Concordance for Harry Dee, or, Making it out / by Francis J. Finn.

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1.   of the Snows The Best Foot Forward; and Other Mostly Boys. Short Stories His First an
2. s His First and Last Appearance But Thy Love and Thy Grace Stories Copyright, 1892,
3. I. my . uncle have a passage at arms, a will is read, . and . I go to sleep in . an
4. o to sleep in . an unhappy frame of . . mind, . . . 15 CHAPTER In III. . which I awa
5. e very gloomy years enter upon a new V. life, . . .26 new CHAPTER In which I fall ou
6. h a young rascal, fall in with friends, one of whom falls upon St. said young rasca
7. t in the and are prepared nation in the other, ....... XI. failure, . , one and an ex
8. in the other, ....... XI. failure, . , one and an exami65 CHAPTER In which Percy W
9. ater, Tom Playfair which, as the reader will find . has an important bearing upon th
10. s . rescue, .176 CHAPTER In which Percy time in his XXII. first . Wynn life, . goes
11. ch Percy time in his XXII. first . Wynn life, . goes barefoot for the . . . . and on
12. y of throws new light on the my uncle's death, ..... 210 CHAPTER In which Mrs. introd
13. APTER XXX. In which I have the doubtful pleasure of renewing Mr. 242 James Caggett's acq
14. ett makes a startling disclosure and my life, .... I . pass 262 CHAPTER XXXIV. In wh
15. g without telling somewhat my own early history. And, to begin wich, the reader must kn
16. in throwing my father and mother into a state of terror by an extraordinary piece of
17. r by an extraordinary piece of conduct. One night my mother, who had a habit of ste
18. conduct. One night my mother, who had a habit of stealing to my little bed to tuck me
19. ce. down our garden walk. Of course the family doctor was called 8 HARRY asked DEE. He
20. ged the usual fee. The doctor's learned opinion of my case was on the point of bringing
21. dency to walk in my sleep, and that its being an idiosyncrasy of mine was another way
22. ook and house-maid, leaving Willie in a state of perplexity not to be described. The
23. exity not to be described. The doctor's opinion, however, did not reassure my mother. T
24. uld charm my dream-haunted fancies into peace. One morning it was in my ninth year I
25. rm my dream-haunted fancies into peace. One morning it was in my ninth year I awoke
26. awoke bright and early, and, as was my custom, kissed the hand that clasped mine. But
27. which I had never seen before, a weird beauty not of this world, which caused me to l
28. seen before, a weird beauty not of this world, which caused me to leap from my bed an
29. ame. My dear mother gave m<, no answer. God had called her away. — — XO I HARRY
30. had called her away. — — XO I HARRY life. DEE. pass over in silence this, the su
31. t to my father that it would not be The death of my prudent to leave me unguarded. mo
32. eration, chose the least of son of nor. many evils, as they thought, in the pera wom
33. her answers, while giving evidence of a good education, and, indeed, of no little re
34. nswers, while giving evidence of a good education, and, indeed, of no little refinement,
35. I was not so difficult to please in the matter as my elders. What does the small boy c
36. leasant answers to all my questions and many a gorgeous Eastern tale to while away a
37. to me. In brief, I came very shortly to love her much and though my father and the d
38. d accents of my dear mother. There were other gracious resemblances, moreover, which
39. came about quite naturally in course of time that I began to call her mamma. There w
40. her by that endearing name. Nor at the time did it seem as though I had in anywise
41. nce of a child's innocent, unsuspecting love. go to prove, was within a little of wr
42. ove, was within a little of wrecking my life. Every term of affection was afterward
43. afternoon and night she was my contime. love, as after-events That stant attendant W
44. o soothe me and my wanderings. first My love grew of with the months, and served to
45. room, reading for the tenth or eleventh time the absorbing tale of " Ali Baba and th
46. and greet him To me his return was ever one of the at the door. pleasantest moments
47. had been face to face the bugaboo of my life. The inwith me only once, but that was
48. ut that was enough. terview was a short one, yet short as it was my uncle had spoke
49. l who came in contact with him. The had man was universally detested. From all I he
50. rough; for he's really making a show of being genial. Look at — this!" And unbutton
51. eriences he was unable to reconcile his knowledge of my uncle with the warmth of affectio
52. ted on my wish thus curtly expressed in being gratified by the this letter, he was ce
53. bered. " B-b-b-because he's an ugly old man; and he " I away out in my grief grew m
54. d speak of my " brother as an 'ugly old man.' I realized that I T began to feel unc
55. red not go." cried, catching her hand, "will my father. I'll "Then My father changed
56. ss you very much while you're gone; but will be better that some one else go with yo
57. u're gone; but will be better that some one else go with you." "But, mamma, I want
58. peed to to my uncle's That night proved life. be an eventful one in my CHAPTER II. I
59. That night proved life. be an eventful one in my CHAPTER II. IN WHICH MRS. RA YNOR
60. AND MY UNCLE HA VE A PASSAGE AT ARMS, A WILL IS READ, AND I GO TO SLEEP IN AN UNHAPP
61. ND I GO TO SLEEP IN AN UNHAPPY FRAME OF MIND. TOWER pile, HILL MANSION, though " a s
62. e. 17 Your nurse wasn't invited all Wo- man," he added, and of his voice the rusty
63. d face to face with this forbidding old man, she manifested that there were other s
64. old man, she manifested that there were other smouldering fires in her bosom; for the
65. led me Previous to the first with awe. "God knows," "this to, is she cried, still h
66. s woman which seemed to pierce his very soul; and when my attendant had uttered thes
67. r heard her make allusion to her former history, my uncle gave a gasp was it fear or an
68. se hang- ing over ing, it, and some day will fall." And turn- we were leaving "Hold
69. re leaving "Hold on! Stay! the library. One minute!" How the old rheumatic hinges o
70. man, you "I'll have to give in for this time. may stay." I won't stay," returned Mrs
71. s. Raynor, her " It is not enough, O my God, that voice trembling. he should have b
72. me away from this awful place." The old man lifted his hand to tion. secure our att
73. . I DEE. 19 was harsh. I I see that you love that boy. For his sake, ask you to stay
74. 's future career; and I have made up my mind that Harry is to spend the night here a
75. poke, that a of the Christmas spirit of peace and good-will shone in his cold, hard i
76. a of the Christmas spirit of peace and good-will shone in his cold, hard it is eye.
77. the Christmas spirit of peace and good-will shone in his cold, hard it is eye. In t
78. for me much of that wretched, loveless man. made answer: "For Harry's sake I will
79. s man. made answer: "For Harry's sake I will stay." "Very well," said my uncle calml
80. had admitted us into the house. In the matter of downright ugliness he set quite a fa
81. ome parently yellowed with age. — — time in his hands, then, without further pre
82. mething to this effect: " I, James Dee, being and bequeath all of sound mind, do here
83. es Dee, being and bequeath all of sound mind, do hereby Revise my money and all my p
84. ind and value soever to 21 my serv- ing-man, James Caggett. The old man here raised
85. y serv- ing-man, James Caggett. The old man here raised his eyes and threw his boy,
86. er and I, explained, " and I made up my mind not get one cent of as the my money. ma
87. lained, " and I made up my mind not get one cent of as the my money. man who'd see
88. nd not get one cent of as the my money. man who'd see to that. Caggett struck me Bu
89. lood is blood. are. Caggett's not of my family and you Besides," strain of continued t
90. of continued the old gentleman, in the same simplicity and candor, "I hate Caggett.
91. and read in substance: " I, James Dee, being of sound mind, do hereby devise and beq
92. bstance: " I, James Dee, being of sound mind, do hereby devise and bequeath erty and
93. e are others to consider, Mr. James am, will you promise to make some restitution to
94. sband ?" "We'll talk about that another time, woman." "But look! fifty You are in I
95. sand dollars. it, claim that money, and will get too," 22 " HARRY Another time, woma
96. , and will get too," 22 " HARRY Another time, woman." DEB. "Now's the time," continu
97. Y Another time, woman." DEB. "Now's the time," continued Mrs. Raynor, in a solemn vo
98. oice. " Can you promise yourself a long life? You're an old man." My uncle looked at
99. ise yourself a long life? You're an old man." My uncle looked at her quite mildly.
100. dly. "Yes," he said slowly, "I'm an old man an old man. Boy," he continued, turning
101. he said slowly, "I'm an old man an old man. Boy," he continued, turning to me, "I
102. business first. — Women both, please sign this will as witnesses." The "women bot
103. first. — Women both, please sign this will as witnesses." The "women both" complie
104. to Whereupon my me with, "You're a rich man now, response to which boy." Then he pu
105. t, the bell, in show fire this is woman good the boy's room, and order. see that the
106. seven, in Breakfast at woman, dinner at one." Then, taking my hand, he conducted me
107. could ever have called him an ugly old man Now he looked quite like my father. HAR
108. oke "Breakfast at seven, boy; dinner at one. Go to bed." And before I had recovered
109. covered from my surprise at this abrupt change he was seated at his desk, and its with
110. s communicative that night. of her past history. In a voice broken with emotion she rel
111. er past history. In a voice broken with emotion she related something It was a feel tal
112. ved a very dark chapter in my I uncle's life. it I do not at liberty, nor consider p
113. er in my I uncle's life. it I do not at liberty, nor consider pertinent to my narrative
114. driven from and as allowed play. — my memory God dim dream for I write I to forgive
115. from and as allowed play. — my memory God dim dream for I write I to forgive me
116. ld have been by the sweet sentiments of peace and love, I yielded to such passions as
117. en by the sweet sentiments of peace and love, I yielded to such passions as I humbly
118. tered a short gasp of terror. the first time in years I awoke to find myself alone!
119. lt with came forth from the chambers of memory and fought hand to hand with the sombre
120. sombre terrors of the present. Was not God present? Could bolts and bars lock out
121. esent? Could bolts and bars lock out my angel guardian? My cries died away. Gradually
122. nees and prayed to "Help! help! — — God for help. Then I breathed a short ejacu
123. eared to assent to that answer which my mind suggested again and again: "Your uncle
124. ake his title to fifty thousand dollars good he has become a murderer." While absorb
125. ne." And he threw open the door. I took one look, gave a scream of horror, and what
126. ce had been enough. ture still is in my memory, I have not the heart to reproduce it
127. whom I had, in all a child's unstinted love, given the sacred name of mother! CHAPT
128. HREE VERY GLOOMY YEARS ENTER UPON A NEW LIFE. I WHEN my ing over came to my senses I
129. dear boy. did it?" " No, indeed, my No one but that The whole wretched Caggett eve
130. hatred to your uncle, partly with the desire to make away with some money which she
131. nurse, after dabbling your night-shirt wilL with blood, killed so as to lead us to
132. "Well, it seems that the miserable old man had a habit of sleeping with a large su
133. seems that the miserable old man had a habit of sleeping with a large sum of money b
134. s, testifies to his certain in who knew knowledge the sum Caggett, fifty my brother's kee
135. lowed her. Nor was Mrs. Raynor the onlv one to disappear- Nevertheless, Mrs. Raynor
136. The two nights they spent in my uncle's death had been nights of Each had a tale of s
137. ry of the furniture, books, and general state Caggett went about this work nobody kno
138. nd brought the the keys to my father no sign of happy human life, no sweet prattle a
139. eys to my father no sign of happy human life, no sweet prattle and silvery laughter
140. from mouth to mouth and in course ; of time my uncle's name ceased to be uttered an
141. me to be called the "haunted house." to Many of these details were I made known was
142. wn was in me long afterward, for at the time no condition HARRY to learn tbem. DEE.
143. I came off the conqueror not without of death. loss. My sleep-walking habit, it is tr
144. ithout of death. loss. My sleep-walking habit, it is true, disappeared with the brain
145. e years that ensued were the unhappiest life. my The memory as it of Mrs. Raynor to
146. ensued were the unhappiest life. my The memory as it of Mrs. Raynor to me, yet so crue
147. ow quivered blanched into the horror of Life, so gay went in sleepless hours of the
148. ys, offered me little now as it hideous death, came and to look forward to. My father
149. stressed at my condition. He counted on time to cure me, but he was disappointed. Fi
150. concluded that the active, stirring boy-life of boarding-school might prove the best
151. YOUNG RASCAL, FALL IN WITH NEW FRIENDS, ONE OF WHOM FALLS UPON SAID YOUNG RASCAL, A
152. nce took was ignorant of the direction. many things, though it failed to discover th
153. n, with as ill-favored a countenance as one would meet with in a year and a eye the
154. ll do it for fifty cents." I was at the time a very timid boy, but this was too much
155. !" I cried. "Yah'" ejaculated the young man, swinging closed and his tongue stickin
156. ise behind his back and facing me, with one eye unmistak- able derision. I stepped
157. the ance, only to find that things were same situation as when I began; if anything,
158. situation as when I began; if anything, one of his eyes was closed more tightly, an
159. g for — Caggett, indeed, was the only one ever brushed up against, —»and me se
160. ne ever brushed up against, —»and me sense of justice prevented a moment I the ide
161. rushed up against, —»and me sense of justice prevented a moment I the idea of giving
162. nse of justice prevented a moment I the idea of giving the fellow a quarter, yet I "
163. .air highway" No quarter, no grip-sack, man, running aside. bub." " I say, handover
164. voice struck me as he spoke gested the other. with its wondrous sweetness. "That's a
165. s)f pursuer and pursued. While, on the one hand, Donnel was handicapped by the gam
166. the game-bag, this disadvantage, on the other, was counterbalanced by the valise whic
167. el's overtaking his opponent was only a matter of a few minutes. surely Donnel was nea
168. n, boys, as fast as you can. Maybe John will need our help." At the word soon left h
169. n left his companion shot on ahead, and many yards behind. does me good to see Percy
170. n ahead, and many yards behind. does me good to see Percy run," continued my compani
171. John's taking the game-sack. down in no time, once he's got that off. John, who was
172. ourselves by the side of our champion. "Will you fight?" exclaimed the fallen highwa
173. u fight?" exclaimed the fallen highway* man, picking himself up and directing a sav
174. ," he answered after a pause. "How much time will you give me for training?" continu
175. answered after a pause. "How much time will you give me for training?" continued Do
176. isters and — still lives." "Don't you mind that Tom," said Percy, taking my hand a
177. "he's always poking fun at me." In the matter of hair, there was no doubt that Tom wa
178. boys; and I may add that the passing of many years has not weakened that impression.
179. Dee. I've been unwell said. for a long time; and my father thought that the bustlin
180. ather thought that the bustling, active life in a boarding-college might give tone t
181. ghing. before and after meals," he said good-humoredly. must admit that Tom's remark
182. emarks were to the At this period of my life I was intensely solemn and very thin. M
183. had a trick of quivering in and out of time, due no doubt to the state of my I poin
184. in and out of time, due no doubt to the state of my I point. nerves. "You'll grow fat
185. get a new boy every day. Tom, it's your time to treat." " What shall it be ?" asked
186. mething new to me. Neither of them said one word smacking of piety, and yet I could
187. hort steps like a pigeon, and the first time he threw a ball he hit John Donnel on t
188. aling slide. He can run farther in less time than afraid to any fellow in the yard."
