Concordance for From Killarney to New York, or, How Thade became a banker / by Sister Mary Francis Clare.

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1.   t (THE NUN OF KENMARE.) A Story of Eeal Life. New York: J. A. 7 McGEE, PUBLISHER, Ba
2. f McGee's to typify Illustrated Weekly, life, an incident in Irish-American which, t
3. he to its rapid, peculiarities of Irish life, ful, and and generally successinstitu-
4. d customs. readers are assured that the life; The main incidents of the tale are dra
5. hade was Lost and Found 19 The Blanders Family at Home Ellen Maloney's Conversion 25 2
6. e for yourself, care for your boy. sent will undertake to feed, good man; if you don
7. your boy. sent will undertake to feed, good man; if you don't society which I repre
8. boy. sent will undertake to feed, good man; if you don't society which I repreclot
9. speaker paused. — The grey shades of death were set- down in all the awfulness of
10. set- down in all the awfulness of that time when famine was the was a fine scorn on
11. s a fine scorn on the face of the dying man a scorn which even an angelic being mig
12. dying man a scorn which even an angelic being might have expressed if tempted by Luci
13. e heaven for earth. The little flame of life was flickering in the frail socket of h
14. LLARNEY TO NEW YORK; I "And that's your religion," replied honest Tim: " you know am dyi
15. u know am dying and you want me to face God Almighty with a lie thundering these mo
16. old Ireland again I'll be where there ! God Himself Mary." "Oh," —glory be to to,
17. he Bible-reader, I pity you. the Virgin will Mary you're trusting Why, my good man,
18. irgin will Mary you're trusting Why, my good man, you be so foolish ? I promise you
19. will Mary you're trusting Why, my good man, you be so foolish ? I promise you to p
20. " How do I know !" exclaimed the dying man, and ' for a moment a shade of the rare
21. of it and ye say yourselves there's no other place but heaven; so where would the Mo
22. ut heaven; so where would the Mother of God be ?" Mr. Blanders was well used to mee
23. have desired. With him it was simply a matter of money. His own religious the ; convi
24. ious is —were money dull, simply that one religion as good as another, but that w
25. is —were money dull, simply that one religion as good as another, but that was a it t
26. money dull, simply that one religion as good as another, but that was a it tangible
27. gible possession very desirable in this world, whatever in might be the next. He a-s
28. people in a stupid sort of way, much a man might it pity a poor savage its who was
29. nowing He had, indeed, at times, a hazy idea that the Irish knew the value of money
30. science, and which he called obstinacy. One thing, however, was certain he was boun
31. to him. They were prized in the English soul-market at so much per head. At one time
32. ish soul-market at so much per head. At one time, indeed, they were so estimated, b
33. soul-market at so much per head. At one time, indeed, they were so estimated, but th
34. the cruelty was not lessened. To hang a man out of hand for his religion was mercif
35. ened. To hang a man out of hand for his religion was merciful compared with the diabolic
36. ion of the torture of Tantalus was as a punishment for crime. It remained for the Bible-lo
37. a little silver streak of little light being visible in the far depths of heaven, an
38. isible in the far depths of heaven, and one clear twinkling star, and the tempting
39. angels came and went with messages from Angel of Death hovered very close to the depa
40. me and went with messages from Angel of Death hovered very close to the departing ath
41. ll the crown was won, till the power of soul and conscience had tri- The white-winge
42. hed in the face of the very weakness of death. Moments now were indeed golden, as the
43. now were indeed golden, as the sands of life trembled in the hour-glass of time. Mom
44. s of life trembled in the hour-glass of time. Moments were being weighed against ete
45. in the hour-glass of time. Moments were being weighed against eternity. Seconds were
46. ime. Moments were being weighed against eternity. Seconds were being counted against cen
47. weighed against eternity. Seconds were being counted against centuries. every passin
48. nturies. every passing But there was no sign of weakness of soul in all the weakness
49. ng But there was no sign of weakness of soul in all the weakness of body. With still
50. sufficient efforts to secure converts. Reasoning from their own point of view these good
51. ning from their own point of view these good people were right. They looked on an Ir
52. lves no choice about If they had needed religion so long as it was not " Popish." wealth
53. ligion so long as it was not " Popish." wealth, and had been offered it on condition t
54. n condition that they should accept any form of opinion, no matter how different fro
55. ion that they should accept any form of opinion, no matter how different from that whic
56. y should accept any form of opinion, no matter how different from that which they held
57. dying of starvation, they should prefer death to violating their consciences. But, no
58. ing their wonder, the fact remained the same, and they naturally blamed the person w
59. used some very plain and very emphatic language that morning. Mrs. Blanders had advised
60. nders, model husband that he was, had a habit of taking his wife's advice. The letter
61. d caused this commotion in the Blanders family had intimated that there was to be a gr
62. ere was to be a great public meeting in one month from that day, in Exeter Hall, Lo
63. ndon, and that some thoroughly striking death-bed conversions from the errors of Pope
64. ndise was appreciated accordingly. If a soul could not be purchased, a child could b
65. nders had some views of her own on this matter, as she said, "if the worst comes to th
66. hews and nieces. She had some Could not one of them be purchased as a sop to the Ce
67. s of English greed for Catholic souls ? One great principle of the society was to a
68. sh greed for Catholic souls ? One great principle of the society was to ask no questions.
69. ty, whose income depended on "something being done," and if a child was snatched as "
70. as "a brand from the burning," no very particular inquiries would be made as to who the c
71. nd kin it. to the tender mercies of the soul -destroyers if she could help And woman
72. they intended to of his own mission was one of the best proofs Here were men all th
73. or a future crime, or leave to commit a sin for so much money, why did they die of
74. He rented a large farm, and had been a man in his day. When he brought his young w
75. e, eight years ago, she was the envy of many a lass around ! JU- 12 FROM KILLARNEY T
76. ich seems to have altered even the very nature of the root. But now all was changed. T
77. meadows. Tim O' Hallo- ran was not the man to store his worldly goods when neighbo
78. s A strong were dying for need of them. man takes long to die. The Scripture-reader
79. e. The Scripture-reader While there was life there was hope. If he could only get on
80. fe there was hope. If he could only get one word of assent his purpose would be acc
81. e on the wretched intruder. Even in his death agony the native courtesy could not sto
82. him quite. sir," " I fear you're losing time, he murmured, faintly; " the priest wil
83. ime, he murmured, faintly; " the priest will be here soon, and the priest will care
84. riest will be here soon, and the priest will care for the boy." But even as he said
85. eavily, wearily, on Poor little lad the same straw on which his father lay dying. he
86. an, the aged grandmother, who lived on, man was many a hard struggle, when the youn
87. aged grandmother, who lived on, man was many a hard struggle, when the young by the
88. at day both had realized, for the first time, that father as old folks do, through f
89. e was not anxious to meet him at such a time and in such a place. But the case was d
90. , and knew what he would be worth, with good food and care. He was a child of much i
91. poor, Soggarth aroon. Banim. all his A man of stately presence and of a native dig
92. st beseeching pathos had bent the noble form, open brow, and had added a touching, a
93. bbard of the body together, so that the soul might remain to do his Master's work a
94. iver them." There were worse evils than death to be feared for them. Happy, indeed, w
95. ving and the dead lying together on the same bed of straw and covered with a piece o
96. , a sanctity altogether divine. And, in truth, such patience and such charity could n
97. patience and such charity could not be other than direigned, and there he vine, for
98. ed, and there he vine, for the grace of God alone could have conferred the last rit
99. t weariness was nearly over; their last pain and ache was well its nigh passed. rich
100. anxious prayer about his boy. The brave man gladly faced death and bravely suffered
101. out his boy. The brave man gladly faced death and bravely suffered pain, but the grea
102. gladly faced death and bravely suffered pain, but the great tears rolled down his po
103. hbors were scarce able to keep body and soul together, though more than one of them,
104. ody and soul together, though more than one of them, with unfailing Irish charity,
105. e of the little lad. Only the great and good priest could realize how hard Tim's dea
106. ood priest could realize how hard Tim's death-bed trial was. Only God knew how glorio
107. ow hard Tim's death-bed trial was. Only God knew how gloriously his faith triumphed
108. . ? What could the priest say Thade was one of hundreds of — V i l6 FROM KILLARNE
109. ation, moment at the door and uttered " Peace be to this house and to it the Master's
110. are therein." conflict. Truly there was peace, though started. was the peace of Mr. B
111. here was peace, though started. was the peace of Mr. Blanders He had his not calculat
112. nders hesitated for a moment, and then, being a bully, as cowards generally are, he r
113. right. By divine right, for this dying man is answerable to God, and not to you, f
114. ht, for this dying man is answerable to God, and not to you, for the faith he profe
115. ve this house. You are here against the will of this good man. His room is his prope
116. . You are here against the will of this good man. His room is his property as much a
117. are here against the will of this good man. His room is his property as much as yo
118. ence in your dying moments against your will? Is there one law for the poor and anot
119. ing moments against your will? Is there one law for the poor and another for the ri
120. moments against your will? Is there one law for the poor and another for the rich?"
121. y anxious He knew the priest had little time to spare, and what if a proud letter he
122. he priest and remained beside the dying man, " preaching the gospel " to him to his
123. e word was breathed so low by the dying man, needed, indeed, the ear of a father to
124. med ears could tell their it was in the death agony it was in the supreme moment of h
125. like his can be best understood ! dying man, and bent over him with a more than ord
126. than ordinary compassion. " Father, for God's sake drive that devil away. He wants
127. shall go, and I promise you, in name of God, that I will take care of Thade, and th
128. d I promise you, in name of God, that I will take care of Thade, and that you priest
129. Thade, and that you priest shall die in peace." The him. had spoken loud enough turne
130. ar He now is " There from it stantly, I will obtain the assistance of the police to
131. etion the better part of There was only one point on which his employer required an
132. re unwilling to receive them. It was no matter what was done privately that was " a tr
133. left the cottage sadly. heavy stupor of death. Granny watched by him, saying her bead
134. faculties were so dull and blunted by a life of much sorrow and by months of starvat
135. est had hoped to have sent to guard the family from the intrusion of soupers had not b
136. e arrived in the morning he found there soul to care. Tim O'Halloran and his was no
137. discarded, but the reader must not for one moment suppose that it is entirely aban
138. ely credible. I know of my own personal knowledge instances of this proselytizing. Within
139. d to eat meat. So much for Protestant " liberty of congirl called attention, in the pub
140. ers, to a gross case of proselytism — science." " OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER. 19 C
141. vexation did not indicate so serious a matter. " Little Thade O'Halloran has disappea
142. a swear." Excuse him; he was not in the habit of using strong language. " I saw Fathe
143. he was not in the habit of using strong language. " I saw Father James after mass this m
144. who's to prove it?" ; — I'll take the law of them; I'll prosecute I'll expose the
145. ce. if " You young dog you? II have the law taken of you some day you haven't more
146. r. Miles O'Grady had been O'Halloran's. life. many years a friend of Tim It is true
147. es O'Grady had been O'Halloran's. life. many years a friend of Tim It is true they h
148. station. Mr. O'Grady belonged to an old family of high respectability, and in Kerry, w
149. rry, where " blood " is held in special honor, his descent counted for much. His worl
150. for much. His worldly position was not one which, under other circumstances, would
151. rldly position was not one which, under other circumstances, would have entitled him
152. hold the position he did. But to he was one of the—we had almost said few that pe
153. od, — Irishmen who, at had the common sense to prefer an honest employment, however
154. are rarely came forth again to tell the world the tale of suffering father, "Well, Fa
155. u can see But Miles O'Grady was not the man to sit down, even to the poor breakfast
156. friend was — — in danger of body or soul. request; his hat for his stick. was on
157. n the present instance, a breach of the peace would have been anything but desirable.
