Concordance for But Thy love and Thy grace / by Francis J. Finn ; with illustrations by Charles C. Svendsen.

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. .. . • 119 125 up for the last landing " 133 ^'But Thy Love and Thy Grace.^' I
3. take a chance the Why, It's diamond ring, of only ten cents a chance, and there'
4. ten cents a chance, and there's nothing near as nice in the whole bazaar." The
5. The speaker was a young lady pre- siding over one of the prettiest and gayest bo
6. zaar. as any She was by her ad- dressing her remarks to a girl who, woman could
7. ould tell dress, girl was of the working class. The had a pleasing face. The fea
8. of the working class. The had a pleasing face. The features "BUT THY LOVE AND TH
9. soft and of the tenderest blue, looking out mildly and kindly from dark silken
10. left, I have twenty cents and I'm going minute ; and don't care about leaving w
11. ng minute ; and don't care about leaving with any money." Regina O'Connell had c
12. the the fragile beauty of girl. working- " Wouldn't you " like to look at the "
13. ouldn't you " like to look at the " ring ? she said. They all say it is a very p
14. e to the kindly young lady she was using her best [13] «BUT THY LOVE AND THY GR
15. E AND THY GRACE." words, and pronouncing them accord- ing to her lights, " Oh, i
16. words, and pronouncing them accord- ing to her lights, " Oh, it it will be a pl
17. aid Miss Dalton, as she spoke, of taking the girl's hand and leading her toward
18. e, of taking the girl's hand and leading her toward that thing beauty, the Young
19. s hand and leading her toward that thing beauty, the Young one's Ladies' Sodalit
20. wheels of of fortune to them, a surging crowd all around and about them; many h
21. all around and about them; many holding " bats " in their hands, many strugglin
22. " bats " in their hands, many struggling to buy them; little boys who would get
23. t ; ; gentleman, whispered to be running for office, surrounded by a knot of gir
24. surrounded by a knot of girls, laughing each waiting for her ; «BUT THY LOVE A
25. y a knot of girls, laughing each waiting for her ; «BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE.
26. ingly to impress some five or six trying to escape from a zealous old lady, who
27. a zealous old lady, who was endeavoring raffling them with the idea which she w
28. s old lady, who was endeavoring raffling them with the idea which she was void i
29. e things made progress onward It a thing which required vigilance and determinat
30. re- vealed by the hundreds of sputtering electric lights. They shone upon of joy
31. osts. Once they have determined on going, once that they have set aside the mone
32. aside the money is they intend spending (and strong of will and armed in triple
33. nd are happy for when they pay something nothing, they become home. idiotically
34. appy for when they pay something nothing, they become home. idiotically ecstatic
35. , and a blaze of eyes, of and a gleaming and a and a shuffling of feet, hum of v
36. of and a gleaming and a and a shuffling of feet, hum of voices. Grief, for a se
37. than you, Miss Dalton, in ground-gaining, the best day iron," I ever played on t
38. on, sweetly, but not at all appreciating the compli- ment. Had he made a speech
39. expected diversion attracted the surging crowd to another part of the building,
40. ng crowd to another part of the building, leav- ing the immediate neighborhood o
41. another part of the building, leav- ing the immediate neighborhood of the Young
42. gress without drance. They were standing presently High on a throne of before th
43. diamond upon a her eyes dainty gold ring. Regina's face lighted up ; grew very b
44. nstill on my eyes swered Regina, keeping the like her sparkling " on diamond. to
45. d Regina, keeping the like her sparkling " on diamond. to How I should win it!"
46. ; «BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." taking the ring from it its box, handed to the
47. THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." taking the ring from it its box, handed to the girl. Re
48. es, there were three diamonds glittering at least, so thought a genial old Irish
49. htened his purse and his heart by taking a chance on green a picture rich in red
50. and wouldn't be lookin' all, at the ring at at all." The old man was [20] then c
51. , and so missed the chance of commenting on the must be rich blush which purpled
52. nswered Miss " It is Dalton, suppressing a smile. valued at sixty-five dollars."
