587.stantly arose from his bed, and kneeling down fulfilled that self-imposed duty.
2588.ur was on the battle-field, and standing in the first line, in front of the enem
2589.st line, in front of the enemy, awaiting the signal for the attack. Suddenly he
2590. said hir accustomed prayers, and making the sign of the ci'oss, he ig'dn. His c
2591.dn. His comrades, on either side, seeing him make the sign of the cross, and per
2592.ke the sign of the cross, and perceiving that he was praying, began to deride hi
2593.ross, and perceiving that he was praying, began to deride him, and raised the la
2594.raised the laugh at his expense, calling him coward, poltroon, &c. The word went
2595., without a single wound, without having received a single stroke, stood alone o
2596.d to thank the Blessed Virgin for having preserved in him that devotioii for her
2597.he year 1571. the son of Soliman, having made himself master of the ChrisChris-
2598.J'he holy Pope Pius V., Philip II., king of Spain, world. and the Venetians, had
2599.my. Although the numbers of the opposing armies were very unequal, yet tite Chri
2600.ry unequal, yet tite Christians, relying on the protection of the Blessed Virgin
2601.sted from six until l.ite in the evening), forty o'<.^/iock defeated, and lost i
2602.ck defeated, and lost in in the inorning thousand men, one hundred and sixteen p
2603.dy were their countless legions marching on Vienna, which city they intended to
2604.eror himself, Leopold the First, feeling himself the Imperial mm} unable to arre
2605.ut what may not be obtained by confiding in the Mother of God! On the feast of t
2606.obicski, tains, banners were seen waving churches took ' « • , .,.• ; -i;*.
2607. was small, it is true, but the blessing of Heaven, drawn down by the piety of t
2608.enna, and of Christendom. On the morning of tlie 12th, Sobieski assisted at mass
2609. Sovereign Pontiff", a solemn and, being filled with a holy ardour, and with reb
2610. with a holy ardour, and with reblessing newed confidence, he exclaimed, " Let u
2611.numerouM squadrons, and their thundering artillery. The Poles were at first stru
2612. who is forced to follow, though foaming with" rage; the route soon becomes gene
2613. upon it were seen two angcU, supporting a crown over Mo^^er of on was inscribed
2614.of the shall conquer." : God and holding a scroll where" By this image of Mary,
2615. gloomy, painful, and cheerless. Nothing is more false, nothing more unjust, tha
2616.heerless. Nothing is more false, nothing more unjust, than this so widelydiffuse
2617. and soul, and by that delicious leeling which arises from a good conscience and
2618. that He speaks of fidelity in observing the law of G od, He speaks also of peac
2619.f on this liead " be faithful in keeping my precepts he, they shall ho to tliee
2620. law of the Lord shall make his dwelling in peace." (l*rov. 13.) Observe that he
2621.oy peace, but he shall make his dwelling in peace ho shall abide in it he shall
2622.f.'-ll ; ; .t tliat solid, and lasting, and ! heartfelt pleasure, v/hich is ta
2623.e a stately tree, planted by the running water, bearing excellent fruit, and unf
2624.e, planted by the running water, bearing excellent fruit, and unfading foliage.
2625.r, bearing excellent fruit, and unfading foliage. These are the very words of th
2626.pleasure have What I found in renouncing the vain pleasures of the world joy hav
2627.s of the world joy have I felt in giving up what I had most feared to lose For t
2628.he oidy true pleasure capable of filling a Boul, in withdrawing me from those fa
2629.apable of filling a Boul, in withdrawing me from those false pleasures, thou oh
2630. f^'t I, I 816 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ing anguish arising from ambition, avarice,
2631.UTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ing anguish arising from ambition, avarice, and the desire
2632.ion, avarice, and the desire of plunging into the filtliy pleasures of voluptuou
2633. began to taste the sweets of conversing with thee, oh, my God ! who see, art my
2634.ruth, that happiness i» only to serving the Lord ; then you were penetrated ; ;
2635.nce. Can any one be unhappy when serving you. Oh my God, you who are the source
2636.ant remorse, apprehension, and consuming grief, such is their continual that for
2637.At a time when a purple fever was making ravages, in the capital, amongst the po
2638.nity of the priests of St. Marcel, being unable themselves to attend to all the
2639.le themselves to attend to all the dying, had called in the assistance of the ve
2640.ce of the venerable capuchin was passing along begging friars. Example. — terr
2641.rable capuchin was passing along begging friars. Example. — terrific A and ent
2642.red a low shed where there was one lying ill of He was an old man, apparently dy
2643.l of He was an old man, apparently dying, the fearful malady. and extended on so
2644. not even a seat he had sold every thing in the On the first days of his illness
2645.could use them, but then they were lying power" Have courage, less, for he was u
2646.ves you you are on the point of quitting this where you have had nought but pain
2647.rouble " Trouble," interrupted the dying man in a faint voice, ; God now »vorld
2648. with satisfaction, without ever envying the rich, or coveting their dainty fare
2649.thout ever envying the rich, or coveting their dainty fare. I was poor, but with
2650.guage, could not refrain from expressing his astonishment; and after returning t
2651.ng his astonishment; and after returning thanks to God for the favour of condue4
2652.vour of condue4« TOWARDS GOD. 319 . Ing him to that wretched hovel he said to t
2653.obeyed." " Certainly," replied the dying man, with a firm voice, and an animated
2654.ive, and I know how thank God for having given me life and for bringing me throu
2655.or having given me life and for bringing me through death to reign with Him. I f
2656.h Him. I feel my last moment approaching, so you will please to give me the rite
2657. he had lived, a child of grace, leaving his confessor and neighbours who witnes
2658.he Holy Ghost, these three persons being but one God, and not three, because the
2659.that one cannot be saved without praying to God. 9. I believe that there are sev
2660.l never fail to say devoutly his morning and 1^ evening prayers, and to assist a
2661. say devoutly his morning and 1^ evening prayers, and to assist at the Holy Mass
2662.e Saints, and take care to avoid reading any bad He will every day give to his p
2663.re U3U> me mor. rnal tor* ourse to ^ying to iaptism, 111, Holy had the misfortun
2664.mmunion, at least once a month according to the advice of his Confessor and on t
2665.l say a Pater and an Ave for the liv ing and the dead belonging to the Church.^
2666.e for the liv ing and the dead belonging to the Church.^ » 7. Lastly, he will n
2667.at thy sa ith fidelle should necessiling and ery day, of Mary, he Salve us book,
2668.ld deprive me of the happiness of seeing thee, loving thee, and contemplating th
2669. of the happiness of seeing thee, loving thee, and contemplating thee in the reg
2670.ing thee, loving thee, and contemplating thee in the regions of bhss, "Vhere T b
2671.thence he shall come to judge the living and the dead Art. I.— On death,— Ar
2672.HAP. XIII. I lelieve in Life everlasting. 120-123 Article I. Of Purgator ', Art.
2673. 73 'ontius . ! again 75 76 79 86 living ent, 88-92 ^ d, B right the eighth Comm
2674.Grace, and the means of ^ ftif obtaining it, ^ ? 9^A C0NTENT8. the Sacraments in
2675.IT. —On the Dispositions for receiving the Eucharist, Article HI.- —On the E
2676.ous Confession, the Manner of Confessing, . . .... ... .... ... — , 234 23G 23
2677.otbnir«rtlie€h|||B| Seboola. Stepping Stone to Geography Stepping Stone to En
2678.la. Stepping Stone to Geography Stepping Stone to English Grai The Spelling Book
2679.pping Stone to English Grai The Spelling Book Sn|K»r8eded Jirit Book of Histofy

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/