189. the small yard, John was looked upon as one of the best second-basemen in the colle
190. t of intuition they seldom judge amiss. form lasting friendships where the older and
191. himself fortunate who finds it an easy matter to win the love and confidence of the y
192. who finds it an easy matter to win the love and confidence of the young; and, looki
193. I saw them on that red-letter day of my life. Tom, stout, brown, ruddy, with his fac
194. as a certain delicacy about his person, form, and feature even his clothes seemed to
195. ose lent an — HARRY DEE. 3f exquisite beauty to his exquisite complexion. face, regu
196. ous memories, and I cry from my heart, "God bless them!" The conversation on our ne
197. t year, when we get Humanities, we've a chance to compete for an intercollegiate gold
198. ollegiate gold medal to be given to the one who writes the best Latin theme; now we
199. our end here at St. Maure' against the other six colleges that are in it." "And besi
200. , "and it's his last year After that he will go off and study of teaching. And if we
201. and study of teaching. And if we don'J theology and come back a priest. give him a send
202. aid Tom, grasping my " We're none of us particular who gets the hand. medal, provided it c
203. hand. medal, provided it comes to some one in our class. But if we all work close
204. f we all work close together we'll help one another and maybe carry " off some of t
205. f the honors." There are nine places of honor, and there are till seven boys in our c
206. are going to work from now next April, one year, to get in their names. There's Pe
207. self, and Joe Whyte and Harry Quip, and Will Ruthers and Joe Richards, and yourself.
208. lk we came to an agreement to help each other in this wise: The "big six," as called
209. in return was to go over with them the particular letters of Cicero which it had been my
210. d, and before he looked up I obtained a good view of his face in profile. I took him
211. his face in profile. I took him to be a man of books and of a somewhat saturnine di
212. His greeting was indeed cordial. After-experience proved to me that I had been deceived b
213. ly, perhaps; for I am convinced that by nature Father Delmar was severe, but grace had
214. as severe, but grace had triumphed over nature, and he had won the secret of sweetness
215. had won the secret of sweetness from a life of selfdenial. "Now, Tom," we place Har
216. y, I congratulate you on meeting He's a good boy, a very good boy, but he's There ar
217. you on meeting He's a good boy, a very good boy, but he's There are others." not al
218. each thinks nothing of himself and each other. the world of But now for your examinat
219. nothing of himself and each other. the world of But now for your examination." The p
220. exhibiting my ignorance to him than my knowledge " first to others. I'll have to stand b
221. air in English, and somewhat wanting in history and geography, which you must make up b
222. private study. Now, my boy, go, and may God bless you." Well," he said at length, "
223. did. to St. Maure's, over my and Percy. being in his class fully as much as Tom It st
224. ertain freshHe was a in its best little man in and breeziness of youth. every sense
225. e man in and breeziness of youth. every sense of the word and a boy In all his sense.
226. sense of the word and a boy In all his sense. dealings with us lads he never seemed
227. as much at home with my new friends as one of my temperament and I was taken with
228. 5 me a pair of piercingly "I think he's one he's of the nicest boys I ever met; —
229. charming," he echoed. Why?" "That's a good word. He almost and I was unable to giv
230. I grew so nervous that I "Do " you like mathematics?" Not much, I'm sorry to say." serious
231. diately brightened up and added: "Well, good fellows don't like things proved. like
232. is the best boy 4"& &ARRY I DEE. in the world. else, don't say anything against any o
233. d. else, don't say anything against any one you understand; but all the same I'll p
234. nst any one you understand; but all the same I'll put my money on Percy every time.
235. e same I'll put my money on Percy every time. Now don't you forget that, please," an
236. o boarding-college escape the ordeal of being teased. Nervous and timid, I had looked
237. his stern novitiate in ticipate, my new life. But, to an- my classmates by some agre
238. the ball. gave him an out-curve. "Very good!" he cried. "That was a big one. Now le
239. "Very good!" he cried. "That was a big one. Now let's see your in-shoot." Tom misj
240. he ex;, aimed, returning me the ball " same way." This time he held it. " Goodness!
241. returning me the ball " same way." This time he held it. " Goodness! but that's the
242. hat's certain. Now let's try your drop. idea how glad I am. That's good enough, too,
243. y your drop. idea how glad I am. That's good enough, too," he remarked as he caught
244. it subject. Stop your wobbling and talk sense." Thus adjured, Harry Quip, supporting
245. nfidently believed, obtain a holiday as being the two hundred and fiftieth boy of the
246. d. My arrival was greeted with a cheer. Other enthusiasts joined themselves to Tom an
247. right," said Percy, who was the calmest one of the party. In fact, he rarely lost h
248. this college, I am told, there were not one hundred and twenty-five boys in actual
249. ercy's pretty speech am tempted to make one myself." Here the boys became very seri
250. rridor and broke into the yard with the good tidings throughout the CHAPTER IN WHICH
251. sor, more than equalled had been led to form of him. The boys of his class to a man
252. form of him. The boys of his class to a man (excuse the bull) were So was Mr. Middl
253. conMr. Middleton was ducted much in the same way. equally enthusiastic; the boys, to
254. yte, Richards, Ruthers, and a number of other boys whose names I did not know at the
255. boys whose names I did not know at the time joined us. "You see," said Frank to me,
256. ng; that's to prevent accidents. It's a good idea, isn't it?" HARRY '"It DEE, 51 cer
257. hat's to prevent accidents. It's a good idea, isn't it?" HARRY '"It DEE, 51 certainl
258. litanies, while the others, with every sign of reverence, responded " Pray for us "
259. true Catholic faith It and devotion was world in itself alive in the college. was a l
260. tmosphere of play and study. a Catholic world. I had been not a little astonished whe
261. ound of the bell, the scene of bustling life and play in the yard was at once change
262. n upon his ears, stood stock-still noon-time at the while reciting the angelical sal
263. the tagger tagged, and the gay-innocent life went on all the more merrily for that s
264. errily for that sweet interruption. The same litanies. spirit showed itself in the r
265. the recital of the All joined in with a will; and sight of the river. thus in prayer
266. n. too "It reminds me," said Tom, "of a man I knew who had a liver complaint, I thi
267. t on we selected a place if it Looks as many cigarettes," for undressing. " I'm afra
268. Tom, throw- ing his jacket. "Are you a good swimmer, take a Harry?" "No, Tom, I'm h
269. nsin on the shore of the prettiest lake one could wish to see. We went in swimming
270. sappeared. Suddenly there arose another form at his side, as it It was were from out
271. blood marked his sinking for the second time. 4 clear voice now arose. 54 HARRY DEE.
272. 54 HARRY DEE. "Percy and Tom go on, in God's name! Every one else out of the water
273. rcy and Tom go on, in God's name! Every one else out of the water." All of us haste
274. water. They were magnificent swimmers. One would almost think that they were racin
275. ed around and about them. discovered no sign of Frank's presence. Then, as with one
276. sign of Frank's presence. Then, as with one impulse, they dived. The place whither
277. Middleton had not been idle in the mean time. Throwing off his coat and shoes, he no
278. e was a groan of dismay from the shore. Many of the boys sank upon their knees as Mr
279. llness Second after second passed. only sign of movement or life came from Tom and P
280. second passed. only sign of movement or life came from Tom and Percy, who were tread
281. m was by his side at once, and catching one of Frank's hands, helped his prefect sh
282. there was reason for our joy, since no one was harmed and Frank had recovered cons
283. IN THE INFIRMARY. "'T^HAT Middleton is one of the pluckiest 1 men alive," observed
284. got to the words, 'Pray the hour of our death' Yes!" put I it and, really, That was m
285. and would you believe it? I didn't feel one bit scared. No, sir; I wasn't afraid of
286. bit scared. No, sir; I wasn't afraid of death, and I just began saying the Hail Mary
287. n I got to 'now, and at the hour of our death, amen,' I felt a hand clutching my arm,
288. e of us said the looks as though at the same sweet prayer very same time." "That's j
289. as though at the same sweet prayer very same time." "That's just my opinion," added
290. ough at the same sweet prayer very same time." "That's just my opinion," added Tom,
291. prayer very same time." "That's just my opinion," added Tom, and &> HARRY fell DEE. it
292. to thinking. Miracle or not, came home life, to us that prayer was a practical part
293. ractical part of the and that Mother of God had not been deaf to the wishes of her
294. , crippled himself in "you remember the time Percy running you down out toward I!" P
295. indeed, sir." the infirmary?' "Well, a good thing will stand repetition. You and Pe
296. r." the infirmary?' "Well, a good thing will stand repetition. You and Percy and Fra
297. etition. You and Percy and Frank need a good rest this afternoon So you needn't mind
298. good rest this afternoon So you needn't mind and a late sleep to-morrow. Don't get u
299. e staying overnight who And by the way, will say mass at half-past eight. your nervo
300. e Brother has promised me to give you a good supper." And Mr. Middleton cut short To
301. o the he dashed others. communicate the good word 5^ HARRY I DEE. And now for that s
302. t bring myself to narrate how pen these life-rescuers demolished the viands. prosaic
303. with much force that because a boy I is good one has no right to grudge him health a
304. much force that because a boy I is good one has no right to grudge him health and a
305. ssly in bed for half an hour, when some one touched me on the arm. I turned and per
306. 1 ness. saw you I guessed what was the matter." "I don't understand you, Tom." "Well,
307. " I almost leaped from the bed. "Pretty good guess, wasn't it?" Tom went on "But it'
308. ll tell me yours, won't you?" "Indeed I will, Tom." I'm told your mother is dead 'Al
309. ace with a sympathy rare and strange in one of his years. "Yes," I said softly; and
310. r far worse than dead, my eyes filled. "Same way with me," said Tom gently. "I just
311. ake the You take her too." place of the one I've lost. For a few moments we were bo
312. anked him in broken words. ful power of happiness goes forth in a little kindBut Tom was
313. ngside of yours, without disturbing the other fellows. Now, if you get nervous or sca
314. they'd DEE. who wouldn't have done the same known you were so nervous. You see, I c
315. w how it is myself. A little before the time of Jimmy Aldine's thing death tell I ha
316. before the time of Jimmy Aldine's thing death tell I had the horrors everv ni^ht near
317. you haven't forgotten it, either. Well, good- night. letters Remember, to-morrow." w
318. ry our hands on Cicero's And making the sign of the cross, Tom closed his eyes and v
319. te words. Yes, Tom had "ministered to a mind diseased." His kind words hovered brigh
320. His kind words hovered brightly in rny memory, and soon conducted me into the very br
321. ot in dreamland the spot consecrated to love, and purity, and innocence, and ever ha
322. and came from the chapel for class. in time to get our books a long tete-a-tete. At
323. t our books a long tete-a-tete. At noon-time Tom and I had told him the dramatic inc
324. ents he listened with no little I of my life, to which I astonishment. When tad conc
325. s. You loved your nurse pretty much the same as though she were your mother. Now, th
326. e that a small boy seldom misses in the matter of likes and dislikes. Now, if nurse ki
327. the greatest shock was the thought that one I had loved so much should prove so bas
328. and loving. I can't say that she at any time acted queerly." " She might have killed
329. didn't kill I him in cold blood." this opinion of was inexpressibly soothed by Tom's.
330. ed?" " I can't say for certain, Tom. No one goes near it, but everybody says it is"
331. like that for granted. Now, I've got an idea which it won't do any harm to carry out
332. row some light on the subject? It's the same lots of way in life, I reckon, as in bo
333. e subject? It's the same lots of way in life, I reckon, as in books. We make bad blu
334. ake bad blunders simply because we take one little Now, I really don't thing or ano
335. nother for granted. see what that house being haunted or not haunted At any has to do
336. but ~uaybe it has. Now, here's rate, it will do no harm to find out. my plan. Next v
337. d out. my plan. Next vacation you and I will spend a night in your uncle's house. sc
338. iend. "But next spring I'll ask you the same question, and I'm perfectly sure that y
339. that you'll say yes." "I doubt it." "No matter; and, Harry, if you don't mind I'll tel
340. ." "No matter; and, Harry, if you don't mind I'll tell Percy all about the matter. Y
341. on't mind I'll tell Percy all about the matter. You can trust Percy a thousand miles f
342. rtainly, Tom, tell Percy." I From after-knowledge did not believe am now certain that Tom
343. hing after his heart. During the day my imagination, despite my en- deavors to the contrary
344. an extreme these With evening haunting state of nervousness. There they came, as I t
345. t me. I say gazing at me, for I know no other form of words to give the reader an ade
346. I say gazing at me, for I know no other form of words to give the reader an adequate
347. of words to give the reader an adequate idea of the manner in which these This pictu
348. as a mother soothes her Percy, the only one of all who has scream. He is been disco
349. master of himself, and the not is only emotion upon his expressive face intelligent sy
350. . "Wake Mr. Middleton, say, " chattered one of the boys nearest me. Strange to slee
351. eorge," whispered " We can arrange this matter ourselves. take Harry over to the infir
352. infirmary. I shall say Percy was not an angel, for angels are not made of clay; but a
353. smile and his gracious It is a fragrant memory. words, as from out his blue eyes there
354. is blue eyes there shown that unselfish love which is not of the earth earthy, I tha
355. h is not of the earth earthy, I thanked God from my heart for this object-lesson in
356. lesson in the sublime nobility of human nature. CHAPTER U* WHICH X. WE DIVIDE OUR ATTE
357. , AND ARE PREPARED FOR A CONTEST fN THE ONE AND AN EXAMINA TION IN THE OTHER. I of
358. T fN THE ONE AND AN EXAMINA TION IN THE OTHER. I of THE nervous attackwas, which spok
359. n but for a few innings, yet he gave me many words of encouragement. " Just wait,
360. ard a trick or two." It was his darling idea to was ambitious. play and defeat the J
361. ys \is the right place and at the right time. Fairly strong at the bat, he was at hi
362. base than any Third base was covered by one of our players. Charles Richards. He wa
363. . Percy was the left fielder; he He had one weak point, and that was in throwing. c
364. a knack, which few fielders possess, of being able to judge a fly almost as soon was
365. st point. I was on was evident to every one that more speed the big boys would knoc
366. ock out two and three baggers almost at will. On the other hand, it was admitted tha
367. nd three baggers almost at will. On the other hand, it was admitted that my curves we
368. t was admitted that my curves were very good and that my command of the ball was unu
369. ention to Percy and myself. In the mean time studies went on briskly. How our set di
370. the Latin class-hour in trying to catch one another. In this Percy was As for knowl
371. h one another. In this Percy was As for knowledge the quickest and Tom next. This, I coul
372. had a private tutor to help me and more time to give to the It was clear to me that
373. ear to me that for taking in new study. matter Tom and Percy were easily my superiors,
374. ery least be on a par with me in actual knowledge of the language. Nor did we confine our
375. par with me in actual knowledge of the language. Nor did we confine ourselves to the cl
376. the thing new. others had all read the same authors. We would liked to have Mr. Mid
377. see it again Archia Poeta with you. in poetry class; but even so, you'll not lose by
378. d, imitated, and memou Pro Archia rized one hundred and fifty lines of 4< ' ; Poeta
379. eally did like Latin; and we really did love Mr. Middleton; and we really did hope t
380. fered a prize for the first wee^ to the one who should make the most blunders. —
381. second. After a month the prize was the one who should make the least blunders; and
382. s that are connected with the prettiest time of all the year. The small boy loves li
383. me of all the year. The small boy loves life; and therefore he loves spring. To him
384. Eighty pounds." And what is it now ?" " One hundred and three," " HARRY " I DEE. 7*
385. pril we're going to play the large boys one game." "Only one?" I inquired. "Well, y
386. to play the large boys one game." "Only one?" I inquired. "Well, yes," answered Tom
387. nquired. "Well, yes," answered Tom. "It will be too much of a strain on us to tackle
388. sides, either we'll beat them the first time or we "So, you see, I won't. If we do,
389. ur class-specimen to come off about the same time?" " That's what I've counted on,"
390. ass-specimen to come off about the same time?" " That's what I've counted on," said
391. n his hand." Tom conquer the boy was of opinion that the same energy which difficulties
392. conquer the boy was of opinion that the same energy which difficulties could conquer
393. lass-room was a freak, a lusus natures. matter of fact, all of his players were as qui
394. n in hours of study, and then when play-time came they breathed in the vernal glorie
395. more joyously that they had done their duty. And so the time flew till April 12th a
396. at they had done their duty. And so the time flew till April 12th arrived — the mo
397. EETS WITH A FAILURE. the THE president, vice-president, and dean of faculty honored
398. n were first The boys, taken as subject-matter for examination. thoroughly drilled as
399. they had been all along in The Precepts memory work, answered with such the lapse of f
400. ake them on something where we'll get a chance of puzzling them." Then came the tug of
401. of puzzling them." Then came the tug of war. HARRY Sallust, bristling with DEE. 73
402. n, and here they've been parading their knowledge for over an hour. Can't you give us a h
403. ey have seen in the text-book. I should state, in justice to the class, however, that
404. en in the text-book. I should state, in justice to the class, however, that they did no
405. dear boys, promise to give a fine book one among you who holds out the longest ing
406. teacher shall be the referee; when any one makes a blunder Mr. Middleton will rule
407. n any one makes a blunder Mr. Middleton will rule him out." Playfair, Percy, Quip, W
408. n 74 HARRY DEE. the specimen, bat, as a matter of private work, we had repeatedly gone
409. d repeatedly gone over our author, each one o f us in turn building sentences in En
410. us rendering them into Latin similar in form and idiom to the style of Sallust. Othe
411. the examiners were hard at us, pelting One by one we were us with simple sentences
412. aminers were hard at us, pelting One by one we were us with simple sentences. asked
413. ual, and steadied us. "Stick up for the honor of the class, boys," he whispered. " Do
414. Your contest in off-hand theme-work is one in which — — boys of higher classes
415. of higher classes seldom come off with honor. Certainly, if you can write Latin as y
416. write Latin as you speak it, there's a chance, and a good chance too, for you to For
417. s you speak it, there's a chance, and a good chance too, for you to For the rest of
418. speak it, there's a chance, and a good chance too, for you to For the rest of the car
419. surprise. Of course, we had a pleasant time of it. Percy made light of his failure.
