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2. so intimately associated with the thing- that proceeds Catholic It Church and e
3. r, con- stantially true, so far as being* a representation not only of what in i
4. vent to the eye of the body; con- veying a vivid idea of what in substance occui
5. d with various accessories, as colouring, and light and shade, which spring from
6. uring, and light and shade, which spring from the and serve painter's ima- ginat
7. r's ima- gination, to impress the living reality on the spectator's mind without
8. on the spectator's mind without imposing unwarrantalily upon his credulity. As s
9. . As such, they are not only interesting and beautiful, but positively instructi
10. due is taken to impress upon the growing intelligence the true character and wei
11. uire. seemed A very few of the following stories have before ap- ])eared in an E
12. u may see his order. green lanes winding" down among the almond-trees to the lon
13. ll see a half-defaced fi-esco, depicting one in the white habit and black mantle
14. orches in their hands, who seem lighting him on his way. It is St. Dominic, who
15. ou stand. cloister ; and before entering the church, you may see, in the little
16. s walls, or took his scanty rest leaning against one of those pillars on a stone
17. e the choir thei-e is a mystic j)ainting of sheep clustered on a gTassy lawn rou
18. gTassy lawn round a fountain of lomning water it i)reserves something of the ch
19. of lomning water it i)reserves something of the character of those traditionary
20. achers chantTheir habit has known no ing' their evening office. retonning change
21. ir habit has known no ing' their evening office. retonning change ; it is the sa
22. no ing' their evening office. retonning change ; it is the same as the day when
23. old times of which we have been speaking in a yet more striking way than aught y
24. ave been speaking in a yet more striking way than aught you have seen beside. Th
25. ich divides it from the nave. Separating into two ranks, the younger walking fir
26. ting into two ranks, the younger walking first, they come out on either side the
27. along to the bottom of the nave, singing as they walk. It is the " Salve Process
28. s the " Salve Procession." Every evening after compline in every convent of the
29. le then, at the words " JEia ; : walking through the kneeling ranks, sprinkles e
30. " JEia ; : walking through the kneeling ranks, sprinkles each one with holy wat
31. ; some way carried back all for nothing in that meets yoiu* eye has tlie charac
32. s before you, it is like an old painting come to life ; and the 4 whole scene to
33. years previously, possessed of a footing- in every country of Christendom. At th
34. fii-st fervour they carried every thing- before them. Men listened with wonder
35. en listened with wonder to the preaching of men whose lives were more marvellous
36. Sabinu at Home it is written, that being awake one night, and lying so on his be
37. n, that being awake one night, and lying so on his bed in tlie dormitory, he hea
38. thren. One of these walked first bearing the cross, &'«other the vessel of holy
39. water, and the third followed orinkling the beds and the whole donnitory with t
40. itnesses, we might be excused for giving them but little attention. But it was f
41. re added to tliese horrible and alarming apjiaritions, specially in the two grea
42. to him, lie did not answer; a treml)ling malignant fi CATHOLIC LK0EN08. death sh
43. the whole of that night. In the morning, having a little recovered, the prior q
44. le of that night. In the morning, having a little recovered, the prior questione
45. ire, than gaze for one moment on a thing so homble." These dreadful visitations
46. al Chapter held at Paris in 1224, during the government of B. Jordan of Saxony ;
47. ; and lie ordered the procession during tlie Salce to be generally practised in
48. arances in the Dominican churches during the singing of the Salve at this period
49. he Dominican churches during the singing of the Salve at this period have many o
50. a popular devotion to attend the singing of the Sahe in tlie churclies of the Fr
51. ames, at Paris, crowds met everv evening after compline to witness the processio
52. sobs and tears were often heard mingling with the voices of the fathers. And som
53. of the brethren, and answered it bowing her head. Once she appeared visibly to
54. ed visibly to the eves of many, standing in front of the kneeling ranks, and loo
55. many, standing in front of the kneeling ranks, and looking do^vn upon tliem as
56. front of the kneeling ranks, and looking do^vn upon tliem as they sang. And when
57. te," she answered the pi-ayer by turning her soft and melting glance upon thpni,
58. pi-ayer by turning her soft and melting glance upon thpni, smiling with a joyfu
59. t and melting glance upon thpni, smiling with a joyful and benign countenance so
60. Divine Cliild into her arms and liolding Him before them, she seemed to show Him
61. upon the brethren as they knelt turning towards her, until its close. Then she
62. il its close. Then she rose ; and taking the hand of the little Jesus, she made
63. ion of this singular devotion, rendering relic of antiquity for the interest att
64. of antiquity for the interest attaching to it is not merely historical, but sup
65. aith was clearer than our own, something more than a curious was often granted t
66. s, they overran the open country sotting fire to villages and convents, and putt
67. re to villages and convents, and putting all the helpless inhabitants to the swo
68. en country, the Polish nobles, gathering together as many of the fugitive peasan
69. attempt, and laid a plan for overcoming the defenders of the town by a fraudule
70. ke themselves masters of the city during the suspension of hostilities. There wa
71. red Sadoc had not been with his to bring to the faith. brethren, but had been se
72. sent on a mission to Poland where, being appointed prior of the Convent of Sando
73. atins were now just -ended and all being seated in their places as the custom i?
74. i?, one of the younger novices, standing in the middle of the choir, prepared to
75. ad aloud the martyrology for the ensuing day that is, the names of tlie saints w
76. sped book that lay before him; something seemed to perplex and astonish him, for
77. ary; the next tyrs." instant the passing emotion of surprise was put away ; and,
78. unce to his brethren their own impending fate. The words fell on their astonishe
79. what I saw in the book ;" and so saying, he placed the oi)en page before the pr
80. ngs were written for him and and turning to them as they sat in his companions w
81. esire more ? God is Eternal Love calling us home from our Ion"' exile ; we will
82. ee that our lamps are bright and burning, and ourselves ready for His coming. Le
83. ning, and ourselves ready for His coming. Let the night, therefore, be given to
84. holy Bath of Penance; and in the morning we will receive the Bread of Heaven, wh
85. the altar, calmly and joylully awaiting the dawn of that day which they knew wa
86. st. Bright and beautiful was the morning light that streamed through the tall ea
87. stern window, and fell over the kneeling forms of that Uttle white-robed army of
88. city lay in profound quiet, and nothing seemed to betoken that the glorious sum
89. e glorious summer day which was breaking over the world was to be one of bloodsh
90. There was but one Mass said that morning in the convent church ; and the few cit
91. communion together at his hands, a thing whicli was not customary save at some o
92. f the Church. And then there was nothing more to do but to wait for their execut
93. and though possibly they felt something of a holy impati; ence for their releas
94. e Convent of the Magdalen. As if nothing imusual were at hand, each one went to
95. aid another ; " it will be a happy thing to die before them or perhaps even God
96. still the day passed en, and every thing wore The convent was situated in a remo
97. a fieire struggle of some kind was going on at no great disBut, as I have said,
98. over all the world around them. Evening came at last, and the bell for compline
99. r compline summoned the brethren to sing the Divine praises in their choir ; the
100. eir Creator in this world, bet'ore being translated to the Surely never had tlie
101. tiful service sounded so full of meaning to their hearts, as now wiien they were
102. r hearts, as now wiien they were fitting First, Sadoc's voice might be themselve
103. ht be themselves for death. heard giving the blessing, as the office began " May
104. ves for death. heard giving the blessing, as the office began " May : : the Almi
105. tone, wliich sang the fect end." warning words " Brethren, be sober and watcli ;
106. or your adversaiy the devil as a roaring lion goeth about, seeking whom he may d
107. l as a roaring lion goeth about, seeking whom he may devoiu ; whom resist ye, st
108. faith." and magnificent chant, swelling through the arched : THE LEGEND OP BLES
109. em; already too heavy blows were falling thick and fast on the convent-gate yet
110. n, and moved down into the nave, singing the Salve with tones so sweet and joyou
111. ought their voices were already mingling with the angel choirs. Then thev knelt,
112. e angel choirs. Then thev knelt, turning to the altar; and Sadoc walked through
113. rank, and gave the accustomed sprinkling of holy water. It was at this moment th
114. n their hands and garments were dripping with blood, and their whole and : : app
115. and : : appearance savage and revolting. They advanced tumultuously towards the
116. vanced tumultuously towards the kneeling fi-iars ; but for a moment the scene be
117. feel it so, as they marked that kneeling i-ow or" figures clothed in white garme
118. ivi! them into its rest, already wearing something of celo tial beauty. Not a he
119. into its rest, already wearing something of celo tial beauty. Not a head was mov
120. ith those words upon their lips, singing as they died. One alone moved from his
121. om{)anions, whose souls were now singing everlasting alleuias with the angels, c
122. whose souls were now singing everlasting alleuias with the angels, ceased not to
123. heavenly swans fly up to heaven, singing the praises of their gi-eat Mother Mary
124. tliey are recorded to have been singing at the moment of their massacre are int
125. n student, who was at once the plaything of his companions and the victim of his
126. o, and other epithets equally flattering'. In order to complete the satire, this
127. uccess. On one occasion, after following' a course of sermons from the Blessed J
128. untry and spoke his own language, having given liim a kind welcome, he was recei
129. cloister the same sorrows he was seeking to avoid. His slow wit could take in no
130. void. His slow wit could take in nothing, or at least could express nothing ; an
131. thing, or at least could express nothing ; and though among his young brethren,
132. or some time ; he W'as constantly hoping that one day he should surmount all obs
133. ed to an impulse of pride, in presenting himself to an order whose mission was t
134. , where I am only a burden; and retiring apait, like the solitaries of old, will
135. , will think God repulses me of notliing but my own salvation, from the career o
136. ored presence." In this burst of feeling the good monk thought he perceived that
137. perceived that his intellect was opening a little, and that he was beginning to
138. ning a little, and that he was beginning to reason; but lie rejected the thought
139. ne ; he knew well that, like every thing else that came out of his lips, it woul
140. ly and tenderly for nine days, imploring her support, and especiallv beseeching
141. g her support, and especiallv beseeching her to make known to him the will of Go
142. m the will of God, whicli he was seeking, and to which above all things he desir
143. length tlmn usual ; tlien, after wniting till all the convent was asleep, and ])
144. all the convent was asleep, and ])lacing himself under the guardianship of Mary,
145. r against them, and then, before placing his foot on tlie first ! c 18 CATHOLIC
146. t to condemn the step that he was taking-, in leaving* a house consecrated to Hi
147. the step that he was taking-, in leaving* a house consecrated to Him ; for that
148. e was suddenly stnick by Was it a waking" dream, or an unexpected sight. a mirac
149. poraries) four majestic ladies advancing towards him they were surrounded by a m
150. as though to prevent him from ascending it. needed no constraint; for Albert, p
151. ent expectation. The third lady, drawing* near to him, asked him kindly why he t
152. ed without of which are so great. rising from the ^ound, and humbly confessed hi
153. and that with her wisdom dwells. coming towards you in all her sweetness pray t
154. human ; ; Then the scholar, recognising in the fourth lady the Blessed Virgin,
155. e, it was only for the sake of employing it for the glory of God, and that there
156. nd liill of hope and confidence, feeling in some sort like a son whom tlu-ee sis
157. a son whom tlu-ee sisters are supporting in the presence of a cherished motlier,
158. en, to know every the foiui;h lady thing ; and do you not remember the history o
159. sire not the dangerous power of sounding the secrets of Heaven I only desire, an
160. eology, which has the power of imveiling to the mind all that man can discover o
161. e pride wliieh it often causes to spring up in the soul. Long shall you possess
162. e vision disappeared and Albert, feeling himself quite changed, and conqn'ohendi
163. imself quite changed, and conqn'ohending the littleness of his past sorrows, rem
164. nees, bless!T)g God, ferventiv tlianking the Blessed Virgin, ques- " Human scien
165. vain, ; 20 of CATHOLIC LEGENDS. tioning the prudence of his choice, dreading" t
166. ing the prudence of his choice, dreading" the ])erils human science, humWing- hi
167. ding" the ])erils human science, humWing- himself, and asking from God humility,
168. an science, humWing- himself, and asking from God humility, henceforth lus ancho
169. tried in vain to sleep. The next morning in the schools there was general Alhert
170. place to the liveliest and most nothing stopped him subtle intelligence he unde
171. lligence he under; : ; stood every thing the most abstruse problems unravelled t
172. his cell, inaccessible to the sedividing his ductions of the world or of vain-gl
173. tion to what is commonly called learning though he occasionally visited the l)ni
174. gh he occasionally visited the l)ni]ding which the Paduans exhibit as the : ; ;
175. ivy, and amused himself with deciphering; the inscriptions found there. At thirt
176. be known {de omni re scibili) according; to the state of science at that epoch.
177. ren. The Blessed Jordan of Saxony having died in 123G, Albert was appointed Vica
178. nt and it was manifest that the blessing- of God was with him. The Chapter assem
179. entreaties and their choice next falling upon St. Raymond de Pennafort, who was
180. troubled the public peace. But the king-s of P'rance esteemed the protection of
181. ed duty; and St. Louis, who was reigning- at the time of Albert's arrival, liked
182. to see his people well taught ; knowing that igTiorance and imperfect instructi
183. gne, whose frail form and modest bearing presented a lively contrast to his vast
184. onscious that they were only translating his name. He became so much the fashion
185. on of Place Maitre Aubert ; Aubert being the French rendering of the pretty G(>r
186. bert ; Aubert being the French rendering of the pretty G(>rman name of Albert in
187. never lie ]>revented him from continuing his public lectures, also received a mi
188. o received a mission somewhat resembling that of the Sainte Enfance, which has l
189. e who had the dreadful custom of killing all their children who were born weakly
190. hey had not adequate means of supporting, and all their old people who seemed us
191. ge customs ; which perilous unilertaking he accomplished with great success. The
192. The Pope wished to rewanl Kim by making him a Bishop, but he could not prevail
193. ment of vanity; when one day, j)reoching at Cologne, and seeing his immense audi
194. e day, j)reoching at Cologne, and seeing his immense audience electrified by Ids
195. me down from the pidpit without bringing it to He had lost his memory. The spiri
196. o the age of seventy-five, he him coming dangerous lived, deserted at tlie ; mom
197. eplored at Padna. underetood the warning-, and devoted all his thoughtsi to prep
198. devoted all his thoughtsi to prepai-ing- himself tor a holy death, whicli took
199. OR GILES. the reigii of Sancho I., King- of Portug-al, there lived at the coin-
200. Kodrigiioz de Vng-liaditt's. This During nobleman had an only son, named Eg-idiu
201. sign of an extraordinary g-enius. Being- sent to tlie University of Coinibra, t
202. er as to attract tlie notice of the king- ; who, willing: to mark his sense of t
203. tlie notice of the king- ; who, willing: to mark his sense of the son's talents
204. im with several rich benefices he having' chosen the ecclesiastical state. T^nha
205. lesiastical state. T^nhappily, in making- this choice Eg'idius had hoon giiided
206. choice Eg'idius had hoon giiided Finding- himself wliilst still a mere only by i
207. ed office only as a means of g-ratifying- iiis thirst for leorning- but neg-lect
208. of g-ratifying- iiis thirst for leorning- but neg-lected all its duties, and g-a
209. ulg-ence and licentiousness. Once having- entered on this course, it seemed inde
210. se company he continued to travel during the whole of that day. lie was of a str
211. day. lie was of a strangely fascinating and winning address and almost without
212. s of a strangely fascinating and winning address and almost without being aware
213. winning address and almost without being aware of it, Egidius suffered him to re
214. e designs and plans which were revolving in his brain. It was, indeed, no oih&c
215. eloquence he won his confidence nothing was concealed the excessive and unrestr
216. d liim at the same time that in choosing the study of medicine he had not select
217. d the "There is a best means of can-ying them into effect. science," he said, "w
218. t. science," he said, "wliich will bring vou far more quickly to your desired en
219. and, dazzled at the thought of acquu-ing- an unbounded possession of all after w
220. e conditions imposed on him before being suffered the first, to renounce obedien
221. : . his own It is blood. a common saying that the devil gets better served than
222. impatient of a ilay which did not bring its new excitement and indulgence, cons
223. ours by a His cures were little dazzling and universal fame. short of miraculous
224. the very recesses of his degi'aded being. Thus dead to gi'ace and sunk in coirup
225. soms which hang around a gi-ave, drawing their nourishment from its deadly conte
226. its deadly contents, and scarce veiling the hideousness that lies beneath. Yet
227. l counsels of God, chosen to be a living monument of His grace. Nor was the mann
228. ge thy life, unhappy wretch !" repeating tin-ice For the moment a the words, " C
229. raised to cast liim in. But the feeling- was but for an instant, the next he la
230. he laughed at his own weakness, at being- disturbed at what he resolved to consi
231. at what he resolved to consider nothing- but a troublesome dream. Three days pa
232. e slave of Satan but the better teaching of childish days roturaed upon him in t
233. d with the precious Blood of Chiist. ing lig-lit ibund him still y)lung-('(l in
234. m still y)lung-('(l in these confiifting tliouglits he looked round him, and saw
235. his srndv tlie night before; and seizing them liastijy. as a first sacrifice and
236. ins at once and for ever; and, returning to Spain, to seek admission into some s
237. d not rest in his journey till, entering Spain, he arrived at the city of Valenc
238. in body and mind, paused by the building and watched the brethren at their work.
239. l looks they passed to and fro, carrying stones and mortar, all busy in raising
240. g stones and mortar, all busy in raising the walls of their happy retreat. Somet
241. walls of their happy retreat. Something in the sight touched his heart; perhaps
242. apid and wise resolution; and presenting himself to verty, the prior, told him t
243. ff, and he saw the hapj)iness of serving God, and the bondage of a life of sin.
244. He returned to the convent; and casting himself at the feet of the prior, besou
245. u a severe judge ; I found only a loving father, whose tears of pity joined with
246. is servants and attendants, and, sending word to his father of his change ; of i
247. ication and iminterrupted labour: during the day they preached and heard confess
248. ons, and assisted in the actual building of their church and convent whilst the
249. as given as much to ])rayer and watching as to sleep. Their food was as coarse a
250. fused to exercise or pui-sue his darling study of medicine, save under obedience
251. re he led a life of the same persevering fervour ; but the peace of his soul was
252. the peace of his soul was still wanting. One thought ever preyed on his mind th
253. und him to Satan as his slave and Having made after sent to the — bond-servant
254. drownetl in bitter tears, and imploring the Divine power to deliver him from hi
255. powei-s of evil; then sometimes, feeling that prayer from such as l;e was could
256. e sure refuge of sinners the most loving and merciful Mary and call on her to be
257. d fly for refuge from his own tonnenting thoughts. It was the silent witness of
258. usted with l)0(iily and mental suffering, he would drag himself to tJie foot of
259. ther of God." Egidius raised his weeping eyes, and saw foUing through the openin
260. raised his weeping eyes, and saw foUing through the opening of the roof where t
261. eyes, and saw foUing through the opening of the roof where the bell-ro{)es of th
262. t Toledo whilst through the same opening a strnnge and hideous form was escaping
263. a strnnge and hideous form was escaping with a gesture of baffled malice. The p
264. j^atronage of Mary. Wherefore, kneeling ag-iiin befoi-e her image, he entered i
265. ervants and his chronicler, in narrating some of his ecstasies and tasted with w
266. Spain, and died in the year 1265, being universally considered the greatest man
267. red the greatest man of his order during the time in which he lived. The circums
268. y be admitted as of much weight treating of the supernatural displays of God's p
269. as ])resident and there also, according to ancient traditions, more or less sup
270. r to the Virgin who was one day to bring fortli the Saviour ; of the world. This
271. r head of oak-leaves, and a veil hanging from it over the shoulders. The grotto
272. n the rei^n of Philip I., on the evening- of tlie 31st of October, there was a s
273. the young' phalanx of choristers bearing tapers. Among- these children there was
274. ere was one especially remarked as being- the most dilig-ent and recollected, th
275. Virg-in celebrated without all his being- there to assist : happy except in chur
276. as may ))e supposed, was very imwilling; ever to have him out of lier sig-lit a
277. house of God and never ceased following- liim with her eyes, whetlier he was se
278. m with her eyes, whetlier he was serving ]\rass, or carrying- tlio little vessel
279. tlier he was serving ]\rass, or carrying- tlio little vessel of holy water, or w
280. suffered to come to Him. On the evening- of which we are speaking, this goo281. On the evening- of which we are speaking, this goo282. LADY OP CHAKTRES. 36 mother was watching- her little son, as lie attended on the
283. ; but the mother, who had been suffering- for more than half an hour, hastened i
284. erved that he and his taper were missing". She went back into the crypt with the
285. had become of him, whether he was lying ill some remote corner, or whether he h
286. iche, every turn, but could find nothing ; they called the child again and again
287. of tlie torclies they covdd see nothing a mother's eye, however, was to be trus
288. truck awe into the hearts of The feeling, however, which so overall around her.