53. red Miss Dalton, of set purpose avoiding the word "familiar." " If I'm not mista
54. mber seen you at church Saturday evening. You're one " of his penitents, aren't
55. as the girl again fell to contemplating the glitter- ing diamond ring. Miss Dal
56. n fell to contemplating the glitter- ing diamond ring. Miss Dalton be- longed to
57. templating the glitter- ing diamond ring. Miss Dalton be- longed to one of the l
58. Dalton be- longed to one of the leading Catholic families of the city. of She w
59. Y GRACE." into the slums without rubbing off or tarnishing the bloom thereof. "
60. slums without rubbing off or tarnishing the bloom thereof. " Here's another cas
61. scenes of and drunkenness. Every- thing about her should have coarse left made
62. n be who has I hardly more than a bowing acquaint- ance with words of three syll
63. aret Dal ton," " she said aloud. telling " " Would you mind yours " ? Oh, no. I'
64. so often. Do you week " I .? like going to confession every didn't at first," a
65. first," answered Regina, " It returning the ring to Margaret. took Father McNic
66. answered Regina, " It returning the ring to Margaret. took Father McNichols a lo
67. atter." How long have you been work- ing?" "Since I was eleven. wasn't doing not
68. ing?" "Since I was eleven. wasn't doing nothing, My father and my sister spinal
69. Since I was eleven. wasn't doing nothing, My father and my sister spinal I got t
70. position in a shoe-fac- and been working there years." " it ? ever since — sev
71. ne now, me and my sister, and poor thing won't ; she's bedridden, and the doctor
72. lains, and time. never asks for anything; praying nearly all the She's worth wor
73. d time. never asks for anything; praying nearly all the She's worth working stic
74. aying nearly all the She's worth working stick a pin in that." for, and you can
75. and you can Regina colored, on realizing that her last statement was couched in
76. out of for an hour or two every morning. in Then the afternoon she reads I stor
77. e, and, think, she does a lot of praying. On Sundays, though, there are factory
78. they are just lovely to her. They bring her flowers and fruit and cake, and the
79. " «BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." staying up with her, two of them every night, a
80. day as though they had done It's nothing out of the usual. derful wonis how kind
81. e ? flowers " said Miss Dalton, bringing of up from beneath the table a bunch vi
82. ied the girl, her eyes again outrivaling the diamond, " how good and last you ar
83. y, would you go." " By mind my " calling to see your sister [30] some day } "BUT
84. e books with chances on the diamond ring, filled I think could try to have it ou
85. among my she lady friends." " In saying " lady friends poor Re- gina thought wa
86. ere are plenty will of them who I'm ring, only be too glad to take a few chances
87. a few chances, no matter on what. going to talk up the diamond and I'm sure est
88. had not quite suc- ceeded in dismissing from her imagination this poor, bright-
89. en she should, of women, be up and doing." " I will act on your advice at once.
90. book of chances " ? on the diamond ring. Perhaps you would " I like to put I yo
91. not. What should do with a diamond ring ? I How- ever, will take a few chances.
92. ? of "Why, girls are course. All working- good. I Never met any other very siste
93. It grace make up in for the are wanting is is her narrow Hfe. wonderful in fill
94. is her narrow Hfe. wonderful in filling how generous God often with His heavenl
95. ather Mc- Nichols, after a pause, during which he was busily writing. " I have p
96. ause, during which he was busily writing. " I have put Miss Regina O'Connell's n
97. name for ten chances." " down I'm going to I tell her what you've done, next ti
98. e " see her." sort," You will do nothing of the cried Father McNichols. [35] «B
99. l my penitent, you say. Perhaps, knowing of this, she will be better affected to
100. affected toward me, and be more willing to take advice. Who on knows but her."
