Concordance for Names that live in Catholic hearts : memoirs of Cardinal Ximenes, Michael Angelo, Samuel de Champlain, Archbishop Plunkett, Charles Carroll, Henri de Larochejacquelein, Simon de Montfort / by Anna T. Sadlier.

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1.   ve behind us Footprints on the sands of time." Longfello NEW YORK, CINCINNATI, 
2. . INTRODUCTION. IT was with no ordinary pleasure that I watched the progress of work, wh
3. no ordinary pleasure that I watched the progress of work, which has been truly a labor o
4. rogress of work, which has been truly a labor of love for my daughter. Some four or f
5. f work, which has been truly a labor of love for my daughter. Some four or five year
6. les Carroll of Carrollton! And yet each one of these names is an heirloom of the Ca
7. se names is an heirloom of the Catholic family. Each one held a foremost place among t
8. n heirloom of the Catholic family. Each one held a foremost place among the men of
9. d a foremost place among the men of his time, whether as the prince of painters, of
10. owers of Israel in a dark and troublous time, like Oliver Plunkett, the last martyr
11. Montfort and Henri Larochejaquelein; as one of the founders of a forests of Christi
12. ot, worthy of the proud dis tinction of being one of the sponsors of the Great Republ
13. rthy of the proud dis tinction of being one of the sponsors of the Great Republic o
14. l of Carrollton! What stern devotion to principle, what noble disregard of selfish what l
15. lfish what lofty chivalry in its truest sense, is manifested interests, throughout th
16. e heroic leader of ! La Vendee, were up life s called early to their reward; others
17. ety to the series in thus changing from one country to another the scene on which h
18. were placed at different periods of the world s history, contributes to give a more d
19. ced at different periods of the world s history, contributes to give a more dramatic an
20. t to make her It has memoirs as torical truth dry as possible, and to bring out, as f
21. mitted, whatever there is of high moral beauty and poetry in these truly noble lives,
22. tever there is of high moral beauty and poetry in these truly noble lives, each presen
23. ignore the lighter elments of fancy and imagination, or dispense with the graces of style.
24. ames that Live in Catholic Hearts" will most likely be followed by one or two m
25. s" will most likely be followed by one or two more of uniform size, as the aut
26. even a few of Her female characters the other countries of Europe and America. form a
27. other countries of Europe and America. form a separate volume. this first volume, t
28. a kindly welcome, I leave it to its own will Commending merits. MARY MONTREAL, CANAD
29. r of 251 m^T~ Xi O thou divinely gifted man, Who made through strength thy merit An
30. grasp the golden keys To mould a mighty state s decrees, known. And shape the whisper
31. The pillar of a peopled The centre of a world s hope, desire. slope TENNYSON. GRAND C
32. a peopled The centre of a world s hope, desire. slope TENNYSON. GRAND CHANCELLOR [E ar
33. sort of interior courtyard, paved with many-tinted marbles, which add to its orient
34. heir glory and their splendor and their One giant form alone power fade from before
35. and their splendor and their One giant form alone power fade from before us. towers
36. that city of 12 his fame, NAMES THAT we will LIVE. endeavor to bring into these page
37. concisely as possible, the chief events life of Spain s illustrious citizen, Francis
38. hief events life of Spain s illustrious citizen, Francisco de Cisneros Ximenes, Archbis
39. year 1437, of a noble but impoverished family, He pursued his studies in the town of
40. we are he defrayed the expenses of his education by giving lessons in civil and canon la
41. on by giving lessons in civil and canon law. Later on, we find told, Twice setting
42. o. The celebrated Alin Ximenes eventful life. episode him phonso Carillo, theji Arch
43. nfinement a priest prophesied he should one day be Archbishop of prison, " suc
44. hen we con Father," sider that the life of solitude its him may have had influe
45. former chaplain of Siguenza. In a short time after, he so gained the esteem and good
46. time after, he so gained the esteem and good-will of his bishop, that he was made Gr
47. after, he so gained the esteem and good-will of his bishop, that he was made Grand V
48. call, and the whisper, He renounced the world, and took "Come up higher." t
49. nd took "Come up higher." the habit of a gray or Franciscan friar, in a con
50. nd near. This so dis to their primitive life turbed him, that he retired to an obscu
51. e thorough fares of men, where he led a life of wonderful austerity. himself, accord
52. lightful though austere picture of his life in this retreat. He He speaks of it as
53. ch had always been a joy forever to his mind that is, his biblical studies. Clad in
54. lding, as he expresses it, the Bible in one hand and the scourge in the other, he p
55. ible in one hand and the scourge in the other, he pondered upon eternal shirt, While
56. s were taking place, wars and rumors of war relating to the succession, till at las
57. She was, however, desirous seeing this man, of whom fame already spoke so Cardinal
58. e known to him, he at first refused the honor. By the queen s special command he, how
59. f even then by contemporaries as iii. g Life of Ximenes, chap. pp. 28-29. CARDINAL X
60. 9. CARDINAL XIMENES. "equal ! 5 in wisdom to St. Jerome, and in zeal to St. Ambro
61. thus: to St. Augustine, in austerity of life courtier A "A man of great sanctit
62. in austerity of life courtier A "A man of great sanctity," he says, "
63. . Paul and St. Hilarion." all this time Ximenes was occupied in reform abuses w
64. . It is related that his secretary upon one occasion said to him, laughing: Most Re
65. im, laughing: Most Reverend Father, you will certainly be the cause of our d)ang of
66. erend Father, you will certainly be the cause of our d)ang of hunger! God gives to ev
67. ly be the cause of our d)ang of hunger! God gives to every one his particular talen
68. our d)ang of hunger! God gives to every one his particular talent. Do you meditate
69. g of hunger! God gives to every one his particular talent. Do you meditate and pray for me
70. m begging for you." was about this time, too, that he ardently desired permissi
71. uperiors to become an But a holy woman, one of apostle among the Moors. those calle
72. Bcatce, declared to him that it was the will of God he should remain in Spain, where
73. declared to him that it was the will of God he should remain in Spain, where a glor
74. y to the king in bishop was regarded as being said that Mendoza named power and influ
75. on successor. Majesties, as his fitting Good Friday of the same year, when the Franc
76. ties, as his fitting Good Friday of the same year, when the Franciscan after having
77. ppeared in the queen s presence, at the same time presenting confession, she said to
78. ed in the queen s presence, at the same time presenting confession, she said to him,
79. , the Papal Bulls: Reverend Father, you will see by these letters what Ximenes kisse
80. m Pope was compelled to send him him in virtue of obedience, before he would manding b
81. ly honors He was * Dr. Hefele 10, II. s Life of 76, 77, Ximenes, p. 40. Flechier, 35
82. the consecration, he came, according to custom, to kiss the hands of the king and quee
83. e hands of your Majesties, not be first cause they have raised me to the because I ho
84. ve raised me to the because I hope they will assist See in in Spain, but me supporti
85. fter this he was conducted with all due state to his palace." * Public events, h
86. ilence, but was forced to submit to the desire of court or at Alcala, so that the peop
87. e Cathedral, that gorgeous mon ument in beauty magnificence worthy the earthly dwellin
88. ght from the painted windows, and their form a heavy clusters of emeralds, rubies, a
89. st nave and irrepressible enthusiasm. O God ! how grandly was day! Thy name glorifi
90. less, multitude looked upon the face of one who, awe-stricken hand. henceforth, hel
91. n Francisco seats himself for the first time in the great carved chair, rising like
92. ins of Castilia; there gentle sights of nature with her varied charms meet the eye thr
93. hes; and there, sweetest of all, reigns peace, deep peace, the peace of God. Such sce
94. re, sweetest of all, reigns peace, deep peace, the peace of God. Such scenes as this
95. t of all, reigns peace, deep peace, the peace of God. Such scenes as this remind us o
96. reigns peace, deep peace, the peace of God. Such scenes as this remind us of the s
97. nued to lead the simple and penitential life of a poor Franciscan friar. He still ap
98. riar. He still appeared publicly in the habit of his Order, went everywhere on foot o
99. on a mule, and permitted not a trace of state or splendor about his dwelling. interfe
100. e, ceremony, forbade this simplicity of life in a man of The exalted station. The ar
101. y, forbade this simplicity of life in a man of The exalted station. The archbishop
102. th a hair shirt; he spread his table on state occasions sumptuously, but continued to
103. of benefits to the Church and To enume State, which ended only with his death. rate
104. enume State, which ended only with his death. rate them within our present limits se
105. erred to his simple and austere mode of life, but cannot refrain from dwelling a mom
106. ssible at the offices of the Church. In one corner of the mighty realm he commanded
107. seclusion he found the rest and prayer. peace he had once so loved at Our Lady of Cas
108. his wrist a small crucifix, which from time to time during the day he drew out and
109. st a small crucifix, which from time to time during the day he drew out and looked u
110. ingly. He deemed it a preservation from sin. He kept himself surrounded by learned
111. hom he could discourse on the things of God, and he made an annual retreat in a con
112. 21 who are versed in the ecclesiastical history of Spain at this period will understand
113. astical history of Spain at this period will understand the importance of the measur
114. pted by Ximenes for the preservation of good order and discipline throughout the kin
115. ticulars which We must necessarily omit many might be of interest to our readers, su
116. rs, as also any detailed account of the opposition which met him everywhere, and the trial
117. ich he had to endure. mon For the great man did not escape the com penalty of great
118. punish the authors of the libels When a man is in circulated against him, he replie
119. s by words." As an instance of the justice and firmness which char acterized his a
120. to confirm Don Pedro de Mendoza in the government of Cazorla. Now this Don Pedro was the
121. But Ximenes moreover, urged the queen s desire. calmly replied that, as Chancellor of
122. endicants, and at an appointed hour the good Archbishop appeared among them, reading
123. distributing alms, and giving to every one a patient and kindly hearing. Little wo
124. lest inhabitants. Busy, indeed, was his life, for, besides his ecclesiasti he undert
125. ace all unworthy judges by men of tried justice, He was the constant ad integrity and p
126. ity and personal merit. cal reforms, of state, viser of the royal consorts upon the m
127. personal toil. thousand converts. Among many he himself made fifty Patiently, means
128. tion his to attain this end, we may men custom of inviting the chief Moorish priests,
129. rsion of the alfaquis led to the conver One day of triumph at last sion of the Moor
130. Ximenes, and bursting again the bond of time and space, we shall assist thereat in s
131. and bursting again the bond of time and space, we shall assist thereat in spirit. A m
132. ur thousand purchased by the agony of a God, ! our baptized unto Christ. Ah, noble
133. shop pours upon each dusky forehead the life-giving waters of the The Koran and the
134. em, but heaven is their inheritance and God their portion forever. There is a sound
135. Granada, and contributed more than any other to implant there the Christian faith.*
136. nesses of the deed. We look in vain for one expression of regret when they behold t
137. ow they turn away from it; they need it wisdom not: the Gospel, the parables of Jesus,
138. en, and entered upon the narrow road to life eternal. All around them their new bret
139. s are When we it upon do " ties of justice to his resplendent virtues and glorious
140. rds of a learned historian, " that State, middle ages, when the two powers, Chur
141. of more misrepresentation and erroneous judgment than any other known to history."*
142. ntation and erroneous judgment than any other known to history."* We have touche
143. oneous judgment than any other known to history."* We have touched thus briefly up
144. n an important subject upon which, were time and space at our command, we would glad
145. rtant subject upon which, were time and space at our command, we would gladly dwell,
146. shop accepted the office, for his clear mind dis cerned that violence and disorder p
147. violence and disorder prevailed at the time in all those countries where this tribu
148. The unconverted Moors forever existing government. remained the dangerous foes of their C
149. e primary ends of the In quisition were good, and that wherever abuses crept in, it
150. e, and gave asylum As to Ximenes, we to many of its victims at Rome. have chronicler
151. he severity ii., * Alzog s Hist, of the Universal Church, vol. p. 668. 26 NAMES THA T LIV
152. eposed bad functionaries, and par doned many accused persons." Mildly, however,
153. xaggerated by anti-Catholic writers, we love to look upon the brighter side of the M
154. Spain. There is a peculiar softness and beauty in the picture of Ximenes and Talavera
155. al s robes he wore a hair shirt and the habit of St. Francis; still, he lived upon on
156. it of St. Francis; still, he lived upon one frugal meal a day, and slept upon a pla
157. ed in the rugged places of this earthly life. The news Alone amid thousands, he towe
158. ey studied how they might best preserve memory. A memorial of the benefit he had thus
159. the walls of the senate chamber, and in one of the public squares. In this interval
160. of the public squares. In this interval many important public events had tude, his t
161. sful. Moors inhabiting the Sierras, and many other affairs of state, in which Ximene
162. Moors inhabiting the Sierras, and many other affairs of state, in which Ximenes gave
163. the Sierras, and many other affairs of state, in which Ximenes gave all possible sup
164. a Moorish convert, who had married some one in the Archbishop of eighty, s service,
165. in Spain. It was in the month May, and nature and art alike combined to adorn the qua
166. It was in the month May, and nature and art alike combined to adorn the quaint old
167. pardon from the queen. But this is only one of many incidents related as to the per
168. from the queen. But this is only one of many incidents related as to the personal be
169. n to see a ruled the woman who from her world." Many foreigners bed of sickness
170. led the woman who from her world." Many foreigners bed of sickness in fact floc
171. ers bed of sickness in fact flocked and one of them, Vianelli, relates the anecdote
172. such a sum," said he, better to do good this to five would be infinitely thousa
173. he diamonds of India." But about A time he received a most valuable pres Franci
174. o be divided into five altar stones the one for the Pope, one for of Portugal, Quee
175. five altar stones the one for the Pope, one for of Portugal, Queen of Spain, one fo
176. e, one for of Portugal, Queen of Spain, one for King Emmanuel one for Cardinal Carv
177. , Queen of Spain, one for King Emmanuel one for Cardinal Carvajal, and the last for
178. . The Archbishop vowed never to use any other stone upon which to say Mass during his
179. stone upon which to say Mass during his life, and resolutely kept After his death it
180. his life, and resolutely kept After his death it was preserved in the Cathe his word.
181. t; and Ximenes, the great Cardinal. The death of Isabella was a source of great grief
182. im in his schemes for the pro motion of science and art. Isabella s love for learning w
183. hemes for the pro motion of science and art. Isabella s love for learning was indee
184. o motion of science and art. Isabella s love for learning was indeed only surpassed
185. n the struggles which followed upon the death of He always Isabella, Ximenes bore a p
186. h claimants for the crown. He was for a time entrusted with the administration of af
187. f the principal nobles even be fore the death of Philip, and during the absence of th
188. of Philip, cious, and just, and held by many writers, both ancient and modern, to ha
189. hould come of age. named in the queen s will " Castile" till the occasion
190. d On ceremony, whilst Ferdinand, on the other hand, ap peared simply apparelled and a
191. d saying to the attendants, door." will myself stand sentinel at the Ximenes pr
192. luence upon Philip, advised him against evil counsellors, and moreover succeeded in
193. as the Benavante and Mendoza. After the death of Philip, he, aware of the total inca
194. r made strenuous efforts to induce some time without avail. * During this interregnu
195. spite the unsettled and un- disciplined state of the country, the childish and foolis
196. s, 31 Ximenes governed the country with wisdom disease and his herculean labors had an
197. t the cor rupt and degraded soldiery in other countries where standing armies were in
198. he Moors also in duced him to carry the war into Africa, where he hoped to effect t
199. held dearest, home, country, faith, and God, to combat bravely, reminding them that
200. etween Christ and Mahomet, between true religion and infidelity. Immediately after he re
201. might have be come Christians. By their death they have deprived me of the principal
202. r them." " " ! " by many biographers that "Ximenes the requ
203. s of a general an in possessed vincible courage and an admirable prudence united with a
204. essed vincible courage and an admirable prudence united with a mind fruitful in resource
205. and an admirable prudence united with a mind fruitful in resources. Ferdinand appear
206. d appears to all "f We are assured opinion, for he gave the entire com mand of the
207. rt of the grandees, that this "The world was turned upside down; and that while
208. Ximenes was received with the greatest honor on his return from Africa. But we are t
209. e for 1854. phers. f Hefele. Hefele and other biogra Gomez. CARDINAL XIMENES. 33 the
210. aston him speak rather of learning and art than of wars and conquests. One of them
211. ing and art than of wars and conquests. One of them made some allusion ished to hea
212. Fernando, the strength and vigor which God has given me. Had my army been faithful
213. ert of infidelity." Long after his death the Moors had a legend among them, that
214. that a gigantic figure in a Franciscan habit and cardinal s hat was seen to urge the
215. st the power of Charles. It was at this time, and in consequence of this insurrectio
216. of this insurrection, that the seat of government was transferred to Madrid, which afterw
217. became capital of the kingdom. At this time, too, 34 NAMES THAT LIVE. Ximenes recei
218. the following passage referring to the will of his grand Ferdinand: "The tamen
219. during }ur absence, entrusted with the government of the kingdom and the administration o
220. f the kingdom and the administration of justice. Indeed, Most Reverend Sir, if this had
221. e we could, considering your integrity, wisdom, and zeal for God and ourselves, not ha
222. ng your integrity, wisdom, and zeal for God and ourselves, not have selected for th
223. es, not have selected for this office a man who would and in safer." whose han
224. gdoms could be Ximenes experienced much opposition at the hands of Grand Constable, the In
225. of Grand Constable, the Infantado, and many other of the principal nobles. When exa
226. rand Constable, the Infantado, and many other of the principal nobles. When exaggerat
227. to know his intentions re specting the government of the kingdom, he led them to a said,
228. gainst Jean d Albret, the exiled " will of the king, !" of Navarre, who, a
229. drian that he danger." may rest in peace. I undertake to face the A serious revo
230. e A serious revolt at Malaga was by his wisdom and He at first exhorted prudence termi
231. by his wisdom and He at first exhorted prudence terminated amicably. the insurgents to
232. eed during the whole course of his long life, were so many and so varied, that they
233. whole course of his long life, were so many and so varied, that they would easily f
234. is abolishing of oppres- 36 sive taxes, will NAMES THAT would be tedious to LIVE. en
235. yglot and the Uni versity of Alcala. It will the be remembered that Columbus appeare
236. and Queen of Spain, somewhere about the time when Ximenes was entering upon his glor
237. ut to evangelize the Indians of the New World the Cardinal had little or nothing to d
238. hosen monks of the Jeronymite Order, to labor among the Indians. To them he gave very
239. the Regent of Cas tile and the Spanish Government; commanded them to procure the erection
240. atives were to be employed. In fact the wisdom and foresight of these detailed instruc
241. ere in their holy undertaking. thither, one of of Scotland. Ximenes whom was brothe
242. enes whom was brother to the About this time negro slaves were in great request in C
243. vantage to Spain, and a source of great wealth to the kingdom. But Ximenes sternly for
244. Priory by force of arms. When Fonseca, one of the principal nobles, remonstrated w
245. e plied: " Be composed, Fonseca. I will so arrange matters that everything shal
246. trout it is poi soned. If you come too death, for he will said: " urge him to p
247. oi soned. If you come too death, for he will said: " urge him to prepare for no
248. lla, done much to bring the then infant art of printing into repute, having given p
249. paniards "the eighth wonder of the world." chose a site upon the banks of t
250. consist of thirty-three professors, in honor of the thirty-three years of our Saviou
251. ty-three years of our Saviour s earthly life, and twelve priests were added in honor
252. life, and twelve priests were added in honor of the twelve apos These latter, howeve
253. to be teaching. distinguished from the other members of the university by a long red
254. osely fitting robe, with a scarf of the same color thrown over the left shoulder, an
255. bina and St. Catherine, for students in philosophy; St. Isidore, a building for students w
256. for students who fell ill, this latter being under the invocation of the Blessed Vir
257. ocation of the Blessed Virgin; again an other for poor theological students and a few
258. ological students and a few students in medicine; a sixth, called "the Little Schoo
259. ch attached special privileges to Papal Government, in St. honor of university met with gr
260. privileges to Papal Government, in St. honor of university met with great also Franc
261. IVE. like but Ximenes alone has founded one Another important foundation made by th
262. ection. At the expiration of this given time they had the choice marrying or enterin
263. choice marrying or entering a religious life. Ximenes was besides one of the chief p
264. g a religious life. Ximenes was besides one of the chief patrons of the hospital fo
265. e for destitute widows and orphans, and many other works of mercy. He founded in all
266. destitute widows and orphans, and many other works of mercy. He founded in all four
267. chief benefits to Spain and aries what many regard as his mankind. We mean his Poly
268. to the gratitude of the whole Christian world." His object, Ximenes himself says
269. Even before he was made of learning and art. patron we are led to suppose Pope, whi
270. ged them frequently as fol lows Lose no time, my friends," would he say to them
271. orious task, lest in the casu alties of life you should lose your patron, or I have
272. ly honors."* price in my eyes than wealth The first volume was finished after twe
273. lume was finished after twelve years of labor; the last some three years later. Six h
274. See as well as Quintanilla, Gomez, and other Spanish authorities, Hefele. 42 NAMES T
275. his son, John Brocar, to an nounce the good tidings to Ximenes. John Brocar was cla
276. t; those around him he exclaimed Of the many arduous duties which I have performed i
277. now opens to us the sacred fountains of religion when friends, they are most needed.&quo
278. dinal had likewise caused to be printed many cheap editions of Lives of the Saints a
279. eap editions of Lives of the Saints and other edifying works. Amongst these was the l
280. r edifying works. Amongst these was the life of St. Thomas a Becket, to whom he had
281. y St. John Climacus; Meditations on the Life of Christ, by a Carthusian, Landulph; b
282. ist, by a Carthusian, Landulph; besides many others. His idea was to stop the spread
283. ian, Landulph; besides many others. His idea was to stop the spread of immoral publi
284. ad of immoral publications by supplying good read ; ing in their place. Being anxiou
285. pplying good read ; ing in their place. Being anxious to promote classical knowledge,
286. ace. Being anxious to promote classical knowledge, he also gave a commission to some lear
287. a complete edition of Aristotle but his death occurring soon after, put an end to thi
288. ble was, indeed, a fitting close to the life of the great Cardinal. Four months afte
289. rwards he died. He lived long enough to experience the ingratitude of kings. Charles, who,
290. in defiance of his faithful minister s will, had caused himself * Canon Dalton, to
291. declared that this letter hastened his death, but the truth letter to the Cardinal,
292. this letter hastened his death, but the truth letter to the Cardinal, is he never rec
293. upon the verge simply of the grave, old man was already and the announcement was ma
294. ad been fixed during all those years of labor and tri umph for the glory and fame and
295. and tri umph for the glory and fame and honor of the highest position in the Court ha
296. ision. The Promised Land drew near; the world receded, and ; the jasper failing sight
297. the narrow gate his spirit That mighty soul, with one great gasp of joy, passed. fr
298. gate his spirit That mighty soul, with one great gasp of joy, passed. freed from t
299. m the earthiness of earth, entered into life of death he spoke to his servants of th
300. rthiness of earth, entered into life of death he spoke to his servants of the instabi
301. s, and of the infinite mer He begged of God the pardon of his sins, cies of God.&qu
302. of God the pardon of his sins, cies of God." eternal. " At the hour impl
303. e so long governed, to struggle and the world to its long strife and turmoil. Contrar
304. ncipal events of Ximenes " "a life." necessarily imperfect glance at
305. n ions upon this the most extraordinary man of his day, and to form our own estimat
306. st extraordinary man of his day, and to form our own estimate of his life and works.