289. t ; it was an impossibility of believing that her son was really taken from her.
290. ized him eagerly in her arms and rushing to the altar of our Lady, she laid liim
291. of our Lady, she laid liim all dripping as he was at the foot of the holy image
292. w full of faith all knelt roimd, praying and sobbing. But few dared to hope that
293. ith all knelt roimd, praying and sobbing. But few dared to hope that a child who
294. ice joined in the rapturous thanksgiving which immediately resounded through dar
295. ich immediately resounded through daring; to attempt to console her ; ; : those
296. estions and he explained that, in trying to get to his place, he had been imprud
297. pass behind the altar ; and not thinking* of the pit, had fallen into it headlon
298. he lost all consciousness of life during the hour that he had passed in tlie wat
299. D AND HIS TWO NOVICES. Celt 37 any thing;. " I felt nothing," he answered, " ex;
300. ES. Celt 37 any thing;. " I felt nothing," he answered, " ex; saw nothins" and I
301. , " ex; saw nothins" and I heard Qothing' except their harmonious voices, which
302. on of aeli^-ht I ; jxcept ang'els moving- gently round me wonderful circumstance
303. artres namely, that when the officiating Bishop chants tlie P(i:v vohlscum, or a
304. al hours, the choir is silent, know- ing that the angels are chanting the respon
305. , know- ing that the angels are chanting the responses, and that God is hearing
306. g the responses, and that God is hearing them. VI. THE LEGEND OF BLESSED BERNARD
307. portunities it iii'ave him of indulg'ing' his devotion unseen by any one out his
308. verent care of the altar and every thing- belong-ing to the Divine mysteries. Be
309. of the altar and every thing- belong-ing to the Divine mysteries. Besides this e
310. wo children, the sons of a neig^hbouring- (gentleman, who sent them every day to
311. nvent, where they remained until evening, only sleeping- at their father's house
312. ey remained until evening, only sleeping- at their father's house. These two boy
313. s' habit of the Friai*s-Preachers, being- probably destined for the order, altho
314. a chapel then dedicated to the Holy King-s on the right of the hi^h altar, where
315. used to sit on the altar-steps, reading-, or writing their exercises spending-
316. on the altar-steps, reading-, or writing their exercises spending- their time qu
317. ng-, or writing their exercises spending- their time quietly and happily nntil t
318. s seldom used for tlie purpose of saying- Mass, there was an image of the Blesse
319. the Blessed Virand the two g-in, holding her Divine Son in her arms children cam
320. we do, but always remain without moving nil day long ? Come down and eat some d
321. ith — And it life, sat with and coming- down trom His Mother's arms, He them o
322. at so "Teat a condescension, remembering* how he came uninvited to be a g-uest w
323. n they mig-ht have Him with them; caring" for nothing" else than this sweet and
324. have Him with them; caring" for nothing" else than this sweet and familiar inte
325. ents perceived a chang-e in in hastening" to them, and how their only pleasure w
326. them But the tale seemed to every thing" without reserve. those who listened no
327. hout reserve. those who listened nothing" but an idle invention, or perhaps an a
328. otice of what they said beyond reproving" them ]{ut for their folly. when they r
329. felt, moreover, tliat there was nothing unworthy of belief He who, being God, b
330. nothing unworthy of belief He who, being God, became a little condescend to give
331. ion of goodness; his pupils. And hearing how they, in their childish way, expres
332. o their master. He well knew the meaning of this invitation the change that had
333. m, as it were before their time, growing ripe for heaven; and he understood that
334. the Divine pleasure, after thus training them for Himself in a marvellous way, t
335. are, was to be left behind and resolving to make one more trial of the condescen
336. of the company; and on Thm-sday moniing I will receive you all thi-ee Father's
337. on Day. rangement as for his approaching death, and obtained his two disciples l
338. n that day to say the last Mass, serving during tne celebration, and receiving C
339. day to say the last Mass, serving during tne celebration, and receiving Communio
340. ng during tne celebration, and receiving Communion from his hands. Doubtless it
341. of devout and joyful expectation during those moments. And when Mass was ended,
342. f the brethren found them still kneeling thus before the altar, Bernard vested a
343. Mass, and the two boys in their serving-robes. But they w'ere quite dead their
344. was hung up over the spot, representing them seated on the aitar-step, with the
345. ected either side, : as before. wisliing to find One of the succeeding triors of
346. . wisliing to find One of the succeeding triors of the convent, some further rec
347. e spot indicated by tiie picture; taking care to have two aj)ostolic notaries an
348. stone sarcophagy was found, wlxich being opened, the church was immediately fill
349. ately filled with an odour of surpassing sweetress; and on removing the clothes
350. of surpassing sweetress; and on removing the clothes that lay on the top, the re
351. ebrated every Thui-sday, in thanksgiving ibr the graces granted to them, and a c
352. ubjects, they were occupied in enlarging* and adorning their city, which in thos
353. were occupied in enlarging* and adorning their city, which in those days did not
354. by the present beautiful and flourishing town, when a sudden invasion of Nor- ma
355. nounced that their sails appeared riding over the waves, and bearing death and m
356. eared riding over the waves, and bearing death and misery to France. Reg-nier wa
357. rmed himself for battle. )raidp, weeping and anxious, hastened to shut herself i
358. as driven back. But Albraide was praying. Battle upon battle did Regnier wage ;
359. y day repulsed, and day by day returning to the charge with renewed courage. Bef
360. before her. Glad indeed were the tiding-s which he brought. Regnier had capture
361. ie counhigh with joy. And after reciting together with all her household a ferve
362. hopeful dreams. Alas on the next morning a woful change had fallen upon the cast
363. er had arrived with early dawn, bringing the news that the young Count of Mons,
364. be easy to ransom her husband by setting at liberty the twelve Norman generals.
365. sent to such an exchange that, ; knowing well how dearly loved the young count w
366. lace and out of the town, only imploring- to be left alone. No one at- tempted t
367. up before her a venerable man in flowing antique robes, and leaning on a pilgi-i
368. an in flowing antique robes, and leaning on a pilgi-im's staft'. She turned awa\
369. . Further on, a third a])peared, holding rays in his hand a fourtl), leaning on
370. ding rays in his hand a fourtl), leaning on a Greek cross: twelve ancient men, m
371. t. it again and again, without remarking that the old men were slowly following
372. g that the old men were slowly following her; till, at the point where she had f
373. have not forgotten you, poor suft'ering child Send ])ack the twelve generals. R
374. your Kegnier again." : ; ! : A light ing- disappeared streamed over the black wa
375. s, they returned to their camp, blessing" and praising* the g'cnerous countess.
376. ed to their camp, blessing" and praising* the g'cnerous countess. The people of
377. nerals, when the first waggon containing the gold and silver arrived, '^i'he spo
378. and insisted on himself acc()nij)anying him home to his wife, to wliom he resto
379. e and an eternal friend; ship." Pressing- his hand, he swore to respect for his
380. fter school he Avas in the habit of ling-ering" in the cool evening- hom-s to en
381. chool he Avas in the habit of ling-ering" in the cool evening- hom-s to enjoy a
382. habit of ling-ering" in the cool evening- hom-s to enjoy a g'amc of play with th
383. Lady as to a mother, and begher blessing- on their work or play, or render their
384. ender their simple acts of thanksg-iving- for a well-learnt lesson or a successf
385. s bowed down, and (piiet and joy beaming- on each innocent and earne?t face. The
386. tly done ; and perliaps few thanksgiving's were more fervent or more deeply felt
387. who took little heed of his son's doing-s ; but on this occasion he had been aw
388. own creed, with a bitter and persecuting hatred of any other. That his son shoul
389. ffence which awakened every evil feeling of his dark that liis child slioiild ev
390. ith a volley of cui-ses into the blazing- furnace which he was then tending, Thr
391. azing- furnace which he was then tending, Throwing two enoi-mous faggots after h
392. nace which he was then tending, Throwing two enoi-mous faggots after him to make
393. ntered. She had seen her child returning-, and followed him as quickh' as she co
394. much astonished " Where is at not seeing him here. but her hus})and the child ?"
395. l a 49 and the poor woman, now beginning ; vague tenor, ran into every comer of
396. ouse and those of her neighbours, caUing on her boy, At last she at first with a
397. had maintained a sullen demeanour during the whole time, was seen, with an expre
398. he furnace height, ; attempted to fling into the furnace. Some of the neighbour
399. hei-s hastened to extinguish tne blazing charcoal and wood and at last, to the b
400. is beset by troops of beggars, imploring the same assistance, and using (in many
401. imploring the same assistance, and using (in many instances) the very same outwa
402. onsists, you come to a very unpretending but very comfortable little hotel, whic
403. nt villag-es. It was in the early spring- of the year 1621, that a boy, named li
404. the year 1621, that a boy, named living; Santi Bevilacqua, a native of Tuscany,
405. ag-ainst the face of the rock something- shining and coloured. Having- removed,
406. the face of the rock something- shining and coloured. Having- removed, as well
407. something- shining and coloured. Having- removed, as well as he was able, all t
408. icture there of our Blessed Lady holding; tlie Divine Infant in her arms, for wh
409. ived a very lively devotion; and falling on his knees, s])ent a considerable tim
410. e the boy took a great pride in kepjjing- his discovery a profound secret from a
411. adonna. He had no other means of finding his way lie to the spot tlian by faitli
412. o the spot tlian by faitlifuUy following- the course had chanced to pursue on th
413. e aware of its existence they made doing; daily pilgrimages to it, offeiing thei
414. doing; daily pilgrimages to it, offeiing their little nosegays of wild flowers o
415. le nosegays of wild flowers or any thing else they could get, by way of ornament
416. a troop of children continually passing to and fro in what they conceived to be
417. n of its flrst discovery. One day, being somewhat weary on his return from the w
418. he lay down in his uncle's shop, leaning his head against a heap of boards which
419. heap of boards which were ranged During his sleep, all these planks along the w
420. uried under them. The carpenter, hearing the noise, ran to the spot to see what
421. dead; but on heai-iiig his voice calling from beneath the timber, tliey lost no
422. e timber, tliey lost no time in rpmoving it, and, to their great amazement, tlie
423. DY OF QALLORO. unhurt. sides 63 Notliing- was now to be heard but cries on all o
424. s soon as he felt the planks were moving, he instantly invoked the Madonna of Va
425. e pilgrims had been constantly honouring it ever since; whereupon the older inha
426. d, and whose zeal for religious painting was so notorious ; any how, they could
427. ace and lands in L'Ariccia now belonging to the Chigi family) had attributed her
428. Now, however, news of the miracle being every where noised abroad, people natur
429. still more truly said of any outpouring" ol wonderful gifts and graces at the h
430. will come, but that others are : coming" surely ; when we feel the first, we sa
431. es, because it has begun ; its beginning marks its })resence; and it goes on lor
432. or even for whole generations, according to the good pleasm'e of Almighty — Go
433. tive of Frascati, determined on erecting an altar there, and enclosing it in a l
434. n erecting an altar there, and enclosing it in a little oratory. also built a co
435. oratory. also built a cottage adjoining, as a residence for some one to take ca
436. opulation of the neighbourhood assisting at a grand procession; and it was soon
437. er pretensions, capable of accommodating OUR LADY OF QALLOHO. 66 The the continu
438. LLOHO. 66 The the continually increasing" number of pilgrims. Cardinal Bishop of
439. shop of Albano and Prince Savelli having consented to this proposal, and upwards
440. s proposal, and upwards of 8000/. having been contributed for the purjwse, the f
441. It was several years before the building was completed, more especially since it
442. ined to ei-ect a convent also, adjoining the new church ; and the funds wiiich h
443. he new monasteiy. Early on the following day (which in that year was Whit-Monday
444. thousand persons might be seen flocking together from all the neighbouring vill
445. cking together from all the neighbouring villages, and even fi-om Rome itself, a
446. us to assist at the ceremony of removing the picture from its frepared for wood
447. d not attempted to detacli tlie painting fiom the rock itself; and indeed this w
448. coat of plaster on which it stood being too thin and delicate to bear removal.
449. d to jireserve; and this fi-agment being placed on a wooden frame, highly orname
450. ten men at a time, continually relieving one another, an|l moving onwards amid t
451. ually relieving one another, an|l moving onwards amid the solemn prayers, and hy
452. rs, and hymns and psulms of thanksgiving of the assembled multitudes. Many mirao
453. S. after it and were wrought both during its progress was placed in the church,
454. rom the village of which we are speaking; but the faithful inhabitants flocked t
455. beggars, all might tlien be seen wending their way through the shady wood to the
456. e chapel, which was crowded from morning till night; the petitioners told their
457. asant miglit suspended. be seen kneeling on the bare ground witnout the door, in
458. e bare ground witnout the door, invoking the assistance and protection of their
459. mercy rendered them extremely unwilling to restore the picture to Galloro, when
460. priests ex-Jesuits, who had been staying with them for some time since the disso
461. r own society to serve the church during their absence; and when, on the restora
462. esent day as it has ever been, fxccpting perhaps on certain special occasions im
463. , we enjoyed the opportimity of visiting it oui-selves almost 68 daily, CATHOLIC
464. Genzano on the otlier (the former being' a little more than half a mile oiF per
465. ommunions that were made there in a sing-le year (1846) were upwards of 7060, be
466. year (1846) were upwards of 7060, being" an average of nearly twenty pilgrims a
467. n the neighbourhood contribute something to this mmiber; we observe, however, th
468. cli prevails among the people, of having recourse to this shrine on all occasion
469. all occasions of special devotion during the time of any public or private trial
470. oment has passed on, and is illuminating some other spot, leaving it again, in i
471. is illuminating some other spot, leaving it again, in its turn, to fall into its
472. ord of terror to Christendom. Yet during the whole of the sixteenth century (unt
473. stroyed at Lepanto) we find Europe lying almost at their mercy. Among- the many
474. any tales which may be found of touching interest in connection witli their crue
475. ^Mediterranean and Levant, the following is told concerning the illustrious fami
476. Levant, the following is told concerning the illustrious family of the Justinian
477. ATHOLIC LEOENOS. though in the beginning- of the sixteenth century they had beco
478. ustiniani family at their head, or dying- There was also another fallantly in th
479. tly in the strug-g-le. ereditary feeling- among' them, and this was their attach
480. nt Justiniani) was Master General during the pontificate of St. Pius V. At the t
481. minican, archbishop of the neig-hbouring island of Naxia. It was the year 1566 t
482. med the less chance of this treaty being broken, for the Turkisli general, Musta
483. d remains of his forces, without liaving gained the shghtest advantage over the
484. h unusual joy and solemnity. Every thing this year contributed to make this pecu
485. e this peculiarly a holiday of rejoicing. I'he return of ; THE CHILDREN OP THE J
486. mination of the Council itself, settling and con- had done the faith of the Chur
487. hem with a powerful fleet, which landing' its forces before the Scians were awar
488. ell knew what would follow ; and turning" from the altar to meet his enemies, he
489. f. Pasha Piali. This man, rudely pushing" aside the Bishop, laid his hands on th
490. trampled under your feet;" and so saying-, resisting with extraordinary coolness
491. er your feet;" and so saying-, resisting with extraordinary coolness and coinage
492. , even to the smallest particle. firming- as it fixinf**•' ; 62 CATHOLIC LEGEN
493. anishment recovered their liberty, being- ransomed through the interest of the P
494. interest of the Pope and the French king but they never recovered their former p
495. e number of about twenty, and separating them from their parents, carried them t
496. woidd be ; make them forget the teaching of their fatliers, and brinw' them up i
497. i, than know that their sons were living renegades to their faith. If tliis was
498. e contented themselves with endeavouring' to tempt them from their allegiance wi
499. rom their allegiance with the flattering" seductions of the senses ; but finding
500. " seductions of the senses ; but finding all their efforts in vain, they savagel
501. s one of tlie?e little martyrs was dying under the lash, a Turk who stood by app
502. onfessed his faith by signs; for raising the hand to which the Turk pointed as h
503. himself came to the spot, and addressing another, who had as yet survived the pu
504. up in ?rison, with the idea of wearying out his constancy, le knelt down on the
505. knelt down on the floor, and addressing himself to God in words of childish sim
506. rage to die in the faith. After spending three whole days in this manner, he die
507. xtraordinary emotion of grief on hearing of these circumAs a Dominican, the Just
508. n fleet lay opposite to the overwhelming' armament of the infidels in the Gulf o
509. urice of Nassau, determined on besieging Antwerp, reckoning on the secret intell
510. termined on besieging Antwerp, reckoning on the secret intelligence which lie ma
511. he heretics inside the town, and relying also on the number With tliis design of
512. and of whom were musketeers and jjassing by Dordrecht, took from thence twenty-f
513. , with the certainty moreover of meeting with none but a very feeble resistance,
514. as sure of success ; that he had nothing to known in the drecht, : ; THE DELIVER
515. of some treason, which she was imploring the assistance of God to defeat. She de
516. that she only knew that God was calling her inwardly At two to pray, and to cau
517. hem to pray also. o'clock in the morning, her fervour redoubled with her hands r
518. ort, that her frame seemed to be sinking with iutigiie. In the morning, she told
519. be sinking with iutigiie. In the morning, she told one of the nuns that she wa"^
520. ," she stiid; "for I I had been fighting all niglit. I liave been pray wlien I f
521. as if foi-ced to ; wished to rest, being (;uite exliausted and when my arms, whi
522. d and when my arms, whicli I was holding stretclied out to- wards God, dropped f
523. Pray on, pray on. If I had been fighting F 66 worn out." CATHOLIC LEGENDS. more
524. regarded as a summons to prayer, feeling certain that the city must be in some H
525. del, but had suddenly withdrawn, leaving many of their gams and other instiiimen
526. n the side of a rang'e of hills skirting- one of the high roads fi-om itome to N
527. el. It was but a small and poor building-, and Petruccia determined to rebuild i
528. ence. Her means were place, tine, living- in quite xmequal to the task. Novei-th
529. all that slie had, and tlie imdortaking- was begTin. Her friends and neighbours
530. rovidence, in thus voluntarily depriving hei-self of those means of support with
531. nually repeated, with an air of exulting- confidence, what seemed like the ravin
532. confidence, what seemed like the raving-s of madness to those who lieard her "O
533. lared that she had begnn the amdertaking, and was encouraged to persevere with i
534. s which had sometimes arisen from giving heed to pretended supeniatiu*al message
535. this kind, had issued a "law forbidding such things to be attended to, unless t
536. n ecclesiastical authorities. the spring of 1407, when tlie following miraculous
537. the spring of 1407, when tlie following miraculous event at once justified and
538. completed the whole imder- guard taking. From time immemonal, the feast of St.