420. humbled me very much to fail. But to my mind nothing succeeds like failure." And the
421. ion ?" said, after concluding prayers, "will you be good enough to promise to pay cl
422. after concluding prayers, "will you be good enough to promise to pay close 76 HARRY
423. RY DEE. "Yes, sir! Yes, sir!" exclaimed many. "We'll do our level best, Mr. Middleto
424. our baseball uniforms foi the first Tom time this afternoon?" sir!" cried six voices
425. s afternoon?" sir!" cried six voices as one. "Yes, "And "No, you're going to be bea
426. Middleton paused, while the boys gazed one another ruefully. " at Because," contin
427. m as mascot and scorer at our head. The other boys of the small yard, who had been aw
428. st the home plate and stood awaiting my pleasure. " One ball," called the umpire as my f
429. plate and stood awaiting my pleasure. " One ball," called the umpire as my first pi
430. ched ball curved away from the plate. " One strike," as the second curved in and ov
431. first came He could hardly do anything One would never have imagined except look p
432. but he's gained strength, and physical courage, and endurance. Some of the boys sneere
433. Percy contrived to bother the pitcher a good deal. One ball and one strike were call
434. ived to bother the pitcher a good deal. One ball and one strike were called; then t
435. r the pitcher a good deal. One ball and one strike were called; then two balls. Per
436. base-running from him. They know he's a good runner, and they know, too, that Playfa
437. ak a batter first on his list without a good reason." And now Tom stood near first b
438. e exception of the Blue Clippers, every one was nonplussed. This was the first time
439. one was nonplussed. This was the first time within the experience of any one that c
440. sed. This was the first time within the experience of any one that coaching had been done
441. first time within the experience of any one that coaching had been done by algebrai
442. raight and low to Donnel in the nick of time to touch the runner. This was the white
443. ng ball. Hardly; and even if he does he will scarcely hold it. Now he is almost unde
444. what I call fielding," said the second Will he get his hands on it? ! — 6 8? HARR
445. es hoarse. At length, in obedience to a sign from Torn, Percy touched his cap, where
446. nd took first. O'Connor followed up the good work by popping a fly into short right
447. a fly into short right field, where no one could get it; Cleary made third on it.
448. rd on it. Things were now in a critical state. O'Connor started for second as soon as
449. o the runner on third made for home. no time; his catching the ball and touching the
450. ; then he returned it quickly to Tom in time to touch Cleary out on home, thus accom
451. o he made it a study to get his base by other than hard hitting. He bunted the third
452. eary. his great " slide;" For the third time Percy the ball and he "Out on third." T
453. after petition was proffered him to the same effect. The most furious spectator was
454. , It should he used some rather profane language. be remembered that poor little Frank's
455. mud-eye. I'll thrash you and your whole family." This was too much for the umpire. He
456. th a few kind yet reproving words, to a sense of his scandalous behavior. Drew, the c
457. as now giving the umpire a piece of his mind, and Tom, who, with an impassive face,
458. ere balls. now two men on bases and but one out. A slow grounder from Earle's bat t
459. with whom he was popular. Tom gave me a sign for a low ball, but unfortunately I pit
460. all, but unfortunately I pitched a high one; and Hudson sent it on a line Both runn
461. hrow from Quip nipped him at the plate. One — run. Keenan for our side knocked an
462. in to O'Malley caught it, and recovered time to throw out Keenan in his attempt the
463. second. Poulin reached He was advanced one bag by Bennett's out at first. Cleary k
464. aptain, then came in and helped to make life unpleasant for the umpire. As for the c
465. crowd their sympathies were with Percy. Many 86 HARRY DEE. thought that he had made
466. lundered. The squabbling went on. Every man on our nine came in save Percy and Quip
467. e out when I'm not, through his own bad judgment, I grin and bear it; in the same way, i
468. ad judgment, I grin and bear it; in the same way, if he declares me to have put a ma
469. me way, if he declares me to have put a man out when I haven't, I grin the more." P
470. I haven't, I grin the more." Percy was good, but he was not goody-goody. His conduc
471. ody-goody. His conduct in baseball, you will notice, was consistent. When the umpire
472. ade none, he said nothing. acted on the principle that the umpire was umpire, and that so
473. game is yet to come, I think the reader will be willing to begin the sixth inning in
474. WITH TOM PLAYFAIR WHICH, AS THE READER WILL FIND OUT LATER, HAS AN IMPORTANT BEARIN
475. rst it inning. It had went further this time, and had not been for Percy's promptnes
476. s long fly to left was caught by Percy. chance for an assist For our side Keenan opene
477. ut. We began to recover from the and no one despondency into which we had been thro
478. ick. "Foul out," ruled the umpire. As a matter of fact Tom had not touched the ball. E
479. t length recovering himself, called for time. — Few if any of the spectators had d
480. be standing near the home plate at the time, had noticed it. "It's too bad," I said
481. can't be cured must be endured, All the same I'll see it doesn't happen reckon. Drew
482. f the delay. Earle realized that it was one. to been publicly exposed. Tom's genero
483. it that he had not The lesson proved a good after he treated Ever Tom with unaffect
484. itcher desperate. In vain did Drew call time to protest against this lingular system
485. objections; and showed was allowed any language which was not improper or indecent; "an
486. s for the pletely disappeared; and upon time had now comwas determined to give my op
487. short field. The shortstop, pressed for time, threw wide to first base. Percy again
488. eupon Tom began ; vowels of the English language in such wise that the pitcher lost his
489. He gave yard was preparing to cheer as one man. the third ball pitched him a vicio
490. gave yard was preparing to cheer as one man. the third ball pitched him a vicious b
491. lley had been playing far out for Tom's particular benefit, and with a side run succeeded
492. boys batted carelessly and went out in one-two-three order. Quip opened stole seco
493. on Richards' safe hit into right field. One run at last; another, and there would b
494. rd. The excitement was now intense. But one man out, but one run needed, Richards o
495. The excitement was now intense. But one man out, but one run needed, Richards on th
496. t was now intense. But one man out, but one run needed, Richards on third but, and
497. — 92 HARRY DEE. all ever got there no one could see; but. the same, he chased the
498. er got there no one could see; but. the same, he chased the ball on a dead run, and
499. tired by Tom on a foul fly. Now was our chance. We built strong hopes upon this, the t
500. creamed and threw their hats in air and many of Little Frank, who since his them act
501. s equally determined not to be forced. "One "One at the ball," called the umpire. s
502. ally determined not to be forced. "One "One at the ball," called the umpire. strike
503. ereal silence. Frank Burdock's face was Many a boy held his aglow with excitement. b
504. n noticed the his usual pleasant smile. change. When the spectators had been cleared o
505. x, and the pitcher had taken called for time. Tom "Frank," he whispered to Burdock,
506. imed, but everything he wanted, namely, time for Percy to recover from the bad shaki
507. ffered. Of course Tom might have called time and given as the reason that the base-r
508. words to centre the attention of every one upon himself. After an interval of some
509. ved up and down put to the blush by the universal with a suppleness, a lightning quicknes
510. kness to recover- HARRY to turn DEE. 95 one way or the other, that delighted the on
511. r- HARRY to turn DEE. 95 one way or the other, that delighted the on- lookers as much
512. s much as it annoyed the Juniors. Every time that Poulin sent in the ball Percy ran
513. , with a boldness not looked for by any one, had not stopped at third. Turning shar
514. rning sharply turn, by the way, that no other boy in the college but Keenan could mak
515. ir, Percy's hurt a little. all The boys will want to shake hands with him, and he'll
516. end to slide again, but when I saw that chance to take a run, I thought I'd do it even
517. I've read about it, but it's the first time I've seen a boy make from second to hom
518. ght ir< your uncle's house this summer? Will you do it?'* "Yes," I answered at once.
519. hat still remain "beautiful pictures on memory's wall," count the ensuing months of Ma
520. to enjoy it, because we had done so our duty in the matter df studies; prepared to e
521. because we had done so our duty in the matter df studies; prepared to enjoy it rightl
522. e zenith are here and tion to the upper world. there gauzy bits of fleece, reflecting
523. holding scene is not without its human element. within a hundred feet of a steep, gras
524. the beautiful day most beautiful in its death." *I hope we'll be that way, too," resu
525. but somehow I can't work it in; I'm nc good at quotations." " Something to the effe
526. thing should so become us Percy. in our life as our leaving it?" suggested "You have
527. sehis head. acre, "I'll find a girl who will keep me from getting cranky." The twili
528. west were softening in color; a classic beauty succeeded the oriental splendor which h
529. anded by Percy. "A wall-eyed pike and a beauty!" exclaimed sit "You right Tom. "It's a
530. was distracted by a novel sight, a new element added to the serene loveliness of early
531. the east of us there swept, in all the poetry of bird-like motion, a milky-sailed yac
532. e her was a boy of fourteen or fifteen. One glance at him would satisfy an observer
533. uousness of childhood. feature which is one of the pretty graces of innocent years,
534. spoken words the message of her ful own happiness in the possession of the graceus. yacht
535. , but, me lud, when we have, me lud, we will be most gratified to secure your ludshi
536. to secure your ludship's distinguished custom." From the bottom of the boat came a si
537. r mark you, me lud, we have not had the pleasure, me lud " here Tom gave a bow which oul
538. it isn't a beech tree, but that is no matter," Tom added in parentheses " stands a l
539. ed her handkerchief and sent a silvery "good-evening, vision sirs," across the divid
540. ou know, I've often wished of late that God had given me a sister. I'm sure I'd be
541. . I'm sure I'd be a better toned down a good deal of fellow. She would have my rough
542. m, I I wouldn't have it removed for the world. But think what you say is reasonable a
543. what you say is reasonable and natural. good don't sister is a treasure to a boy —
544. 've just the best lot of sisters in the world. know what I'd have been were it not fo
545. d," I remarked, " that there no earthly love so pure and elevating as the love betwe
546. rthly love so pure and elevating as the love between brother and sister. is " I beli
547. said great pity — isn't it? — that many big brothers make Tom. "It's a Io6 it H
548. s, to be cross and ugly Lots of 'em are good boys, too; toward them. but what is goo
549. ood boys, too; toward them. but what is good in them is kept for outsiders, and thei
550. doesn't seem to care two cents for the happiness of his little sister as long as there's
551. the way/' said Percy, "that puts me in mind made to me one day. He was speaking of
552. Percy, "that puts me in mind made to me one day. He was speaking of a boy who had b
553. nothing out of the way in this boy. But one day, in speaking with me, he said that
554. a cold, unloving disposition." " showed One of that kind," observed Tom, " could be
555. fish. I guess we can start for home. It will be dark in half an hour I'll row." " No
556. on this seat were Tom and I, each using one oar. Percy was behind us wielding the o
557. e oar. Percy was behind us wielding the other pair, while Frank, with the tiller-rope
558. e may pos- make it, but our safest plan will be to turn What's the matter, Frank?" F
559. safest plan will be to turn What's the matter, Frank?" For Frank, who was facing us,
560. rising waters. Clinging to a mast with one hand, the boy was vainly endeavoring wi
561. the boy was vainly endeavoring with the other to take in sail, while the girl, her ha
562. g in the wind, was stretching toward us one little hand in pitiful We scarce had ti
563. ne little hand in pitiful We scarce had time to take in this awful entreaty. picture
564. as a novice in Every day during the the art of managing a boat. past few weeks we h
565. nk," continued Tom; "don't let her turn one inch either way." I'm not afraid; you c
566. Frank for our course. Pull steadily." "God boat is help them!" cried Frank, despit
567. sweat of agony. Frank was sobbing. "For God's sake, Frank," cried Tom hoarsely, "ar
568. you do there's Quick are they under no chance of saving them. ! water yet?" "The girl
569. d is hanging on to There's the boy now. Good! he is clinging to too." The " If three
570. I can see the boat quite plainly. I've good eyes, and I'll keep that boat in sight
571. waves, impressed us, I am sure, with a sense of God's might and our 11 own powerless
572. mpressed us, I am sure, with a sense of God's might and our 11 own powerlessness. I
573. I" had a great deal to say to Almighty God. None, indeed, was overmastered What bo
574. der as think, Tom Playfair? Presence of mind never deserted influence him, and such
575. An exclamation from Frank commune with God. "Listen!" he exclaimed. Again the " in
576. streamed something of the — cwi light beauty, and the veil of darkness, routed the w
577. the centuries, * 'Jesus, Saviour of my soul, fly, Let me to Thy bosom While the ang
578. ace. turned at once, and in the nick of time; the child was just sinking. He made fo
579. t if worst came to worst it would be my duty to venture after my friend. No sooner h
580. is arms about his would-be rescuer in a death-ciasp. Tom struggled vainly to free him
581. e surface. Oh, what a weary, long, long time it was while we prayed for their reappe
582. arance! At length, still clasped in the other's arms, Tom came to view. Even in the m
583. t which stands out as vividly before my imagination now as it presented itself to me in the
584. pression. It was a hideous nightmare of God's image. All this I noticed in one glan
585. e of God's image. All this I noticed in one glance as I threw myself from the boat.