158. ggested proceeding than the general and particular onslaught which he had meditated on the
159. which he had meditated on the Blanders family. ready known. Father James could give n
160. f. It was no policy of hers to keep any one waiting ' ' that day. For once Mr. Mile
161. he took it up, he put it down again; he life his hat consulted the inside of it, and
162. but she was not the to allow the little sense of the ridiculous with gifted to interf
163. to interfere with the stern business of life. woman which she was She had not the sl
164. repared. The eldest son of the Blanders family dashed unexpectedly into the room, and
165. the stranger, roared out: ma, that boy will make the sign But Mrs. Blanders, though
166. roared out: ma, that boy will make the sign But Mrs. Blanders, though stunned for t
167. other's fancy about these signs another time — free-mason " These boys of mine hav
168. at different matters in the eyes of the law. His courage was restored, however, by
169. ent matters in the eyes of the law. His courage was restored, however, by the barefaced
170. ordered by him to leave the house. You will be so good as to remember that this can
171. him to leave the house. You will be so good as to remember that this can be ! — p
172. d if, in his anger, he used threatening language to her, she could the sooner visitor of
173. g louder every moment) but in courts of law, at least in to believe all this gramEn
174. in to believe all this gramEngland, no one would believe a priest (she glanced cov
175. ictims of priestcraft." " If you were a man," exclaimed Mr. O'Grady, with an indign
176. e street he met Father James, who was a man of few words. sir," replied "Well, sir?
177. E A BANKER. 25 CHAPTER IV. THE BLANDERS FAMILY AT HOME. They sold us and scorned lied;
178. t the look of amusement which his usual form of asseveration had provoked in Kate's
179. men would be on their side. Glory be to God, but some of the gentry have the wrong
180. -I FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW YORK; 26 have wealth and power against us, but we have God w
181. ealth and power against us, but we have God with us," he said, " and do not for one
182. God with us," he said, " and do not for one moment doubt that the father's dying fa
183. ent doubt that the father's dying faith will be abundantly rewarded." " I am certain
184. ad," observed Kate; "We "I only hope it will not make matters worse than they are al
185. Mr. O'Grady rose and rang the bell. " I will caution him this is no time — for act
186. e bell. " I will caution him this is no time — for acts of imprudence, however wel
187. he was goin' to live at the expense ov government, as it was nothin' to do and good pay f
188. government, as it was nothin' to do and good pay for He would not be 'listin', sure,
189. mother wit often sucfails; ceeds where man's wisdom and Pat has a knack of succeed
190. r wit often sucfails; ceeds where man's wisdom and Pat has a knack of succeed- ing whe
191. n paying you, do nothing ?" you sit all state of mental do you expect the day with yo
192. he day in personal exercise. He had two good reasons. One was that he was bound " to
193. onal exercise. He had two good reasons. One was that he was bound " to do good in s
194. sons. One was that he was bound " to do good in season and greater part of the out o
195. f his agreement with his employers. The other reason was that, warmer reception than
196. iling. 11 Very well, Mr. Blanders, very good, sir; but you need not put on your piou
197. ted to use " plain words," Mr. Blanders time for action had arrived, and quailed acc
198. That's intend to support your wife and family, or do you not what /call a plain quest
199. Well, really, Liza, you're too "I'm too good for you, sir, if that's what you mean.
200. at's what you mean. Here am I losing my time, and every moment precious, waiting the
201. ous, waiting the last two hours to hear one word of sense from you." "I," faintly m
202. the last two hours to hear one word of sense from you." "I," faintly murmured Mr. Bl
203. our eyes open, and do something for the good of your family — — and I don't want
204. , and do something for the good of your family — — and I don't want any of your so
205. gs Here I am for the last two But never mind, sir, never mind. Mr. Blanders, was it
206. the last two But never mind, sir, never mind. Mr. Blanders, was it for this you led
207. have been quite sufficient to drive any idea out of the head of any human being subj
208. e any idea out of the head of any human being subjected , much hours imploring you to
209. much desired to hear, but long years of experience had taught him prudence, and he refrain
210. long years of experience had taught him prudence, and he refrained. But on this occasion
211. er silence, as he had not the slightest idea what course to pursue, and he dared not
212. Blanders was not slow in pronouncing an opinion when she had an opinion to give; and th
213. pronouncing an opinion when she had an opinion to give; and the occasions were rare in
214. eed, in which she did not consider this opinion infallible. OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANK
215. REPORTED BY MRS. SLAND- the spirit and life in the world. De "If it's wantin' to se
216. MRS. SLAND- the spirit and life in the world. De "If it's wantin' to see the Verb. m
217. thout a twinkle of humor in her eye. if same tome, masther or misthress, do me busin
218. few and far between, like the masther's good words," the latter part of the observat
219. ds," the latter part of the observation being made in faith, Miss, it's all the " Oh,
220. d, with equal determination, to attend "family prayers," or the master's church; but s
221. church and knelt before the altar, with many tears and sobs, "to bid God Al- **i JPO
222. ltar, with many tears and sobs, "to bid God Al- **i JPOMW 30 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW
223. W 30 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW YORK; mighty good-by" till better times should come, and
224. service, let us hope little knowing the sin she was committing. It may be supposed
225. be supposed that Ellen had very little desire to increase the number of the " mission
226. oselytes, but if she it made any active opposition to their increase silent. had would hav
227. e wanted a Since it Bible she could buy one that was the real thing."] have constan
228. She is familiar already Blanders, but a good deal sotto voce.] with the names of all
229. n here to inspect thing. the mission he will certainly question her, and it will be
230. he will certainly question her, and it will be very unpleasant if she cannot answer
231. n, and have taught her [the eldest hope being and hearing himself mentioned inclusive
232. he Bible about Mary: that, and you said one day it of grace it was, or something li
233. ad if it's in the Bible?" The inquiring mind receives, however, a severe shock in th
234. wever, a severe shock in the unpleasant form of a blow on the side of the head, and
235. de of the head, and a recommendation to mind his own business, which the result of n
236. ttending to a similar recommendation on other occasions being vividly remembered he p
237. milar recommendation on other occasions being vividly remembered he proceeded to do w
238. e who live by the Gospel, you know." "I will not say anything about compensation, Mr
239. out compensation, Mr. Blanders. painful state of the times Hold your tongue and write
240. pe I shall know how to answer them. You will be so good as to remember that you are
241. know how to answer them. You will be so good as to remember that you are writing of
242. subsided and continued.] If we have no other fruit to show of our long and weary lab
243. ent to compensate for a large outlay of time and money but there is no doubt whateve
244. NEY TO NEW YORK; effect, her conversion will have an immense as the exeitement it ha
245. repay the outlay. possible, as I which will fully These funds should be supplied as
246. e are ready to receive our words, there will not be the same hope of success." " Any
247. eceive our words, there will not be the same hope of success." " Anything more, my d
248. girl to the Hawk's Nest at present; she will be perfectly safe here, and is my wife
249. be perfectly safe here, and is my wife will take care that not tampered with by her
250. her some light occupation in our small family, to occupy her mind, as she cannot be a
251. tion in our small family, to occupy her mind, as she cannot be always en- gaged in B
252. her; and the expense we have had in the matter seems to weigh heavily on her sensitive
253. he had no money Such to give him."* the history of the girl whom we have kept too long
254. at the present day, to the writer's own knowledge. Soon after the writer of this story wa
255. ice, how much she paid the priest every time she went to confession. Soupers and so-
256. circulate them. If Protestants knew the truth about Catholic teaching there would be
257. about Catholic teaching there would be many converts; hence the devil has a special
258. VI. BACK AT THE HALL-DOOR. But fixed as fate her altars stand. Unchanged, like God,
259. fate her altars stand. Unchanged, like God, her faith. De Verb. " Well, my good ma
260. ike God, her faith. De Verb. " Well, my good man, what do you want ?" Mick scratched
261. od, her faith. De Verb. " Well, my good man, what do you want ?" Mick scratched his
262. able source of information to the Irish mind. 4< They're hard times, miss," replied
263. ted accordingly. "You are Mr. O'Grady's man," she said, rather as an asserThere was
264. said, rather as an asserThere was not a man, woman or child tion than as an inquiry
265. , sight. "Thrue for ye, miss. I was his man, anyway; which puts me thinkin' of the
266. for once fairly perplexed. What did the man want, and why did "he not say what he w
267. ugh to be purchasable, and he had had a good place with Mr. O'Grady for several year
268. nders assented with a sour smile at the man's attempt She had, indeed, observed tha
269. treet while this short conversation was being carried on, and that gave her some hope
270. she had landed a prize. "Well, now, my good man, what is it you do want ?" inquired
271. had landed a prize. "Well, now, my good man, what is it you do want ?" inquired Mrs
272. . Blanders; "an' I heard tell there was good livin' an' good wages for a poor boy up
273. I heard tell there was good livin' an' good wages for a poor boy up in Dublin that
274. r boy up in Dublin that wouldn't be too particular about his religion, and that yourself i
275. at wouldn't be too particular about his religion, and that yourself is the lady that wou
276. he muttered to himself. Mrs. Blanders' mind was quick when business was concerned,
277. d thrown in her way. She mistrusted the man with a woman's keen instinct, and she d
278. called " miss;" but we must do her the justice to say that she never allowed any perso
279. Faith, miss, I dunno, if it wasn't the change-faver came over me. He' 11 not know whe
280. with the most charming assumption of a desire to exert his memory to the very utmost,
281. ing assumption of a desire to exert his memory to the very utmost, "to oblige the lady
282. of chaps working up at the church, you mind, there near Muckross domain, an' a lot
283. and walks round everything, for all the world as if they were paying God Almighty a c
284. or all the world as if they were paying God Almighty a compliment for looking at th
285. mpliment for looking at the beauties of nature and art; and then they ups and they goe
286. r looking at the beauties of nature and art; and then they ups and they goes to the
287. hen they ups and they goes to them, and one chap gave the wink to another, and the
288. chap gave the wink to another, and the other nudged the next chap, that they'd have
289. n' your presence, miss, always has. An' one of them swaggers up to him, puffin' him
290. ugly mouth: " * What are you doing, my man?' "'Makin' morthar, sir,' says O'Hallor
291. n England,' he says to himself; but the other gentlemen heerd him, and they signed th
292. Roman Catholic Church.' " Then all the other chaps gives a laugh you might hear over
293. tty loud, what the divil says,' an' the other chaps roared at this. You might a heerd
294. at Kenmare, let alone at Adrigoole." A sense of the ridiculous was not one of Mrs. B
295. ole." A sense of the ridiculous was not one of Mrs. Blanders' mental gifts, and she
296. int of the joke. Indeed, the cares of a family like hers, and an income held by a very
297. just Nor did she very much concern Her religion, so far was to provide for her family r
298. religion, so far was to provide for her family religion. herself about the broad hit a
299. n, so far was to provide for her family religion. herself about the broad hit at her as
300. the evening was closing " Mornin', your honor," said Mike, with an utter and callous
301. h an utter and callous disregard of the time of day. Mrs. Blanders volunteered an ex
302. This is a muscle. I believe a person a man, in fact—" "Yes, your honor, I'm a ma
303. a person a man, in fact—" "Yes, your honor, I'm a man," said Mick, without moving
