Concordance for The Flemmings, or, Truth triumphant / By Mrs. Anna H. Dorsey...

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1.   s of Catholic Ncvelt. THE FLEMMINGS OB, TRUTH TRIUMPHANT. BY MRS. ANNA H. DORSET, ETC
2. s keepsakes V. 60 VI. CHAPTEE The inner life of Wolfert Flemming 75 CHAPTEE VH. Mrs.
3. ming is thankful for the prosperity AND HAPPINESS OF HER FAMILY 88 IV CONTENTS. CHAPTEE G
4. for the prosperity AND HAPPINESS OF HER FAMILY 88 IV CONTENTS. CHAPTEE Gropings and th
5. .. glad of something at 318 CHAPTEE The man with the hammer drop XXII. last bitter
6. s of that beautiful Lake, which the red man, with his higher appreciation of nature
7. ed man, with his higher appreciation of nature, called Winnijoiseogee, the smile of th
8. oad on the storm, mingling their savage war-whoops and death-songs together, of the
9. m, mingling their savage war-whoops and death-songs together, of the while like drift
10. ouse, there was ruddy light, warmth and good cheer. That quaint old room where he an
11. re he and But there, inside Wolfert his family sat grouped about in the warm glow of t
12. he eye of a ; Flemish painter and I its will describe it— not with its an idle pur
13. On plat- the broad shelves arranged on one side of the wall there was a great arra
14. and a line of crinkled gold ; played in many upon the oaken floor, dark and polished
15. n vari- ous ways secured to them, until one might have thought, watching it flashin
16. €” the precious heirlooms of the sat ha state Flemmings door, as if —which this spo
17. above all others was the most worthy of being glorified. And right bravely they gleam
18. nt. among the spice Somewhere about the time forts that the imperishable " " goodlie
19. rds proved how well they had learnt the science of intolerance from the persecutions an
20. find his descendants. In the course of time he of this built his modest homestead,
21. s when and intolerance —sometimes all one, sometimes another, and sometimes toget
22. onary sacrifice to serve their country, war spared shrunk from no toil to raise the
23. and daughters with wo- manly vanity and many reasons soft persuasions showed why ; t
24. e-light. This room was very dear to the man's true honest heart, for its old associ
25. ade them feel nearer and dearer to each other, for straint, here each one uttered his
26. r to each other, for straint, here each one uttered his thoughts without re- and wi
27. and with that sweet confidence left in one another which but small occasion for an
28. ey admonished and respirit, proved each other with christianly holding up one another
29. each other with christianly holding up one another's hands, warming one another's
30. holding up one another's hands, warming one another's hearts, until the bonds that
31. bound them together were stronger than death. Here the weak sought to the strong, th
32. und their father and mother, to worship God according hearts hear read the word of
33. according hearts hear read the word of God, which, off to their teachings and with
34. hem, impressed their minds with a noble love of truth, spiritual aspirations, and a
35. ressed their minds with a noble love of truth, spiritual aspirations, and a sol- emn
36. heart, they accepted as true Simple in mind what they were taught, and lived justly
37. if of ana- lyzing their lives, and any one had said to them, what I have written o
38. E FLEMMINGS. for a useful 13 work-a-day life ; such an one as they be. feared their
39. r a useful 13 work-a-day life ; such an one as they be. feared their golden-haired
40. lden-haired Eeuben would They if were a matter-of-fact, clear-headed people; and a tho
41. ted like a lever some tangible suffered principle into existence, there was not a Flemmin
42. of the believe the old almost inclining one to Saxon superstition that angels were
43. , always basking in the light of a wood truth. a very Eva and Hope Flemming sat toget
44. lips, showing tween their red and their beauty crowned by thick suits of soft golden b
45. pon relic which was outspread the large family Bible, a of early English printing, for
46. ntic scenery of the neigh- borhood, had time and again offered him large it, it. * s
47. the rude line engravings and above the family record of his house for generations bac
48. untenance. He was with a tall, muscular man, broad- shouldered and well formed, his
49. t in the appearance and attitude of the man a dignity and power cult to describe. i
50. is diffi- There was a vacant chair near one of those prim, low-seated high-backed c
51. Flemmings had no such tradition of this one, and yet they never doubted in the old
52. it it of the early settlers and wished history, for might speak its own may have belon
53. ever of re- They had all of them a very good idea and would only have if relics in a
54. of re- They had all of them a very good idea and would only have if relics in a limi
55. would only have if relics in a limited sense, garded them as superstitious religion
56. ted sense, garded them as superstitious religion had invested 16 THE FLEMMINGS. spiritua
57. another of instincts were aroused. the family group present, who sat leaning against
58. like him out from the dark back-ground one of those celestial figures one sees in
59. k-ground one of those celestial figures one sees in the pictures of slight Domenich
60. holesome minds of his kindred, who were good for, utterly at a loss to know what he
61. . Mrs. Flemming came in now and brought good wholesome breath of news of the calf, a
62. eal with, as she was, until to her hard one clear thinking all that seemed doubtful
63. ar thinking all that seemed doubtful in principle or fact was "I made clear to her. am th
64. ver the mountains that we should have a good old-fashioned snow before long. glad,"
65. ound is ; wellfrozen, and the sleighing will be perfectly splendid. fall of I do adm
66. s until up fences and walls, and blocks one up one has to be dug out." Just then a
67. up fences and walls, and blocks one up one has to be dug out." Just then a gust of
68. let fall their work and looked at each other, startled and The boy Reuben did not he
69. sun, listening to the cherub who sought knowledge of Eden, his soul thrilling with horror
70. herub who sought knowledge of Eden, his soul thrilling with horror, as at the angel'
71. s soul thrilling with horror, as at the angel's touch the beautiful heaven-clad thing
72. is Him it forever." like a With another man, might have seemed dramatic display, bu
73. eemed dramatic display, but in him of a soul was the spontaneous outflowing of the w
74. ally on the infinite attributes Supreme Being, and who searched the Scrip- tures dail
75. it- that he had —the words of eternal life. " I guess father," said Mrs. tle Flemm
76. mming, knitting vigorously girl too, "a God-fearing and raises the finest chickens
77. ckens and spins the evenest yarn of any one from here to Alton Bay." Wolfert Flemmi
78. igure great, smoothed her hair with his art troubled about brown hand very gently,
79. gently, and said: "Martha! Martha! thou many things." little " Yes, I know it," she
80. ear. It " was no fun to have raised the family I have " — And the husband — " Nons
81. onia, where he's last four years of his life in learned to take care of himself. Tru
82. arned to take care of himself. Trust in God for your boy's safety, and in his own s
83. stationed around every night to prevent being torn down," said the Elder, sternly. "W
84. e Elder, sternly. "What Romish?" in the world sort of sect is it? Is it " Well, about
85. s it? Is it " Well, about as bad ; it's one of the Church of England tabernacles, a
86. to have such doings on the soil of New Time was, when the lines would not have been
87. as now. I heard my grandmother tell of one that was kept England. 22 THE FLEMMINGS
88. rbor them. There it is — " "Yes, some one was knocking at the side-door of the ne
89. almost thrown on him. off his feet by a man and falling heavily The wind rushed and
90. I am not hurt/ he cried; 'but here is a man and frozen, or dead, in my arms. Courag
91. a man and frozen, or dead, in my arms. Courage, child, close the door quickly.' The wi
92. eded in closing and locking it. By this time Mrs. Flemming and Hope, uneasy at their
93. ng slowly, for the weight of the frozen man was heavy even to the Elder." "I knew t
94. and now, suppose he should be frozen to death through our not going at first." " I do
95. first." " I don't think he's frozen to death, mother," replied. he " God forbid such
96. frozen to death, mother," replied. he " God forbid such a thing should is happen at
97. . and pillows. He unfastened the shirt, man's wrappings, unbuttoned his vest and an
98. ; for there was no pulsation in the big life brawny wrists, in the blue frozen hands
99. blue frozen hands so helpless and that will let in heat cold. faintly. "It beats,"
100. d minpatiently, istered to him long and life and hopefully, dis- as the signs of gre