539. r in that town. Accordingly it was being celebrated in the usual manner in the y
540. o see so good a work unfinished. Evening was now fast approaching, the gayest, b
541. nished. Evening was now fast approaching, the gayest, brightest hour of the fair
542. hour of the fair, wlien, business being ended, the pleasure of the day be^-an a
543. sure of the day be^-an all were devoting themselves to amusement, each in his ow
544. , in front of the churcli, saw something like a thin cloud floating in the air,
545. saw something like a thin cloud floating in the air, and tlicn setof the new. je
546. air, and tlicn setof the new. jeered ing, " This Some had woman had begun to bui
547. me had woman had begun to build, : tling on one of the walls of the unfinished b
548. of the walls of the unfinished building. Here tlie cloud seemed to divide and d
549. pread rapidly among them, that something wondcri'ul had happened in the Piazza d
550. it M'ith outstretched arms; then rising and turning round standers, to the peop
551. tstretched arms; then rising and turning round standers, to the people, she told
552. y for her, and that the bells were being" rung' in this mii*aculous way only to
553. Erayers before this marvellous painting, which tliey new not how otherwise to d
554. had left the city, and were in rejoicing. the act of returning' liomewards, when
555. were in rejoicing. the act of returning' liomewards, when their steps were arre
556. at long before daybreak on the following morning, nniltitudes of the country peo
557. before daybreak on the following morning, nniltitudes of the country people migh
558. the country people might be seen taking advantnge of the day of rest (it was th
559. ourth Sunday after Easter), and hurrying towards the town to hear and see for th
560. ch reached them, that persons were being' miraculously healed of their infirmiti
561. were restored to life again ; and during the next two or three montlis we have a
562. quent in their visits to it, e itreating the Madonna's interference to deft^nd t
563. had reason to apprehend, were meditating- a fi'esh invasion, and who, as a matte
564. ens had already fled from the im})ending calamity, and taken refug-e (as contemp
565. e themselves like their hut before doing- so, they went out to bid ; a last fare
566. to flee from the face of one of the king-s of the earth, Avho was plotting- misc
567. e king-s of the earth, Avho was plotting- mischief ag-ainst them, so she would m
568. said that, whilst they were yet praying-, the picture disappeared from their si
569. aw Jiim And he went on his way rejoicing, but, no more Pliilip Avas found at Azo
570. m upon the waters then, that, as evening a pillar of a cloud by drew on, that wh
571. t from one church to anotlier, inquiring; for the picture which tliey had watcli
572. ree days, they heard of a picture having* appeared in a strang'e wa\ at Genazzan
573. The people of Genazzano lent no willing; ear to this strang;e history it detrac
574. nity of g'oinp- to Scutari and examining* for tlieniselvo?, they testified iipon
575. of tlie )tifture and that the colouring- and style of art exhibited in the pict
576. be remembered, that this was no painting- exe; ; 74 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. cuted upon
577. hus capable of easy removal, and leaving- no trace behind it; it was a mere fi'e
578. a mere fi'esco upon a very thin coating- of plaster, whicli no human skill coul
579. to have taken place late on the evening- of the 25th of April ; and before the
580. doubt ; Petruccia's unfinished building- was immediately resumed ; and a handso
581. FuLK of Anjou, the fourth Christian king of Jerusalem, keld the weighty sceptre
582. of Godfrey of Bouillon with a trembling and uncertain hand ; but lie took care
583. , among tlie crusaders who were guarding Beci-sheba, there were three knights of
584. of the Holy See, had left their smiling- domains to fly to the assistance of th
585. riors most prize, that, namely, of being always placed in the hottest of tlie ba
586. o issue fi-om Ascalon, and were marching onward with a rajiid step. pilgi-ims ;
587. e, and thus to prevent tlieir besieg-ing- the town. The encounter was sharp; for
588. rounded, a fresh band of Saracens having* emerg'ed from their hidingplace, and c
589. hree knights, who, wounded, but fighting to the last, and worn out with their ef
590. Ascalon. The soldiers, enraged at having bought their captives so dearly, ill-tr
591. of Eppe were dead. mishings were taking j>lace every day, it was thought that t
592. at Ascalon and an officer who was going to Cairo in search of reinforcements, t
593. pay his court to the sultan by offering them to liim: and, in fact, the sultan
594. ey were allowed a week of repose, during which time they were guarded, but treat
595. from the proposal, neitiier skil- making the sign of the They were nor theologia
596. om, they hoped never to be found wanting to God, and never to swerve from the pa
597. he place of their confinement, resolving to leave no means untried of overcoming
598. to leave no means untried of overcoming their resolution; and accordingly, for
599. uence iind tlieir arguments in extolling a religion of sensualism and deatli but
600. ent, ; : ; woi-se food, and more galling fetters; and from day to 78 day CATHOLI
601. yrdom lasted more than two years; during which time theu- str ngtli could scarce
602. the depths of their dark prison, singing hymns of thanksgiving; and whenever the
603. rk prison, singing hymns of thanksgiving; and whenever they \vere brought before
604. me before which Hell trembles, imploring the intercession of our common Mother,
605. rist, captives for His cause, and living imder the eye of God, they suffered in
606. il at last the sultan resolved on making a final effort against them. He had one
607. ter," said the sultan to her one evening, "to-morrow you sliall go to the prison
608. s have failed and if, either by learning or good fortune, either by your wisdom
609. from the chance of one of them becoming enamoured of you ; for I should be too
610. r them, and they jjei-sisted in adhering to their own faith, the people were cla
611. ir own faith, the people were clamouring for their death. They replied, that tli
612. at they had therefore no means of paying their nmsom, unless one of them might b
613. o Europe. They added, tlmt as to denying sultan's intention. the faitli, they tr
614. her what jileasure they felt ui heaiing her speak tlieir own language. Ismeria,
615. gun in g-ood faith to endeavour to bring them to the religion oflier father, and
616. that the knights could not help feeling interested in the poor young girl, brou
617. in these fatal errors ; and after having ascertained fi'om her that none of her
618. ed, but, without in the least foreseeing lively curiosity to what the result wou
619. on. in one God ; he spoke of everlasting blessedness in heaven. The clearness an
620. a preacher. forgotten our Lord's saying " When ye are called to bear witness of
621. y. She deliglited her fatlier by telling him that she intended to continue her c
622. ght slie saw the Blessed Vii-gin leaning over her ; and tliis drew her lieart al
623. ises, : : ! THE THREE KNIQHTS OF longing" to ST. JOHN. 81 and related such conso
624. ST. JOHN. 81 and related such consoling wonders, that the princess, honour the
625. were doctoi-s of the faith ; but fearing to refiise to attempt any thing which m
626. fearing to refiise to attempt any thing which might be the will of God, they pr
627. urnished with wood and tools for carving. These were soon procured and one of th
628. procured and one of the brethren, having said the Hail Mary, set to work to roug
629. ped him as best they could, all praj'ing to God to guide their hands, and implor
630. God to guide their hands, and imploring Mary to bless their efforts. For severa
631. or several days they laboured, di-eaming of nothing, whether awake or asleep, ;
632. days they laboured, di-eaming of nothing, whether awake or asleep, ; but their p
633. but their pious enterprise. One morning, when they awoke, what was their surpri
634. it had brought into their prison. During the niglit which followed tliis happy d
635. e, to fly to France witlj them; offering to be her support, and jn-omising her t
636. fering to be her support, and jn-omising her that, after a pure and holy life, s
637. n of imperisluible glory and everlasting blessedness. She hesitated no longer; a
638. ht sleep. l)rofess the faith; confessing to them, moreover, tliat in a 82 CATHOL
639. in a 82 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. was executing* a command given her by our Lady. The L
640. threw themselves on their knees, giving- tlianks to God and the Holy Virg-in, a
641. o God and the Holy Virg-in, and swearing to the princess that they would conduct
642. he dooi-s, she found the guards sleeping. unfastened the chains, and imder the e
643. starliglit, they discerned a bark coming towards them impelled by a single rower
644. ly arrived on the opposite bank, looking back on the stream, they could see no l
645. urns, but in vain; they all three lowing. ; yielded to fatigue, and fell asleep.
646. d to fatigue, and fell asleep. awakening, says the old legend, tliey wei-e amaze
647. ed, and thought they were still dreaming-, for often liad the captives dreamed o
648. ment, a shepherd passed by them g-uiding- his flock, dressed in the costume of E
649. vestments, must be yourselves returning- from the Crusades. Perliaps you can br
650. rom the Crusades. Perliaps you can bring- us certain tiding's of our poor lords;
651. erliaps you can bring- us certain tiding's of our poor lords; and thoug-h this l
652. ech, followed his example; and, shedding the sweetest tears of gratitude and joy
653. beards, and the long period of suifering they had past, had so changed them, tli
654. snes. Their mother, who was still living, almost expired with joy at again behol
655. most expired with joy at again beholding her ^he sons, whose deaths she had moun
656. age. crated to this work of thanksgiving the larger portion of the jewels she ha
657. the elder of the three knights standing as her godi'atlier; and her piety conti
658. or a few days, the preacher entertaining- them with an accoimt of all the wonder
659. ir dexterity in the art of imagebreaking. The preacher, who had more than once h
660. ch enterprises, collected on the evening before the feast a number of young men,
661. doctrine, who spent the night carousing in the tavern j and at break of day, ha
662. the tavern j and at break of day, having provided themselves with crowbars and o
663. cred Scriptures ; and assured of finding many adherents amongst the crowd, they
664. to the imperial officer then commanding' in the town, requesting a guard for it
665. then commanding' in the town, requesting a guard for its protection. But he was
666. cement of the ceremonies was approaching, and the nuns prej)ared for Mass with m
667. xieties of the nuns on memorable morning, it so happened tliat tlie leader and m
668. up in this their large mantles, waiting behind the piHars of the church, the co
669. te to The abbess on the previous evening so high a festival. had ordered a mass,
670. the performance. Meanwhile some alarming scenes had already taken place in the c
671. church; and as the bell was then tolling, ordered the nuns, who surrounded her i
672. who surrounded her in fear and trembling, to select any music, however inferior,
673. ence without delay. The nuns were taking their places the parts of a mass which
674. omewhat pale, o[)peared slowly ascending the staii-s, carrying under her arm the
675. d slowly ascending the staii-s, carrying under her arm the mass of that old Ital
676. ret of her wonderful recovery and giving to each their several parts, she seated
677. most heavenly and mi; ; raculous feeling of consolation ; the very anxiety wliic
678. e entire service ; the " Gloria," daring the " Kyrie" especially, and yet more a
679. s to what road they had taken on leaving Aix-la-Chapelle; for that they had neve
680. the emj)eror. But as they were suffering from religious dei'angement, and, as th
681. er, or no heed to the information. being struck by many of the particulars given
682. crucifix. They a])peare(l to be ])raying before it in silence, their folded hand
683. t in silence, their folded hands resting on the table. The unfortunate mother, r
684. ble. The unfortunate mother, recognising her sons, sank powerless on a chair. To
685. the adoration of the Redeemer, imagining- that they had a clearer conception tha
686. ivinity as the true Son of the one Uving God. He said that they had now led this
687. nd then only for the purpose of intoning the Gloria in excehis, wliich they did
688. he very windows He concluded bv assuring her, that notof the house. withstanding
689. her, that notof the house. withstanding all this, these patients enjoyed perfec
690. crucifix, and employ his time in singing the Gloria in excchlt, like themselves.
691. be conducted home ; and on the following morning, hoping to gain some informatio
692. cted home ; and on the following morning, hoping to gain some information as to
693. e ; and on the following morning, hoping to gain some information as to the caus
694. er with much cou: tesy ; but on learning her business, he bolted the door, and a
695. he bolted the door, and after requesting her to l)e seated, he cautiously began
696. sly began his narrative in the following words " Mv good ladv, provided you prom
697. dulged in many wanton pranks, disturbing the divine service ; and that upwaras o
698. and after awhile the preacher, tui*ning round suddenly, called on us all, in a
699. econcerted sig-nal. Instead of answering, the preacher crossed his hands on his
700. together with his three brothers, bowing his head with fervour to the very groun
701. ment before he hnd ])een openly scoffing. Utterly perplexed at such a s])ectacle
702. ived of tlieir leader, remained standing, undecided and inactive, until the conc
703. m the cluwch and disperse. 1 hat evening, after many fruitless inquiries who had
704. the convent, with the view of obtaining further from tba THE CONVENT OF door-ke
705. om tba THE CONVENT OF door-keepei"s, ing- ST. CECILY, 91 in assist- who had been
706. ansformed, as it were, into stone, lying prostrate, with folded hands, before th
707. ded hands, before the altar, and kissing the ground with most enthusiastic fervo
708. loaks and shook them by the arm, begging of them to leave the church, which was
709. hout heavy sighs, and constantly looking round, as if their hearts were breaking
710. round, as if their hearts were breaking at this parting from the church. repeat
711. eir hearts were breaking at this parting from the church. repeatedly asked them
712. s thoroughly to change their whole being ; but thev 2nade no other reply than by
713. ev 2nade no other reply than by pressing our hands, Itjoking at us kindh , then
714. ply than by pressing our hands, Itjoking at us kindh , then gazing on the gTouri
715. ands, Itjoking at us kindh , then gazing on the gTourid, and wiping from time to
716. , then gazing on the gTourid, and wiping from time to time the tears from their
717. made a cross of birch-rods ; and setting it upon a little mound of wax, placed i
718. their senses were closed to every thing else in the world, they seated themselv
719. whilst v..eir friends, who came crowding to see them in increasing numbei"s, sto
720. came crowding to see them in increasing numbei"s, stood round in sej)arate gTou
721. ood round in sej)arate gTou])s, wringing their hands in unutterable anguish at w
722. nds in unutterable anguish at witnessing such strange and ghostlike behaviour. T
723. been prepared for them in the adjoining chamber. By and by, at the hour of midn
724. idnight, your four sons, after listening for a moment to the dull striking of th
725. tening for a moment to the dull striking of the clock, rose abruptly with one ac
726. d from their horror, maaam, on beholding these men We 93 seats, CATHOLIC LEQEN1>
727. ne the Gloria in ten-ible as the howling; of wolves excelsis with and leopards I
728. s against them. through the neighbouring streets, wliich soon became filled with
729. y from their slumbers. The mob, breaking through the house-door, reached up stai
730. ed tlieir dreadful chant, without paying the least attention to the anger of the
731. , or the exclamations of the surrounding multitude. At length, when the clock st
732. heads the perspiration which was falling in large diops on the table, and spread
733. large diops on the table, and spreading out their cloaks, laid them down on the
734. hour's rei)ose. AVith the firet crowing of the cock, they rose again, rosmned t
735. me as usual to visit them in the morning, asked for some bread and water, and a
736. s, and beg them to assist him in getting rid of his lodgers, who were doubtless
737. ijected to medicnl inspection; and being declared deranged, were lodged in the l
738. for the melanclioly ])urpose of viewing with lier own eyes the spot where God n
739. ie earth, as ifwitii invisible lightning. Tha lady abbess having heard of her ar
740. isible lightning. Tha lady abbess having heard of her arin the icy winter season
741. formed on that f arful day. On receiving* an answer in the affirmative she rose
742. k of some fearful spirit; and on finding-- tbe pag-e opened at the Gloria in exc
743. in excelsis, was on the point of sinking' to the ground. It seemed to her as tli
744. tellects of her children was now rushing with equal force on her own devoted hea
745. fi-om the mere sight ; and after having hastily pressed her lips to the pnge, w
746. ips to the pnge, with an intense feeling of humility and re- signation to the Di
747. cution of that composition you see lying before you. It is certain that Sister A
748. ember of our community cnpaljle of doing it, lay on her sick-bed during tlie who
749. of doing it, lay on her sick-bed during tlie whole period of its performance, d
750. edside the whole of that forenoon during tlie celebration ot" the Festival of Co
751. sibility in which she was on the morning of that day, but died that very same ev
752. hat day, but died that very same evening. The Archbishop of who was 94 CATHOLIC
753. ef from ; is HoHness the Pope expressing the same opinion." * * m to the Haggle,
754. retunied and was received the following year into the bosom of the Catholic Chu
755. calm and peaceful death, after intoning once more, according to their custom, t
756. ath, after intoning once more, according to their custom, the Gloria in excehis.