304. an, in fact—" "Yes, your honor, I'm a man," said Mick, without moving a — —
305. The devil said wants, I think, to a —change —in fact, to improve his condition."
306. ow," observed Mick to himself.) " Never mind, an' your me thoughts said to the clutc
307. to the clutch of ducks. It's bettherin' good lady, I'm tould, is I mean, the woman,
308. xpected to make some remark. ""Well, my good man, I am sure we are only too willing
309. ed to make some remark. ""Well, my good man, I am sure we are only too willing to h
310. are a few little conditions as regards religion, and that, but we will make it as easy
311. s as regards religion, and that, but we will make it as easy as possible for you; an
312. asy as possible for you; and git sinse) many for me, as the hin me condition I'm aft
313. as the hin me condition I'm afther, the man (whist, ye villain, and is too — —
314. lady and miss ? — I understands each other I'm agreein' to all the conditions befo
315. t hearing them, an' I'm sure nothin' in life could be fairer. An' look here, miss,"
316. uth when he roared out, not knowing the good ye was doing that night the father died
317. hat night the father died his bed, him (God be merciful to his soul heaven be him;
318. ed his bed, him (God be merciful to his soul heaven be him; ye clapped it to his sho
319. n', an' he tryin' to make signs to some one in the street beyant, as if the ungrate
320. ul little villain did not know what was good for him, an' he pointin' to his arm, r
321. olice — him right, "Bless silence. my soul !" exclaimed Mr. Blanders. Mrs. Blander
322. ece, from the fertile depths of his own imagination. He had not seen the child carried away
323. secrecy, with such a calm assumption of knowledge, with such a who were about to confer a
324. taken in; and, in their alarm lest the knowledge of what they had done could be really a
325. s favor; still he knew the injured have good memories. Mrs. Blanders was equal to th
326. ived she would have accused the unhappy man of having precipitated its arrival. "Ye
327. his wife made, even had he not lost his mind altogether from sheer * ' fright. But,
328. ht. But, my dear, who I'll is suspicion will follow on — to take him ? If either o
329. to Dublin yourself, together with this good man and the boy. As it is well, I'll th
330. ublin yourself, together with this good man and the boy. As it is well, I'll think
331. t I'm goYou must go to Dublin with this man. I believe he is in earnest at least, t
332. least, that he wants to get money, and will make — some sacrifices for it; but it
333. "My dear— "You're enough father of a family to drive any woman clean crazed—you,
334. e any woman clean crazed—you, the — God help them —with no more sense than a
335. , the — God help them —with no more sense than a ! teetotum, or —an elephant" (
336. ainly I cannot leave this place with no one but you in it, and of two evils choose
337. re in it is always the worst. And now I desire, or what I beg you will attend you need
338. st. And now I desire, or what I beg you will attend you need not come to to me and d
339. ncapable this minute." " Oh, sure, your honor, sir, you would not be blamin' him; he
340. e myself that never touched a since the time I was born, barrin' the one I swal- —
341. since the time I was born, barrin' the one I swal- — has not got his mornin' shu
342. drop to rouse his sowl." If ever mortal man was in an agony of desperation and de-
343. - comes to his bedside with spair, that man was John Thomas Blanders. was his bette
344. Blanders. was his better-half, If ever man realized realized that his wife it John
345. d that his wife it John Thomas Blanders life to that day. Certainly he would have gi
346. ich it was swathed. Having expressed by many groans and contortions, he asked for so
347. ons, he asked for something to ease the pain, and on being provided with a remedy, h
348. for something to ease the pain, and on being provided with a remedy, he said that he
349. es. Now Mr. Blanders was an inoffensive man in general partly from natural characte
350. ated for the dirty — work he did. Any other sufferer would have been received with
351. ress, and the return observation of the other, that he wondered would it be any harm
352. t be any harm to put the least taste in life more opium than creosote in the mixtion
353. e opium than creosote in the mixtion of one shop-boy to another, to had anything an
354. two. Whether the opium was put in the "pain killer " or not remains to be proved. T
355. erness would have set a more uneducated man mad; but Mr. Blanders had long gone thr
356. grief was nearly as destructive of the peace of had been of its safety. But a word f
357. was that Mick had there made up his Any one mind to rescue Thade in his own fashion
358. that Mick had there made up his Any one mind to rescue Thade in his own fashion. who
359. a game, and he knew pretty well by this time that he was no match for a quick-witted
360. y it with all possible tenderness. What man is there of any right feeling, of any r
361. dly to his do- mestic hearth when cruel fate has torn him from it ? Mr. Blanders was
362. KILLARNEY TO NEW YORK: And the unhappy man was lips in literally tongue-tied. He H
363. d up before a magistrate on a charge of being drunk and disorderly. It is true, indee
364. ndeed, that his employers were not very particular as to the character of the persons who
365. ter of the persons who served. It was a necessity of the case. They got the weeds which t
366. y found that the bargain was a very bad one indeed, that was their explanation or e
367. enuation. affair. dared not open his No one had asked them to undertake their dirty
368. were quietly condoned. became known to one or two, they were treated compassionate
369. d it conven. ient to forget, that these same Papists were supposed to be converted.
370. t hung over him ever since. Glory be to God, what some men have to pay for their sp
371. men have to pay for their spake to your honor. Sure it all sins —I mean their virtu
372. all, or maybe they left it out for some one else whin ye were born. Don't Mr. Bland
373. bly. ye hear the crathur groanin', your honor's worship, sir? Sure it's sorry he is,
374. him afore, an' faith, I'll promise your honor's worship, sir, you'll — — never se
375. ee playin', like a sunbeam, on bit your honor's illigant mouth, under the purty ov ha
376. There was a roar in court, in which his honor heartily joined. * There, your friend f
377. anders thought he might. He owed Mick a good deal more than he ever expected *'Is it
378. d *'Is it to repay. five shillin', your honor ?" " " I told you so before. Make haste
379. , an' it's meself that always it to the quality since Phil O'Rafferty put into an oak-s
380. the thick end of " Policeman, take that man he does not pay that out, and give him
381. ve shillings in ten "Oh, your boy. It's honor, you're hard entirely on a poor motherl
382. entirely on a poor motherless first the time he's got into a bit of throuble, and he
383. her than to be inthrudin' meself on the quality. Sure it's takin' up the room on ye I'd
384. in court, and several custodians of the peace came in from the outside to see " what
385. to me, " and Mick pocket but the right one for the commenced money. to feel in eve
386. liberately as he could. " An' now, your honor, sir, I'll thank you for a resate." " P
387. nk you for a resate." " Pooh, nonsense, man, we don't give receipts here." " Ah, th
388. Thade, with a finger in his mouth and a wisdom beyond his age, clung to his friend and
389. . " Really, you must go out of this, my good man." OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER. 47
390. eally, you must go out of this, my good man." OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER. 47 " G
391. A BANKER. 47 " Give me the resate, yer honor, an' I'm gone as quick as ye'd swallow
392. t you know you won't be taken up on the same charge again?" «* Is it what I want th
393. it what I want the resate for, yer yer honor. Ye'll soon see the raison of it," hims
394. lf with the air of a telling his story. man honor? Well, I'll tell and Mick settled
395. ith the air of a telling his story. man honor? Well, I'll tell and Mick settled who w
396. and Mick settled who wants to take his time while " Ye see, yer honor, I'll die som
397. ts to take his time while " Ye see, yer honor, I'll die some day, glory be to God and
398. r honor, I'll die some day, glory be to God and have mercy on me sinful sowl, amin.