101. n into their home ? was he a prophet of evil to the happy household, or were they en
102. household, or were they entertaining an angel unaware?" They did not know; they had n
103. ; The sisters but they recognized only one fact concerning him, and that was he wa
104. ing with the rest to restore the frozen man, but had stepped out additional at his
105. of ; whatever it is, is a cross on the other side." face A gleam of joy up the homel
106. " enraged at losing its prey. his Poor man, I am glad he found that thing of it is
107. t his anxiety to himself, and talked of other things, trusting all the while in of Go
108. er things, trusting all the while in of God for the safety his first-born. "We have
109. . "We have just rescued a stranger from death," he thought to himself; "we our have d
110. ilence longer than usual ; " maybe that man roof. in there is not a safe one to hav
111. e that man roof. in there is not a safe one to have under our ; Suppose we move him
112. emly for Christians to hold a halter in one hand, when they do a thing for God's sa
113. r in one hand, when they do a thing for God's sake with the other? wife ; Be patien
114. they do a thing for God's sake with the other? wife ; Be patient, thrifty, and carefu
115. she felt that, according to her common-sense view of the matter, he was wrong in fac
116. cording to her common-sense view of the matter, he was wrong in fact, however right he
117. g in fact, however right he might be in principle ; so this managing little woman determi
118. rategy, by which she could preserve her same time avoid sures from harm, and at the
119. y, by which she could preserve her same time avoid sures from harm, and at the ; obe
120. e sitting-room a little while after the family had retired, and bolt the door one down
121. e family had retired, and bolt the door one down in between stranger ; it and the o
122. e down in between stranger ; it and the other one occupied by the first and being alw
123. in between stranger ; it and the other one occupied by the first and being always
124. the other one occupied by the first and being always the the morning, she could slip
125. g, she could slip the bolt back, and no one be the wiser. This idea quieted her min
126. olt back, and no one be the wiser. This idea quieted her mind, and she began to narr
127. one be the wiser. This idea quieted her mind, and she began to narrow the toe of her
128. e spread on the snow-white cloth by the time their morning devotions were over. They
129. le she looked into his honest eyes. The man lifting down, right little it, then he
130. bowed his head, and hand, his made the sign of the cross, not in a if twiddle on hi
131. ter of his fingers, as he were catching sign, in flies, but a slow, deliberate, broa
132. ng, who had been watching ! exclaimed : Good gracious " and gave such a fell start t
133. obliged to you ; all for your kindness God and His saints if reward ye for ye hadn
134. reward ye for ye hadn't taken of a the same, for I must have perisht me in. I was a
135. We were thankful to have saved a fellow-being from such a dreadful death. ing?" said
136. ved a fellow-being from such a dreadful death. ing?" said the Elder. " " To Wier's La
137. escape I don't remember such a storm in many years" said the Elder, who had not noti
138. fervent tones : May the holy Mother of God reward you" There. It was out. It had e
139. d like a bomb in the very bosom of this good Puritan family, that their guest was ne
140. in the very bosom of this good Puritan family, that their guest was neither Indian, u
141. ox. for room of all others, generations God had been worshipped he sat in Irishman
142. on each cheek. 32 THE FLEMMINGS. simple soul, utterly unconscious of offence, drew a
143. at was the felt ; last bit of con- some one it?" to Reuben think he could get go a
144. ch in the " old country." " Yes, the !" man had been Then Reuben, to France, all an
145. of his poetic dreams, and if he got no poetry and romance in exchange, he received sh
146. she saw her son, his arm leaning on the man's shoulder, their heads so close togeth
147. e together that his golden hair and the other's grizzled locks mingled, the one telli
148. the other's grizzled locks mingled, the one telling strange tales of other lands, t
149. ngled, the one telling strange tales of other lands, the other listening entranced. "
150. lling strange tales of other lands, the other listening entranced. " Reuben," she sai
151. y invoking the prowife. Mother duced of God to reward his benefactors, different ef
152. lled a library, office, or study, but a matter-of-fact sort of a place, where a plain
153. by that 34 THE FLEMMINGS. which formed one of the ; anti-catholic spirit inte- gra
154. et- anchor they were to their spiritual life. The Elder closed the door, went to a w
155. eyebrows lowered over his eyes, a sure sign that he was perplexed and hastily ; ann
156. ty of the occasion required, or her own sense of dignity of right demanded it, called
157. ot into their sheep-fold ; "What is the matter, wife? " " You may well ask that, Elder
158. ing what happened at the breakfast That man is a I never saw one before, and hoped
159. the breakfast That man is a I never saw one before, and hoped I never might ; but I
160. atience in this case were an offence to God. I can have no patience, not the least
161. d tones. out to-day ? " he asked in the same even snowing as ness ; " Yes, I have lo
162. hat that is it is —but not my busi- I will not have that man contaminating if my h
163. €”but not my busi- I will not have that man contaminating if my house with his idol
164. idolatrous breath, and " you want off." peace under your roof you must send him ' Won
165. do, and is it not for us to gainsay the wisdom of suffer it. God knows that I would ri
166. us to gainsay the wisdom of suffer it. God knows that I would rity of it even deat
167. God knows that I would rity of it even death for the integ- my I faith ; but in this
168. in all its bearings, I can come to but one conclu- sion. did not make door it stor
169. , impressed by his of- simple practical reasoning, " consider fence it is what an to our
170. sider fence it is what an to our simple God-fearing faith, to :'n have him flouting
171. You are not faithful to your christian duty, and your responsibility as an Eider of
172. rstitious practices, wife, neither do I love popery," said the Elder, with just litt
173. tle quaver in his voice ; " but neither one nor the other can hurt the integrity of
174. n his voice ; " but neither one nor the other can hurt the integrity of my belief in
175. t I should feel worthy of con- I turned one of God's creatures from the shelter of
176. uld feel worthy of con- I turned one of God's creatures from the shelter of I will
177. f God's creatures from the shelter of I will not do my roof in The such a storm as t
178. be upon your you, Elder, I have done my duty —and is I tell that there's something
179. rt which it means us. trouble, and that man I to bring upon up a I never it felt so
180. o, no! —think better of this, and the time will come when you will be thankful tha
181. ! —think better of this, and the time will come when you will be thankful that you
182. f this, and the time will come when you will be thankful that your husband did not d
183. cold water given in His name ivliom to one of His little ones, and for His sake, i
184. tle the value upon the act done for the love sorry that you have been ruffled, I ; a
185. I lightly, but the question between us one that must settle according to the prece
186. MINGS. " I do not wish to 39 ; hang the man far though I don't know that it would b
187. f their doctrines might not imperil the God-fearing," she said, holding her head ve
188. en, knowing how useless it to argue the matter further, she turned the room to go the
189. hinking stop," of the Spaniards all the time : —with ! such vim that his will moth
190. the time : —with ! such vim that his will mother cried out " Reuben my son, you y
191. e broken meshes of the loom. What is he good for ?" thought his mother, look; ing wi
192. ay, and Eva and ; Hope were ironing the family linen rosy, cheerful and happy, they sm
193. he making strenuous exertions by way of being useful ; to half- sole his boot, but hi
194. rk to be done, while the thought of his being a papist and a wholesome dread of their
195. ve, I'm afeard ; and it's no for a poor man like myself to lose," he said, as he tu
196. ir, at your service." Mr. McCue, and We will get shovels presently, turn over the dr
197. be we must hope there is for the best, life Mr. McCue for." if it is lost, your to
198. nkful " That's thrue, sir, thanks be to God and and all the of Blessed Virgin first
199. ught so. benighted mortal ? Was not his duty, there before his children, to break a
200. ices? It seemed so to his well balanced judgment ; and he asked What " What " religion a
201. d judgment ; and he asked What " What " religion are religion, sir you ? of, Mr. McCue ?
