Concordance for A garden of roses : Stories and sketches / By Maurice Francis Egan.

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1.   RIG OF SHAMROCK 89 95 106 116 131 A A A GOOD EXAMPLE CHRISTMAS HYMN JUNE DAY WILDE B
2. HYMN JUNE DAY WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE THE BOY WHO WANTED TO BE OLD THE LAST M
3. f the parlor. had thrown down her book, One Margaret and was lounging on a comforta
4. her dreams apwere not very pleasant, if one might parently judge by the expression
5. nd unencumbered. It was in the country, one hundred miles from any town. The girls
6. , their made them older than been a gay life. to thought or study, but much to socia
7. unfortunately become too often adepts. life in the city had their real age. It had
8. in the city had their real age. It had time had been given Little Their mother was
9. ittle Their mother was devoted to them. matter No or weary she might be, she would has
10. she would hasten to save them from the necessity ill how of doing anything that she coul
11. ould do. They accepted the service as a matter of course. Their father had never been
12. for a moment that they were lacking in duty or respect. They were only helpless in
13. . embroidered, played, or They had more time on hands now. missing. Their city occup
14. why their mother would not save in some other way. would have helped them to enjoy th
15. osalie did not believe it; it was "just one of mam- A pony carriage ma's queer ways
16. D SKETCHES. This made the mother had no time to listen. Margaret somewhat impatient.
17. isten. Margaret somewhat impatient. "No time!" she murmured; "mother is too busy too
18. d; "mother is too busy too restless she will wear herself ; out." And that the dinne
19. ters were kept from the petty trials of life. away Anna had a taste for Art, with a
20. ials of life. away Anna had a taste for Art, with a capital A. She painted golden r
21. golden rods and asters, and numberless other fashionable flowers on plates; she embr
22. ce ; she was sure he had no feeling for Art. No attempt had been made to educate th
23. been instructed in the duties of their state in life. " They had heard a great deal
24. tructed in the duties of their state in life. " They had heard a great deal about hi
25. hood and aspirations," womanhood to the world," and " the necessity but of the practi
26. ns," womanhood to the world," and " the necessity but of the practical duties of Christia
27. ure of her darlings but she had not the courage to tell them that ; they were living in
28. eacher beautiful." He had called making life had not intended to say to ; them that
29. hed that novel at last!" she said. "How many Madge?" " Let ' ' : have you read this
30. ot re- member There is the names of the other nine just now, ' but the tenth was a La
31. it, and a great deal about and English life. Dear me I wish I hunting lived in Engl
32. d huntparties and luncheons, they enjoy life. ing ! ! ! The English know how to live
33. ther novel " " I don't see how tired of being I wish I tired of everything. rich ! I
34. osalie, somewhat sharply. "It ruins the memory, and makes one discontented." novel-rea
35. harply. "It ruins the memory, and makes one discontented." novel-reading to A GARDE
36. , to your conscience. You waste as much time as I do, and you are quite as disconten
37. you are quite as discontented. said the other day you practicing of You know would ra
38. yckoif, apologetically, "I have not had time to touch it. Hannah was busy with the w
39. n for the dessert, you and there are so many little things of which you girls know n
40. re scribbling about in your room for so many mornings, was it?" asked Rosalie. this
41. older than we are." I'll " If you don't mind, mamma, now ? " you to A GARDEN OF ROSE
42. e is boiling." "Oh, the sordid cares of life!" said Margaret, tragically. III. Mrs.
43. Margaret on brown She had never met the other she shook hands with them. girls before
44. it, please," said Philomena. "Would you mind getting me " asked Margaret. water, mam
45. f Mrs. Wyckoff rose from her chair as a matter Philomena looked from her to the in ama
46. es, to light each day. (O roses of June-time! your life discloses Fre^li perfume, fr
47. t each day. (O roses of June-time! your life discloses Fre^li perfume, fresh beauty
48. ur life discloses Fre^li perfume, fresh beauty in summer's way.) I would that my life
49. eauty in summer's way.) I would that my life With a new bud open " would make my lif
50. ife With a new bud open " would make my life a garden of roses, But keep the thorns
51. s for myself alone. (O rose of the June-time your heart encloses Sweet thoughts for
52. ir June has flown.) I " I would that my life its were like hidden roses, sweetness,
53. eetness, to fade Gently, gently as rose life closes, Known by away To live for other
54. water, She ing : does not mean ' ' it." Life offers us so few opportunities of " ing
55. koff, comback to earth. " I haven't any time, dear. ing I must get tea myself. Hanna
56. ey " is working and worrying herself to death ? ' ' ! ' ' "What Margaret, did you thi
57. Nuns afraid to stay until he comes you will not like us as well as the at the conve
58. like us as well as the at the convent." will try to," said Philomena, with a wistI f
59. yckoff. thought, "the payment for board will help mamma." 20 STORIES AND SKETCHES. "
60. 0 STORIES AND SKETCHES. "But only let I will help you!" " cried Philomena; me stay !
61. ather mischievously : " I would make my life a garden of roses, But keep the thorns
62. her aunt's head, and go to work with a will. She liked the occupations of her cousi
63. aunt wearing herself away. Sisters, The good committed early in life, most menial wo
64. y. Sisters, The good committed early in life, most menial work done at the call of d
65. e, most menial work done at the call of duty, for our Lord's sake, became noble and
66. worthy. She had not learned in vain the life of the whom Philomena had been had taug
67. mile. could these girls fail to see the sin of leaving their mother, sick and weak,
68. to face all the rough little trials of life? Philomena asked herself this question
69. a came. Then she had said to her aunt : will go, too; burden to you." "I I know that
70. The that have room now, but I know they will keep me until father comes back. Perhap
71. N OF ROSES. 23 Wyckoff, eagerly. "You I love to have you, dear besides, stay. I don'
72. meet, if it were not for the money you will pay for your board." Philomena wa^ surp
73. s Philomena entered " I : would that my life its were like hidden to fade roses, Kno
74. sweetness, away Gently, gently as rose-life closes, live for others, and then decay
75. of anger. She was inclined to speak her mind to these people, so well satisfied with
76. s- contented with their lot in herself, life. She restrained prayer ; ; murmuring he
77. d with a smile she She "Why, Madge, you life have put your mother's into poetry !" 2
78. e, you life have put your mother's into poetry !" 24 STORIES AND SKETCHES. "Mamma's is
79. 4 STORIES AND SKETCHES. "Mamma's is all life is prose," said Margaret, loftily. I co
80. it "I wish my talent ; I would make her life a poem of infinite splen- dor full of t
81. ld and crimson harmonies of colors that one finds in the old cathedral windows of y
82. ches over the sea." "Have you ever seen one? asked Philomena. "No," answered Margar
83. lay." Rosalie and " Anna looked at each other, and said with their eyes, "No feeling
84. d said with their eyes, "No feeling for art !" "I have heard," Margaret said, layin
85. ng of things acquire only a superficial idea of the world's great possibilities." Ma
86. acquire only a superficial idea of the world's great possibilities." Margaret was pa
87. t that the highest aspiracan have is to love and serve God Madge we tion a in the wo
88. est aspiracan have is to love and serve God Madge we tion a in the woman state of l
89. serve God Madge we tion a in the woman state of life in which He I don't know much a
90. d Madge we tion a in the woman state of life in which He I don't know much about has
91. I don't know much about has placed her. education myself; but I do know,- without being a
92. ucation myself; but I do know,- without being able to make comparisons of the differe
93. tems, that the Sisters keep young girls good and pure. are not taught to appear olde
94. ! They do credit to into put your whole soul your embroidery, if you did it at all,"
95. should think you'd " cock's feather. " Soul?" asked Philomena, in surprise. "Certai
96. s a new What she had done, she had done language. and well, without talking much about s
97. dipped into her novel again, "that your religion colors your life? In mine, religion has
98. again, "that your religion colors your life? In mine, religion has always been some
99. our religion colors your life? In mine, religion has always been somewhat of a thing apa
100. girl then because Catholics remembered God every hour of their life, and prayed da
101. lics remembered God every hour of their life, and prayed daily to be remembered by H
102. ered by His Mother at the hour of their death. Why, Madge, left religion is our life.
103. e hour of their death. Why, Madge, left religion is our life." Philomena, who was near h
104. death. Why, Madge, left religion is our life." Philomena, who was near her heart, ti
105. : mena " ! A GARDEN OF ROSES. 27 " With pleasure." After this the girls treated Philorae
106. mena could give gather autumn leaves. a good reason for staying at home. As soon as
107. staying at home. As soon as her cousins One ran into the kitchen. were out of sight
108. king chair, ' aunt; I'm going to have a good work.'" into Mrs. Wyckoff the old- fash
109. placid, as Philomena remembered her in other from her days. Tears rose to the girl's
110. to be helpful for their more own sakes. life." They do not like the work of every-da
111. le " I do not like embarassed it hold a sin if aunt," said Philomena, a but I have
112. ost un- If I were pleasant duties of my state in life. not a Catholic, aunt, I should
113. f I were pleasant duties of my state in life. not a Catholic, aunt, I should never d
114. erior sent her a note saying that I was one of her children, and that Mrs. d'Eresby
115. he wants you and and me to go with her. Will girls you go into the parlor and say ye
116. ff. " Aunt means to decline in favor of one of the girls, but I will not let her,"
117. ine in favor of one of the girls, but I will not let her," said Philomena to herself
118. Eresby to the miles across the country. one of the door. 30 STORIES AND SKETCHES. V
119. orations of them. Margaret was in great good humor. They had met Mrs. Treverne, a ne
120. tthew Arnold, that the truest effect of religion is lucidity," she said, making a cross
121. I not are you not lucid " demanded Mrs. life Philomena, losing patience. "Am in my l
122. e Philomena, losing patience. "Am in my life? Our friend, Treverne, says that my lif
123. ife? Our friend, Treverne, says that my life is as lucid a as that of any girl she k
124. d don't." at their cousin After all, no matter what reproachful eyes. think of her say
125. rgaret was they might the genius of the family, and she ought to be respected accordin
126. e acquaintance with cultured people you will be less of a Philister. The quotation I
127. f a Philister. The quotation I made the other day was from it was only an echo of Geo
128. her books on the to condemned list. The truth is, Cousin Mar- 32 STORIES AND SKETCHES
129. way," Philomena continued, very glad to change the subject, "Mrs. d'Eresby called this
130. country. To be called on by her was an honor. eminent inhabitants ; Every it localit
131. s in her carriage for next Sunday There will be a jn-and consecration A GARDEN OF RO
132. at Compton. and the music be there, 33 will ceremony An Archbishop "I hope mamma wi
133. ll ceremony An Archbishop "I hope mamma will will be grand." have time to fix up my
134. remony An Archbishop "I hope mamma will will be grand." have time to fix up my black
135. "I hope mamma will will be grand." have time to fix up my black silk," said Margaret
136. mother has not been out for a drive for many weeks. She does not have tune to go to
137. her church on Sundays." " She does not mind," answered Margaret, " She would rather
138. er and Rosalie, because was the musical one." "You do not know Margaret mamma, my d
139. o not know Margaret mamma, my dear. She will not go. She is a dear little mother, bu
140. ande than Mrs. d'Eresby than could. She will not go. " you "Then nobody will go from
141. ld. She will not go. " you "Then nobody will go from e/awze'like well this house." 3
142. ry my poem as a duo." " I would that my life With a new bud open were a garden of ro
143. nice teacher you are ' ' ! You improve other people, and you can" not even keep your
144. s. d'Eresby, instead of her mother. " I will make my excuses to Mrs. d'Eresby when s
145. her voice trembling a little, " if you will give me your black silk it like gown O
146. k it like gown O Mrs. d'Eresby wore the other day." the one " Mother is someMargaret