101. the end of the bazaar. And and I'm going to get brothers interested, my too." *'
102. hen some man comes along who is spending his money then, [36] And *^BUT THY LOVE
103. ter, or, to put it more on the following Saturday, Father at nine o'clock of the
104. y, Father at nine o'clock of the evening, Mc Nichols, awake. side of little seat
105. in his confessional, efforts was making heroic to keep The of person on the oth
106. shed her sins, all I tale and was saying, the sins which I " For these and do no
107. s do. Father. But to-day girls was going about among the in the factory with who
108. hem to take a chance on the diamond ring." it- Sleep very suddenly took unto sel
109. ook unto self " the wings of the morning. The diamond ring " he repeated. ! It w
110. e wings of the morning. The diamond ring " he repeated. ! It was no longer nine
111. LOVE AND THY GRACE." to you for putting my name down happy over win the for ten
112. loomy and mysto *' terious by confessing * Michael, the girl, dark ' angel." A l
113. gloom the angel. same prayer by changing angel into also a "ark" an "arch" There
114. er Creator, " always giggled all. saying, That's Father." A working-boy invariab
115. d all. saying, That's Father." A working-boy invariably accused himself of commi
116. t[40] "BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." ting the' sin of " detraction " whenever he
117. d woman had the habit and Father cursing the devil, McNichols, wondering set it
118. cursing the devil, McNichols, wondering set it whether heaven's chancery or aga
119. he girl that thought God was [40 calling to a high degree of perfection." " "BUT
120. Do you make your day " spiritual reading every Yes, Father, for at least ten min
121. THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." at your fearing to say that prayer. I kruow very holy t
122. e, O Lord, and receive my I liberty, ing, my memory, my and my whole will, Then
123. he ex- dispose of tent of them according will,' Thy are resignation to God's wil
124. s. And then, if my child, the concluding words, really meant by their utterer, a
125. , and I'm " " afraid to think of praying not to get them." For instance } " O Fa
126. t them." For instance } " O Father, ring." I I do so want that dia- mond "And ne
127. choed the confessor, " I mentally adding, had forgotten all " ? about him. " Wel
128. Well, what about him He's been drinking again. Father, I and feel so bad. He th
129. sickens me do } to think that I'm going to marry a '* drunkard. But what am I t
130. r Mc- Nichois hesitated before answering. he can't keep sober for love, trying t
131. ng. he can't keep sober for love, trying to get you, he will not, now that he's
132. day, and especially just after receiving bless Holy Communion. ! God you Go in p
133. e wall was a coarse print represent- ing the Saviour showing His Sacred Heart. i
134. print represent- ing the Saviour showing His Sacred Heart. invalid It was so pla
135. Despite the it upon the without turning. erty of its povroom, appointments, the
136. kitchen. Dutch Rose O'Connell was lying on her [47] "BUT THY I.OVE AND THY GRAC
137. my " dearest little sister, this evening ? she cried, bending upturned ir down f
138. ister, this evening ? she cried, bending upturned ir down face. and kissing the
139. nding upturned ir down face. and kissing the " Fine, Regina. [48] I've had sever
140. isitors THY LOVE AND THY GRACE.'' during the day, and they I all talked and laug
141. ell is the pain to-day ? Ah, been crying, dearest. '* Now, " the truth, haven't
142. "What else, dear.?" " You were coughing Regina ; so, last night, and then you l
143. the night before sleep. you was moaning dear in your O my own it ! sister, if y
144. " me. I'm used to it Oh, I'm mur- muring now. Rose began were eyes, God to forgi
145. eep There Regina's tears too, struggling but she kept them back bravely. "Now, w
146. " she said, "don't you to it. go praying have get my And troubles. I You've had
147. your and more. then. Rose, I'm not going to groan any more in my but sleep. it's
148. nk God. You " ? know, he got to drinking again " " Yes, I know." didn't And I kn
149. THY GRACE." afferble. He says he's going to be man from this out. Oh, he was And
150. t. he I've sat up it all night composing got it with me, and life. I intend to k
151. *' * Believe me, if all these endearing young charms, Which I gaze on so fondly
152. orrow, and fleet in my Like arms. fading away, fairy-gifts Thou wouldst sti]l be
153. d it it again, Regina: heart." I'm going to get So Regina read the which Rose re
154. ina read the which Rose recited clapping first stanza a second and then a third
155. didn't know It is it. Regina, I'm going to give read poetry. up story-books and
156. e rest, now; and heart, too. I I'm going to learn it by Go on, dear, read the re
157. s Her cheeks gina continued " ' flushing prettily, Re- It is not while beauty an
158. e " ! " My, isn't it like angels talking cried the invalid, her cheeks blazing w