399. e are, ask you a few questions before I honor, they needs to be particular, out Mick
400. stions before I honor, they needs to be particular, out Mick M'Grath, but I must you in;'
401. gets in "An' I says, With the greatest pleasure, your holiness.' "An' he says, *Mick M'
402. * In coorse I did, your holiness, every one of he'll them.' " An' are your say to m
403. V ' "An' " An' say to him, Here's every one of them, your holisorry I ness, barrin'
404. of them, your holisorry I ness, barrin' one.' he'll say to me, 'Mick M'Grath, it's
405. ter, but I can't let you you bring that one, an' ye must go an' get it for us.' "Su
406. or me goin' down below lookin' for your honor to get me resate." to be — 48 FROM KI
407. he took pity on him, as he was from the same county as himself. Indeed this good man
408. the same county as himself. Indeed this good man seemed quite devoted to your husban
409. ame county as himself. Indeed this good man seemed quite devoted to your husband (i
410. that our patient is your husband). The man, whom, no doubt, you will know, as he e
411. husband). The man, whom, no doubt, you will know, as he expressed himself very warm
412. t there is nothing really dangerous the matter, Mrs. Souper (we conclude this is the c
413. t for which this hospital is famous, he will, no doubt, recover. " It is now more th
414. h him, though he was far from well. You will be glad to hear, he said, that the boy
415. husband more than he could bear, never being a very strong man, and that this was th
416. e could bear, never being a very strong man, and that this was the reason why you a
417. us, and that, though he never uses bad language at other times, he has an unfortucorrec
418. t, though he never uses bad language at other times, he has an unfortucorrectly, " If
419. two parties as a consequence fined for being drunk and disorderly. his the fine for
420. very strange manner. any questions, he will not give his religious denomination, an
421. circumstances, and that you devote your time you are in and money to works of charit
422. rd at the Ho spital^ Dublin" "P. S. You will pardon me, I am sure, for writing so fa
423. that I feel already as if I — had the honor of your acquaintance. "P. S. —In comp
424. d that by addressing you thus the shock will be broken to you." Mrs. Blanders' feeli
425. ly bear description. this communication will so appalling The catastrophe was As soo
426. action. as she could think, She had not one moment's doubt as to what course Mick h
427. learned to read and speak English, they will be perused with great attention, and th
428. at the precious seed which we have sown will bear fruit at last in this travelling,
429. g, in season districts with the Word of Life. unfruitful soil. "A great opportunity
430. ciety, that of saving a poor, benighted soul has ocassured, You may be it and can as
431. so- we took care should not be lost. " One of the most respectable farmers in this
432. iritual and temporal comforts. The poor man was overjoyed to have his company, but
433. y husband away. Late at night the dying man was, however, most anxious that his chi
434. ORK; and you may be assured we know our duty to the society by which we are employed
435. ure the poor little child. But the long experience of my husband, and his fertility in res
436. vere illness caught in the discharge of duty. We took the poor boy so quietly that h
437. r house, and was soon reconciled to the change. But we were obliged to get him out of
438. se the priest would have swoni that the man died a good Catholic. Your society know
439. st would have swoni that the man died a good Catholic. Your society knows how pruden
440. stake, when, of course, we would do our duty regardless of consequences from which w
441. set on by them and severely injured. It will be some weeks before he will be able ag
442. njured. It will be some weeks before he will be able again to travel, and the expens
443. tendance and lodging in a private house will be very heavy. But we are sure your soc
444. ery heavy. But we are sure your society will amply compensate him for what he has su
445. te him for what he has suffered in your One partial failure this time will insure s
446. ffered in your One partial failure this time will insure success on the service. nex
447. d in your One partial failure this time will insure success on the service. next occ
448. ntered on the books of the society, but prudence will require that his JrtHH — III ! !
449. the books of the society, but prudence will require that his JrtHH — III ! !' ' O
450. ael Murphy, aged thirteen, and, for the same reason, it is well own name to alter th
451. e Killarney as soon as poscould do more good We now in any other place. ' Mrs. Bland
452. as poscould do more good We now in any other place. ' Mrs. Blanders read her composi
453. or very minute inquiries made as to the truth of her statement. In fact, the whole bu
454. had relieved her feelings and done her duty by informing her husband that he was a
455. een in the Hawk's Nest. what his wife's opinion of him was, reiterated without that he
456. e Mother's house, Killarney, August the one, it 18 — Respectful Sir: I write thes
457. l Sir: I write these few lines, hopi.i' will find *** L. FROM KILLA11NEY TO NEW YORK
458. for we had an awful storm, glory be to God, at sea, an' went part way down to the
459. ns were drowned dead, and there was not one left above wather, that the poor boy cr
460. man enough for —a civil-spoken —how many miles was to land the time we was littl
461. poken —how many miles was to land the time we was little it sea, an' he said two I
462. t ov them Yankees he'll be yet, for the honor and glory of ould Ireland. "It's a quar
463. believe it, now, but the hoight ov the quality live in brown stone houses, an' they sa
464. ay rent to but meself. " Honorable sir, will you tell the ould mother that it's not
465. eep me long here. They say it's twenty -one days we'll be in it, which if I cabin w
466. ike a rale lady in goin' to Mass, as it will have been twice over the says, as the c
467. s, as the captain's boy brought it from one of the men in the East In- where they d
468. ord save us all, what a quare place the world is entirely, that the people can't even
469. thing up in the sky which, glory be to God, I never saw but once, and then it was
470. th where the sun never sets part of the time and never rises the other part, and sur
471. ts part of the time and never rises the other part, and sure I told them it's a pity
472. y, and believe them; faith, no sir your honor, I took good care to let them know they
473. them; faith, no sir your honor, I took good care to let them know they need not put
474. doin' that souper woman. Oh, thin, your honor, only it's afraid I am I'd be kilt dead
475. to see the fun out. An' that puts me in mind that I've come to the beginning of me l
476. end at the beginning, it'll be all the same, as the chaps is comin' in and out with
477. with nothin' to do, an' all helpm' each other while we're doin' this writin', an' mak
478. that woman's the worst. boy would fill one of her own soup-kettles over and over,
479. drowned comin' over in the sea, and the man kept turning the wheel to keep the vess
480. e Holy Virgin and the blessed Mother of God, that never refused the prayer of a poo
481. Irish boy, that died dead for the true religion over and over thousands of years ago, b
482. illarney, where they never had anything particular except a few dip candles and a pipe or
483. ur obedient servant, Mick M'Grath. "An' honor, for the sir, to tell his he'll write t
484. s we had at all, you may say, a at all, pleasure comin'. It's a bill of health we've bee
485. they say. Sure I thought it was when a man was sick the doctor sent in a bill. Fai
486. f me 'ill 'ill be melted away, and then one-half of me be looking for the other hal
487. then one-half of me be looking for the other half at the day of judgment in the stre
488. ooking for the other half at the day of judgment in the streets of New 'ill York, Amin,
489. ets of New 'ill York, Amin, Glory be to God; but I suppose the holy angels know whi
490. f us is which, an' won't be mixin' true religion. up one with "P.P.S. yet. the other, an
491. , an' won't be mixin' true religion. up one with "P.P.S. yet. the other, and not of
492. religion. up one with "P.P.S. yet. the other, and not of the —Here I am at the end
493. dying No breath of prayer did waft thy soul to heaven. B.J.H. "Oh, my God, my God,
494. waft thy soul to heaven. B.J.H. "Oh, my God, my God, where am " Hush, my dear, you'
495. soul to heaven. B.J.H. "Oh, my God, my God, where am " Hush, my dear, you'll only
496. ly the dying can cry and moan, " Oh, my God, my God, where am I going?" A pitiful s
497. ying can cry and moan, " Oh, my God, my God, where am I going?" A pitiful sight it
498. g?" A pitiful sight it was, indeed, and one to make the angels weep. Even her husba
499. ake the angels weep. Even her husband's love could not soothe her now. She knew it c
500. h her over the terrible barrier between life and death. But one short year ago she h
501. r the terrible barrier between life and death. But one short year ago she had come, a
502. ble barrier between life and death. But one short year ago she had come, a gay and
503. her husband's splendid mansion in York. Death ! What had still she to do with death,
504. . Death ! What had still she to do with death, when wedding con- gratulations were ri
505. wedding presents were all untouched by time ? Death What had she to do with death,
506. g presents were all untouched by time ? Death What had she to do with death, when her
507. by time ? Death What had she to do with death, when her young life was just beginning
508. ad she to do with death, when her young life was just beginning, when the young bloo
509. ! through her veins, and the tenderest love of a noble all man was to her own ? ! D
510. , and the tenderest love of a noble all man was to her own ? ! Death If the idea ha
511. e of a noble all man was to her own ? ! Death If the idea had crossed her mind at all
512. all man was to her own ? ! Death If the idea had crossed her mind at all, it was onl
513. n ? ! Death If the idea had crossed her mind at all, it was only — OR, HOW THA.DE
514. r. young have a strange way of thinking death impossible for She was face to face wit
515. roaring lion face to face with a savage animal themselves, but possible for all others
516. hemselves, but possible for all others. Death ! The would have had —with a raging o
517. f defeathowever vague, of escape —the chance, however rouse every nerve, deenemy —
518. deenemy —the so great as ing tiger, A man — less fear. possibility, slight, his
519. peril, to to mand every thought for the one purpose of self-help if it —this woul
520. t altogether have deadened to face with death, But she was face preparation, Scant ti
521. th, But she was face preparation, Scant time to prepare for that and she knew it. wh
522. hat and she knew it. which would need a life-time of and pitiful ignorance of how to
523. nd she knew it. which would need a life-time of and pitiful ignorance of how to prep
524. l would be over. Every alleviation that wealth and love could give was hers but What t
525. over. Every alleviation that wealth and love could give was hers but What these very
526. tions seemed a cruel mockery now. could wealth do for her ? Nothing. If all the gold a
527. the gold and all the jewels and all the wealth of the whole world could have been brou
528. jewels and all the wealth of the whole world could have been brought to her and laid
529. w ? As much use to her, and no more, as one of the brown there stones of knew with
530. e house appurtenances. all its costly ! Love What good to the last could that do her
531. purtenances. all its costly ! Love What good to the last could that do her now, exce
532. pt to add a deeper pang ! agony ? Ah if love could have saved her, she would have be
533. ng which demanded all her strength. For one who had been, as men call it, nursed in
534. it, nursed in the lap of affluence for one who — — 60 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW YO
535. for her own attractions she only wanted one thing; and in that supreme hour all tha
536. uld not be satisfied with platitudes. A man in momentary danger of death will not t
537. latitudes. A man in momentary danger of death will not thank you for assurances that
538. des. A man in momentary danger of death will not thank you for assurances that he ha
539. ip six and then he went, not to worship God, nor to pray for pardon for his sins no
540. it was to hear some popular preacher, a man who, living himself a life that even hi
541. r preacher, a man who, living himself a life that even his friends ? do He why he ha
542. hat even his friends ? do He why he had life, times in his — could scarcely call m
543. dared to take the ing name of the Liv- God in vain by preaching a Christianity of
544. ty of his own invention. He was not the man to help the soul in that terrible hour.