147. Mrs. d'Eresby wore the other day." the one " Mother is someMargaret was delighted.
148. ught" There is something in Philomena's religion that is noble," she said to Anna. " But
149. oes not know what it means. Philomena's religion seems It makes her give up things. real
150. I felt that she was really speaking to God. Now, ful. ! Anna, you know we always s
151. u know we always seein to be praying at God. Don't you think we might help mamma to
152. amazement. Mrs. "VVyckoff had a little time to sit on the 36 porch STORIES AND SKET
153. The Margaret was not prepared for this. idea of the elegant Mrs. d'Eresby offering p
154. ed Mrs. plause. " I would make ' And my life a garden of roses, " keep the thorns fo
155. an, and I have seen a great deal of the world, but I do not understand what you am me
156. ought you If we remain for Vespers, you will hear did. It is worth the choir sing th
157. the briars, and gave it ' to Philo- " I will mena, saying, with a smile, " alone.' t
158. the rest grand music fulfilled They her idea of what worship ought to be. Margaret p
159. orgot her intention before There was no rhetoric, no it was over. " lucidity." It was a
160. , no it was over. " lucidity." It was a life. plain It sermon on the everyday duties
161. salie saved steps. Mrs. Wyckoff a great many Rosalie became so cheerful that she eve
162. ecome a Catholic, mamma?" Rosalie asked one afternoon, when the three were merrily
163. ecome a But I Catholic myself, if I had time to think " Very much, dear, if it Philo
164. lomena here. Do you know," ! never have time," she added, with a sigh. " Rose and I
165. ," she added, with a sigh. " Rose and I will give you time now," Philo- mena said, k
166. with a sigh. " Rose and I will give you time now," Philo- mena said, kissing her aun
167. ena said, kissing her aunt's worn hand. life Margaret and Anna varied their in the p
168. esby, and not to deprive Rosalie of the pleasure of the visit, that she consented at las
169. ret was resolved that she should make a good appearance at the musicale. It was to b
170. deration but it, required attention and time. Margaret particular, was very santly.
171. , required attention and time. Margaret particular, was very santly. she found fault inces
172. the words "If I " Now she had less had time to think only ! time than usual. No had
173. w she had less had time to think only ! time than usual. No had been found. hectic h
174. rgaret singing, "Gently, gently as rose-life closes, To live for others and then dec
175. self at Philomena's feet, "teach me the truth, help me to repair my awful wrong. Oh,
176. eart- broken cry, so often repeated too world over. side. late all the Margaret rose
177. yer she had begun "Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us now and at the hour of our
178. pray for us now and at the hour of our death." And her cousin answered with her, "Am
179. nd comfort in his words. She alone, was one. all had made her life a very simple Si
180. s. She alone, was one. all had made her life a very simple Since her mother's death,
181. r life a very simple Since her mother's death, which had happened on the voyage from
182. it had father, father! little been his one friend. "Oh, you the if I could only ha
183. e, Mary, you're a cordon bleu," the old man often said, growing cheerful as the app
184. kles are grace-notes in the sym- "Never mind, Mary," her bow copied from the father
185. her bow copied from the father phony of beauty." wrote this sentiment in her noteand t
186. were the lesson-books now, their was no one to hear her repeat their words Alone !
187. ! You, Wilhel-rneena Mary felt a great desire to talk to somebody, know this Wilhelmi
188. hbors had dropped in after her father's death ; the women, rough and ready, tried har
189. er, thus it is with those who less of a man talk much." It is best to " be quiet,"
190. success that comes sion " to those who love flowers. The " exten- glass. was a vera
191. ays when the house was the residence of one family, instead of half a dozen, it had
192. when the house was the residence of one family, instead of half a dozen, it had been a
193. ged in no luxury, except these flowers. One by one he had added to his collection.
194. no luxury, except these flowers. One by one he had added to his collection. The the
195. s no bud on the Chinese primroses. " It will soon be time to set the roses out of do
196. he Chinese primroses. " It will soon be time to set the roses out of doors," she tho
197. am-shells, planted to Mary sighed. give beauty to the place. let in the air open the w
198. . I slipped " ' ' : it in yesterday. It will make you happy could only add Here he g
199. before you can look around, as we were God bless you had been thankful many times
200. we were God bless you had been thankful many times Mary in the old country. " ! sinc
201. ught. She shared with him the horror of being "turned out." She had, after all paid,
202. e of the big shelf of books, the little one filled with MSS. of music, the flowers?
203. ? It would have been tered like another death to have sold and scat; them yet in a la
204. sold and scat; them yet in a large city space is so valuable that the poor child, wit
205. am. My father was a Catholic." " " Poor man said the visitor, poor man " He sees th
206. c." " " Poor man said the visitor, poor man " He sees the light now." feelingly. "
207. ate girl, and the Rev. Melancthon Bangs will pray with you and get you some work to
208. ut she played every dav an exercise and one of Moore's melodies in 52 STORIES AND S
209. ORIES AND SKETCHES. of her father. it ; memory and she knew She played very badly, dep
210. on, except her cooking and sewing. The world seemed very bleak, cold, and wide. She
211. e two great cities. to Mass through the same streets day after day, and sometimes go
212. few minutes, not before the violin this time, but in prayer before her little statue
213. myself," thought " without Mary, taking other people's troubles on my shoulders. What
214. 54 STOUIKS AM) SKETCHES. something the matter with that nasty Schmid baby." But the l
215. se I must go, though I shall not " have time to Another cry from above Wilhelmina da
216. r mother was almost too She sank into a life, weak to stand. chair, and Mary caught
217. s into her rooms, she cried out : " Go, one of you, and get the court-plaster which
218. baby's nose, say- ing, in German : " It will make thee well, thou angel." Mrs. Schmi
219. German : " It will make thee well, thou angel." Mrs. Schmid watched Mary, her fat, re
220. after a June shower. Filomena, after a time, put her chubby arms around Mary's neck
221. Mrs. face. face ! Schmid. ' "Never " ! will I call you 'little old maid again the T
222. brought' Mary back to herself. To tell truth, her chief reason for disliking the Sch
223. ds was that the children had acquired a habit of singing out, whenever they could " l
224. ever went to Mass. " Can't the children mind one another while " you are out ? " Min
225. went to Mass. " Can't the children mind one another while " you are out ? " Mind on
226. ind one another while " you are out ? " Mind one another " Wilhelmina, I will cried
227. ne another while " you are out ? " Mind one another " Wilhelmina, I will cried Mrs.
228. ut ? " Mind one another " Wilhelmina, I will cried Mrs. Schmid, whip thee well when
229. speaking another. in English, "how they mind one I went out to the grocer's for a mi
230. ing another. in English, "how they mind one I went out to the grocer's for a minute
231. rd to bury his sleeves in his sides. "I will not," he said, sulkily. "You only 58 ST
232. ND SKETCHES. made them worse, mother. I will not go to church and be laughed at by t
233. t go to church and be laughed at by the other boys. The last patch you put on " Augus
234. to call him Dutchie.' It is hard to be good when one is poor." Mary felt that she o
235. im Dutchie.' It is hard to be good when one is poor." Mary felt that she ought to d
236. en o'clock said. Mass," she " I this is will not be selfish. is I morning. hard for
237. m neatly cloth. a drawer, wherein laid, many things were took some pieces of black T
238. ," she was "come to the saying called ; man who had little Bethel ; then you will l
239. ; man who had little Bethel ; then you will listen to the holy the Scriptures, whic
240. never heard Popish ! words of your poor Good-morning, ma'am." And then to Mrs. Schmi
241. e cloth she had brought. are committing sin. Is this what at once you ; your priest
242. urprised. a Her cheeks a flushed "It is good work work of necessity. August has need
243. eeks a flushed "It is good work work of necessity. August has need of his jacket to-day.
244. forgot to look sulky ; he grinned with pleasure. Had he not a new black necktie and a p
245. . as there the children, was but little time and she intended to go to eleven o'cloc
246. k Mass herself, she denied herself that pleasure, and told them stories. impulse, The Ge
247. impulse, The German children asked for one of Grimm's Marchen, which their mother
248. t. Gudula. She was just telling how the evil spirits tried to blow out the saint's l
249. d to blow out the saint's lantern every time she went to Mass early in the morning,
250. e walls of the " extension" quivered in time l)c to the trilling of the canary, sing
251. fted the burden of her grief; and for a time she ceased to ask herself, ' ' What can
252. a's plate, and Florestan and August had one or two slight misunderMary saw that Mrs
253. rMary saw that Mrs. Schmid's standings. knowledge of cooking led to some waste. She asked
254. the boy's question thinking The Schmid family did not long remain em. " Never mind,"
255. family did not long remain em. " Never mind," she The mother had told her brood was
256. Mrs. Schmid," she said, after a pause, will get breakfast for these children to-mor
257. row and help them off to school, if you will let Au- gust sell " Ach, some of my flo
258. , kissing Mary on both cheeks; " are an angel "you "How And good O is the little old
259. th cheeks; " are an angel "you "How And good O is the little old maid!" chor" ! used
260. glasses. little box of sham- A rock and one of white clover, now in bloom, had been
261. wonderful how he had managed to pack so many plants into such a small place, and sti
262. plenty of hyacinths, a few carnations, many rose-geranium leaves, mignonette, and f
263. arnations and clover-blossoms ; but the man that flowers are scarce, and the evenin
264. lowers are scarce, and the evening best time to sell them." is says the "Very well,
265. hem." is says the "Very well, August. I will have the bunches ready about five o'clo
266. fect them with the clover-blossoms. was good. " They wont bring will help." " but mu
267. r-blossoms. was good. " They wont bring will help." " but much," she thought, they S
268. as ages. I begged them whenever I saw a man with a package." Mary thanked him. Augu
269. . died. " the happiest day since father soul rest in peace " ! May his She took up h
270. happiest day since father soul rest in peace " ! May his She took up her sewing a fr
271. ' he said, 'I didn't know there were so many of the fashionWhat do you want for all
272. gust, "seven dollars and a haJf, except one five cent piece with a hole in it. But
273. so glad !" cried Mary, thinking of the pleasure must give him. Mrs. Schmid was aghast.