159. ng cried the invalid, her cheeks blazing with fervor. " do get dearer And it's s
160. I think, dear, — that " I'm getting worse; and little here Regina gave a cl
161. nd sob — and "and the will I'll coming. " But you last, be my sunflower to the
162. gina slipped to her knees, still holding the dear head with her arms. Together t
163. y, O Lord, and receive all my I standing, my memory, my underand my whole will,
164. rn them. them, dispose of them according to the extent of Thy love Thy will. Giv
165. " Rose to read added, pres- Fm It going it nothing but love too, I poetry. God
166. read added, pres- Fm It going it nothing but love too, I poetry. God — — mak
167. w ! how little unutterably lovely fading Rose ! was the poor " O my God, my God
168. my God that. " she mut- tered, "anything but " ' Anything love and — " She cor
169. e mut- tered, "anything but " ' Anything love and — " She corrected her though
170. the shall new year. read poetry nothing but poetry. good-night ! — And — th
171. her sister Thank God Regina said nothing: had sunk into slumber. ful, How ! peac
172. ptoe. She found Miss Dalton do, standing without. *' Oh, how do you ? " Miss Dal
173. And, oh, her face is beautiful sleeping so soundly, and doesn't moan as she use
174. oetry." To-morrow," she to "she is going Miss the Dalton followed Regina looked,
175. E AND THY GRACE." started. Then, bending down, she put her face close to the sle
176. inted her one week ago, and this morning he brought her Holy Communion. But, Mis
177. girl," said Miss Dalton, vainly striving to keep back the tears, "your poor agai
178. ng diamond of other things, the the ring was postponed. Some the books containin
179. was postponed. Some the books containing been returned there was a great chances
180. s. weeks So, for three after the closing of the bazaar, the books went round mer
181. was turned to her lips, Rose, and crying out for her to back. come Oftentimes de
182. love for Re- gina was the most elevating thing in his left poor, sordid life. Wh
183. or Re- gina was the most elevating thing in his left poor, sordid life. Whenever
184. ed, was her presence, he departed vowing better. to do The spirit, willing. One
185. vowing better. to do The spirit, willing. One week the raffle, before the holdin
186. One week the raffle, before the holding of Miss Margaret Dalton called to see R
187. inued, after the first words of greeting, " " what are you doing with yourself?
188. ords of greeting, " " what are you doing with yourself? " I go to my And work, M
189. added, almost," she to was her thinking of glorified '' her ingratitude Tom. tr
190. yes, Mar- garet; but I can't do anything. At all, night I feel worn out, and, wo
191. leep. I And then, while I lay awake, ing, see her face coming and goroom. coming
192. le I lay awake, ing, see her face coming and goroom. coming and going, shining o
193. , see her face coming and goroom. coming and going, shining out of the from the
194. face coming and goroom. coming and going, shining out of the from the blackness
195. ng and goroom. coming and going, shining out of the from the blackness oh, I I A
196. Be patient, and wait. God ment, counting every moment, and each seed of sorrow,
197. h, He'll not me the way I've been acting." " I think He will, my dear. For hour
198. to the mind to of the Prefect a touching hymn Our Lady sions, of Good Counsel, s
199. u think they would care " about me being with them " I ? don't know what you mea
200. ntation of the Sacraments and the living of a good Catholic life. There are dome
201. chols girl is doesn't want any deserving stay without because she poor. By want
202. ant the way, the all how are you getting on with ? book on the ring takes place
203. e you getting on with ? book on the ring takes place We the returns in by Monday
204. by Monday. 'The raffle on the following night." " That's a I've fact. How 1 car
205. ut of my mind. Here," she added, pulling out the drawer of the table, and bringi
206. ut the drawer of the table, and bringing therefrom a packin age neatly done up "
207. now till Monday I'll my time to getting chances. Oh," she " it broke out, her e
208. ," she " it broke out, her eyes kindling, is such a lovely to say ring it, ! I'm
209. s kindling, is such a lovely to say ring it, ! I'm I still almost ashamed but wa
210. nd don't forget come to the next meeting of the Sodality. You Keep shall be most
211. w friend. * Miss Dalton left her weeping, but happier than she had been since th
212. e fourth decree. The Librarian,' smiling and affable, was showing, not without t
213. arian,' smiling and affable, was showing, not without treasures portly of pride,
214. ted gazed on him fixedly, many wondering whether he ^ Librarian was " as harmles
215. she did not, for her easy air of smiling unconcern, and her light in laugh, rich
216. esn't look crazy," Regina the was saying Sodality. " to the Secretary of Crazy !