586. surface, Percy said, Tom, who had freed one hand, made an effort to free the ! othe
587. one hand, made an effort to free the ! other. With a wild, animal-like, muffled voic
588. ffort to free the ! other. With a wild, animal-like, muffled voice, the drowning lad c
589. fore, bear- ing in his arms a senseless form. "Quick! catch hold!" he gasped. I took
590. or yourself, Frank. To the yacht, every one!" Fortunately boat; efforts we had kept
591. ad the child in charge; fortunately, in particular, for myself, who ^4&d the greatest diff
592. self, who ^4&d the greatest difficulty, being a poor swimmer, in n6 deed, it HARRY DE
593. HARRY DEE. In- sustaining the senseless form of the brother. would have gone hard wi
594. come to my assistance. made but little progress, and we were fain to be content with ho
595. , when we were all clinging beside each other, "thank God we're safe; and if we can o
596. all clinging beside each other, "thank God we're safe; and if we can only hold out
597. e; and if we can only hold out the wind will bring us to shore within an hour." had
598. enseless boy!" think this was the first time that I ever heard Percy speak harshly o
599. I ever heard Percy speak harshly of any one. Tom very shortly opened his eyes and f
600. pens you look out for yourselves- don't mind me. I'm not afraid to die. And be sure
601. hers? Wasn't it beautiful? I guess that God Jesus.' intended us to be His instrumen
602. he hardest, bitterest — v thing of my life, but I had to do in fact it. I'd as hav
603. were between himself and his Maker. His mind was wandering but into what beautiful f
604. s off his guard, we discovered that the life within was as saintly as the life witho
605. t the life within was as saintly as the life without was noble. Again and again he s
606. istened to these confessions of a noble soul It mental brought vividly to our minds
607. the struggle that had gone hand in for life. It hand with that physical struggle ve
608. in un- sharp outline Tom's indomitable will-power, his ability to grasp a situation
609. w moments later. " Jesus, Saviour of my soul, 4 in- Let me to Thy bosom fly.' " I "T
610. finite pathos in his simple words, "I'm courage, dear so tired." "Keep up your "We're t
611. on Now, my account. And, Percy, give my love to all the fellows, and if I've treated
612. despair. of us had, I The boy whom each love, think, loved with a love deeper, stron
613. boy whom each love, think, loved with a love deeper, stronger, tenderer than a broth
614. ast. "Now," he exclaimed, "perhaps that will stop the flow of blood." " His face is
615. to Gordon. Overhead the stars came out one by one and the wind softened into a lig
616. don. Overhead the stars came out one by one and the wind softened into a light bree
617. ng shore." was going to die. I never my life. But now you needn't We make turned our
618. rdon not to sail without having papa or one of the hired men along to manage the ya
619. t. This afternoon Gordon sent the hired man up to our 122 HARRY DEE. iouse, and jus
620. come out in a boat to meet us just the same as though we were bawling for help. Do
621. 're to shout 'hip hip hurrah,' just the same as though you were a little boy, which
622. sky and ing a golden furrow in " "Thank God!" Percy That settles it, exclaimed. lit
623. a's happy now; she heard you out 'hip a good time." — hip— hurrah,' and she thin
624. appy now; she heard you out 'hip a good time." — hip— hurrah,' and she thinks yo
625. er cheer," cried Tom. We gave it with a will. An answering cheer came gratefully upo
626. fully upon our ears. "Boat ahoy!" cried one of the rescuing party. "Ahoy!" answered
627. he Scarborough children there?" came an other voice. "Yes, papa!" screamed Rose. " Th
628. ight, little girl; always said tell the truth,'' Tom parenthetically. "I do, sir." He
629. Percy presently was in the arms of his will — — HARRY DEE, mother, and 125 cryi
630. d our party, and his admiration cost us many a blush. Had we Even not been resolute
631. HARRY won't go," protested DEE. ; about being lionized." But for all that Tom did go,
632. om attention by keep- He was the bright particular star of the evening, and my little ligh
633. kept himself in the background, and the judgment he displayed in the omission of our adv
634. details as would have reflected on the courage In due course a young lady seated herse
635. her a solemn crowd it's dancing. in our family. I have no sisters at home to help me i
636. ve no sisters at home to help me in the matter of parlor amusements; and I suppose tha
637. at's the reason I have given most of my time to such solemn tasks as kite-flyir.g an
638. rruthers," to conceal came the grave "I labor There was no mistaking the twinkle in T
639. istaking the twinkle in Tom's eyes this time, and the young miss, breaking into a gi
640. hanges with the ease of a society young man. Mr. Scarborough was a kindly old gentl
641. ay billiards or cards, " said the young man plaintively. "Euchre?" asked Tom. "What
642. o wonder some boys give up trying to be good." "Hear! hit the nail hear!" said Mr. S
643. set up. They don't see how a boy can be good and happy at the same time; consequentl
644. how a boy can be good and happy at the same time; consequently they go to extremes
645. a boy can be good and happy at the same time; consequently they go to extremes and t
646. tly they go to extremes and throw aside religion almost entirely." Gordon took advantage
647. musement in an upper room. To do Gordon justice, he was quite skilful in handling the c
648. l trouble you, Gordon, to hand over the other two." Gordon. "Keep away, " he suddenly
649. been waiting for five deals to spot the man who's been keeping two cards out of the
650. don't play that kind of game." larly. " God bless me!" exclaimed Mr. Scarborough, "
651. sly punned; and struck me for the first time that there was an accidental fitness in
652. I was shown The to my room some little time before the others. One was sleeping apa
653. oom some little time before the others. One was sleeping apartment had two double b
654. alloted to Percy, Tom, and myself: the other, I was informed, to Gordon and two of h
655. academy, as he pointed to the kneeling form. The three of them engaged hypocrite,"
656. The Percy to notice this. bilious young man from the military academy T32 HARRY it
657. erposed Gordon. (I this noble youth the justice of stating that must do The yellow-face
658. f stating that must do The yellow-faced one lowhe actually interposed.) ered his ar
659. ered his arm. " Go on," interposed the other. " I dare you." Few boys of poor princi
660. other. " I dare you." Few boys of poor principle can take a " dare. " He raised his arm
661. and threw it out into the night. "That other that." slipper isn't worth " much witho
662. ct " Look : out, he can lick your whole family, you bilious fool." So the challenge wa
663. indows. I d«y it regularly." The young man of the coffee-and-cream complex- ion at
664. I shall have to hurt your feelings the same way as my friend Percy. In the mean tim
665. ame way as my friend Percy. In the mean time, if there are any little jokes in the w
666. the way of flying slippers, Percy Wynn will show what a convenience a window is whe
667. ouder key. The tone of conversation, in form, at was not vulgar, but the matter was
668. on, in form, at was not vulgar, but the matter was by no means innocent. As they went
669. that Eugene 134 HARRY DEE. changed his opinion the following morning. Mr. Scarborough
670. -pole to the winner." The bilious young man, who was blessed with long legs, steppe
671. question of Mr. Scarborough, Percy Wynn will run him." Eugene smiled, and glanced at
672. Eugene smiled, and glanced at the slim form of Percy with contempt that was not eve
673. would be hardly younger and Give him a chance to show how he can fair, as hold out."
674. aw! that's nothing," said Eugene. "Very good; we will make it a quarter of a mile
675. s nothing," said Eugene. "Very good; we will make it a quarter of a mile —that is,
676. t from thi" hitching post here, and the one who touches it first on his second roun
677. uld an eighth the winner." As these and other preliminaries were being arranged, Rose
678. " As these and other preliminaries were being arranged, Rose, who had stolen over to
679. ." all Tom grinned. "Much and kind, and good; and Oh! how brave you were, when you c
680. here and said that he Aad only done his duty. But he didn't. "Little girl, when you
681. l, when you sang 'Jesus, Saviour of day soul,' I felt perfectly happy out there on t
682. ng in his throat. "That's right, little one," he said, patting her golden hair, "an
683. en hair, "and I hope and pray you never will fear to meet Him." And the child and To
684. hild and Tom turned away, each from the other, with such expressions as we see on the
685. e, while Mr. Scarborough was counting: "One !" two three go "God bless me!" ejacula
686. ugh was counting: "One !" two three go "God bless me!" ejaculated Mr. Scarborough a
687. as they both neared the gate. " There's one quarter of the race over," said Frank g
688. us with- HARRY DEE. out moving his head one us, bowed and Tom's feet. "That means 1
689. Tom's feet. "That means 137 way or the other. Percy: as he passed, he turned his dof
690. rcy was now running at his best. By the time Eugene had made his third quarter of th
691. feet behind him. up with him inside of one hun" I'll put up my head dred yards," s
692. ted Mr. Scarborough; " I consider it an honor to know him.' Percy in his generosity g
693. breath. Now Percy breaks away from him: one foot, two on, Percy, "Come Frank. run a
694. feet behind. There were more races and other contests of skill, which I omit for the
695. s are coming. The quiet tenor of school-life is to be broken upon by a certain train
696. as dreams are made of, not realities of life. The shadow to cast upon my early years
697. lly was very shortly is The hope reader will see that the mystery to give — whethe
698. — whether true or false, later events will some show being solved; and so, leaving
699. e or false, later events will some show being solved; and so, leaving the pretty lake
700. resort, I invite the reader to a — of change of scene. HARRY DEE. 139 CHAPTER IN WHI
701. ies had so important an influence on my life. "It doesn't look any too cheerful in t
702. in the dying of the day. To my excited imagination they seemed to be incorporate spirits f
703. to be incorporate spirits from another world spirits of bloodshed and robbery and mu
704. give up what I considered his romantic idea. "Cheer up, old boy," said Tom, in his
705. I've got some holy water along; it's a good style. thing to have in a house whether
706. d." " All right. Just wait till I get a good hold on my ing against cane." Tom raise
707. trike at once. " Now, old boy, make the sign of the cross and open that door." I cro
708. ere talking, were again renewed. "Don't mind the racket, Harry; when you shove the d
709. advice. Tom, however, moved neither to one side nor the other; but, standing full
710. ever, moved neither to one side nor the other; but, standing full in the doorway, str
711. ed not a muscle. "Let's give the bats a chance," said Tom, in his usual tone, as he th
712. g at me over his spectacles. It was the same dark room darker, gloomier, dustier. As
713. oesn't as we made our way out. beat the world! I felt as It's stopped at twelve, too.
714. 's stopped at twelve, too." though some one had thrown a bucket of back. ice-water
715. upon me very we knew, had met his awful fate at midnight. was somewhat relieved, sub
716. eved, subsequently, by discovering that other clocks in the house had stopped with th
717. nt Jane's handkerchief, and she's awful particular about her dry-goods." Instead of dustin
718. od! "The stain of my uncle's blood! and same black mark upon the pillow-slip." Even
719. pillow-slip." Even Tom showed signs of emotion. He quickly mastered it, however, and s
720. re, to my relief, there was no striking sign of the tragedy. The bed was made, the r
721. o discuss the probability of a murdered man's spirit coming or not coming at night,
722. ing at night, and in the room where the man had been murdered, is an exhibition of
723. you, but the beads make me brave every time." "It's a good idea," I answered. Toget
724. eads make me brave every time." "It's a good idea," I answered. Together we recited
725. make me brave every time." "It's a good idea," I answered. Together we recited the f
726. the bud. For on my first proposing the matter to my Howfather he had shown marked dis
727. go?" I go myself," was the answer. " It will be no harm to try the plan. Of course,
728. rse, there's no ques* tion of the house being haunted; that's superstition. a bit of
729. king up there in regard to your uncle's death, and if one goes there one can hardly h
730. in regard to your uncle's death, and if one goes there one can hardly help staying
731. ur uncle's death, and if one goes there one can hardly help staying all You ought t
732. to me that were we to suc- bringing to justice the woman whom you had loved as a mothe
733. man whom you had loved as a mother your life would become somewhat embittered. But n
734. that old feelings have been softened by time, and that you are a strong, healthy, ch
735. ong, healthy, cheerful boy, it might be good to stir up farther inquiries. Tom Playf
736. though romantic, may have something of good in it. Yes; I'll pass a night at Tower
737. ough was beginning to The meal, all the same, gave me heart of yawn. grace, and I en
738. ed into conversation with Tom in really good spirits. But as mine rose Tom's seemed
739. EE. 147 An hour's rest would make a new man murmured "Will you call me before twelv
740. r's rest would make a new man murmured "Will you call me before twelve?" Tom, withou
741. f Tom's falling asleep to his awakening desire to I tell the events as I then honestly
742. ke upon the silence. my Then making the sign of the cross, I took out of valise I ha
743. hat was nodding, and even in the act my imagination had wandered from " Samivel" and his fa
744. tand on end as I listened. Even in this state of alarmed expectancy I took up my watc
745. ery clock in the house began to strike. One, two, three I could clearly distinguish
746. ut, till, as the lamp sputtered out its life, the mist was no longer a mist but a lu
747. than a shadow. There was no doubt to my mind that I was standing before the ghost of
748. w, sepulchral voice from — that weird form, yet carrying in its hollow, sepulchral
749. t had been when I met him for the first time in the library but it wore also the loo
750. d I do for you that night?" "You made a will leaving me all your property." "What ha
751. lance. " Nephew, listen: swear that you will take reasonable measures to have my mur
752. LL CLOCK TELLS A STORY. What's the feet matter?" cried Tom, 1 1 jumping to his "Is it
753. sleep my uncle!" me everything from the time I 1 till now." incoherence gave him a f
754. s he was surprised, and was ished. very particular in inquiring into the exact words my Th
755. heir to you at all. murders avenged are good enough for story-books, If they were so
756. he had come to ask your prayers for his soul, I could believe it; but the 'avenge-hi
757. ound up about it seriously to you. your imagination: it would have been better had As it wa
758. that struck twelve." Tom talked in the same strain at some length, wearily, draggin
759. haunted? Don't be afraid to tell me the truth." Tom and put his feet apart, his hands
760. vile pun like to "Oh, hold on; there's sense in my pun. You didn't " suspended his s
761. ere — hop up on this chair and take a good look at the top." got up beside him on
762. ame 'Tom "Now, Harry, iook at it take a good look at that letter by letter. Try to n
763. ter. Try to name; photograph it on your memory." I was now deeply impressed, for I saw
764. and excited, so I gazed at the letters one by one till I was perfectly satisfied t
765. cited, so I gazed at the letters one by one till I was perfectly satisfied that exa
766. ed down from the chair, " have you read many ghost-stories?" "Yes. The two years bef
767. ht not harm a healthy boy, but that for one in my state of health nothing could be
768. m a healthy boy, but that for one in my state of health nothing could be worse." "Oh,
769. he doctor! But didn't you come across a good many ghosts appearing at midnight and j
770. ctor! But didn't you come across a good many ghosts appearing at midnight and just o
771. in getting excited, Harry, it's and no sign of foolishness to have a vivid imaginaW
772. our doctor is against you. tion. in the world should a ghost wait till it strikes HAR
773. the hand of this There.' clock back to one half minute to twelve. so and now that'
774. y." It is thus that the small boy saves time and many That's a bit out of story-book
775. thus that the small boy saves time and many That's a bit out of story-books. — !