757. of Chan][)agne, his suzerain, was coming to pass a few days on his estate, and w
758. he in secret. might weep After wandering about for an hour, he stopped in the mi
759. by seven withered chestnut-trees. giving vent to his vehement gnef, and seeking
760. g vent to his vehement gnef, and seeking in vain in his mind for any device wher
761. receive the proposed visits in a fitting manner, without jierceiving that the da
762. in a fitting manner, without jierceiving that the day was drawing to a close (it
763. out jierceiving that the day was drawing to a close (it was in the month of May)
764. ened to steps of a hoi"seman approaching him. dry his tears, rose up, and found
765. himself in the preof lofty and imposing stature, but mounted on an Arab hoi"se
766. ce you in a brilhant position, restoring to you greater riches than those you ha
767. " and if it ruin me utterly, only saving' my at the point of death honour, I giv
768. aimed the Sire of Champfleury, recoiling- with terror ; and he raised his hand i
769. ternal salvation of your wife, and bring her to me on this day next year." The k
770. night, though he expected some revolting proposal, was indignant at this j and h
771. ebel angel mi^ht have demanded something yet worse; that he had a year before hi
772. and so he only muttered in a hesitating voice, that it was not in his power to
773. ute the condition proposed. " Only bring her here," said the black knight, *' on
774. k knight, *' on this day next year bring your that is all I ask wife here alone
775. wife here alone with you, without having warned her of our contract. The rest is
776. to which the stranger answered notljing; and too soon the kniglit's resistance
777. o this second crime, secretly whispering to himself that he had a year before hi
778. re him wherein to repent. Without daring, tliorefore, to raise his eyes towards
779. his eyes towards heaven, and shurldering all the time at his own baseness, he re
780. of his compact and the fiend, protesting that after that he would ask nothing ;
781. ing that after that he would ask nothing ; i{ 98 fiirther, CATHOLIC LKaENDS. dec
782. or, thoug-h he well knew that in denying- his God he had committed a crime still
783. led to God ? No," he continued, speaking- aloud, " I will never submit to this l
784. as so determined, that the demon, seeing that he might lose all if he pressed hi
785. irected to seek for them ; and gathering them u]), without confiding to any one
786. nd gathering them u]), without confiding to any one tlie treaty by which he had
787. he barons in the Count's suite reminding him that St. Bernard was at that time p
788. t St. Bernard was at that time preaching the second crusade, and invitmg him to
789. m to follow under the banner of his king, Louis the Young, he replied that pai-t
790. ; THE KNIGHT OF CHAMPFLEURY, home during V)9 the whole of that year ; but keep h
791. gned with his lieai-t was slowly wasting away his own blood within him ; his nig
792. a church, he was seized with a trembling horror wliich drove him from it; so tha
793. acred offices. He had reckoned on making use of this year to reconcile himself w
794. pride revolted at the idea of confessing from wluit source his riches came, had
795. It was only at the moment of fulfilling liis engagement tliat he reretted he ha
796. urn ?" she asked. " Oh we are not g'oing' far," answered the knight vaguely, and
797. ed to the Blessed Virgin without pausing there to ofter up a short prayer. Accor
798. f at the door while she went in, holding the two horses. The lady remained but a
799. dle, and rode on by her side, shuddering inwardly more and more, the nearer tlie
800. f, to dare dream for a moment of drawing back from the fullilment of his pledge
801. he cried; " I may not delay." A feeling- which he could not account for had ari
802. igned, the black horseman came galloping" up, followed this time by numerous squ
803. loyal man," said he at last, adch'essing the knight, '' is this your oath '' Wha
804. my." The knight, in no way comprehending what these words meant, turned towards
805. e knight to the fearful place of meeting. The Lord of Champfleury, stupefied wit
806. ow appeared to him only as the consoling sign of the protection of the Blessed V
807. full of a celestial harmony, and calming all the tumults of she said to the demo
808. had lost for a whole year, the blessing of being able to pray ; and confessed w
809. for a whole year, the blessing of being able to pray ; and confessed with sobs
810. fessed with sobs of anguish, and beating his breast, the enormity of his fall. "
811. lous sleep, she saw her husband kneeling beside her. Tlie Blessed Virgin had gon
812. enada; inclosed within which, and hoping in vain for succour, the cowardly Boabd
813. people named in derision the little king, found no consolation for his calamitie
814. lt, but contented themselves with firing on the ramparts, and forcing back furth
815. with firing on the ramparts, and forcing back further and further the outworks o
816. d caused to be erected a wooden building, crowned with towers, on the loftiest o
817. e nuns sang their holy and every morning the queen, accompanied office daily by
818. ch & choir of nuns assisted. One morning- Isabella disting^iiished a voice among
819. assisted. One morning- Isabella disting^iiished a voice among" them, the beauti
820. could not doubt but that it was joining- for the first time in The queen looked
821. nd her, and the holy service. perceiving that her attendants participated in her
822. air, his far from her, and who, kneeling* on his hands joined, and his e^'es g-l
823. hands joined, and his e^'es g-listening with earnestness, was gazing fixedly at
824. g-listening with earnestness, was gazing fixedly at the gi-ating of the choir. W
825. ness, was gazing fixedly at the gi-ating of the choir. When ^lass was ended, Isa
826. ilar had formed the project of attacking one of the enemy's outworks, which supp
827. k by a ri))bon of gold, and after having" struck a few chords, she began to pour
828. he was on a mission at the court of King- Boahdil I will give thee thy liberty,'
829. he cmcifix in his hand, and was standing- near, interrupted him, suesting th
830. ing- near, interrupted him, suesting that it was no kindness to the captive
831. ce of God might enlighten her, and bring her back into the fold of the faithful.
832. rful, now soft and plaintive her ringing voice was heard every where. One night,
833. ther in the choir of the church, singing our holy office by the light of the wax
834. en ta[)ei"s, I discerned Zulima standing by the open door of the choir, gazing a
835. ng by the open door of the choir, gazing at us with a grave and meditative aspec
836. ct; and when we left the chapel, walking two and two, I saw Zulima kneeling near
837. lking two and two, I saw Zulima kneeling near an image of our Blessed Lady. The
838. image of our Blessed Lady. The following day she sang no Moorish songs; but pass
839. reflection and soon we heard her trying on her lute the chants which we had sim
840. g in churcli and afterwards endeavouring, in a low voice, to sing them herself,
841. ds endeavouring, in a low voice, to sing them herself, and even to imitate the s
842. t that the grace of God was. manifesting ; : ; itself in this song, and therefor
843. een permitted her to join us in praising the Lord, and in raising her wonderful
844. us in praising the Lord, and in raising her wonderful voice for the glory of ou
845. quis of Cadiz, Henry of Gusman, standing as her sponsors. After her baptism, how
846. urmurs of her lute were like the moaning^ of a distant storm. She lierself becam
847. temptation but Julia, far from following her council, would often, to the gi'eat
848. the gi'eat scandal of the sisters, sing Moorish songs at the very time when the
849. en the chants of the Church were echoing through the cloisters, touching at the
850. echoing through the cloisters, touching at the same time on her instrument, a l
851. like accompaniment, whicli formed a sing-ulai* contrast to the solemn chords of
852. a beggar covered with rags was standing at the principal gate, who, when the :
853. ith his sword, wlien the beggar, drawing a lute from under his mantle, drew from
854. The giiards at last succeeded in leading In'm away, and it was told the queen th
855. e church, and the young convert, closing her books, prepared to leave tbe choii*
856. er's splendid chords ? I must go to sing with him." But Donna Emanuela, holding
857. g with him." But Donna Emanuela, holding her by the arm, said in a solemn voice
858. tins, when the nuns were just assembling in the church, a thick cloud of smoke r
859. to its root; and very soon the crackling flames burst through its wooden walls,
860. a heap of ruins; and tlie Moors, taking advantage of the tunmlt, made an attack
861. nchments, the Queen Isabella, assembling her chiefs, gave ordei-s to build a tow
862. er camp had occupied, thereby announcing to the floors that the siege would neve
863. the siege would never be raised. During the building of this town, the Moors we
864. uld never be raised. During the building of this town, the Moors were continuall
865. wn, the Moors were continually harassing tlic Spaniards, and many bloody •onfl
866. : who ; 108 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. Returning one day from a parliciilai'ly distingii
867. continually before his eyes even during; the combat he had seemed several times
868. h ecclesiastical chants. While straining" his ear to catch these distant sounds,
869. the Moor was already upon him, standing in his stirrups, and' with his scymitar
870. th his scymitar raised. In the twinkling of an eye, however, Ag-uilar was on his
871. Ag-uilar was on his feet and, straining his opponent in his arms, threw him vio
872. im violently on the gro\md, and kneeling on his breast, pointed his poignard at
873. throat. Ho was on the point of stabbing him, when he heard the Moor with a sigh
874. y Hichem horse, but, instead of laishing- resumed his buckler and scymitar upon
875. appeared with the swiftness of lightning-. After a time the Moors, continually r
876. s sung* a solemn Te Deum in thanksgiving to tlie God of armies. The rage and fur
877. s. The rage and fury of tlie Moors being well known, bands of soldiers were plac
878. iers were placed in all the neighbouring streets to protect the procession and A
879. manded one of these bands, was advancing towards the cathedral, when he felt him
880. ead and Aguilar, immediately recognising him, joined in fight with him hand to h
881. ed, and already the flames were mounting even to the roof, wlien a wonderful voi
882. dst of 110 CATHOLIC LEeENDS. the burning building, chanting, Sanctus, sancttu sa
883. 0 CATHOLIC LEeENDS. the burning building, chanting, Sanctus, sancttu sanctus Dom
884. LEeENDS. the burning building, chanting, Sanctus, sancttu sanctus Dominvs Deus
885. nedictine nun, came forth, still singing Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus ; while behin
886. heir ranks to the cathedral, on entering which she intoned, Benedictus qui venit
887. d and Isabella were engaged in assisting at the holy function; and as soon as th
888. our on foot throug-h Switzpiland, Having' visited Chamouny and the upper distric
889. of the valleys, the more g"ently sloping- Alps stripped of their horrors of prec
890. and then anxious to exhaust every thing- remarkable in these parts, I began to
891. if they had come from a distance, asking neither alms nor employment, but with a
892. inditlerence to people and things, going" on their way in companies, telling the
893. oing" on their way in companies, telling their beads or repeating litanies, knee
894. panies, telling their beads or repeating litanies, kneeling before the wayside c
895. ir beads or repeating litanies, kneeling before the wayside crosses which guard
896. ich guard the Catholic cantons, greeting travellers as they went with a friendly
897. r a pious word, and invariably answering when I asked them whither they were bou
898. e bound, " For Einsiedeln." On referring to my guide-book I found Einsiedeln was
899. ch and as a place of pilgrimage. Nothing more was necessary to excite my interes
900. ook the road thither, and after crossing one or two mountains, and passing a lar
901. ossing one or two mountains, and passing a large town made up oi inns and comple
902. ter a conflagration, present an imposing mass, with a regular and majestic faqad
903. church with its two towers, each bearing a double cross, and SQ^arated by a larg
904. mage of the Blessed Virgin, and poiu-ing from twelve ever-flowing* jets its cool
905. n, and poiu-ing from twelve ever-flowing* jets its cool pure water. All round th
906. and gardens of the convent. On entering the church one is struck by the richnes
907. from Bethlehem to Calvary. The touching" recollections of the Old and New Testa
908. ps many famihes of pilgi-ims had Sinking under the burden of heat and just an'iv
909. e foot of this altar, as if a protecting powt;r was discovered, hitlserto iui1;n
910. hoed througli tlie chiu-ch. It was >iing by fifty pilgrims from tlie nioi ntains
911. sole object of this long and f itiguing journev liad been to kneel at tlie foot
912. anticle of praise. The shades uf evening revealed but dimly the bold, manly form
913. had left perhaps her child langTiishing^ upon a bed of sickness, gave more plai
914. permission to see the abbey, which being granted, a Benedictine showed me, besid
915. history of the abbey, the ravages rising once had endured from fire and revoluti
916. to whicli he was entitled, and entering a monastery, became a Benedictine. But
917. ed with his choice. hermit; and building secretly with his own hands a little hu
918. r seven years, dwelt Meinrad, practising all the austerities the most rigid pena
919. oly recluse of the mountain, and wearing into beaten paths its hitherto untrodde
920. es to refer themselves with unhesitating confidence to the advice of solitaries
921. of God, spoke faithfully to all, fearing not man, and determined to do justice.
922. ly to prayer and meditation ; and having discovered at the foot of the mountain
923. o all, he etfected his departure, taking witli him nothing Itut an image of the
924. his departure, taking witli him nothing Itut an image of the Blessed Vii-gin; b
925. d him CATHOLIC LEGENDS. still. Resisting* no more the evident will of concerning
926. * no more the evident will of concerning him, Meinrad received all who braved th
927. s, and none went away without a blessing. Nor was it only human visitants he wel
928. apel, whither he went to say the evening office, when suddenly the whole chapel
929. y at yoiu* last liour. God : my blessing and forgiveness before me; and when I a
930. u shall receive you kill Notwithstanding this address, the simple piety of which
931. to kill the hermit : they found nothing, however, but bis penitential hair-shir
932. usly kindled by invisible hands. Fleeing in terror and remorse, they escaped uns
933. is bread, followed the murderers, crying after them, and striking at them with t
934. rderers, crying after them, and striking at them with their beaks, as far as the
935. ion of some people of Wolrau, who having found the hermit dead, had instantly se
936. quest of the assassins, and recognising the birds as those of Meinrad, felt lit
937. irds, adds the tradition, still hovering above the scalTold. The inn where this
938. nce, and canon of Strasbourg, renouncing all his worldly wealth, came to the Dar
939. e school for young nobles, a well-spring of general civilisation.* * An ancient
940. y and countless and wisdom the beginning' of their strength. But a time of perse
941. ess succeeded to centuries of increasing prosperity. The impiety of a French arm
942. y appointed, whilst Conrad was ]»raying- at midnight, on a sudden he saw' the n
943. Lord Himself and His apostles appearing in the midst. In the morning all assemb
944. s appearing in the midst. In the morning all assembled for the ceremony but on s
945. ssembled for the ceremony but on seeking out Conrad, tliey were informed by him
946. rice heard from the sanctuary, declaring that the church was consecrated. It may
947. I., to the same effect and the following sentence of the angelic doctor in liis
948. olic St, travellers, who, after visiting- the shrine of Alphonso at Pagani, and
949. ned aside to the left, soon after having passed the village of San Cesareo, two
950. two minutes' walk would suffice to bring him to the edge of a longdeep narrow an
951. e, and commo- up the dious path, leading to the mill which is a little farther v
952. Federigo, a priest of La Cava, was going- along by this way to St. Pietro a Drag
953. a Dragonea, one of the hamlets belonging to the parish of San Cesareo, he had an
954. otection of the Madonna; but not liaving- sufficient means to procure a statue o
955. nt means to procure a statue or painting- for this purpose, he was obhged to con
956. bhged to content himself witli fastening" to tlie rock a little print, which he
957. which he happened to have, representing the Blessed Virg-in, with the Dove and
958. and the Cherubim over her head, holding' the child Jesus in her arms, and havin
959. the child Jesus in her arms, and having St. Paul, the first hermit, on her righ
960. ninjured by time and by the damp, during' a period of forty-eight years, the cav
961. by the devotion of the passers-by during this half century; and at length, in th
962. Virgin, caused a copy of tlie engraving to be executed in fresco, in a little n
963. all it. liad a natural tendency to bring about its own fulfilment. One of the pr
964. n altnr to be raised before the painting-, a lamp to be kept burning, and the li
965. the painting-, a lamp to be kept burning, and the litanies and other devotional
966. THE MADONNA BELLA GROTTA. 121 following year, that as a poor man, named Antonio
967. son, a boy of six years old, was driving along this path a donkey laden with com
968. the precipice and rolled over, cairying the boy along with him. The depth of th
969. so that the poor father expected nothing else than to see his son dashed to piec
970. pot, he found the animal quietly grazing-, the boy busily collecting the scatter
971. etly grazing-, the boy busily collecting the scattered grain, and both perfectly
972. ns to the grotto, that the crowd passing to and fro in so narrow a place became
973. clesiastical authorities to The building was carerect a spacious chapel there. r
974. briskly, through the liberal almsgiving of those who came to ask for grazw here
975. dden whilst this examination was pending-; but it soon appeared that the jn'oofs
976. newed to the vellous reports xmdertaking in hand. On the 7th of September, 1704,
977. reescore years and ten," and who, having' himself received a signal grazia at th
978. he last j^ears of his hfe to celebrating her glories, and, by order of the bisho
979. year, simple peasants from the adjoining- villages, groups of women, members of
980. eighbours in the same village, suffering under some common affliction, may be se
981. e common affliction, may be seen wending theu- way through the chestnut-groves o
982. nd dishevelled hair, alternately telling their beads and reciting the litanies u
983. rnately telling their beads and reciting the litanies until they reach this Chur
984. itselfj and to make some little offering of flowers, or oil, or candles, after w
985. ich they retiu-n to their homes, beaiing with them some portion of the oil from
986. oil from the lamp that has been burning before the shrine, nothing doubting tha
987. been burning before the shrine, nothing doubting that, if it be God's will, the
988. ning before the shrine, nothing doubting that, if it be God's will, the sick wil
989. was yet unbroken except by the rustling' of the foliage in the fresh sea-breeze
990. when the bell of the monastery of Lering began to ring for Matins, and its sound
991. of the monastery of Lering began to ring for Matins, and its sound re-echoed thr
992. pallets to meet in the church, and sing the praises of Him to whom they had vow
993. summons it was the abbot, who, standing at the window of his cell, looked out i
994. nce. Sometimes, too, he seemed straining his ear as if to catch a remote sound ;
995. ore of his own island, At last, I'ousing himself or broke against its cliffs. fr
996. m be in where his brethren were awaiting some anxiety ; for their abbot was ever
997. tatory " Oh, come, let us adore the King" of king's, whose Virg-in ]^I other was
998. Oh, come, let us adore the King" of king's, whose Virg-in ]^I other was this day
999. horus, " Oh, come, let us adore the King- of king-s, whose Virgin Mother was thi
1000.Oh, come, let us adore the King- of king-s, whose Virgin Mother was this day tak
1001.esence with song's of gladness, and sing- hymns to His giory !" And again the ch
1002.eated, " Oh, come, let us adore the King of kings, whose Virgin Mother was this
1003.he altar, to place themselves in fitting order to receive the Holy Communion. Th
1004. Holy Communion. Then the abbot, holding aloft the vessel containing the " My we
1005.bot, holding aloft the vessel containing the " My wellSacred Hosts, tlms address
1006.s blood for you on Calvary, is now going to give you Himself. After sucli genero
1007.generosity, can you refuse Him any thing ? Nay, even if he should demand from ea
1008.lves ; day by day you have been lenrning by practice how to sacrifice yourselves
1009.ranch of palm, at the same time crowning your brows with a resplendent g-arland.
1010.ar." Tbis address, so far from saddening the hearts of the brethren, only made t
1011. souls with courtig-e to meet the coming- trial. ; ; ; 126 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. At
1012.he monastery as pensionei's, and placing them on board two barks, he sent them t
1013.coast of Italy, after tenderly embracing them, and giving them his last benedict
1014.fter tenderly embracing them, and giving them his last benediction. They all wep
1015.ed them, and they departed, long looking back with regretful eyes to their belov
1016.ft beliind busied themselves in securing, as far as they could, against pillage
1017.n with the works they had beg'un copying. No one seeing them thus employed, in s
1018.s they had beg'un copying. No one seeing them thus employed, in such perfect pea
1019.s were discerned in the distance, making rapid way towards the island; and, as t
1020. abbot, in tranquil expectation, holding- the cross in liis hands, and praying t
1021.ng- the cross in liis hands, and praying to the Lord to g'ive both to him and hi
1022.d noise of destruction ; for every thing that could seats, not conveniently be c
1023.ndows ; and the rage of the invadnothing ers was inflamed by finding no rich boo
1024.invadnothing ers was inflamed by finding no rich booty, in any part of the monas
1025.ast the chief of the Saracens, snatching the cross li'om the hands of the abbot,
1026., and I offer you the menus of attaining it. Kenoimce the religion of Christ, an
1027.mmediately beg'an a song of thanksgiving. TJie chief commanded their immediate s
1028.er to claim their crown, four only being* reserved, wlioin the chief ke[)t back
1029.an men. and Colombo remained hidiancying every moment they heard the Saracens ap
1030.ent they heard the Saracens approacliing, wlien suddenly a hrilliant light shone
1031.ould not doubt, of their brethren having won at that moment the martyr's crown;
1032. moment the martyr's crown; for, lifting tlieir eyes, they saw, though the sun w
1033.rotto, THE MONKS OF LERINS. disappearing one 129 by one in the depths of the sky
1034.the port, we are stiU here below tossing about in the storm, and in danger of sh
1035.tyrdom, whichever be my lot, can nothing avail to shake my faith I will go and t
1036.ill be useless to think of : "My burying oiw brethren to attempt it will be to i
1037.d the Lord will be your helper, covering you with brazen armour, so that you wil
1038. God be done." Accordingly, after giving the farewell kiss, Colombo left the gTo
1039.re but he met no one, though threatening cries entering* warned him that he had
1040.o one, though threatening cries entering* warned him that he had been seen from
1041.t lie threw liimself on his face sobbing; but one blow from the scymitar of a Sa
1042.of slangliter foundly still; and knowing by the silence that the ! 130 CATHOLIC
1043.ver the bodies of his brethren and being unable to procure any thing to make a l
1044.en and being unable to procure any thing to make a light, was constrained to end
1045.ours, which he spent in prayer, kneeling on the sod made holy by the blood of so
1046.he felt a blessed consolation in knowing that they were all interceding in his ;
1047.n knowing that they were all interceding in his ; behalf. brethren !" he said to
1048.bot had sent tliither, in order to bring them back and reestablish the monastery
1049.e distant step of a man slowly advancing by the cloister wall. His first impulse
1050.ino'uish who it was that was approaching" him ; but in a lew moments a Moor stoo
1051.od beside him, and spoke. " Fear nothing, my brother," he said, " I am no longer
1052.d of the population, and held out during a sieg'e of several months; but at last
1053. massacred before my eyes while kneeling in prayer; and I myself, seized by her
1054.o change my religion, yet on my refusing he left me in peace. But when I reached
1055.ously; and by dint sometimes of seducing promices, sometimes of harsh treatment,
1056.more and more distinct, My in overcoming my resistance." At this avowal his spee
1057.han my faith! At the moment of accepting the turban I ceased to be a slave, and
1058.T to murder, and to pillag'e, respecting- have led the Saracens on to fire, neit
1059.s on to fire, neither age nor pillag"ing clmrches, devastating- monasteries, so
1060.age nor pillag"ing clmrches, devastating- monasteries, so that my crimes rather
1061.r, 0, holv monk," he continued, throwing* himself at the feet of £leutherius, "
1062.ir murderere. Therefore, let hope spring- up in your soid, together with repenta
1063.they both occupied themselves in burying- tlie bodies of the holy martyrs. In a
1064.leutlierius set otf for Italy, to ])ring- back the brethren whom the abbot had s
1065.hiinself to works of ])cnance, intending- to await the re-estal)lishment of the
1066.ork of devastation far and near, sacking" and burning* towns, villag'es, and chu
1067.ation far and near, sacking" and burning* towns, villag'es, and churches. One da
1068.sign to any; so that the chief, becoming" impatient, commissioned two of his sol
1069.ers to g"o and make inquiries concerning" him. For this service he selected t\vo
1070.he selected t\vo renegades, who, knowing- the country, were best able to help hi
1071.e law; the declaration of apostasy being* to them a mere formula, which they pro
1072.ug-ht or conviction one way After taking- counsel together, they or tlie other.