217. more that you and he have done to bring in money on the dia- mond city " } ring
218. in money on the dia- mond city " } ring than any two people in the " Him I and
219. " cried Regina, the pale color " rushing didn't to her cheeks. to Why, I do anyt
220. k you, Miss Dalton," said Regin^, rising in some saw confusion. Her wan " face,
221. I," said the Assistant, her eyes beaming genially through her " glasses. I I'm s
222. ' " Here's my it; candidate for the ring. and, if He for " wants he wins fifty i
223. der any one, and in the is for that ring than number rival." of chances taken sh
224. ndeed a pleasure," he rival said, bowing, "to meet a cause. in such a I They I a
225. Dalton " said Mr. Fairweather, smil- ing benevolently. " It's a brilliant sugges
226. nevertheless, she found herself talking easily, frankly, all about her sister a
227. death. tently to Next, she was listening in- Mr. Fairweather, who, de[83] "BUT T
228. e impressiveness. He say- was conversing about death, and how much he wondered q
229. ndered quiet, calm way in which good ing lics at the Catho- awaited the final su
230. d his hands for silence. He was standing on a " raised platform. Ah, that's Mr.
231. ] : "BUT THY LOVE AND THY ton was saying, *' GRACE.** I have the honor to announ
232. to announce to you that we are now going to find out to whom the dia- mond to ri
233. o find out to whom the dia- mond to ring belongs. it We are going : go about " i
234. a- mond to ring belongs. it We are going : go about " in this way In this bag
235. nd another man man to verify his reading. Mr. Fairweather, couldn't you " — to
236. ed Mr. Fairweather, "but I win that ring myself. isn't Get some one who interest
237. d. the sack energetically, then, opening its mouth slightly, bade the urchin for
238. rchin forth thrust in his hand and bring one slip of paper. The boy " obeyed, an
239. e next the number is ^he winone who ning gets number. it May ! the deserve it Wh
240. y ! the deserve it Whereupon he laughing that began to shake the bag with comica
241. ckets flew the air and floor. scattering, upon the the The crowd moved workers w
242. eir upon knees at slips. once recovering the precious " Say," whispered the Libr
243. e Librarian into the ear of the kneeling Prefect, " while you're down say a litt
244. 'Connell little may she a dear all thing?" We've been praying for her," answered
245. he a dear all thing?" We've been praying for her," answered the Prefect. Quickly
246. six," announced the Mr. Dalton, finding in corresponding stump " a book handed
247. the Mr. Dalton, finding in corresponding stump " a book handed him. O'Connell !
248. to the foot of the platform, and, taking the ring from Mr. Dalton, handed " it t
249. ot of the platform, and, taking the ring from Mr. Dalton, handed " it to the gir
250. can She had It it her heart on the ring. nated her. Desire of fasci- had grown
251. balm upon her innocent slipped the ring heart. For a time the girl was in heave
252. rned its it this way and that, w^atching all changing splendors with of the girl
253. his way and that, w^atching all changing splendors with of the girl delight a ch
254. ight a child. The poor toy. was enjoying her first She was aroused by the voice
255. her. " of Miss O'Connell," he was saying, case " in you should ever wish to part
256. should ever wish to part with that ring *' — " O dear, ! no " ! interrupted R
257. ld, call on me at any time. I am willing — or; rather, its should be glad- —
258. hat should care to for my beautiful ring even a hundred dollars." " I am very, v
259. d, " I take great pleasure in announcing to you that, in honor of this pleasant
260. to honor, has kindly con- sented to sing a solo." Mr. Dalton held up his hand fo
261. '• the the occasion, sang May Morning." The audience was that an encore so de
262. h, Believe " ! Me if All These Endearing Young Charms," " Oh cried Regina, invol
263. involuntarily, to her heart. and putting her hand Then she addressed [95] hersel
264. listener. Again she sister; was standing beside her dying again she saw the dear
265. he sister; was standing beside her dying again she saw the dear face flush and t
266. nt to every heart. Presently the weeping girl began [96] "BUT THY LOVE AND THY G
267. e." " ! Moore repeated Regina, look* ing puzzled. "Yes. Why, what's [97] the mat
268. Connell? Are you for I Can't do anything " you I ? No, no ; — must sir; I leav
269. d, once she was on the staircase landing outside, faint, she and grew and was ob
270. LOVE AND THY GRACE." most heart-breaking moment it was. Her love was gone foreve
271. angry. The great wave indignant feeling which flooded her soul submerged her re
272. ess the steps quickly, her eyes flashing, her bosom heaving, lips set together f
273. ly, her eyes flashing, her bosom heaving, lips set together firmly. sidewalk, As