274. "No," she said, sharply. "My August You will take only what he has earned. him what
275. e only what he has earned. him what you will." may pay it fingered the money for an
276. ered the money for an instant, and, the justice of this, divided it into two seeing Mar
277. cried out, ' "To-morrow we old maid !"' will make it little Mary laughed. She began
278. Here was enough to keep her in food for many days. Unconsciouswhile thinking least o
279. Her whole She thought had been for the family up-stairs. had hoped to help them to br
280. s is great. The rent was low and, after many consultations, in Mary rented the place
281. were wholesale dealers now. the rest ; One day, sent a in the next spring, Mary ha
282. what my holds," she said, father meant God rest his soul." tained Mary never found
283. s," she said, father meant God rest his soul." tained Mary never found what the old
284. eep thy heart free and raised upward to God; because thou hast not here a lasting a
285. ; lived in Nantes, a town in Brit- you will find in left your maps. Pier- rot's fat
286. ighbors, as Madame Choux Pierrot was to one of her seen wildly rushing a helmet. do
287. rushing a helmet. down the street with one of her tin his head, cooking utensils o
288. ench soldiers represented by a squad of other boys of various sizes. "He'll break for
289. ed Pierrot. He had become quite used to being boxed on the ear he minded them as much
290. ever be a Prussian damaged article. but one must have something on his again; I did
291. hink 74 STORIES AND SKETCHES. head when one is a Prussian, you know, for the French
292. rPierrot, however, soon found this out. Experience had taught Madame that extreme quietnes
293. quietness on Pierrot's part was a sure sign of brewing mischief. As Pierrot made no
294. ut when Pierrot begged her to admire an animal, either a dog or cow, which he had draw
295. but you To-morrow I shall shan't escape punishment. send you to Le Cheval Rouge." Pierrot
296. ock of dried cherries, she felt that no punishment could be too severe for the young culpr
297. e to cook. His father had owned a small idea at all. farm about a mile from the town
298. dreamed of working on it at some future time. to stay where he was. attended one of
299. re time. to stay where he was. attended one of the Brothers' schools and, in spite
300. anwhile he wanted He scholar. To do him justice, he was not a bad ; boy, although he wa
301. angers. Madame Choux did not relent and one ; morning Pierrot, with eyes red from w
302. , and she told him if he wanted to wear one of her stew-pans, instead of a hat, she
303. Poor Pierrot hung his head in silence. Time passed Pierrot had a hard time at the ;
304. silence. Time passed Pierrot had a hard time at the ; inn. thought with regret of hi
305. nything went wrong, the blame was, as a matter of course, usually left on his shoulder
306. he ungrateful boy! "she would exclaim, will never come to a good end." passed, and
307. she would exclaim, will never come to a good end." passed, and with autumn came a de
308. und step-mother's house. that the whole space between himself and the dwelling was on
309. ce between himself and the dwelling was one rippling expanse of water. "Where is my
310. you seen her ? " he asked anxiously, of one of the bystanders. No one had seen her.
311. anxiously, of one of the bystanders. No one had seen her. Pierrot called out But th
312. aged however. Pierrot could not procure one. In the meantime, Madame Choux might be
313. ds. all were Seeing these, a a pole new idea entered Pierrot's head. He threw one of
314. w idea entered Pierrot's head. He threw one of these into the water, and seizing fr
315. rang upon wonder of the lookers on. " I will bring Madame Choux back on this," he sa
316. ome words of encouragement, and keeping one end of the board on the window, pushed
317. of the board on the window, pushed the other through until it rested on the of the o
318. " ! With her step-son's assistance, and many groans, Madame Choux at last arose to a
319. to mount the board. "You have saved my life, Pierrot; between fright and pain I cou
320. ed my life, Pierrot; between fright and pain I could not move." feet, The ladder tha
321. raced him tenderly, scolding him at the same time for having been so reckless as to
322. him tenderly, scolding him at the same time for having been so reckless as to ventu
323. the river all around me, I think I have science well, you may be sure. been too harsh w
324. x and he live on the best of terms. His experience at the Red Horse learned him the value
325. oss by any mischievous tricks. The last time I was in Nantes, I asked venerable cure
326. ed by tall, brick houses on every side. One little girl was searching for any tiny
327. ume to show itself above the ground the other was looking for bugs and ; SUCH 81 82 S
328. the High Altar, are any flowers on the other bush." if there are five crimson buds r
329. her sister, " or JUNE ROSES. your face will look drawn in red ink " ! 83 rivers lik
330. aves. make a very pretty nosegay." That will " A ; "The " nosegay with a meaning, re
331. of it mygirls !" called a shrill, pip- "Good-morning, ing voice above them. "Who's "
332. m. "Who's " that?" they both asked. ! ! Good-morning, girls Good-morning, girls " Go
333. hey both asked. ! ! Good-morning, girls Good-morning, girls " Good-morning, girls Th
334. od-morning, girls Good-morning, girls " Good-morning, girls The girls looked up, and
335. said Nora. "Jack has taught him to say Good-morning.' " ' "Dear me?" said Bridget,
336. eness. ' He might teach his bird to say Good-morning, " young ladies,' instead of gi
337. l?" "Yes. Well, Mr. Morgan lives there. One day last week he came past our house ju
338. Jack wouldn't sell him. he changed his mind he O might take Charlie up to the house
339. " said that if JUNE KOSES. " Jack won't change Charlie too well. his 85 mind. He in li
340. k won't change Charlie too well. his 85 mind. He in likes We had better go and I'm i
341. ut Bridget " You said called him. girls will never let a fellow be quiet," ' ' a Jac
342. ," said Jack. "Each of our fellows wore one in his jacket button-hole, 86 STORIES A
343. knowingly, twinkled his eyes and said: "Good-morning." " Yes must Charlie, for I can
344. can't you go, spoil Nora and Bridget's pleasure, and I must give them some roses for th
345. ow, and white roses, telling him at the same time that he might have some of his bes
346. nd white roses, telling him at the same time that he might have some of his best pla
347. e saw how delighted by were greatly the wealth of flowers he brought his sisters them.
348. ke, ' ' : he heard somebody calling out Good-morn- looked from his window, and saw C
349. er Charlie could escape he invariably " Good-mornflew to Jack's window, and said " t
350. irest and purest created beings. On the other side of the street, watching the proces
351. sion, stood a little newsboy within the honor the of all shadow of the wall. He was a
352. He started move on when two passed him, one of them carrying a large bouNed Murphy,
353. em. " Morning papers, ladies !" and the one with the flowers took out her pocketboo
354. his papers and thanked the ladies. The one with the bouquet broke off a flower and
355. ! given him the passion-flower the only one " So I have Ned by this But it can't be
356. ed by this But it can't be helped now." time was fully a square ahead, with the prec
357. not notice the flight of purple petals. time as he held the flower in various positi
358. r in various positions, and enjoyed its beauty in different lights. : Ned's life-story
359. its beauty in different lights. : Ned's life-story was a very short one mother had d
360. ts. : Ned's life-story was a very short one mother had died when he was a baby. fat
361. ayers by the old apple woman, and among other things, he had read So he was not illpa
362. aper from Ned that morning knelt at the same altar. She noticed her own passionflowe
363. interested boy who had the offered the one bright object he possessed to Queen of
364. ch condescension Ned was greatly conand one of his fused, flattered and delighted b
365. avor which Ned never received from that particular boy. Mrs. Woodleigh did not lose sight
366. nd Catechism every Sunday and ; after a time she succeeded in procuring place as ass
367. ay. BLUFFS BOY. CHAPTER I. ALONE IN THE WORLD. was a sailor. The phrase and ready" de
368. retense of keeping his birthday. He was good-natured and good-hearted but he did not
369. g his birthday. He was good-natured and good-hearted but he did not mend his ways, h
370. not mend his ways, his future, in this world and the next, was not likely to be very
371. , was not likely to be very ; if happy. One evening, when his ship was in port and
372. then went back to the boxes. In a short time he returned with a large coarse bag. Th
373. the pavement with his Tom back against one of them. " Much obliged, youngster," he
374. hereabouts?" "I don't live anywhere in particular," said the boy, creeping into a box tha
375. e so ; a whipper-snapper ! alone in the world like you " What's your name ? " all "Le
376. 'm going to adopt you. I'll give you an education, though I'll have to give up my birthda
377. shed boy suddenly found him- Tom Bluff. Time passed. Tom became adopted by each day
378. sailor expressed it. Lewis Arlyn was a good boy. I don't mean to say that he was a
379. and play, but I do that .he mean to say good Catholic, and he gained great influence
380. ting on his a was next voyage, received time since his boyhood. Our Lord for the fir
381. hool, but because he could not bear the knowledge was working hard for him. He do somethi
382. , " a wilful boy must have his way. But God is on the sea as You've made me believe
383. here. You shall be a cabin- our captain will take you. boy, Lewis became a cabin boy
384. FF'S BOY. 101 him a favorite with every one on board. The him Tom Bluff's boy. The
385. the acquaintance of several Esquimaux. One Esquimau boy, named Mukhe-bc-out, had t
386. . The dogs belonging to Muk-he-be-out's family were fighting and snarling among themse
387. Tom and did was outside, but he had no other weapon than his knife. Before Muk-he-be
388. with upraised spears, and, actuated by one impulse, they fled rapidly from the pla
389. tightly. still in the hut. There was no time Tom BLUFF'S BOY. 103 resolved to fight
390. ed to fight the bears, and give the boy time to escape. " Lewis," he cried, " come o
391. eth hard, and murmured a prayer, at the same time preparing to launch his block of i
392. ard, and murmured a prayer, at the same time preparing to launch his block of ice. T
393. ns. The foremost bear uttered a roar of pain, and, leaving Tom, hastened to 104 STOR
394. ught The second bear, probably thinking pain. that discretion was the best part of v
395. l and disappeared behind the iceberg. A man, clad in the fur dress and hood of the
396. -covered rocks. Not noticing Lewis, the man fired another shot at the bear. With a
397. e bear. With a low, rumbling groan, the animal expired. to in examine his He knelt dow
398. Lewis!" Lewis knew BLUFF'S BOY. 105 The man lyn's father. in Esquimau dress was Lew
399. g to make sure of it. He had arrived in time to save Lewis and death. Tom from a hor
400. e had arrived in time to save Lewis and death. Tom from a horrible The Morning Star s
401. her is ; Tom is happy, and they are all good. Don't you think the all happy because
402. best are last reason is the reason for happiness. A SPRIG OF SHAMROCK. a certain ON as M
403. y and her son were kitchen, all and the family. a perfect picture of neatness. the sno
404. ood by her, her head barely reached the Time and trouble had level of his shoulders.