776. certainly sent me into that undesirable state; then the clock began to strike. Tom's
777. and groaning together." "Whoo! what an imagination you had, Harry. No wonder you dreamed o
778. jumped upon the triumph. " chair, gave one look, and uttered a cry of Quod took er
779. been blurred then. top wasn't disturbed one bit last night; now do you see ?" " Tom
780. " 157 put Now you're my name up talking sense. there last night; is I'm mighty glad i
781. he word " naviculariis" in the"Manilian Law." " Revera, nescio: nunquam antea vidi.
782. al earth with changing — where are ye one but Percy could have delivered such an
783. ies and talking Latin twice a week. Not one of us had laid aside our Latin during t
784. leaving school we had agreed, " for the honor of the class, for the honor of rest of
785. , " for the honor of the class, for the honor of rest of us the school," to give a ce
786. s, we had kept up a correspondence with one another in Latin. Whence came all this
787. sents itself to every reader. From none other than Tom Playfair. That vigor- HARRY ou
788. at vigor- HARRY ous little DEE. his 159 man had made up the it was to secure mind t
789. 59 man had made up the it was to secure mind that our class intercollegiate medal if
790. of elegant Latinity, Cicero's "Manilian Law." This speech belonged to the matter of
791. ilian Law." This speech belonged to the matter of rhetoric class, During this hour but
792. " This speech belonged to the matter of rhetoric class, During this hour but we took it
793. ing this hour but we took it up all the same. Latin. all the talking was in Strange
794. y interested in Latin, and took as much pleasure in a new idiom or turn week. of express
795. y. October afternoon we looked much the same as during the preceding year. Percy had
796. so different from the " hobble-de-hoy" form, manner, and emotion of the ordinary bo
797. the " hobble-de-hoy" form, manner, and emotion of the ordinary boy of sixteen, gave a
798. t two inches below Percy the in height, same noble fellow. into a bookworm. Keenan a
799. sent meeting Tom was bubbling over with good-humor, but he found Latin a poor vehicl
800. ish the hour was up " [supra]. was some time before we came at Tom's meaning of " su
801. . " Tempus est; licet anglice loqui. " "Time's up you can talk English," said Percy
802. n Tom began "Boys, the best news in the world! Mr. Middle- — ; ton thinks we're los
803. this Latin business " much of our play-time "Oh! that's great news/' interpolated Q
804. ally. you? He's been thinking about the matter, and he's gone to the president and obt
805. to stay up half an hour longer than the other small boys every night!" " Hurrah !" Wi
806. ix pairs of vigorous lungs! inning out, will "Let me have my HARRY "And that's not a
807. uperintend is our work himself. Listen, will His plan simply gorgeous. you?" fifteen
808. all ears," said Quip. " Every night he will assign us lines seen. from Cicero a pas
809. c English translation, which he himself will make out, and put it back can, into Lat
810. him when we go up to the dormitory. He will examine every one of them before he goe
811. to the dormitory. He will examine every one of them before he goes to bed, and he'l
812. d in blue, and where we're particularly good in red, and occasionally, when he think
813. ionally, when he thinks it suitable, he will jot down a few words of criticism on ou
814. atin." "Ah!" "And I've given my word of honor that that condition will be observed fa
815. en my word of honor that that condition will be observed faithfully. Now, in return
816. r on Tuesday and Thursday and put in at good, solid physical exercise." And 44 then
817. his heels together, and adding: In " my mind's eye, Horatio.' 44 Just think of the s
818. eye, Horatio.' 44 Just think of the six rhetoric and poetry classes that are to contend
819. ' 44 Just think of the six rhetoric and poetry classes that are to contend against us,
820. fference between easily. 44 44 much The pleasure as we read a novel." They don't shirk d
821. at makes the difference between a great man and a small potato," said Harry Quip. 1
822. hat quotation you made from Carlyle the other day, Percy?" "'Our wishes ities.' " are
823. ments of our capabil- "Precisely. Tally one for Carlyle. little bit wish to get tha
824. great He's foladvantage in keeping the same teacher. lowed us, and knows just where
825. udy than in a day college. Now, the six other competing colleges are day schools." "Y
826. s this way. why we should be afraid Asa matter of fact, though actually studied we as
827. already as boys have ordinarily studied poetry. Look at this! is, Last year we as did
828. but is all bent to tba 1 64 HARRY DEE. one single purpose of making ourselves good
829. one single purpose of making ourselves good theme^ writers." "That's a solid reason
830. ame Tom. Richards was a boy of wondrous memory and a maturity beyond his years. The ot
831. s intellec- tual a set for their age as one could wish to meet with. October glided
832. raged, February stormed, March wept but change the seasons as they might, the Ciceroni
833. b was hard at it night after night. The progress we made was something remarkable. after
834. not only in idiom At Christmas we made one change but in facility. We shortened th
835. only in idiom At Christmas we made one change but in facility. We shortened the time
836. hange but in facility. We shortened the time of transin our programme. This we did f
837. icero; secondly, we wished to give more time and finish to our theme. So wrapped was
838. dents ")f any note. HARRY DEE, The only matter which distracted 1 65 me from my books
839. e this is child's play to us. years ago one of our men yanked a defaulter out of on
840. that looked up into his bloodwould be a good thing for this at St. Maure's, vigilant
841. Chief Detective Bureau. Horace Tinker, One week later there came this letter which
842. . Raynor, but a Mr. RayDetective Green (one of the best men on our force) says that
843. force) says that he thinks he's got He will not mention it till he has discovered a
844. be Mrs. to Ada Raynor's grandmother, no relation my former nurse at all. Then Mr. Tinker
845. ing about a the small boys. it is great change for the better among In order to make t
846. ed, a conjunction with the eyes, strong sense of humor, entered the college. His sens
847. ense of humor, entered the college. His sense of humor seemed to develop with the pas
848. g of the small yard. Willie Tipp was as good-hearted a boy as ever came to St. Maure
849. 's; but he was as thoughtless as he was good-hearted. When he returned at the beginn
850. t, enlisted under his standard. At this time "Oliver Twist" was being read to Tipp's
851. andard. At this time "Oliver Twist" was being read to Tipp's sense of fun and lively
852. "Oliver Twist" was being read to Tipp's sense of fun and lively us during meals. imag
853. ense of fun and lively us during meals. imagination were taken by the character of the " Ar
854. r of the " Artful Dodger." He procured, one fine evening in Sep- tember, a set of g
855. out a ticket After awhile I'll on. send one of our 'pals* to the fellow whose goods
856. to stand by you. When he comes up, you will tell something. him that you're a poor
857. l something. him that you're a poor old man named Fagin, and that you can't give hi
858. give him back his goods unless he pays one chocolate caramel for each piece." 168
859. mel for each piece." 168 HARRY won't do will. T DEE. "He it." "Yes, he Now go down i
860. ver for a counter." Master Tipp had his will, and very soon Frank was standing behin
861. Frank had to run, as it were, for dear life. The experiment, in consequence, was no
862. down as a member of the "gang," and In many ways Tipp thus Tipp became notorious. h
863. the making of a leader of boys. He was good-natured, energetic, and truthloving. Th
864. 169 soever various and estimable be his other qualities. But what most of all secured
865. on. He was ever devising something new. One day it might be a game; another day a p
866. neighbor of as the " his disregard for law in that place of al- his, commonly know
867. d his base of operations* or rather his time. The second hour of 17° studies was ke
868. umph. The joke was unanimously voted so good, indeed, that it a capital one; was res
869. oted so good, indeed, that it a capital one; was resolved to repeat it night after
870. plan worked nicely for a week till each time. This young man lost it came to Broadhe
871. y for a week till each time. This young man lost it came to Broadhead's turn. coura
872. g man lost it came to Broadhead's turn. courage when, on entering the ber's place. his
873. the yard. Some HARRY of his jokes were good; to say, subversive of order. DEE. of t
874. ubversive of order. DEE. of them, I 171 many am bound Tipp was a good boy and freque
875. of them, I 171 many am bound Tipp was a good boy and frequently felt remorse when, a
876. noyed poor Mr. Auber in season and out. One evening a number of us were seated on a
877. right along without the least danger of being caught. You sit where you are, and ten
878. ten or eleven Mr. Auber can tell of us will stand around you. that somebody's smoki
879. a few of his special friends, after the peace. manner of a pipe of Mr. Auber very soo
880. isappeared long before he got near us. "Good-evening, boys." 17* HARRY all lifted DE
881. caps and tried to look cheerful, but no one ventured upon uttering a word. Poor Mr.
882. me heavy with cigarette-smoke. To every one's surprise, Mr. Middleton (who seldom e
883. swered Tipp; "but he'll fix some way or other." "Shoo!" exclaimed Broadhead in a rais
884. n, boys," said Mr. Middleton, giving no sign to show that he had heard the words tha
885. echism. Suppose a thief wanted to rob a man's house, but couldn't do it without the
886. ouldn't do it without the help of three other men. He explains his difficulties to th
887. to and assist him to rob. ?" He clears one hun- dred dollars. "Yes, " sir," You un
888. ir," You understand answered Tipp. Very good. Now, who is bound to make resti tution
889. hat case would have to make the robbery good ?" "All three of them, ards. I reckon,"
890. to have had a hand in the stealing, how many of them would be punished?" "All of 'em
891. g on the sly,* it's against the college law and all concerned in it are Next time y
892. ge law and all concerned in it are Next time you boys combine liable to punishment.
893. re Next time you boys combine liable to punishment. to help a smoker you shall all perform
894. you shall all perform the penance. This time I'll let you off. Broadhead, I'd like t
895. you." The Anarchist went about with his history under his arm for the next few days. Th
896. serious disorder there. He was a timid man, rather retiring, and one could see tha
897. e was a timid man, rather retiring, and one could see that he was at a loss as to h
898. fficient to induce a lasting amendment. One morning in December matters went worse
899. cember matters went worse than usual. A quantity of red pepper placed on the stove set a
900. , and if he keeps on getting excited it will raise tell "I his hat off his head." "
901. ght ahead. I've been thinking about the matter all day, and can't see how to start the
902. and can't see how to start them in some other direction. Somehow the idea won't come.
903. em in some other direction. Somehow the idea won't come." "Suppose we go down anyhow
904. e can't do much harm and we may do some good. Come on." CHAPTER /.V XXI. IVYIIX WHIC
905. olunteered Broadhead. " It was a pretty good joke. Anarchist all except place for To
906. the more Anarchist laughed." "And when other "That's a fact," said Tipp. pantomime,
907. to take him off to see the pigs killed. One day, after seeing a thousand pigs done
908. h they were inseparable friends, at the same time apologizing profusely for the word
909. y were inseparable friends, at the same time apologizing profusely for the words he
910. ou ought to know how to take a friend's beauty roasting just the same as the rest of u
911. ake a friend's beauty roasting just the same as the rest of us." "That's so," said t
912. s. By a happy accident Quip had taken a good step Tom saw there was in making fun of
913. t up. a Percy, who studied to offend no one, had deliberately continued the teasing
914. iberately continued the teasing for the one purpose of lessening Broadhead's influe
915. he whole goes to dinner at a quarter to one. crowd of us will get together by the p
916. dinner at a quarter to one. crowd of us will get together by the pump and begin whis
917. p to some mischief. Of course Mr. Auber will get rattled right off, and he'll come o
918. us, two of our fellows, who are on the good conduct list, will go up to him and say
919. lows, who are on the good conduct list, will go up to him and say, 'Mr. Auber, Of co
920. nd say, 'Mr. Auber, Of course he'll say will you please let us go out?' Then those t
921. se two 'yes,' or something of the sort. will give a whoop and say to all of us, 'Hur
922. says we can go out.' whole crowd of us will give a lot of whoops and scoot out of t
923. and before Mr. Auber can tell a single one of us that he didn't mean the permissio
924. out as chec -ng as I've heard in a long time," observed Qui^ " Is it ?" exclaimed Ti
925. ver, too," added Tom. M Do you think it will work, Tom ?" "Yes on one condition."
926. you think it will work, Tom ?" "Yes on one condition." — HARRY DEE. "What's that
927. ondition that you fellows all back each other up by the tallest kind of lying." Tipp'
928. might start in wholesale. He's a timid man and very kind; but if he gets on the wa
929. an and very kind; but if he gets on the war-path the Anarchist will have a chance t
930. f he gets on the war-path the Anarchist will have a chance to snuff blood." But if "
931. the war-path the Anarchist will have a chance to snuff blood." But if "You just leave
932. king off. Whereupon the boys, following time to his footsteps, whistled, with zeal a
933. The fellows," said a noticeable for its good-nature always been very kind to us." 18
934. ellows," said a noticeable for its good-nature always been very kind to us." 180 HARRY
935. 0 HARRY DEE. "say "The boys They say of Rhetoric class," put in Percy, that he's the mos
936. in Percy, that he's the most wonderful man they ever met. when he gets started in
937. to a genius that he ever met." "All the same," pursued Harry Quip, "we treat him as
938. u're of his class told down on him; and one me to- day a bad job." " Talking about
939. ow occurs ta we can kill two birds with one stone we can give him a surprise and at
940. e we can give him a surprise and at the same time show him that we like him." "What'
941. can give him a surprise and at the same time show him that we like him." "What's you
942. of the professors." "The Dodgers don't mind a rule more or less," observed Tipp wit
943. Percy, "we'd like to make a present to one of the teachers." "It's not allowed, Pe
944. rcy. I thank you, in his name, for your good-will." " But, Father, it is not exactly
945. I thank you, in his name, for your good-will." " But, Father, it is not exactly to a
946. make I " it." i« "Oh, indeed. of your good-will, Mr. Middleton already assured and
947. I " it." i« "Oh, indeed. of your good-will, Mr. Middleton already assured and x8i
948. . "Yes, sir," put in Tipp. "It'll do us good, sir, if you give us permission." the p
949. termined to expel Tipp on the morrow as being a promoter of at his we knocked disorde
950. hat night the most popular boy, for the time boy in the small yard. ; Tom being, in
951. r the time boy in the small yard. ; Tom being, in St. Maure's, and, heart. I verily b
952. ver laid head upon a pillow. Tipp had a good CHAPTER IN WHICH PERCY XXII. FIRST WYNN
953. RST WYNN GOES BAREFOOT FOR THE AND ONLY TIME IN HIS LIFE. TARRY," said Percy to me j
954. S BAREFOOT FOR THE AND ONLY TIME IN HIS LIFE. TARRY," said Percy to me just before n
955. d to foam at the mouth and said: 'Never mind; I'll And get even with you fellows, pr
956. chief. of It's not; and there's just my opinion that Broadhead means all I've He's a ba
957. n it his face. a How eagerly he thanked God that was but dream! He jumped from his
958. ore, must have made his way out through one of the two windows giving upon To the s
959. t was necessary to pass over a sleeping form: Mr. Middleton was in one bed, Harry Qu
960. r a sleeping form: Mr. Middleton was in one bed, Harry Quip in the other. On first
961. leton was in one bed, Harry Quip in the other. On first thought Percy determined to g
962. window; he knew that his teacher, like many hard, energetic workers, was an extreme
963. nobserved. But even then Percy's strong sense of reverence and respect asserted itsel
964. spect asserted itself, and he chose the other window. Harry Quip, as Percy's foot pre
965. But on this occasion he gave himself no time, but dropped at once. A sharp pain ran
966. f no time, but dropped at once. A sharp pain ran through his foot as he touched grou
967. through his foot as he touched ground a pain to which tory door. It — he gave no a
968. o: for as he bare- footed boy, for dear life toward the study-hall. And was well he
969. account could be believed, the hero of many a fight. He had begun his career in St.