274. her. Mr. Tom Betterly had been awaiting her. just then She could say nothing co
275. ing her. just then She could say nothing contempt him. thing that it but she tur
276. he could say nothing contempt him. thing that it but she turned upon him a look
277. hat occasion. said, Regina," he speaking with that difficulty in pronouncing cle
278. king with that difficulty in pronouncing clearly which we sometimes notice in th
279. dulade you. I heard you won diamond ring. zo " ? Zat [lOO] " ! "BUT THY LOVE AND
280. Ah zat'z right." ! finger. Then opening " his mouth ! he roared Caw ! Caw Mr. t
281. after in Thomas manner was of rejoicing his kind when condition. loose-toothed
282. ined fixed though paralyzed. The blazing eyes of Regina had caught and almost so
283. . The ried force of , habit is something rage, car- wonderful. BHnded with away
284. hat she was no longer a reasonable being, Regina, turned when she came to entere
285. he had no intention whatever of stopping, no intention of entering. All the same
286. er of stopping, no intention of entering. All the same, she did both. it For yea
287. life tom never to pass the visit paying a short of Love, living His hidden in t
288. the visit paying a short of Love, living His hidden in the tabernacle out of lov
289. he far to realize found herself kneeling before in a pew up the navc: the statue
290. meek and her and lowly Saviour, exposing to to all who visited Him ? His most sa
291. l, and sank back upon the bench, burying her face in her hands. Oh, if she could
292. to the soul it, without any it preceding cause for because be- longs to the Crea
293. he soul, to excite it motions attracting entirely to the love I His Divine Majes
294. y means of own acts of the understanding or will." This principle had never been
295. of peace. her soul she saw our Lord ing ; and, see- Him, her heart grew glad an
296. rew glad and and strong with the burning storm the brave love Himself had enkind
297. e, liberty, O Lord, and my ever standing, I my memory, my underand my whole will
298. m. acwill. Receive them, dispose cording to the them extent Thy and Give grace,
299. and composed make her spiritual reading. For some weeks past she had been readi
300. For some weeks past she had been reading " The Life of St. Jane Frances de Chant
301. it, When Regina read pealed to touching. it the narrative had ap- her as being
302. g. it the narrative had ap- her as being pretty and But now, looking back, haunt
303. her as being pretty and But now, looking back, haunted her. She [no] felt in her
304. had not got out of it all the in meaning; that there was, perhaps, it some me3sa
305. oached, and ' scratched her face, saying, You will now be much more [in] beautif
306. se.' Marie-Mar- guerite awoke, screaming, and insist- ing that the skin had been
307. uerite awoke, screaming, and insist- ing that the skin had been torn from her fa
308. torn from her face. Her mother, finding nothing go to the matter with her face,
309. om her face. Her mother, finding nothing go to the matter with her face, treated
310. so many means and she graceful, pleasing the world, so witty, lively, was so sti
311. way, that she thought not of abandoning her life of pleasure and dissipation. O
312. sipation. One ball, , day, while resting after a grand there suddenly appeared b
313. ce. He seemed irritated. far,' are going too he said. ' I You know ^ [U2] "BUT T
314. va- gance your youth.' feet, And, taking hold of her he crushed them so severely
315. urth day after this accident, as she ing, the child was crying and griev- again
316. cident, as she ing, the child was crying and griev- again appeared, but this lig
317. ned, and hid head under the bed-covering. '"I told you,' said the child, smiling
318. . '"I told you,' said the child, smiling, ' that I would succeed the follies in
319. t I would succeed the follies in putting a stop to of your youth. since Give you
320. enly Nature, however, was far from being conquered. One day, in the early part o
321. tant the child again ap- peared, holding a veil figure of * upon which the excla
322. pon which the exclaimed Mar- Jesus dying was depicted. is Ah, what that is ? ' g
323. ,' said the saint, ' if you have nothing, we want nothing. Offer these two thing
324. , ' if you have nothing, we want nothing. Offer these two things to God, and go
325. tal that she may receive you for nothing.' " The holy Foundress received her wit
326. ght that perhaps the diamond loved, ring, which she for her. left," still strang
327. erself. And she gazed upon the twinkling splendor, the only toy that had ever br
328. slightly, voice without was heard saying May I come in, Regina ? " The " girl st
329. ? " The " girl started, then recovering herself, arose and answered Mrs. Steven
330. iful ! " she " ! ex- claimed, " catching Regina's it, finger. And " so you ; won
