Concordance for The canary bird / from the German of Christopher von Schmid.

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1.   EDWARD DUNIGAN 599 & BROTHER, PUBLISHING HOUSE, CATHOLIC Broadway. Entered, acco
2. E, CATHOLIC Broadway. Entered, according to Act of Congre*., in the ye»r 1*4 J
3. der it a garden of Paradise by elevating the its character of inhabitants. Devot
4. hose reli- which he spent in instructing them in gion. He was firmly convinced t
5. ligion is alone capable of truly forming a man, imparting to him true worth, sec
6. apable of truly forming a man, imparting to him true worth, securing his happine
7. n, imparting to him true worth, securing his happiness, and comforting him in th
8. , securing his happiness, and comforting him in the hour of necessity or of deat
9. the same feelings, always sat by during these lessons, and her tender and pious
10. s and children, however, notwithstanding the perils which encompassed them, pre-
11. i- chord, and gentle little Lina to sing. One gloomy and terrific evening in the
12. to sing. One gloomy and terrific evening in the end of winter, the father and mo
13. her, with Charles and Lina, were sitting together at the harpsichord, in their w
14. brilliant saloon; for music and singing was their ordinary relaxation at this s
15. ritten a little hymn to God's protecting Providence, spe- cially for the two chi
16. and composed set it to an easy, pleasing air, for it an accomlittle paniment so
17. of it Their mother did not know anything It as yet, for the children wished to g
18. less voice, in- her husband accompanying her on the strument, he called upon the
19. med with this performance of her darling children. concert at the king's court c
20. er darling children. concert at the king's court could have No given her so crie
21. e town prison. He was charged with being liberty a royalist, and an enemy of —
22. n who on stood before with dark flashing eyes, tangled black his forehead, hair
23. tangled black his forehead, hair hanging dishevelled and a fierce-looking bushy
24. hanging dishevelled and a fierce-looking bushy beard. —She tears wrung her han
25. g her hands; streamed ror ; the scalding down her little cheeks, pale with ter-
26. too, held up their tender hands, praying and beseech- ing them not to take away
27. r tender hands, praying and beseech- ing them not to take away their father. The
28. me they could not articulate for sobbing. All was in vain till They did not even
29. terror; she sat in an arm-chair, weeping, wringing her hands, and raising her st
30. e sat in an arm-chair, weeping, wringing her hands, and raising her streaming ey
31. weeping, wringing her hands, and raising her streaming eyes to heaven, the child
32. ing her hands, and raising her streaming eyes to heaven, the children sobbing an
33. ing eyes to heaven, the children sobbing and wail- ing around her. this pious In
34. aven, the children sobbing and wail- ing around her. this pious In a short time,
35. s lived peaceful and retired, not mixing at all in public business, nor even spe
36. ll in public business, nor even speaking it. to any one upon She flung herself 1
37. go in, and went sadly away, for weeping and bewailing her children, rio one cou
38. nt sadly away, for weeping and bewailing her children, rio one could tell her wh
39. dispersed late it was now in the evening, and she knew not whither to turn, even
40. eril of he, ar- are in at imminent being any moment. In some hasty moment you dr
41. w words about and about barbarity crying out to heaven;' 'oppression under the e
42. hope your husband to and your remaining would but lead your own destruction. ho
43. and the sickness had increased. evening greatly lay in a delirious, The poor li
44. ize even her mother. The mother, darling child therefore, insisted upon re- main
45. ild therefore, insisted upon re- maining and taking charge herself of her ; but
46. re, insisted upon re- maining and taking charge herself of her ; but the physici
47. RD. death, and her eyes red with weeping, by the sick bed, unable to resolve on
48. e sick bed, unable to resolve on leaving it. The physician took her gently a ste
49. k her gently a step by: tjie arm, urging her anxiously to fly. She made or two t
50. rly with outstretched arms, and clasping her daughter to her heart, cried out in
51. tone of *' deep anguish, No, my darling child ! I cannot leavO you! I care not
52. said Richard: possible "under protecting shade it is to escape every delay bring
53. r any one for a night, is without giving previous notice, forbid- den under pain
54. ervice in this world ; if my re- maining here can serve no end but to bring thes
55. ining here can serve no end but to bring these good old people to the scaffold I
56. here the tear ceases to flow, and loving hearts shall ration." know no further s
57. you !" mother knelt down by her darling daughter's sick bed. " To Thee, God," s
58. bed. " To Thee, God," she cried, looking up to heaven, " to Thee I offer her as
59. took Charles's hand, and without looking around, passed out of the door, trembli
60. round, passed out of the door, trembling in every nerve with suppressed emotion.