970. le to say. Probably he suspected that a man, perhaps even a college official, was a
971. rcv saw it, ture would be a question of time. HARRY DEE. too, 187 and wondered what
972. spot on the highway where repairs were being made, suddenly dashed aside to a pile o
973. re Percy was aware of his purpose, sent one of these missiles at Percy's head. Perc
974. er and another and anTo go nearer would other stone flew past him. inevitably lead to
975. e flew past him. inevitably lead to his being knocked senseless. Broadhead was throwi
976. from his father Now, Frank happened it time no room for partly to to among the curi
977. hat swelled his pockets; so partly as a matter of convenience, show favor to the boy w
978. show favor to the boy whom he delighted honor, he had intrusted it to Percy's care. D
979. n your face." "Once more," said Percy, "will you show me what you've got?" Broadhead
980. d." HARRY He half-way and DEE. 189 took one step forward; Broadhead met him would h
981. e course of all his summerings, and the many lines and gashes that marked his soles
982. that was flowing from them. There was a time when Percy would have fainted at the si
983. for the money. By moving his legs, now one way, now another, in he satisfied himse
984. and Broadhead's trousers pockets but a one or two small articles. As Percy knew th
985. chief, he could infer that there was no necessity of taking Broadhead's vest into account
986. e coat he wore had two outside pockets, one on the right and one on the left. With
987. o outside pockets, one on the right and one on the left. With these data before him
988. a great hurry, for he doesn't even take time to get his coat, which saw him hang up
989. ent to bed. He is nervous and afraid of being caught, otherwise he'd have taken that
990. wouldn't have taken him two seconds of time. Now. when he opens the box he HARRY DE
991. ney Here Percy, before acting upon this hypothesis, breathes a short prayer. He is beginni
992. ll. made his way to the infirmary, With pain and exceeding difficulty he and there h
993. KES A SPEECH. IT is hardly necessary to state that Mr. Middleinto ton was let the sec
994. very " Oh, we're not going to cut up —honor bright, Mr. Auber. If there's a single
995. be depended wreck of Tipp's reputation truth had been saved; and it is hard to despi
996. r the wash-ioom, though for it boys who history. in the matter of was occupied by fifty
997. though for it boys who history. in the matter of was occupied by fifty scrapes were m
998. uietly and pursued their work steadily. One would think they were preparing for a f
999. were preparing for a funeral. "There's one thing I notice, boys," said Tipp, when
1000.nd he and he trusts us Dodgers just the same as if we had acted like gentlemen all t
1001. if we had acted like gentlemen all the time. There he is now, down at the other end
1002. the time. There he is now, down at the other end of the yard, looking on at a game o
1003. as they left the wash room were urally love with Mr. Auber. They were a. wild set o
1004.e known stiff to be preju- diced in the matter of dinarily feeling it hats, each membe
1005.g it hats, each member in or- to be his duty to smash every one he could reach with
1006.er in or- to be his duty to smash every one he could reach with his hand. Clearly,
1007.ion was eying his charges, suddenly saw one hundred solemn faces break into luxuria
1008.hats variegating the procession like so many banners; and then Mr. Cavanne, the stri
1009.s we pushed out of the refectory, which being interpreted means that we ate a good qu
1010.h being interpreted means that we ate a good quantity of food in the smallest compas
1011.ng interpreted means that we ate a good quantity of food in the smallest compass of time
1012.tity of food in the smallest compass of time. "Mr. Auber, " said Tom, "it's a pretty
1013.ced Mr. Auber took it mechanically with one watch. hand while he began passing the
1014. watch. hand while he began passing the other through his hair very rapidly. judge wh
1015.fficult to Tipp or Mr. Auber. "Ten " to one they both faint," whispered the ir- rev
1016.d the orator, shuffling his and getting one shoulder hopelessly higher than the oth
1017.one shoulder hopelessly higher than the other, "we've been a blamed hard lot." One of
1018. other, "we've been a blamed hard lot." One of Tipp's arms seemed to get out of joi
1019.all, but I never told a story in all my life." "Perhaps you never tried, sir." "Go o
1020.h in his pocket, to the great relief of many of us, who feared he would destroy it,
1021.ugh his hair, and said: " " Once upon a time He never finished that first sentence,
1022. exaggeration to say that the ideals of many were revolutionized. For example: Tipp
1023.tionized. For example: Tipp came to Tom one day and said: " Tom, will you do me a f
1024.pp came to Tom one day and said: " Tom, will you do me a favor?" — " If I can, cer
1025. Get Percy and all your chums to do the same. You see, I used to be proud of that na
1026. of the year, as honest, as gay, and as good as though he had done all the noble thi
1027.Why, Frank?" " For the Ciceronians. 199 Other fellows went too, and there were lots o
1028.I prayed for you to get second place of honor." "Indeed?" "Yes. to get first You see,
1029.course next. He's He's fellows place of honor. all the thought in the beginning of th
1030.aynor that you've given Percy and Tom a chance to catch up. Of course you don't expect
1031.elieve you are," said our honest little man. " I've known them longer than I've kno
1032.u begin worksecond place on the list of honor. ing at it at nine o'clock this morning
1033.l that night. We had been in a feverish state the preceding morning, and could not ev
1034.th HARRY my that DEE. ghostly uncle, at one of which he informed there would be no
1035.o intercollegiate medal if me given out justice. I neglected to bring the murderer to W
1036.lt, was quite don't think that a single one of us Ciceronians so much as looked at
1037.s Ciceronians so much as looked at each other during the four hours allowed us for ou
1038. much scurrying and scratching of pens. Time was called at length, and each boy hand
1039.ivin his paper, signed, not ered to the vice-president of the college. The papers th
1040.nd the others taking the nine places of honor. The according to this plan, could have
1041.ording to this plan, could have no more idea as to who were the leaders than judges
1042. said Mr. Middleton when we were about "one remark. You all know how heartily I wis
1043.ou* to leave the class-room, HARRY DEE. duty. 201 is That is the essential ; success
1044.ch feeling that Mr, Middleton came your duty," there was a quiver in felt more than
1045.hose graduates first. our innings." Not one of us attended to the conferring of deg
1046.t of the astonished audience. Places of honor," continued the vice-president HARRY DE
1047.dience. Places of honor," continued the vice-president HARRY DEE. violently, 203 whe
1048.ds and pulled us about in an ecstasy of happiness. "Third place John Ray, of a competing
1049. "Ninth— Charles Each of us Maure's." honor was presented by the president with a b
1050.and I have a strong suspicion that each one sent him a bouquet. Our hero of the hou
1051.u, Percy," he piped; "let them come the one I on with their baskets. sent." The big
1052.on stole out of the hall and shook each other's hands over and over. Willie Ruthers h
1053.y, All of us have we've come to bid you good-by. been under you for several years, a
1054.several years, all of us long enough to love you. You have taught us to love our boo
1055.ough to love you. You have taught us to love our books, to love our religion, to lov
1056.ou have taught us to love our books, to love our religion, to love one another, and
1057.aught us to love our books, to love our religion, to love one another, and in teaching u
1058.ove our books, to love our religion, to love one another, and in teaching us all thi
1059.ur books, to love our religion, to love one another, and in teaching us all this to
1060.another, and in teaching us all this to love you. Should we never meet " again, Mr.
1061.ou. and night our prayers shall rise to God that He may bless you and prosper you i
1062.ys; and should any of us go wrong for a time, should we forget your kind words, shou
1063.t all of us. all And the brave, strong, man we loved so well turned his face from b
1064.and placed his hand upon his bless you, God my dear boys. Good-by." upon us we left
1065.d upon his bless you, God my dear boys. Good-by." upon us we left him, and none of u
1066.aiting us and looking unusually grave. "Good-by, boys," " we're going for good." the
1067.ave. "Good-by, boys," " we're going for good." they said; that benediction With 206
1068.oke softly parting is ever a sorrow, no matter how sweet. We had always looked up to G
1069.s were marking the inexorable flight of time. When we returned we missed three whom
1070.r, till upon each of us comes the great change beyond which there is no shadow of vici
1071.icissitude, no parting, but everlasting peace and death- — less reunion. CHAPTER XX
1072., no parting, but everlasting peace and death- — less reunion. CHAPTER XXV. JN WHIC
1073.ou sing yes, sir; 'Jesus, Saviour of my soul' yet, little girl?" and I know ten, ele
1074.e the sweetest, nicest girls! Oh! how I love them. They're nicer than any girls I ev
1075.our strange conduct. She bore us no ill-will, however, for she came over of set purp
1076. evening to sing, for Tom's Lover of my soul." Very vividly as her sweet treble brok
1077. I turned my head aside till the little one had finished, and thought I heard a sob
1078." desist!" sir." would sooner his hand. life Tom held up "Desist, little girl, "I be
1079.e for?" said this very ingenuous little one. It's "All the way around that song, li
1080.d them by myself." You did! But they're love-songs." Rose looked at him very compose
1081.om the detective bureau, each and every one of them announcing a fresh clew. My fat
1082.pless detectives to Mrs. Raynor in this world. take a little — needful repose. Your
1083.red. Each announcement of a clew cost a good round sum of money. My father inclosed
1084.ews. I the sequel, to which now hasten, will show, As we were mistaken. CHAPTER XXVI
1085.ll that is highest and holiest in human life, thought, and endeavor. when we underta
1086.them. — — It is hardly necessary to state that all of us poets had exchanged our
1087.d walked about with the certain step of man— so, at least, we thought. His deliPe
1088.cy was the real poet of our class. cate imagination was a storehouse of fancies, sweet, pur
1089.ing he had but to touch a seemingly dry idea and it burst into blossoms of beauty. T
1090. dry idea and it burst into blossoms of beauty. Tom was not so successful in poetry pr
1091.of beauty. Tom was not so successful in poetry proper, but in English prose, for stron
1092.of the classics that he might give more time to the Frank Burdock remained in the sm
1093.t at ten, and reach the college by noon-time. " Harry," remarked Tom, after a pause
1094. He says that our finding Mrs. almost a matter dependent upon chance. that in all prob
1095.ing Mrs. almost a matter dependent upon chance. that in all probability she is He thin
1096.s without giving any clew to her former life up to the very night of the murder, I i
1097.. of such reticence is A woman even a ' man " a hard subject to overreach. "He's qu
1098.s DEE. " I think he's quite right. I'll Chance your hope, and yet wager my last poem t
1099.I winning you looked upon in the sacred relation of mother, It's cruel! should turn out
1100.t want to Nor Percy; but I fear I must. God knows I'm life I loved her as a mother,
1101.Percy; but I fear I must. God knows I'm life I loved her as a mother, and she loved
1102.at mystery tion for is to reconcile her love in Harry with the cruel way and affecwh
1103. took that. her revenge. Children don't love people like Innocence is the greatest d
1104.ocence is the greatest detective in the world." "Well, for the present it is a myster
1105.we ordered our lunch of a smiling young man with heavy eyes, who looked as though h
1106.ff. DEE. the 213 right, sir." And young man hastened the small boy If the three of
1107.e. busy, while We kept the we had young man Tom worried him into the lowest depths
1108.g story short. Tom stopped "What in the world's the matter, exclaimed as I sprang fro
1109.t. Tom stopped "What in the world's the matter, exclaimed as I sprang from my through
1110.alling." For I staggered, the wheels of life stood still, and would have fallen to t
1111.ow it was that wine was on sale bakery. will in a Harry?" inquired Tom as I showed s
1112. of privation had written the pathos of many years. She had just bought a loaf of br
1113.er. Terrible fancies great crisis in my life was come. stared me in the face and con
1114.other to me, and now it might become my duty to hand her over to the law. Percy perc
1115. become my duty to hand her over to the law. Percy perceived my distress. " God hel
1116.the law. Percy perceived my distress. " God help you, my dear friend," he said, his
1117.ost proves to be I do? It is my certain duty to have her put in custody." " Go and s
1118.ustody." " Go and see her," said Tom. I will " If the worst does come, old boy, Perc
1119. "That's the house," said Tom. and be a man." "God bless you!" added Percy. "Go in,
1120.s the house," said Tom. and be a man." "God bless you!" added Percy. "Go in, Harry,
1121.ked in. an agony even to think of going one step farther. At a sewing-machine sat M
1122.the floor was a bright all Summoning my courage, I little girl of six or seven. As I st
1123.few weeks I'll be able to do two hours' good work every day you've promised me, you
1124. you'll get strong and well — and and will be When Enoch Arden gazed upon the happ
1125.enter and destroy this sacred own. home-life? God knows I would have departed on the
1126.and destroy this sacred own. home-life? God knows I would have departed on the mome
1127. haunted from that day to the day of my death by my uncle's ghost. But the one elemen
1128.f my death by my uncle's ghost. But the one element of uncertainty the mystery; Tom
1129. death by my uncle's ghost. But the one element of uncertainty the mystery; Tom's words
1130.eated urging me to see Mrs. Raynor; the sense of duty had I felt certain that Mrs. I
1131.ing me to see Mrs. Raynor; the sense of duty had I felt certain that Mrs. I Yes, —
1132.sand times in — had they not met mine love and tenderness? — looked at my me a i
1133.as for stands the evidence against you, God's sake give lieve me your word that you
1134.e me your word that you are innocent! I will beyou now as I did when, a little child
1135.ou mother." "Harry, my own dear boy, in God's name I assure you that I am innocent.
1136. it?" I cried. "You know more!" " Harry God help you, my dear boy you killed yourse
1137.ristmas eve that I was to face the only man I had ever had reason to hate. I had ne
1138.y pent-up wrongs came thronging upon my memory. I failed to restrain myself, and you r
1139.E. room, in you all the sad story of my life — of my You noble husband, of his dea
1140.ife — of my You noble husband, of his death of a broken heart. your sweet love ming
1141.his death of a broken heart. your sweet love mingled your tears with mine. You were
1142.for Raynor was not my mar. ried, but my family name. Now, please to remem. ber that wh
1143.he terrible emotions that had shaken my soul. For an hour or more my thoughts Then c
1144.y in the room, unconscious. It was some time before I recovered at all, and even the
1145.. or thought I heard, the sound of some one walking on tiptoe, and it occurred to m
1146. spell upon me and rose to my feet in a state of terror you can hardly imagine. the f
1147.eard in my nightThat was the sound of a man or woman's mare. tread on tiptoe; this
1148. hastened to the hallway. How I thanked God as I saw you coming along quietly, !