405. ot impatient, said this provoking "It's time you were off, Joe." keep promised yeste
406. performed a double! " Well, then, it's good news, mother." " Good news will keep, J
407. Well, then, it's good news, mother." " Good news will keep, Joe." " Sure, I can't M
408. n, it's good news, mother." " Good news will keep, Joe." " Sure, I can't Mr. Maher i
409. th gold rims And, having unburdened his mind of the shuffle. ! ! secret that torture
410. evening, he hastened away to his daily labor. "He never thinks of himself at all, at
411. pe away a tear. Mrs. Murphy had endured many trials. Her husband and three children
412. ome to America. Joe was employed in the law office of Maher & Arnold, lie ran erran
413. s, copied documents, and performed such other Mr. Maher held duties as fell to his sh
414. s he divided Joe's usual labors, but at other times he sat at a high desk, in an up-
415. ly way. lived in the James Tyrrell Joe. same house with an old A distant relative of
416. never of late arrived at the office in time, and when he did come he was generally
417. punctual. made no eifort to imitate the good conduct that made the latter a favorite
418. s a week phia. was pleasant; and in his mind's-eye, Joe already saw many improvement
419. and in his mind's-eye, Joe already saw many improvements in the little room at home
420. fter a while, Tyrell came in yawning. " Good morning," said Joe. " Early enough to-d
421. Tyrrell; faith I'd not be letting every one know I was ' ' Irish." " More shame At
422. know I was ' ' Irish." " More shame At man this moment for you," said Joe, gravely
423. A SPRIG OF SHAMROCK. Ill Mr. Maher said good morning, and then went into his private
424. private office. He came out in a short time, with something in his hand. " You've n
425. ons of admiration. The watch was in the form of a tiny gold rose ; each petal was ex
426. ing melody from the various bands added life and animation to the scene. Mr. Maher a
427. sitated an instant, and then joined the other two at the door. He took his stand very
428. hile we were standing in the doorway no one entered, that is certain. The back door
429. facts, what is your conclusion?" " That one of us took the watch," said Tyr: ; A SP
430. brain, Joe walked home. In an hour all happiness had flown. The streets were gay with fl
431. mother comforted him. She, at least, " God will make it all believed him. ; right,
432. her comforted him. She, at least, " God will make it all believed him. ; right," she
433. eserted him at his hands, for the first sign of the disease. Had ister to not Joe Mu
434. ed Joe and the doctor into the room. We will not dwell on the scene. In the presence
435. o made it all right." grateful to Him A GOOD EXAMPLE.* TBANSLATED FKOM THE FKENCH OF
436. TED FKOM THE FKENCH OF MADAME GUIZOT DE WILL. room, and I was often forced to spend
437. . room, and I was often forced to spend many hours on I "Winter had set in, and my w
438. a placed near a carpet, and so I had my time my window. the draughts," somebody was
439. the smallest cracks were closed up. "I will see all that goes on outside," I answer
440. all that goes on outside," I answered. will feel "You said, although this * Slightl
441. although this * Slightly altered. 116 A GOOD EXAMPLE. 117 husband laughed. "You will
442. GOOD EXAMPLE. 117 husband laughed. "You will see servants shaking carpets, and maids
443. treet are dear, and I intend to observe many things in my little court. This evening
444. dow, when I uttered an exclamation of I will tell delight. Louise, had known ment. '
445. ' ' me all my old waiting-maid, who my life, looked up in astonishdown on the I fir
446. ad a little girl once, but her Guardian Angel had led her from earth into the home of
447. e window. At first, I thought the elder one resembled my dear Maria, for she had go
448. paint destroyed and her limbs broken by being washed in a basin of water? " " And hot
449. hite cat ! seat with the gravity of a A GOOD EXAMPLE. 119 human being (and with more
450. gravity of a A GOOD EXAMPLE. 119 human being (and with more than the gravity of come
451. , had ceased knitting, to look from the other window. "That cat is a good animal," sh
452. k from the other window. "That cat is a good animal," she remarked, " Ten tunes at l
453. m the other window. "That cat is a good animal," she remarked, " Ten tunes at least be
454. would have scratched the little and The idea of washing a cat stupids. detest water
455. Yes, ! ! madame, they are children of a man employed in a government office. Their
456. hey are children of a man employed in a government office. Their mother died 120 last STOR
457. hen you meet him again, tell him your A GOOD EXAMPLE. wife is 121 sick, to her, some
458. wife is 121 sick, to her, sometimes, he will and that by sending his little girls pe
459. she was, she already felt the weight ; life my visitor had nothing of this. She cro
460. e you," they both chimed in. The pretty animal jondescended to roll himself up in my c
461. - comes to shake the carpet." shuddered good house-wife that I was A GOOD at the EXA
462. shuddered good house-wife that I was A GOOD at the EXAMPLE 123 thought of this carp
463. e, my Faradet" cat. is who tired," said animal rubbed his head against his mistress' s
464. aw and de- scended gently. "You see how good he is, madame " ! ex- claimed his delig
465. Too long ! I looked at the clock. Two A GOOD EXAMPLE. 125 hours had slipped away as
466. d children soon understand and learn to love one another. I will be greatly obliged
467. ldren soon understand and learn to love one another. I will be greatly obliged to y
468. rstand and learn to love one another. I will be greatly obliged to you if you will t
469. I will be greatly obliged to you if you will their permit them to come back to-morro
470. them to come back to-morrow ' ' father being willing," I said, turning to the " and
471. and not to disturb nurse, you, my maid will take them home, so that it will not be
472. my maid will take them home, so that it will not be necessary to attend them, mademo
473. d to perform some errands, during which time she would leave her charges in my care.
474. ruitless efforts, to deavored, with the many open window, " downfall. in spite of Lo
475. e a whip- ping," she observed; "the cat will be trying There it is, open at to raise
476. en at to raise the window next. last." "Good day!" voices, repeated two " ! fresh li
477. " voices, repeated two " ! fresh little good day, opened our window to let the dust
478. you slept well ? Faradet has been very good Louise shut the window, and the childre
479. f their cat. "I have never seen such an animal," said stopping her work to look at our
480. ese girls keep the I beasts from eating one another. ing time." But am los- Louise
481. e I beasts from eating one another. ing time." But am los- Louise managed to protrac
482. visit. They brought their books and I A GOOD EXAMPLE. 127 commenced could read a to
483. had not ; "We yet been admitted to the honor of paying me a visit but the most perfe
484. Genevieve, trying in her turn, with the same success as her sister. Where- upon they
485. r, and they were obliged to give up the idea of making me comprehend Raton's ex- pre
486. sions of joy. 128 STOEIES AND SKETCHES. will bring "We promise. leave I him and you
487. bring "We promise. leave I him and you will see," they their promised. I did not re
488. my room. I had decided to profit by my liberty, in order to see Mr. Boilou and advise
489. me (with my Louise) but they were kind, good-natured, and docile. I was not astonish
490. and docile. I was not astonished at the peace that reigned little friends. ; among th
491. to see my but, although they loved each other with all their hearts, they teased and
492. r hearts, they teased and provoked each other from morning to night. two boys act in
493. aradet into favor. He helped her, she A GOOD EXAMPLE. 129 avowed, to count her linen
494. against my Eaton's cage the poor little animal, frightened by the shock, took refuge i
495. the old dog and the meowing of the cat; peace, however, was at last established. sons
496. eir old employment of teas- My ing each other, while the girls played with their anim
497. is it like what you made," laughed the other. Theresa agreed that it was not, and th
498. a box on the ear the latter raised head good-naturedly. My son Henri was I placed my
499. for college and murmured in my ear " I will try to become less quarrelsome, dear :
500. RISTMAS HYMN. were three in the O'Meara family, Nora. Little Thomas, Nora was seven ye
501. years old. The O'Mearas were poor, and one of them was not contented. This was the
502. ssage to the sufficient 133 to pay New "World. Well, he started, and Xora wept more t
503. bout the hymn. Three months passed, and one joyful day Mrs. O'Meara received a lett
504. d every face on the wharf that familiar one was absent. Sick at heart, she stood, w
505. she fancied to be him, As the expected one. night fell she took refuge in a hotel.