545. vention. He was not the man to help the soul in that terrible hour. The husband woul
546. tre. There are stem words. realities in life which need something more than It She o
547. th dew, were lying on her bed. She took one in her hand, and with a look of unutter
548. er hand, and with a look of unutterable love and anguish, she said: "Call her Rosali
549. ciful way name — a poetical name; not one to remind her of a saint or of holy thi
550. r of a saint or of holy things. for the death Not one to help her to prepare in any w
551. nt or of holy things. for the death Not one to help her to prepare in any which mus
552. ain the poor dying girl moaned, "Oh, my God, my God! ^qwy^HffjigP$egg?5gg553. poor dying girl moaned, "Oh, my God, my God! ^qwy^HffjigP$egg?5gg554. ECAME A BANKER. 6l She knew the name of God, and that was Time and eternity seemed
555. She knew the name of God, and that was Time and eternity seemed to nearly all she k
556. the name of God, and that was Time and eternity seemed to nearly all she knew of religi
557. ernity seemed to nearly all she knew of religion. have changed places in the minds of th
558. ho had educated her. Everything in this world was treated as if it was to be eternal,
559. e eternal, as if there could not be any change, as if it were all to go on where am I
560. l to go on where am I going ?" forever. Eternity, if thought of at all, nite, wholly uni
561. ght of at all, nite, wholly unimportant matter. was treated as some vague, indefiIt di
562. this girl -bride was face to. face with eternity, and it seemed to her as if she should
563. she would have envied Tim O'Halloran's death-bed How willingly now would she have ch
564. ittle What would she not have given for one minute of ! their glorious faith, their
565. harity But as we live, so we shall die, one and all. time enough given us to arrang
566. we live, so we shall die, one and all. time enough given us to arrange for the futu
567. for the future availed ourselves of the time, the fault is We if have had ; we have
568. he was so He had literally been without God in the world. How was He to be found no
569. e had literally been without God in the world. How was He to be found now, who had ne
570. e heathens believe that there true is a God, .and worship Him —ignorantly, we say
571. ey 02 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW YORK; calls good, were what the world well-meaning peopl
572. TO NEW YORK; calls good, were what the world well-meaning people. They did no evil,
573. world well-meaning people. They did no evil, indeed, to any one —they were mercif
574. eople. They did no evil, indeed, to any one —they were merciful as those who —
575. they were merciful as those who — not God may be merciful to every one except the
576. ho — not God may be merciful to every one except themselves. But what a terrible
577. have been the means of saving the whole world by our prayers, and That, tears, and pe
578. en do feel when feel the light of their life is about to be extinguished —as men w
579. inguished —as men when they think the world can never again afford them a moment's
580. can never again afford them a moment's happiness. But we cannot compare the feelings of
581. But we cannot compare the feelings of a man on the point of perishing from a violen
582. n the point of perishing from a violent death with the feelings of one who merely loo
583. om a violent death with the feelings of one who merely looks on at danger. ask hims
584. y looks on at danger. ask himself, " of one whose Mr. Maxwell was not face to face
585. e Mr. Maxwell was not face to face with death. lie had not to Where am I going ?" He
586. m I going ?" He was not in the position life is counted by hours, if not by minutes.
587. y minutes. But his wife, his bride, his love, to her had come the agony of death in
588. his love, to her had come the agony of death in no dulling stupor of insensibility,
589. stupor of insensibility, which sends so many souls who might have prepared souls unc
590. or it before this came, but did not. To soul her had come the agony of death in such
591. not. To soul her had come the agony of death in such anguish that pain almost is una
592. the agony of death in such anguish that pain almost is unable to realize not as it c
593. is unable to realize not as it comes to many, deadens every sense, so that the the t
594. not as it comes to many, deadens every sense, so that the the terror that is coming
595. t the the terror that is coming no; her life — — was ebbing away, yet her change
596. r life — — was ebbing away, yet her change, each advance of the soul was quite abl
597. ay, yet her change, each advance of the soul was quite able to nets each fell destro
598. quite able to nets each fell destroyer, Death. The saints who have lain dying —who
599. expressions of blasphemy or defying of God. She had simply and quietly passed God
600. God. She had simply and quietly passed God by. She could not profess Her ignorance
601. m. heart She said in a general way that God had been indif- very good to her; but e
602. neral way that God had been indif- very good to her; but even this goodness had not
603. hat would have been excuse enough once; sin, it but she was face to face with reali
604. t it was her thought. She knew now that God had given her a duty to have mind and a
605. . She knew now that God had given her a duty to have mind and an intellect that she
606. w that God had given her a duty to have mind and an intellect that she might use it
607. . her thoughts been occupied with ? The world, its and pleasures, herself— with pre
608. with precisely those very things which God had expressly forbidden. Certainly she
609. tainly she had not broken those laws of God which were the laws of her country. Thi
610. e laws of her country. This was all the world asked from her. She must not offend aga
611. nd against the code of morals which the world has condescended to sanction. There mus
612. e devil's reluctant tribute to Almighty God. The world, for its own sake, is oblige
613. reluctant tribute to Almighty God. The world, for its own sake, is obliged to enforc
614. BLOOD-GUILTINESS The guilt of another ! God help that soul fears, That bears such a
615. SS The guilt of another ! God help that soul fears, That bears such a burden of sin
616. soul fears, That bears such a burden of sin and One only art can A life-long wipe o
617. rs, That bears such a burden of sin and One only art can A life-long wipe out the c
618. bears such a burden of sin and One only art can A life-long wipe out the crime pena
619. a burden of sin and One only art can A life-long wipe out the crime penance of pain
620. life-long wipe out the crime penance of pain and tears. M. F. C. "Where is Kathleen?
621. d with apparent reason, that his wife'j mind was wandering. "Kathleen?" "Yes." But t
622. "Kathleen?" "Yes." But there seemed no sign of wandering, though the voice had grow
623. d, in that large estab- lishment. girl, one; but she was a smart and would soon ris
624. Kathleen?" " She knows something about religion, I am sure; they say all these Irish se
625. ould you be any harm." " I am afraid of God." " afraid of? You never did ! L. OR, H
626. o have served Him faithfully. What have God ? Nothing. ever done for Him?" And she
627. new now, when she was face to face with death. Nothing We do something for those whom
628. thing We do something for those whom we love. We are never weary of doing for them.
629. doing for them. Our hearts are full of desire to please them, to surprise them with s
630. act of gratitude, of affection. "If you love Me, keep My commands." Which of God's c
631. ou love Me, keep My commands." Which of God's commands had she kept ? Not one of th
632. ch of God's commands had she kept ? Not one of them. for the love of Had she ever d
633. had she kept ? Not one of them. for the love of Had she ever done one single act of
634. them. for the love of Had she ever done one single act of her life simply never tho
635. Had she ever done one single act of her life simply never thought of Him. God ? No.
636. f her life simply never thought of Him. God ? No. Had she feared him ? No. She had
637. had gone to that most marvellous of all Nature's marvels, the Falls of Niagara. As she
638. he rushing mass of waters, a thought of God had come into her heart. The flashing l
639. words of the great glory of the Eternal One, who sits above the mighty waters, who
640. ngs of follow the Lamb The and voice of God spoke to her through the voice of Natur
641. f God spoke to her through the voice of Nature, in the mighty falling of the cataract
642. cataract waters she heard the whisper: God! She knew God had spoken. touched. It .
643. rs she heard the whisper: God! She knew God had spoken. touched. It . For a moment
644. grace freely. it. was but for a moment. God had She had done nothing —nothing wha
645. ndly ! She had never given for her, him one loving thought. God, if we may say so,
646. given for her, him one loving thought. God, if we may say so, had set a device her
647. e for a — mo- ment complying with any desire which she might express. But before he
648. ion to timidity, and said: " This is no time to think of yourself, girl. If you can
649. irl. If you can help my dying wife, for God's sake do;" and he forced her into the
650. e do;" and he forced her into the room. mind. If you can — " Oh, — — *' Kathle
651. leen, oh, Kathleen, help me!" for their beauty, if terror Already the eyes, once so ex
652. ready the eyes, once so extolled ing in death. It were glaz- seemed, indeed, as of th
653. s. She scarcely knew her. There were so many helps in that great mansion, that one m
654. many helps in that great mansion, that one more or less mattered little. It was no
655. years since I the — — practiced my religion." Years since she practiced her religio
656. eligion." Years since she practiced her religion, and time is counted only by years, whi
657. s since she practiced her religion, and time is counted only by years, which are but
658. e but as minutes in the great spaces of eternity ! "Let me go for the priest," she cried
659. , as it passed sounded upon the dial of time. It is them, was worth a prince's ranso
660. ransom poor comparison to make. All the wealth of India, all the a ! wealth of all the
661. e. All the wealth of India, all the a ! wealth of all the world put together, could no
662. of India, all the a ! wealth of all the world put together, could not delay the supre
663. nd faster the minutes seemed to fered a death-agony with her dying mistress. and Kath
664. ith full to the full what she had done. knowledge of her religion, without an excuse befo
665. ull what she had done. knowledge of her religion, without an excuse before God and man,
666. her religion, without an excuse before God and man, had flung away her glorious bi
667. igion, without an excuse before God and man, had flung away her glorious birthright
668. fidels have admitted to be the grandest religion the world has ever known. Unhappy, mise
669. dmitted to be the grandest religion the world has ever known. Unhappy, miserable girl
670. found her out. Happily for her, she had time for repentance; but to her dying hour s
671. d, what might she not have done for the soul of that dying woman ? How she might hav
672. her over to receive the ministration of God's holy Church The girl knew her religio
673. of God's holy Church The girl knew her religion very well. She knew if there was immedi
674. e knew if there was immediate danger of death, and that there was not time to get a p
675. danger of death, and that there was not time to get a priest, that she should have h
676. t of contri- tion for all her sins. And cause as then this poor soul might have gone
677. l her sins. And cause as then this poor soul might have gone hopefully to God. is Pr
678. poor soul might have gone hopefully to God. is Protestant baptism it is so careles
679. that those who die without holy baptism will never see God's blessed face in heaven.