1073. the Isle of Lerins, as it was According-Iy, there that tliey had last seen Mous
1074.v landed on the island, even yet reeking- witli the blood of tlie martyrs, an em
1075.row path lead- 134 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. ing to the cloister. The bodies of the mai-
1076.cess in the sanctuary was a monk praying. " Here is a man," said one, " who has
1077.hink yourself lucky to be still standing- on your feet, and with your head on yo
1078. these same Saracens that we are seeking Moussa is his name. Plave you met with
1079.liim ?" " Moussa !" answered the seeming monk " I am he; or rather I am he who o
1080.d gives me the opportunity of retrieving my sni so far as it is retrievable, T i
1081. mercy is infinite, as I am experiencing; but His wrath will indeed be ; : : dre
1082.er almost as tliougli they were dreaming, and dared not break the silence. "What
1083.om the town of Marseilles lies a smiling valley, fertile and gTeen, which is abu
1084.ace, sepai-ated by its thick surrounding" woods from all the cares and turmoils
1085.er world. In this lovely vale, a fitting- habitation for those whose vow bound t
1086.g-irlhood must have been far more trying", to her happy home, her motlier's tend
1087.under which the outer world was gToaning'j and it is ])robable that no personal
1088. but a deeper dread, a more overpowering horror oppressed the sj)otless spouses
1089. sucli utter bai'batlic rians. Trembling and j)ale, they crowch.'d rf)un(l the a
1090., they crowch.'d rf)un(l the and nothing was beard amongst them but groans of ag
1091.altar like startled doves, heart-rending sobs. Amidst the weeping, trembling cro
1092., heart-rending sobs. Amidst the weeping, trembling crowd, Eusebia KU8EBIA OF MA
1093.ding sobs. Amidst the weeping, trembling crowd, Eusebia KU8EBIA OF MARSEILLES. 1
1094.e. At the first sound of the evil tiding-s she had soug'ht the foot of the altar
1095.ps moved in inward prayer, then, tm-ning' to her Sis" Dear children, terhood, sh
1096.r, Eusebia rose uj) calmly, and pointing" to the crucifix, she said " Sistei-s,
1097.he raised a knife, and with an unshaking hand severed her nose and ears, and cov
1098.ry hand was stretched towards the saving* weapon every nun followed the example
1099.maidens whom -they had hoped would bring' so hig'n a price in the slave market,
1100.d only a g-roup of g-hastly and bleeding images, who could inspire nothing but h
1101.eeding images, who could inspire nothing but horror. Furious at being thus defea
1102.ire nothing but horror. Furious at being thus defeated in their end, the barbari
1103.own. XXI. THE LEGEND OF PLACIDUS. During the reign of the Emperor Trajan, a man
1104.es victoriously against their Possessing the gi-atefid confidence of Parthian fo
1105.soul'/ heathen; not one of those joining inveterately in the cry of persecution,
1106.ared ax-^owedlv in the universal feeling of contempt with which the immediate su
1107.uch of his time in the forests ; finding in piu-suit of stags and other game a r
1108.m the companv. Tlinj followed the flying herd f;ir away into the depths of the f
1109.osity that had even to himself something supornatursil in it, tracked, closely a
1110.in it, tracked, closely as liis jianting horse could bear him, the footsteps of
1111.l of the time, the distance, the closing hour of the day it 140 CATHOLIC LEGENDS
1112. it 140 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. He saw nothing but the stag ; he must gain it at last.
1113. stag boimded to its summit, and turning, faced the astonished Placidus. Motionl
1114.less it stood; and between its brandling antlere, dimly dis- ceraed against the
1115.e, dimly dis- ceraed against the evening sky, arose a cross, encircled by a ring
1116. sky, arose a cross, encircled by a ring of lig'ht, piercing and dazzling, as no
1117. encircled by a ring of lig'ht, piercing and dazzling, as no ray of sun or moon
1118. a ring of lig'ht, piercing and dazzling, as no ray of sun or moon could kindle.
1119.The voice re" I am the Son of the living God. I created heaven and earth, and di
1120.licant, no hour was too late for gaining admittance to the Christinn bisliop; an
1121. immediately ushered into his jireHaving- related bis wonderful adventure to the
1122.ne of his miraculous converThen kneeling* in prayer, he awaited the message sion
1123.lie wife and sons of Eustace, on hearing from his lips the wonderful things whic
1124.he gods ofiiis former worship for having treacherously abandoned thorn. But, enl
1125.ervant. Eustace then resolved on leaving his native land, and seeking" in some d
1126. on leaving his native land, and seeking" in some distant country a new home, wh
1127.new home, where he might peaceably bring up his children in the true faith. Jour
1128.s children in the true faith. Journeying in this spirit to the sea-shore, he fou
1129.convinced that he had no means of paying for the voyage but on per; ceiving the
1130.aying for the voyage but on per; ceiving the beauty of Theosbyta, his wife, a di
1131.ent ; in vain Eustace pleaded his having- been taken on board out of charity ; t
1132.y ; the captain was resolute in pressing his claim and on being assured by Eusta
1133.olute in pressing his claim and on being assured by Eustace that he Imd nothing
1134.g assured by Eustace that he Imd nothing Avberewith to satisfy it, he immediatel
1135. immediately seized Theosbyta, declaring he would sell her as a slave. Remonstra
1136.o save himself and the cliildren willing herself to endure whatevfjr trials mig'
1137.fe. His cliildren now were all remaining to him in this world, once a treaSilent
1138.this world, once a treaSilent and musing on the mysterisure-house of joys. ous w
1139.till without a murmur, Eustace, clasping the hands of his children on each side,
1140.fail; ' THE LEGEND OF PLACID US. 148 ing footsteps of his youno: companions reca
1141.m in safety on the other side retui-ning" for Ag'apetus, what was the hon-or of
1142. midway in the river, to hear despairing- cries for help from both his sons at o
1143.f sig-ht. my God !" cried Eustace, fling-ing* himself face downwaras " Thy will
1144.g-ht. my God !" cried Eustace, fling-ing* himself face downwaras " Thy will be d
1145.vered head, and the cold dews of evening fell upon his exhausted limbs, and he w
1146.jour; A neyed on. That nig'lit, on lying down to sleep desolate and homeless on
1147.. He seemed to see his children sporting with the ferocious beasts that had torn
1148.nged, grown into young men uiul weai-ing the dress of soldiers, noble and in ang
1149.lancholy cry of the night-birds hovering above In'm, — ; 144 CATHOLIC LEGENDS.
1150.ement, he felt that tender comfoi-t ling-ering- in his mind, he felt that he sho
1151. he felt that tender comfoi-t ling-ering- in his mind, he felt that he should ye
1152.byta was the first object the retui-ning' faculties of Eustace entertained, when
1153. years his master died, and appreciating the patient fidelity of Eustace, ])eque
1154.us to please the emperor, some trembling- for the fate of their country, and a f
1155.s party after party retui'ned desponding from their unsuccessful search. At leng
1156.two former comrades of the hero, pushing in their generous zeal beyond the other
1157.lacidus. Eustace started, but concealing his emotion, evaded their questions, fo
1158.ed, and he hastily left the room. During his absence, the soldiers confeiTed tog
1159.they were sent to seek ; and remembering an old sword-mark which liad honourably
1160. look for it in their On his re-entering the room, they accordingly host. glance
1161. the hearts of thousands. that of a king, his wealth houndless, his prosperity u
1162.f secretly the Church of God but fearing that in this unwillingness to return th
1163.s and wilfulness than any better feeling, Eustace braced himself for the departu
1164.imself for the departure, and committing his future to the care of God, quitted
1165.care of God, quitted his lonely dwelling with his guests. ; ; As they journeyed
1166.se, thanked his gods for such a blessing, and came out himself to meet and welco
1167.imself to meet and welcome the returning hero shouts and acclamations resounded
1168.l the imjx'rial forces there was nothing but glor}' in joining an ui-my headed b
1169. there was nothing but glor}' in joining an ui-my headed by Eustace. Amongst the
1170.mongst the youths who crowded contending for this honour, two j)articular]v attr
1171.d advanced within sig-ht of the invading enemy, who lay encamped within but a sh
1172.treacherous captain. Nig"ht was stealing- silently over the hushed camp; slept,
1173.ostrate ; but they started on perceiving- that they were not alone -another wors
1174.ere a woman, pale and bowed, and looking- in the dim evening- twilig-ht so shado
1175.d bowed, and looking- in the dim evening- twilig-ht so shadowy and motionless, t
1176. the presence of some supernatural being-, mingled with the instinctive reverenc
1177.ror; she seemed like one who has nothing; any long-er The young- men knew alread
1178. ; and now, at the words of the kneeling- woman, tliey doubted no long-er they h
1179.ther !" burst forth in pcai-cely looking- at them. to fear or hope. were brother
1180. name so long unheard, and sunk fainting- to the ground ; but joy in that instan
1181.oy in that instant had gone like healing balm into her wounded heart ; and when
1182.osbytus my Agapetus !" from the reviving mother, struck on his ear. He paused th
1183.nd ; but on one of the young men looking up, he recognised the face of his young
1184.young captain, who started on perceiving his commander; he knew not yet that Eus
1185.he Roman armies, was a Christian. Making a sign to his brother, Theosbytus rose
1186.n still tilled his thouglits, and gazing intently on the pale Theosuyta, his fai
1187.munnured Theosbyta " remember, suffering was to be the portion of thy Christian
1188." ''The will of God be done in all thing-s," replied Eustace; and an "Amen!" ech
1189.ed by joy. Then they prayed till morning's dawn, and then Theosbyta related to h
1190.ured and maintained herself, ever hoping that the day might arrive when her husb
1191.hat the lion which had seized him, being- pursued by hunters before it had time
1192.he wolf; and that hopeless of recovering either of their parents, they had remam
1193.l able to carry arms; when both becoming soldiers, they had risen rapidly in the
1194.urse; and with the dawn of day, kneeling together for a while in prayer, they em
1195.army was for some time delayed; pursuing his conI Then Theosby tus 160 CATHOLIC
1196. Suest, Eustace followed his reti-eating- foes until he had riven them completel
1197. wont on such occasions. day of feasting and rejoicing- was proclaimed ; and the
1198.occasions. day of feasting and rejoicing- was proclaimed ; and the emperor himse
1199. his presence could bestow, by presiding- himself at " But first," said he to Eu
1200.e Temjile of Mars, and make the offering-s he has so richly merited '' at our ha
1201.e." The emperor g-uessed not the meaning of this spe(!ch at first, but those w s
1202.ill die first !" cried Eustace, kindling at the whisper, for he knew it to be th
1203.halt !" cried Adrian furiously, fancying- somewhat of insult in the unwonted ene
1204.es," said Eustace, as he gazed inquLring'ly on the faces of his wife and sons. B
1205.stians that even Eustace, on proclaiming' himself one, had lost at once all titl
1206.an family were exposed before the raging- beasts but not one would open its mout
1207.was an enormous fig-ure, made resembling an and when heated by a fire underneath
1208. was used as an instioiment of torturing execution to those victims who were pla
1209.ne by one within its cavity, and looking* on each other they marvelled how these
1210.ic traveller will recall their affecting story as he visits the stately churches
1211.the stately churches which g"o so loving-ly in bear the name of St. Eustachius.
1212.that band of noble knights died fighting for the recovery of the Holy Land, with
1213. LADY OF THE THORNS. The 153 out leaving" an heir to hand down the name to poste
1214.ce of a genial sky, the saint was taking- her usual exercise, by walking along t
1215.s taking- her usual exercise, by walking along the avenue of her chateau, her mi
1216.e avenue of her chateau, her mind Having arrived at tlie occupied with pious tho
1217.ous thoughts. thorny thicket terminating the avenue, she was not a little surpri
1218.she was not a little surprised at seeing that one of the bushes was already char
1219.arged with all the decorations of spring. She quickened her steps, to assure her
1220. winter's snow; and, oveijoyed at seeing it in reality crowned with a great numb
1221.branches for the ]nir})ose of suspending it in her oratory, before an image of t
1222., her heart surcharged with joy at being tlie bearer of this simple offering. Wh
1223.eing tlie bearer of this simple offering. Whether it was that this feeble tribut
1224. this feeble tribute was really pleasing to the Divine Mother of Jesus, or that
1225. manor never experienced more tlirilling delight than on that charming- evening.