1149.saw tht next morning your uncle cold in death." easily, — — — 2 20 HARRY DEE. C
1150.r my harsh words against that poor dead form! I came near and examined your uncle Th
1151.I formed my plans in an instant. If any one were guilty of his blood it was I. I re
1152.ht of all the qualiyou which had won my love. I imagined the life. future of happine
1153.u which had won my love. I imagined the life. future of happiness which should be yo
1154.my love. I imagined the life. future of happiness which should be yours I by right, and k
1155.wou* way for HARRY DEE. make it 221 any one to find out that you had done it was to
1156.was to throw all the suspicion I bathed one of my gloves on myself. my righthand gl
1157.he fond agony of a last embrace. And my God! shall I ever forget it? without openin
1158. I did not make the sacrifice a perfect one, my own dear boy. I was resolved that w
1159.memories of your nurse. So after making good my escape I wrote out a full account of
1160. hapIt was to be delivered to you at my death, pened. and you, you alone were to know
1161. it and destroy it, and it has been the one comfort of my life that when I was dead
1162., and it has been the one comfort of my life that when I was dead and gone you would
1163.s I did, I would throw a shadow on your life. knew that you loved fairly impossible
1164. terrible. It was narrowed I had little time to think. I do? down to a question betw
1165.nd often have I since pondered over the matter. Sometimes it has seemed to me that my
1166.as seemed to me that my conduct was But God knows that I tried to do what wrong. se
1167.at wrong. seemed to be for the best. My judgment may have been wrong, but at the time I
1168.udgment may have been wrong, but at the time I thought it was the best I could form.
1169. time I thought it was the best I could form. if I I acted, perhaps, on impulse, but
1170., on impulse, but sinned I trust I feel God has long since forgiven me. I let you k
1171.g few minutes. My brain was in a whirl. Love, gratitude, the shock of this revelatio
1172. — and the bright little castle, real life in. "Harold and Louise, this is friend,
1173. of fun; mamma's working hate needles." time with big needles. " I know how to use n
1174.mostly. You see, brother Harry, I'm the man of the family; and it isn't right for m
1175. see, brother Harry, I'm the man of the family; and it isn't right for mamma to do all
1176.wered with a smile. "I know a beautiful one." Mrs. Dome had gone over to the window
1177.n, of the strength and intensity of the love which had nerved on that noble woman "
1178.ghing. Louise." "Go ahead, "Once upon a time," began the little one, "there was a be
1179.d, "Once upon a time," began the little one, "there was a beautiful prince; and he
1180.as the nicest prince oh! he was so ter. good and pleasant and kind nicer than Harold
1181.he beautiful prince. What's red all the matter, brother Harry? Your face is "Go tion.
1182.ep he would cut her head Now, there was one lady who offered off with an axe. take
1183.o And she watched over Prince Harry for good. many years wivout going to sleep. Now,
1184.she watched over Prince Harry for good. many years wivout going to sleep. Now, the y
1185. — the lady asleep in a faint." first time it ever happened," said Harold. "The "A
1186. she?" I said. " Didn't I say she was a good "Ah! mamma — there!" cried Harold, wh
1187. there!" cried Harold, while Louise was good? clapped her hands. She wanted the prin
1188.n't kill his uncle; and then the prince will come and see the lady, and he'll take t
1189.quired. "Oh, yes; let's play it." "Very good. Louise, you be the little Harold, you
1190.tle Harold, you be the little girl, and will boy, and your mamma be the lady." "Oh,
1191. fairy part. of a fairy, some beauteous angel of the great God has sent him hither."
1192.airy, some beauteous angel of the great God has sent him hither." "It's nicer than
1193. hours, and two of the best boys in the world waiting for me down the street." Harold
1194. hair, who has blue eyes and golden you will smile at you catch his eye, and the oth
1195.ill smile at you catch his eye, and the other, who is darker and jolly-looking, will
1196.other, who is darker and jolly-looking, will be pretty sure to say something." Very
1197.pon very intimate terms with that young man. "Oh, brother Harry," he said, "it was
1198. was just the way you told me. The tall one smiled and this one " winked at me this
1199.u told me. The tall one smiled and this one " winked at me this way Here Harold put
1200.s way Here Harold put up his hand, shut one eye with it, and continued: "Then he sa
1201.o, little boy?' and I knew him." "Thank God! it's all right," I whispered to Tom an
1202.d them over and introduced them to that good mother. " Say, little boy," said Tom, "
1203. again came upon me. to speak and, by a sign which Mrs. Dome interpreted aright, beg
1204.murdered my Tom's face gave no signs of emotion during uncle. the whole course of the r
1205.been very brave and noble, but there is one circumstance connected with the murder
1206.e night of she asked. the papers at the time. that So strange! It is possible Harry
1207.im to swear that he'll bring himself to justice. Worse than that, think of a ghost want
1208.rse than that, think of a ghost wanting justice to be inflicted on one who wasn't respo
1209.host wanting justice to be inflicted on one who wasn't responsible for what he did.
1210.who wasn't responsible for what he did. God and the law are at one on this point, t
1211.esponsible for what he did. God and the law are at one on this point, that what a p
1212.for what he did. God and the law are at one on this point, that what a person does
1213.imputed to him as a crime. And just the same, your uncle is as unreasonable in the o
1214.e, your uncle is as unreasonable in the other world as he was I in this. Even assent.
1215.r uncle is as unreasonable in the other world as he was I in this. Even assent. if th
1216.ures where you fell senseless up to the time when you sprang to your feet?" asked To
1217. episode in substantially in telling it same words which she had used suddenly. I to
1218. to me. "Oh!" exclaimed Tom "What's the matter, Tom?" asked. "We'll talk about it on t
1219.want It seems to me that I've got a new time to think. light." Further comment on th
1220.ion all to the Sacred Heart, and Harold will be the better for what he will learn on
1221.d Harold will be the better for what he will learn on that point alone." It was sett
1222. my suspicion I'd have Dome ran away my opinion, only to I save you. didn't see any way
1223.that you were right in your feelings of love toward Mrs. Dome, and her story has giv
1224.e actually did hear the real steps of a man or if half-conscious — and woman —
1225. — remember, you can find she was out man the or woman was you'll find the thief
1226. think that the money was taken by some one else after I had caused my uncle's deat
1227. one else after I had caused my uncle's death?" I I T> OM," exclaimed, when " More th
1228.hould have known him! He was more of an angel than a boy. He was too gentle to Well,
1229.th heard of me speak had offered up his life for my recovery, a life, too, he had in
1230. offered up his life for my recovery, a life, too, he had intended to consecrate to
1231., too, he had intended to consecrate to God. James died the very morning and as I k
1232.made my First Communion body I promised God that with His blessing I'd great many t
1233.ed God that with His blessing I'd great many things about himself — he ; take Jame
1234. meant by my James intended to give his life to God by working for God; since the de
1235.y my James intended to give his life to God by working for God; since the death of
1236. to give his life to God by working for God; since the death of James I've prayed a
1237.fe to God by working for God; since the death of James I've prayed and prayed every d
1238. "that Tom is choosing the more perfect life?" Of course he's not," whispered Tom. t
1239. Percy's face. But there's something or other troubling you." " Up to this present an
1240.heard Percy complain. me, for the first time, one of the awful mysteries of life. He
1241.Percy complain. me, for the first time, one of the awful mysteries of life. Here we
1242.rst time, one of the awful mysteries of life. Here we were three boys on the most fa
1243.iliar I had thought that I footing with one another. knew my two friends thoroughly
1244.iends thoroughly, and yet for years the one idea of Tom, the mainspring of all his
1245.s thoroughly, and yet for years the one idea of Tom, the mainspring of all his actio
1246.! if friend. And Percy, the gentle, the good, he, the whose days had been made up of
1247.s the desolations and temptations which God so often sends upon those who are And i
1248.en sends upon those who are And in that one moment of insight dearest to Him. I rem
1249. his confessor. Yes, this saintly young man had gone on treading the wine-press of
1250.sodality, — live alone." "Boys, let's change the subject," said Tom after HARRY mome
1251. without words. Harry, doubt whether it will be worth your while to examine your unc
1252. point. Besides the advantage the thief will be able, of getting the money back, you
1253. their whereabouts, their way of the it life — if any of them took money the way t
1254.ook money the way they have since lived will make " cer- A servant with fifty thousa
1255. a genius in cunning, would be the last man to accuse you of the murder. And yet he
1256. of the murder. And yet he was the very one Caggett was the Again, who did. man who
1257.ery one Caggett was the Again, who did. man who made the biggest fuss 236 HARRY I D
1258.NEY AND TOM BIDS US FAREWELL. THAT very one to night I dispatched two long the lett
1259.atched two long the letters, my father, other to Mr. Lang, our lawyer, giving them a
1260.nts who were in my uncle's house at the time of my visit. I insisted particularly on
1261.'s favor and for giving her children an education. My letter came very promptly. He assen
1262.become very seedy. Tramps occasionally. One of my clerks managed to meet him He got
1263.you have anything further to communithe matter of Caggett let me know at once. Yours r
1264.. Yours respectfully, If Walter Lang. I will now put an exand papers. Your uncle see
1265.r uncle seems to have been a methodical man, and I think we'll have no difficulty i
1266. Wilmott, who was in the library at the time, waiting for a receipt for six thousand
1267.ave a growl. " It'll be riskier for the man who comes bed. sleep light, gentlemen;
1268. money under makes -it necessary broker will give me to study up their record. The T
1269.ee," cried Tom. Harry did not enjoy the pleasure of throwing me just then, for I broke a
1270.ntinued Tom. " I've just weighed myself one hundred and forty — five pounds. You
1271.tiate. DEE. 239 I'm five feet seven and one-half inches high, and, if I can believe
1272.t he and Harry were pulling The coneach other about in the approved style. test was b
1273.n: remarked over Harry, "I'd make every one of 'em — touch." Tom arose, gazing ru
1274.n arrive horns to-morrow to bid 'em all good-by." "Come on; try me," said Percy, "an
1275.o panting, blushing young men, looking, one would think, as though their whole live
1276.ch was to take Tom to the depot was had being drawn out from the coach-house. Percy n
1277.interrupted Tom. if you should need any particular purpose just let me know." Tom thought
1278.ht for a few moments. "I'll tell you an idea I've had for years," he then "What we w
1279.s," he then "What we want just now is a good Catholic said. magazine for boys and gi
1280.t get them to write something that they will American boys don't care for transread
1281.t, and it for he is the best boy in the world. In ten years or so who knows but we mi
1282.t money to bring out just such stories? One good Catholic story will do more than a
1283.ney to bring out just such stories? One good Catholic story will do more than a doze
1284.t such stories? One good Catholic story will do more than a dozen volumes of snailin
1285. read." "'It is better to fight for the good than to rail at the ill,' " said Percy,
1286.il at the ill,' " said Percy, employing one of his favorite quotations. HARRY "Prec
1287.t has come upon like a flash. you've no idea light. how I My confessor told till hav
1288.me not to think of taking the religious state my mind But now should clear. I It has
1289. think of taking the religious state my mind But now should clear. I It has not clea
1290.It has not cleared till now. think that God I have plenty of wants me for just such
1291.m." "I'm with you, Percy," I cried. "No matter whether that money is recovered or not,
1292.s was no boy talk. Percy's father was a man As for myself, my uncle had of immense
1293. As for myself, my uncle had of immense wealth. left me a fortune of some three hundre
1294.ousand dollars. How all the quickly the time passed as we discussed, in glow of rose
1295.ng till a curve shuts off from our view one of the noblest, bravest boys We were al
1296. verge of tears. Harry Quip changed our emotion* m* his peculiar way. Taking 24* HARRY
1297.APTER XXX. IN WHICH I HAVE THE DOUBTFUL PLEASURE OF RENEWING MR. JAMES CAGGETT'S ACQUAIN
1298.r, it Percy and myself, our year in the rhetoric We had an excelis and started in with a
1299.We had an excelis and started in with a will. But early in November Percy was called
1300.olution, as far as I can see. uncle. My idea, then, is that all of said money is on
1301.steps in the there it can be found. for matter, I would like to have a personal interv
1302.ly satisfied that I have used all human prudence in studying up this very complicated ca
1303.studying up this very complicated case. Will call on you at St. Maure's, if you wish
1304.ure's, if you wish but, as am busy with other cases, would prefer it could you contri
1305.hat should kill my was improbuncle with one blow of a it dagger, even in waking sle
1306.s a falsifier. Did Mrs. Dome There were other difficulties. it really hear an adult's
1307.dence these doubts still lingered in my mind. The desire to solve the mystery of my
1308.e doubts still lingered in my mind. The desire to solve the mystery of my uncle's deat
1309.sire to solve the mystery of my uncle's death had now become the leading thought of m
1310.ad now become the leading thought of my life. There was no risk I would not encounte
1311.nger I would not dare, to arrive at the truth. If necessary I was resolved to give no
1312.only my money, but also to venture I my life for the unravelling of this tangle. sho
1313. the unravelling of this tangle. should state here that for some months past the enti
1314.he house by an been compelled to put My good father had the Of course I consulted ut
1315. teach him docility and independence in one lesson. As I read and reread this lette
1316.ods yet with regard to this muddle. The time will come when you'll feel it your duty
1317.et with regard to this muddle. The time will come when you'll feel it your duty to y
1318.time will come when you'll feel it your duty to yourself to go to that house again,
1319.ain, and who knows but the second visit will bring out more than our first? But you
1320. you can get a I can't be with you next time. better companion; take Percy Wynn. Per
1321.on. He's not afraid of anything in this world or the next, except sin. As for ghosts
1322.thing in this world or the next, except sin. As for ghosts why, Percy would as soon
1323.or ghosts why, Percy would as soon talk vice, ; — to a ghost as to a peanut-seller
1324.elonging to myself. was too troubled in mind to return to St. I felt Maure's, and be
1325.difficulties presented themselves. said one evening in mid-December, "I'm not satis
1326.y I wired him the following message: It Will you accompany me to the Tower Hill Mans
1327.ning I received this letter: is My Dear will Harry: — My mother my now out of dang
1328.my now out of danger, and it be a great pleasure, dear friend, for I'll me to clasp your
1329.s a haunted house, after all ? We're in God's house. " Isn't God upon hands there j
1330.ter all ? We're in God's house. " Isn't God upon hands there just the same as anywh
1331.. " Isn't God upon hands there just the same as anywhere else. the ocean just the sa
1332.me as anywhere else. the ocean just the same as on the land ?" asks the little girl
1333.. But how much better than cold writing will it be to speak to you from my heart and
1334.t let of him, we were I entertaining an angel unawares. He sends you his dearest love
1335.ngel unawares. He sends you his dearest love. have just now him a few lines to of Ch
1336. know where we are to be at midnight He will be at a midnight mass; and I've given h
1337.rayers as He's an American saint. Well, good-by, I my dear friend — you have no id
1338.od-by, I my dear friend — you have no idea with I what pleasure look forward to me
1339.friend — you have no idea with I what pleasure look forward to meeting you. I'll have
1340. to meeting you. I'll have examined the time-table and find that reach Sessionsville
1341.t your house and making the connection. Good-by once more, dear Harry. Yours most af
1342.lking homeward toward nightfall, when a man came shambling up to me asking for an a
1343.aties. natural transition in my present state of mind, brought back the then in an in
1344.tural transition in my present state of mind, brought back the then in an instant bu
1345. formed on the instant. me was the very man who, of all men living, was best acquai
1346., who could be a more useful assistant? other hand, knew full well that, of all the p
1347.ull well that, of all the places in the world, Tower Hill Mansion would be the last p
1348.s own free choice. I In common with the other servants of that ill-fated I mansion, a
1349. learned from Mr. Lang, he held All the same I it was a house of haunted horrors. wa
1350., " I am talking to an old friend of my family, James Caggett." The bloodshot eyes gla
1351.have gone awful hard with me. An honest man can't make a living in these hard times
1352.ty-fourth, and I'll give you a job that will pay you well, and if you satisfy me, I'
1353.o help you along." sir. "I'll be there, Will it be ready money?" "You'll get a good
1354. Will it be ready money?" "You'll get a good sum from me on Christmas morning. Here
1355. had never come within the sphere of my life. morning I arose in disgust, took a col
1356.rew my things into my and was taxing my memory to find whether anything had escaped me
1357. I heard a sharp ring at the door-bell. Being on the tiptoe of expectation I hastened
1358. hours. Can't make it so as to meet yo\ Will see what I can do. Percy Wynn. 250 HARR
1359.hat house of ? houses, with loathfilled man is of all men — Caggett To The fear a
1360.ertain There are us in early days which many years efface not. In the presence of Ca
1361.equal in strength. Thus I reasoned; but memory were not to be carried by syl- that was
1362.nt, and to which I have pledged myself, will not allow me Am very to accompany you o
1363. the only availMr. John Nugent. He is a good able man I can command man, very acute,
1364.availMr. John Nugent. He is a good able man I can command man, very acute, but youn
1365.nt. He is a good able man I can command man, very acute, but young, inexperienced,
1366.HARRY wanting in physical bravery. DEE. will 251 It will be a do. spend a night in H
1367.g in physical bravery. DEE. will 251 It will be a do. spend a night in Hope he good
1368. will be a do. spend a night in Hope he good what novitiate is for him in our line o
1369.hat novitiate is for him in our line of life to popularly supposed to be a haunted h
1370.end," thought, as " if of the very weak man, gazed into the face unnecessary and in
1371.and at the top in a disgracefully brief time." Further reflections were cut short by
1372.ds and patches for a special occasion. "Good-morning, Caggett," and as grateful for
1373.ence of even the Mr. Nugent; "you're on time for a I'll need your services to-day an
1374.s." 11 give you twenty, " What I'm your man," said Caggett promptly. do you want me
1375.you'll not be alone," tleman and myself will "This genkeep you company." The horror
1376.You know the I'll house better than any one alive. make it worth your while to go.