680. die without holy baptism will never see God's blessed face in heaven. This poor dyi
681. oof the greatest grace which mortal can desire. lic Kathleen knew full well what she o
682. ught to do; but the paralysis of mortal sin was on her, and she hesitated till the
683. was on her, and she hesitated till the time for action was past. Then, indeed, when
684. for action was past. Then, indeed, when death had claimed its prey, she cried out, wi
685. ears or cries could help —the hour of judgment had come. now ? The time of probation T
686. he hour of judgment had come. now ? The time of probation Time enough had been given
687. t had come. now ? The time of probation Time enough had been given both to mistress
688. d been given both to mistress and maid. Time enough to prepare Time enough, intellec
689. stress and maid. Time enough to prepare Time enough, intellect enough, opportunity e
690. tellect enough, opportunity enough. for eternity What excuse could either mistress or ma
691. ffer, when called to account before the judgment-seat of God? Kathleen had come to New Y
692. to account before the judgment-seat of God? Kathleen had come to New York some few
693. w York some few years little before, as many another Irish girl had come, with thoug
694. ything except to advance herself in the world. The sudden change from the regular hab
695. dvance herself in the world. The sudden change from the regular habits of home not imp
696. me not improved her. in a freedom which life had She was her own mistress now, and g
697. way to hell. It is, indeed, paved with good intentions. No alas ! gij# says to hers
698. gij# says to herself deliberately, " I will go to hell." But, how many boys and it,
699. erately, " I will go to hell." But, how many boys and it, girls choose deliberately
700. ipitate themselves into these snares. A man who is walking along a road which ends
701. ngerous and often where he is going. He will not Far is going to walk into destructi
702. g to walk into destruction. from it. He will assure you that he is very well able to
703. ued. And what is the danger of temporal death, compared with the danger of eternal da
704. damnation Kathleen had been the envy of many Irish girls in New York, in consequence
705. ence of her success in obtaining such a good situation and such high wages. She real
706. ! lest, having gained first all in this world, they should lose all in the next. Kath
707. ave been indignant and furious with any one who had even suggested that she would b
708. state At from her faith. What could any one suppose that she would turn from the re
709. ne suppose that she would turn from the religion of old Ireland from the faith for which
710. say of those who become traitors their God and their faith, not from any dire temp
711. ish hope of temporal advance- —that a man who outrages his country, or who turns
712. fellow-servants, who knew nothing about religion, ridiculed, as the ignorant will always
713. ut religion, ridiculed, as the ignorant will always do; and she who was once wise be
714. who was once wise became a fool not for God's sake, but to duties after her arrival
715. ral loss; is for in She was giving away truth, no one ever man or woman who not true
716. is for in She was giving away truth, no one ever man or woman who not true to their
717. She was giving away truth, no one ever man or woman who not true to their religion
718. ever man or woman who not true to their religion. She was risking her eternal salvation
719. ten find that those who should be their God, that those who may wear a royal crown,
720. yal throne prepared for them in heaven, will fling it all aside because they fear so
721. ecause they fear some little word which will be forgotten almost as soon as it is An
722. or persuasions of some bad combeing who will laugh at them in the their folly in so
723. ly in so easily led Ridicule may, for a time, be the portion of those fast to their
724. he end faithfulness ways respected, and will surely have honor in this world as well
725. ss ways respected, and will surely have honor in this world as well as in the next. B
726. ted, and will surely have honor in this world as well as in the next. Blood-guiltines
727. s neck could know that this child would one day imbrue its hand in the blood of a f
728. t that it is far more awful to kill the soul the 1 — — 1 OR, HOW THADE BECAME A
729. n to Let us sometimes think how fearful will kill the body. agony, the anguish of th
730. the glorious mission of converting the world. It is the Irish God has From north to
731. f converting the world. It is the Irish God has From north to south, from east to w
732. n every English-speaking country in the world. the Irish who fail in the great work o
733. religious duties, who is ashamed of his religion, who has upon him the sin of blood-guil
734. d of his religion, who has upon him the sin of blood-guiltito those ! Woe man or ne
735. m the sin of blood-guiltito those ! Woe man or ness, since he does his best, accord
736. ince he does his best, according to the world's if example, to but the help those aro
737. to lose their souls, while, he remained soul, God, he might save not only souls of t
738. e their souls, while, he remained soul, God, he might save not only souls of those
739. ption ran thus: sir; Here's Thade, your honor, tell guard comes afther him, her to go
740. d his friends. She had quite sufficient sense to know when a case was hopeless, and s
741. her husband had absconded. In fact, for many reasons, they had discovered that a for
742. rs of Popery to those of the Protestant Religion," far it would be more remunerative. Bl
743. nibals. Mr. Blanders demurred. He had a habit of taking things au pied de la her wits
744. with the cannibals or near them ? Thank God, if you were born a fool, I was not. Of
745. he added, not without a touch of scorn; death, he "Did I but whether for the credulit
746. er employers, or for her humiliation in being obliged to earn her living cious procee
747. e, and that converts can be got there a good deal cheaper and with far less trouble
748. ening for commerce ; and, I am told, on good authority, a fortune can be realized in
749. fortune can be realized in a very short time and with very little trouble. That done
750. regularly to school, and had got a fair education. In those days common sense ruled in th
751. a fair education. In those days common sense ruled in this matter, and an unfortunat
752. n those days common sense ruled in this matter, and an unfortunate school-boy of twelv
753. or fourteen was not obliged to learn as many ologies " as a professor. Good reading,
754. learn as many ologies " as a professor. Good reading, ' ' good penmanship and good a
755. ies " as a professor. Good reading, ' ' good penmanship and good arithmetic were con
756. . Good reading, ' ' good penmanship and good arithmetic were considered the essentia
757. ies of from: killarney to new york; the family; but Mr. Tom, the eldest son of Mr. O'G
758. on. For him he would have laid down his life freely at a moment's notice, and Mr. To
759. ce, and Mr. Tom's career and success in life was of far more moment and consideratio
760. and sisters, for he was idolized by his family, as only sons are apt to be, especially
761. r than water, and had not the slightest desire to do so. Would to God that the Irish p
762. the slightest desire to do so. Would to God that the Irish peasant would save his c
763. , sir ?" " True for you, Thade, and you will have your It heart's desire." must be a
764. hade, and you will have your It heart's desire." must be admitted that to be the posse
765. , and his constant association with the family of his patron had tended not a little t
766. raction was in the honest glance of his Truth and fun sparkled from those truly light
767. light clear blue eye. Celtic orbs; and one might feel certain that, whatever misch
768. a truthful account of his exploits, no matter what .blame might be the consequence of
769. avowal of his faults. His chief ness of vice. fault was a somewhat reckless disposit
770. to be passed. Certainly Thade knew his duty well—his duty to God and a f6 FROM KI
771. ertainly Thade knew his duty well—his duty to God and a f6 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW Y
772. Thade knew his duty well—his duty to God and a f6 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW YORK; If
773. ailed hereafter, it was not for want of knowledge. His was a happy preparation for the gr
774. ppy preparation for the great battle of life battle the result of which is so moment
775. prepare their children for it. Here, in one little moment, the most awful decision
776. y be made. Here, in a passing second of time, we may win or lose a his duty to his n
777. econd of time, we may win or lose a his duty to his neighbor. — battle that will m
778. s duty to his neighbor. — battle that will make our future eternal gain or loss. A
779. none the less grave when gravity was a duty none the less wise when wisdom was need
780. vity was a duty none the less wise when wisdom was needed in her household cares. And
781. boy could have. He had imparted to him knowledge of the truest kind; for if we do not kn
782. truest kind; for if we do not know our duty, how can we fulThe soldier who goes int
783. oldier who goes into battle without any knowledge fill it ? of the tactics of war, would
784. y knowledge fill it ? of the tactics of war, would meet with certain defeat. The Ch
785. e Christian who goes into the battle of life without knowing what he must do in orde
786. ing side, is, indeed, in a And, besides knowledge, he must have exercritical position. ci
787. t have exercritical position. cised his art, he must have used his arms, he must ha
788. lways right ideas all on the subject of courage, and with there Thade's careful trainin
789. reful training, was a weak point there. Many a boy has simply become a coward becaus
790. id not choose to bear the reputation of being one a reputation not given him by the g
791. choose to bear the reputation of being one a reputation not given him by the good
792. g one a reputation not given him by the good and wise, but by — who were cowards o
793. Thade had gone on a boating expedisome other lads during the preceding summer. They
794. ummer. They had upset the boat, as boys will do in their wild fun, with little It ti
795. robable consequences of their rash act. Death seemed certain. Only one could swim (wh
796. ir rash act. Death seemed certain. Only one could swim (what fatality is it which p
797. desirable an accomplishment?) and that one boy was Thade. The instinct of self-pre
798. ads, whom he had often warned, to their fate. — — — ! 1 FROM KILLARNEY TO NEW
799. nvariably accompanies such a disposiThe idea of saving himself never seemed to have
800. on. to him; and yet he was as young and life was quite as dear to him as to any of h
801. keep himself afloat, called out to the other two to cling to the capsized and had la
802. but he was doing wrong afraid as only a good and brave boy may be. The coward trembl
803. e. The coward trembles before the petty tyranny of a companion, or the idle taunts of a
804. e taunts of a fool. The brave boy fears God, because God is his Maker, his. Master,
805. fool. The brave boy fears God, because God is his Maker, his. Master, and his Lord
806. ves, for divine fear is — but another form of perfect charity. So the boys did ill
807. So the boys did ill to taunt Thade with being a coward, and they were half ashamed of
808. not like to be baffled in their plans, good or bad, and, human nature being what it
809. in their plans, good or bad, and, human nature being what it is, the boys were determi
810. r plans, good or bad, and, human nature being what it is, the boys were determined Th
811. how much pride has had to do with human sin since the devil dared Eve to disobey he
812. o wrong, but he had not quite moral so. courage enough to say You see, after all, moral
813. enough to say You see, after all, moral courage it a much higher mon. gift than physica
814. t a much higher mon. gift than physical courage, and is far less com You will see a man
815. ysical courage, and is far less com You will see a man do deeds of the utmost daring
816. age, and is far less com You will see a man do deeds of the utmost daring which onl
817. BECAME A BANKER. require great physical courage. lives You will see men peril their aga
818. quire great physical courage. lives You will see men peril their again and again to
819. an- tage on the battle-field. Yet these same men will stay away little from Mass, wi
820. on the battle-field. Yet these same men will stay away little from Mass, will neglec
821. me men will stay away little from Mass, will neglect their religious duties, even if
822. hey are the veriest cowards. They tempt will get great applause they know it — for
823. or their deeds of physical daring; they will meet with gibes and con- — for awhile
824. le, at least — if they have the moral courage to practice their religion. It is a bad
825. ave the moral courage to practice their religion. It is a bad choice. it: The applause b
826. ause breath that utters the applause of will be proclaimed before the men passes awa
827. med before the men passes away with the God and the holy angels whole world at the
828. with the God and the holy angels whole world at the Day of Judgof ment, and will las
829. le world at the Day of Judgof ment, and will last forever. " Oh, he's afraid of Miss