307. ay, and to form our own estimate of his life and works. Even his personal appearance
308. ell to quote the follow ing significant opinion, which is one biographer. " Robert
309. ollow ing significant opinion, which is one biographer. " Robertson, in his Li
310. ne biographer. " Robertson, in his Life of enunciated by more than Charles V.,
311. han Charles V., says that, In the whole history of the world, Ximenes is the only Prime
312. says that, In the whole history of the world, Ximenes is the only Prime Minister who
313. ous and "passed happy phase of her history. Would that another Ximenes were born t
314. bitter political opponent, acknowl was one of the edged, after the Cardinal s deat
315. one of the edged, after the Cardinal s death, that most remarkable of men, a true ol
316. he Preface to his translation of Hefele man Ximenes, says: "As a states he was
317. anons "I of Toledo, devoted to the cause to his enemies." of the "If,&
318. dds he, can inspire my readers with the same love and admiration for the character o
319. e, can inspire my readers with the same love and admiration for the character of Xim
320. f Ximenes which words I feel myself, my labor will be fully repaid," which we ma
321. nes which words I feel myself, my labor will be fully repaid," which we may app
322. aid," which we may apply with full justice to our humble analysis of the character
323. s of the character of this truly heroic man. Throughout Spain, he was even in his l
324. y NAMES THAT LIVE. regarded as a saint; many miracles are ascribed to and in some an
325. monk, we see him full of the Spirit of God, practising almost unparalleled s auste
326. nal robe we find him still, wearing his habit of St. Francis and a rough hair shirt;
327. ugh hair shirt; still detached from the world, still full of zeal for the things of G
328. d, still full of zeal for the things of God, frugal and penitential in his diet, sl
329. et, sleeping upon a plank, his tranquil mind undisturbed by the splendor and luxury
330. a statesman he stands out promi nent in history as a reformer of abuses, the organizer
331. izer of a superior military system, the man who increased ten fold the maritime pow
332. and who posed the introduction of negro slavery in Ameriea. op A constant generous patr
333. nerous patron of all that was noble and good and beautiful of science and art, and e
334. hat was noble and good and beautiful of science and art, and even of agriculture, for h
335. e and good and beautiful of science and art, and even of agriculture, for he caused
336. ctor of the poor, at once the friend of liberty and the supporter of established govern
337. iberty and the supporter of established government, the foun der of a University and the c
338. rs of a luxurious court, a model to the world. He shunned the honors which were force
339. ty, bordering upon accuse him, was ,the quality which enabled him to hold the helm of s
340. y which enabled him to hold the helm of state, lous times. amid all the storms of tho
341. that hunger which ceased only with his death. thirst after justice" Besides, &q
342. eased only with his death. thirst after justice" Besides, " This man intellec
343. fter justice" Besides, " This man intellect and sublime of indomitable wi
344. an intellect and sublime of indomitable will, fiery ardor, all-grasping faith, has s
345. ifice which serves as a fit a spirit as death ting monument to as grand and pure ever
346. pure ever freed from mortal thrall and immortality ushered the through the gates of the gr
347. its dusky, contemplation of that great life, which in those so-called The moonlight
348. ior kings and heroes famous once in the history of the country, but whose bodies have l
349. ous Mozarabic Chapel, and its beautiful one of the gloom Madonna, where, amid a gor
350. geous mingling of jasper, porphyry, and other precious marbles, Our Lady is en throne
351. magnificence. According to the Spanish custom, her robe is of rich velvet, adorned wi
352. wed upon her by Christ, her Son, to the particular " glory of last all the Saints.&qu
353. pon which, in the days of the great and good Cardinal, time had scarcely laid its va
354. he days of the great and good Cardinal, time had scarcely laid its vandal hand. We b
355. n. And unapproached, Thou, the inspired One, whose gigantic mind Lived in some sphe
356. Thou, the inspired One, whose gigantic mind Lived in some sphere to thee alone assi
357. R, POET, ARCHITECT, AND SCULPTOR. HAT a world of historic associations cluster about
358. id at the feet of the Sovereign Pontiff one small portion of this vast world to be
359. Pontiff one small portion of this vast world to be the visible Kingdom of Christ upo
360. t was the homage had so long swayed the world, fell, one by one, with hideous clamor,
361. age had so long swayed the world, fell, one by one, with hideous clamor, and the ol
362. so long swayed the world, fell, one by one, with hideous clamor, and the old race
363. e old race of heroes, who had swept the world with their conquests, vanished forever
364. ic silence of sleep had fallen upon the world, a few faithful hearts gathered around
365. was offered, and the Bread which is the Life of the world distributed to the first G
366. and the Bread which is the Life of the world distributed to the first Grand and subl
367. n for the people. But in the fulness of time this newer, grander, most imperishable
368. o disappear from its green surface till Time shall cast its burden of centuries ,int
369. hall cast its burden of centuries ,into Eternity s shoreless Constantine, flushed with v
370. with victory, beheld in the heavens the sign of the Crucified; he recognized the mig
371. htier Conqueror, and he cast before Him wealth and fame and honor, his alike by birth
372. he cast before Him wealth and fame and honor, his alike by birth and conquest. Thenc
373. ils of victory. be held the heritage of God in the person of His Vicar; light of da
374. gitate the the Church might possess her soul in peace, nor earth, be ever again comp
375. he the Church might possess her soul in peace, nor earth, be ever again compelled to
376. n compelled to celebrate the worship of God so that MICHAEL ANGELO. beneath the ear
377. ed for her sovereign spirits whose very memory casts a spell over the civilized world,
378. memory casts a spell over the civilized world, was born in Tuscany, on the 6th of Mar
379. rchitect, and sculptor. the illustrious family of the Counts of Canossa, who had been
380. nd sup porters of the Papal See. At the time of the artist s birth his father was Po
381. ence, and sent the infant Angelo to the family villa of Settignano. There he was nurse
382. y a woman who chanced to be the wife of one stone-mason and the daughter of another
383. r- and here school in Florence, kept by one Francesco d Urbino; his father wished h
384. to prepare for an honora ble career in one of the learned professions. But this de
385. s were calling the student into another world, peopled with rare and exquisite creati
386. ried the wondrous pro ductions of their art, lured him on with visions of the in fi
387. nd woke in his him far beyond the earth soul vague longings which bore into a nobler
388. re into a nobler and purer atmos phere. Nature, too, with her thousand charms allured
389. the lofty Soracte, the moonlight on the time-vanquished walls of the Coliseum; the c
390. of his all these spoke to his youthful soul in land, strange language, thrilled him
391. e to his youthful soul in land, strange language, thrilled him with passionate joy and n
392. lled him with passionate joy and native pain, filled ings, him with mighty imagery a
393. to rest until he had gained a threefold immortality. Even at this Angelo spent every moment
394. andaio, did much to encourage the boy s love for art, and brought him to his master
395. id much to encourage the boy s love for art, and brought him to his master s studio
396. German So desirous was he of imitating nature, that he print. went to the market to o
397. of great displeas ure to his father and other relatives, the profession of painter be
398. er relatives, the profession of painter being held as a degradation. Their interfer e
399. agreed to pay him a small salary. that time his progress in art was he gained but l
400. o pay him a small salary. that time his progress in art was he gained but little from th
401. small salary. that time his progress in art was he gained but little from the instr
402. as it at work, and this in so mas forth universal admira manner that called Meanwhile, Lo
403. he study of sculpture, feeling that its progress had not kept pace with that of painting
404. ular attendants, thus gaining a correct knowledge of the antique.* The young artist now f
405. ue.* The young artist now for the first time attempted and also tried his apprentice
406. elling in marble. Lorenzo de Medici, in one of his vis carving its to the garden, o
407. nted a marble faun, in clay, * Vasari s Life of Angelo. Vasari s Ragionamenti. Duffa
408. Angelo. Vasari s Ragionamenti. Duffa s Life of Angelo 56 NAMES THA T LIVE. and Lore
409. he teeth were too Angelo perceiving the justice perfect for so old a faun. of the criti
410. the Carmelites, so rich in treasures of art. From that time dates the artist s tian
411. so rich in treasures of art. From that time dates the artist s tiano, the distingui
412. ind and munificent patron. At Lorenzo s death the artist went home. Pietro de Medici,
413. ates, was far inferior to his father in mind and character. Still, he induced Angelo
414. r the artist that he MICHAEL ANGELO. 57 beauty of person, and so swift of foot that on
415. ty of person, and so swift of foot that one riding on horseback could not overtake
416. e him.* Angelo occupied himself at this time in carving a great statue of Hercules,
417. Bologna in company with some friends. A law was then in force that a foreigner ente
418. ll a member of the to Francis Bolognese Government, Signer Aldovrandi, released them and i
419. y. " go with you myself to see the world, since take such good care of your frie
420. yself to see the world, since take such good care of your friends." you Angelo
421. ied himself with marble statues think I will for the Church of San Domenico: one, a
422. I will for the Church of San Domenico: one, a San Petronio; the other, a kneeling
423. San Domenico: one, a San Petronio; the other, a kneeling angel bearing a branch for
424. , a San Petronio; the other, a kneeling angel bearing a branch for candles in the han
425. pid, so perfect an imitation of Grecian art, that he was induced to stain it such a
426. it would have been if buded for ages. A man who had suggested the deception to now
427. Cardinal San after, Giorgio; though the man who had practised the imposi* Pondivi.
428. er particulars. The result was that the man who had sold obliged to refund the mone
429. iorgio Angelo went a statue of Bacchus, one of Cupid, and a figure of the Virgin an
430. n grandeur and simplicity, and a tender beauty of expression. It is now used as an alt
431. follow ing anecdote is told. Angelo on one occasion entered the church, and found
432. chanced to be present, answered, "One of our heard countrymen, a Milanese.&qu
433. ving the Stigmata;" but about this time he left Rome, and returned to Florence,
434. ront of the Palazzo Vecchio. His patron being brought to see it, just or so the story
435. that of Lionardo da Vinci. scene in the war between the Florentines and Pisans, is
436. e of cavalry. In the former and the sub life and movement," says Mrs. Jameson,
437. and movement," says Mrs. Jameson, life." "all " ject affords th
438. ng for combat. There are thirty or more life-sized figures, drawn with black chalk,
439. iety of attitude and action, anatomical knowledge, and admirable skill in great This work
440. was a stupendous design, instinct with life and animation, the full power of the hu
441. tion, the full power of the human frame being portrayed with consummate Yet it lacks
442. that of this magnificent conception but one small copy remains. The reigning Pope,
443. said, "The character of Julius is one of incomparable ately grandeur. chral d
444. uld have been the most magnificent of a man who fos sunshine of his munificence. Th
445. ions in the tribute ever offered to the memory tered so many geniuses in the building
446. ute ever offered to the memory tered so many geniuses in the building were suggested
447. s statue of Moses, wherein the inspired law giver is represented grasping with one
448. law giver is represented grasping with one hand his flowing So beard, and with the
449. hand his flowing So beard, and with the other the tables of the law. high was Angelo
450. d, and with the other the tables of the law. high was Angelo in the favor of the Po
451. o, that the Pope might visit him at his pleasure and watch the progress of his works. Su
452. visit him at his pleasure and watch the progress of his works. Such distinction naturall
453. sary in the carrying on of the work. On one occasion Angelo went as usual to the Va
454. cumstance, the artist retired. A short time after, he repeated his visit, and was t
455. new to whom he spoke. " I know him duty to well enough," orders." rep
456. enough," orders." replied the other, " but it is my " obey Angelo
457. e refused decidedly, saying, "That being expelled the antechamber of his Holines
458. e Pope sent a message to the Florentine Government to induce Angelo if possible to return
459. persuaded him to return. Some political matter having brought to the the ity Pope to B
460. washed over, and painted by Angelo. The death of MICHAEL ANGELO. 63 Julius prevented
461. prevented this portion of the plan from being car So that the ceiling and some of the
462. In these divisions and five small ones form the centre. is The He bids light majest
463. they await Last comes the the moment of universal annihilation. creation of man, the hand
464. of universal annihilation. creation of man, the handful of clay, the vital breath
465. stamped and dominion imparted over the animal tribes, thereupon, the crowning touch o
466. he creation of Eve and the fair face of nature is complete. But a change comes over th
467. fair face of nature is complete. But a change comes over the blissful garden and its
468. he sad story of the expulsion. Out, and death out into the dreariness, and misery, an
469. ut into the dreariness, and misery, and sin, and labor of the outer world, never to
470. he dreariness, and misery, and sin, and labor of the outer world, never to revisit, s
471. misery, and sin, and labor of the outer world, never to revisit, save in melancholy r
472. se joy the heart leading thitherward of death. of is cannot conceive; but the way thr
473. way through the dark and rugged defile man The artist leads us onward to that awfu
474. g human agony brought in the fulness of life, face to face with death. As a relief w
475. the fulness of life, face to face with death. As a relief we turn to the sacrifice o
476. l Redeemer. They are brought vividly to life by the artist, seated before us with th
477. r mighty scrolls or upon our minds Each one feels the breath of inspiration, and th
478. which burst asunder the myriad bonds of time and space, and hurries him onward into
479. st asunder the myriad bonds of time and space, and hurries him onward into a marvello
480. wait in the ambient air the message for immortality. In compartments called lunettes is the
481. mate productions, MICHAEL ANGELO. 65 In one corner of the ceiling is the majestic f
482. of Judith, full of austere and stately beauty, at the moment triumph over Holofernes.