61. peared very heavily laden. him, carrying a The poor lady followed little packet
62. little packet under one arm, and holding with the other hand her dear little boy
63. ears to our advantage ; Thus, everything actually tends it is terrific, and thus
64. s skiff to the Rhine, his wife conveying the set before the lady and the bread,
65. wine. warm soup, and a little Trembling with cold and with swallowed a few mors
66. erleft through broken clouds, enlivening the rific darkness a chill little. The
67. on the brink of the vast river, roaring fearfully in the their its current, and
68. little skiff scarcely capable of holding two persons. She trembled little as the
69. had saved in her service, without saying that they were ; THE CANAKY-BIRD. his o
70. e master. untried." I will leave nothing They all wept and sobbed together. to T
71. om my knees, till mj brother shall bring the glad tidings of their safety. Oh !
72. of their safety. Oh ! that I could bring to them there the same happy news of my
73. news of my dear master and their darling little daughter!" CHAPTER III. THE HONE
74. was. the way H of a refugee's remaining in that country, and besides the scene
75. the 25 war THE CANARY-BIKD. was drawing nearer every day. directions whicli Ric
76. disappeared rapidly. The cost of living in Switzerland was rep- resented as too
77. a. fruitless After much and at wandering hither and thither, she ; came last, to
78. s, who showed her the way, also carrying the baggage. Her sum- road lay over hig
79. alley, at the cliff, gloomy over-hanging stood THE CANARY-BIRD. a few low wooden
80. , from the midst of which arose gleaming, as though it were covered with glossy
81. ely covered with snow, though everything in the Ysllej was green and blooming. v
82. ing in the Ysllej was green and blooming. valley with his The guide pointed staf
83. d TyroUse, who had been air. ex- pecting her on that day, came out to meet her w
84. HD. monious forms of address in speaking to any one.* Still he had his own corre
85. his own correct notions of good breeding. And on this day, to testify his respec
86. een hat, from whicli a feather !" waving cock's dangled. said he ; "Grod de- sav
87. rupulously clean. As she was just coming from the kitchen, she rubbed her hand i
88. a bench, two. deal chairs, and a shining green earthenware stove, which supplied
89. ere was a small Still miserable sleeping closet. the lady thanked God for having
90. closet. the lady thanked God for having granted her even this little spot. She
91. managed her well as little housekeeping as permitted. circumstances herself, Sh
92. d spent the rest of the time in knitting and sewing, by which she earned a trifl
93. rest of the time in knitting and sewing, by which she earned a trifle. Her grea
94. lready begun to learn Latin. One morning S* as she was thinking anxiously 29 abo
95. atin. One morning S* as she was thinking anxiously 29 about this, the little bel
96. he chapel began THE CANARY-BIRD. to ring, and her good, pious hostess came to sa
97. e to say that the parish priest, running in from the village on the opposite sid
98. opposite side of the mountain, was going to say Mass that day. Madam a little D'
99. , if he would take the trouble of coming over the mountain to him. Charles agree
100. prevented 30 THE CANAKY-BIRD. from going out, the poor fellow was almost without
101. ried to devise some means of provid- ing both for him. In the Tyrol they breed a
102. *'buy one for me, and we have something, amid these rocks and woods, to remind
103. ut the bird began its interruption. sing, When " to he was never tired praising
104. g, When " to he was never tired praising notes. You must teach him some pretty l