1226.tlirilling delight than on that charming- evening. With heartfelt joy, she promi
1227.g delight than on that charming- evening. With heartfelt joy, she promised to re
1228.the blossomed bush, and from it to bring back daily a That she remained faitlifu
1229. said that ; she be^an to regi*et having entered so far into this dreary wild, w
1230.d softened lig'lit, like tliat preceding- the rising sun, displayed at once befo
1231.ig'lit, like tliat preceding- the rising sun, displayed at once before her eyes
1232.rrested her steps for a moment, thinking' that this lig-ht mig-ht proceed from t
1233.s lig-ht mig-ht proceed from the halting-})lace of brigands for that it could be
1234.the obligation, self-imposed, presenting itself to her mind, and somewhat giving
1235. itself to her mind, and somewhat giving her courage, she advanced slowly with b
1236.ated bi-eath, took hold with a trembling hand of a branch, which of itself seeme
1237.e way to the manor, without once looking behind her. During all that night the l
1238. without once looking behind her. During all that night the lady reflected on th
1239.to unravel the mystery, on the following day, at the same hour in the evening, s
1240.ing day, at the same hour in the evening, she repaired to the thicket, accompani
1241.ayed about it as on the previous evening, and seemed to become, the nearer they
1242.ly towards tlie flowery thorns, chanting* at the same time a cliurcli hynm, and
1243.ads bowed, followed him slowly, offering up their prayei-s in union with his. It
1244.nd that even until midnight the chanting of the faithful offered it their gi-eet
1245.s. But, strange to say, on the following morning no image could be seen, and no
1246.strange to say, on the following morning no image could be seen, and no little a
1247.nced such unalloyed happiness at finding it. What unknown sin could have brought
1248.? What new There could be little resting-place had she selected ? The Blessed Mo
1249.ed ? The Blessed Modifficulty in solving the mystery. ther of iTesus had preferr
1250.es to the grandeur of a worldly dwelling. She returned to the coolness and fresh
1251.he chateau repaired there in the evening, and found it there, shining with even
1252.the evening, and found it there, shining with even greater splendour than on the
1253. after a life of good works and edifying examples, which, like odoriferous incen
1254.died there full of days. Such, according to the old records of the province, is
1255.inic to the city of Rome, whilst waiting for the completion of the monastery of
1256.been made with any intention of pursuing his apostolic labours at that time, yet
1257.and he accordingly commenced the reading of the holy Scriptures in the Papal Pal
1258.Papal Palace, with the view of remedying the idleness and vice of those attached
1259. to the commoner sort of people, gaining from both these He also did mucli labou
1260. of souls. at this time by the preaching and propagation of the triarch St. Duri
1261.nd propagation of the triarch St. During CATHERINE OF ROME. 157 devotion of the
1262.adoption of this devotion, the following' story is related. There was at that ti
1263.hich attached to St. Dominic's preaching, to go and hear one of his sermons. It
1264.er, that she went fm-ther; and receiving from his own hands one of the rosaries,
1265.he daily recital of it many years having passed since she had said a single pray
1266.oduced no change in her manner of living. But God designed to make this soul a s
1267.tlie Rosary. One day, as she was walking near her own house, there met her a you
1268.with an emotion she had never Addressing himself to her with a grace which, whil
1269. guest. Catherine lost no time in making every tiling ready, and they sat down t
1270.rine lost no time in making every tiling ready, and they sat down together at th
1271.rise when she perceived that every thing which her new guest touched was immedia
1272. may be alone together." The order being duly obeyed, he rose from his seat, and
1273.nto that of a little child of surpassing beauty, yet a beauty His face had all t
1274.wounds, and his whole body was streaming with blood. It was a mixed representati
1275.of the Cliild Jesus revived her fainting spirits, as He said, " Enough of sin an
1276.d she saw Him as He apj)enred when dving on tiie Cross. Ev'ery bloody trace of H
1277.eyond all human loveliness, and flashing- with the brightness of a thousand gems
1278.id, "and look at Me. blind and wandering sheep, return to the straight path and
1279.e words of our Lord and the accompanying visions, meditation on the mysteries of
1280. more to seek St. Dominic ; and relating to him the whole of what had passed, pl
1281.DS XXIV. THE MIRACLE OF TYPASUS. Evening was thag-e, setting' in over the ancien
1282. OF TYPASUS. Evening was thag-e, setting' in over the ancient city of Car- and b
1283.er the ancient city of Car- and bringing- to its close a day of great and solemn
1284.lose a day of great and solemn rejoicing; bells had been ringing the whole day l
1285.solemn rejoicing; bells had been ringing the whole day long, solemn processions
1286.only to those the extremity of suffering. For tlie church of Carthage had receiv
1287.ies of life ; and the future has nothing terrible for those who have borne thems
1288. as the voice of one man in thanksgiving to God. 'I'hat solemn ancient chant, it
1289.^s of Jesus ; their hearts were bursting at the remembrance of the insults which
1290.before their very eyes; they were making- an act of reparation, they were making
1291.- an act of reparation, they were making- atonement, they were thanking God for
1292.re making- atonement, they were thanking God for those mystei-ies of faith, tlia
1293., which looked all golden in the setting- sun, and joined his heart to theirs. F
1294.idst the Mauritanian mountains, sleeping in such a flood of light and spiritual
1295.m all, and beyond them all, the watching angels caught the sound, and bore it be
1296.was a man of tall statm-e and commanding countenance; but that peculiar expressi
1297.e saints. As he stood tliere, addressing for the first time the flock wlach had
1298. waters brought to her feet the learning, wealth, and respectful salutations of
1299.ach. In the year 428, Genseric, the king of the Vandals and Alans, burst upon th
1300.oblest descent disqualified from holding any office, We : ; ; THE MIRACLE OF TVI
1301.odom* of sanctity ; and he, well knowing what he was doing, accepted the solemn
1302.; and he, well knowing what he was doing, accepted the solemn call, knowing that
1303.doing, accepted the solemn call, knowing that the spousal ring with which he esp
1304.lemn call, knowing that the spousal ring with which he espoused the Church of Ca
1305.of Carthage was one of certain suifering, and almost certain death; knowing that
1306.ering, and almost certain death; knowing that the present lull in the storm woul
1307.f his rnge. Perhaps even his unshrinking heart would have quailed, if he could h
1308. that lay before him; the long lingering martyrdom, harder far than death the ag
1309.s now, with the full glow of the setting sun upon his brow, and his piercing eye
1310.ting sun upon his brow, and his piercing eye searching the very " Therefore, hea
1311.his brow, and his piercing eye searching the very " Therefore, hearts of those w
1312.ness with the foot of lowliness, fearing only sin, which will easily make an apo
1313.ide upliltoth Chastity, therefore, being the splendour of charity, and martyrdom
1314.trong, ana up her child to death, gazing on the Mother o£ the tender offer God
1315.und the relics of the martyrs. Something in the solemnity of that moment thi-ill
1316.st in peace ; soon shall the everlasting niiptials of the Lamb be celebrated, an
1317.efore go on with stedfast foot, jiraying and for our unworthiness that we may Th
1318.ur unworthiness that we may Then raising his hand, he bli^ssed attain this crown
1319. thnt day was well redeemed, and leaving Carthage, travel westward to the ancien
1320.hit at the time of which we are speaking, the gi'acefid columns which surround t
1321. one a that old city two men are passing quickly venerable old man in the dress
1322.ecclesiastic ; the other clearly showing by his fair complexion, keen blue eyes,
1323. them, the foremost of whom was speaking ill a loud voice of the measures soon t
1324.to his cheek in a moment, and, clenching his teeth, he drew the short sword whic
1325.h the deix'nded from his belt, muttering, " The wretch blasphemer never shall he
1326.le I " son," said the old priest, laying his trembling hand upon his lips, " wel
1327.aid the old priest, laying his trembling hand upon his lips, " well may it be se
1328. of Christ, when words like these spring to your lips so readily. For the sake o
1329.omb of the Christian." Above the resting-place of the dead, one fair solitary pa
1330.out ag;ainst the deep blue sky, bringing' remembrance of her of whom the Church
1331.'s eye. and then seemed rather tliinking aloud than answering his " Four little
1332.ed rather tliinking aloud than answering his " Four little months ago yon sea wa
1333.nths ago yon sea was with boats, bearing their living cargoes to the All along t
1334.sea was with boats, bearing their living cargoes to the All along this line of s
1335.is line of ships which lay in the offing. sand tliei'C were groups of })eoj)le i
1336.irit was worn out by the long* harassing struggle witli the Arian inHis ilesh qu
1337. soi-rowfully to the land he was leaving, a form seemed to float Tqion the edge
1338.onfessors, who, from bark, their longing- for martyrdom, would not embark. Love
1339.d not embark. Love rekindled the failing- torch of faith. He went with joy — a
1340. faith. He went with joy — and singing- in his heart to console his children,
1341.ords, but the priest checked him, saying-, " Enoug-li, my son; I know all you wo
1342.against the Vand-als, who were beginning- to embrace the faith in munbers. Eugen
1343.short, rough, jngged staff, and twisting- it into the hair, vio- My my 168 lentl
1344.weakness that first drew mo, a wandering sheep, into the fold. I saw one, Dionys
1345.nurture, scourged till she sank fainting in her own blood. During the torment, I
1346.e sank fainting in her own blood. During the torment, I saw her gaze fastened on
1347. young son, Majoricus, who stood weeping beside her, with a devoted tenderness s
1348.ost lofty words, she went on encouraging him, as he endured the torment with her
1349.en he coidd no longer stand, his burning head was laid upon her lap; and while t
1350.to which slie gave birtli was (piivering in agony before her, she perpetually tr
1351.e perpetually traced upon it the healing sigii of tiie cross, until she received
1352. of execution, and succeeded in bringing^ them to her. ^le i)uried them in her o
1353.ed Theobald. " Eugenius does every thing, and is every where ; he moves like an
1354.stood forth, an envoy between the living and the dead, and said they must now re
1355.h the cries of those who were descending into this living grave, but of those wh
1356.ose who were descending into this living grave, but of those who were returning*
1357.g grave, but of those who were returning* to life. Mothers cast their babes at t
1358.ice be offered ; ness. Then ])rostrating at the feet of the pr-'-cipal bishop am
1359. LEGENDS. and all the people prostrating to receive it. Eug-enius led them back
1360.hage, with solemn hymns of tlianksgiving; for those who were counted wortny tp T
1361.ume it is now priest, fervently. sending up in the sight of the company of heave
1362.f heaven But, my son, the hour is waxing late, and I may not tarry longer from m
1363. even now his fierce bands are preparing to do their worst. What that worst may
1364.benediction in the Lord and not doubting of your crown, he bids you remember him
1365.l)ut it ])a^sed in a moment, and raising liis eyes he exclaimed, my dear and wel
1366.Blessed be Tliy Holy Name." Then turning to the youth he said, " Blessed be thou
1367. is God who weak and contemptible tliing-s of g-iveth victory to the this world.
1368.epart quickly, ray son," he said, laying- both liands on the head of the youth,
1369.peechless emotion to receive his parting* blessing*. "It seemeth that the sun wi
1370.emotion to receive his parting* blessing*. "It seemeth that the sun will soon ri
1371.efore depart in peace, and do my bidding- with the holy bishop. to Fai-ewell." *
1372.ved. It found them prepared and watching. It had been agreed that three strokes
1373.pitiless goad- 172 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. ing; of the swords, their ears stunned with
1374.semen ; was guard the place till morning dawned, and the rest of the Vandals dis
1375. night in revelry and left to ; feasting. Meantime the confessors received the l
1376.ast words of reconciliation and blessing from their pastors they strengthened on
1377.t with a hymn of triumph, as the dawning of that happy day which should see them
1378. were accusto use in battle. Then riding slowly into the arena, he shouted, " Ci
1379. There rose a sound from the surrounding soldiery like the growl of a Avild beas
1380.commanders hold thcin l)ack from darting on their jirey, and tearing deal not in
1381.from darting on their jirey, and tearing deal not in life — THE MIRACLE OF TYP
1382.tched out his right hand to the gleaming axe of the barbarian, he murmured, "Hol
1383.then knelt upon his breast, and spitting in his face, pulled the tongue out by t
1384.bdeacon Reparatus was the next, uttering his confession of faith while the tortu
1385.of blood ; their mutilated members lying all around them, sometimes cast to the
1386. hands could fhrust Speechless, bleeding, mutilated, what more could it. wha V m
1387.their oeigecutors thought; and preparing to leave them to xn^' fate, the foremos
1388. them to xn^' fate, the foremost, giving a contemptuous kick to th% prostrate fo
1389.wp nnd jircach as of old, of a God dying on a cross, and a»v()inan, the motlier
1390. LEGENDS. that prostrate band, finishing* the sentence, " The Chnsfc is very God
1391.on their minds, a cry, strong, thrilling, but most musical, burst from their lip
1392.t on the sj)ot of their torture, g'iving" God thanks for the miraculous gift He
1393. bright with saintly deeds and xmfailing perseverance. In long exile, in impriso
1394.laid upon the block and the axe gleaming over him, he was still tlie same, the :
1395. still tlie same, the : — unslirinking confessor of that precious faitli, dear
1396.eemed as though the yearninglive longing of his soul miglit not be gratified he
1397.olffrful any I'csistance to the piercing blast which swej)t througli it from tli
1398.jiop, who made his exile (Jiie unvarying round of sullorings, to which his eag'c
1399.s continually added acre. He was writing by the dim lamp, when suddenly a mystei
1400.mself; to prayer. suffer 176 and leaving his writing, he betook himself It was n
1401.ayer. suffer 176 and leaving his writing, he betook himself It was no wonder tha
1402.hat left by years of exile and suffering. He rose and gathered his mantle round
1403.down again and wept. At last, recovering his calnmess, he said, " Let prayer be
1404.urches, that the mercy of God may In-ing them to repentance: and do you, my son,
1405.only one which seemed woi-th remembering. But the tears which the saints of God
1406.IC LEGENDS. be wiped away in the morning sins of others shall all of the resurre
1407.them daily from house to house, be"*ging the alms of the faithful as tlieir only
1408.You might meet them every day, ti-eading barefoot through the dirty streets in t
1409.ts in their ])oor rough habits, carrying a coarse bag on their backs to receive
1410.were too poor to ofter more ; or driving the convent ass before them, laden with
1411.ey were of that meek, patient, suffering spirit which is the heritage of their o
1412.)eak, the inhabitants had lost something of that fervent charity and devotion th
1413.offered at their door. They were growing- rich, and their hearts were narrowing
1414.g- rich, and their hearts were narrowing and often the poor Franciscans were dri
1415.; and they never thou^'ht of complaining at what seemed as much a j)art ot their
1416.owliness of spirit were very displeasing to the great enemy of souls, who eyed t
1417.sessed in the town. therefore, on making a powcrfid effort to shake their consta
1418.wn for the order, and charitable fceling-s and bad never yet allowed tlie friars
1419.ed tlie friars to go away without giving tlioni some trifie i'or the love of God
1420.e ouse what kind of visitor was standing at his gate; for when the door opened,
1421.se you, good sir," replied the trembling It has pleased our Lord to try us durin
1422.It has pleased our Lord to try us during this last week as seems good to Him, an
1423.eld out his little box with a hesitating and pitiful glance. "The Lady Octavia f
1424.ou to be patient; and have taken nothing; send me not away empty, and God will i
1425., threw mud and stones upon him, bidding him carry them back to the convent to f
1426.o eifect his entrance, without receiving serious injury from some of those who p
1427.hose who pressed about him. That evening- the friars went indeed to their refect
1428.se, for the riot of the previous evening had roused the attention of the governo
1429.f many ; "of the friars was fast failing them ; tlioy made a lair show back was
1430.how back was turned, the general feeling of discontent and despondency began to
1431.hildren should perish for their kee])ing of the dead letter." "It were well to s
1432.or our own maintenance, without breaking' those twentyfive precepts which our fa
1433.his words ; his confidence was faltering; with the rest ; and the triumph of the
1434.re in the midst of those fearful failing hearts, terrifying- them and temptfilli
1435.those fearful failing hearts, terrifying- them and temptfilling- them with a str
1436.earts, terrifying- them and temptfilling- them with a strang-e unaccountable ing
1437.- them with a strang-e unaccountable ing- them, dread, by the imseen influence o
1438.cowardly sug-g-estions he was whispering- in their ear, he was every moment g-ai
1439. their ear, he was every moment g-aining- more and more power over their hearts.
1440. over their hearts. He was then watching them with an infernal joy ; btit the jo
1441. was the voice of Michael. — : Morning," said those angelic tones, "wherefore
1442. reproach them for the shameful yielding of their hearts ; and shalt streng-then
1443.im before. singular m:ijt'sty of bearing might be discerned even througli that ]
1444.or despisetl garb of pov(;rty, something too mucli of the air of command, as som
1445.d the bright ilosh of liis eye, gleaming beneath the thick hood covering his fac
1446.gleaming beneath the thick hood covering his face, A — ; 182 seemed to CATHOLI
1447.religious, who were in the act of making their final preparations for removal. "
1448.sen up ag'ainst us, and will do notliing and we are oven now preparing to go for
1449.o notliing and we are oven now preparing to go for our support for we fear lest
1450.n crown was ; encircled by a single ring of coal-black liair tlie bi'ow and the
1451.nifest," said brother Obligatus, turning the lustre of his sparkling eyes lull o
1452.tus, turning the lustre of his sparkling eyes lull on the last ^' speaker. And t
1453. fail, the angels themselves would bring you food nay, the very demons would be
1454.ths ere I abandon this house, or infring;e one letter of the rule of Francis." n
1455. but been the occasion of their g-aining- a new title to the i'avour of heaven,
1456.was a stronger power than his compelling- him to say words which were not liis,
1457. an ag'ony for him to utter. So covering- his face for a moment with his hand (t
1458.tlie giiardian, " if you purpose seeking- alms, know that there is none to g-ive
1459.-ive tliem in this town." " Fear nothing-," replied Father Oblig-atus ; " but c-
1460.urn empty-handed." And now the unwilling- ])rracher found himself compelled to g
1461. throug-Ji street after street, stirring- up the cold heai'ts of all he met by h
1462.jion Jiis woi-ds; they felt that nothing- could resist the force and mag-ic of h
1463.of the Most High, what a bitter humbling thing it was and how he writhed and —
1464. Most High, what a bitter humbling thing it was and how he writhed and — ! stn
1465.very hand was now eager to put something, and so bring his load back to the mona
1466.now eager to put something, and so bring his load back to the monastery. This we
1467.us an amount tluit it was judged fitting the surplus should be approi)riated in
1468.Obligatus was forced to go about seeking for hibourcrs and masons, urging tliem
1469.seeking for hibourcrs and masons, urging tliem on, so tliat they woiked with ext
1470.f that wonderful friar was seen standing near tlie spot. Meanwhile, the friars t
1471. convent-garden, he met Obligatus coming from the new building; and though usual
1472.t Obligatus coming from the new building; and though usually he did not seek his
1473.is time he could scarce avoid addressing him. lie was the first to speak " Broth
1474.d Obligatus, well advanced ?" concealing liis face as he spoke; for lie had beco
1475.w that he was discovered; and not caring to dissemble any longer, he tiu-ned fie
1476.d fiercely towards his companion, saying-, witli an impatient gesture, " God alw
1477.e. " Oh, would to God," said the weeping Octavia, " that the holy friar Obligatu
1478.for him, good Beppo," she added, tuniing to an attendant, " and tell him that Ma
1479.nd tell him that Master Louis is growing worse ; and pray him not to delay, for
1480. his hour is come at last." Then turning to the sick man, his whole form seemed
1481.rth in one of those strains of thrilling eloquence which had so often fiiscinate
1482.iiscinated the ears of the people during the last five months. He spoke of the s
1483.ugh his own fa^jlt. Oh, the wild weeping", and mourning, and gnashing of teeth,
1484.jlt. Oh, the wild weeping", and mourning, and gnashing of teeth, and the cry of
1485.ild weeping", and mourning, and gnashing of teeth, and the cry of long despair o
1486.eemed to rise round the bed of the dying man it was the loss of God whereof he s
1487. as those should be spoken over my dying bed." But scarcely liad Louis heard the
1488. you take some rest ; your much speaking has ovemTought your strength." But as t
1489.y perceived that the friar was wrestling as witli some strong power, which his w
1490.ill not he is mine, I say." Then turning to those wlio filled the room, " Follow
1491.cannot resist that voice." And so saying he rushed from the room, and into the s
1492.." And so curiosity, the hope of hearing', the well-known eloquence of the friar
1493.of the friar on so terrible and stirring a subject, soon gathered a vast crowd t
1494.d day, which him from a for firet having witnessed the tragedy of that broiight
1495. his moment of triumph was over. Tearing off liis friar's habit, and casting it
1496.ring off liis friar's habit, and casting it from liim, he cried, " Francis the t
1497., and thou hast conquered." Then tm-ning to the astonislied multitude, " Go to t
1498.ess of liis last words, and tlio casting away of the holy habit, perplexed them
1499., and Charles fled a second time, having with him only thirty men. Tlie Confeder
1500.tle, fell on their knees in thanksgiving for the success of their arms ; the tru
1501.illages, and the bells rang out exulting peals ; sounds of triumph echoed from t
1502. that remained of his forces, and having on this occasion to contend with troops
1503.held at Zui'ich, in 1478, for concluding peace with Burg-undy, were to be seen e
1504.ys from the Emperor of Germany, the King of France, the Archduke of Austria, and
1505.ngle enemy to fear. But notwitlistanding these brilliant victories, these distin
1506.d marks of respect, and their increasing internal prosperity, the deputies of th
1507. seductions of gold, had lost sometliing money to circulate of their pure and di
1508.and the fear of God so visibly declining among the people; and tlieir former sim
1509. simplicity and purity of manners giving place insensibly to corruption and diso
1510.rioration of manners threatened to bring about the ruin of tlie country. The min
1511. could come to no mutual un- derstanding, and were unceasingly embittered agains
1512. enemy, desired peace beyond every thing; and distrusted the ambition and cupidi
1513.cks of the enemy, Switzerland not having as yet any natural frontier; and these
1514.untenances, and separated without taking leave of one another, to meet again, pe
1515.ss were themselves in danger of bringing about by their internal dissensions; an
1516.ves in the presence of a divine blessing is certainly witli him ; all honour ; h
1517.d rose up, took his staff, and ascending ; God him as a saint o 194 CATHOLIC LEG
1518.four len. cantons, surrounded by smiling meadows, and enamelled with odoriferous
1519. all manner of fish may be seen sporting in its depths, and every variety of aqu
1520.every variety of aquatic plants floating on From tlie crystal basin which laves
1521.sheltered by dark forests; while grazing the lofty summits of flocks give hfe to
1522.nows, and penetrate the clouds, towering far above all surroundmg objects. Upon
1523.alleys, and on the hills, are cliai'ming villages, beautiful Crosses in many par
1524.d this beautiful lake; the whole forming a magnificent pano: ; THE HERMIT NICHOL
1525.CHOLAS. 195 rama of mountains, elevating the soul by its grandeur and variety. I
1526.ues of the Swiss, and who enjoyed during successive centuries the esteem of thei
1527.ds, when he returned home in the evening, he would dis- appear by stealth to pra
1528.that such was the will of God concerning him. Notwithstanding his fervent and au
1529.l of God concerning him. Notwithstanding his fervent and austere devotion, his d
1530. a noble firmness of soul, a penetniting intelligence, and great purity of heart
1531. in tlie same expedition was tlie saving; of the monastery of tlie valley of St.