506. a large place is. America were vain. No one knew him. Christmas was near and was bi
507. they entered the barn, and during that time they had eaten no food. Poor little Nor
508. . said the driver it was Thomas and the man by his side was his emO'Meara, " " Do n
509. of all." little "That's the voice of an angel, or of Nora " cried O'Meara. 1 my own "
510. they said, not only to him, but to each other. One bright sweet-scented day in June,
511. id, not only to him, but to each other. One bright sweet-scented day in June, the 1
512. aid that they might go and it gather as many flowers as they liked, because was the
513. . Jennie it off quick!" it " Oh, Eddie, will bite me " ! don't bite; they sting," sa
514. er her shoe not the tidiest girl in the world pulled Sir off. it was easily The quest
515. heel of the stocking, and then the bee will drop out." The stocking was Eddie, taki
516. The children were very angry with each other. They picked up their baskets and went
517. ance of the purple and white lilacs. In one place a red rose-bush, covered with mag
518. . Jennie stretched out her hand to take one of 142 the STORIES AND SKETCHES. white
519. es, uttering an exclamation rnustn t of pleasure. ao that " said Eddie. " Why not?" aske
520. to be reproved by Mm. Then her Guardian Angel whispered in her ear. She kissed the to
521. ssed them when they came home at dinner-time, loaded with the rarest roses " ! in th
522. th long stems WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE. MARTHA AUNT strict. It was very strict
523. ghbors said, "Wilde by name and wild by nature." She was an orphan, and she had been t
524. ing around the East Meadow. Brindle was one of Aunt Martha's three cows. Kitty's am
525. hree cows. Kitty's amusements. This was one of She was always very 144 WILDE BY NAM
526. ways very 144 WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE. 145 sorry, after she had been told and
527. ." was agreed everywhere that Kitty was good-hearted she never refused to do an act
528. of kindness. Farmer Birch, the richest man in the neighborhood, had been so gratef
529. y very much, and She Kitty returned the love with interest. worked with energy in fi
530. t to meeting. WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE. 147 would not go again. She said the p
531. ouldn't be a Methodist. not what / call religion." " Sister Briggs, do you hear the to c
532. s a yard hear her? How can she expect a change of heart?" Sister Briggs shook her head
533. bold, Kitty Wilde," said Mrs. Briggs, " good-for-nothing Aunt Martha straightened he
534. ou wouldn't be so touchy. if Them Irish will make a Jesuit of her, you don't be care
535. " Aunt Martha put down her tea-cup. ' ' Law sakes " ! the other members of the comp
536. down her tea-cup. ' ' Law sakes " ! the other members of the company " You're not don
537. s? You Kitty associates with that Irish family ? " "I saw her with these eyes picking
538. erty to-day." WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE. 149 Aunt Martha was blow. silent. This
539. ard-working carcolony. and an admirable man, quite as well penter, exclusively had
540. nd Rose and Anna were considered by the other girls as "Irish." In East Hampton this
541. ipped idols." WILDE BY NAME AND WILD BY NATURE. 151 Mrs. Briggs looked very much asham
542. sweet child, Oh, our why she risked her life, she said Lord wants us to do good to t
543. her life, she said Lord wants us to do good to them that injure ' ' ' : us.'" "And
544. WANTED TO BE OLD. went into the library one day, and found it empty. His grandfathe
545. ng useful. have to depend on others for many things." I am " Then, after all." it is
546. ; be old and feeble I have lived a long time God has been very good to me, and I hop
547. old and feeble I have lived a long time God has been very good to me, and I hope so
548. ave lived a long time God has been very good to me, and I hope soon to join in prais
549. he thinks me worthy, after purifying my soul in Purgatory." "Grandfather, I would li
550. t way." content ; "No, Walter, be be as good as you 154 STOKIES AND SKETCHES. can do
551. ES. can do your best every hour of your life. That will make you as happy as any man
552. your best every hour of your life. That will make you as happy as any man can be out
553. ife. That will make you as happy as any man can be outside of Heaven." Walter kisse
554. John McDermott. Harry was holdIn ing up one side of his father's cellar-door. the c
555. ut, so was his He held a broom-stick in one hand and cap. there were three splashes
556. a circle, Around him, grouped were five other boys, each with his coat or jacket turn
557. ash youth, that on the road towards the will forest? Every brave have at least ten W
558. go forth to the wilds of Jersey. There will slay aye, slay, until the earth be- com
559. e great men. new brother brought to the cause of the T. I. and B. B. E.'s, with which
560. feast our souls ? No raw sweet potatoes will be accepted." THE T. I. AND B. B. E.'s.
561. . and B. B. E.'s yelled, scrambled over one another, and scattered Mrs. Jones' ash-
562. sappeared through the cellar- door. The other T. I. and B. B. E.'s scrambled after hi
563. burned in the grate. Grandmother sat at one side of the fire with her knitting, Aun
564. with her knitting, Aunt Frances at the other, making a cap for Baby. children, Lousi
565. r content with the pleasant room as the other Snow had begun to fall, at people were.
566. were. first slowly, then quickly, with many a whirl. The passers-by turned up their
567. lars, and trudged along. But somehow or other, the coming of the snow seemed to make
568. t to get their feet wet ? " But we have good strong shoes " cried the children, "and
569. ay we go?" "Do let us go!" "We'll be so good, Grandmother " Oh, do come, Aunt France
570. t Frances !" After a great treaties, !" many exclamations and en- Grandmother at las
571. leigh, big and comfortable-looking. The man who drove was heavily muffled in furs.
572. he children looked less expectation. at one another it in breath- Who smiled. could
573. rances was. She guessed who The door of man entered. the parlor opened, and a gentl
574. out to Ridgesaid. wood," he "The sleigh will be rather 164 STORIES AND SKETCHES. cro
575. STORIES AND SKETCHES. crowded, but you will not mind that, will you? We'll have som
576. AND SKETCHES. crowded, but you will not mind that, will you? We'll have something to
577. S. crowded, but you will not mind that, will you? We'll have something to eat at the
578. s hand to them. They all " cried out, " Good morning, Father in return. Father ! The
579. nd they in the open country. They met a man on a bicycle, making tracks through you
580. w. It seemed very funny ; but the young man had a hard time ploughing nlo ig. Jack
581. ry funny ; but the young man had a hard time ploughing nlo ig. Jack said that winter
582. much, which induced Aunt Frances to say other lively which sent the children into con
583. sleighing, Jing, jing, jing, jing!" The will ; children joined in this chorus with a
584. ng. "How do you now?" said Jack, as the other children picked themselves up, and brus
585. augh at us," said Ellen. The dinner was good everything was "just " and the drive ho
586. sparrow, there was a and in Grace Court one corner of the mulberry-tree. stunted Th
587. the mulberry-tree. stunted They had no other glimpses of the wonders The boys someof
588. ht women and children sitting on 168 of many poor the door-steps GRACE COURT. and pa
589. found employment along the wharves. But many of the men drank too much and helped to
590. in happened Grace Court were Catholics. Good Father that Beresford, rector of the ch
591. e had fill it. established was hard Two good that came. Charity taught the Their par
592. it attractive, he could induce a great many children to But he had no money, and th
593. h Grace Court. seemed to be hardened in vice. The parents If he could only reach the
594. some hope for the fathers and mothers. One afternoon in the spring he entered the
595. It school-room. was late in March, and one of those spring showers that are the he
596. g to pelt the sidewalks. There was only one little girl in the schoolroom. She was
597. ain came up so suddenly that I took the liberty of knocking "Pardon me," he at this doo
598. get wet." I hope that your mother lady, will sit down and when rest awhile." The for
599. de her veil, thanked Father Beres- "The cause this school is open later than usual, b
600. and as I am My it ; not rich and nobody will rent myself." it of me I occupy " You a
601. y careful. I often wish I could do some good, but I can't." Father Beresford looked
602. children let you can do her little any good, " I will. Good-by, Little me know." gi
603. let you can do her little any good, " I will. Good-by, Little me know." girl. Come,
604. u can do her little any good, " I will. Good-by, Little me know." girl. Come, Robert
605. ay, where there are robins." In a short time they reached the d'rty flight of stone
606. ary. " She is for the first tune that a man * ' lay on the uncarpeted floor. We've
607. don't want dren in the cigars, like the other chilcourt. She likes to go to the make
608. ou said might go school." No in a fury. matter what I said," cried the woman " I'll ha
609. . " to see if I could do Wisby, you any good." " Of course you can," replied the wom
610. out o' here cried the woman. get ! The man on the floor grunted like a pig. " Come
611. T. 177 Robert was a thoughtful hoy. The death of his father had caused his mother to
612. an office uptown, where he was studying law. "We have too much room here, mother,"
613. ther," he said, as he helped himself to one of his mother's poached eggs, and, look
614. go wants to start a night-school. They will not to how go to the Catechism class on
615. ealthy work of cigarthem something else Will you " let to do, as well as their relig
616. Will you " let to do, as well as their religion. me have the use of the parlor ? " You
617. gs "We'll have to give them up, mother, God's sake." Mrs. Wisby sighed. The evening
618. y dear to her. But she felt that if any good could be done, she ought to give them u
619. n Robert came to him with his plan. "My will dear boy," he said, "if you could teach
620. dren to use their hands in any way that will help them to earn a living, you my way.
621. n't learn and they learn very little at religion there, who home." Robert's plan was thi
622. flower or a butterfly. But, Father," I will try continued Robert, " to teach my mot
623. e evenings." priest's face flushed with pleasure. them "You can try!" Robert rushed off
624. rushed off to the confectioner's at The matter was soon settled. once. The confectione
625. ed everyIt was the beginning of a great change Grace Court. WHAT THEY FOUND COUNTRY. I
626. dared play for fear of disturbing her. One day the doctor said to Mrs. Desmond " T
627. ! "It is too early in the season. They will catch cold in April." " Country childre
628. ountry children do not catch cold. They will be sick if cise in the you do not let t
629. octor, And who was an old friend of the family, took his leave. n. Kose sat at the pia
630. at the piano practising and counting " one and two and three." Cecilia was crying
631. oked, and which nobody in the house had time to set right. Anna was deep in her Cate
632. se's ingenuity. " You are the cleverest one of this family," said Cecilia; "Anna is
633. ty. " You are the cleverest one of this family," said Cecilia; "Anna is the prettiest,
634. efusing to be com" but forted, you have one tooth out in front. It makes you look s
635. you look so ' cute.' " This settled the matter. that It was admitted a Anna was the pr
636. dmitted a Anna was the prettiest of the family compliment which she rejected with disg
637. d wished mamma would have pet names for one another. let them " I don't." said Ceci
638. to important than anything else in the world. They were growing more selfish every d
639. outside of themselves. They were kind, good-hearted children in the main, they had
640. ered that there were no children in the world worse off than they AVI I AT THEY FOUND
641. the rain. And she often wished she was one r of the poor, ragged children they saw
642. uld eat what they chose ; ; ; ; without being bothered by anybody. Cecilia compared t
643. ompared the tears came into her eyes in imagination, a often herself to Cinderella. And as
644. Susan's face. m. Their Aunt Somehow or other to be old ladies. Susan was not an old
645. at deal she talked a great she was very good. Eose rushed to the door. Aunt Susan ki
646. d not be so pretty as the gifts for the other girls. Anna was divided between at some
647. etween at something having happened and pleasure the hope that Aunt Susan had brought pl
648. ed her eyes and snuffled. the dissolute one if anybody always Cecilia ; "I am is to
649. both to Cecilia's tearful moods and her habit of using words she had caught up withou
650. s me because I am the black swan of the family." " you we love you And the two little
651. the black swan of the family." " you we love you And the two little girls hugged ' '
652. u And the two little girls hugged ' ' I love ! ! their sister enthusiastically. Aunt
653. Anna repeated them without a blunder. "Good, little girl!" Then she opened It the s
654. sulked. Cecilia ! "Why, "Oh, what's the matter, Cecilia?" nothing, is it, Aunt Susan."