105. im, lay. one Charles thought the old ing, for man was jok- he did not know that
106. an be 32 THE CANARY-BIRD. taught to sing airs. The old man produced which he cal
107. her every week by Charles, not receiving them oftener himself. One evening, Char
108. eiving them oftener himself. One evening, Charles came joyously into the house,
109. shake his head and say "Alas! the coming harvest will strew its leaves on the gr
110. wall, perhaps, never see the next spring." 85 THE CAJ^AKY-BIRD CHAPTER rV. THE F
111. urned with the news of the lady's having safely reached the opposite bank. anxie
112. sh for his devotion to the rightful king. Early on the following day he hastened
113. he rightful king. Early on the following day he hastened to the town. He had a s
114. youth, who 36 took his turn in guarding the THE CANARY-BIRD. prisoners, Eichard
115. sieur D'Erlau was condie, demned morning. to and the sentence was ordered to be
116. rdered to be executed upon the following Gloomily resting his head upon his hand
117. uted upon the following Gloomily resting his head upon his hand, he sat late at
118. to sleep. They had not thought to bring worth while him a light, so that he sat
119. Thee, dearest Father in heaven What ing to thou permittest, with is ever the be
120. shall be devoted to tinual thanksgiving to con- Thee !" While the high-minded p
121. ken soldier, had broken out the building confined. where the prisoners were sold
122. and uniforms, and were engaged guishing it. in extinfirst Kobert made use of th
123. let which the poor gentleman had during his confinement, made grow re- him semb
124. m semble more closely the savage-looking soldiers of the time, and completed his
125. le, with fire-buckets, who were pressing in " Way, way !" and reached the street
126. t the great gate, straight to and having learned the word from Eobert, he passed
127. 41 thanJ<:s- 4* THE CANAKY-BIRD. giving, and led him joyously Kichard, into the
128. ard, into the room. who had been wailing and watching here for ten nights, threw
129. room. who had been wailing and watching here for ten nights, threw himself into
130. hts, threw himself into his arms, crying out, " dear master !" My and they embra
131. ndeed, slept in the next room, and being awakened by Richard's joyous exclamatio
132. ear and starry. In deep were approaching the Rhine, little where the skiff lay i
133. any of the prisoners had escaped during the confusion and uproar of extinguishi
134. he confusion and uproar of extinguishing it. To their great mortification, cell
135. s reached the bank, and commenced firing on the The bullets whizzed frightfully
136. e water, tottered and was almost sinking; but they all escaped unhurt, neverthel
137. began Richard, " till to speak of going. "I shall not have one easy moment," sa
138. ected while prison, you were languishing and your wife was an exile in a distant
139. e himself of their hum- ble housekeeping, in which he skilful. was very all —
140. ed him with her heart; and every morning and evening little cheerfully performed
141. her heart; and every morning and evening little cheerfully performed all the hou
142. ot beyond her strength. In the beginning M. D'Erlau was obliged to keep his bed
143. reater part of the day. to sit up during the Lina did everything in her power to
144. to sit up during the Lina did everything in her power to cheer him, to take care
145. Lina's birth-day arrived. Early morning she went to mass, to offer her thanks t
146. the flowers in the win- dow. The morning sun shone with unusual brilliancy and b
147. of his wife and But a melancholy feeling came over him " in the midst of his joy
148. is birth- mother and brother celebrating day of yours ? Alas ! What has befallen