202. and he asked What " What " religion are religion, sir you ? of, Mr. McCue ?" thanked," s
203. none of your religions I'm a Catholic, God Almighty be THE FLEMMINGS. 43 the man,
204. , God Almighty be THE FLEMMINGS. 43 the man, opening wide his dull grey eyes and lo
205. ; and sorra a bit do I want I'll of any other. If I ever want to turn haythen go to A
206. d the "Yes, sir! I'm satisfied for this world, next, with the ould faith." this to ir
207. rofanity, and a something in the Irish- man's reply, which came very near calling h
208. him a heathen, that tried his patience one, as ; but he was not we know, to quarre
209. t he was not we know, to quarrel with a man on ; his own said hearthstone on accoun
210. own said hearthstone on account of his religion but the crowning paradox of " I'm it al
211. owning paradox of " I'm it all was, the man had none of your religions, it I'm a Ca
212. hat he yond the pale Christianity. (the man) was without what he Catholic religion
213. (the man) was without what he Catholic religion or faith being in his opinion beof (the
214. hout what he Catholic religion or faith being in his opinion beof (the Elder) knew as
215. Catholic religion or faith being in his opinion beof (the Elder) knew as "What. had he
216. hat teas be- ing a Catholic? Was that a religion? He thought not, Catholics being idolat
217. t a religion? He thought not, Catholics being idolaters, and where there was religion
218. cs being idolaters, and where there was religion; idolatry there could be no then the :
219. up before him with a dark splendor like one of Salvator Rosa's pictures, of one "cl
220. ike one of Salvator Rosa's pictures, of one "clothed in scarlet, saints." who was d
221. y lore, could have enlightened him upon many points on which he deemed him fists ign
222. n his grave and gentle voice, only said God is sufficient for all men, and I pray t
223. pray that He may open your eyes to the truth as I mean no offence, friend, but we it
224. in Christ. " The grace of are a simple, God-fearing family, serving spirit Him in a
225. The grace of are a simple, God-fearing family, serving spirit Him in and taking no ac
226. tarry with which you are safe, heartily will welcome to do until the roads are if yo
227. oads are if you be doing us a favor you will omit this making the morning " signs ov
228. you did at the table." is it And ! the sign of the Cross?" cried Patrick " McCue, a
229. alive staring with wide open eyes. Why, man to, I always blesses mj^self before and
230. e blessed cross of Christ, if the whole world stood forenent it, me ? I, that was red
231. nt it, me ? I, that was redeemed by the sign of gers. it baptized by it, and expects
232. gers. it baptized by it, and expects to life make fin- with the last that's left in
233. is Patrick McCue ness, ; and, sir, with many thanks for your kind- I'll be off at th
234. our kind- I'll be off at the risk of my life in the snow, sooner than stay where I d
235. ay where I daren't the Cross." make the sign of And Patrick McCue chin, got up, butt
236. ulder and began to speak " Sit down. No man storm. ever my house in a passion or in
237. cred with the I have done Elemmings. my duty before God and my children in protestin
238. e I have done Elemmings. my duty before God and my children in protesting against w
239. subject shall not be renewed." for the life of him, help Then the Elder could wonde
240. dolatrous for a liis make upon body the sign of that in- cross upon which the Son of
241. that in- cross upon which the Son of ; God paid such an but he only said : finite
242. aid : finite price for his salvation "I will will go and fetch the snow-shovels, and
243. finite price for his salvation "I will will go and fetch the snow-shovels, and we f
244. mustn't bless myself; and the straight, man with sich a Sorra a kind face on him al
245. sich a Sorra a kind face on him all the time. bit it if I know whether he's poking f
246. est, beclad but he's the most benighted man I ever met this side the Algerines." CH
247. ing came in with snow- shovels and gave one to Patrick McCue, and they went out to
248. r shoulders in snow, they worked with a will, clearing a space around the door and a
249. ow, they worked with a will, clearing a space around the door and a success, until th
250. ew rods beyond, without THE FLEMMINGS. man, much of whose life 47 in had been spen
251. thout THE FLEMMINGS. man, much of whose life 47 in had been spent warm, sunny latitu
252. seas, made him ashamed, and he bent his will to his shivering hands, pitch- ing off
253. nce and pious invocations, them. He had man done his duty," he thought, in to recov
254. invocations, them. He had man done his duty," he thought, in to recover his pack, b
255. ther they went. 48 THE FLEMMINGS. was a good enough nook, furnished with a cot, one
256. good enough nook, furnished with a cot, one or two chairs, a table on which lay a B
257. since with tke quick perception of his nature he had come to feel himself unwelcome,
258. feel himself unwelcome, and least, his religion abhorred. Here, at of the he could bles
259. e name Holy Trinity, knowing it to be a sign of his belief in a crucified it God, wh
260. a sign of his belief in a crucified it God, whose passion and death of, kept him r
261. n a crucified it God, whose passion and death of, kept him reminded and nourished in
262. kept him reminded and nourished in his soul the divine virtues of Faith, Hope, and
263. aith, by the belief it signified in the death of the ; Son of God for his salvation H
264. signified in the death of the ; Son of God for his salvation Hope, nourished and o
265. is salvation Hope, nourished and or the love of increased by this belief; Charity, G
266. e of increased by this belief; Charity, God, excited by the sacred sign which repre
267. ef; Charity, God, excited by the sacred sign which represented to him the love which
268. acred sign which represented to him the love which for dying on the cross God showed
269. m the love which for dying on the cross God showed mankind by him. No wonder Patric
270. and ; McCue made much was ready of the sign of the cross, to brave peril to and dea
271. ign of the cross, to brave peril to and death for its sake no wonder he was glad be w
272. would to the day of THE FLEMMINGS. his death, " for/' he reasoned, " they've 49 done
273. han give me a cup of cold water for the love of it; God, though mebbe they don't kno
274. a cup of cold water for the love of it; God, though mebbe they don't know and it is
275. thoughts passed through Patrick McCue's mind while he was unstrapping his pack, neve
276. o Reuben, saying: Faith ! it's the very one I was looking afther it, ; and do you t
277. that'll do to pray by, to swear by, or love by; for you must know he's got some sac
278. the Sassenach like to boil over and the love songs, honey, bate Bannagher genuine po
279. ve songs, honey, bate Bannagher genuine poetry —rale —take it, my lad, with a hear
280. gifts : have never been used my father will give , me money to buy it of you if I a
281. from it's not the way, bedad, to slap a man if in the face with a gift offered out
282. he saw that he had wounded the heart of one who, under heavy obligations to them al
283. 1 ) 7iis ri'EMMiNG^/ 51 it take it with many thanks, and keep for at " your Para- sa
284. ed the heart, dazzled verses, while his imagination and glowing, felt as if under a spell o
285. richer in session than if its pos- some one had given him a string of diamonds. "I
286. ions which neither he nor any of his it family had ever visited, distant, being a hund
287. is it family had ever visited, distant, being a hundred miles facilities for travel-
288. nobody at all ; wid the smoke of it it, being in the open street 'bating that, it see
289. t very satisfactory about Boston to any one except Mrs. Flemming, who, although she
290. n must be a most godly place. Then some one asked him about seas, his voyage across
291. cient iii no excuse was suffi- puritan family to linger ; around the table when a mea
292. the Irishman made devoutly the blessed sign of the cross upon himself, which gave t
293. faces. But he was nothto the spiritual life it ing daunted of ; it was as natural h
294. was as natural him to make this blessed sign as was to his for the natural soul of l
295. ssed sign as was to his for the natural soul of life to breathe, and he could not hi
296. n as was to his for the natural soul of life to breathe, and he could not him unders
297. uld not him understand how any rational being, who to a was not a heathen, could obje
298. ho to a was not a heathen, could object symbol which meant so much. But he sat down wi
299. had not yet cooled off. "I spoke to the man about his doings," began Fiemming. "I w
300. ther not but I did. I told offensively, mind you; him that his cross, and praying of
301. simplicity of to the saints, was an our religion, and asked him to refrain from such usa
302. ere he dare not make the THE FLEMMINGS. sign of the cross 55 try his chances in upon
303. he perished the snow ful to ; and ;' if God would be merci- him and he was going, m
304. —going, rewhat he wel- member, to his death but I held him back, seeing his sinceri
305. held him back, seeing his sincerity in being ready to perish for thought was right ,
306. Flemming " It beats me, though, that a man ; should be ready to die for so small a
307. t lie thought but as he sees sees it it mind, mother, as —he would it have felt gu
308. is whole Faith, of which the cross is a symbol, by putting father, under foot at any t
309. by putting father, under foot at any to man's bidding. I am ashamed have asked him.
310. , ! what may that be? singing ; now The man must be singing some of his ungodly son
311. n a thousand years ; and now — wonder time. ! there's a jingle like sleigh-bells k
312. w we go about pulling up the pull we up good wheat with them. They are good little c
313. ll we up good wheat with them. They are good little children, according to the natur
314. ttle children, according to the natural law, and a harmless amusement won't harm th
315. he brass globe of the andirons, in such good time and with such light touches that t
316. ass globe of the andirons, in such good time and with such light touches that the gi
317. lty so enjoyable, to hear the music and language of other lands sung in a clear flexible
318. able, to hear the music and language of other lands sung in a clear flexible tenor wh
319. nwary pilgrims, to devour them body and soul the — and asked for more, and little
320. s and idolatries, while his voice, like one of those exquisitely toned old Straduar
321. McOue hailed the sunset splendors as a sign of promise and home. The night was and
322. e " Old Homestead," and before long the cause appeared. The young ox-teams, men their
323. er : fondly, while she whispered "Thank God that you had an uneasy time are safe, N
324. pered "Thank God that you had an uneasy time are safe, Nicholas ; I have about you."