483. moment triumph over Holofernes. In the other corners are David vanquishing Goliath,
484. ners are David vanquishing Goliath, the Punishment of Aman, the Brazen Serpent, and the mi
485. cal flat in we behold Angelo during the progress of this marvellous work, pausing with b
486. mighty imaginings spellbound, his great soul dilating upon its conception of the Ete
487. ternal Creator. His the task to give to immortality an idea of the Infinite, which might be
488. His the task to give to immortality an idea of the Infinite, which might bear some
489. ding new and tender touches of majestic beauty to the countenance of the Incarnate Son
490. the countenance of the Incarnate Son of God, perfecting each fold and wrinkle of th
491. the divine tenderness, the unutterable beauty of the face which smiled above the crib
492. arious insignia of their mission ; upon God. earth, or the signs and symbols of the
493. which he alone had begun and ended, his soul had passed. His earnest faith, his ador
494. passed. His earnest faith, his adoring love, his reverent devotion, were imaged in
495. t. eign Pontiff entered in his robes of state and sang High Mass, amid the harmonious
496. ong within him. A great uncontrol lable desire possessed him to approach what seemed t
497. the unattainable, and produce what his soul, full of an undefinable longing, urged
498. ed before the altar, and gave praise to God, the mighty and the strong, the holy an
499. erdict of the universe, and stand where man for good or evil might not stand. lofti
500. f the universe, and stand where man for good or evil might not stand. loftiest that
501. iverse, and stand where man for good or evil might not stand. loftiest that mountain
502. e, breathing that purer air, he need ac knowledge no kindred with the world that lay stre
503. e need ac knowledge no kindred with the world that lay stretched High upon at his fee
504. nd an end came to the earthly career of one who had been to the artist the noblest
505. artist undertook with some reluctance, being desirous of com pleting the mausoleum o
506. elt this to be a debt which he owed the memory of his benefactor. out both works at th
507. f his benefactor. out both works at the same time. Pope Leo gave him permission to c
508. benefactor. out both works at the same time. Pope Leo gave him permission to carry
509. y But the facade of San Lorenzo did not progress very rapidly. Pope Leo had heard great
510. and support given by the Pontiffs to so many artists who were fostered in the shadow
511. ulius had been a most liberal patron of art and artists, as we have already seen, a
512. re told that this they did "from a desire to elevate the common standard of manki
513. gn of Leo, is who was of the celebrated family of Medici, known as the golden age of a
514. y of Medici, known as the golden age of art and litera and men of letters found and
515. we have already mentioned, retarded the progress that he might have made. Again, with Li
516. rve as a mausoleum for that illustrious family. Adrian died after a pontificate of twe
517. d military architect, and for the first time distinguished himself in that way by th
518. gelo at first concealed himself, but on being offered the most favorable terms by Pop
519. San Lorenzo, and also executed for the same a statue of the Madonna bear ing the Ch
520. , and this he did with some reluctance, being anxious to complete the mausoleum of Ju
521. n of the Duke d Urbino. But in the mean time Clement died, and Paul III., of the Far
522. ent died, and Paul III., of the Farnese family, became Pope. He was most anxious to pr
523. d by Angelo, and the remaining three by other artists of 70 his choice. NAMES of THA7
524. ations his immortal picture of the Last Judgment so terrible in its conception and execu
525. , no longer the Redeemer, no longer the Man of Sorrows, no longer ; the veiled God
526. Man of Sorrows, no longer ; the veiled God of the Tabernacle, but mighty, resplend
527. summons are the to the children On the one hand "just made everlasting joy is
528. ust made everlasting joy is passed, and eternity in store for them already mingles with
529. laden with into the fathomless ocean of eternity. human beings, the faces of whom are ap
530. f whom are appalling in their The whole idea of the picture is eternal despair. MICH
531. this picture to be unique in sublimity. art. Angelo was next engaged upon the fresc
532. invocation of those saints. These were being the last pictures of importance ever pa
533. the Madonna her lap. finished About the same time he began a group del Pieta, bearin
534. adonna her lap. finished About the same time he began a group del Pieta, bearing the
535. s never completed, and stands in its un state before the high altar of the Church of
536. been architect of St. Peter s since the death of Bramante, died in 1546, and Angelo w
537. id, con grandissimo name, amore, but on one condition: this was, that he should rec
538. He simply accepted the office from his desire to accomplish something for the honor o
539. desire to accomplish something for the honor of the Most High. Such was the deep fai
540. terized the great artist. Now was begun one of what a historian calls " the ap
541. gaged upon this grand monuments, for so many ages the pride and glory It of Christen
542. on, and was very near completion at the time of He continued his labors upon it duri
543. inued his labors upon it during the his death. pontificate of four popes Paul tell II
544. Age began frame, and at length to upon man he worked with stern and rugged per eve
545. r attacked him, of which he died in the soul, still young in its dawn when of immort
546. e soul, still young in its dawn when of immortality r month of February, 1563, leaving unfi
547. cried out in a strong, clear voice: My soul I resign to God, " my body to the
548. trong, clear voice: My soul I resign to God, " my body to the earth, and to ne
549. dside, the solemn dignity and repose of death shad owing his face and lending emphasi
550. ferings of Jesus Christ." " : life, remember the more, and some moments af
551. genius of his age. long servitude; the soul departed whither its aspirations, ever
552. not dead; he had but entered into ages. life, leaving his lived memory He had fiftee
553. ered into ages. life, leaving his lived memory He had fifteen eighty-eight years, the
554. of the painter, architect, and sculptor being ended, our task is done, save as it beh
555. essional reputation as our brief limits will permit. death we find that the grand wo
556. tation as our brief limits will permit. death we find that the grand work of During t
557. th St. Peter s, he was also employed in many lesser undertakings. of the He continue
558. such antique relics as were still from time Rome. He to time being discovered among
559. ics as were still from time Rome. He to time being discovered among Rome. On the sum
560. s were still from time Rome. He to time being discovered among Rome. On the summit of
561. all of the Roman Empire." reigning idea of turning the Baths of Dioclesian, the
562. ecuted: it was called the Porta Pia, in honor of Pius V., the During these He also ca
563. the work was delayed, till in course of time Angelo died too. It was afterwards comp
564. a dim foreshadowing. Beholding it, his other works sink into for there his insignifi
565. k into for there his insignificance; it One word more master genius has raised, and
566. dmiring est and the loftiest thing that mind of man has^ever con Before us rises as
567. est and the loftiest thing that mind of man has^ever con Before us rises as in a pi
568. dest of all, the figure of the weak old man, directing, commanding, following its m
569. d breadth in the immensity of which the soul of man is the vastness of which the car
570. h in the immensity of which the soul of man is the vastness of which the carved ang
571. seem of the stature of children. Of his other works we have given the and imperfect n
572. iven the and imperfect notice which our space permits. But besides the pieces of scul
573. imes ever equalled him in perfection of form and symmetry of outline; none excelled
574. re ever painted," that of the Last Judgment; and his ceil- ?6 NAMES THAT is LIVE. i
575. onception of the spiritual and material world. Art was his mistress, the sole, absorb
576. on of the spiritual and material world. Art was his mistress, the sole, absorbing i
577. ss, the sole, absorbing interest of his life. No toils were too toilsome, no labors
578. e, no labors too un tive portion of his art, No unsurpassed in the beauty and the h
579. rtion of his art, No unsurpassed in the beauty and the harmony of the whole. painter,
580. pt for the efforts of others and at the same time with a certain diffidence in his o
581. r the efforts of others and at the same time with a certain diffidence in his own po
582. ld that a certain Cardinal, finding him one day among the ruins of ancient Rome, as
583. as doing, to which "I am still was one of an old man in a go-cart, Angelo neve
584. hich "I am still was one of an old man in a go-cart, Angelo never married, nor
585. iously thought of it. an attachment for one of the opposite sex, except his famous
586. ss of Pescara, most eminent for talent, virtue, and piety was the woman of her time. F
587. virtue, and piety was the woman of her time. For her he enter who Colonna, Marchio-
588. cter of the artist. To Vittoria Colonna many of his poems are addressed, and this br
589. ; their was deep and ardent, and at the same time friendship noble and MICHAEL ANGEL
590. ir was deep and ardent, and at the same time friendship noble and MICHAEL ANGELO. 77
591. rude mixture of Platonism and those on love to be " metaphysics." It is,
592. latonism and those on love to be " metaphysics." It is, in fact, true of his ever
593. s the ration; groundwork of all he did; religion his highest inspi by its aid he attaine
594. ttained an eminence which, per haps, no other man has ever reached in so many branche
595. d an eminence which, per haps, no other man has ever reached in so many branches He
596. ps, no other man has ever reached in so many branches He was a sincere and practical
597. cere and practical Catholic; nor did of art. lie consider it inconsistent with his
598. , preferring the society of men. Yet no one ever possessed a more profound knowledg
599. t no one ever possessed a more profound knowledge of the world, or was more in timately a
600. sessed a more profound knowledge of the world, or was more in timately acquainted wit
601. ties which gained him the reputation of being both morose and In temper he was undoub
602. seized a mallet and flattened the great man s nose, giving him a mark which he bore
603. iving him a mark which he bore till his death. Yet, while his de to fects of him best
604. s of him best loved him temper made him many enemies, those who knew well, for he wa
605. llustration of his more qualities. When will endearing he felt himself growing old,
606. lt himself growing old, he asked Urbino one day: " What become "I suppose
607. " Paradise." Angelo for some time continued a correspondence with Urbino
608. proof of his sincere attachment to the memory of his humble friend. The great artist
609. as in all respects above re proach: his honor was unsullied, his life pure and blame
610. re proach: his honor was unsullied, his life pure and blame his disposition kind and
611. itter per, petty weaknesses, enemies in life, died with him; only his virtues, his l
612. oraries, or by more recent writers upon art. " tion, says, Varchi, in the extr
613. ulpe, e colora, Michel, piu che mortal, angel divino."* is characterized sublimi
614. ed sublimity of conception, nobility of form, and ease by and breadth of manner.&quo
615. ps, only rival, the immortal he thanked God Raphael, frequently exclaimed that in t
616. phael, frequently exclaimed that in the time of Michael Angelo." A for having b
617. olemei, declares that " the mas by many and great artists he was considered the
618. n." By ter, prince, and deity Upon one his time he was held in the highest est
619. By ter, prince, and deity Upon one his time he was held in the highest esteem. when
620. lived and labored, each in turn in the being his munificent patron. So we have done,
621. ture divine." more than mortal, an angel f Hazlitt s translation of Duffa s Ange
622. end, he pursued unceasingly his doom of immortality, which would not give him rest. The sur
623. not give him rest. The surging waves of time and death closed over all who had been
624. him rest. The surging waves of time and death closed over all who had been his con So
625. ngulfed him; unto his mighty heart came peace; unto his indom itable spirit calm; unt
626. flame stands Angelo, with the threefold art he loved crowning him with a diadem of
627. architecture keep watch around Through life, like the hero of an ancient leg * The
628. of the illustrious Aretino, " The world has many kings, and but one Michael Ang
629. lustrious Aretino, " The world has many kings, and but one Michael Angelo."
630. quot; The world has many kings, and but one Michael Angelo." atttt of[ Wanderi
631. ing there mongst the red men, I bless d God in truth and in secret, But cast That h
632. re mongst the red men, I bless d God in truth and in secret, But cast That he had not
633. me it is given To lead the vanguard of Truth region of souls inmost recesses who kno
634. vages armd, and heard the roar of their war-cry. McGEE. -be EXPLORER AND FOUNDER OF
635. ng of to-day is a flourishing dominion, many prosperous and populous and many happy
636. inion, many prosperous and populous and many happy homes of more than cities, Saxon
637. oom of gnarled oaks olden, white spring-time with the blossoms of the acacia, their
638. ll-tops, the very air is laden with the memory of your mighty to deeds. At this presen
639. resent stage of our sketch, however, we will not pause to consider these missionarie
640. anadian civilization; nor shall we take time to observe the claims of the Recollet F
641. llers upon her changeful waters. to The family seem have risen somewhat in the social
642. omewhat in the social scale, for at the time of Samuel de Champlain s marriage in 16
643. aptain. Champlain, however, inherited a love for the sea, and the full witchery of h
644. reflected in the sullen waters, and the war to death between contending elements, p
645. ed in the sullen waters, and the war to death between contending elements, possessed
646. and impelled me to expose myself during many years of my life to the fury of the oce
647. o expose myself during many years of my life to the fury of the ocean waves." T
648. cean waves." This partiality for a life of adventure did not, how ever, prevent
649. t him from devoting most of his leisure time to study, and the acquiring of that acc
650. ing of that accurate and com prehensive knowledge for which he was afterwards re markable
651. d him on some of his "The He gives many years art of seafaring," short voy
652. me of his "The He gives many years art of seafaring," short voyages. of T
653. ain s uncle, a veteran tar, was at this time famous throughout France as an experien
654. amplain, all enthusiasm for a seafaring life, and 86 filled NAMES THAT LIVE. ble to
655. him from occupying each mo ment of his time. He made out charts of every place at w
656. considerable stay. Then it was that his desire of a voyage to the Indies seemed about
657. en." While the vessels " were being rigged and put into order for this long
658. o make a voyage to the West Indies, and being pleased with the Saint Julien," an
659. been in command of her, was needed for other duty, and his nephew, already known as
660. in command of her, was needed for other duty, and his nephew, already known as a pro
661. ries in the following glowing terms: No one," he says, could see, nor desire t
662. : No one," he says, could see, nor desire to see, a more beautiful region than th
663. ithful and accurate accounts of the New World. 88 NAMES THAT De the great Chaste. LIV
664. cele He had long been revolving in his mind the certain great schemes relative to c
665. pedition to Champlain. Due prepara tion being made, the vessel sailed from Honfleur o
666. visited this region before, and brought one or two Indians back with him to France.
667. or two Indians back with him to France. One of these Indians now arose, and made an
668. ect gravity undisturbed, and their only sign of interest an occa- SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAI
669. arose, and passed round the calumet or peace-pipe, offering it first to to the princ
670. er to the Great Falls of St. Louis, and one or two of their crew. by Font-Grave com
671. to the condition of affairs in the New World, and accounts of their voyage. Henry of
672. ir voyage. Henry of Navarre was at that time the accounts reigning sovereign, and. i
673. ents, and pictured it as a land full of beauty and rich in all material mystery, goods
674. nxious to found a settlement in the New World, but was also anxious that it should be
675. its fervid sky. make him new With this desire in his mind he rejoiced that his patron
676. y. make him new With this desire in his mind he rejoiced that his patron should have
677. l voyages thence to various and amongst other places of portions of the continent, vi
678. uot; we catch a glimpse of the Royal; a life, indeed life it first settlers at Port
679. a glimpse of the Royal; a life, indeed life it first settlers at Port was, of roman
680. ; writes he, Ordre de Bon"and made good cheer, by means of the which I establis
681. he which I established, and which every one found temps, than all very beneficial t
682. little ceremonies, we put round neck of one of our people, appointing him thus for
683. s at Port Royal, as well as a temporary one at the island of Sainte Croix, where th
684. he St. facility for commerce. since the time of Lawrence offered an unequalled Besid
685. d both Champlain and his patron were of opinion that a settlement on the St. Lawrence m
686. ts landed upon a projecting and lost no time in preparing temporary dwellings, where
687. ring temporary dwellings, where the red man had hitherto held undis puted sway. The
688. s grew up with almost magical rapidity. Time went on, and the little colony seemed t
689. usy had not been left behind in the Old World, and soon Among the began to show signs
690. igns of their existence. settlers was a man named Jean Duval, who was noted for his
691. was noted for his bravery, and had done good service in certain Hence he was justly
692. ting maladies peculiar to their mode of life. The tree could not be found, and from
693. ults of such quarrels disastrous to the peace and welfare of the colony. In the vicin
694. and the Tortoise. Champlain has been by many historians severely blamed for his cont
695. the Iroquois were a distant tribe, and one that openly historians If professed sco
696. lves their unrelenting enemies. Besides many this, the Hurons and other adjacent tri
697. mies. Besides many this, the Hurons and other adjacent tribes in instances befriended
698. age of Their object was to gain further knowledge discovery. of the country and the peopl
699. nd the people, their habits and mode of life, and such particulars as might be there
700. e. The vengeful Algon quins bided their time, but when the hunters slept the deep sl
701. eads. 95 Henceforth the red tomahawk of war was unsheathed between the nations, and
702. ween the nations, and so continued from time immemorial. When Champlain returned fro
703. f us, they hastened on their mission of war and desolation. They landed on a portio
704. ndians with wampum belts and plumes and war-paint. silence At length the was broken
705. s the savages chanted their dis cordant war-songs and danced their hideous dance of
706. songs and danced their hideous dance of death. From either camp opprobrious epithets
707. un streaked the East with red, like the war-paint of the savage, and came slowly an
708. y were about two hundred in number, and being tall and symmetrically formed, presente
709. rranged, Champlain stepped forward with one or two of his men, who in fact constitu
710. d ever, they discharged a fire out of a war-club in his hand. The loud report of mu
711. the ground. Clearly, they thought, this man must be a mes senger from the Great Spi
712. es senger from the Great Spirit. On the other hand the allies were delighted, and beg
713. and begged Champlain to fire again. The other two French men stepped forward and disc
714. spectacle. their wigwams, and fastening one of their prisoners to a tree, chanted t
715. their prisoners to a tree, chanted the death hymn around him. It a detailed account
716. ance of his race, nor gave the faintest sign of fear or horror at his fate, SAMUEL D
717. faintest sign of fear or horror at his fate, SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN. 97 Vainly did Cha
718. d of their prey, and at dawn put him to death with the most inhuman tortures. Champla
719. France, where he re mained but a short time, and returning found the Algonquins and
720. uage, and Champlain remained there some time, arranging the affairs of the settlemen
721. t was signed. matters that occupied his mind, and in spite of weighty the roving, de
722. spite of weighty the roving, desultory life he had led, he seems to have been not i
723. choice was in some respects a singular one. Helene plain s Boulle, daughter of the
724. etary, was only twelve years old at the time of her betrothal, which took place in 1
725. ng with deep and loyal affection to the one true faith. Ardently the childwife long
726. VE. Her youthful fancy tinged the great world beyond life. the ocean with a halo of r
727. ful fancy tinged the great world beyond life. the ocean with a halo of romance, and
728. an with a halo of romance, and lent its poetry to the uncertainties, the perils and th
729. e she joined her husband in the western world, time had dis remain pelled many of the
730. oined her husband in the western world, time had dis remain pelled many of these ill
731. stern world, time had dis remain pelled many of these illusions, and caused her to d
732. . Champlain was question of the at this time much occupied by of the evangelization
733. the evangelization This had always been one of his most cherished designs; and in f
734. heard to declare that the salvation of one soul is of more value than the conquest
735. rd to declare that the salvation of one soul is of more value than the conquest of a
736. bjecting them to Jesus Christ." On one occasion Champlain questioned a savage
737. gious belief of his nation. believed in God. Yes, they believed in one Great they S
738. believed in God. Yes, they believed in one Great they SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN. 09 Mani
739. mplain then asked if they believed that God created man. The when the Great Spirit
740. asked if they believed that God created man. The when the Great Spirit had made eve
741. and its ravishing delights, amid which man had spent his primal morning. The India
742. further said that they believed in all one Great Spirit, in his Son, in a Mother,
743. illumines the earth. all, He added that God was above his but that he was no better
744. etter than he oughc to be; that Son was good, and did much for mankind; that the Mot
745. e Mother was bad, and would eat the red man; but that the bright Sun that shone abo
746. he bright Sun that shone above them was good, and brought great blessings to earth.
747. . Champlain asked if they believed that God had ever come down upon earth, and the
748. people, it is told that in the far-off time five warriors went yonder to the red ho
749. ; " And they answered, To seek for life. Ye will find "And "<
750. And they answered, To seek for life. Ye will find "And "< the Great
751. re turned into stone. Then he asked the other three, Whither go ye ? " " &q
752. t;And " To they answered, seek for life. 100 " < NAMES THAT Here wi
753. fe. 100 " < NAMES THAT Here will LIVE. ye find it/ said the Creator; go
754. turned two of them into sticks. And but one remained. Whither goest thou ? said the
755. ing sun, that I may seek for shalt find life. Pass not onwards. life. the warrior li
756. for shalt find life. Pass not onwards. life. the warrior listened and obeyed. Then
757. broken the pipe when he knew he had no other. And the Manitou, giving him a new pipe
758. ell him to "guard and keep it from evil, and while he did so his tribe should h
759. my brother. Then Champlain told him of God, the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; of th
760. and asked how he should pray to age the God of the pale-faces. SAMUEL DE CHAMPLA IN
761. enable him to bring out missionaries to labor among the savages and teach them knowle
762. labor among the savages and teach them knowledge of the true God. His noble project did
763. es and teach them knowledge of the true God. His noble project did not meet with th
764. nd would meet them no more, whether for peace or for war. that year to the Great Fall
765. them no more, whether for peace or for war. that year to the Great Falls to During
766. a wealthy and influential nobleman, and one whom he rightly judged would advance as
767. ual savages in the wilds of the western world. affairs of While still in his native c
768. e long-sought north westerly passage. A man recently returned from Canada declared
769. ty, as the Eng shore. lish were at that time pushing their explorations very far nor
770. lgonquins. Champlain was accompanied by one savage and four Frenchmen, amongst whom
771. d respect. Tessouat gave a great in his honor, and invited all the neighboring tell T
772. pushed The explorations to the than the truth was, De Vignaux had never gone farther
773. rcely restrain them from putting him to death on the Overcome with fear and confusion
774. essed that he had supposed the perilous nature of the enterprise would have deterred C
775. ion. The voyage, however, was turned to good account; for the savages during Champla
776. rosperity of the infant colony. La Some time after, he finally put into execution an
777. yage, that to the Recollets belongs the honor of first preaching the gospel to the sa
778. vicinity of Quebec, at least since the time of Cartier. Champlain busied him self p
779. rade. Soon after, Canadian winters. the other religious followed by Champlain. He tel
780. he intense severity of the climate, and other similar reasons. Father Le Caron replie
781. t it was necessary for him to learn the language of the tribes and gain an intimate know
782. uage of the tribes and gain an intimate knowledge of their manners and customs. As for th
783. me, he hoped to succeed by the grace of God and the assistance which He would grant
784. scomforts or hardships were little to a man who had made profession of poverty, and
785. ty, and whose only aim was the glory of God and salvation of souls." Champlain
786. Wyandots, and, bound by his vows to the life of a beggar, had, on foot or paddling a
787. heart of our continent; the motive was religion and he adds, "The only policy whic
788. ss Champlain would assist them in their war with the Iroquois they would have to di
789. , as the journey was long, and beset by many perils from the hostility of their foes
790. or took council with Sieur du Fonts and one or two others, and it was agreed that a
791. tells us that it saddened him to see so many poor creatures without the knowledge of
792. see so many poor creatures without the knowledge of the true God, and subject to no law,
793. tures without the knowledge of the true God, and subject to no law, either divine o
794. edge of the true God, and subject to no law, either divine or civil. oaks, elms, pi
795. hamplain, fearing to give the Iro quois time for reinforcements, planned a second at
796. er, when he mentioned to the allies his desire to proceed to Quebec, they, whether fro
797. whether from motives or really through necessity, declared would have to pass the winter
798. merchants the SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN . 107 necessity for providing against all changes affec
799. e, which had just taken place. For some time after his return to Quebec he labored s
800. up in the company, the Huguenot members being de sirous to prevent the growth of Cath
801. n the new settlement, and the Catholics being equally anxious to forward it. A specia
802. ive authority in Pont-Grav6. Champlain, being lieutenant-governor of the colony by ap
803. both astonished lighted at his sister s courage, and received and de her, as IO8 NAMES
804. and toils, and privations of a colonial life. By every means in her power she sought
805. oms fell abundantly in the early spring-time, and the winter was neither long nor se
806. rude winds chilled her, and the want of many luxuries to which in her Parisian home
807. d that she ever rejoined him in the New World. Years after his death she became a rel
808. d him in the New World. Years after his death she became a religious, under the of Si
809. Champlain, warning of M. de Caen serve peace in the colony till the arrival of the c
810. ociety determined to maintain agents in World and colonial company de Montmorency the
811. the city; all till attempts to preserve peace proved a few men in the new fort, soon
812. forced them to useless; Cham- de Caen. peace the arrival of M. The people assembled,
813. asures which were so detrimental to its peace and prosperity. sent as deputy to the C
814. The duke ardently embraced the project, being heartily in terested in the evangelizat
815. t recording the date upon which the new one had been begun, the name of the viceroy
816. uois, prevailed upon the Algonquins and other of Champlain s allies to join them in a
817. lle, to Three plain sent his brother-in-law, Rivers to arrange, if possible, an ami
818. Iroquois envoys were seized and put to death, and the treachery of Champlain express
819. riated ties that they put the envoys to death without mercy. Meantime, two white men
820. him some they soon after conceived the idea tribe to be educated in the Chris of th
821. governor had once expressed such a tian religion. the savages now resolved to gratify it
822. the savages now resolved to gratify it. desire, and chose Champlain graciously accepte
823. me years previous to these events a new element had been introduced into the colony. We
824. Chateaubriand says, dominion in the New World against the united efforts of the Iroqu
825. entirely to the " * Jesuits." will here digress so much from the direct su
826. year after their arrival, which was in One Chateaubriand, G6nie du Christianisme..