655. I'm only a half-orphan, with nobody to love me." Aunt Susan was puzzled. better tre
656. ed herself to understand the "sulks "in other people. Not knowing what 192 STORIES AN
657. ht much of Himself and His own wants. I will tell you some news if you will try to b
658. wants. I will tell you some news if you will try to be more like pleasant Him." Then
659. Idle wild was near the sea. There were many beautiful bits of scenery around the pl
660. of scenery around the place. There was one in particular on Aunt Susan's father's
661. nery around the place. There was one in particular on Aunt Susan's father's farm, which wa
662. e to do this later; but she had by that time discovered that her nieces needed some
663. felt She with it. When she spoke of the world. said nothing to Mrs. Desmond She spoke
664. rs. Desmond She spoke frequently of the life of the Holy Child, and tried to teach t
665. ere willing to accept her services as a matter of course, and that the more she gave t
666. HAT THEY FOUND IN THE COUNTRY. 197 farm will bo without your grandfather. He will sa
667. rm will bo without your grandfather. He will sail from Liverpool on the first of Jun
668. ornin', but she hang around 'bout train-time and you." Dick was Mom Johnston's son.
669. o take the children down to Allenville, one station below. She would leave them the
670. hese sudden changes much. It was a long time since they had very had any excitement
671. looked puzzled and anxious. " Little " will you girl," she said to Rose, hold my an
672. n I guess I'll have as as the lady much time who has just gone out. Baby's hungry."
673. e affrighted eyes. Susan Rose was equal will meet us the occasion. "Aunt I at the ne
674. ng children travel How Aunt The confrom one country station to another, took up the
675. this The cars stopped. Nobody got on or time. Allenville ! " " " It off. do as well,
676. hem to take the next train back station will in a superior " The next to Allenville.
677. noon when they entered the station. " I will not mind the conductor," Rose said. " I
678. they entered the station. " I will not mind the conductor," Rose said. " I'll just
679. She trotted along gaily. For the first time the children were unselfishly happy. "
680. were unselfishly happy. " Oh, how I do love a real meat baby," said Anna. " I am so
681. istance into the open lots, whose level space was only broken by the high chimneys of
682. tired. It occurred to Rose that it was time to go back to "Why the station. She sai
683. night, too. The children could not see one step ahead of a turn. 202 them. STORIES
684. ecilia. baby!" said Rose, shivering. "I will put my silk handkerchief around its nec
685. ," she cried. Two baby For the of first time in her life she had thought ! somebody
686. . Two baby For the of first time in her life she had thought ! somebody " Here they
687. n and Susan went back to Idlewild. Aunt One June oaks, with day, as Cecilia Aunt Su
688. ould always be cross and disagreeable I other people. children have to is "I know wha
689. ned suffer. I think the Holy Child very good to us." "Yes, Aunt Susan, I think so to
690. and orangecommon as apples and applethe beauty of the place, life blossoms here. In sp
691. pples and applethe beauty of the place, life blossoms here. In spite of all was not
692. was not easy. Bianca's brothers, except one, Giovanni, had been forced into the Ita
693. , how easy the work would be, how happy life would seem 'We cannot have all things,
694. d never want to go to Heaven." When the good priest laid his hand on her ! 205 206 S
695. Bianca felt comforted. she had at least one friend in the world. Times were hard. T
696. ted. she had at least one friend in the world. Times were hard. The rulers of Italy a
697. extravagances entail on them. sequence, many poor Italians, formerly prosAnd yet we
698. Victor Emanuel robbed the Holy Father. truth, things have not suffer and are ground
699. left the hearts and faces of the poor. One day, in the orange-picking season, when
700. k his head when he came. Giovanni was a good boy he did not fear death but he ; , fe
701. Giovanni was a good boy he did not fear death but he ; , feared little leave his sist
702. arm." nobody to work "Trust Bianca with God and His Blessed Mother," said Father Ca
703. sed Mother," said Father Caracci. "They will BIANCA. take care 207 trouble of her. D
704. e felt herself to be all alone ; in the world. She but the willing hearts and strong
705. ianca struggled bravely. She had little time to knit now. The work of the vineyard a
706. useless. The taxcame several times, and one day the gatherer little farm was sold.
707. human in her great sorrow. Her home was being The dear little house in which irone jj
708. r and father had said the Angelas on so many happy nights was gone She loved ! each
709. e no place on earth for her. Oh, if the good God would only take her to Giovanni She
710. place on earth for her. Oh, if the good God would only take her to Giovanni She was
711. to Giovanni She was indeed alone in the world. Her two brothers, Carlo and Pasquale,
712. merica, do with the poor boy until some one will care all ; "These are still beauti
713. ca, do with the poor boy until some one will care all ; "These are still beautiful.
714. are still beautiful. But poor Beppo is God made them, going to I cannot send him a
715. r Caracci sighed. "Well, Bianca, I have good news for you. The Countess Lilli wants
716. the cook. I spoke to her about you." "I will not be a Bianca's cheeks flushed. serva
717. untess Lilli is, now that he is dead, I will not work in everybody knows in Sorrento
718. work in everybody knows in Sorrento, a good Christian, and consequently a kind mist
719. , and consequently a kind mistress." as will not be a servant," said Bianca, all her
720. e, and her cheeks flaming. "None of our family ever served in the kitchens of "I other
721. , because you have old Lorenzo Pradi. I will go to America with for you, Father, if
722. , if you wanted And kitchen, but for no other. Beppo. to There, they say, one does no
723. or no other. Beppo. to There, they say, one does not have for others. work There ev
724. " cried Bianca, burst of enthusiasm. "I will convert them." Father Caracci shook his
725. ver made a convert. There are some very good Chris- BIANCA. 211 tians, my child, in
726. in America. as here." People have to I will work there as well " I have some Beppo.
727. with for a moment. Beppo's uncle was a good man. Perhaps he could find something fo
728. for a moment. Beppo's uncle was a good man. Perhaps he could find something for Bi
729. Bianca was not much older than Beppo of life ; but her independent and healthy mode
730. dent and healthy mode had given her the prudence arid self- reliance of a woman. to Bepp
731. y next a steamer Be ready to-morrow you will find ; On poor little Beppo up in my ho
732. tood a moment as if stunned to tell the truth, she had not expected to be taken at he
733. d Beppo started on their way to the new world. Father Caracci gave them his and he sa
734. is and he said to Bianca blessing, "You will have to learn to be a servant. We are a
735. as not wife, in a large tenement-house. man by any means, but his savings would hav
736. a place for you, too." Bianca said, "I will not stay." Will you go back and be a se
737. , too." Bianca said, "I will not stay." Will you go back and be a servant in the ' '
738. illi?" "Never," said Bianca; "I fields, will work in the but I cannot be a servant,
739. quickly ; but Bianca would not stay in one She wanted to work in a vineplace all d
740. AND SKETCHES. day, "the uncle said, "I will go back and buy a little farm. Then I w
741. l go back and buy a little farm. Then I will enjoy what I have worked for. That is t
742. et to do. Here, in this country, " poor man who chooses loses.' Little all. ' the B
743. s found for Bianca. She would not learn cause the too close ; to in make artificial f
744. that fall in BIANCA. 215 your way, and God will be pleased to reward you for it ev
745. t fall in BIANCA. 215 your way, and God will be pleased to reward you for it even in
746. eased to reward you for it even in this world. Remember that the best thing you can d
747. that the best thing you can do in your state of life is to work contentedly at whate
748. best thing you can do in your state of life is to work contentedly at whatever God
749. life is to work contentedly at whatever God sends you to do." But in spite of this
750. must earn your living," said the aunt, good" There is naturedly. always enough maca
751. s, like the rest of roni for ; but what will you do when If us. you do not you will
752. will you do when If us. you do not you will not have enough money to get back to It
753. s aunt, this,' do no slave. I do that ' will not ' submit to be in Italian, We It is
754. ndure much in silence. for the glory of God." Bianca shrugged her shoulders, and be
755. usted. si " You " Ees like-a school-a?" One evening, just as the steaming dish of m
756. he saved every cent. " Thanks Mother of God, who never " ! ceases to pray for us at
757. ; wine to-night, years. it is the first time in many We can forget all, except the j
758. o-night, years. it is the first time in many We can forget all, except the joy of go
759. was radiant. " Oh, how I long brothers will soon be out of the to see Sorrento agai
760. rned no money. She had followed her own will. She turned red. " It will be hard for
761. owed her own will. She turned red. " It will be hard for you, Bianca," said " You wi
762. ll be hard for you, Bianca," said " You will have no home now. Beppo's aunt. The fru
763. . Beppo's uncle and aunt looked at each other. What could they do ? ; "I " read will
764. other. What could they do ? ; "I " read will go too I will be a servant in Italy to
765. uld they do ? ; "I " read will go too I will be a servant in Italy to the Countess L
766. arned to be She spent much of her spare time in the church, praying for meekness. Sh
767. her the reward which patient incontent. One morning she bought dustry always gains.
768. ou can get to do, and leave the rest to God. A VACATION TALK. HE vacation days have
769. ll pleasant things come do. Suddenly no matter how long we have exsuddenly, the days o
770. joy your freedom now, and The roses the world seems made for you. Of bloom, the raspb
771. ND SKETCHES. warmed ! for swimming, all nature welcome if But, in spite of this, all y
772. lcome if But, in spite of this, all you will soon grow weary, you accept time, and p
773. ll you will soon grow weary, you accept time, and play too much. the invitations of
774. ore the vacation if grow weary of them, time in play, and, while you you spend your
775. in play, and, while you you spend your will hate to go back to school, you will be
776. our will hate to go back to school, you will be tired you will of vacation. Do not t
777. o back to school, you will be tired you will of vacation. Do not throw your books in
778. and let them become dusty. Refresh your memory by a glance into your geography book, o
779. nd mother to ask you. Remember that you will enjoy your game of base-ball, croquet,
780. ow." It is a word that kills energy and good work. Protestants are fond of saying th
781. her force and greatness because of her religion. This is A VACATION TALK. not true. 223
782. ow." Don't say "I'll begin to look over will learn a my ; lessons to-morrow ; ; I Fr
783. ddition do a sum in to-morrow!" These I will ! to-morrows seldom come Those of you w
784. ave an open book before you the book of nature. Like the melancholy Jaques, in "As You
785. ume on geology, you may find profit and will. pleasure in long rambles, besides expa
786. geology, you may find profit and will. pleasure in long rambles, besides expanding your
787. creatures had made him so long to serve God, that he was led into the only road to
788. the small things around you, you, too, will be charmed by the graciousness of Our L
789. ed by the graciousness of Our Lord. You will find many reasons for loving 224 STORIE
790. graciousness of Our Lord. You will find many reasons for loving 224 STORIES AND SKET
791. . Him you which might have escaped you. will learn facts of practical Besides, value
792. ich may be of great use to you in after life. I may as well tell you, as an example
793. could not run, swim, or play ball, like other boys. He used to sit on his father's do
794. on his father's door-step and watch the other boys many books but one day, play. in a
795. er's door-step and watch the other boys many books but one day, play. in an old "rea
796. and watch the other boys many books but one day, play. in an old "reader," he read
797. and No Eyes." It is all about two boys, one of whom sees everything, the other He h
798. boys, one of whom sees everything, the other He had not ; sees nothing. "Now," thoug
799. er than my legs and arms ? " About this time, Father Ray, the rector of the church i
800. church in Holston, gave him some books, one of them being a book on geology. It was
801. lston, gave him some books, one of them being a book on geology. It was a simple text
802. of rock around his father's house. The desire to gain new knowledge of This rocks and
803. father's house. The desire to gain new knowledge of This rocks and stones made him walk.