325. had at the Deacon's, having the in best time I ever as he put her my life," he said
326. he in best time I ever as he put her my life," he said laughing, down to kiss his si
327. m up yonder alive again we crossed each other together. last night, I ; never expecte
328. ou but you see how things come Almighty God was holding you in your people here sav
329. your people here saved safe keeping, my life ; may the Blessed irre- Mother of God r
330. life ; may the Blessed irre- Mother of God reward ! them," answered the pressible
331. g countenance. ? The what any but never mind, it's a free country. Mother, get us so
332. ng the hand she had held out to to each other that apart, he welcome him, whispering
333. ratus which the New England house-wives will poison their bread and pastries with, t
334. stries with, there are no people in the world who understand better what the art of c
335. he world who understand better what the art of cooking and this the spreading of a
336. y the Elder, to like hungry doing ample justice to the inviting fare, while Mrs. Elemmi
337. ending with compla- THE FLEMMINGS. cent happiness to the needs of all 61 —for the littl
338. Hope and John Wilde happy ; sat beside other, quietly and Eva, who was thought in th
339. the table. little But Patrick McCue by life and little became the of the company. S
340. t he completely turned the laugh on the other side, and kept of up the fun late to th
341. ound, talking over their bear-hunts and other adventures, until Mrs. Flemming, assist
342. er's table, upon which lay open the old family Bible, in the centre of the room. Patri
343. rs. McCue found himself in the midst of family off to He would have stepped bed if had
344. raculous things done by the prophet of God, not as to a far-off tale of dreamland,
345. ed on earth ; for he knew that Almighty God had never ceased working miracles as gr
346. ands of His saints, down to the present time faith ; his Faith was a living, deathle
347. , gravely twirling his thumbs over each other, benignly thankful that his entertainer
348. the out, first lines of a familiar hymn being given they all sang together, old and y
349. in devotional harmony to THE ELEMMINGS. one of the old quaint puritan only been out
350. would have enjoyed more sic —for the man had to a fine natural ear for tell mu-
351. he road-breaking mission, to unite with other parties for the same purpose, and thoug
352. on, to unite with other parties for the same purpose, and thought they might posHarb
353. id Eeuben and the " whom he whispered ; God bless the winsome face of yez may the s
354. z both into the fold of her Son." No it one heard what he said except the sisters,
355. germinates and grows into strength and beauty, cover- ing with vines, blossoms, leave
356. ard the germs of mighty trees, which in time cast broad shadows on the mountain wide
357. ws on the mountain wide boughs over the peace- sides, or stretch their ful brown home
358. heir ful brown homes in the valley; for man's mission in is more mighty still, Almi
359. ssion in is more mighty still, Almighty God His own THE FLEMMINGS. 65 wise designs
360. rant and humble as messengers of of His will, as prophets His coming, to plant the s
361. fting the thinking : threw it "To waste time over the pages idle, of such a book as
362. t Patrick McCue meant when he bade them good-by, Hope and Eva lost no time but ran u
363. bade them good-by, Hope and Eva lost no time but ran up first stairs, and on enterin
364. g with Him the bitter passion and It it pain she could neither soothe or avert. high
365. nted they might be some poet-sculptor's idea of "Charity," or "Peace," or "Maternal
366. poet-sculptor's idea of "Charity," or "Peace," or "Maternal Love," but whatever it m
367. of "Charity," or "Peace," or "Maternal Love," but whatever it might mean, it was be
368. utiful in its holy expression of serene peace. thrilled But the picture first them th
369. picture first them through ; it was the one of the kind they had ever seen, and alt
370. er father's tone in " only think of her being there, close beside Him, seeing all tha
371. to these fair Puritan maidens, and the time not vet hand when " out of many hearts
372. and the time not vet hand when " out of many hearts thoughts should at last be revea
373. retting her by ; letting it her know. I will leave the image here can 68 THE FLEMMIN
374. ere can 68 THE FLEMMINGS. it it hurt no one, and is certainly very pretty. ' I shou
375. ween the leaves of my Bible ; as it you will say, Hope, it can't hurt me ; indeed I
376. an't hurt me ; indeed I think it, do me good whenever I see for it brings that sorro
377. ell again." " It is Borne it Antichrist man bought with other things very likely. N
378. is Borne it Antichrist man bought with other things very likely. No, I don't think h
379. a great string of black beads and that sign on himself again, then to himself while
380. in- began whispering ; he counted them one by one deed he did, Hope, and Nicholas
381. gan whispering ; he counted them one by one deed he did, Hope, and Nicholas laughed
382. rd Eva, because you might some day I or other ask mother, and that would never do. ne
383. told to read to her. me about night- it one day when I went Indian squaw, One an ol
384. t- it one day when I went Indian squaw, One an old who had been in the habit of com
385. n squaw, One an old who had been in the habit of com- ing here to beg, was taken in o
386. INGS. clutching her throat. It was some time before before she revived, and has neve
387. nonsense, Eva I thought you had more ! sense than that. Such a question is worthy of
388. tion is worthy of Sarah Gill, who hears death-watches, and believes in signs and witc
389. that happened here long years ago, when God was who was so merciful as to save our
390. -by out its fibres, would begin to send life. Cold weather now set steadily in peopl
391. es gay cutters and large double sleighs life, with young people rosy with health and
392. he dangers ; of property then more than one or two disparaging hints were thrown ou
393. t against Elder Flemming for giving the man hospitality 1 ; " if r he must needs ta
394. s take Lim," said they, "the arn w as a good enough place for such a character, and
395. t no want of kindness they were serving God, and vigilant in His service, when they
396. gilant in His service, when they sat in judgment on their brethren's comings or actual t
397. dreaming that they were clothed garment duty to ; in it as with a their first and th
398. nd they firmly believed that to cherish God and man was and defend — THE FLEMMING
399. firmly believed that to cherish God and man was and defend — THE FLEMMINGS. 73 ev
400. ” THE FLEMMINGS. 73 everything in their religion in the sternest antithetical way agains
401. ight of " private interpretation," each one felt authorized to set up new doctrinal
402. lights, until there was danger of their being lost in sects of the utter darkness. So
403. eet sleighs ; mountain, skimmed the and many a as they poor half-famished family rec
404. e and many a as they poor half-famished family received gifts stopped a moment in fron
405. turkey, or a joint, or a basket of and other substantial things which fed the little
406. close at the They generally looked main chance, but on the whole were as -humane and k
407. ut as 74 THE FLEMMINGS. ignorant of the truth as revealed to His Church by Jesus Chri
408. of this disturbed the sedate carnival- time of our puritan friends, along the lake
409. ying the ecstatic of a and the prospect good supper at John it, "Wilde's mother's an
410. e and delightful anticiit is pations of pleasure as ness of the young and innocent to en
411. THE FLEMMINGS. 75 CHAPTEE Vie THE INNER LIFE OF WOLFERT FLEMMING. Never shone the su
412. ly settled; the noisy clangor of modern progress had not yet disturbed its grand solitud
413. g sun " to revisit the scenes roamed at will, the " monarchs of all they veyed," the
414. So insular was the neighborhood, that a man of it who little could over say he had
415. f their well-meaning teacher, an old 77 man who had been nursed in the early cradle
416. itanism and who laid down the spiritual law as he understood it, disintegrating the
417. tegrating the Scriptures blindly and at will with much unction, and had devoted the
418. ted the to building labors of his tion, life upon a sandy foundait happy in the conc
419. safe but soft kind. "With the Bible in one hand and the " Articles of the other, W
420. e in one hand and the " Articles of the other, Westminster Assembly " in the Father R
421. them with an amazed sort of wonder that God should allow His creatures, for whose s
422. re restraints the innocent pleasures of life were condemned by the harsh creed of th
423. hey could not of all of them get up the state mind which they called conversion, many
424. uld not of all of them get up the state mind which they called conversion, many of t
425. tate mind which they called conversion, many of them became indifferent so indiffere
426. r, them and made them all, suspect that religion was not, after divine the holy and powe
427. sweeten the routine and toils of daily life ; their souls bris- tled with the thorn
428. souls bris- tled with the thorns of the Law, upon which they hung good their interp
429. thorns of the Law, upon which they hung good their interpretations of the faith ; Ho
430. o preached the Sermon on the Mount, be- cause they believed He had done all, and anyt
431. , and driv- THE FLEMMINGS. ing sharp 79 other bargains with each between whiles, neve
432. Sabbath rolled round. Mrs. Flemming was one of the stern disciples of Father Ray ;
433. ay ; while her husband, although a just man and living a godly life before the worl
434. although a just man and living a godly life before the world and his brethren, who
435. man and living a godly life before the world and his brethren, who held him in high
436. he sinner;" they had not professed that change known ple as "conversion," objects of a
437. were consequently the and warnings from many stern reproofs the old minister. On thi
438. sharp edges of the snow-covered ridges, one might almost have imagined himself up l
439. e a sprawk ing blot on the fair face of nature but that by some chance he had tied a r
440. he fair face of nature but that by some chance he had tied a red comforter around his
441. d. in Biding with him was a young furs, man wrapped face whose handsome, intelligen
442. o having graduated at Yale was studying law in Boston. He had come up to the "White
443. absent the exceed- ingly doctrines of "universal salva- tion," listened to with suppress
444. gs, and assure himself that Eva Flemthe world all ming was unchanged went well with h
445. MINGS. 81 then hurried on to send their man-of-all-work in to kindle a great fire i
446. uch gushes of talk and fun that for the life of them they could not keep it up, and
447. Ray sat bolt upright, thumbs over each other and gazing fire with a displeased count
448. e child of is gone so far astray, he is many prayers," said Father Ray, sternly. "Wh
449. ons?" asked the Elder. salvation. all, "Universal He argues all that will our Saviour die
450. ion. all, "Universal He argues all that will our Saviour died for and that men be sa
451. wrests the old to own perdition " cried man with indignation. "I have come to think
452. ings to confuse the experienced, and it many mind things in of the in- has become a
453. to confuse the experienced, and it many mind things in of the in- has become a subje
454. strange doctrines. of George in is only one many, and it was so even my young days.