1532.veres him as its deliverer. It was owing* to his exliortations when he commanded
1533.ss relinquished their desig-n of setting" fire to the abbey, in order to expel t
1534.ier and a merciful Christian, protecting; the widow and the orphan, and not perm
1535.widow and the orphan, and not permitting; the conqueroi's to perpetrate acts of
1536.e to the wishes of his parents; choosing" from among* the maidens of the canton
1537.ous young' girl, named Dorothy W3'syling-. They had ten children, five sons and
1538.cted agninsT; my conscience in any thing; I liave never regarded persons, nor ha
1539.ved him for some other and greater thing. Nicholas had thus livod liftv vcsirs f
1540.self moved by an ai-dent desire of being more intimately united with God, in a l
1541.aw him rise again, and heard him praying in his chamber until morning. Many time
1542.him praying in his chamber until morning. Many times, also, he would repair in t
1543.k at a place called Berg-natt, according to his wont, he knelt upon the grass, a
1544.ray, when God vouchsafed him a consoling vision. He beheld a fragrant lily, wlii
1545.of the flower, his flock came gambolling towards him, and amongst them a noble h
1546. of At length he disclosed to separating- from the world. his wife the desire of
1547.ange the affairs of his house, assigning" to each of his children his part of th
1548. things then lie g'ave them his blessing and departed. That this separation was
1549. and be regarded as an impostor assuming an appearance of sanctity ; at the same
1550. possible from the eyes of men. Crossing the fertile valleys and the verdant mou
1551. peasant whom he found in a neighbouring" farm-house ; and after some preliminar
1552.e made known to him his Eurpose, begging him to point out a solitary spot where
1553.ood counsel, and retook the same evening the road to his native place. He passed
1554. in a field in the open aii*, reflecting on the end of his pilgrimage, and prayi
1555.n the end of his pilgrimage, and praying God to enlighten him. Soon he fell asle
1556., as he afterwards declared, a suffering as from the sharp incisions of a knife.
1557.harp incisions of a knife. The following moniing he rose, and went the same day
1558.isions of a knife. The following moniing he rose, and went the same day without
1559., and went the same day without stopping as far as Melchthal, his native place h
1560.ery till the eightli day, neither eating nor drinking, but al)sorbed in prayer a
1561.eightli day, neither eating nor drinking, but al)sorbed in prayer and meditation
1562. case. This g-ood man gave tne following- testimony after the hermit's death, as
1563.esired to be able to live without eating-, in order to be more effectually separ
1564.d to visit his pastures, without seeking an interview with this wonderful inhabi
1565.k a more isolated spot. After traversing several of the wildest valleys with thi
1566.elch precipitates itself witJi deafening roar, a Obedient to brilliant liglit de
1567. Obedient to brilliant liglit descending from heaven. this indication of tlie wi
1568.other Nicholas entered this new dwelling-, and continued there to serve God in t
1569.ed there to serve God in the and knowing- him same supernatural life. Meanwhile
1570.xtended far and wide many were unwilling to believe that a man could thus live m
1571.s. When the journey became too fatiguing on account of his advanced age, and the
1572. slreno-th, a supernatiu'al food. During the remainder of the day, from midday t
1573.r of the day, from midday to the evening, he received those who visited him ; or
1574. he would traverse the mountains praying, or visit his friend Brother Ulrich, an
1575.country-people provided for him. evening Brother Nicholas resumed his prayers; t
1576.e clear and profound insip^ht into thing's divine and human which he manifested.
1577.lous priest succeeded in his undertaking-. Nig-ht was already far advanced when
1578.s was so low that he touched the ceiling with his head it was not three feet in
1579.tion that Brother Nicholas has something to propose to them, and that he will re
1580.e inns where the deputies were preparing for departure, and conjured them, with
1581. midst of tlie assembly. Notwithstanding his great age, Nicholas had performed t
1582.ng and difficult journey without resting his fine majestic figure, which time ha
1583. scarcely bent, was to be seen advancing across the mai-ket-place of Stantz to t
1584.ntz to the town-hall. He wore, according to custom, his simple dark-coloured dre
1585.ded to nis friendly salutation by rising spontaneously and bowing low before him
1586.ation by rising spontaneously and bowing low before him. After a few moments, si
1587.me here, that I may exhort you toucliing your dissensions, which are likely to b
1588.r dissensions, which are likely to bring about tlie ruin of our beloved country.
1589.ATHOLIC LEGENDS. that my words may bring" you to unity and peace! dear Confedera
1590.imil justice; divide the booty according to the service rendered, tlie conquered
1591.rendered, tlie conquered lands according to the lociilities. Do not be drawn int
1592. live in peace and in good understanding with your neighbours if they attack you
1593.irmed, and further consolidated by being established on the basis of new laws im
1594.e peace, the division of booty according to the rule given by Nicliolas, such we
1595.t. The brother returned the same evening to his peaceful hermitage. At Stantz th
1596.bells were rung, and sounds of rejoicing floated across the lakes and through th
1597.wy heights of St. Gothard to the smiling plains of Thurgovia. There was as much
1598.HOLIC LEGENDS. to the brother by sending him letters of thanks and precious gift
1599. a courier with a letter ot thanksgiving and a handsome present. The answer whic
1600. life of the saint had been an unceasing combat with his earthly nature, a comba
1601.ns bones. In this condition of suffering he turned from side to side, writhing u
1602.ng he turned from side to side, writhing upon his couch like a worm trodden unde
1603.rightful pains lasted eight days, during which his body was as it were annihilat
1604.ble to fall into the hands of the living God." When his pains were a little reli
1605.ament of Extreme Unction. Near the dying man stood his faithful companion Brothe
1606.the same solitary life in a neighbouring cell ; his faithful wife and children a
1607. The magistrates of the canton, desiring to verify the fact of the monastic life
1608.eat, in order that no person might bring provisions. Thomas, Suffragan Bishop of
1609.ight attentively observe Nicholas during several days and nights. Frederic III.,
1610. chronicle, "there was in Ireland a king by name Finnloj^a, who had a brother, t
1611., Bishop Brendan. Adlin, one of the king's of Scotland, had a dauo;hter named Ge
1612.named Gelg-^s, who had embraced the King- Finnloga's son waS'- smitten religion
1613. Gelg^s placed her foot upon the burning wood than it was extinguished. Her fath
1614. to the throne; but instead of retm-ning to tlie court, they resolved, by Brenda
1615., the crown of martyrdom. was pre])aring on the 31st October, G55, the day on wh
1616., where Gertrude was he had been resting for a short space. at this time the abb
1617.lan was t to join him ; but before doing- so he wished to rnte the festival of A
1618. his journey therefore thrash an opening in the forest by the route of Soifj-iii
1619.tality for the lastery of Vincent. being and ])avinffmoreoverjRs he thought, los
1620.many intricate paths in solitude meeting" any living- to IHKbout for^ome human h
1621.te paths in solitude meeting" any living- to IHKbout for^ome human habitation wh
1622.neflte. rected his steps. Foillan seeing that it was now late, and that he had n
1623.along the rough and imequal path Finding they were still but they said 4ittle in
1624. or whether they thought only of robbing him, the four threw themselves upon him
1625. by the melted snow and ice. Not knowing where to cross, it is related that Gert
1626.ss, it is related that Gertrude ordering them to leave the horses free, the latt
1627. middle ages, and at this day a thriving little village. Soneffe, whence the miu
1628.oiii&p hamlets around became flourishing^ towns, this alone has :|^mained as in
1629.GEND OF ST. CEDMON. It is a common thing amongst us to speak of the gifts of gen
1630.gree, convey to the rudest understanding the notion of coming fi'om a higher Sou
1631.udest understanding the notion of coming fi'om a higher Source, and of being far
1632.ming fi'om a higher Source, and of being far out of the reach of those on whom t
1633.e annals he saints there are not wanting an abundance of examples which seem as
1634.en with fhe direct intention of teaching our forgetfulness and presumption that
1635.re the reader; another, equally striking, is to be found in our own early histor
1636.e in the drudgery of his servile Ctt^ing, if'hirh, however, was seasoned and mad
1637.omed at times to join in the merrymaking's and entertainments of his neig-hboui'
1638.g-hboui'§, at which meetings, according* to tlie favourite Saxon custom, music
1639.e favourite Saxon custom, music and sing'ing", of tlie rude and unpolished style
1640.vourite Saxon custom, music and sing'ing", of tlie rude and unpolished style of
1641.ho was wont to sit a rapt and marvelling listener to what doubtless seemed to hi
1642. of incomprehensible talent. One evening, as he sat with his comrades round a bl
1643.he sat with his comrades round a blazing- winter hearth, one of the company prop
1644.ny proposed that all present should sing in turn to the music of a small lute, w
1645.o the music of a small lute, which being" handed from one to another, should ind
1646. The proposal was agTced and the singing began. We should probably think ; but l
1647.oiild be obliged to make the humiliating* avowal that he could not sing; and goo
1648.miliating* avowal that he could not sing; and good and holy as he was, it g*ave
1649.well, and painful consciousness of being* awkward and stupid his gay companions.
1650., to pass it on and say, " I cannot sing ;" and to-night, moreover, there are st
1651.amid ST. CiEDMON. 213 has been a meeting- of bishops and clergy wlio have come t
1652.attendants in tb^eir train; and mingling" with the master's gniests you may see
1653.mon had determined on flight, and rising from his chair as softly as he could, h
1654.ashion of speech which they call singing, it sliould not be on the heathen Vikyn
1655.ai'ter all, was scarcely worth the doing ; and how far better it was to sing God
1656.oing ; and how far better it was to sing God's ])raises in his heart, and remain
1657.d the echoes of the last chorus yet ring'ing* in his ears, Ca^dmon leant his hea
1658.e echoes of the last chorus yet ring'ing* in his ears, Ca^dmon leant his head on
1659. fell asleep. In his sleep he had a sing-ular dream ; it seemed to him that he w
1660.it seemed to him that he was still lying" on his bed of straw, close bv the hors
1661.before him. " Caedmon," he &aid, bending" over his sleeping" form, "I pray you r
1662.on," he &aid, bending" over his sleeping" form, "I pray you rise, and sing" me a
1663.eeping" form, "I pray you rise, and sing" me a song" to-nig"ht." And the voice i
1664.choir. " I cannot " it was even for sing"," replied Ctednion, sorrowfully that r
1665.to hide myself, because I could not sing"." vertheless, thou shalt sing"," said
1666. not sing"." vertheless, thou shalt sing"," said the other. came "Ne- "And what
1667.d Ciedmon " I am fit to speak of nothing" save the beasts and oxen that I tend,
1668." " Tlie beasts and the fields I to sing" ; are God's creatures, and his ; show
1669.ompanion " fear not, therefore, but sing" as you find words, and it shall be of
1670.words, and it shall be of the beg'inning" of created thing"s." Then C;i^dmon fel
1671.l be of the beg'inning" of created thing"s." Then C;i^dmon felt a marvellous cha
1672.ellous chang-e in his soul came flocking" on his mind, and they were not so much
1673.nd, and they were not so much new tiling's as old thing's with a new Iig"ht shin
1674.re not so much new tiling's as old thing's with a new Iig"ht shining" on them an
1675.as old thing's with a new Iig"ht shining" on them and making; them g"lorious. Th
1676.a new Iig"ht shining" on them and making; them g"lorious. The ima;i"es traced on
1677.he larks carollingsweetly in the morning" air, as they were Avont to do when he
1678. his daily labour, scarcely know; T. ing" how much Nor was this CJJUMOW. 215 of
1679.5 of theix' all; for, beauty was sinking- into his soul. ming-ling- with the ima
1680. beauty was sinking- into his soul. ming-ling- with the imag-es of nature and th
1681.ty was sinking- into his soul. ming-ling- with the imag-es of nature and the exc
1682.ture and the excellence of created thing-s, there came thoughts of the Lord who
1683.dmon had been wont to speak, but flowing- forth with a fulness and impetuosity l
1684.and noble river ; he felt that something- mightier than himself was strug-g-ling
1685.- mightier than himself was strug-g-ling- within him for utterance; and when at
1686.essed him and commanded him all, to sing-. and the story of Ctedmon were nothing
1687.-. and the story of Ctedmon were nothing- but the story of a dream, there would
1688.ith C;edmon it wns not He went on making verses and singing them in so. his slee
1689.not He went on making verses and singing them in so. his sleep; and when he woke
1690.en he woke he still foimd himself making- verses, and could remember all he had
1691.remember all he had made and sung during the whole of that night. Moreover, thou
1692. had l)een given him from God refiecting w'ithin himself that the change which c
1693. space of a winter's nig'ht, was nothing short of miraculous, his next convictio
1694.ion to his master the steward and having come to this conclusion, he presented h
1695.im, and informed him, with his " To sing!" usual simplicity, that he had come to
1696.ual simplicity, that he had come to sing. exclaimed the steward ; " now thou art
1697. beasts, when it is time for merrymaking; and now, when thou shouldest be abroad
1698.tle, dost come to me to prate of singing thou wast not given to such : ; ; : vag
1699.s I deem him, hath taught me how to sing- wherefore I pray you to listen to the
1700. befallen him, he gave him leave to sing; and ; : ST. CiKDMON. 217 Csedmon Thing
1701.; and ; : ST. CiKDMON. 217 Csedmon Thing^s." beg-an his poem on " Tlie Be^nning
1702.g^s." beg-an his poem on " Tlie Be^nning of Created Scarcely did the steward kno
1703.ady Hilda to resolve surely go, and sing even as thou hast sung to me; and see w
1704.n to thee in the stable ;" and so saying, he carried the inspired ploughman to t
1705.a little did the purport of their coming perplex her. " Tliou desirest nie to he
1706.Tliou desirest nie to hear this man sing," she said, addressing the stev/ard in
1707.ear this man sing," she said, addressing the stev/ard in a tone of some severity
1708.strange, and methinks scarcely a fitting request. Of what does he sing, that tho
1709. a fitting request. Of what does he sing, that thou sliouldest call me from choi
1710.ke those that Coedmon spoke this morning have I never : '•' A ; heai-d before.