827. lief of the savages, their faith in the immortality of the soul, and their consequent provi
828. , their faith in the immortality of the soul, and their consequent provision for it
829. heir consequent provision for it in the world to come, country. He relating that havi
830. he Indian answered, Because our brother will need them in the land of shadows, whith
831. ave of a warrior who had been dead some time, and whose possessions were still undis
832. told him, had a passage plied that the soul of those things had rejoined the soul o
833. e soul of those things had rejoined the soul of their owner in the shadowy land. He
834. ent end to come out next morning at the other. The in at one lives Jesuit goes on to
835. ut next morning at the other. The in at one lives Jesuit goes on to say that the wh
836. s, for not only would they kill a white man who offended them if they dreamt of one
837. man who offended them if they dreamt of one at they met in the morning, being most
838. eamt of one at they met in the morning, being most superstitious on the subject of dr
839. f the Black-Robes would be content with being asked if In these early his nation 114
840. adding that they could not give Quebec. One of the most distinguished missionaries,
841. of the Recollets in of our frail human will may not be of prejudice to the announce
842. ng into the hands of the English by the courage and resolution of Champlain. The scarci
843. happily met with the English fleet, and being taken at a disadvantage, was utterly de
844. could be crushed in greater During this life and death struggle for the quantities.
845. crushed in greater During this life and death struggle for the quantities. necessarie
846. ggle for the quantities. necessaries of life, envoys were sent from the Abenakis dem
847. in some uneasiness; since the arrest of one of their number on murder they kept upo
848. rs when the English, information of the state of Quebec, again ap gaining peared befo
849. orable, occupied in the fisheries or at other outdoor labor. Champlain re similar pli
850. ed in the fisheries or at other outdoor labor. Champlain re similar plied to the Engl
851. the English flag of truce by hoisting a one upon the fort. An English gentleman the
852. in English, any way connected with the government, returned to France. Champlain himself
853. vigor of his manhood; he was cheered by one hope alone that of a speedy return. One
854. one hope alone that of a speedy return. One circumstance that espe him was the fear
855. l Massachusetts. A gov ernor of Boston, being desirous of conciliating the sav The sp
856. , once offered to send them a minister. man of the tribe at once replied as follows
857. u thought of them That was If I brought many I was your friend. alone. " SAMUEL
858. ; SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN. all. \\>j One day I lost my way, and sailed in my bir
859. Paradise, of hell, and My heart was of truth. of prayer, which is the only way to he
860. ed your prayer, for I knew not what was good. But I have learned the prayer of my Fr
861. ned the prayer of my French brothers; I love it and will follow it to the end. The R
862. er of my French brothers; I love it and will follow it to the end. The Red Man does
863. and will follow it to the end. The Red Man does not want your money and your minis
864. t want your money and your minister. He will speak to you no more." This gives
865. quot; This gives us an insight into the cause of Champlain s anxiety for the spiritua
866. l welfare of the tribes, and his ardent desire to return to his life-work on the shore
867. and his ardent desire to return to his life-work on the shores of The day after the
868. e of the blue St. Lawrence. the vessel, one was sighted in the distance, which they
869. said, " If the vessel is taken you will die. Tell I them to sur have treated yo
870. to sur have treated you; otherwise, it will be certain ruin for them if the two slo
871. ulation are signed." render, and I will treat them as well as Il8 NAMES THAT It
872. ill me under present circum stances. It will be a most dishonorable proceeding on yo
873. hinder those on board from doing their duty." The French vessel, however, surr
874. ymouth news reached it that a treaty of peace had been signed between England and Fra
875. dvancement of their interest in the New World. In 1632 the matter was de cided by the
876. interest in the New World. In 1632 the matter was de cided by the treaty of Saint Ger
877. en was appointed governor of Quebec for one year, with the revenues thereunto apper
878. s of passage. they would acknowledge no other allies but the French. Rivers to treat
879. ssionaries to the Hurons, and persuaded many of the red men to hear the words of tru
880. any of the red men to hear the words of truth. Soon after his return to the colony he
881. ves sel from shipwreck. In this " same Relation des 1633, we find an account i
882. sel from shipwreck. In this " same Relation des 1633, we find an account in the Jes
883. , and the Fathers were still in a great state of rejoicing at the return of Father Br
884. the captain had a salute fired in their honor, and at the booming of the cannon the s
885. . Champlain was busying himself at this time in the establishment of a mission at Th
886. tioned to be allowed the privilege. The government had concluded lish that the Jesuits wer
887. t distant tribes, and did inconceivable good amongst them; but as for themselves, a
888. rves, "few of them died the common death of all men." For testimony of thei
889. testimony of their labors let us quote one of our All persons," says most dis
890. re in the least familiar with the early history of the West, know with what pure and un
891. reme frontier of New England, more than one man whose youth had been passed among t
892. frontier of New England, more than one man whose youth had been passed among the w
893. n unresting, and, with a power which no other Chris tians have displayed, "Their
894. e, 1838, Each 122 NAMES THAT felt LIVE. one indeed that his that he was " bapt
895. at his that he was " baptized unto death," and the for own blood poured out
896. ed than he could win by the labors of a life." upon the Jesuits we have again f
897. s missionaries. His aim and theirs were one to gain souls to the knowledge of If in
898. nd theirs were one to gain souls to the knowledge of If in these last remarks to digress
899. in these last remarks to digress seemed God; of the for, as he himself tells us, he
900. s us, he "should esteem it a great sin on his part to neglect the religious in
901. harity as to render any comments on his life and character unnec essary. Twenty time
902. times he had crossed the ocean for the Many long cold nights, when snow was deepest
903. xpeditions to the far northwest. In the time of famine he had shown a manly enduranc
904. heroic self-sacrifice remarkable in the history of the colony. In matters of government
905. he history of the colony. In matters of government he had displayed a wisdom, pru dence, a
906. atters of government he had displayed a wisdom, pru dence, and moderation which gained
907. dence, and moderation which gained the love of his peo ple and the unwavering attac
908. is great penetration served him well on many occa sions, and his frankness and simpl
909. ess and simplicity of manner gained him universal good-will. s * Marshall Christian Missi
910. mplicity of manner gained him universal good-will. s * Marshall Christian Missions,
911. ity of manner gained him universal good-will. s * Marshall Christian Missions, vol.
912. nto faint reflections of their autumnal beauty when the day was waning and the sun gle
913. n their primitive dwellings were making good-cheer for the birthday of the Son of Go
914. od-cheer for the birthday of the Son of God, It when ocean the mariner set out upon
915. is last voyage: the It was announced to death. eternity, the pilot the colonists that
916. voyage: the It was announced to death. eternity, the pilot the colonists that the gover
917. grief, and grand his obsequies. spring-time the bright stream he had loved flowed a
918. ony prospered and flourished since that time, while in Quebec and throughout Canada
919. ude of posterity. Of his character as a man we have said enough, and shown him in h
920. in the hearts of the people. noble dead Peace to the hero s ashes and lasting memory
921. d Peace to the hero s ashes and lasting memory Honor to the ! ! anil ^rintaU nf Anothe
922. to the hero s ashes and lasting memory Honor to the ! ! anil ^rintaU nf Another scaf
923. He The of the the culprit in the car of death? open brow and folded hands! There crow
924. bears upon his breast salvation all s * sign." [MONGST there is the countries o
925. Ireland has been described, with great justice, as resembling from afar a country of r
926. character, and allow free scope to the imagination, which is con stantly at work resting i
927. e hastened on in their swift passage to eternity. If we be of a po etic turn of mind we
928. eternity. If we be of a po etic turn of mind we are at once whirled backwards into a
929. dawn to watch for the appearance of the god whom they adored as he slowly emerged f
930. nnounced the glad tidings, and the with one accord lit their adoring fires, or bent
931. n and again we are back in the night of time, where the shines down on the wondrous
932. , where the shines down on the wondrous beauty of this west ern isle; and forth from t
933. as they mingle in their awful dance of death. begin to perceive other ruins too, whi
934. awful dance of death. begin to perceive other ruins too, which tell us Ruined abbeys
935. stand solemn and desolate, the prey of Time and his parasites, the mournful ivy and
936. the roof have entirely disappeared, so time works its will other tales. We upon the
937. entirely disappeared, so time works its will other tales. We upon the unprotected wa
938. ely disappeared, so time works its will other tales. We upon the unprotected walls, w
939. VER PLUNKETT. priests of the caust of a God. I2Q Most High offered up their living
940. faith, and the worship of their fathers God ? We hear hasty and indignant denials W
941. he country, and trampled under foot the religion which their neighbors had received at T
942. heavily upon the people of Ireland. The same per secution continued, though with dim
943. al tyrant; the destroyer of monarchical government, the founder of a despotism; the denoun
944. onarchical government, the founder of a despotism; the denouncer of Catholic greed for ga
945. from beginning to end of his career in one thing onlycruelty. was who, following o
946. born," alty; the new masters, not being "to the qualities which had endear
947. ous race of monks, the guardians of the world s civilization, pondered no more over t
948. ers, se curing for themselves a blessed immortality and for their brethren the fertilizing
949. heir brethren the fertilizing shower of God s grace. Driven forth from their silent
950. s grace. Driven forth from their silent life of prayer, they still continued to trav
951. spel and en deavoring to keep alive the love and sufferings of their Divine Master i
952. n the hearts of the people, giving them God; rather bright glimpses of the eternal
953. ly preached forgiveness of enemies, the duty of praying for them, and warned the peo
954. gainst harboring resentment towards any one whomsoever; while they exhorted them to
955. very priest its and bishop was required sign Many of articles, however, bordered on
956. priest its and bishop was required sign Many of articles, however, bordered on heres
957. for the priesthood in such an abode of knowledge and sanctity. Father Scarampo, an Orato
958. ed great things of him, from his ardent love of study, his earnest application, his
959. illiant talents; with which he combined many re markable virtues. When he was finall
960. o della it OLIVER PLUNKETT. Caritd. 133 love have been deeply imbued with a company
961. Catholic France, and sup ported to the death by Catholic Ireland, was riding in the
962. eland, was riding in the chariot of his love of ease over the dearest liberties of h
963. ed, and two at Episcopate, least of the other three were enfeebled by old age or bedr
964. ff, Clement IX., aware of the troublous state of Ireland and the perilous condition o
965. sh Church, began to look about for some one worthy to be his successor, at the same
966. one worthy to be his successor, at the same time possessed of the heroic courage, z
967. worthy to be his successor, at the same time possessed of the heroic courage, zeal,
968. t the same time possessed of the heroic courage, zeal, and judgment required in that da
969. sessed of the heroic courage, zeal, and judgment required in that dangerous The Sacred C
970. interested position. themselves in the matter, and various persons were * Hist, of Re
971. re * Hist, of Remonstrance, or Crolly s Life of Plunkett. 134 NAMES THAT as being LI
972. y s Life of Plunkett. 134 NAMES THAT as being LIVE. named worthy of the dignity. At l
973. city of Rome itself Oliver Plunkett, a man of long experience, tried virtue, ! and
974. e itself Oliver Plunkett, a man of long experience, tried virtue, ! and consummate learnin
975. unkett, a man of long experience, tried virtue, ! and consummate learning Him, by my a
976. r twelve years he had been Professor of Theology in the celebrated College of the Propag
977. ly; the Master of the vineyard required many laborers; and in tears and humility of
978. y Church, where he had first worshipped God, and in the came surrounding alleys of
979. pse of the green island round towers of other days" were reflected where "t
980. to be there, to see her misfortunes, to labor among her people, and to share to find
981. rds remain concealed for a considerable time. During the Lord-Lieutenant Robarts per
982. rmation from the king that two persons, one of whom was Oliver in Plunkett, had arr
983. country orders, wrote to his brother-in-law, Sir George Rawdon, would be an accepta
984. s, who is com described as hav ing been virtue; a stanch Presbyterian, sour and cynica
985. erkeley, under intractable," whose government the Catholics enjoyed considerable a sl
986. joyed considerable a slight foothold 10 liberty, and were enabled to regain 136 NAMES T
987. urch, where they were sadly needed; for death and persecution and transportation had
988. to hold commissions as justices of the peace. The venerable Archbishop of Dublin, th
989. Archbishop, to London, to negotiate the matter, which called forth fierce opposition f
990. e the matter, which called forth fierce opposition from the English Puritans, who then con
991. ons of Ormonde, who was of the Catholic cause, the king appointed a commissioner to i
992. it, returned an unfavorable report. The matter was dis missed, resulting chiefly in th
993. y acts of indulgence towards Papists or other dissenters; every person who did not ta
994. ile let us take a glance at the private life He dwelt in a small thatched of the gre
995. ly Fathers, and dwelt lovingly upon the history of his country. Visions rose before him
996. e before him, overpassing the bounds of time and space: Tara, the mighty palace of t
997. him, overpassing the bounds of time and space: Tara, the mighty palace of the ancient
998. ights of Tara the first rising of their god, and bowed down in adoration. The Prima
999. ings and chieftains there assembled the same faith which the chosen twelve preached
1000.twelve preached of old in Galilee. With one accord the nation laid its superstition
1001. ancient glory, every prophetic word or sign, seeming to point to new greatness hidd
1002.for the authors, because of the patient love with which they had gleaned in the harv
1003.eaned in the harvest-field of Ireland s history, and filled with their garnered sheafs
1004.every Irishman, side by side with their love for the ancient faith and their pride i
1005.ism should be and This patriotism, this love of native land, seems to have been a pr
1006.r repose that occurred in his laborious life, which was spent in alleviating the mis
1007.oral as well as spiritual. Aided by his one servant, the only retinue that this goo
1008.one servant, the only retinue that this good man permitted himself, he visited the p
1009.ervant, the only retinue that this good man permitted himself, he visited the poor,
1010.undred and sixty-five souls." This one item gives us some idea of his herculea
1011.ouls." This one item gives us some idea of his herculean labors. He travelled,
1012.priesthood. The Archbishop or dained so many priests that, we are informed, the num
1013. salvation in the condition of midst of many tribulations, should at the same time e
1014.dst of many tribulations, should at the same time en deavor to hold themselves aloof
1015.f many tribulations, should at the same time en deavor to hold themselves aloof from
1016.nvened a synod at Armagh in 1670, where many im portant matters were discussed. Arth
1017.aid, ap pointed viceroy of Ireland, and being too much under the control of the Purit
1018.riend of the Primate, whose talents and prudence he held in the highest esteem, describi
1019.letter to the Protestant wise and sober man, fond of living Bishop Burnet as and in
1020. Burnet as and in due subjection to the government." quietly, However, his administra
1021.on a charge of complicity in the plots, one of which was supposed to be an attempt
1022. supposed to be an attempt on Ormonde s life; Talbot was in a dying yet he privately
1023. then found his release where Ormonde s tyranny could never again reach him. The vicero
1024. from Rome, as well as all Jesu its and other priests, regular and secular, to depart
1025.also disarmed, and the jus tices of the peace ^ere commanded to make diligent search
1026.ettors, relievers, or harborers, and to labor for the suppression of Mass-houses and
1027.d come into the Castle of Dublin or any other fort or citadel without a special order
1028.itadel without a special order from the government that fairs should only be held in cer;
1029.d NAMES THAT ; LIVE. all there; of said religion were forbidden to meet in large bers by
1030. priest was in a parish where murder or other crimes were committed he should be cast
1031.in close confinement till the arrest or death of the said tories that when for the pr
1032.lics were in the alarming ascendency of one to every hundred Prot estants. The pers
1033.apostolic zeal did the great Archbishop labor among them, continuing to exercise his
1034.s ministry at the imminent peril of his life. Must a soul go before its Creator unco
1035. the imminent peril of his life. Must a soul go before its Creator unconsoled, unstr
1036.nd sacraments of the Church because the law OLIVER PLUNKETT. forbade it ? 143 Over
1037.t ? 143 Over the bed of sickness and of death bent Oliver Plunkett, calm and unconcer
1038. as though no bade him fear for his own life and liberty. Many a pas to many a broke
1039.h no bade him fear for his own life and liberty. Many a pas to many a broken heart he s
1040. him fear for his own life and liberty. Many a pas to many a broken heart he sage in
1041.his own life and liberty. Many a pas to many a broken heart he sage into eternity he
1042.pas to many a broken heart he sage into eternity he smoothed; words of peace and comfort
1043.age into eternity he smoothed; words of peace and comfort; in many a vault whispered
1044.moothed; words of peace and comfort; in many a vault whispered and cave he offered M
1045.e offered Mass and preached the word of God. and bold as a lion, Fearless, undaunte
1046.s very enemies. What a spectacle is the one undivided Church, with its hosts and se
1047.n all times and places, through out the world s history, with persecution and impriso
1048.mes and places, through out the world s history, with persecution and imprison of ment
1049.th persecution and imprison of ment and death! Dying upon the common battle-field one
1050.ath! Dying upon the common battle-field one leader, not vainly did of the Church, o
1051.vice of even to the consummation of the world. Meanwhile Oliver Plunkett was preparin
1052.y his holi But so ness and austerity of life for a martyr s death. exact was he in e
1053.ss and austerity of life for a martyr s death. exact was he in every duty, so mild, s
1054.a martyr s death. exact was he in every duty, so mild, so forbearing, so meek, so fu
1055.iligent a pro moter of public order and virtue, so zealous and withal so prudent, that
1056. arrested, and allowed him to remain at liberty withdrew from He after the proclamation
1057. a charge of to prcEtnunire. About this time a proclamation was issued by which a fr
1058.pardon was offered to all criminals, no matter what their offences, if they would disc
1059.e community, to swear away the lives of good and saintly men who had at heart the tr
1060.true interests of their country and the peace of terror. : and notably two or three w
1061. the witnesses against Dr. Plunkett and other supposed conspirators were themselves i
1062.eir active aiders and abettors. Murphy, being in prison for these treasona ble practi
1063.rimate of Ar magh. offences, showed his good-will in a similar way. It is John Moyer
1064.e of Ar magh. offences, showed his good-will in a similar way. It is John Moyer, who
1065. was also convicted of like towards the government curious to observe the in Duke of Ormon
1066.them to be were permitted to swear away one of the gentlest, This purest, and noble
1067.m. nobleman also very frankly admits in one letter that witnesses were being brough
1068.dmits in one letter that witnesses were being brought over from Ireland to give testi
1069.e case, the material for their evidence being manufactured by Hetherington and others
1070. to deserve credit in the most trifling cause upon the most immaterial facts gave evi
1071. from the pen of an eminent Protes tant will enable us to form some idea of the iniq
1072.n eminent Protes tant will enable us to form some idea of the iniquitous proceedings
1073.Protes tant will enable us to form some idea of the iniquitous proceedings by which
1074.tous proceedings by which the great and good Oliver Plunkett, of "whose "n
1075.uot;whose "no innocence," the same writer tells us, doubt could be to deat
1076.same writer tells us, doubt could be to death, his entertained," was tried and c
1077.onable dealings of the Primate, and the matter was of brought for examination before t
1078.to be totally false and absurd. Yet the good Archbishop remained in prison. We can p
1079. he in his little cell, where he served God in peace and lowliness, undisturbed by
1080.his little cell, where he served God in peace and lowliness, undisturbed by the great
1081.ess, undisturbed by the great troublous world that was working out its own ends. Only
1082.that was working out its own ends. Only one consideration troubled him: he could no
1083.ing falling like a halo around him, the man started back in fear, feeling that this
1084.eling that this indeed was a servant of God. Meanwhile the witnesses whose testimon
1085.was the character he bore as priest and citizen. Therefore it was necessary that the En
1086.s treason able practices, and that this time the trial should be in England. On the
1087. allowed a period of five weeks or This time he knew would thereabouts, till Trinity
1088.ts. whom he sent over to Ireland, after being two days at sea, were obliged to cast b
1089.the term, that the witnesses might have time to appear, but this was abso lutely ref
1090.convict him." He further said that man in Ireland would believe the charge aga
1091.esired to bring a defenceless it." man alone and unsupported to the bar of jus
1092.man alone and unsupported to the bar of justice. They would seem to have been afraid le
1093. in Dublin, where he was known. However Justice, to that be, on Plunkett was summoned t
1094. to be introduced. There was s pause: a man prematurely old and worn attended only
1095.e could not be tried in England for the same offence. He was brought into court amid
1096. guilty. After which, the procla mation being read by the clerk of the crown, the Pri
1097.s me nor the If I had been in Ireland I quality of my adversaries. would have put mysel
1098.e jury, so it was in both the grand and other jury; yet there when I came to my trial
1099. to my trial, after I was arraigned, no one appeared. This is manifest upon the rec
1100.cord and can be proved." the Chief Justice having answered that he had not been pr
1101. bishop replied: " To which or the quality of my adversaries, for they are not a T
1102.ows them. . me I . . cannot harbor, nor will not, nor ought not, the least conceit o
1103.I have not 150 full I NAMES THA7^ LIVE. time to bring my records and witnesses all t
1104.I beseech your lordship that I may have time to bring my records and witnesses, and
1105.ng my records and witnesses, and then I will defy all that is upon the . . . earth a
1106.say anything against To which the Chief Justice answered: "Look me." and make
1107.answered: "Look me." and make man is you, Mr. Plunkett: it is in vain for
1108.t furnish you with witnesses; give such time. you must look to get witnesses for you
1109.ses for yourself." And more to the same effect. The Archbishop again asked for
1110. effect. The Archbishop again asked for time, if only till the end of the term, sayi
1111.of my my witnesses over. this on." life if I I cannot I desire if may have but
1112.er. this on." life if I I cannot I desire if may have but to the 2ist of month, a
1113.ch he re plied by asking if it was this same jury who condemned the five Jesuits. To
1114.ed the five Jesuits. To which the Chief Justice said, What if they have? that is no exc
1115. having in his heart the fear of " God, from the cordial love and obedience he
1116.he fear of " God, from the cordial love and obedience he owed the king; that he
1117.ntriving with all his might against the peace and tranquillity of the kingdom of Irel
1118.reland and that of England, stirring up war and rebellion against the king, and wor
1119. the aforesaid sovereign and put him to death; as also to bring destruction on the tr
1120.ring destruction on the true worship of God in the kingdom of Ireland, by law estab
1121.ip of God in the kingdom of Ireland, by law estab- OLIVER PLUNKETT. lished, 15 of t
1122., and traitorously assemble with divers other traitors unknown to bring destruction u
1123.to bring destruction upon the crown and government of the kingdom, and compass the death o
1124.ernment of the kingdom, and compass the death of the king, and did for these purposes
1125.ty." According to the cruel " custom of those times, no lawyer was permitted
1126.re his spotless character was un known. One of the lawyers, Mr. Heath, then comment
1127. Sergeant Maynard spoke somewhat to the same effect, and the Attorney-General began
1128.der a foreign and usurped jurisdiction, will be a great inducement to you to give cr
1129.service, and to subvert the this " government."* *The judges Justice Dolbein, er
1130.s " government."* *The judges Justice Dolbein, eral (Sir Robert were Sir Fran
1131. were Sir Francis Pemberton, Lord Chief Justice, and Justice Jones; the lawyers, the At
1132.ncis Pemberton, Lord Chief Justice, and Justice Jones; the lawyers, the Attorney-Gen Sa
1133.uspend and excommunicate them for their evil lives and the scandal they occasioned.