149. I I am ^I am Lina threw herself weeping upon her father's neck to console him.
150. l not forsake us 5* God —He will bring us all S3 THE CANARY-BIRD. once more to
151. does," said Kichard, dryall silent. ing his eyes. They were It was a moment of
152. dden the canarylittle bird began to sing the air of the which M. D'Erlau had for
153. pany him by which we were arrested, sing- singing — ^the very air ing when you
154. by which we were arrested, sing- singing — ^the very air ing when you were fat
155. ted, sing- singing — ^the very air ing when you were father, Eichard. 54 deare
156. he same —not a single note " want- ing !" "That father, is most wonderful," sa
157. her, is most wonderful," said her taking off his cap. I believe merciful God ! T
158. at he had bought the pretty little thing from a young Tyro- lese yesterday. " Oh
159. master, all your might," said everything in his "and do your power to find him o
160. y thanked God with many a for disclosing to them, tear, by His wondrous providen
161. l medicine. Lina assisted him in packing, and little Eichard went to put the ord
162. e order, little carriage in and to bring back their horse, the brown, which he h
163. he innmeanwhile, to work for his feeding, hire. i»3eper, without set On the ver
164. nd Lina had the from time to time during the pleasure, journey, of being enterta
165. e during the pleasure, journey, of being entertained livening notes. by its en-
166. , journey, of being entertained livening notes. by its en- CHAPTER VI. THE REUNI
167. w plunged her, and she is now recovering, but very tediously and imperfectly." M
168. ed a packet of newspapers, and selecting one of them, placed it before him eyes,
169. nfusion, this mistake was but a trifling irregularity. They had either forgotten
170. tter to avoid animadversion for allowing him to escape. It grieved M. D'Erlau to
171. uld be necessary now, in communicat- ing to her the joyful intelligence which aw
172. d It it set out for all had been raining now began to snow heavily for in that c
173. r flat snow-covered roofs fi and smoking 61 THE CANARY-BIRD. chimneys. Here the
174. he branches of the trees. Madam mourning, D'Erlau was at sitting, little in deep
175. . Madam mourning, D'Erlau was at sitting, little in deep her rude fireplace, who
176. eep her rude fireplace, whose flickering blaze had begun to illu- mine the apart
177. mewhat dark. her little She was knitting, and she boy was reading aloud. As saw
178. he was knitting, and she boy was reading aloud. As saw her faithful white-headed
179. the dear told ? Alas perhaps the darling child !" is now in her cold grave Richa
180. her counte? nance why did you not bring her with you ? Why did you not rescue h
181. Oh, then w'ere alive she cried, looking to heaven with tears in her eyes. indee
182. imagined. The great happiness of seeing the good old man once more — ^the sti
183. ^the still greater delight of clasping her daughter in her arms again — ^had
184. and gradual preparations foi* receiving now into, her heart even the greatest j
185. even the greatest joy-^the joy of seeing alive once again her Jiusband, whom sta
186. eved to have been executed. With beating heart he had long been ing outside the
187. With beating heart he had long been ing outside the door, where he could hear e
188. d her dear husband now saw him if living before her eyes, were altogether peculi
189. e party spent fireside ? a happy evening by their humble The old Tyrolese and hi
190. s of their guests. On made the following morning another guest his appearance, a
191. ir guests. On made the following morning another guest his appearance, and one w
192. God, had had the chief share in bringing about the reunion of this noble family.
193. ary-bird, which he had left, the evening before, in the parish priest's house. C
194. s bird again. mother's illness it During his had escaped through the and now M.
195. window, and he had never heard anything more of it related since then ; how the
196. idence. " Yes, God!" she cried, clasping her hands, "it it. was Thou who didst d
197. vial misfor may prepare a great blessing for us." " You are right, dear Charles,
198. th which splendor and riches are nothing, and of which alone it can be : THE CAN
199. ry, it, and who, it instead of returning had sold to the bird merchant, was very
200. ored it lodged in one of the neighboring cottages the canary-bird it to the plac
201. , all seated together in their look- ing out upon the white earth, and the wild
202. e earth, and the wild snow-powdered sing the first pine-forest, the bird would p
203. children and parents together would sing the rest of it, and console it themselv
204. mily were afterwards subjected, trifling solace to was them all, when the tiny s
205. s already done continue his pro- tecting care over us "Yes, yes!" old Richard wo
206. there, in the deep snow and the piercing frost, has always something affecting i
207. the piercing frost, has always something affecting in think of the words the air
208. ng frost, has always something affecting in think of the words the air: * — Co

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/