830. distinguished themselves most in after life were generally those who, when boys, we
831. not afraid of Miss Kate or of Miss any one else," replied Thade, with a toss of hi
832. hy of its suggester, the devil. all his honor and glory and fame and a swimmer was me
833. all the sole charge of the splendid and animal —much what too spirited, Mr. O'Grady
834. t Mr. Tom thought otherwise. What young man of two-and-twenty ever admitted that hi
835. far rather have suffered any injury no matter how serious, than to have allowed any h
836. nd mischievous, though not in the worst sense of the word. They quite anticipated tha
837. anticipated that he would be tempted by other lads to run races when he took the hors
838. would have enhanced his reputation for courage if he had withstood how he would have s
839. his con- " Come on, boys," he said, — science. OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER. 8l " I
840. dly excited, as a spirited boy's always will be rides a noble horse. when he He won
841. ertainly, but at what a price The noble animal, finding his rider thither in his bould
842. he was not much hurt, all but the noble animal which had met with such a careless, rec
843. of gaiety she was far from feeling. " I will go and have rose also. a look at Brian
844. e rose also. a look at Brian Boru." " I will go with you," said Kate, door, and the
845. he heard the voice of his was the first time he had ever feared to look in her face,
846. s far as I can see hopelessly lamed, of being gentle Wait till my father comes, and y
847. hade, what have you done?" answer. this will No a I have taught you to be and you kn
848. you know your Blessed Mother in heaven will not love you if you are not honest in w
849. your Blessed Mother in heaven will not love you if you are not honest in word and d
850. ou are not honest in word and deed. The truth must be known sooner or later; be a man
851. uth must be known sooner or later; be a man, and tell it now " Come, Thade, never d
852. o. truthful boy, yourself," guish, With many sobs and tears and groans of real heart
853. hey could never hope to have. He had an education which at that day was rare indeed. And
854. disobeyed commands given again and his good master. could be no possible excuse for
855. to their children in such matters. They will punish with severity, almost with cruel
856. ave been culpable in itself; while they will pass over some serious matter which has
857. while they will pass over some serious matter which has been a grave offense against
858. which has been a grave offense against God, because it has not touched their own f
859. t the horse, and though he attached but time before he rose from the table; but litt
860. his conduct far more than any corporal punishment, however severe. But the sharp pain see
861. nishment, however severe. But the sharp pain seemed to bring him to himself. Before
862. he had so grievously offended, and with one wild cry he fled out of the stable and
863. n. Thade, after running wildly for some time he knew not whither, came to a sudden p
864. o do with himself? In his then frame of mind, he thought he could never face his mas
865. no near relations, nor did he wish any one to see him in his present plight. The d
866. y, and with little thought of prayer or God at the moment, Thade went in and flung
867. in all the stupor of grief. no note of time. Evening he did not stir. At last a car
868. y Rosaline, Gentle, loving Rosaline, » Beauty gains more grace from you— Kind and g
869. re grace from you— Kind and grateful, good and true. "Well, really, Mr. Maxwell, I
870. d to be brought up a Roman Catholic. It will certainly be , an injury to her prospec
871. inly be , an injury to her prospects in life, though the heiress of the firm of Maxw
872. l defy adventitious circumstances." " I will not do otherwise. It was my poor wife's
873. , seemed to recall views.' the terrible death-bed scene, and to shudder at the recoll
874. was not a Catholic himself. His wife's death had made an ineffaceable impression on
875. d, as such, it had little effect on his life. " I suppose that Irish nurse of hers i
876. rish nurse of hers is the source of the evil, as the Irish believe seem to men like
877. hink of crossing the ocean this summer. Will you plied Mr. Maxwell; come?" But befor
878. ttle is answered, we must glance at the history of the Rosaline, and at the faithful wh
879. so much. Kathleen's remorse, after the death of her mistress, was some- •^"»A*»
880. ect. She had witnessed the terrors of a death-bed unilluminated by even one gleam of
881. rs of a death-bed unilluminated by even one gleam of hope. She knew perfectly well
882. hope. She knew perfectly well how this death-bed could have been made one of peace a
883. how this death-bed could have been made one of peace and consolation. It is true, i
884. s death-bed could have been made one of peace and consolation. It is true, indeed, th
885. is true, indeed, that those who neglect God in their days of health and happiness,
886. neglect God in their days of health and happiness, cannot expect Him to work miracles for
887. work miracles for them in their hour of death and despair. So far the unhappy young m
888. ew that she would have to answer at the judgment seat of God for the sins which had caus
889. have to answer at the judgment seat of God for the sins which had caused her to fa
890. care whether he destroys his victims by one snare or another ? she was no use, she
891. ter all the evils had done— as if the good and merciful God, by allowing her to li
892. had done— as if the good and merciful God, by allowing her to live so long, was n
893. priest after having remained away so It many years from the sacraments; but happily
894. more ashamed she would beat the Day of Judgment, if she did not now make her peace with
895. f Judgment, if she did not now make her peace with God, and obtain pardon in the way
896. if she did not now make her peace with God, and obtain pardon in the way which He
897. as appointed. But grace triumphed. With many groans and many tears, Kathleen went wi
898. t grace triumphed. With many groans and many tears, Kathleen went with her sad story
899. est, and she found not only pardon, but peace and hope. Often in after life would she
900. don, but peace and hope. Often in after life would she quote her own example to some
901. e had feared and dreaded to confess her sin, cleverly the devil had tried to how di
902. f OR, HOW THADE BECAME A BANKER. 89 all other how she means had failed; how long she
903. sional. triumphed. The devil's ways are God's ways are ways of peace and joy. The d
904. devil's ways are God's ways are ways of peace and joy. The devil kneV very well what
905. and joy. The devil kneV very well what peace and rest she would find in the Sacramen
906. Sacrament of Penance, and so he did his evil best to keep her from it. There was one
907. vil best to keep her from it. There was one duty for her now, and that was the duty
908. best to keep her from it. There was one duty for her now, and that was the duty of r
909. one duty for her now, and that was the duty of reparation. It is a duty which even
910. hat was the duty of reparation. It is a duty which even our own conscience must tell
911. en our own conscience must tell us that God will demand from us. It is a duty which
912. ur own conscience must tell us that God will demand from us. It is a duty which even
913. s that God will demand from us. It is a duty which even the world requires. If we ha
914. nd from us. It is a duty which even the world requires. If we have done evil, we must
915. ven the world requires. If we have done evil, we must atone for the evil; if we have
916. e have done evil, we must atone for the evil; if we have done injury to others, we m
917. that injury. Unhappily ered as it this duty is too often neglected, too seldom cons
918. prayer and penance, make reparation to God Almighty for her sin. But she owed a sh
919. make reparation to God Almighty for her sin. But she owed a should be ; and will ce
920. her sin. But she owed a should be ; and will certainly it reparation, also, to those
921. with whom she lived. She owed a at her religion, reparation to the Protestant servants
922. she felt that she could best repair the sin against her mistress by devoting hersel
923. her mistress by devoting herself, heart soul, to the little baby, Rosaline, and, wit
924. ncern himself, as she grew older, as to religion she was taught, or, indeed, as to wheth
925. ndeed, as to whether she was taught any religion. If she looked well and seemed happy, t
926. he asked. The question came before him one day, when he found that it was quite ti
927. ne day, when he found that it was quite time that she should have some regular instr
928. d at her earnest entreaties, the little one was sent to a convent school. what 90 F
929. y was far rarer then than it is now, so many non-Catholic Americans are glad to take
930. istinguished them- tage of the superior education given in our Catholic convents. The con
931. convents. The convents of America whole world. May they prosper, and continue their d
932. ork. Kathleen had believed it to be her duty to remain in Mr. Maxwell's family until
933. be her duty to remain in Mr. Maxwell's family until her little charge had made her fi
934. r needed. Then she obtained her heart's desire, and she is even now a devoted and fait
935. aration made with that expedition which wealth can selves in that matter before the al
936. edition which wealth can selves in that matter before the always insure. Rosaline rema
937. s, amiable child, and with a promise of being as beautiful as she was good. m^tm OR,
938. romise of being as beautiful as she was good. m^tm OR, HOW THAD2 BECAME A BANKER. 9!
939. hears tis cry, every misery. Mother of God Mother of God !" It was the cry of poor
940. , every misery. Mother of God Mother of God !" It was the cry of poor Thade's broke
941. is rosary every night, and when was any one ever forsaken who trusted to the powerf
942. werful intercession of of « Oh, Mother God ! ! our Blessed It Lady ? ! was a mere
943. en he moaned out his prayer, "Mother of God Mother of God !" But if human mothers a
944. ut his prayer, "Mother of God Mother of God !" But if human mothers are so full of
945. !" But if human mothers are so full of love — if their hearts are so easily touch
946. down carelessly to pick it up, but his mind was too absorbed in his grief to pay mu
947. money in bank-notes. Here, indeed, was good fortune. moment the boy was himself aga
948. oing back to Dublin, to his master. His good fortune almost stunned him for the mome
949. d him for the moment, but is quick. How many things he had settled in his own mind,
950. w many things he had settled in his own mind, and acted over in his imagination in a
951. in his own mind, and acted over in his imagination in a few minutes. But the one great tho
952. s imagination in a few minutes. But the one great thought was the overwhelming joy
953. ught could now provide for himself. the justice to say that it We must do Thade was not
954. hat it We must do Thade was not fear of punishment which made him so desirous to escape. H
955. rave and manly a boy to wish to shirk a punishment which he knew he well deserved, as we h
956. as we have said. To his fine and noble nature, the shame and disgrace of having acted
957. he church. But what has happened ? What change is this ? Thade has ceased his joyous m
958. sed his joyous melody. He turns pale as death; a cold sweat bursts out on his fine, o
959. rehead; he trembles in every limb. " My God !" he mutters, in accents of alarm and
960. cents of alarm and horror; " I was near being a thief." Never that, Thade, boy, whate
961. other of Jesus, she, too, looked at him one long, tender, reproachful glance. In on
962. ne long, tender, reproachful glance. In one moment he realized his danger. He saw t
963. owner. the Thade flew home. The fear of being tempted to sin if he kept money a momen
964. flew home. The fear of being tempted to sin if he kept money a moment longer in his
965. nsider that he was performing an act of virtue. As he came near the house his courage
966. f virtue. As he came near the house his courage cooled a little, but his determination,
967. could he dare show his face any of the family ? Mr. O'Grady's garden was divided from
968. tory, and that all he wanted was to get one word with Miss Kate, and then he would
969. , Miss Kate, I've found some money; for God's sake take it," and he pushed the pock
970. "Oh, Miss Kate, sure I could never look one of you in the face again you that reare
971. that reared me and cared for me all my life, and for me to go and kill Mr. Tom's ho
972. he devil entirely when she just gave me one look, and sure that was enough." "But,"
973. e she where I saw the Blessed Mother of God ? Sure it was and she looked at is, out
974. t I had done, and I was praying all the time to the Blessed Virgin unknownst to me,
975. urse; and I said to myself, Glory be to God, Thade, you can go to America, or Londo
976. I looked back to bid the Blessed Virgin good-bye on the statue, you mind, outside th
977. ssed Virgin good-bye on the statue, you mind, outside the door and she just looked a
978. moment I knew what it was, glory be to God It was the same as if she said, * Thade
979. what it was, glory be to God It was the same as if she said, * Thade, you're a thief
980. and shed more tears for us than all the world put together, except her blessed Son !"