1134.ndal they occasioned. They all made the same statements, their lesson having been re
1135.ell understood in Ireland (the wit ness being evidently in the confidence of the dign
1136. appointed by the Pope in preference to other candidates because he had expressed him
1137.he Catholic powers that they should not war with each other, but unite in defence o
1138.wers that they should not war with each other, but unite in defence of their persecut
1139.n in Ireland; that he had com missioned one of the witnesses, Hugh Duffy, to raise
1140.s committed to Newgate. This Murphy was one of the unfortunate men whom the Archbis
1141.communicated, and was in fact, like the other witnesses, a base apostate, of noto He
1142. and Paul Gorman, and the gerald, Chief Justice at once demanded whence it came. that t
1143.emanded whence it came. that these were good I was told," said the stranger, wi
1144.ining the " " asked the Chief Justice. Where are they was the answer. They ar
1145.self asked him him to swear against his cause," but Gorman, becoming frightened,
1146.t; that Moyer had told him if there was law or justice in Ire and land, he would sh
1147. Moyer had told him if there was law or justice in Ire and land, he would show Mr. Plun
1148.tt his share of added that, as he had a soul to save, he never heard of The any misd
1149.e prisoner. and the prisoner *The Chief Justice then asked if Mr. Plunkett sent for him
1150. Murphy, John McClare, and Owen Murphy, one or two of whom were Franciscan friars w
1151.ing against you. I thought you did more good in Ireland than hurt; so I declared.&qu
1152.an hurt; so I declared." The Chief Justice asked the prisoner if he had any more w
1153.ore witnesses, my lord." The Chief Justice then made an address to the jury, remin
1154.protestation that there but give my not one word of this said " against me tru
1155.n with any French minister, cardinal or other." The jury withdrew for a quarter
1156.said: !" Deo Gratias (Thanks be to God !) The prisoner was removed from court,
1157.k asked him what he had why sentence of death should not be pronounced. The Archbisho
1158.in a long address, which in our present space cannot be given, pointed out the utter
1159.IVER PLUNKETT. 155 and improbability of many of the charges against him, and the fal
1160.e was arrested for pramunire. The Chief Justice in reply made a rude and most brutal ad
1161.ten times worse than all the heathenish religion to be " superstitions." Such
1162.d in his dying attestation: If I were a man that had no care of my conscience in th
1163.at had no care of my conscience in this matter, and did not think of God Almighty, or
1164.ce in this matter, and did not think of God Almighty, or conscience, or heaven, or
1165.t; it by divers people here, so I would life, for I was offered but confess my own g
1166. any fully accuse anybody, or take away one farthing man s goods, one day of his li
1167.cuse anybody, or take away one farthing man s goods, one day of his liberty, or one
1168. or take away one farthing man s goods, one day of his liberty, or one minute of hi
1169.ne farthing man s goods, one day of his liberty, or one minute of his life." The C
1170.man s goods, one day of his liberty, or one minute of his life." The Chief rep
1171.ay of his liberty, or one minute of his life." The Chief replied: "They Ju
1172.fe." The Chief replied: "They Justice said he in the principles of that relig
1173.stice said he in the principles of that religion, was sorry to see him persist and the P
1174.are those principles that even Almighty God cannot dispense withal." After whi
1175.nse withal." After which the Chief Justice spoke as follows: the judgment which we
1176.the Chief Justice spoke as follows: the judgment which we must give you "Well, howe
1177.owever, And therefore is that which the law says- and speaks. you must go from henc
1178.d of as his Majesty pleases; and I pray God to have mercy upon your soul." The
1179. and I pray God to have mercy upon your soul." The Archbishop asked leave for a
1180.mended him to receive a visit from some Justice which the prisoner replied: if you plea
1181.icted on account of any crime, and they will do my business very well; for they will
1182.will do my business very well; for they will do it accord ing to the rites of our ow
1183.e Popish Primate of Armagh, was at this time brought to his trial. Some bad Irish pr
1184.ation, hearing that England was at that time disposed to hearken to good swearers, t
1185.was at that time disposed to hearken to good swearers, thought them ings. " sel
1186.rimate of Ireland, OLIVER PLUNKETT. 157 man, who was for living quietly and in due
1187.or living quietly and in due submission government, without engaging into intrigues of sta
1188.ent, without engaging into intrigues of state. Some of these witnesses had been censu
1189.sses had been censured by him for their evil behavior; and they drew others to swear
1190.Pro testant, told me, they contradicted one another so evi dently that they would n
1191.lowing: [Dr. Plunkett] was a worthy and good man, who, notwithstanding his high titl
1192.g: [Dr. Plunkett] was a worthy and good man, who, notwithstanding his high title, w
1193.ding his high title, was in a very mean state of life, having nothing to subsist on b
1194.high title, was in a very mean state of life, having nothing to subsist on but the c
1195.ntributions of a few poor clergy of his religion in the province of Ulster, who, having
1196.harged a plot upon that innocent, quiet man, so that he was sent for over and broug
1197.sex was himself so sensible of the poor man s hardship that he generously applied t
1198. of Sir Richard Baker, continued to the death of King George I. 158 NAMES THAT LIVE.
1199.al ? It would have done " him some good then; but I dare pardon nobody;" a
1200.ker, in the most beautiful and touching language: "DEAR SIR: I am obliged to you fo
1201.hich is properly our country. And truly God gave me, though unworthy of it, that gr
1202.gh unworthy of it, that grace to have a courage fearless of death.}; I have many sins t
1203.hat grace to have a courage fearless of death.}; I have many sins to answer for be fo
1204.e a courage fearless of death.}; I have many sins to answer for be fore the Supreme
1205.r the bench I and whereas with cannot I God s grace yesterday, I am I /"/, me;
1206. the bench of the All- ut sit, there is one comfort, that He can powerful. not be d
1207.that I may be sure of a fair trial, and will get time sufficient to call witnesses,
1208.y be sure of a fair trial, and will get time sufficient to call witnesses, nay, the
1209.cient to call witnesses, nay, the Judge will bring them in a moment if there will be
1210.ge will bring them in a moment if there will be need of any. You and your comrade ca
1211.e cates at that bench. " s prayers will be powerful advo Here none are admitted
1212.Ibid. OLI VER PL UNKE TT. 159 From this time forward the Primate seems to have been
1213.s ministry were soon to be laid down in one great burden at the At its summit he wa
1214.sful martyr entrance into that glorious immortality of which no human soul, howsoever exalt
1215. glorious immortality of which no human soul, howsoever exalted, can conceive even t
1216.. nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive the ineffable glory which a
1217.martyr beyond the tomb. Well done, thou good and faithful servant; enter into the jo
1218.ared for you from the foundation of the world. Image In the time of waiting he knelt
1219.e foundation of the world. Image In the time of waiting he knelt all day long before
1220. who was his confessor and attended him life in moments, thus speaks of his kept, as
1221.rm you of what I learned, as it were by chance, from the mouths of the said keepers: t
1222.e few that came near him. But his trial being ended, and he condemned, his man had le
1223.rial being ended, and he condemned, his man had leave to wait on him alone or in hi
1224.s we had intercourse by letters to each other. And now it was I clearly per- l6o ceiv
1225.the Spirit of LIVE. those lovely fruits God and I, Holy Ghost, charity, joy, peace,
1226.ts God and I, Holy Ghost, charity, joy, peace, etc., transparent in his soul. And not
1227.y, joy, peace, etc., transparent in his soul. And not only but many other Catholics
1228.ansparent in his soul. And not only but many other Catholics and were eye-wit nesses
1229.rent in his soul. And not only but many other Catholics and were eye-wit nesses (a fa
1230.ed mixture of cheerfulness, con stancy, love, sweetness, and candor, as manifestly d
1231., by his very Concerning the manner and state of his prayer, and he seemed most devot
1232.e died: upon these sentences he let his soul dilate in love, following herein the sw
1233.ese sentences he let his soul dilate in love, following herein the sweet impulse and
1234.ce of exe me cution make use of any set form of prayer except the Our and Father, Ha
1235.for the rest he would breathe forth his soul in such God Almighty should then him wi
1236.he would breathe forth his soul in such God Almighty should then him withal. He con
1237.advance himself in the purity of divine love, and by consequence also in contrition
1238.is deficiency in both which this humble soul com prayers and ejaculations as inspire
1239. the only thing that troubled him. This love had extinguished in him all fear of dea
1240.ove had extinguished in him all fear of death. " OLIVER PLUNKETT. died, being no
1241.of death. " OLIVER PLUNKETT. died, being now as it were at he went to bed at ele
1242.ndly till four in the morning, at which time his man, who lay in the room with him,
1243. four in the morning, at which time his man, who lay in the room with him, awakened
1244. the passage to After he certainly knew God Almighty had chosen him to the crown an
1245.ocaust; to which end, as he gave up his soul with all its faculties to the conduct o
1246.ith all its faculties to the conduct of God, so, for God s sake, he resigned the ca
1247.aculties to the conduct of God, so, for God s sake, he resigned the care and dispos
1248. mollified and attendered at his sight; many Protestants, in my hearing, wished thei
1249.heir All believed him inno souls in the same state with his. and he made Catholics,
1250.All believed him inno souls in the same state with his. and he made Catholics, even t
1251.olics, even the most timorous, in cent; love with death." * In a letter written
1252.n the most timorous, in cent; love with death." * In a letter written about this
1253." * In a letter written about this time to Father Corker he expressed his joy a
1254.he expressed his joy at the prospect of being put to death for the faith, he says, &q
1255.his joy at the prospect of being put to death for the faith, he says, "Ireland,
1256. son, all cerned as earth. quietness of mind, and went to the sledge as uncon * if h
1257.g." was his awakening for the last time upon Calmly and tranquilly he rose, his
1258. the Blue and cloudless truly apostolic life. was the sky, bright the golden sun, th
1259.e execution of that lonely, defenceless man. Slowly and with undisturbed majesty of
1260.ho were crowded close together in their desire to see and hear him. An awe fell upon t
1261.n and he cried, Indeed, this was a just man It was not the sunlight alone which sho
1262.ir Richard Bulstrode upon the Reign and Government of Kings Charles I. and II. OLIVER PLUN
1263.would thenceforth pray at the throne of God, that the ancient faith of their brave
1264. or be misled by respect of persons; He being all good ness, and a most just Judge, w
1265.led by respect of persons; He being all good ness, and a most just Judge, will infal
1266.g all good ness, and a most just Judge, will infallibly decree an eternal reward for
1267.llibly decree an eternal reward for all good works, and condign punish ment for the
1268.ssions against His com mandments. Which being a most certain and undoubted truth, it
1269.hich being a most certain and undoubted truth, it would be a wicked I petual welfare
1270. now, by declaring anything contrary to truth, commit a detestable sin, for which, wi
1271. contrary to truth, commit a detestable sin, for which, within a very short time, I
1272.ble sin, for which, within a very short time, I must receive sentence of ever lastin
1273.re is no reprieve nor hope of pardon. I will, therefore, confess the truth without a
1274. pardon. I will, therefore, confess the truth without any equivocation, and make use
1275. and I protest upon the word of a dying man, hope for salvation at the hands of the
1276.on at the hands of the Supreme Judge, I will declare the naked truth with all candor
1277.Supreme Judge, I will declare the naked truth with all candor and sincerity; and that
1278.be better known to and I all " the world. It is to be observed that I have been
1279.users, and were not informed of several other circum stances conducing to a fair tria
1280.e resolution; a rare fact, of which you will hardly find a precedent these five hund
1281.bouts, to the was brought me five weeks time to get them brought hither; but by reas
1282.getting copies of records, and bringing many witnesses from several counties in Irel
1283.om several counties in Ireland, and for many other impediments (of which affidavit w
1284.veral counties in Ireland, and for many other impediments (of which affidavit was mad
1285.he records and witnesses the lord chief justice gave brought hither. I I more, that mig
1286.ss for my trial, which my my lord chief justice denied; and so I trial, and exposed, as
1287. me of these following points," my life OLIVER PLUNKETT. \Q He detail, after &q
1288.chief crimes laid to my charge, no wise man that knows Ireland would believe me. If
1289. landing, all would but laugh at me, it being well known that all the revenues of Ire
1290.sed by his Majesty s subjects men. If I will to raise and maintain an army of 70,000
1291. acquainted with the affairs of Ireland will not believe that my denial is grounded
1292.hat my denial is grounded upon deny all truth, " though I assert it with my last
1293.ve made of my innocency, and I hope you will believe the words of a dying man. "
1294.e you will believe the words of a dying man. "And that you may be the more inc
1295.r* sent me notice that he would save my life if I would accuse others; but I answere
1296.e publicly outlaws, and that to save my life I would not To falsely accuse any nor p
1297.falsely accuse any nor prejudice my own soul. take away any man s life or goods wron
1298.or prejudice my own soul. take away any man s life or goods wrongfully, ill be- Ire
1299.judice my own soul. take away any man s life or goods wrongfully, ill be- Ireland bu
1300.nown cometh any Christian, especially a man of my calling, being a clergyman of the
1301.istian, especially a man of my calling, being a clergyman of the Catholic Church and
1302.alling; and though thereby I did but my duty, yet some who would not amend had a pre
1303.was never acquainted with them. But you good. how I am requited, and how by false oa
1304. oaths they brought me to this untimely death; which wicked act, being a defect of pe
1305. this untimely death; which wicked act, being a defect of persons, ought not to refle
1306. upon the Roman Catholic clergy; see it being well known that there was a Judas among
1307.among the Twelve Apostles, and a wicked man called Nicholas among the Seven Deacons
1308.as among the Seven Deacons; and even as one of the said deacons, to wit, holy Steph
1309.n, did pray for those who stoned him to death, so do I for those who with perjuries O
1310. as St. Stephen did, Lord, lay not this sin to them. do heartily forgive them, and
1311.he judges who, by denying me sufficient time to bring my records and witnesses from
1312.d witnesses from Ireland, did expose my life to evident I do also danger. forgive al
1313.l. I do "I finally forgive all who life; to take away my and did concur, direct
1314.en, the Duke of York, and all the royal family health, long life, and all prosperity i
1315., and all the royal family health, long life, and all prosperity in this world, and
1316., long life, and all prosperity in this world, and in the next everlasting felicity.