455. nge doctrines. of George in is only one many, and it was so even my young days." THE
456. octrines are as much opposed is to each other, and as far asunder as the east the wes
457. generate follow after the idols of this world, and trample in the dust cipline. all o
458. aning and dislike yourself i But when a man expresses a doubt, a word,' man Lord ra
459. when a man expresses a doubt, a word,' man Lord raised on the very is milk of the
460. hose head already whitening in the ser- vice of the filled —then, "Wolfert way Fle
461. I am with fearful misgivings as to his state." is " That exactly ths I feel about my
462. r in fact, I have been wishing for some time past have arisen in tures," said to lay
463. efore you, as they are laid bare before God, some of the perplexities which my mind
464. God, some of the perplexities which my mind listen, from reading the Scrip- Flemmin
465. points that you do not already know as will take well as I ; but we if counsel toge
466. el together, Wolfert, and the spiritual experience of a man much it is older than yourself
467. fert, and the spiritual experience of a man much it is older than yourself will be
468. of a man much it is older than yourself will be any help to you, at your service." F
469. om I believe to be the very things unto God, equal in all Him: in whom : and throug
470. we trust for salva- then I go over the same ground again, and after text to the art
471. elieve Jesus Christ to be the " Eternal Truth, disbelieve His word? " No christian do
472. e minit ister. you receive in a limited sense, or is go beyond meaning, there your co
473. way, " I can explain what I mean 85 —God help me regeneration on at least one po
474. —God help me regeneration on at least one point. We deny that takes place in bapt
475. emus asked Christ again ? ' ' How can a man be born replied ' : Except a he He —
476. lied ' : Except a he He — the Eternal Truth man be born of water and of enter the t
477. : Except a he He — the Eternal Truth man be born of water and of enter the the s
478. e infants, but how ? "We give them as a symbol, a pledge or testimony that do our best
479. ur best as sponsors to raise them ; ive will christians for the child, we deny that
480. d ; Father Bay, in of " for how can His man be born water ? selves He meant by bapt
481. cation of themto service, as an outward sign that they believed and hoped in Him : b
482. w can water wash the total depravity of man's nature away? " I do not Absurd " ! kn
483. water wash the total depravity of man's nature away? " I do not Absurd " ! know how" s
484. e clares shall even these enter without being 'born of water;' and what becomes of to
485. . Paul says Arise and be baptized every one of you, in the Christ, for the remissio
486. ins, you of the Holy ' Ghost.' 'Arise,' sin.' said Ananias to Paul, tells and wash
487. Church, and gave himself for cleansing Life.' it it, that He might sanctify it^ by
488. disturbs me ; but while we are thanking God that we are not as we stand blind and n
489. and naked before Him." yours, in which other men, "Wolfert, Wolfert Flemming! that o
490. have always misdoubted and now see with good reason," said the minister earnestly. "
491. hat lated in you read no more ; and get one trans- more enlightened days." " said t
492. ng. how you turn the word of ercises of God to your own destruction. The ex- your m
493. d to your own destruction. The ex- your mind are not uncommon. Doubts and temptation
494. temptations are the ordeal by which the soul — if faithful and steadfast —reache
495. IS VII. THANKFUL FOR THE PROSPERITY AND HAPPINESS OF HER FAMILY. " Yes, I will pray on, h
496. FOR THE PROSPERITY AND HAPPINESS OF HER FAMILY. " Yes, I will pray on, hoping for ligh
497. Y AND HAPPINESS OF HER FAMILY. " Yes, I will pray on, hoping for light," said Flemmi
498. sed ; and the end that my the spiritual life is full of discord. ' In the pages of w
499. the pages of word,' where I found only peace, I discover contradictions which so con
500. some- times wonder if I have risked my soul on a lie." is Wolfert Flemming's mental
501. Flemming's mental condition at all side one not uncommon to thinking religious mind
502. mmon to thinking religious minds outthe One True Fold, though there be only a few a
503. t in regard who to their own individual experience ; they go stum- bling on over their dou
504. dis- THE FLEMMINGS. 89 soluble unity of one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism, that the
505. LEMMINGS. 89 soluble unity of one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism, that the integrity
506. 9 soluble unity of one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism, that the integrity of the Scri
507. se, given by almighty Eedeemer, down to God hem and ; to our first parents, of a th
508. e cross, from the cross unto the end of time, from time into a bound] ess infinitely
509. om the cross unto the end of time, from time into a bound] ess infinitely glorious e
510. e into a bound] ess infinitely glorious eternity ? liever there is no discord in the bel
511. res, for his is no ephemeral an amateur religion founded for the glorification and selfi
512. r the glorification and selfish ends of man, but a science of eternal principles co
513. fication and selfish ends of man, but a science of eternal principles coming from Himse
514. principles coming from Himself, sealed God by the precious blood of His Son, and i
515. he earth ; awaiting the consummation of time to as- cend in triumph with her spoils
516. conquests into the eternal heavens. Our good Puritan knew nothing of this True : 90
517. enden- cies that it sickend his upright soul and wonder at the great patience of it
518. at patience of it ; ; made him almighty God in bearing with but beyond this mistake
519. ny pagan in the jungles of India of the one true Catholic Church — its Faith, Cre
520. s, Precepts and usages. He was ing only one of many God-fearing, truth-seek- men wh
521. epts and usages. He was ing only one of many God-fearing, truth-seek- men who, like
522. and usages. He was ing only one of many God-fearing, truth-seek- men who, like Saul
523. e was ing only one of many God-fearing, truth-seek- men who, like Saul of Tarsus, thi
524. of Tarsus, think they are best serving God when in their blindness they rage again
525. the old minister, laying his the strong man ; " hand upon the bowed head of but kee
526. keep them from the knowof ledge of your family, lest you scandalize the weak and unreg
527. MINGS. 4- 91 not."* So was it with this man who with earnest purpose rested on the
528. ccounted for very satisfactorily to her mind, for it was utterly impossible for her
529. impossible for her ever to disassociate religion with a stern gravity herself ; and exce
530. The young people were having a cheerful time around the bright hearth of the old roo
531. silence down which was a revolt against nature and innocence, while in their hearts th
532. were thinking then, as if "how unlovely religion is;" satisfied with this outward seemin
533. ngs received, which gave the turkey and other viands time to cool, while the mouths o
534. which gave the turkey and other viands time to cool, while the mouths of the wholes
535. ing would not fly down and in seize the good things before his grandfather got throu
536. house and took possession of " the best one," and enjoyed themselves. George Merill
537. ent was ; full of unre- her intelligent mind gave animaall and interest to she said,
538. e .took leave, " adof the monished each one to give up the vanities world, and decl
539. nished each one to give up the vanities world, and declared that sity it was " their
540. artedness that kept them from Said he : being converted." You harden your small voice
541. d stiffen your necks, and by-and-by you will be abandoned by the still you repent."