804. ks and stones made him walk. In a short time, strengthened his ankles. armed with a
805. tz, crystal, and water- worn pebbles. ; One day, Squire Warner, the owner of half t
806. reat deal of in educating that five ; ; good work, and, after a time, to help his pa
807. g that five ; ; good work, and, after a time, to help his parents and the younger ch
808. nds who have gone before. moment of how good and kind your Perhaps, the dear old gra
809. han sheep or goats That nourish a blind life within the brain, If, knowing God, they
810. lind life within the brain, If, knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer Both for
811. Bound by gold chains about the feet of God." my soul. More things of. face again,
812. gold chains about the feet of God." my soul. More things of. face again, are wrough
813. s of. face again, are wrought Than this world dreams This is worth reading. Lord Tenn
814. le it was, and put it into imperishable poetry. All the greatest poets the world has h
815. able poetry. All the greatest poets the world has had since the coming of our Lord Je
816. best poems. Let us not forget that the world owes to the Church all the most beautif
817. the most beautiful things in Christian art and literature. thinks that, as Catholi
818. , because, although he may not know how art, literature, or science, he knows work
819. he may not know how art, literature, or science, he knows work for God, and to save his
820. terature, or science, he knows work for God, and to save his soul. But you who have
821. he knows work for God, and to save his soul. But you who have opportunities, here i
822. ho have opportunities, here in this new world, ought to make yourself as perfect anyt
823. ch is the protector of civilization and knowledge that, without the Church there would ha
824. ten. The politicians call it " the sick man." In India and China, mothers kill thei
825. hinese adore, all left the treasures of many noble maxims. But human wisdom and know
826. easures of many noble maxims. But human wisdom and knowl- 230 STORIES AND SKETCHES. ed
827. ow. His mother is a widow and she makes many ; sacrifices to keep Jack at the paroch
828. l, and Jack knows it. He said to me the other day, when he brought home my washed clo
829. "Do you think it is better to become a good carpenter, or a clerk, sir?" I told him
830. ir?" I told him that a trade would be a good thing There are too many clerks, too ma
831. ade would be a good thing There are too many clerks, too many to learn. young men wi
832. od thing There are too many clerks, too many to learn. young men with white hands, e
833. ng up penters. figures, 231 and too few good car- "Look, Jack," in the wall, "I want
834. that I shall have to get a 'first-class man' to do it, and none of them are 'first-
835. st-class' carpenters. If I were a young man, I should be ashamed to say it. Now I w
836. . Now I would give thirty dollars for a good bookcase that can be taken apart on the
837. ever you underIf you don't do that, you will never be take. man. Opportunities will
838. don't do that, you will never be take. man. Opportunities will come and pass by yo
839. will never be take. man. Opportunities will come and pass by you will be unable to
840. Opportunities will come and pass by you will be unable to grasp them, unless you res
841. eel "My dear boy, you must wish to be a good workman rather than to be genteel. It i
842. ty' is a word that no American should a honor." Jack went sermon. off. I hope he prof
843. Y. I. was taken by his aunt to a Museum one It was a bright, clear day in winter, a
844. d when the drum and cymbals came in, it time. A brass Indeed, 233 234 STORIES AND SK
845. hands to her ears, but Joe laughed with pleasure. " I am " that afraid, Aunt Lucy," he s
846. here was a big blue, yellow, and green. man in a pink suit, painted on a green grou
847. ut, and they had to leave her with only one arm, and ; ; cut off part of her should
848. uded be equalled within. it could not A man around his stood outside with a big sna
849. father. Did you live in London ? " The man grinned, and put his hand on Joe's him
850. e people laughed and Aunt Lucy darted " one of her looks," up to the man, gave him
851. y darted " one of her looks," up to the man, gave him ; and took Joe's hand. " Did
852. and. " Did you see that the impertinent man was " exhibiting you as a curiosity, Jo
853. upon them. There stood the Fat AVoman, one-sixth the size of the fat canvas pictur
854. ask questions, and Aunt Lucy had a hard time answering them. At last it was time to
855. ard time answering them. At last it was time to go. The brass band was playing " Hom
856. ee. ? Don't curiosities have ! a lovely time I wish I " ! ! " silly A lovely time yo
857. ly time I wish I " ! ! " silly A lovely time you are, Joe ! was a curiosity " " How
858. said Aunt Lucy. have a very hard They " time, poor things "You said Joe, in curiosit
859. an injured tone. " I'm sure the have a good time. They just stand do nothing, and e
860. njured tone. " I'm sure the have a good time. They just stand do nothing, and eat pe
861. as I said, he was a very His health was good, and there was lazy boy. no excuse for
862. ness gave a great deal of trouble. said time for Mass After his visit to the museum,
863. It is a very pleasant place, and so we will call it Pleasant City. One day, Joe's g
864. , and so we will call it Pleasant City. One day, Joe's grandmother, who lives in Ne
865. he Arctic regions, and he talked a long time about the Esquimaux, which name is, I b
866. y his Aunt Lucy. She kissed him a great many times, and took him over to the refresh
867. oing to be a curiosity." "You severely; will be a curiosity," said Aunt Lucy, "you'l
868. ND SKETCHES. But Aunt Lucy and Joe were good friends. They had so much to talk about
869. ittle parlor," he said. The glimpses of life he caught in the windows of the houses,
870. shot past them amused Joe very much. In one, he saw a little baby in a hia;h chair
871. e, " I think grandmothers are almost as good as mothers." asked, Grandmother laughed
872. mother laughed. "Well, Joe," she " what will do, when you grow up? you I like boys t
873. u grow up? you I like boys to have some idea of what they What will you will do when
874. oys to have some idea of what they What will you will do when they grow up. be, a ca
875. ve some idea of what they What will you will do when they grow up. be, a carpenter,
876. m a strange boy?" Joe asked, earnestly; will "because, at the if I am, people want t
877. or a Feejee Cannibal nuts." * ' because good fun be paid for doing nothing but just
878. or a Feejee Cannibal on our side of the family, had we?" out of this idea. We "I shoul
879. ide of the family, had we?" out of this idea. We "I should hope not," answered littl
880. ll you, Aunt Lucy, as we've always been good friends when you don't fuss about a fel
881. t fuss about a fellow too much, I don't mind, if I get you an engagement when I grow
882. ir fluffed out, you'd Curiosity. make a good Circassian Girl." Grandmother said it w
883. rcassian Girl." Grandmother said it was time for Joe to go to bed. On the next day,
884. n they were done with it, and coffee in one bottle, and lemonade in another. Joe ha
885. ore wonderful as ; ; it was but, to his mind, not so wonderful the noise of the orga
886. e the museums. would not move away from one of them, Joe where a fat woman was pict
887. an, and the Living Skeleton must be the one I saw Pleasant City. in Do take me in "
888. a minute, and then, fathers seeing that other boys were going in with their and mothe
889. r, a photograph of a templo "This," the man said, "is the pillars. Coliseum at Rome
890. another temple with a "This," said the man, portico and pillars. pillars that is,
891. hole, and saw another "This," said the man, temple with pillars. " is a Wonder of
892. with pillars. " is a Wonder of Classic Art ; you will see it, Europe." "You now pe
893. ars. " is a Wonder of Classic Art ; you will see it, Europe." "You now perceive," th
894. " through another hole. But it said the man, "St. Peter's at Rome." like the others
895. al opened some bottles of beer, and the other the Fat Woman 'of the head the table. ;
896. ving the cold beef. The manager, a bald man, with red whiskers, wanted to do it, bu
897. e said the manager had a not permit it. habit of cutting the slices of meat too thin,
898. tand that. "If the ladies and gentlemen will excuse me," said the Circassian Lady, w
899. r salary. You're not worth as much as a good Boa Constrictor year. more than you did
900. lled you," cried the Two-headed Boy, as one mouth with beef, and the other with bre
901. ed Boy, as one mouth with beef, and the other with bread, not Jim?" "I must have more
902. ve more money. Curiosity. I am tired of being a Living Are you : at once "Yes, no fun
903. re, making people believe there is only one boy I'd rather go and here, when there'
904. o and here, when there's two. sir ! The other mouth answered It's dig cellars, I woul
905. th her handkerchief; I "Tin have quite! world to be able to move about like I'm thoro
906. e about like I'm thoroughly and utterly other people wretched. Death would be a relie
907. ghly and utterly other people wretched. Death would be a relief!" The Joe could endur
908. ght I to be thankful, ma'am. has to for other poor lady people, and never sees a pean
909. eanut, except on boy run around all day Many a poor mean Sunday." The Circassian Lad
910. carvingThe Two-headed Boy grinned with one mouth, and said "Put him out!" with the
911. and said "Put him out!" with the knife. other. "Do I hear right?" asked the Fat Woman
912. ians. "The poor child's lost," said the good-natured Fat Woman, changing her tone. "
913. child near me. I guess his grandmother will come We'll keep him until she does. Ple
914. r him. cassian Girl. "Sure that lady. I will, with a heart and half," said "And will
915. will, with a heart and half," said "And will the dear child take sugar in his tea? v
916. useum. year, though, wearing a wig, and being " stared at Joe soon felt quite at home
917. he told them how he slice longed to be one of them. The Circassian Lady gave him a
918. r : of beef, cut thick, and said do not mind work. Work will strong. honest. "My dea
919. thick, and said do not mind work. Work will strong. honest. "My dear child, make yo
920. Any honest work is it's This work isn't good, provided honest so far as I'm concerne
921. ic every day. The Feejee Boy thinks the same as I do." HE WANTED TO BE A CURIOSITY.