331. m so glad it you won a little will bring into more joy and pleasure your " I lif
332. d you did so much for me without knowing it by your pleasant ways. You was heart
333. " to Dear, dear ! I didn't say anything " I ? to hurt your feelings, did But th
334. hurt your feelings, did But the sobbing woman was unable to make any reply. in
335. ely, Mrs. Stevens, I have said " nothing to hurt you, have I ? The woman wiped h
336. ked up again, she wore her calm, smiling expression as before. " Excuse me," she
337. gina meanwhile had been closely scanning the other's the first features. For tha
338. sk. suffer- There were lines of care ing upon the cheeks:, and an expression alm
339. nd an expression almost of agony lurking in the eyes. " Mrs. Stevens," she [121]
340. " Mrs. Stevens," she [121] said, putting " "BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." her arm
341. y. " What " And my ! sick ; son is going into typhoid, is I believe ; and the ol
342. here's afraid call for a doctor: nothing coming. Oh, why didn't God [122] "BUT T
343. afraid call for a doctor: nothing coming. Oh, why didn't God [122] "BUT THY LOVE
344. weeks, my I've boy will late, be working. unless I But will be too go begging. p
345. ing. unless I But will be too go begging. pawned this," it ; everything that wil
346. o begging. pawned this," it ; everything that will sell." "Please take " said Re
347. your little ones and yourself something to eat." Regina held out a dollar to it
348. stairs. She took off the diaixiond ring in her descent, sighing as she did so.
349. e diaixiond ring in her descent, sighing as she did so. It was hers no longer. [
350. d " fin- ished the letter he was writing. please Now, he resumed. Suppressing hi
351. ing. please Now, he resumed. Suppressing his surprise when Regina O'Connell ente
352. welcome " ! he said, with his " engaging smile. You must excuse me, sir, for com
353. e. You must excuse me, sir, for com- ing at such an hour of the night; [127] "BU
354. come. want once: to I sell diamond ring at have need for the money." Regina had
355. ney." Regina had no intention of telling him the for ; what purpose the money wa
356. rpose the money was but, needed yielding gradually to kind manner of the old gen
357. old the whole " Miss O'Connell," he ring, buy the " and pay " for it too, on two
358. ge at once," he said to the '* answering maid. he went I will see to the doctor,
359. he " I create a job for him. And taking out a pocketbook, I think yes," can pay
360. g tired. you look very pale and anything of coffee there ? offer you " or — "
361. , thank you, [130] sir. I used to taking anything at night." "BUT THY LOVE AND T
362. ou, [130] sir. I used to taking anything at night." "BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE.
363. n my carriage." Regina could say nothing. Good-by," he said a moment later, as "
364. y slower as she neared the first landing. On reaching breath. it, she paused to
365. he neared the first landing. On reaching breath. it, she paused to get her As sh
366. , — the crowd, the lights, the winning of the ring, the loss of her lover, the
367. owd, the lights, the winning of the ring, the loss of her lover, the visit to th
368. sit to the church, the spiritual reading, Mrs. Stevens's story, the interview wi
369. de. carriage And now first the last ring was gone toy. — her [132] and She sta
370. and She started up for the last landing " p 135, ^•BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE
371. !" "It seems years since won I that ring left — years and years since I the ha
372. ly, labori- ously up to the next landing, where she paused again. Regina was was
373. me she won the rest diamond sorely, ring, and she needed sorely. She started up
374. ely. She started up for the last landing, steps, fit when, having made but a few
375. he last landing, steps, fit when, having made but a few she was seized with a vi
376. he was seized with a violent of coughing. handkerchief stained with it When from
377. n his the who way and reached faint- ing girl in time to prevent her from fallin
378. girl in time to prevent her from falling. With room. little difficulty very ligh
379. " Here, here out " said Regina, reaching Stevens. It her hand to Mrs. was a twen
380. airweather telephoned me the whole thing." " The ring is gone," Mrs. Stevens obs
381. lephoned me the whole thing." " The ring is gone," Mrs. Stevens observed. The do
382. is love and His grace, and the receiving her bliss throbbed with a earth ; seldo
383. ere. Anecdotes and Examples Illustrating the Catholic Catechism. Selected and Ar
384. ller, C.SS.R. net, o 40 Art of Profiting by Our Faults. Rev. J. Tissot. Beginnin
385. 4 SO 00 40 10 00 17 00 Catholic Teaching for Children. Winifride Wray. Catholic
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Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/