1317. would I were " able with the like truth to clear myself of high crimes committe
1318.ution and a strong purpose by your O my God, never to offend you; and I beseech you
1319.rgive me my sins and to grant grace, my soul eternal rest!" While he read ifest
1320.e read ifested, affected even to tears, many of the listeners were and the deepest e
1321.y of the listeners were and the deepest emotion was man while no man made the least sou
1322.teners were and the deepest emotion was man while no man made the least sound which
1323.nd the deepest emotion was man while no man made the least sound which might this s
1324.charity to believe the words of a dying man, I again de clare before God, as I hope
1325.of a dying man, I again de clare before God, as I hope for salvation, what is con t
1326.ed in this paper is the plain and naked truth, without any equivocation, mental reser
1327.atever; taking the words in their usual sense and meaning, as Protestants do when the
1328.Into Thy hands, O Lord," etc., and other ejaculations. The attention of the spec
1329. so intense and painful was their inter emotion. But the Primate had no further concern
1330.ncern with them, with Ireland, with the world; for the last time he had looked upon t
1331.h Ireland, with the world; for the last time he had looked upon the earth and sky; f
1332.ed upon the earth and sky; for the last time he had addressed the people, not those
1333. hear of his est, so heartfelt their as death and weep. at hand, A thrill went throug
1334.me there were who understood the mystic sign of pardon, others understood it not; bu
1335.ople seemed to feel the presence of the angel who held the crown above the martyr s h
1336.Adorable Trinity would receive him with love; the Man-God offer him to the Eternal F
1337.rinity would receive him with love; the Man-God offer him to the Eternal Father as
1338.ty would receive him with love; the Man-God offer him to the Eternal Father as a mo
1339.ties, with the saints and elect, praise God with exceeding praise for the mar tyr s
1340.signal to a disguised priest as he gave death. his blessed soul into the hands Redeem
1341.ed priest as he gave death. his blessed soul into the hands Redeemer; the cart was d
1342.ere thrown into the fire; but his happy soul had escaped the eternal fire of hell an
1343. flown into the bosom of "the Lord God, the strong and patient He commended an
1344.e of of high Ireland, who, in hatred of religion, was accused treason by false witnesses
1345.treason by false witnesses, and for the same condemned and executed at Tyburn, taken
1346.he II." his heart fire. and bowels being suffered He martyrdom with constancy, t
1347.est himself mentions, and as the Church History. in the quiet But it his body was not G
1348.in Germany,* where they rested for some time, with a hand some monument erected by F
1349. some of his contemporaries that by his death he did more for the *Athen. Oxon., p. 2
1350.cen does not prevent his execution from being, as a Protestant writer, Goldwin Smith,
1351. on the white ermine of clares, English justice." Burnet affirms that "he was
1352.ntly, expressing himself in ticulars as many par became a bishop. He died denying ev
1353.gh McMahon became Archbishop of Armagh. Being an ardent admirer of his martyred prede
1354.nlaid with silver. There are two doors, one in the front and little is and inside o
1355.ith the exception in the rear, *vol. i. one p. 502. OLIVER PLUNKETT. \>]\ so
1356.fore the Catholic public this great and good man, too task is, little known it howev
1357.the Catholic public this great and good man, too task is, little known it however,
1358. are the turely old and sorrow-stricken man. firm mouth and chin, attest same high,
1359.ricken man. firm mouth and chin, attest same high, broad forehead, ing the mingled s
1360.ression of But in the later pictures of truth, holiness, and purity. him we observe t
1361.n his crown. He was not very old at the time of his r martyrdom, having been born at
1362.In character the year 1631 and suffered death in 1681. he united the most consummate
1363. in 1681. he united the most consummate prudence with the most * s Life of Crolly Plunke
1364.t consummate prudence with the most * s Life of Crolly Plunkett. NAMES THAT heroic L
1365.rolly Plunkett. NAMES THAT heroic LIVE. courage; profound learning, with remarkable mod
1366.med to have ever be fore the eye of his mind that divine Master whom he ity, zeal wi
1367.tness, To such privileged souls as his, peace." " and steadfast endowed wit
1368.s and graces, it is given to behold the man sions of that supernal city with someth
1369. of the most high It is curious, on the other hand, to observe the fate God if ! tinc
1370.ious, on the other hand, to observe the fate God if ! tinctness of the just made per
1371. on the other hand, to observe the fate God if ! tinctness of the just made perfect
1372.o the Tower amid the execrations of the Many of the witnesses whom popu he had emplo
1373.nd condemned to perpetual imprisonment, being also deprived of his pension. Rouse and
1374.ad been so active in bringing about his death, were themselves persecuted before the
1375.f the year, the laws against Dissenters being put in force. Most of the witnesses aga
1376.were consumed by the liveliest remorse. One of them, Duffy, OLIVER PLUNKETT. 73 pre
1377. wasted, came years after the Primate s death to Dr. Hugh McMahon, his successor, cry
1378.crying out in agony, Am I never to have peace ? Is Dr, McMahon, in answer, there no m
1379.btained by the prayers of the great and good Primate offered to Christ, who had plac
1380.en our information principally from the Life of Dr. Plunkett, by Rev. George Crolly;
1381. George Crolly; from the Ecclesiastical History of from Feller s Biographic Ireland, by
1382. Memoirs of Plunkett; and from vari ous other sources, Protestant as well as Catholic
1383.strife his spirit glowed with zeal, For truth andjustice, For freedom as His life its
1384.or truth andjustice, For freedom as His life its warp and woof, signature and seal.
1385.re and seal. as its thus sacredfrom the world, discharged ambition, From vain In virt
1386.orld, discharged ambition, From vain In virtue Lifted, and inordinate care, exercised,
1387.ARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. It ought to be one of the first objects of a republican pe
1388.th whose names their national character will be associated.* enshrine the characters
1389.he characters of those men [EVER in the history of the world has a more inspiring strug
1390.f those men [EVER in the history of the world has a more inspiring struggle taken pla
1391.he Treaty on the 3d of September, 1783. Peace signed at Paris, not our purpose to tra
1392.purpose to trace out the causes of that revolution, to go back of It is through that long
1393.sive acts, upon the part of the British Government, which finally induced the patriots of
1394.finally induced the patriots of the New World to take up arms in the sacred cause of
1395.New World to take up arms in the sacred cause of liberty. The soul-thrilling words of
1396. to take up arms in the sacred cause of liberty. The soul-thrilling words of Patrick He
1397.rms in the sacred cause of liberty. The soul-thrilling words of Patrick Henry give i
1398.f Patrick Henry give in the Assembly me death," of Virginia, give rang like a wa
1399.a, give rang like a watchword " me liberty, or through the * The Letter VI. from I
1400.rs are a private correspondence between one ton, p. 65. Jesuit in America to anothe
1401.n contained upon " Washington, his government and the like, are admirable. The fol No
1402.cal lowing passage occurs in a not-, to one of the letters: improvements, no nation
1403., exalted talents by their superior and virtue." ;^8 NAMES THAT LIVE. country. rY
1404. and fence, afforded shelter The sun of liberty had appeared to the Americans. above th
1405. of Washing ton and the patriots of the revolution. To follow the glorious panorama of bat
1406.ch that no true Catholic can be a loyal citizen. It should rather serve to estab a cont
1407.axiom, that every true Catholic must of necessity be a loyal citizen.* lish Frenchman, Du
1408.e Catholic must of necessity be a loyal citizen.* lish Frenchman, Du Bourg, gives the f
1409.of Arch bishop Carroll: During the last war which the United States wage,d " *
1410.hour of bitter trial, confidence in the justice of their cause to save them from despai
1411.ial, confidence in the justice of their cause to save them from despair. Catholic Fra
1412.d of the list. and assistance under the form of 6,000,000 sympathy The queen, that f
1413.Marie Antoi francs. nette, whose tragic death was so soon after to fill all to heart.
1414., took the interests of the colony much Many noblemen and officers were directly or
1415. he writes to his wife: " own From love to me become is is welfare of America o
1416.welfare of America of all mankind; it a good American. The bound up with the welfare
1417.ut to become the safe asylum closely of virtue, tolerance, equality and peaceful liber
1418.fe asylum closely of virtue, tolerance, equality and peaceful liberty." * Among the
1419.irtue, tolerance, equality and peaceful liberty." * Among the women of France he w
1420.d with his fleet at a importance to the cause of independence, and whose assistance c
1421.se, with his naval force, and a host of other brave soldiers who came to shed their b
1422.ver withheld, this alien soil. from the time when that wounded French officer appear
1423.ez, Spanish gov ernor of Louisiana, and one of the ablest statesmen of that day in
1424.nd the sufferings of which, endured for religion, have made it the theme of CHARLES CARR
1425.e of CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. 181 many a ballad and romance. From Poland came
1426.selves It was to a hapless and hopeless cause. that Kosciusko, re long after the War
1427.ause. that Kosciusko, re long after the War of Independence leased from imprisonmen
1428.is compatriot Pulaski, he displayed the same desperate valor and loyalty that both h
1429.rned a vote of thanks at the end of the war. To Pulaski a monument was erected at S
1430.i a monument was erected at Savannah in memory of his gallant deeds. fell It was at th
1431.innumerable Irishmen who fought in this good fight, and lived to enjoy the ultimate
1432.diers had their share in promoting this good cause. The rea obvious; and indeed thes
1433. had their share in promoting this good cause. The rea obvious; and indeed these indi
1434.ritish could tempt me from the American cause." He was a sincere and devoted Cat
1435.hinuelf between his Washington, placing Will you give up your enemy, cried out, &quo
1436.and flew to his side, exclaiming, Thank God Your Excel- * Mr. G. Washington Custis
1437.r Excel- * Mr. G. Washington Custis and other writers of note mention him at length,
1438.the silent remembrance of their virtues will be tomb, but the cherished while memory
1439.s will be tomb, but the cherished while memory is dear to the American heart." Am
1440.dear to the American heart." Among other Catholics who played a more or less imp
1441.d a more or less impor tant part in the history of those stirring times we must not for
1442.tance. His heart was closed against the matter. trade," settled such generous sen
1443.oted in his presence.f But this was the same Joseph who and the Jesuits. plotted at
1444.gainst the Church Nearer the theatre of war was Father Gibault. This eminent and pa
1445.iastic was pastor of Vinthe continental cause. cennes, and was truly devoted to He it
1446. Settlers. \ Bancroft, vol. ix. \ Judge Law. 1 84 NAMES THAT LIVE. valiantly was, i
1447.my, wherein he held a commission. These good and simple souls made only one stipulat
1448.. These good and simple souls made only one stipulation, that they should have a pr
1449.o noble and so figure in early colonial history, sustained Now, actors, and more partic
1450.cularly among those gentlemen of birth, education and position, who were called upon to s
1451.n and position, who were called upon to sign the immortal Declaration of Inde among
1452.f Carrollton. Charles Carroll came of a good old Irish stock. His grandfather was th
1453.k. His grandfather was the first of the family to settle in America. He came thither a
1454.olis in Maryland. A brief glance of the history of Maryland about this time, and for ye
1455.e of the history of Maryland about this time, and for years before and after, gives
1456.nd for years before and after, gives us one of the most curious instances of religi
1457. of religious intolerance on record. It will be many remembered that Lord Baltimore
1458.gious intolerance on record. It will be many remembered that Lord Baltimore had esta
1459. Chesapeake, the first community in the world in which entire freedom of conscience w
1460.f conscience was a fundamental maxim of law." * It forms a curious fact Mary &
1461.rious fact Mary " s, " in the history of the " human mind," continu
1462.uot; in the history of the " human mind," continues the same from intolera
1463. " human mind," continues the same from intolerant episcopacy in Vir disse
1464., and author,! ; that exiles ; * Samuel History of the American Revolution, by a non-Ca
1465.iles ; * Samuel History of the American Revolution, by a non-Catholic writer, F. Wilson. t
1466.ith in a colony of Catholics.* For some time all went well, some Jesuit arrived on f
1467.ommissioners bearing a large cross. and many others took part in this procession, an
1468.." These priests afterward went to labor, one among the Patuxent, the other amon
1469. These priests afterward went to labor, one among the Patuxent, the other among the
1470.t to labor, one among the Patuxent, the other among the Piscataway Indians. But other
1471. first steps in After the colony when a revolution broke out in 1644. had full sway in Mar
1472. had full sway in Maryland, the in that time intolerance and religion tolerance of n
1473.yland, the in that time intolerance and religion tolerance of non-Catholics against thei
1474.is persecution of priests and religious liberty. Catholics had previously existed in mo
1475.s had previously existed in most of the other States, but here, in the cradle of free
1476.aint was put upon the exercise of their religion was forbidden them, and they were conse
1477.almost entirely with out churches. This state of things continued, and was in full fo
1478.ined to play so important a part in the history of his Of his earlier years the glimpse
1479.eighboring church, and here the Carroll family on Sundays and holy-days devoutly assem
1480.gement, the country might be trained in knowledge, virtue and their duties to God and man
1481. country might be trained in knowledge, virtue and their duties to God and man. It was
1482.n knowledge, virtue and their duties to God and man. It was as a dim fore establish
1483.dge, virtue and their duties to God and man. It was as a dim fore established, in B
1484.great College of afterwards established one of the loveliest Potomac." Georget
1485.he loveliest Potomac." Georgetown, many by Archbishop Carroll, and most captiva
1486., and most captivating spots on the But many years had to elapse till then; the Carr
1487.pse till then; the Carrolls were to see many trials and many changes abroad and in t
1488.he Carrolls were to see many trials and many changes abroad and in their native land
1489.en, and divers great events, before the one cousin was to found, so to say, the Cat
1490.the Catholic Church in America, and the other to stand foremost among the defenders o
1491.oremost among the defenders of national liberty. CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. The rec
1492.oth boys at their elementary school was good, though their stay there was but short.
1493.e Maryland, which he was not to see for many years, ac companied by his cousin, the
1494.Omer, in France. Here the boy s natural love of learning displayed itself, and that
1495. ly colored threads of the old romantic life of Continental Europe were woven into t
1496. Continental Europe were woven into the man s grow existence, that existence to old
1497.rriors ; the burnished gold or steel of many where kings came in triumph to bend the
1498.ce where the most wondrous event in the world s history was enacted, and the peasant
1499. the most wondrous event in the world s history was enacted, and the peasant maid, the
1500.ommon with the. ; 1 88 NAMES THAT LIVE. life through which the of the student passed
1501.l civilization, Paris and London. liant life of the French capital could entirely di
1502. around newer and more varied phases of mind of those shades that far-famed College
1503.and the general, the noble and the rich citizen, the gifted and the witty and the learn
1504.d from portals into the amphitheatre of life. But they bore with them their alma mat
1505.n of France were instructed not only in science and but in ceeded to England, specially
1506.d to England, specially to continue his law studies It was an Temple. abrupt change
1507.is law studies It was an Temple. abrupt change from Bourges, it was an abrupt change f
1508.t change from Bourges, it was an abrupt change from the en at the Inns religion, dowed
1509.n abrupt change from the en at the Inns religion, dowed the accomplishments suitable to
1510.nk, fortune and position. The manner of life was totally different, but the young ma
1511.fe was totally different, but the young man formed many warm friendships in London
1512.lly different, but the young man formed many warm friendships in London during the s
1513.s of his stay there. At the end of that time he thought of returning to America. all
1514.RLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON varied 189 a man, with the and polished manners which hi
1515.n which emotions. The boy returned ripe judgment, scholarly intellect revolutionary prin
1516.of the colonists. Not that they desired revolution, nor from the mother country. But were
1517.on into the subject of politi His clear judgment and quick percep cal freedom. tion saw
1518. people versus Governor Eden. Carroll s logic in favor of the former was unanswerable
1519.werable. He had precisely the temper of mind to encounter such an antagonist, and th
1520.o encounter such an antagonist, and the courage of his opinions to maintain In this con
1521.umed the soubriquet the right. of First Citizen, in allusion to a dialogue once publish
1522.. for There was a softer episode in his life about this time, it must not be suppose
1523.a softer episode in his life about this time, it must not be supposed that that old
1524.easure of romance, the golden thread of poetry, to brighten the dark tissue of actual
1525.righten the dark tissue of actual fact. man In 1768 Mr. Carroll married Mary Darnal
1526.for her loss, devoted himself heart and soul to the affairs of his country. Three of
1527.ccepted. After his triumph in the First Citizen contest he was greeted with acclamation
1528.They made a public demonstration in his honor, and tendered him the ^Kanks of the com
1529.ess patriotic leader. It was about this time that Mary land replied, in answer to Go
1530.tional measures for common tures of the other dated," colonies." "We o
1531.be right." doing It was about this time, too, and when the temper of the people
1532. upon the naval commander, Stewart, the necessity of resolute action in regard to the tea
1533. those which had been going up from the other States. Some time before, in a letter t
1534.en going up from the other States. Some time before, in a letter to a friend, Mr. Ca
1535.t, and declared that so great was their love CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. 191 of l
1536.e CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. 191 of liberty that nothing but an armed force could e
1537.n armed force could ever overcome their opposition to the unjust principle of tax ation wi
1538.overcome their opposition to the unjust principle of tax ation without representation. wr
1539.n without representation. wrote to this same friend the Some years afterwards he fam
1540.g words : British troops, if sent here, will find naught but enemies before and behi
1541.them. If we are beaten in the plains we will retire to our mountains and defy them.
1542.re to our mountains and defy them. They will be masters but of the spot on which the
1543.e spot on which they en "The camp. Necessity will force us to exertion, until, tired
1544.which they en "The camp. Necessity will force us to exertion, until, tired of c
1545.fter victory cannot subdue, your armies will evacuate our loser from the soil, and y
1546. Such was the spirit which animated the man, and when the people of Maryland, somew
1547.here as early as J 773) joined with the other States in a fearless and reso lute oppo
1548.ther States in a fearless and reso lute opposition to the encroachments of the hpme gov er
1549.issary of the Jesuits. He was heart and soul devoted so carefully fostered in to tha
1550. religious intolerance effaced from the Constitution of Maryland. This laudable ob ject he e
1551.shment. a declaration of the rights and form of govern prepare " ment for this
1552.heir efforts were consequently in 1775. State," our hero. 192 NAMES THAT LIVE. c
1553.ey de served, our after glimpses of the history of Maryland fully prove. Meantime, stra
1554.which afterwards extended to France and other continental countries. This outbreak dr
1555.those sacred vows they had taken before God s altar." However, the whole pon c
1556.e was brought to bear on him that, like one who sac rifices his most precious goods
1557.s its very wording suggests, was a mere matter of expediency, which none more deeply *
1558. none more deeply * Abbe Darras, Church History, vol. iv. CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON
1559.red of this, we need only remember that other, though not so widely known Bull, Ccele
1560.estium Munerum ThesauIt is with joy and happiness that we bestow of the ros:" abunda
1561.ures upon those who ear nestly seek the good of souls, as we reckon among those &quo
1562.rd, the religious of the most assuredly desire to nourish ciety of Jesus. We So and by
1563.able pastors and missionaries, and at a time when both had still to encounter the tu
1564.n occasion of lively joy to the Carroll family and to the Catho lics of Maryland in ge
1565. his whole vast diocese, which for some time included the thirteen original colonies
1566.was a diplo.matic mission of a delicate nature, and had for its object to persuade the
1567.that he declared he which was just then being planned could not go, deeming it incomp
1568.c., and saluted by firing of cannon and other military honors." try, He goes on
1569. a half. We always came to in the night time. Passengers generally encamp in the woo
1570.ees, and large fires at But as we had a good awning to our boat, etc., I chose to th
1571.Carroll did among the cler But in vain. Many reasons militated against them. gy. In
1572.ssage of the Quebec Act; the Quebec Act being simply legislation to con firm the Fren
1573.t was a spirit which had come out as an evil leg acy from the mother country, and a
1574.required the purifying influence of the Revolution to purge out. Added to this there was t
1575.atory policy of Gover nor Guy Carleton, one of the most popular of English Viceroys
1576.joyed gime. The terms in which this the same response that the lay seculars did to t
1577.sponse that the lay seculars did to the other commissioners; they said they could not
1578. flock to take up arms for a chimerical liberty, when they were even then in possession
1579.cts, combatted the Americans during the progress of the war with little enthusiasm. But
1580.he Americans during the progress of the war with little enthusiasm. But our space f
1581.the war with little enthusiasm. But our space forbids us to enter into such details.
1582.on, then to New York, entered heart and soul into the plans for the coming contest.
1583.rie lands, seemed incompatible with any other idea than that of liberty. But here let
1584.nds, seemed incompatible with any other idea than that of liberty. But here let us m
1585.atible with any other idea than that of liberty. But here let us mark the difference: l
1586.y. But here let us mark the difference: liberty might look down and smile; there were n
1587.roud title this, prouder even that that one ment."* which was to follow, for h
1588.ortal year, when freedom offered to the world this spectacle of honest, sincere and e
1589. and its results has had no parallel in history. It was upon the Fourth of July, that d
1590.o his wife: I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by suc ceeding generation
1591.liverance by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized wit
1592.bells, bonfires and illuminations, from one end of the continent to the other, from
1593.s, from one end of the continent to the other, from this time forward forever."
1594.f the continent to the other, from this time forward forever." Of that glorious
1595. the United States, he thus speaks: You will think me transported with enthusiasm, b
1596.e blood, the I am not. treasure that it will cost us to maintain this declaration, &
1597. than all the means, and that posterity will triumph, although you and I may rue, wh
1598.was an inspiring moment indeed. the old State House, Philadelphia, was a living mass
1599.e go millions," in allusion to his wealth. But a second voice, said, No, he canno
1600. No, he cannot be identified; there are many Charles Carrolls." This decided th
1601.t; This decided the patriot. He did not desire safety which could not be shared by his
1602.e words, noble scene, and worthy of the cause which these men served. Almost at the m
1603.There was a peal of joy such as the old man had never put into his bell before, and
1604.trangely appropriate in " Proclaim liberty scription, all the inhabitants thereof.
1605.h congratulations and such wishing each other joy! Surely they forgot the dark and de
1606.icings there, as well as throughout the other colo were no less cordial and heartfelt
1607.e his country in the arena of political life. He soon CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON.