1711.; and wlien she had heard "The Beginning of Created Tilings," she marvelled as g
1712.o be the place of their abode. All thing's were of Him, and all thing's should e
1713.. All thing's were of Him, and all thing's should end in Him ; therefore in crea
1714.t speak to them it may be their learning' ma}' see farther in this matter than d
1715.as poor Coedmon on that eventful morning'; thrice within an hour's space to repe
1716. away. When he returned the next morning, he gave them the whole composed in mos
1717.n," says V. Bede, " the abbess embracing the orace of God in the man, instructed
1718.e upon him the monastic life which being accordingly done, she associated him to
1719.f sacred history. Thus Ceedmon, keej)ing in mind all he heard, and as it were ch
1720.ind all he heard, and as it were chewing the cud, converted the same into most h
1721. harmonious verse, and sweetly repeating the same made his masters in their tui-
1722.e true vocation of a poet, who receiving- his powers directly from tlie hand of
1723.lie hand of God, is bound by his calling' to dedicate them to those objects whic
1724.ely, the praise of God, and the exciting- of men's hearts to The first to write
1725.ath in the words of his bioAfter telling- us that he was taken with a grapher. m
1726.cause there were no sig-ns of Jiis dying- soon; nevertheless, he did as he had o
1727.e accordingly went there, and conversing- pleasantly and in a joyful manner with
1728. you were JNevertheless,' he said, bring me in perfect healtli. tlie We have giv
1729.ct healtli. tlie We have given a fitting- illustration We : i* .'' ' * ST. C^DMO
1730.. C^DMON. 221 the Eucharist.' And having received the same into his hnnds, he as
1731.ervants of God,' Then lie streng-thening' himself with the heavenly viaticum, pr
1732.e hrotliei-s were to he awakened to sing the noctm-nal praises of the Lord ? The
1733.for off.' wait that hour ;' and sigTiing himself with the sign of the cross, he
1734.laid his head on the pillow, and falling Thus it into a shmiher, ended his life
1735.e now departed to His ])resence, leaving the world by a quiet death and that ton
1736.rds wliilst he was in the act of signing himself with the cross, and i-ecommendi
1737.imself with the cross, and i-ecommending himself into His hands." Miracles follo
1738.e Anglo-Saxon poem. Conybeare, comparing the passage referred to, says, " the re
1739.e resemblance of language is so striking, that much of this portion of Ca-dmon's
1740.me when B. Alan de la Roche was re\aving- the almost forg'otten devotion of the
1741.he was wont to return home every evening", for she could not resolve to trust hi
1742.pecially in g-rammar; but he was wanting- in quickness and vivacity of imaginati
1743.ry hour did the poor boy spend, striving", by hard labour and toilsome persevera
1744.of his companions, and were always bring-ing" him into disgrace and still the mo
1745.is companions, and were always bring-ing" him into disgrace and still the more h
1746. disconsolate mood ;)n the steps leading into tlie garden, and leaning his One e
1747.ps leading into tlie garden, and leaning his One evening", THE SCHOLAH OK THE KO
1748.tlie garden, and leaning his One evening", THE SCHOLAH OK THE KOSARY. head on hi
1749. his class, with the reputation of being- the dunce of the school ; and all beca
1750.de ; and it seemed an unreasonable thing' to spend so many a long' day in trying
1751.' to spend so many a long' day in trying' to become what nature had not made him
1752.le, and never have mastered the scanning' of an hexameter " What can be the use
1753. eye had caught a glimpse of her darling, and recognised in his attitude, and th
1754.lay on his clasped hands, that something unusual was the matter. *' Bernard," sh
1755.hat is the matter ? Your hair is hanging about your eyes, your cap is on the gTo
1756.he gTound, and I see somemoreover, thing* very like teal's on those white cheeks
1757.s past I have watched you with an aching heart, and with a sore misgiving lest t
1758. aching heart, and with a sore misgiving lest the trouble should be in your own
1759.ould crave a g-it't that covet the bring's little ease, and ofttimes less of g-r
1760.with boys we have to learn so many thing;s you would marvel to find the use for
1761.re is none so stranj^-e to fit a meaning' to as the making" of these verses. And
1762.nj^-e to fit a meaning' to as the making" of these verses. And yet Master Ilolan
1763. sounds brave enoiig-h in plain-speaking- prose, will never do for verse tlien t
1764.bles and feet to be counted on jvmv fing-ers, and seldom coimted rig-ht moreover
1765.there is little to hinder you from doing- the same. Master Alan has given you a
1766.; take it before her altar every morning- before you go to school, and say the p
1767.e ever pi-ayed to Mary without obtaining ; relief." Bernard was not slow in foll
1768.lief." Bernard was not slow in following his mother's coimsel and not content wi
1769.er's coimsel and not content with saying part of the Rosary, he every day recite
1770.y's altar. Nor was it long before a sing-ular change was observed in the boy not
1771.isappear, but a certain depth of feeling and gracefulness of imagery was display
1772. been otlierwiser* His soul was drinking at the very sources of s])iritual beaut
1773.anion ; and all day long he felt shining on his heart the earnest g-.ize of thos
1774.on, but from the influence of an abiding- Reality. The masters marvelled at the
1775.out the development of the understanding; the scholars wondered also, and soon c
1776. he was wont to answer, with a wondering simplicity, that any one might do the s
1777. school ; the highest awards of learning, he was told, were now within his grasp
1778.ncy, and tliat solidity of understanding, he might aspire to any thing; the prof
1779.erstanding, he might aspire to any thing; the professor's chair or the doctor's
1780.me as usual, and complained of an aching pain in his eyes before the mommg the i
1781.227 the sligfhtest object from uritating the eye; an order strictly obeyed. Neve
1782.ess, in spite of his pain and increasing weakness, nothing- prevented Bernard fr
1783.is pain and increasing weakness, nothing- prevented Bernard from fulfilling his
1784.thing- prevented Bernard from fulfilling his customary prayers. Every day, as us
1785.blindness t^at threatened him, by saying* his devotion was one winch needed neit
1786.ocious genius were now loud in deploring the loss of one from whom so brilliant
1787.the sure hope that she was but ti-usting him to tlie arms of a more loving Mothe
1788.usting him to tlie arms of a more loving Mother than herself But there were the
1789.s in the house; and before administering the Viaticum and the holy Unction, he w
1790.receive the last confession of the dying which was child. His mother entered the
1791. the room to prei)arc him for the coming of the jn-iest and as she did so, she d
1792.so, she desired ; the attendant to bring a candle into the still-darkened chambe
1793.is " Your mother and I iu-e time hending: over him. standing here, but to our ey
1794. I iu-e time hending: over him. standing here, but to our eyes tlie room is dark
1795. by my bedside, and the rays are shining- from her, and make it day. Tliere has
1796.felt luntarily bowed his an awe stealing* over him, and invohead towards the spo
1797. in his last words he was still thinking' of the Rosary. And so he died; and tho
1798. to the fulness of that glory, something of whose radiance had thus rested over
1799. radiance had thus rested over his dying bed.* — XXX. THE LEGEND OF ST. HUBERT
1800.UBERT. In the reign of the Frankish king Tlieodoric tlie Third, there lived in A
1801.e celebrated Ebroin, marshal of the king's ])alace, had compelled him to tiy fro
1802.out from their convent, and were sitting- by tlie banks of the river that tlowed
1803.by the place, where they w^ere indulging" in somewhat vain and idle conversation
1804. as if comingup tlie river ; and looking to see the vessel from which the sound
1805.d proceeded, they could perceive nothing. Still, however, the stroke of the myst
1806.arer, they could hear the water wasliing round the prow of the invisible boat, w
1807.ce of ice " are demons, who are carrying away the soul of Ebroin, mayor of the p
1808.l of Ebroin, mayor of the palace to king Tlieodoric for he is an apostate from t
1809.d tlie monks, as they listened trembling to the awful words; but the infernal vo
1810.ken you also, because you were s{)eaking unfitting words at an unseasonable time
1811.so, because you were s{)eaking unfitting words at an unseasonable time." And wit
1812.nseasonable time." And with this warning the sound of the oai-s recommenced, and
1813.ssel was once more heard sol'tly parting the waters before her, until the echoes
1814. false ^i'^nh, a pagan. and knew nothing of the light of the Gospel, something 2
1815.ng of the light of the Gospel, something 230 of its CATHOLIC LEGENDS. influence
1816. Friday he rode out with a great hunting'-train to follow the deer in the forest
1817.ofs scarcely seemed to shake the morning' dew from the g'rass that gTew upon her
1818.e stopped her rapid bounds, and tui-ning- as though to meet him, he saw between
1819.d he had no difficult}' in underetanding" the language which he heard, and which
1820.of faitli was in his heart, and yielding to the power of its influence, he said
1821. was gone, and he found himsolf kneeling alone in the forest-glade, with ; : ; h
1822.de, with ; : ; his horse quietly feeding beside him. He mounted, and full of tho
1823.hey would have questioned him concerning his success witli the deer, he was sile
1824.tman's vanity deterred him from speaking- of the failure of his sport and so, su
1825.st his retainers followed him, wondering at the unusual manner his ; of their ma
1826.rned the Chiu'ch in that city. Something- of similarity existed between tlie ear
1827.om which the cabals and jealousy of King Childeric's courtiers had succeeded in
1828.ric's courtiers had succeeded in driving him. After wandering about for some tim
1829.ucceeded in driving him. After wandering about for some time as ji lionie- 232 l
1830.and g-ave orders that whoever was moving at that unseasonable hour should out of
1831. when the office was finished, according to custom they assembled before the fir
1832.o warm tliemselves before again retiring to rest. The abbot looked around him, a
1833.ou, my lord," said one of tliem, praying by the cross outside; though, as I tlii
1834.though, as I tliink, the snow is falling lieavily, and the frost is slinrp." The
1835. he received from his hands the teaching and direction which tended to lead him
1836.y to bid them farewell for ever. Calling" his peoj)le about him, he declared to
1837.een honoured as its lord. The next thing was to chose out a solitude for his fut
1838.of France and Flanders Avere not wanting in sj)ots whose loneliness presented hi
1839. deserts he chose liis abode ; scooj)ing out of the hard rock his little cell an
1840.. he lay on his hard bed, he was shining- light, which streamed through the rock
1841.aw a beautiful and heavenly form bending* over his couch the lovely head was cro
1842.of glory than of gold, wings of dazzling- lustre and many colours floated from t
1843.piritual master St. Lambert; and setting out towards Utrecht, he soon arrived in
1844.ption and of my old ag-e, for this thing' is from the hands of God ofo, and fear
1845.m the hands of God ofo, and fear nothing- for verily I know that gTeat things li
1846.all pass to them Hubert arose, wondering that are fitter to bear it." at the Bis
1847.t." at the Bishop's words, whose meaning*, however, he did not devise and in obe
1848.ifical chair. Whilst Hubert was pursuing- his long and painful journey, a terrib
1849.l journey, a terrible tragedy was taking- place in the city ne had left behind h
1850.death, and the opportunity of gratifying- his revenge soon ])resented itself. Pe
1851. all, without respect of persons. Taking- advantag-e, therefore, of the disgiist
1852.fe ; wliilst the ruffians were battering at the palace-doors, he called his atte
1853.ir sins and prepare for death and having given them his blessmg, he himself knel
1854.t streak of early dawn was just breaking' its golden bars on the night's horizon
1855.d started as he beheld an angel standing by his bed. "Sleepest thou, Sergius ?"
1856. of the ruffian Dodo is even now reeking with his blood, and the widowed Church
1857.e widowed Church of Utrecht is bewailing him in her tears. And even as I sjjeak,
1858. and beloved disciple Hubert is entering Rome, not knowing wherefore he hath bee
1859.ple Hubert is entering Rome, not knowing wherefore he hath been led hither, save
1860. is, Sergius, whom thou must is giiiding him. name to the vacant see, nor shall
1861. vacant see, nor shall a sign be wonting to show thee that this is tlie sure wil
1862.have been only a strange and distressing dream, if the staff which he still held
1863. Frankish pilgrim, who had tliat morning entered it, should be found and brought
1864.re the messengers of the Pontiff, having succeeaed in their errand, ushered Serg
1865.sence. him with an earnest and inquiring eye the sixteen years of solitude had w
1866. the indications nobility of his bearing*. of g-entle and courtly training' that
1867.earing*. of g-entle and courtly training' that arrested the eye of the holy Pont
1868.r he had no thought of further declaring his dignity, or the " I come from Aquit
1869.sed for a moment in thought; then taking the pilgTim by the hand, he said, " Tho
1870.o hear there than here ;" and, so saying, he led his astonished visitor to the g
1871.reat Basilica of St. Peter, and standing by the tomb of the apostle, he declared
1872.mess of another father ; " for my tiding-s are not ended yet thou art lie whom G
1873.at length he looked up with Jiis weeping- eyes to the countenance ofSerg-ius, an
1874.and Ser- understood their import. Giving- him his benediction as he knelt, he em
1875.under the ministry of angels ; something, perhn})s, in his gentle and loving nat
1876.hing, perhn})s, in his gentle and loving nature, made him very dear to those lie
1877.e prayer of the two saints then kneeling before tlie Apostles' tomb was not long
1878.e Apostles' tomb was not long in finding- its answer, and that answer was brough
1879.f an angel. He stood belbre them holding- a stole in his hand, and he laid it on
1880.he laid it on the neck of Hubert, saying-, *^ This comes to thee from the Mother
1881.ily entered his presence with the tiding-s that Hubert, the disciple and friend
1882.aimed the ferocious tyrant ; and calling* tog-ether his retainers, he set out at
1883.to meet the new bishoji, wlio was making- his way, accompanied by two attendants
1884. on them, and scarcely would you filling: The Requiem Mass have jutlg-ed from th
1885. before lay so peacefully in the morning" sunshine j and as he drew near and g-n
1886. all the windings of the forest, casting down the idols, and preacliing with suc
1887., casting down the idols, and preacliing with such a winning grace, that tlie li
1888.dols, and preacliing with such a winning grace, that tlie liearts even of the fi
1889.re told, to see the holy l;ishop keeping the ! liogation-days in that great fore
1890.ilderness. St. Hubert retained something- of his old associations, and to the la
1891.ame at length, and not without a warning from his angel-fiiend, a year before th
1892.before that it was at hand. Often during' that year he visited the tomb of Lambe
1893.ew near, he rose in his bed, and Joining his hands with the simplicity of a chil
1894.ople of all ranks and ages were crowding to tlie open door of the church, not, i
1895.r journey towards the island of g-aining* its first melancholy celebrity as the
1896. it was to oppose the rapid and alarming* progress ofPelag'ianism, that a counci
1897.s. which had given them two such disting'uished visitoi*s as the Bishops of Auxe
1898.fterwards assist publicly at the singing- of tlie divine office in the parish ch
1899.s of that prelate denounced as savouring of heathenism. For Germanus was wont to
1900.ishop summarily stopped these proceeding's by ordering the tree to be levelled t
1901.y stopped these proceeding's by ordering the tree to be levelled to call to the
1902. he had taken veng-eance on the meddling prelate who had spoih^l his sport. His
1903.rcfi, and give him the tonsure, assuring him at the same time that such was the
1904.but gave himself blindly and unresisting-ly to When the the course marked out fo
1905.t station among* the councils of ceeding's, the Galilean Bishops. Such was the m
1906. Bishops. Such was the man who, standing- on the altar-steps of the church of Na
1907.e church of Nanterre, was now addressing- his simple audience in a few brief and
1908. people of Nanterre heard such preaching- before ; and perhaps its power over th
1909.ttle enhanced by the affable and winning- courtesy which Germanus showed to the
1910.made prouder and liappier till her dying- day by the thoug-ht that the lord leg-
1911.rd as they knelt to receive his blessing*. Among- those who were thus presented
1912.e to watch and drive home in the evening'. And so when we speak of the beauty of
1913. to the ])resence of the prelate. Taking the (:;hild by her hand, Germanus addre
1914.hem with the air of one who was yielding to a Divine inspiration " Severus," he
1915.ou, 245 daughter/' he continued, turning- to Geneyou not consecrate yoiu'self wl
1916.lu'led Germanus desired that the singing of vespers might be begun but the wonde
1917.that lie kei)t the child near him during the whole of tlie office, and that his
1918.and Gerontia, and charg'ed them to bring their daughter to him on the following
1919.g their daughter to him on the following morning before his departure for Paris.
1920.daughter to him on the following morning before his departure for Paris. The imp
1921.an and when, verv early on the following morning-, Sevonis and his daughter were
1922.hen, verv early on the following morning-, Sevonis and his daughter were again b
1923.ENDS. suite as they entered, and calling- the child to lier face. come close to
1924.as about to speak ag-ain, when something" lying at his feet caug-ht his e^'e, an
1925.t to speak ag-ain, when something" lying at his feet caug-ht his e^'e, and he pa
1926.nd, and g-ave '^ it to Genevieve, saying-, Always carry this round your neck in
1927.ewels and ])earls of the eraThen g'iving{)ire, to trample them under your feet."
1928. them under your feet." ler his blessing-, he rose to depart; and in a few hours
1929.y day saw the little shepherdess leading- her ordinary life among- them, with no
1930. by day deepenfid in her soul, fill; ing- it with the |)ei-j)etnal memory of Ili
1931.d unoljserved ])y any human eye, leaving- no trace by which they could l)e g-ues
1932.e was little in the hahit of restraining her tongue; and whilst she was far from
1933.nd whilst she was far from comprehending the quiet gmvity of Genevieve's manner,
1934.ishop of Auxerre, Gerontia was preparing one morning to set out for the village
1935.erre, Gerontia was preparing one morning to set out for the village from which t
1936.he was surprised to meet witli something like opposition from the child, Avho ra
1937. to churca and keep the fete, by hearing Mass. Gerontia was very angry " Thou sh
1938.ver- forward for thine age; a fine thing, indeed, if all the cliildren and babie
1939.d babies of the village are to be crying thus to keep their fete like grown wome
1940.te like grown women. You will be wanting earrings, and a silken kerchief next."
1941.iousness that the pleasure of exhibiting her own gay holiday dress had no small
1942.t hast thou done ?" she cried, extending- her arms, as one who feels in the dai-
1943.or, Genevieve began to cry, and throwing herself into Gerontia's arms, continued
1944.though she tried many remedies, notliing- availed to restore the smallest g-leam
1945.re patient, and her tongiie was learning- a gentleness or civility to which it h
1946.y that Genevieve had g'one to the spring- which was at a little distance from th
1947.her's bhndness prevented her from taking- any active ])art in the affairs of the
1948.er " And witJi these thoug-hts revolving- in her muid — : ; THE SHEPHERDESS OF
1949.249 her buckets with the clear sparkling; water, back to the cottage. " Is tliat
1950. put a thoug-ht into my heart, and bring- with you some of the water which you h
1951.yfully, " it is what I have been praying' but what will you do with the water?"
1952.r a few moments in silence, then holding out the vesfor; her daughter, slie desi
1953. the sign of the cross. Genevieve having obeyed, Gerontia sel to bathed her eyes
1954.ater, whilst her daughter stood watching her with feelings of extraordinary tend
1955. that her glance was no longer wandering and expressionless. Gerontia's sight wa
1956.rits of her child. Her time of suffering had produced its effect, and tlie grati
1957.e which she now displayed in cherisliing and fonvarding the holy design to which
1958. displayed in cherisliing and fonvarding the holy design to which the child liad
1959.in a formal and solemn manner, according to the custom of the times, on the occr
1960.sion of the Bisliop of Chartres visiting Nanteri'e. Genevieve was presented to h
1961.ee stood before him, Genevieve, as being the youngest, was ])laced the last in t
1962.ly ; attendant priests, he said, " Bring- that youngest child to the front, for
1963., for God has ah-eadv sancti- commencing' the ceremony some of fied her." is Gen
1964.s Genevieve," said one of those standing by the holy father Germanus did indeed
1965.ion, without wholly withBut very drawing* from the society of their families. sh
1966.neil before her. The celebrity attaching to her name accompanied her to the capi
1967.erved, it seems to have borne a striking resemblance to that of St. Catherine of
1968.m-neys and troublesome' atfiiirs, living before the jniblic eye and accompanied
1969.ed by a number of tliose who were living like liprself in a state consecrated to
1970.he suffered had the effect of disturbing; for one moment the interior calm of a
1971.natural life of ecstasy and miracle ming-led with the thread of her ordinary exi
1972.y life of tlie fourteenth " Tiien having- returned to France, he came century. t
1973.him with great joy. But before all thing-s the blessed Germanus asked how fared
1974. replied that there were no g-ood tiding-s of her. But as they tried to blame li
1975.ears, and related to them the bog-inning- of her life, and Iioav it had been mad
1976. a while the current of po})uIar feeling-, and silenced the bu?;}' tniig-iios th
1977.ned to take her life, and were preparing; to drown her as a witch and impostor,
1978.n of Germanus was the means of restoring' her to the popular esteem. At the very
1979. they were drag-g-uig- their unresisting" victim to death, the archdeacon of Aux
1980.mnumion. This had the effect of changing* the rag'e of the fickle populace into
1981.n, which they continued to retain during" the remainder of her life. But events
1982.ieve undertook to reanimate the drooping- courage of the ])eople, and "^ ohe adm
1983.hey should watch in {)ra3'er and fasting, whereby they should powerfully resist
1984. old time. And they obeyed her, watching mnny days together in the church in fas
1985.ut she was not C(mtent with this leaving her companions in the clnn-ch, .she her
1986.the streets and ])nl)lic pUiees, calling on the men to arm themselves and remain
1987.lves and remain at their posts, and king" of the Iluns, and had sworn to subdue
1988.E SHEPHERDESS OF XA5TERRE. 253 promising them the protection of Heaven. Each day
1989.; for tidings wei-e continually reaching the tenified inhabitants of the nearer
1990. eacK day was Genevieve to be seen going- about among the fearful and faint-hear
1991.l and faint-hearted people, and assuring them that Some, indeed, the day of deli
1992.ly clianged their course, and abandoning their designs on Paiis, had retiUTied i
1993.ple of Paris were not slow in afributing ic to the particular gi-ace of God, who
1994.the intluence she exerted in sanctifying and christianising it, than for its del
1995.xerted in sanctifying and christianising it, than for its deliverance through he
1996. seen a long procession of women winding through t!ie rough and dirty ronds tlui
1997. on ti.e conntry, which was then sharing in the terrible >uliVriiig-8 that atten
1998.and they couki scarce keep their footing^ in the dirty roads yet still they kept
1999.ey kept on, hrave and undaunted, singing psalms and litanies, and battling' with
2000.inging psalms and litanies, and battling' with the wind, which arose with tempes
2001.ill light you to the church." And taking' it in her hand, she had scarcely touch
2002.tantly relighted of itself ; and bearing it in front of them, so that its clear
2003.heir lives ; in their interior suffering's, and the martyrdom of love which each
2004.her body all her life for the preventing- of sin ; her only delights were fastin
2005. of sin ; her only delights were fasting, prayers, and penances." At length the
2006. penances, and to take a more nourishing kind of food. She obeyed ; and yet, "wh
2007.y see our Lord in open vision, according to the g'ospel promise which saith, tha
2008.l, 255 A new enemy was fast establishing* itself and after having taken possessi
2009.st establishing* itself and after having taken possession of the western and sou
2010.rtions of the country, was now preparing" These were the French under their King
2011." These were the French under their King Childeric, who, appearing before the ci
2012.der their King Childeric, who, appearing before the city walls, commenced a sie^
2013.a blockade that lasted ten years, during which to advance against Paris. time th
2014.f hunger, and the cries of the famishing populace fell on the ear of Genevieve w
2015.ed so dearly, was torn to see them lying- in her way in the agonies of despair a
2016.eroic a nature to be content with giving ])ity and compassion where there was ro
2017.ressed city. The proposal seemed nothing short of madness, for the banks of the
2018. I must needs g-o myself;" and so saying, she loosened one of tlie smaller boats
2019.s course she herself directed, exhorting them not to fear, but to put We their i
2020.notice that a boat was t^ be seen coming down the stream, which bore every resem
2021.ed safe amid her fellow-citizens, having succeeded in bringing them a welcome su
2022.w-citizens, having succeeded in bringing them a welcome supj)ly of pi-ovisions,
2023.e peiil of her life from the surrounding villages on the Seine. Even the noble e
2024.he pagan conrpieror, with a noble daring, to solicit the lives of the prisoners,
2025. have sigTialised himself, on the taking- of Paris, by a clemency which formed n
2026.'s name was well known to him, as having- been the foremost among- those wlio ra
2027. simplicity, which was the most striking- feature of her character. Childeric co
2028.t her with respect and veneration during the remainder of his life; and his succ
2029. age of eighty-nine years, all her being illustrated by miracles of every kind.
2030.conversions which she made, both dui'ing her life and after death, were far more
2031. to her name than all the other offering* which long- adoi-ned She vieve," 'as s

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/