542. was 94 THE FLEMMINGS. " to indeed " but one thing needf ul fect mate them per- —b
543. stern old preacher would and make ; try religion a more winning and lovely yearned tende
544. rt them that they might become vants of God. and faithful ser- That evening the Eld
545. father, we ought to feel very thankful. God has here if prospered us abundantly, ar
546. ppier than most. Indeed, I often wonder many have been as we two." the pity. as happ
547. ated wife " I'm afraid there are not is many, little ; moro to Tes, as you say, we h
548. e be thankful, and I hope that we are I will Elder smoothing her hair. " on. And tel
549. she ; went they " I think our children will be happy too are handsome and ; thrifty
550. re going of that marry so suitably, and will have none rough close struggle that mos
551. hat most young couples have. well-to-do man, Deacon Sneathen's a is and Huldah a go
552. an, Deacon Sneathen's a is and Huldah a good, managing, wife ; natty girl, and will
553. good, managing, wife ; natty girl, and will make Nick a good then, — THE FLEMMING
554. wife ; natty girl, and will make Nick a good then, — THE FLEMMINGS. 95 John "Wilde
555. lde —I don't is know ; a better young man you know that he rich leastways he's go
556. d best stocked farm in these parts, and will be a good husband to Hope, depend upon
557. cked farm in these parts, and will be a good husband to Hope, depend upon that. I An
558. . I And " am it sure that George Merill will ask if Eva ; I saw in his eyes to-day I
559. lder, smiling to sit " and what a proud one be down among your children and dren so
560. dchil- But you ; about George Merill he will want a city wife, and don't you see tha
561. e that if head over ears in all fire in love with Eva, I never life," was so deceive
562. s in all fire in love with Eva, I never life," was so deceived my said Mrs. Flemming
563. g up the with the tongs. "It would be a good match, a very suitable match," replied
564. and it would be stand in the way of her happiness and interest she likes him," an- swered
565. likes him," an- swered Mrs. Flemming. " will That go. Why, mother, the old home be v
566. th us." : — THE FLEMMINGS. 96 " It is time enough, to think of that, father. It wo
567. own house. oftener than not Mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law get to hate each o
568. han not Mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law get to hate each other, and I shouldn't
569. w and daughters-in-law get to hate each other, and I shouldn't like Nick's wife to ha
570. oo long." " And shall be to the end, my good faithful little wife and helpmate. is A
571. ," he said fondly, while a warm glow of happiness passed over her face, softening away ev
572. ce, softening away every hard then " It will line until the beauty of her youth few
573. very hard then " It will line until the beauty of her youth few moments ; seemed given
574. Keuben " and j^ou know we shall all the time." ! Our poor Keuben I fear that his lif
575. ime." ! Our poor Keuben I fear that his life will be spent uselessly. I can't imagin
576. ! Our poor Keuben I fear that his life will be spent uselessly. I can't imagine wha
577. pent uselessly. I can't imagine what he will do," sighed the Elder, while his heavy
578. rings over Keuben. I dare say something will turn " up to suit him," replied she, al
579. rill is very handsome." "Yes, George is good-looking. I don't think replied the city
580. nd Eeuben and I like him so now," anbut good night, I should swered Eva seriously."
581. that," said Hope, getting for rest —" good night up ; to begin her preparations te
582. e and quiet realms of this young girl's mind floated ever T and ever, no matter wher
583. girl's mind floated ever T and ever, no matter where she was or what she w as doing, t
584. before, beyond the natural fact of her being the Mother of Jesus. She had read ton,
585. the Gracchi, the mother of Washing- and many other noble and true mothers whose admi
586. racchi, the mother of Washing- and many other noble and true mothers whose admired an
587. had wept over the grief of Hecuba ; her soul had glowed with a sort of burn- ing ire
588. on of her before, felt for her than for other women the mother of Washington had stoo
589. hts, let which would not her alone, and being possessed of a clear analytical brain a
590. the mothers she knew, and there was not one of them, she was morally sure, who if t
591. died in the But this Mother, unlike any other, accepted the wrongs and ignominies of
592. erenced next to himself in the American mind ; but here was the Mother of the Saviou
593. re was the Mother of the Saviour of the world, scarcely known, never venerated, never
594. ld not make asleep murmur- ing " unlike other mothers." Unlike other mothers ! Tes !
595. ur- ing " unlike other mothers." Unlike other mothers ! Tes ! promised from the all b
596. truly was she unlike should pierce her soul." THE FLEMMINGS. any mother the world e
597. er soul." THE FLEMMINGS. any mother the world ever saw eternity virgin all ; ; 101 el
598. LEMMINGS. any mother the world ever saw eternity virgin all ; ; 101 elect from all ; sin
599. of her Divine Son ; a martyr above all sin ; martyrs, while for He was the victim
600. was the victim for and what ? That the world might be redeemed. Her Son had " to be
601. o be about His Father's business ;" the time had come when all was to be acomplished
602. and passive in her woe, bearing in her soul the cruel wounds and bitter torments of
603. to see Him every nerve and fibre of her being pulsing with the dread sword-thrust of
604. on ; sharing every pang, immolating her nature, and offering with great Him w ork r th
605. with great Him w ork r the sacrifice of soul and body, that the of Redemption might
606. nds crevice, unknowing of the boundless wealth of sunshine and its ; dew outside or li
607. osperous, contented and happy in each ; other and, as Mrs. Flemming said : " What bet
608. they expected to make ?" true that the good little mother got into quite a gloomy,
609. d every Sabbath, over the un- converted state of her sons and daughters, for which sh
610. sermons ; but she scarcely gave herself time during the busy week days to feel troub
611. nding her solace in ; her household and family cares itual and for any spir- anxieties
612. ; 103 This was a lusus of, but an idle man ! which she could not endure to think a
613. m week to week, and spent much ; of his time at the old homestead then something hap
614. hing happened which gave them all great happiness. John Wilde expe- rienced the " saving
615. eming a pledge made long ago to a dying man, and he rejoiced that he was spared for
616. or the work, no doubt ever crossing his mind as it. to the method, or his right in p
617. in performing John ; Wilde was always a good, moral young man all but of his friends
618. ; Wilde was always a good, moral young man all but of his friends, those who were
619. his conversion, it because they thought man just starting in life be a religious. l
620. cause they thought man just starting in life be a religious. little, Nicholas told F
621. upposed that he would think himself too good to shake his foot in a reel again." Mr.
622. n in such a got afraid that she was not good enough for him but on the whole he was
623. ugh for him but on the whole he was the same, and they were all very happy together,
624. €”the deeper he got into the mire, each one gave different none of them agreed inte
625. ut, until at last became clearer to the man's mind, every day, that in the administ
626. til at last became clearer to the man's mind, every day, that in the administration
627. ery day, that in the administration and government of God's kingdom upon and founder. shor
628. in the administration and government of God's kingdom upon and founder. short. eart
629. - vateering, and cheap dissemination of philosophy. Kant and Spinoza had not then enlighte
630. a had not then enlightened the American mind with theistic effusions. their transcen
631. tal and pan- Eenan had not written, and one heard nothing of " Symbolic Christs," o
632. at all, or it is just possible that our good Puritan might have been drawn into an i
633. easure an infinite infidel and tried to God by safe the poor guage of human reason.
634. r from try- such temptations, his whole mind w as bent on ing to reconcile the glari
635. rose and gloomy, he got into his cutter one morning, and went a day's journey up th
636. ny blows, and braced 106 THE FLEMMINGS. will, for themselves up with a these half wi
637. mountains did not like to be outdone by one who followed the plough and pottered ab
638. those few days than fore in so short a time. was ever brought down beWolfert Flemmi
639. lfert Flemming's blood and he brought a good circulated more healthily, appetite wit
640. e the difficulties and exercises of his mind. it, Father Ray could not do for they c
641. adicted neither could his books, ; each other and he had prayed His Bible most were t
642. turbed him, for therein Divine nothing. Truth If itself, which meant everything or th
643. l If they meant nothing, then If Christ religion was a lie. was the Eternal ; Truth, the
644. t religion was a lie. was the Eternal ; Truth, then were His words the truth not, if
645. ternal ; Truth, then were His words the truth not, if He was And then^His teaching wa
646. ly and with all 107 the strength of his will and understanding, that Christ was the
647. derstanding, that Christ was the Son of God, Redeemer who came upon earth not only
648. who came upon earth not only to ransom man, but to found a law of Faith in which t
649. not only to ransom man, but to found a law of Faith in which the very he could wal
650. mbling, and out contradictions and this law of Faith should be something divine and
651. ould a thorn tree bring forth his Bibfe one day, figs ? He opened and read of the :
652. th shall be loosed in heaven." As My to life, Father hath sent Me, I also send you a
653. sent Me, I also send you and Flemming's mind, even in the ordinary it affairs of wou
654. ns, he had re- some such power, but the other ; 108 THE FLEMMINGS. it formed sects tr
655. rampled abuses of popery. under foot as one of the said, " If Then, too, Christ had
656. the said, " If Then, too, Christ had he will not hear the Church, let him be anathem
657. tures but the crowning and most weighty one of in the sixth chapter of St. John, al