1608.e Declaration. He, however, divided his time for many years to come be tween the dut
1609.tion. He, however, divided his time for many years to come be tween the duties of St
1610.ny years to come be tween the duties of State Senator in his native Maryland and thos
1611.His Such men as labors thenceforth were many and varied. he were, at this trying cri
1612. stand in His political sagacity, clear judgment, long the breach. and varied experience
1613.r judgment, long the breach. and varied experience of men and manners, his energy, his dev
1614.anners, his energy, his devotion to the cause, and his uncompromising hon esty made h
1615.is uncompromising hon esty made him the man amongst men, to unite with his co-labor
1616.mation of a just, solid and harmoni ous form of government to suit the exigencies of
1617.f a just, solid and harmoni ous form of government to suit the exigencies of the time and
1618.overnment to suit the exigencies of the time and circumstances. Nor did he neglect m
1619.y SIR: and unbounded confidence on your being called, by a unanimous vote, to the fir
1620.ces, of eminent wis dom and unblemished virtue. Our congratulations have not reached y
1621.portunity, not merely of pre saging the happiness to be expected under your adminis trati
1622.h we expe It is your peculiar talent in war and in 2OO NAMES THAT LIVE. peace to af
1623.lent in war and in 2OO NAMES THAT LIVE. peace to afford security to those who commit
1624.curity to those who commit their pro In war, you shield them from tection into your
1625.on into your hands. armed hostility; in peace, you establish public tranquillity, by
1626.u establish public tranquillity, by the justice and moderation, not less than by the vi
1627.ion, not less than by the vigor of your government. By example, as the ravages of you exte
1628.fluence of laws on You encourage re for religion, and inculcate, by word and action, spe
1629.culcate, by word and action, spect that principle on which the welfare of nations so much
1630.ng Providence governs the events of the world, and watches over the conduct of men. Y
1631.fellow-citizens. a warmer interest than pleasure by ourselves, we derive additional reco
1632.ipal instrument in effecting so rapid a change in our political situation. This prospe
1633. a well-founded title to claim from her justice, the equal rights of citizenship, as th
1634.ect the full extension of them from the justice of those States, which still restrict t
1635. or the prolongation of your health and life, in which are included the energy of yo
1636.cluded the energy of your exam ple, the wisdom of your counsels, and the persuasive el
1637.atis faction your congratulations on my being called, by a unanimous vote, to the fir
1638. an opportunity benefits of the general government, you will do me the of the increase of
1639.benefits of the general government, you will do me the of the increase of justice to
1640., you will do me the of the increase of justice to believe that your testimony the publ
1641.mony the public prosperity enhances the pleasure which I should otherwise have experienc
1642.affectionate I feel that my conduct, in war and in peace, address. has met with mor
1643.e I feel that my conduct, in war and in peace, address. has met with more general app
1644.nd ought to excite the exertions of all good men to establish and secure the happine
1645.ll good men to establish and secure the happiness of their country, in the permanent dura
1646. Divine Providence, the protection of a good government, and the cultivation of mann
1647.ne Providence, the protection of a good government, and the cultivation of manners, morals
1648.more liberal, spectability abroad. they will be more apt at all times to allow that
1649.ion of civil I hope ever to see America government. among the foremost nations in examples
1650.ong the foremost nations in examples of justice and who conduct And liberality. presume
1651.lity. presume that your fellow-citizens will not forget the patriotic part which you
1652.u took in the accomplishment I of their revolution, or the establishment of their govern m
1653.lemen, for your kind concern for me. my life and health shall continue, in whatever
1654.es as the faithful subjects of our free government, enjoy every your society temporal and
1655.N." that, as we have said, the new Constitution was gradual process of completion, Char
1656. of completion, Charles Carroll and the other Catholics of Maryland and the United St
1657.LLTON. began nition 203 to consider the necessity of obtaining some recog The from Congre
1658.y these true-hearted men, who foresaw a time when rights and liberties, dearer to th
1659.f which they had themselves tasted. our opposition to the settled "As in 1775: gress
1660.inistration a union of all ranks of men will be strengthened by within this province
1661.stly recommend former differences about religion or politics, and all private animositie
1662.e of their felt eminent services to the cause of independence, and justified, themsel
1663.itle, in demanding recognition from the government. A memorial was to Con consequently dra
1664.t services rendered by Catholics to the cause of independence, and of the im a renewa
1665.ing disunion by His personal esteem for many spirit of intolerance. 204 NAMES THAT L
1666. he knew innumerable instances of their courage, For the Carrolls patriotism and devoti
1667.From his exalted worth as a minister of God, his stain less character as a man, and
1668.r of God, his stain less character as a man, and above all, his distinguished "
1669. said that services as a patriot of the Revolution, Dr. Carroll stood high, very high, in
1670.n the Third Article of Amendment to the Constitution, namely, that Congress shall make no la
1671.on, namely, that Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religio
1672. no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free " exercis
1673.y-three Mr. Carroll retired from public life. Thenceforth it is our privilege to see
1674.usion of his home, where he devoted his time to private affairs, and the pursuit of
1675.latter years of the veteran statesman s life form a charming picture. He dwelt at th
1676.r years of the veteran statesman s life form a charming picture. He dwelt at the old
1677.n a par with London, certainly with any other English city, in luxury, dress, You kno
1678.f the colonies, and this, again, to the Revolution. The cos tumes were those of the Englis
1679. tumes were those of the English of the same period, certainly not more than a few m
1680.n. in Remember, I am speaking of people good circumstances, which remark extends to
1681. while in all the ele gancies of polite life few men were his superiors." A por
1682.their convictions. as it now stands, is one of those true old Southern mansions whi
1683.. The several parts of the building now form a pleasing whole. At one end is a prett
1684. building now form a pleasing whole. At one end is a pretty little chapel, St. Mary
1685., and is principally for the use of the family and people of the estate, the " st
1686. John Lee Carroll. At ; either side are memory of deceased is handsome marble tablets
1687.le tablets sacred to the members of the family. A white " marble slab at the very
1688., while above the seats occupied by the family, is an exquisite copy of Muriilo s Imma
1689. Immaculate Conception. The wing at the other end of the building, correspond ing to
1690.ere They are all panelled and hung with family from the very first Carroll down to the
1691.irst Carroll down to the last. pictures Other valuable portraits likewise adorn the w
1692.re exactly as they were in the signer s time. The rest of the house is more modern b
1693. some palms and Australian ferns summer-time. Sloping down beyond the circle is an a
1694.l prefer re manor, maining with the old family. In the house are several of the older
1695.pon the estate. The Signer." Every one, grand and all, calls him so.* There is
1696.lls him so.* There is no doubt that the Revolution, and the causes leading thereto, may ha
1697.lish cloth The account of the Manor and other valuable information was sent through a
1698.d friend, now residing with the Carroll family, and the letters which appear on page 2
1699.returns thanks. 2O8 NAMES THAT LIVE. of other days, and it is not unlikely that the s
1700.llen into discredit and disuse, under a form of government whose boast must hencefor
1701.o discredit and disuse, under a form of government whose boast must henceforth be its simp
1702.idents there was a strong flavor of old-world punc and courtliness of dress and manne
1703.from long withered herbs, and it lent a poetry and a pomp and a stateliness to the dec
1704.ot, which seem most in harmony with his life and character. He was wealthy for those
1705.d and eighty-five slaves, the linen and other articles of domestic use were imported
1706.gland,* as well as the clothing for the family. In such surround to womanhood the two
1707.wo daughters of Mr. Car ings grew roll, one of whom, Mrs. Caton, was the mother of
1708.ards George the Is it possible that the world can Fourth, exclaimed, brother to the &
1709.a woman ?" The Marquis was, at the time of his marriage, * Lord Lieutenant of I
1710.* Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Up to the time of the Revolution at least. f Sister-in
1711.enant of Ireland, Up to the time of the Revolution at least. f Sister-in-law to the wife o
1712.of the Revolution at least. f Sister-in-law to the wife of Jerome Bonaparte. CHARLE
1713.h a queen." continued he, "no other court in Europe "Certainly,"
1714.All England bent before their fresh new beauty, which But let us rested like a crown u
1715.ss the subject of admiration than their beauty. Lady Wellesley, who, afterwards became
1716.his fellow-citizens, and go " down life life in its the decline of years with t
1717.ellow-citizens, and go " down life life in its the decline of years with the se
1718.ample worthy the imitation of youth, of man hood, of old age; of the lawyer, the st
1719.the Christian. His career was guided by virtue and prudence; his every action marked w
1720.an. His career was guided by virtue and prudence; his every action marked with honesty,
1721.uggle, and now came, in the calmness of peace and prosperity, to speak of it as of a
1722. led him backwards to recollec tions of life in Europe, episodes of his stay at that
1723.est; for of note, travelling merely for pleasure; College can imagine that often the men
1724.or fellowthat distinguished students at law. In the usual course of human affairs &
1725.in which he was held by his countrymen. good and great made pilgrimages to his dwell
1726.f America." Mr. Carroll s home was one of the great social centres of the day,
1727.ified and stately. Charles Carroll upon one occasion received a deputation from the
1728.e to his country, his re For this model citizen, this incor ligion and his God. was als
1729.odel citizen, this incor ligion and his God. was also a model Catholic, a devout ru
1730. upon it, for he held it as his highest honor. His library was composed in great part
1731.ety. spoken of by biographers Bossuet s History of the Variations of Protestant Churche
1732.tant Churches, and the Abbe McGeoghan s History of Ireland, had also a conspicuous s Mi
1733.cuous s Milner End of Controversy is as one of his favorite books. place upon the s
1734. He spoke of it as most impressive, the family devoutly assembled, and the colored sla
1735.ly assembled, and the colored slaves to form a background. 212 NAMES THAT LIVE. In J
1736.y direction of the President I have the honor of transmitting to of the United States
1737.and accordingly signed on the 2d of the same year. Of this document, un paralleled i
1738. Of this document, un paralleled in the history of mankind, the original, de posited in
1739. this department, exhibits your name as one of the subscribers. The rolls herewith
1740.itted are exact copies, as exact as the art of engraving can pre sent, of the instr
1741.the signers to it. While performing the duty thus assigned me, per mit me to felicit
1742. I With every sentiment " have the honor of subscribing myself, Your fellow-citi
1743.onor of subscribing myself, Your fellow-citizen, "JOHN QUINCY ADAMS." This gr
1744.JOHN QUINCY ADAMS." This great and good ome of his life, in gives us an admirab
1745.S." This great and good ome of his life, in gives us an admirable epit those wo
1746.ble epit those words, which have become man CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. 21$ almo
1747.h year I have been blessed with ; great wealth, prosperity, and most of the good thing
1748.eat wealth, prosperity, and most of the good things which the world can bestow publi
1749., and most of the good things which the world can bestow public approbation, es but w
1750.nder words these tised the duties of my religion." than any he had spoken throughou
1751.ng extracts from two letters to his son will serve to give a further insight into th
1752.2, 1821, In writing to you I deem it my duty to call your at tention to the shortnes
1753.our at tention to the shortness of this life, the certainty of death, and of that dr
1754.hortness of this life, the certainty of death, and of that dread judgment which we mu
1755.e certainty of death, and of that dread judgment which we must all undergo, and on the d
1756.ecision of which a happy or a miserable eternity depends. * The impious man said in his
1757.serable eternity depends. * The impious man said in his heart, He would willingly b
1758. willingly believe there is There is no God. no God; his passions, the corruption o
1759.ly believe there is There is no God. no God; his passions, the corruption of his he
1760.im that there is not; the stings of con science betray the emptiness of the delusion; t
1761.; the heavens proclaim the existence of God, and unperverted reason teaches that He
1762.unperverted reason teaches that He must love virtue and hate vice, and re ward the o
1763.verted reason teaches that He must love virtue and hate vice, and re ward the one and
1764.aches that He must love virtue and hate vice, and re ward the one and punish the oth
1765.e virtue and hate vice, and re ward the one and punish the other." u We should
1766.ice, and re ward the one and punish the other." u We should not set our hearts t
1767.our hearts too much on anything in this world, since everything in it is so precariou
1768., talents, etc., of which disease, revo Virtue lution, or death can deprive us in a mo
1769.f which disease, revo Virtue lution, or death can deprive us in a moment. In the hour
1770. deprive us in a moment. In the hour of death, to no vicissitudes. alone is subject w
1771.felt, it 214 NAMES THAT LIVE. and alone will console us, and while we live soften th
1772.while we live soften the calami ties of life and teach us to bear them with resignat
1773.iety and devo tion to the Church by his many generous donations in the cause of reli
1774.h by his many generous donations in the cause of religion. His old historic home at A
1775.many generous donations in the cause of religion. His old historic home at Annapo lis, r
1776. be called the last public event in his life now approached. jubilee signers" o
1777. the nation, the mouthpiece of a sacred cause. Children, who were in grown to manhood
1778.ved them all he had seen after the last time. : grand father fled in terror, his gra
1779.ns a CHARLES CARROLL OF CARROLLTON. But death, which had long spared It was in Novemb
1780.It was in November at last. He had some time previously returned 21$ this stately fi
1781. moments were edifying and impressive a life in the highest degree, the fitting clos
1782.gree, the fitting close to spent in the love and fear of God, and the service His ho
1783. close to spent in the love and fear of God, and the service His household was asse
1784.n the bed, and did not long survive the change of position. His soul took its flight i
1785.ong survive the change of position. His soul took its flight it so tranquilly that t
1786. shall Carroll is in the tomb. upon his death: of the monarch, the The sceptre not wh
1787. the monarch at the solemn mockeries of liberty, and their moulder We pageants be forgo
1788.he canvas or in marble bust, but in the memory of virtuous freemen. His name, with tha
1789.after ages be hymned whilst the muse of history to the lyre of the minstrel ; little *
1790.Catholic Miscellany, published at the s time of Mr. Carroll death. 2l6 NAMES THAT of
1791. published at the s time of Mr. Carroll death. 2l6 NAMES THAT of LIVE. shall point to
1792. the fadeless mon in ument the American wisdom in the cabinet, and valor field. of the
1793.oath of The devotion Fortune and Sacred Honor Life, as a Catholic, his practical piet
1794.f The devotion Fortune and Sacred Honor Life, as a Catholic, his practical piety and
1795. and unsullied morality well proved the other. The blended rays of both shed a halo ;
1796.of both shed a halo ; well attested the one round his name while living sweetly tem
1797.ly tempered the evening of his virtuous life, till, the object of the venera tion of
1798.tranquilly breathes ; his spirit to his God, and consigns his tomb of his ancestors
1799.ts expres it only proves that he had in truth the nation for his mourners. From one e
1800.truth the nation for his mourners. From one end of the continent to the other poure
1801.s. From one end of the continent to the other poured in testimonies of grief and resp
1802.monies of grief and respect. Church and State alike bewailed his loss the Cath sion,
1803.he Jesuits, the student of that home of science and of the its olic Church in America h
1804.the its olic Church in America had lost one of zealous Catholic had passed away fro
1805.hool at Soreze to be taught the arts of war and the whole system of military tactic
1806.ole system of military tactics. At this time he is described as a slight, soldierly,
1807.ly marked by the innate nobility of his soul, no less than by the out ward tokens of
1808.s bright high destiny of fame and early death. He was then sixteen years of age, and
1809.. He was then sixteen years of age, and time had dealt feature of his face: He chase
1810.of St. Louis and sat upon the throne of many a glorious race of kings. The halls whe
1811.cts of base and unprincipled men. Human life was as a feather, to be blown from thei
1812.tment. Gray-haired were trampled in the same dust where childhood and innocence lay
1813.e descendants of Adam in times of yore, God sent upon them confusion of speech, and
1814.I DE LAROCHEJAQUELEIN. knowing not each man 221 his brother, they fell upon and sle
1815.s brother, they fell upon and slew each other. Henri de la Larochejaquelein was then,
1816.green among its foremost defenders. The life of the king was already threatened, and
1817.some faithful arms to strike a blow for God, for king, for country, gave himself up
1818.ot; " foresee the future, when the sin of regicide down a deeper vengeance upo
1819.on of the Temple. There he remained for many months; that gentle and gracious king w
1820.e princely halls, which were for her so many paces, from childhood in an Austrian pa
1821.childhood in an Austrian palace, to her death upon a scaffold. Here, then, was a touc
1822.ally here that never, perhaps, does the history of any conflict present such extremes o
1823.xtremes of nobility and degradation, of vice and exalted sanc Never, to our thinking
1824., to our thinking, in the annals of the world, tity. occurs a finer episode than that
1825.b, drunk with blood, at the door, tion. Death to the priests who will not take the cr
1826.he door, tion. Death to the priests who will not take the crying: There were human t
1827.spring oath!" upon their prey. The Convention summoned them in The first called was M
1828. of Agen. answered he, the sacrifice of wealth is of little moment to me; but there is
1829.is of little moment to me; but there is one sacrifice which that of your respect an
1830.ng the oath required by your decrees. I will not swear." The whole body of the
1831.e right loudly applauded his words. The Convention then summoned them " collectively
1832.ce within, rendered awful by the horrid Death at the door. Not an ecclesiastic upon t
1833.ree hundred members of right moved. the Convention; only twenty had seceded. Meantime Laro
1834.kinsman, the noble Lescure, after wards one of the great leaders in the war of La V
1835.r wards one of the great leaders in the war of La Vendee. Meanwhile we shall glance
1836.in amongst the nobles. of The Moreover, being in complete submission to the laws of t
1837. of the socialist or nihilist. When the revolution ary movement began to remained tranquil
1838.egan to remained tranquilly in of false liberty, and willing in all sincerity to render
1839.Suddenly he cried out Brethren, for the punishment of sinners God will one day send into a
1840.Brethren, for the punishment of sinners God will one day send into all this region
1841.hren, for the punishment of sinners God will one day send into all this region a hor
1842. for the punishment of sinners God will one day send into all this region a horribl
1843.ay send into all this region a horrible war. Blood shall be shed; men shall be slai
1844.Years passed on silently and dwelt this prophecy. old men alone remembered the preacher
1845.d the preacher s swiftly; words, and in many a fireside chat related it, with the ga
1846.it quietly, noiselessly, and surely, as time covers the surface of the earth with ne
1847.oad for leaders. * Bonchamps, Charette, War in Stofflet, and d Elbee History of the
1848. Charette, War in Stofflet, and d Elbee History of the Montfort. La Vendee. Life of Ble
1849.bee History of the Montfort. La Vendee. Life of Blessed Grignon de HENRI DE LAROCHEJ
1850.nd even anxious to strike a blow in the good cause, if they only had a leader. Laroc
1851.en anxious to strike a blow in the good cause, if they only had a leader. Larochejaqu
1852.ed, they were wanting in everything but courage, trust in God, and a firm belief in the
1853.ing in everything but courage, trust in God, and a firm belief in the justice of th
1854. trust in God, and a firm belief in the justice of their cause. Of these forces Laroche
1855.d a firm belief in the justice of their cause. Of these forces Larochejaquelein now t
1856.ore setting out the young leader made a soul-stirring address to his sol diers, conc
1857.ence in him. I am only a boy, but by my courage I will show myself worthy to command yo
1858.m. I am only a boy, but by my courage I will show myself worthy to command you. If I
1859.ich greeted the boy orator; for at this time our hero was scarcely twenty years of a
1860. Lescure having left Clisson about this time in com pany with for Marigny to levy tr
1861.or Marigny to levy troops, if the royal cause, met a band of mounted " his frien
1862.uelein. Warmly they congratula ted each other on being at last in the service of the
1863.armly they congratula ted each other on being at last in the service of the king; but
1864.arily short, and, exchang ing a cordial God-speed, each hastened upon his way. The
1865.yalist army advanced in four divisions, one being under the command of Larochejaque
1866.st army advanced in four divisions, one being under the command of Larochejaquelein a
1867.ommand of Larochejaquelein and his kins man Lescure. They marched to Vrine, a villa
1868. near among Thouars. On a bridge of the same name a short but The ammunition failing
1869.the besiegers gained an entrance at the same moment that another division of the Ven
1870.kind, they acted with remarkable modera Truth to showing mercy to all the prisoners.