922. my name "It's a loafing, idle, useless life," said the Fat Woman. "It is better, my
923. other's Thank you all!" voice outside. "Good-night! running out. he said, "Oh, Joe a
924. n he said, taking Grandmother's hand on one side, and Aunt Lucy's on the other : 25
925. and on one side, and Aunt Lucy's on the other : 250 STORIES AND SKETCHES. "I don't wa
926. so Gretchen, who was an orphan, had no one to play with. Besides, ; Frau Julia's b
927. e made, brought Gretchen several dolls. One of them, named Lilia, she loved very mu
928. spoke a little German, and more French. One day a letter, postmarked " Milwaukee, U
929. write to ask a favor, which I hope you will grant. You know that my wife is dead, a
930. ife is dead, and that I am alone in the world. I I have no children. : not poor I hav
931. a sum of money for Gretchen. I hope you will send her If who may be coming ing, over
932. raph to me the name of the steamer. You will find more than enough money in the box
933. ner. Josef shook his head, and said " I love the little too; but she is too : girl,
934. it. toys! It's Your father did Our boys will good enough " No," said Josef, " our bo
935. oys! It's Your father did Our boys will good enough " No," said Josef, " our boys wi
936. od enough " No," said Josef, " our boys will, smiling, I hope, go with us over acros
937. . Land is cheap there, and dear here. I will for Gretchen." make farmers of them." F
938. m." Frau Julia shook her head. " As you will, husband. But I could not let Gretchen
939. ged had just been plaited for the tenth time that morning, seemed to smile out of he
940. ia, whose hair "At Lilia, least," I " 1 will never sobbed Gretchen, "I have never pa
941. s she sent her last kiss to the " and I will say the rosary every night, as Julia ba
942. y every night, as Julia bade inc. And I will not lose my twins, money. rang. And ash
943. se my twins, money. rang. And ashore. I will tell "but the little bell Josef kissed
944. lifted And she was pleased when a kind man her and Lilia into their berth. Gretche
945. cry, too, and she sang no Lilia' was so good She never answered back, or did She smi
946. nswered back, or did She smiled all the time, anything naughty. 256 STORIES AND SKET
947. AND SKETCHES. said, listened po- and no matter what anybody litely. When one of the li
948. and no matter what anybody litely. When one of the little children from Zurich trie
949. children from Zurich tried to gouge out one of her blue eyes with a pencil, she smi
950. her ! I have lost her " ! " What's the matter with the little child?" " Has she lost
951. the little child?" " Has she lost asked one of the officials. any- body " ! "Have y
952. ' Lilia was all I had ! Ah ! she was so good a so Heblichf" she said to newspaper re
953. en, amazed at his stupidity, She wasn't one of ' ' those that speak. She couldn't o
954. most Another day passed. Still pathetic language. Gretchen lamented. The purser of the s
955. box to find a collar. She couldn't get one at first, because was beneath a pile of
956. nd kissed her over and over again. "The good St. Anthony found her." "A doll, cried
957. cried a pleasant voice, as a big, brown man caught her in his "And this is Lilia, t
958. too," answered Gretchen, "thanks to the good St. Anthony !" Gretchen and Lilia are v
959. herself not been lost since that awful time. AT SCHOOL AGAIN. school weeks are over
960. g beyour eyes. It used to be hard in my time very hard. They are tell me the new-fas
961. ea sends out every I remember the year. History of Jack Halyard" was our reading-book;
962. lyard" was our reading-book; there were one or two wood-cuts in it of women and lit
963. hero's name was Halyard or Halifax, but one of the leading incidents turned on the
964. saw a gilt-framed mirror for the first time, and who thought the frame was pure gol
965. e grown I have never and I hope I never will, until I meet the dear old Canon in Hea
966. spoil it by wishing to be old. up your mind to this you will never be quite happy i
967. ing to be old. up your mind to this you will never be quite happy in this world. The
968. s you will never be quite happy in this world. These October days will never come bac
969. happy in this world. These October days will never come back again and in the time t
970. s will never come back again and in the time to : ; come, although you may have gain
971. although you may have gained gold, you will look to the gold of these youthful days
972. uch of it think now but a much of it. ; time will come when you will The coming days
973. f it think now but a much of it. ; time will come when you will The coming days may
974. a much of it. ; time will come when you will The coming days may bring you the fine
975. hing is, All this are getting ready for life. going to school is only a making ready
976. r religious duties, to know, serve, and love God in this world, and to be happy with
977. igious duties, to know, serve, and love God in this world, and to be happy with him
978. s, to know, serve, and love God in this world, and to be happy with him forever in th
979. . In order to do your part well in this world, you must fit yourself for work. You mu
980. stronger your muscles are, the more you will be able to endure in the race of life.
981. u will be able to endure in the race of life. mind a scratch or two. ball, Play hard
982. be able to endure in the race of life. mind a scratch or two. ball, Play hard, then
983. ay keep out in the open air, and have a good time whenever your parents have nothing
984. ep out in the open air, and have a good time whenever your parents have nothing for
985. 't fail is ought to work, and there's a chance. to help mother when What more disgusti
986. es, while they stay idle, never come to good. You must remember ready to earn your o
987. ing living, and that readand arithmetic will help you to do ing, writing, that. And,
988. map, if called on. There was a boy, the other day, who wanted a place very much. His
989. re, them, sir. get to East though." The man shook that boy. his head. He did not wa
990. OVERTY HOLLOW. was not Tim Murphy's own idea, I am ITbound to admit. He had read of
991. ad read of it somewhere but, as he made good use of it, I think he deserves credit.
992. w refugees had settled there during the war. They were very had come up from South
993. lement took its name from them. After a time, a coal mine was found near, and a grea
994. erty Hollow began to lose its After his death, a priest came every people. One Sunday
995. his death, a priest came every people. One Sunday Father on the necessity of readi
996. every people. One Sunday Father on the necessity of reading Mooney preached month to say
997. times when so ignorant Catholic boys in other things are concerning their bright Ever
998. ight Everybody reads the story-papers,' religion. I see ' how you say. That is all the m
999. st set everyf body' an example, because God has given } ou the gift of faith. Read,
1000.he gift of faith. Read, all of you read good r ; books." There was no Catholic book-
1001.cept prayer-books, in the place. On the same Sunday afternoon, Father Mooney gave hi
1002.ntensely in- them he wished he had more time, to give them the whole story, but that
1003.o gather. They sang songs, danced, told one another the impossible adventures of th
1004.ntures of the story-papers, and swore a good deal. Father Mooney saw that a great de
1005. Father Mooney saw that a great deal of evil was caused by these meetings but he saw
1006.their Some of them knew their catechism religion. On tolerably well ; others vaguely rem
1007.g. They were idle and listless, with no idea of anything beyond the dime novels and
1008. widest street in Cadiz, Dona Inez went one day, Clad in costly silks and laces, Wi
1009.d beggars, Basking in the pleasant sun, One an old man he a Christian Blind to all
1010.Basking in the pleasant sun, One an old man he a Christian Blind to all the outward
1011.k to me.' I would be a Christian, blind man, Christian charity ' ! , " Lo! here com
1012.o see I am but a Moorish beggar, ' ; No Will the lady come to me ? she will not, for
1013., ' ; No Will the lady come to me ? she will not, for she hatetb. ! All the children
1014.he Moor; If she come, I tell you, blind man, I will kneel and Christ adore ! " Pass
1015.; If she come, I tell you, blind man, I will kneel and Christ adore ! " Passing was
1016.ng on them tenderly. are poor; they are God's children,' Said a voice within her so
1017.od's children,' Said a voice within her soul, And she lightly from her litter Steppe
1018.laughed, and laughing, wondered All the other ladies gay ; And Lady Inez knew not She
1019. And Lady Inez knew not She had saved a soul that day " the ! After that Father beau
1020.Father beautifully Mooney told them how God had formed the snow crystal, and how th
1021.osphorescent light on the "The works of God are mar"The more we know about vellous,
1022.ellous," he said. them, the greater our love for Him ought to become." Father Mooney
1023.ght to become." Father Mooney told them other sea at night. He said they might all be
1024.ories. found in a book called "Familiar Science." Tim Murphy, in his Sunday jacket, whi
1025.me with Seth Gudgron. Seth Gudgron \vas one of the boys whose fathers had come from
1026.g. "But "Guess I do want that 'Familiar Science.' I never think cared much for books be
1027.butcher of Poverty Hollow. He never had time to read, and he burned all the story-pa
1028.t somewhere. If you bought 'Familiar IN Science,' I'd POVERTY HOLLOW. 'Fabiola,' and 27
1029.ark seemed personal. Katie interfered a time, peace was restored. ; and, after "Have
1030.emed personal. Katie interfered a time, peace was restored. ; and, after "Have you an
1031.flected. "I guess you're right. We byos will each put in a dollar, and let Katie put
1032.roscope. me the dollar." and he'll give good humor, Katie tripped obstinate home Dan
1033. books. She was very happy. Her mother, being told that Father Mooney had recommended
1034.spent all his he was a carpenter, and a good man wages when he was sober gave the bo
1035. all his he was a carpenter, and a good man wages when he was sober gave the boy hi
1036.a big edition of Fabiola," " " Familiar Science Felix with ; ' ' ; book the children ha
1037.urphy's house when the box Katie was no relation of Tim's arrived. Mr. Murphy watched op
1038.llars to see them now." And it was Such pleasure, when "Fabiola" was pulled out And then
1039.ck Blake, whose father was the richc.st man in Poverty Hollow, but who never went t
1040.Corvinius. "Yes," he read, "and was the cause of my For when we went forth from schoo
1041.ratius, this is, I understand, the last time we meet here emphasis on the word) scor
1042.phasis on the word) score to (he laid a particular but I have a long ; "No book. '" demand
1043.You can't read that book unless you buy one, too. down, Tim?" Wasn't that the rule
1044." said Tim. but we want to read all the good books we can, and every fellow that com
1045.ry fellow that comes in must bring in a good book." let "All right! Just Dick's face
1046.ad all "Father Mooney Our books must be good." Dick, after a slight grumble, went ou
1047. Seth rushed home with "Familiar Kent," Science." The other books were left in Tim's ke
1048.ome with "Familiar Kent," Science." The other books were left in Tim's keeping. For t
1049.re left in Tim's keeping. For the first time in many years, Seth father stayed at ho
1050.in Tim's keeping. For the first time in many years, Seth father stayed at home that
1051.ew wonders. His mother silently thanked God. Katie read aloud the first chapters of
1052. girls, friends of Katie, added and two other good books were bought. 278 STORIES AND
1053., friends of Katie, added and two other good books were bought. 278 STORIES AND SKET
1054.Fabiola Dick Blake's father dipped into one night, and became so interested that he
1055.for, is early worth living for." "Thank God !" said Mrs. Blake. Tim Murphy was happ
1056.twenty-five books in circulation, and a change was perceptible in the contriba change
1057. change was perceptible in the contriba change which Father Mooney was utors Tim felt

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/