658. low belief of his sect and doubting the time. What right had he to set up to be wise
659. ure his distractions against the sacred wisdom of three centuries ? "There must a magg
660. something corrupt in my THE FLEMMINGS. soul. 109 I will shake off these importunate
661. orrupt in my THE FLEMMINGS. soul. 109 I will shake off these importunate tempta- tio
662. ld, he could not silence these deof his soul ; mands and he went on plodding the lif
663. oul ; mands and he went on plodding the life, routine of his everyday practical wres
664. day practical wrestling with the strong Angel in the darkness until sometimes he felt
665. y would there ever dawn. In the outward man was no change. A close observer would h
666. re ever dawn. In the outward man was no change. A close observer would have thought hi
667. exercises, which he now confided to no one, not even to Father Ray, with whom he d
668. y he should try to let telling fall him one day " that back into the old things way
669. deavor to silence his doubts, and serve God according to the lights he had;" which
670. umbermen pine region but when the third one rolled round, " Table of the Lord's and
671. so looked for the shortcoming up to by other their ; professors as a " burning and s
672. grief to the old all own lives, was no man but Flemming heard and only replied, ;"
673. ming from him, a hundred excuses of any other man. We have seen how happy and prosper
674. rom him, a hundred excuses of any other man. We have seen how happy and prosperous
675. ere, and heard them congratulating each other, with thankful hearts, for the blessing
676. Flemming's mental disquiet, because his family had not the remotest idea that he was t
677. because his family had not the remotest idea that he was thus exercised-. Except tha
678. truly happy and united home circle, or one bound together by bands of stronger kin
679. d together by bands of stronger kindred love. But have you ever there in a calm sumb
680. ful things of earth around you, like an evil thought, aud a little chill quivered ov
681. o the far off depths of the distance. I will tell you that one day such a shadow fel
682. s of the distance. I will tell you that one day such a shadow fell upon of after th
683. py household. It happened in this wise. One away afternoon, George Merill rode down
684. on, George Merill rode down all. to say good-by to them at Hope and Nicholas were De
685. mployed in some household sewing in the family room, gossiping cheerily over the fairs
686. ning from malice or slander —that was one of the moral laws of this family to whi
687. ”that was one of the moral laws of this family to which they scrupulously adhered 112
688. ealthy came in, his well-knit, handsome form by a plain rich city suit of broadcloth
689. as I George said ; but my grandfather's religion seems to hurt don't all the time like a
690. 's religion seems to hurt don't all the time like a tight boot. mean any disrespect,
691. disrespect, Mrs. Flemming; but, except one or two, here and there, people's nature
692. ople's natures appear to be affected by religion just as a green persimmon does a fellow
693. r grandfather is a faithful minister of God's of w ord, George, and you ought to be
694. lemming. is "Yes, my ; grandfather is a good man, Mrs. Flemming but he troubled with
695. ng. is "Yes, my ; grandfather is a good man, Mrs. Flemming but he troubled with spi
696. fact, I don't call a thing that rable, religion ; makes a man miseit ; at least, if it
697. a thing that rable, religion ; makes a man miseit ; at least, if it is, don't suit
698. ," he replied gravely. You have taken a good long holiday ; but I expect you'll go b
699. is nothing in Boston that I so well as being here. Where is everybody to-day ? " Fat
700. ll you, depend upon the answer you give love me now. I you, Eva. Ever since we were
701. ther. I have loved you, and the hope of one day winning you for wife has been the i
702. the safeguard of my manhood me ? girl's honor. "I What have you to say to ; am sorry,
703. was tremulous with pity; "I am sorry to pain you; but—" " Don't, Eva ; don't " he
704. tell me that all my patient waiting and love goes for nothing. I couldn't stand that
705. ndeed I couldn't." "You must have last, courage, George," she said at as she lifted her
706. ge ; on the contrary, I do not know any one who has for you, such as I " greater pe
707. errupted almost rudely, " there is some other person towards whom your little liking
708. d his dreams so long, she added more no other person." " "There is Then I will hope,
709. re no other person." " "There is Then I will hope, Eva. Remember, I will not give yo
710. e is Then I will hope, Eva. Remember, I will not give you up; I will write to you, I
711. va. Remember, I will not give you up; I will write to you, I will come"; I will impo
712. not give you up; I will write to you, I will come"; I will importune you, and bear w
713. p; I will write to you, I will come"; I will importune you, and bear with your capri
714. your caprices and wait patiently; but I will not give you up, rememwaste I ber that,
715. you up, rememwaste I ber that," he " It will said. all useless, be George and you ;
716. said. all useless, be George and you ; will the best years of your will life in an
717. e and you ; will the best years of your will life in an idle pursuit. not receive yo
718. you ; will the best years of your will life in an idle pursuit. not receive your fa
719. fe in an idle pursuit. not receive your family, I will give As a friend of the you wel
720. dle pursuit. not receive your family, I will give As a friend of the you welcome whe
721. THE FLEMMINGS. but the sincerity of his soul asserted itself, 117 and he I want mere
722. and he I want merely uttered the simple truth. " And for you, Mrs. wife," Flemming â€
723. e answered bravely " I only do what any other honorable their sanction of man would.
724. t any other honorable their sanction of man would. ; I ask for al- my endeavor to w
725. wing that you have no secrets tell from one another, I speak openly, and again, bef
726. and again, before you them all, that I will not give you up. faithful- I intend to
727. dded manfully. 118 THE FLEMMINGS. Since will " It will be so mucli time wasted, Geor
728. lly. 118 THE FLEMMINGS. Since will " It will be so mucli time wasted, George. you ar
729. MINGS. Since will " It will be so mucli time wasted, George. you are so very frank e
730. ght as well know, up and all, down, for good and It is that I will not marry him. no
731. nd all, down, for good and It is that I will not marry him. no use for him to set hi
732. ot marry him. no use for him to set his mind upon him it, and lose chances in Boston
733. chances in Boston which the use of a ? will suit better. life Besides, what is man
734. which the use of a ? will suit better. life Besides, what is man throwing his backw
735. will suit better. life Besides, what is man throwing his backwards in such waste Fo
736. r myself I don't in- tend to marry. the family." I am going to be the old maid of " "W
737. am going to be the old maid of " "Well, good-by, Eva. All that you say makes again,
738. u say makes again, no difference to me. will I shall come and per- haps you change y
739. me. will I shall come and per- haps you change your mind. I don't know so ;" whatever
740. hall come and per- haps you change your mind. I don't know so ;" whatever I have don
741. ithheld hers. you ; ; only treat you as one honorable person should treat another,
742. hould treat another, by telling you the truth. I have no idea of marrying. It does no
743. er, by telling you the truth. I have no idea of marrying. It does not seem to me tha
744. ld be the sole end and aim of a woman's life ; and I am very happy here," she said b
745. you would not like a wife who could not love you," she said, pittying the grief and
746. va, because I in his eyes. know that in time I could win your love," he said quickly
747. yes. know that in time I could win your love," he said quickly, hoping that she woul
748. spurs pretty deeply into his sides. No one said a word to Eva about George Merill
749. d to Eva about George Merill indeed, no one saw Eer until supper time, for she had
750. ill indeed, no one saw Eer until supper time, for she had gone straight up self in,
751. , to her room, and shut her- then had a good womanly cry, for she was : both sorry a
752. ppointment into her old school-fellow's life, and angry at his presumption in assumi
753. just taken place in the presence of the family. being treated Eva Flemming could not b
754. en place in the presence of the family. being treated Eva Flemming could not brook li
755. casual observer could have detected no change. The fire burned brightly; between the
756. er of cider, slowly warming at ; on the other side the cat was curled up asleep feet,
757. ding. They talked but there was to each other, trying to be cheerful ; a restraint; a
758. rying to be cheerful ; a restraint; and one after another they dropped into silence
759. his knee, and turned his quiringly from one to another. mild eyes infelt Hope redde
760. t Hope redden as if she were the guilty one, and stole her hand down and folded her
761. hould be the to create a discord in the family it harmony, always so perfect; but was
762. mings had, to have no secrets from each other, and speak out openly of whatever troub
763. : ; "I guess, father, that I of. am the cause of the quiet all that you complain I'm
764. should have liked him well my sonis in-law ; but when that ; is said, all is said
765. I like him. I still value you and your happiness more. You have not offended me, daughte
766. said Eva, while her voice trembled with emotion. It was much for her to be assured that
767. was not angry with her a ; but the rest opinion is "Well!" said Nicholas, "my that Geor
768. " said Nicholas, "my that George and it man that any girl might be proud of looks t
769. silly caprice, would be a and a wicked one, ; too, Nick, for Huldah to throw you o
770. spirit. Nicholas subsided and held his peace, directly for this came home to him. "
771. tly for this came home to him. " George will be a very rich man. The minister Boston
772. me to him. " George will be a very rich man. The minister Boston ; told me that he
773. ; own sake," said Eva, quietly " for he will more I easily forget his disappointment
774. dishonor George Merill, —for I do not love him for his I married money, I should b