1871. were more occupied in giving thanks to God they At Thouars than in taking vengeanc
1872.wn. They also came into possession of a quantity of artillery so much ne_eded. and ammun
1873.cure interposed: officers objected, but will fight none the worse for he said, they
1874. result of the combat remained for some time " " it." The republicans
1875.sters of Fontenay without the slightest opposition. resolved just after this victory that
1876.questionably as the Cure of St. Laud s. one of the great leaders in the Vendean ris
1877. from the Catholic armies " to the Convention in which La Vendee victorious; the Holy
1878.. appeal was totally disregarded by the Convention. New generals were sent into La Vendee
1879.ere sent into La Vendee to carry on the war, and amongst them were the celebrated S
1880.r the ramparts, he cried: Soldiers, who will get me my cap So saying, he leaped over
1881.outs of " LIVE. "Vive Vive la religion catholique!" le One of the churche
1882.e Vive la religion catholique!" le One of the churches of the city had been ma
1883.ishment," replied the "when I God." think of our success; it is clea
1884.keeping Saumur, which he did with equal courage and skill. It was on this occasion that
1885. his execution the only votion to a bad cause. instance of ingratitude upon the part
1886.nce of ingratitude upon the part of the Convention. Meanwhile the Vendean army was making
1887., but now formed a conjunction with the other royalist leaders; the bulk of their for
1888. defeated. There they lost Cathelineau, one of the most able as well as popular lea
1889.Lescure was appointed to the command of one, and at once chose his young kinsman as
1890.t the foe. Already artillery and turned one of their Blues upon the eve of flight,
1891.; escape was impossible, and a glorious death was the only object of their hope. Nigh
1892. the very ; hand to hand, foot to foot, man to man, the armies met. A panic spread
1893.ry ; hand to hand, foot to foot, man to man, the armies met. A panic spread opposin
1894.iring leaders called upon them, for the honor of God, by their love of country, by th
1895.ders called upon them, for the honor of God, by their love of country, by the memor
1896.on them, for the honor of God, by their love of country, by the memory of their mart
1897.f God, by their love of country, by the memory of their martyred brethren, to remain a
1898., and Bonchamps, filled with superhuman courage, refused to ; abandoned ; lay wounded o
1899.onchamps the spot where, a moment after-life, solemn hour seemed so near. When the l
1900.f hope from the hearts of the Vendeans, one alone re mained full of undaunted valor
1901.i de Nothing could subdue his dauntless life and hope and valor. A reinforcement arr
1902.e and valor. A reinforcement arrived in time to save him and carry the wounded leade
1903.so strong, so full of lay stricken unto death. Utterly disheartened, the peasants pro
1904. HENRI DE LAROCHEJAQUELEIN. 233 under a sense of failure and defeat; and learning tha
1905. amongst the help less republicans, not one of whom would, however, have hesitated
1906. his foe. But Bonchamps from his bed of death summoned the many " ! !" offi
1907.amps from his bed of death summoned the many " ! !" officers. He " ad
1908.ce was already gray with the shadows of death, had commanded. With one accord the pea
1909.e shadows of death, had commanded. With one accord the peasants cried Bonchamps com
1910.nchamps was at rest. Shortly before his death he received the Viaticum with extraordi
1911.o the noble and gentle qualities of the man. Larochejaquelein the passage of the no
1912.e borne across, that he might spend his life amongst the people whose cause he had s
1913.spend his life amongst the people whose cause he had so nobly espoused and gallantly
1914.. With tears in his eyes he refused the honor, begging of them to elect one whose mom
1915.sed the honor, begging of them to elect one whose moments of years and experience m
1916.to elect one whose moments of years and experience might the fidence. more in readily insp
1917.of all the leaders of the rebellion; in judgment and experi ence he must necessarily hav
1918. must necessarily have been inferior to many of his seniors; although it is unquesti
1919.nable that he fre quently exhibited the knowledge and military skill of a great general.
1920.y skill of a great general. In personal courage he was unsurpassed; his valor was reckl
1921. a prisoner, he at once offered him the chance of single combat; while " ant posi
1922.when he proffered advice, it was always good. When he was called upon for his opinio
1923.s good. When he was called upon for his opinion, he invariably Decide; I will execute.&
1924.or his opinion, he invariably Decide; I will execute." His motives were replied
1925.he. spilled his heart called him. Every man would have drawn s best blood for Maste
1926.racter and such were the qualifications man who was now summoned to the chief com m
1927.th the Larochejaquelein was unarmed and one arm being quite helpless from a partial
1928.arochejaquelein was unarmed and one arm being quite helpless from a partially disable
1929.t the royalist without weapons and with one arm disabled, general, threw you to the
1930.ing spurs to his horse, he regained the life." camp. All this the royalists. ti
1931.fe." camp. All this the royalists. time Westermann was upon the track of They s
1932.red before the heights of Entrames, was one of the most important of the campaign.
1933.thirst for glory. He pointed out on the one hand fame and the consciousness of well
1934. well-doing as their reward, and on the other martyrdom. The royal forces occupied th
1935.ted friend. Lescure died a most saintly death, which is touchingly described by his w
1936.ibed by his widow in her memoirs of the time; to her he declared that besides in lea
1937.et Larochejaquelein after her husband s death, she ex claimed: You have lost your bes
1938.ot; dearest to " him of all in the life world." Could my restore him to yo
1939.earest to " him of all in the life world." Could my restore him to you,&quo
1940.es of the holiness and austerity of his life. his as the evening of the i4th Novembe
1941.the republicans revived, and in a short time victory was theirs. In the gray some vo
1942.ed them; they had refused to accept any other aid from a country which had ever been
1943.h had ever been the enemy of France. No sign of the English fleet, however, appeared
1944.d foe alike hastened hither the aids of religion, and the priests and thither, administe
1945.n. This engage ment, which proved to be one of the most important of the campaign,
1946.ated an engage ment, which, but for the prudence and foresight of Larochejaquelein, who
1947.d throughout; again come the earth. The courage of the royalists was at its upon intens
1948.heir very midst, shouting the inspiring war-cry and calling upon the terrified peas
1949.aloft a large crucifix, called upon the courage therefrom. authoritatively. "Will
1950.urage therefrom. authoritatively. "Will you," spoke to them sternly and he
1951.ht; it is the only way of sav ing them. Will you abandon your general in the midst I
1952.you abandon your general in the midst I will march at your Kneel down, you who are w
1953.l march at your Kneel down, you who are will ing to follow me, and I will give you a
1954.ou who are will ing to follow me, and I will give you absolution; if you die, you wi
1955.ll give you absolution; if you die, you will go to heaven; whilst those who betray G
1956.l go to heaven; whilst those who betray God and leave their families to perish will
1957. God and leave their families to perish will go to perdition." By a spontaneous
1958. facing a alone, When he saw that not a man remained by his battery. and that resis
1959.less, he stood thus, side, When braving death, too proud to turn his back upon the fo
1960. Never yet in all the fierce ordeals of many battles had he done so, nor would he no
1961.shing onwards themselves into the Not a man followed, and all save Larocheja breach
1962. and Westermann, determined to stop the progress of the Vendeans towards Ancenis and cut
1963.rmy. Though fully aware of their slight chance of success, Larochejaquelein, with his
1964., with his usual energy and presence of mind, made every preparation for a determine
1965.vailed upon the fugitives and share the fate of their comrades. Taking three thousan
1966.them; but again without avail. Loyalty, courage, honor, all seemed alike to have desert
1967. again without avail. Loyalty, courage, honor, all seemed alike to have deserted the
1968. not, when they must die. For the first time positive despair and a sort of frenzy s
1969.he final blow was dealt to the royalist cause in La Vendee. When the Vendeans began t
1970.an their retreat, Larochejaquelein with other leaders, amongst whom were the afterwar
1971.chivalric spirit still remained amongst many of the royalist leaders. Having collect
1972. remain here while a yourself; it is in good hands. grain of powder or a ball is lef
1973.e have our flag. If they send it to the Convention, they they shall also send my head.&quo
1974.child was restored to its mother, whose life had been preserved. royalists hastened
1975. of the river in two frail fishingtheir progress being watched with intense eager smacks
1976.iver in two frail fishingtheir progress being watched with intense eager smacks, ness
1977.ts, roused licans back. La Vendee, made one by the distant view of their fondly lov
1978.heir leader at the very crisis of their fate. Larochejaquelein, having penetrated in
1979.o the heart of the country, came, after many wanderings, to a farm in Chatillon, whe
1980.e took shelter. His adven tures at this time remind us rather of those attributed to
1981.the Here he remained for a considerable time; under cover of the darkness he stole o
1982.ew plans for a final effort in favor of God and king and country. For, inspired by
1983.ield again as the sworn champion of the good cause. But even in this ruined haunt of
1984.again as the sworn champion of the good cause. But even in this ruined haunt of the o
1985., Mortagne; if you wish to follow me, I will see that you are provided with a horse.
1986.ey regarded as their hereditary It is a matter of some surprise that the young crisis
1987.r numbers were very few, but about that time they took among other prisoners an adju
1988.ew, but about that time they took among other prisoners an adjutant-general of the co
1989.join Larochejaquelein in great numbers. Being therefore reinforced and in command of
1990.eral points, republican army, upon each time defeating him with considerable loss to
1991.rochejaquelein was ever to gain for the cause he loved. Pursuing the fugi tives, he d
1992.o give up their arms. But at the moment one of the hedge. Vendean officers, riding
1993.n the republicans. to seize his musket, one of the grenadiers, taking aim, dead. fi
1994.e So perished on the 4th of June, 1793, one of the bright nearer to est stars in th
1995.were; but nowhere among them do we find one greater, more noble, more knightly than
1996.pomp or ceremony, so that perchance his death might escape the notice of the republic
1997.y knew the import of such a loss to the cause for which he had given his heart s His
1998.t distance from blood. the place of his death, and there made him a grave where in su
1999. there made him a grave where in summer-time the grass grew very green and a waving
2000.lic the knot of white the colors of the cause, which he had ever kept ribbon, pure an
2001.hat he should take his place among them one day, adorned with a prouder title of no
2002.f the people, his all remains deep down memory enshrined with it that is most precious
2003.worthy to have lived in the mourned his death, alike recall with enthusiastic admira
2004.on the year. gallant boy, did thy young life flash out the midnight darkness of the
2005. new day had dawned for Thus, O France. Many a fervent prayer was breathed over thy
2006.yer was breathed over thy honored dust; many an eye has grown moist over the story o
2007.story of thy gallant deeds and untimely death; and many a young heart has caught from
2008.y gallant deeds and untimely death; and many a young heart has caught from thine a k
2009.ENRI DE LAROCHEJAQUELEIN. though is 249 evil times may come again for France; thy ta
2010.ain for France; thy task done, and thou art once more united to thy gallant comrade
2011. the valiant, loyal among the loyal, to God, to king, to country, their names stand
2012.why, The Blues, first having killed the good king our sire, Burnt out such poor devi
2013.mple chief was he, with no pride in the world, Reckless when peril was nigh; I seem t
2014.rushed to the front: Forward, lads, for God and " King, Rang " his words
2015.ered before. tis have limped since that time, boys, Very soon I shall limp no more.
2016.ed Of his brave with a sob the mournful history Monsieur Henri. ^MoVF"" jjfe,
2017.uf Jfa Stp$$ Souls of the slain in 7wly war, Look from your sainted rest ; Tell us
2018.e with the Tell us blest; How short the death-pang s power, the joys of your immortal
2019./id in the warrior s praise. Crusader s War Song. HEMANS. <be CHAMPION OF TH
2020.or, inspired with a lively zeal for the cause of too often covered his is religion an
2021.r the cause of too often covered his is religion and the welfare of his country. Simon d
2022.h century, of a noble and distinguished family, who were seigneurs of a little town ab
2023.us house of Hainault. Of Si mon s early life not many details come down to us, but w
2024.of Hainault. Of Si mon s early life not many details come down to us, but we know th
2025.d unscrupulous rebels, dangerous to the peace and safety of Norman subversive of Albi
2026. of Norman subversive of Albigenses the state.* assassinated priests, pillaged These
2027.rale de Languedoc; Alzog s Hist, of the Universal Church, vol. ii.; Darras s General Hist
2028.nd, Count 1 of Toulouse, espoused their cause, lending them every support in his powe
2029.for their sins and return to the way of God. sionaries. Peter of Castelnau was ofte
2030.f Castelnau was often heard to say: The cause of Christ cannot flourish in this count
2031.t cannot flourish in this country until one of the missionaries has shed his blood
2032.h to whatever the people had learned to love and respect. All the sover eigns of the
2033.enemy of the Pope, framing laws for the government of Sicily decreed the most fearful puni
2034.r * suppression." At this juncture God raised up to his people one who was to
2035.is juncture God raised up to his people one who was to be a leader in Israel. St. D
2036.Dominic was already the champion of the good cause by prayer and preach ing, but Sim
2037.ic was already the champion of the good cause by prayer and preach ing, but Simon de
2038.nocent III. excommunicated Raymond, and evil. called upon the knights, barons, and n
2039.of France to unite in a crusade for the peace and safety of their Forty thousand coun
2040.heir Forty thousand country and for the honor of God. men answered to the appeal, and
2041.y thousand country and for the honor of God. men answered to the appeal, and at the
2042. fear less soldier and skilful captain, one of the finest types " of the chiva
2043.could not have been chosen," con A same author; to the fearless daring of Cceur
2044.e sacred ensign of the cross, worn this time tinues the " breast, in contradist
2045.e, a social pest as well as a religious evil. SIMON DE MONTFORT. Louis, son of Phili
2046.ed the walls of the once There had been peace among the townsfaithful town, in those
2047.THAT days of old, the LIVE. sunshine of God s peace, sweet their daily lives as the
2048.ays of old, the LIVE. sunshine of God s peace, sweet their daily lives as they follow
2049.ing their fathers and worshipped at the same altars. But in their present repulsive
2050.ucifer. They renounced all all "of family ties and forbade the sacred bond marria
2051.rms and knightly steel, the neighing of war-horses, the undiminclank of shouts of t
2052.ymns which the crusaders chanted to the God of Battles. Undaunted and inde fatigabl
2053.ing his ponderous battle-axe he carried death to the ranks of the foemen. His clarion
2054.n calling upon the Christian him to the death for knighthood of France to follow for
2055. for France, and for their holy Church. God, The charge was made, ardent and impetu
2056.lls were scaled, a breach effected. The God The city of Battles had given them the
2057.y had massacred the consecrated ones of God and spread death and desolation through
2058. the consecrated ones of God and spread death and desolation through many fair provin
2059.and spread death and desolation through many fair provinces of France. The conqueror
2060.g Christians, knights and and the noble cause honored by an exer they served would ha
2061.n best But while we condemn them in all sin cise of mercy. this stain should rest u
2062. that character of Montfort, who in all other respects was the flower of Christian ch
2063. remember that this stern and merciless justice which he meted out was the A learned wr
2064.haracter and tendency of their teaching will go far to The con supply the motives of
2065.ut until they sequences embraced social life, all the relations of political, commer
2066.When and were subversive of them in the same connection the sanguinary cruelties com
2067. goes in the cru- * Alzog, Hist, of the Universal Church, vol. ii, 260 NAMES THAT LIVE. s
2068., 260 NAMES THAT LIVE. sade came to the knowledge of Pope Innocent, he was borne down wit
2069.rt personally had an inherent horror of vice, which made their excesses peculiarly a
2070.him. His predominant characteristic was justice. A justice severe and inexorable, indee
2071.edominant characteristic was justice. A justice severe and inexorable, indeed, but equa
2072.what he held to be the straight path of duty. In fine, let us remember that we can s
2073.ity, which is seized upon by enemies of truth as the essential attribute of pause a m
2074.eat exploits, he gree, united with this courage an imperturbable coolness which never d
2075.rted him even in the heat of battle. No emotion howsoever deep and powerful ever suffic
2076.wise and prudent as on the battle-field war like and martial. He was affable and co
2077.rs tell us So that old chroni he had no other enemies than those of Holy who approach
2078.it; as for myself, I believe firmly the truth of the Eucharistic Mystery as our Mothe
2079.ant than those of the angels, for they, being face to Well face with God, have not th
2080. for they, being face to Well face with God, have not the power to doubt. f he be c
2081.c faith." Meantime the fortunes of war turned steadily in favor of the crusade
2082.called to his assistance his brother-in-law, Peter of Arra- gon. tics, Montfort, at
2083.ll town upon the Garonne, by a force of one hundred thousand, under the leadership
2084. by Peter of Arragon. To human eyes the fate of De Montfort and his valiant band was
2085., as well as his irresist stances. ible courage, disconcerted the confederates from the
2086.in Thy holy Can we wonder day receive * cause." my arms, since must wield first.
2087. my arms, since must wield first." good Catholic. all their intrepid leader the
2088. Hist, of the Church, vol. iii. Gazeau, History of the Middle Ages. p. 336. SIMON DE MO
2089.5th of June, 1218, he went according to custom to early Mass. Just as Mass was beginni
2090.aid he, is " the and the Christian cause wavers. lost." " in fearful p
2091.illy, leave the church until I adore my God." Nevertheless," I will not C
2092.ore my God." Nevertheless," I will not Calmly he knelt, amid the dim relig
2093.tly, indeed, for the wavering Christian cause, and begged that the enemy might not pr
2094.uot; Dimittis" Now, O Lord, let in peace." He had adored the living "
2095.ed the living " Thy servant depart God for the last time upon earth. Immediate
2096.ot; Thy servant depart God for the last time upon earth. Immediately after the Eleva
2097. from the church, crying, Now onward to death for Him who suffered death for f us!&qu
2098.ow onward to death for Him who suffered death for f us!" * Histoire de pp. 470-4
2099.nd He beat his breast, recommending his soul to God and the Blessed Virgin, and so d
2100.at his breast, recommending his soul to God and the Blessed Virgin, and so doing ex
2101. doing expired. stones. Truly his was a death worthy a crusader, for he fell sword in
2102.and, facing the enemy, and offering his soul to God. his son, Amauri, was obliged to
2103.ing the enemy, and offering his soul to God. his son, Amauri, was obliged to raise
2104.ater emy of his race last Louij the and religion, and in the reign of St. remnants of th
2105.l of whom the illustrious hero gave his life, we may quote the words of Raymond of T
2106.n the last drop of my own blood in this cause, too happy if I can but help to crush s
2107." So it was, indeed, in a glorious cause that Simon, Count de Montfort shed his
2108.tfort shed his blood and gave his noble life. To our thinking he is the grandest fig
2109., our task is fully done and the slight labor it has Simon de Montfort belongs to cos
2110.ibute trious we would fain offer to the memory of the illus Montfort falls far own des
2111.ory of the illus Montfort falls far own desire, we Simon de Montfort short of our subj
2112.e words of Horace: On I I this earth; I will tarry no longer but victorious o er env
2113.he not be cities of men. the portals of death; the waters of Styx. shall not pass awa
2114.mmed round by Not for Hush me raise the death-dirge, my urn shall be empty; the vain
2115.CHRIST IN HIS CHURCH: A CATHOLIC CHURCH HISTORY, Translated and adapted from the German
2116.irst in the Catacombs. concise Catholic History of the Church ever published in English
2117.s day, that the noblest examples of all other virtues have never been wanting among P
2118.od should purchase the volume. It makes one love the Catholic Irish character. The
2119.hould purchase the volume. It makes one love the Catholic Irish character. The work
2120. times that all may recognize the happy truth that the grandest charac teristic of th
2121.h priest who has learned to know and to love Ireland s The work in question admirabl
2122.d sons and daughters. genuine Christian truth and piety." Catholic Columbian. Th
2123.o, whilst he praises, does not lack the courage which marks the true The Catholic Fires
2124. the true The Catholic Fireside. friend courage to admonish of a fault." "Whe
2125. of the soil, they 7^he Irish American. will feel proud of this tribute to their fai
2126.is nation of laborers, by whose efforts Religion is preserved and extended. Every Cathol
2127. preserved and extended. Every Catholic will derive benefit from a perusal of the bo
2128.t; Hibernian Record. book that contains many interesting illustrations of the devoti
2129. should be read in every Irish Catholic family." New York Sunday " told &quo
2130.ot; . . . We k "A Union. have seen many books neither so well brought out nor c
2131.author had varied opportuni interesting matter sold for over three times the price. ti
2132.information well and simply told." Law rence, Mass., Catholic Herald. "We
2133.uot;We hope every reader of the Monitor will secure a copy of it, in order to learn
2134.n this country for San very faithfully. many years, and has been translated by Misss
2135.a deserved interesting book people, but will prove appreciative and instructive to t
2136.il to be gratified and thankful for his good opinion of us." Richmond, Va., Cat
2137. be gratified and thankful for his good opinion of us." Richmond, Va., Catholic Vi

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/