981. ether, except her blessed Son !" "Thank God, Thade, you are not a thief," replied K
982. I think I ' — — ! hour of need. "I will take the purse to my father," she conti
983. d. "He know best what to do with it. He will be pleased with your honesty; and belie
984. your honesty; and believe me, Thade, we will none of us ever will reproach you with
985. ieve me, Thade, we will none of us ever will reproach you with what has happened. do
986. d as it seems, at the beginning of your life." Kate was no hand at " preaching," and
987. " and so she said no more; but her holy life was the best sermon she could have give
988. best sermon she could have given to any one. " I can let you into the stable, and n
989. " I can let you into the stable, and no one will see you there to-night. To-morrow
990. can let you into the stable, and no one will see you there to-night. To-morrow my fa
991. you there to-night. To-morrow my father will tell you what to do. Thade complied ver
992. ore he would find such a home, and such good and true ' friends. 1 96 FROM KILLARNEY
993. ght way not with the depression of self-love, but with the noble and invigorating sa
994. sleep that night —yes, before he even good supper which Kate had brought him, gues
995. sting all day he knelt down and thanked God for all His mercies to him and when he
996. ithfully kept, that for the rest of his life he would be obedient to his superiors,
997. en, with a newspaper. Kate knew by long experience that the straightforward way entered th
998. t like you women. right." You think any one you like is Kate was too wise to offer
999. 'Grady was looking really pleased, but, man-like, he would not give his womankind t
1000. scoundrel has given trouble enough for one day, and now to go and find this purse.
1001.im with a horse-whip ? No, have a great mind to But what Mr. O' Grady's mind was inc
1002.a great mind to But what Mr. O' Grady's mind was inclined to, remains un- Did you hi
1003.r stolen." "Faith, sir, I wish I'd find one." yet Tom was always short of cash. Was
1004.up and put in jail on suspicion, if any one finds out what he's got." "Can't you wr
1005.nces, as well as women and we must do ; justice to say that when they have, they genera
1006.inquired Mr. O'Grady, not without a and will be restored to the w«awf.ffwnnnwBfmi <
1007.se; where —well, I should say by this time." A fact sufficiently patent and self-e
1008.ortune and distinction " to the O'Grady family. "We have ventured to intrude on you ea
1009.en he entered, more like a culprit than one who was about to ; receive a reward. Bu
1010.l, "I am sure your master you freely. I will ask it as a personal favor to myself; "
1011.ote of some value, "here is what I hope will help to set you up in an honest and hum
1012.p in an honest and humble career, and I will send you a further remittance from New
1013.a further remittance from New York from time to time." will forgive " my But, to the
1014.r remittance from New York from time to time." will forgive " my But, to the surpris
1015.tance from New York from time to time." will forgive " my But, to the surprise of bo
1016. pay me for sir. Virgin ? Oh, no, said, being honest and for plaasing the Blessed Ind
1017.to you both, gen- when he saw had given pain; " but I could not take it. If the mast
1018. but I could not take it. If the master will forgive me and trust me again and he sh
1019. it that is all that I'll take from any one, and God knows it's more than I deserve
1020.is all that I'll take from any one, and God knows it's more than I deserve." Thade
1021. tlemen," he with the ready tact of his nature that his refusal of the gift — — "A
1022.ack to the hotel to prepare for a day's pleasure. was quite evident that he was deeply a
1023.e girl. We were very deeply attached to one another, and I never even thought of ma
1024.ying again." "But you are still a young man; you may change your 11 I the birth of
1025."But you are still a young man; you may change your 11 I the birth of our mind." " Wel
1026.u may change your 11 I the birth of our mind." " Well, you one say, sir, I believe t
1027.1 I the birth of our mind." " Well, you one say, sir, I believe that I shall not I
1028. say, sir, I believe that I shall not I change my mind, but, as it is possible. wish t
1029. I believe that I shall not I change my mind, but, as it is possible. wish to adopt
1030.ish to adopt Thade, and I want some who will have my interest at heart in my busines
1031.erence it makes to any business to have one whose heart is devoted to your interest
1032.our interests, as well as his head." "I will not stand in Thade's way for. a moment,
1033.gh. But you had better hear more of his history before you see him." Mr. Maxwell listen
1034.d with the attentive consideration of a man who knows the subject spoken of to be o
1035.n who knows the subject spoken of to be one of grave importance. "And do you tell m
1036.at there are people in this country who will deliberately try to girl is my a little
1037.ely try to girl is my a little older, I will travel with her in buy and sell a man's
1038. will travel with her in buy and sell a man's religion in this way ! ' " ants It is
1039.travel with her in buy and sell a man's religion in this way ! ' " ants It is, unfortuna
1040. thus think that they are influenced by good moby which tives; but, for a great majo
1041.as I have been, an eye-witness of their courage and constancy under trial, you would at
1042.O NEW YORK; to them do and suffer as no man could suffer or act for a mere opinion.
1043.s no man could suffer or act for a mere opinion." "You will, perhaps, be surprised to h
1044.suffer or act for a mere opinion." "You will, perhaps, be surprised to hear*that, th
1045.hat, though I do not to be profess your religion myself, I have allowed my little girl b
1046.she in a convent school." is at present being educated Mr. O'Grady was surprised, but
1047.ated Mr. O'Grady was surprised, but the knowledge of this circumstance removed what he fe
1048.circumstance removed what he felt to be one great objection to parting with Thade.
1049. wordly prospects; and much as he would desire to see Thade in life, he certainly woul
1050.much as he would desire to see Thade in life, he certainly would not desire that thi
1051.e Thade in life, he certainly would not desire that this advance- ment should be purch
1052. purchased by the sacrifice of a single principle. Mr. Maxwell 's friend was listening to
1053.k with him to New York; to give you the education of a gentleman, and put you in a positi
1054.. I think I can promise for him that he will never seek to interfere with your relig
1055. will never seek to interfere with your religion. It is for you to decide this important
1056. " Is it to go out of it, and never see one of you again, sir ?" "Well, you might s
1057.s again, Thade. But this is I a serious matter." " think you will have no cause to reg
1058.his is I a serious matter." " think you will have no cause to regret 1 me, Thade. so
1059.rious matter." " think you will have no cause to regret 1 me, Thade. son of my it, if
1060. own to take any of the care from me. I will have you educated as I told you, if you
1061.n child, and when you are old enough, I will place you in a confidential position in
1062.ars. He began clearly to understand the matter. Naturally, he wished to advance himsel
1063.elf, and he was old enough to have some idea of the importance and value of the offe
1064.difference to pecuniary advantage which one so often sees in our people, and which
1065. so often sees in our people, and which one scarcely knows whether to admire or dep
1066.s. He asked Thade an hour, to think the matter over With this request they willingly c
1067.master, attired in his new clothing, no one could deny that, in appearance at least
1068.t, he was no disgrace to the station in life which Providence had now assigned him.
1069.res to see. u And going to so, constant love, my darling, the wedding-day is fixed,
1070. tear glistened in the great eye of the good lay sister. Ever since the time of St.
1071. of the good lay sister. Ever since the time of St. Colomba, and before it, a passio
1072.t. Colomba, and before it, a passionate love of Ireland has been the born heritage o
1073.nd of Atta under his feet, so that when duty called him to his beloved Erin, he migh
1074.country. Kathleen had now been lose her love of Ireland. a nun for some years, but s
1075.hope of seeing motherland again. If the desire to do so still remained, it only remain
1076. a new source of penance, sacrifice and love. She had chosen the name of Magdalen, a
1077.She had chosen the name of Magdalen, as one which she believed specially suitable t
1078.row sinned much indeed, for she and her love. had sinned against knowledge and abund
1079.or she and her love. had sinned against knowledge and abundant grace. and most truly sinc
1080.dant grace. and most truly sincere. Her history was known only She had and repentance w
1081.but was noticed by all that she lived a life of —not in great things, her Holy Rul
1082.lt austerity the mortification of every sense, faculty and desire in her daily life;
1083.rtification of every sense, faculty and desire in her daily life; and it was also noti
1084. sense, faculty and desire in her daily life; and it was also noticed that she was s
1085.of most impressive earnestness, to give good example, and to strengthen themselves f
1086.acraments, and to take care lest at any time they should be guilty of the spiritual
1087.oran is that you are is to be united to one of your worthy of your choice, and I th
1088.your worthy of your choice, and I thank God own faith and one of my country." "It a
1089.r choice, and I thank God own faith and one of my country." "It a great happiness,
1090.ith and one of my country." "It a great happiness, at least," replied gentle Rosaline, is
1091.eplied gentle Rosaline, is " that every one so pleased." was still little more, had
1092. young heart to Thade. Her aristocratic family had chaffed her not a little upon her c
1093. " Irish " and a Roman Catholic, and no one knew anything about his family, though,
1094.lic, and no one knew anything about his family, though, in truth, his descent might ha
1095.w anything about his family, though, in truth, his descent might have been traced up
1096.re business, ability is held in special honor, and where intelchild, for she affectio
1097.ns of her ; The dear lect takes rank as nature's patent of nobility. ; E06 FROM KILLAR
1098.agdalen ejaculated a heart-felt " Thank God," and well she might. And all this came
1099.his patron, so soon to be his father-in-law, had made a very deep impression on thi
1100.affected to treat the whole affair with good-natured contempt; but he reflected none
1101.ten bestowed on them. of Several years' experience Thade —his steadiness in business, hi
1102.nduct in prosperity, his quiet, patient religion — each and all made a deep and blesse
1103.ssion. was living for, and what was his life likely to be worth hereafter. He had in
1104.us, self-denying to ask himself what he life Then Mr. Hillman began of a Catholic pr
1105.an of a Catholic priest. Little did the good farmer, whose death-bed scene forms the
1106.iest. Little did the good farmer, whose death-bed scene forms the opening chapter of
1107.g chapter of our tale, ever imagine the many happy results which would follow from h
1108.Little did he imagine live to bless how God would reward, and how many would \ Tim.
1109. to bless how God would reward, and how many would \ Tim. O'Halloran's Choice. DATE
1110.fore the last date stamped below a fine will be charged Fairness to other borrowers
1111.elow a fine will be charged Fairness to other borrowers makes enforcement of this rul
1112.ut renewal. Books may be renewed 2. for one lose week 3. only. Students who damage
1113.st pay for them. 4. A fine of two cents will be imposed for each day that the book i
1114. Failure to return a Reserve 5. book on time subjects the borrower to a fine of 15 c

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/