1377.ed Caggett's at purpose? thought so the time. Perhaps the sequel will supply the rea
1378.thought so the time. Perhaps the sequel will supply the reader with another and a At
1379.use and consideration, Caggett asked: " Will you give me one pint of brandy to-day,
1380.tion, Caggett asked: " Will you give me one pint of brandy to-day, another to-night
1381.es," I answered, after reflection; "but mind, if you get drunk, you get no pay." He
1382.r motive. HARRY of DEE. 253 whereat the law-clerk changed color, and tugged nervous
1383.f events that I the benefit of at least one chapter to CHAPTER IN WHICH "TV TOW," I
1384.in That money, in the house. " is still one of the three rooms " I thought," interr
1385.r, " but later events have changed that opinion. As I was saying, I have reason to thin
1386.om where I slept that ; night or to the time library." it my uncle's bedchamber, acc
1387. my uncle's room, and examine it in the same manner." But here the wretched Caggett
1388.o!" he exclaimed, his voice hoarse with emotion. "Not that room! Take your own first. W
1389.leven. "Now, gentlemen," "we shall " My mind is made up. My uncle's first." "No! or
1390. be alone here for alJ the money in the world." As he spoke he took a mouthful of bra
1391. Nugent took the lead. Caggett was in a state of terror, which he kept within limits
1392. sit down. We'll put in our work in the other room. Hadn't we better try the other ro
1393.he other room. Hadn't we better try the other room now?" he inquired, turning to me.
1394.o his feet and ran over toward me. "For God's sake!" he cried, "let us leave the To
1395." he cried, "let us leave the To-morrow will be the time tohouse now. morrow." "Sit
1396."let us leave the To-morrow will be the time tohouse now. morrow." "Sit down, you co
1397. at it when spend we were here," I much time at it." replied. "But we didn't "There'
1398.Nugent, I call upon you to look at this man." Nugent, who had put himself beside me
1399.arry: — To-night suicide. find If — will at twelve o'clock I commit you you shou
1400. took the note from my palsied hand and Good God !" it I cried, " am read with eager
1401. the note from my palsied hand and Good God !" it I cried, " am read with eagerness
1402.hat seemed to penetrate Nugent's inmost being. "Look! look!" he gasped. Well might he
1403.ppeared to me at once that the wretched man had been taken by a fit. Placing the la
1404.s throat and a few deep gurgles as of a man choking to death, before he succeeded i
1405.few deep gurgles as of a man choking to death, before he succeeded in forcing out the
1406.ome to know of my uncle's suicide?" The same struggling and play of his throat ensue
1407.o your uncle, and I wanted to throw his death on —— her." I was not satisfied wit
1408. fallen into a stupor. "Don't give that man any more brandy," whis" If pered the fr
1409.y," whis" If pered the frightened young man in my ear. you do, there's every chance
1410.ng man in my ear. you do, there's every chance that we'll have a madI was a fool to co
1411.houlder and shaking him, "was there any other reason?" He opened his lips to reply, b
1412.d to steal his money," he answered with man on an effort. I glanced at the detectiv
1413.earnestly; he seemed to be speaking the truth. "Mrs. Raynor stole it," he added. "You
1414.ry he had made. revealed a recess about one foot square. "How did you find this?" I
1415.is?" I asked. "I I touched something or other; it must have been a spring, and a part
1416.re Caggett did not know that he was the cause of the darkness, and as the clock struc
1417. I PASS THROUGH THE GREA T CRISIS OF MY LIFE. THERE terrible beside the faint light
1418.wered lamp, in presence of a kneeling I man It writh- ing with agony, stood horror-
1419. sound, with the added human agony of a man beside himthroat, gasps self I with ter
1420.I with terror. I did not know it at the time; but am now I certain that, as Nugent h
1421.elf; and for what seemed a long span of time I stood motionless, gazing with awe upo
1422. would have come HARRY Go away DEE. 263 God's sake don't look on me that way," and
1423.ove me me to it. Didn't you tear up the will which made I was listening, and I knew
1424.mean to kill you!" Imagine words. It my state of mind when after all, I heard these I
1425.ill you!" Imagine words. It my state of mind when after all, I heard these I was a m
1426.nd was alone with the murderer. "Before God, I didn't mean it! I stole up here, and
1427.. There he lay — my uncle's murderer. soul sickened as I could scarcely bring myse
1428. put How my my arms about this dreadful man and on my uncle's bed! I placed him Ser
1429.blood, feared was the condition of that man of could not bring myself to touch his
1430. several hours, at the very nor, as the time passed on, my feelings of loathing less
1431.rove. I about counting my spent quite a time in separ* ating the gold, silver, and t
1432.ently I found that I was in no frame of mind to carry out my intention. Then I began
1433.d, endeavoring to put Caggett out of my mind, and forcing I my ; thoughts into lovel
1434.ught of Tom, our little Jesuit. By this time, Tom must have heard midnight mass, and
1435.s were with me and helping me Now. That one word brought back the even now. ugly pr
1436.rnished me by Lang, had not been in the habit of hiding his money. Had he actually in
1437.Christmas. I believe that all boys take pleasure in thinking of Bethlehem and the angels
1438. I actually made what Catholics call My imagination grew vivid, and I a meditation. almost
1439.e heavenly host praising and glorifying God; almost saw the great light which cast
1440.nly (why do not know, I have a guardian angel) the vision by some impulse, which I do
1441.or, I turned my head sharply. I was not one moment too soon. As I turned, I noticed
1442. advanced half-way across the room. His evil eyes were fixed upon me in a way there
1443.to bring a pisI was face to face with a man stronger than tol! myself and more accu
1444. tol! myself and more accustomed, I had good reason for thinking, to deeds of violen
1445.n getting assistance from That cowardly law-clerk might, after all, without. have h
1446.ght have impressed an observer with the idea that we were playing a game of "tag. "
1447.r a few seconds. Whatever the length of time, we were soon breathing table, ; heavil
1448. was pauses, would have was too excited one of these in when I stood stock-still, s
1449.oise came, and I took advantage of that one moment to seize the lamp from the table
1450. had taken in the circumstance, without being obliged to turn my eyes from my enemy.
1451.on the table there still given me a new idea. In remained the box, heavy with its st
1452.econd, but my decision, as the se- quel will show, was unfortunate. gett's head. I t
1453.f a moment, there was a sharp, stinging pain in my left leg just above the ankle, wh
1454.ful He was under me, glaring at me with same murderous look, and despite all my effo
1455.ding over me with a scared face. "Thank God! thank God!" I whispered. "Is it you, P
1456.e with a scared face. "Thank God! thank God!" I whispered. "Is it you, Percy, that
1457.Caggett had you down, when I saved your life. struck out at him." I attempted to ris
1458., bruises, and loss of I gave a gasp of pain, and sank back upon blood. the pillow.
1459.daging you, and if you move my bandages will come loose. Be patient for a while; I'v
1460.It's a long story, Harry. I went on the principle 'better late than never,' and took the
1461.stupid, an insignificant looking little man, who seemed to be in a state bordering
1462.oking little man, who seemed to be in a state bordering on insanity." "Oh, Mr. Nugent
1463. I got his name out of him in about the time that an ordinary dentist would have ext
1464.ing on here. He gave me *7 2 HARRY DEE. idea that Caggett was dead because of the I
1465.d then you should have seen record that time, and came me run; I bounding into the h
1466.gave bim were cruel; he dropped over to one side like Alog." thought beat ; my —
1467.zle against his ear, and said: Caggett, will you be obliging enough to answer a HARR
1468.his By the way, Mr. Caggett, I believe, will never ear. What drinking has left be ha
1469.ot of this night have accomThe wretched man will probably never plished. leave his
1470.f this night have accomThe wretched man will probably never plished. leave his bed a
1471. you're weak. You know how, once upon a time, your uncle destroyed a will in your pr
1472.nce upon a time, your uncle destroyed a will in your presence which favored Caggett,
1473.resence which favored Caggett, and read one Your nurse claimed fifty thousand in yo
1474.angry, and made using a keyhole. up his mind to get something out of your uncle. He
1475.fly the country. He did not make up his mind to kill your uncle—* ; 274 HARRY DEE.
1476.t with it under his pillow; but on this particular night of all nights there wasn't a trac
1477.t your uncle anticipated some danger or other that night, and hid those things away."
1478.e this as though he was speaking on the state of the weather. Having assured himself
1479. room half a minute, when he heard some one else coming along the corridor. He put
1480.ving Mr. Caggett I I gathered up a long time you, to the scattered contents of that
1481. box. never handled much money it in my life. It took me to get together; for I had
1482. watched you closely for ever so long a time. Do you know how much you've fallen hei
1483.ercy, those forty-five thousand dollars will be put in a bank and there they'll grow
1484. happy Christmas." And as we shook each other's hand we heard voices without, and peo
1485.nd that the shadow which had wrapped my life thus far had to — been lifted forever
1486.CULTY IN BRINGING HIS STORY TO A CLOSE. one year and eight months since Arrayed in
1487. the gold medal various branches of the philosophy class. He knows Frank Burdock, the only
1488.a face eminently intellectual. He knows Will Ruthers and Joe Whyte and as there come
1489.ock and biretta, a handsome, dark young man, with bright twinkling eyes and merry f
1490.end's hand, and congratulate him on his happiness! For it was only yesterday that Tom, im
1491.y yesterday that Tom, impelled with the desire of serving God, and trusting in His inf
1492.om, impelled with the desire of serving God, and trusting in His infinite sweetness
1493.It's the happiest day of think '"t's my life, almost," said if it Tom — I piest. s
1494.w's the new magazine ?" blessing of his life. "Strong in spe" I answered. "The money
1495.d I," said Joe Whyte, " intend to study law." "Will Ruthers, who looks so mild and
1496.aid Joe Whyte, " intend to study law." "Will Ruthers, who looks so mild and gentle,
1497.ere's not a newsboy of poor boys in the world. or a bootblack in Cincinnati who doesn
1498.oor fellows, and he's done ever so much good amonjg: them already, though 28o HARRY
1499., though 28o HARRY DEE. he's only had a chance of making their acquaintance fact, that
1500.d what was the Percy was looked upon by many a homeless lad as a saint. They loved h
1501.ut their reverence kept pace with their love. Percy had not forgotten his adventure
1502.venture His great heart was filled with love and compassion for God's chosen ones, f
1503.was filled with love and compassion for God's chosen ones, for the poor and the out
1504." asked Mr. Playfair. of literature and philosophy. Oh, we'll settle down, and take a spec
1505.thirty years old or so; and in the mean time there's a big sum of " money gathering
1506.ttle, DEE. 281 ing upon us with his old-time smile. He had changed though his face w
1507.elt, and Father Middleton, passing from one to another, gave us his priestly benedi
1508.tly benediction. What ing! a delightful time of it we had that morn- Old memories pl
1509. and laughed with an abandon which sent time flying on the swiftest and lightest of
1510.talked, and joked, and laughed for lost time. till Frank Burdock brought him to a st
1511.dleton a general confession of my whole life." Harrv was now quite serious; so were
1512.ry Quip!" exclaimed Percy. "He's of the same opinion as Father Middleton; and in a f
1513.ip!" exclaimed Percy. "He's of the same opinion as Father Middleton; and in a few days
1514.e a lucky fellow. 1 Here you go and get one of the sublimest of calls, and leave Fr
1515. still all of us, I trust, were more at peace with ourselves and with God after our i
1516.e more at peace with ourselves and with God after our interwith our saintly Father
1517.hat!" I burst out, "Arthur Vane?" " The same," laughed Arthur. " I'm the youngest no
1518.go," said Mr. Playfair, We "and fell in love with this place. could hardly get him o
1519.t Mr. Playfair as the night of "And now life." my During the hour that preceded dinn
1520. became warm friends. They struck me as being remarkably similar in their tastes and
1521.y well, but well, we played better. The time came but too quickly for our departure.
1522.m, concealed by the tabernacle, was the one sweet secret was the Incarnation that h
1523.parating, and taking different walks in life; but, different as were these walks, th
1524.e all to conduct us, we trusted, to the same goal to an everlasting union with Him b

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/