775. uld," said Hope, speaking for the first time, " and I should be ashamed for you." "
776. useful, and not expect to go about the world mooning and daubing, and doing nothing
777. ghts him. of the ideal, soon forgot the family discussion going on around His mother a
778. I do not wish to marry —least of all will I marry George " Merrill." Many a one j
779. of all will I marry George " Merrill." Many a one just as positive as you are have
780. will I marry George " Merrill." Many a one just as positive as you are have " Ther
781. as you are have " There's changed their mind," said Mrs. Flemming. Prudence Rogers ;
782. hanged their mind," said Mrs. Flemming. Prudence Rogers ; why, she and Sam ; hated each
783. Rogers ; why, she and Sam ; hated each other after they got acquainted, for more tha
784. er ?" " And I read once of an audacious man that beat and cuffed and kicked a high-
785. n- because she was afraid that the next time kill her, he would married him. But if
786. igh that she could not wait to hear the history of Sam Eogers' happy marriage. " Well,
787. Eva ; repentance different and changing one's mind are perhaps things," smile. said
788. repentance different and changing one's mind are perhaps things," smile. said Mrs. F
789. our mother and I ought to rejoice place will seem too we can keep you for the old em
790. be glad to think I'd have you me all my life but I don't want you to be an of old ma
791. ng, whose mother-heart, always true and good in its instincts, Pride and ambition fo
792. and I'm She women. Now it ; if that's a sin, it done with so let the subject be dro
793. een in a Scotch mist." And they tried " being as they were before " but the shadow ha
794. shadow had flitted over them, and each one had an indescribable and the indefinite
795. efinite prevision that harmony of their life was broken. But Mrs. Flemming began to
796. splendid winter feeding for stock, and will make your butter look like gold, mother
797. like gold, mother." " Yes, I guess they will. I hope you'll put ; down a good lot of
798. s they will. I hope you'll put ; down a good lot of mercer potatoes on that slope th
799. y spring, how then ?" " It'll be a poor chance for early potatoes, and hard to de- on
800. xit month to or so ; and he should take will head make a change, be a great disappoi
801. o ; and he should take will head make a change, be a great disappointment as well as l
802. eacon and else, you thinking about? The idea of Sneathen throwing you over for anybo
803. m, while he "I walked up and hope he is will continue in the same mind. The business
804. up and hope he is will continue in the same mind. The business a profitable one." C
805. nd hope he is will continue in the same mind. The business a profitable one." CHAPTE
806. he same mind. The business a profitable one." CHAPTEE X. MRS. FLEMMING HAS A GREAT
807. eason for want of hands to get it in in time, and having seen a hay-tedder at work s
808. mined farm. to defy prejudice, and use one upon his He had -great much mechanical
809. had -great much mechanical genius, and being very interested in his experiment, had
810. ould become told her not think, for the life of her, of him." But the Elder laughed
811. r domestic duties, idle them no its af- time ; while Mrs. Flemming helped everybody,
812. with reference to the comfort and well-being of all, and had, every day, two hours l
813. two hours left for her carpet weaving. One letter had come read to Eva from it Geo
814. ests but he made no subject, nor remark one way or the other on the did any of the
815. e no subject, nor remark one way or the other on the did any of the rest of them. One
816. her on the did any of the rest of them. One day Huldah Sneathen and her aunt, Miss
817. and Miss Deborah were entertaining each other in their peculiar way, Mrs. wardly fret
818. ble motherly pride, to talk over Hope's good prospects, said plainly to all of which
819. ith her eyes whenever she addressed any one, which was embarrassing and al- most te
820. ever been handsome, and the wine of her life had long ago turned thin dry hair to vi
821. having a dread of banks, and as little love for the vanities of the world, as her a
822. as little love for the vanities of the world, as her attire of plain dark woolen it,
823. a since his wife died, and if start in life under the tender, cheerful care of her
824. rm believer in total depravity and that world-re- nowned precept spoil the child," al
825. ich proves that Solomon with to im- his wisdom sometimes gave utterance practicable th
826. ion ; and she and Huldah had a spirited time of it, which resulted in Huldah's setti
827. vels she had ever seen, which she found one day in a THE FLEMMINGS. barrel of old p
828. et "where she 133 had day been sent for punishment, and with which she was so charmed, tha
829. r heart's content in the new, wonderful world she had discovered. loved to wear ribbo
830. t Miss Debby had got Huldah to think of God pretty much as she used to think, when
831. ing outside her windows, the thought of God, the stern and terrible Judge, the merc
832. ble Judge, the merciless executioner of justice and wrath, who might at any moment reac
833. ing and eternal flames of woe in, ; the God a her aunt had taught her to believe da
834. flying from voluntary thoughts of this religion of horrors, and, like an epicurean prie
835. over the skeleton with flowers. Only in one thing had she profited by her aunt's gu
836. girl She liked house-keeping and having good that she taste and ambition, she beauti
837. " Wal, now, Elder, I hear you're making one of things." them tedder THE FLEMMINGS,
838. t is a Yes ; I have it nearly finished. good thing for harvesting hay." " It's a gre
839. he snorted out, elevating her higher. ; Labor's hard to get sometimes spoiled. meanwh
840. fpur times necessary, and if there's a good hot sun, get heavy grass cured enough t
841. t heavy grass cured enough to go in the same day." " I don't believe a word of it. I
842. eve a word of it. I don't like newI saw one of fangled things. They're unlucky. the
843. re unlucky. them things summer, and out will its legs. at it work in Captain Jones'
844. irginny nigger make our drivers." " The world moves and I'm on, Miss Debby, in spite
845. she said. 136 THE FLEMMINGS. he " It's one of the best fertilizers in the world,"
846. It's one of the best fertilizers in the world," replied, good-humoredly. got that out
847. est fertilizers in the world," replied, good-humoredly. got that out of books, I sup
848. tenance, " but I don't think pond ' mud will ruin me, if I do get the notion from th
849. und west of your orchard, where nothing will grow but rag-weed." silent. ; Miss Debb
850. ot That sterile was the eye-sore of her life and the Elder he had taxed could not ha
851. ou your " I have never flirted with any one, Miss Debbj\ Hope, give me that " sleev
852. out it. too. There must be something in chance." I wish Huldah had such a THE FLEMMING
853. enched, to another, " Then, defeated on one point, she flew and said, turning towar
854. say : " I declare of ! I do wonder what will ever be- come Ruby ?" while Eva and Hul
855. hs of the Lord's Supper. I hope nothing will take you off next Sabbath." She had bee
856. these solemn occasions was of absolute necessity ; but Miss Debby's remarks, so full of
857. her to re- THE FLEMMINGS. lieve 139 her mind by speaking out. ; not answer her at on
858. proud as the impersonation in true and good man, would be there at his post the bur
859. d as the impersonation in true and good man, would be there at his post the burning
860. fter these years of christian, !" godly life ? all men 140 " I THE FLEMMINGS. may be
861. 140 " I THE FLEMMINGS. may be that in a sense," he answered, " but I will not be a hy
862. that in a sense," he answered, " but I will not be a hypocrite." " Hypocrite ! Why,
863. ing out of the great truthful eyes from one to the other of them, as they, full of
864. the great truthful eyes from one to the other of them, as they, full of wonder at the
865. bled me for years, and made a miserable man would have kept breast of me whenever s
866. lized in me." "Wolfert guilty of hidden sin, " O "Wolfert ! Flemming ! what awful t
867. w help you, but we do know whatever the cause is, it is an honest one, and we can res
868. whatever the cause is, it is an honest one, and we can respect . and sympathize, a
869. ho are so be so troubled truthful ? and good, tvhy should you It must be something o
870. child !" he said, folding her un- hand will moment in his own. ; " But I will bosom
871. hand will moment in his own. ; " But I will bosom " myself, then think as you may o
872. ring the while if that strong energetic will and intelligent mind, to which she had
873. t strong energetic will and intelligent mind, to which she had been wont to look as
874. as to something higher and better than other men's, were drifting into the eccentric
875. neighbors and friends, and in- stead of being looked up to by all as a model of every
876. he scope of for human ingenuity to show good reasons not to wait long ; such backsli
877. interest upon him, said " It is a : bad cause which can show no good it ; rea- son to
878. " It is a : bad cause which can show no good it ; rea- son to support and while I do
879. elf, which would argue that I doubt the justice of to you, my conclusions, I am willing
880. ng to explain my wife and children, the cause of my any more of the Sacrament of refu
881. s. little among our- I am not a learned man, and have but of other religions outsid
882. I am not a learned man, and have but of other religions outside the sect ; knowledge
883. t of other religions outside the sect ; knowledge in which I was bred mind, forcing but f
884. he sect ; knowledge in which I was bred mind, forcing but from a constant study of t
885. d through the hearts of the rest but no one spoke, not and the Elder went on the hi
886. ne spoke, not and the Elder went on the history of : "I ; will now go it is into my dou
887. the Elder went on the history of : "I ; will now go it is into my doubts some other
888. ; will now go it is into my doubts some other time will do; but I will explain, as I
889. now go it is into my doubts some other time will do; but I will explain, as I said
890. go it is into my doubts some other time will do; but I will explain, as I said befor
891. y doubts some other time will do; but I will explain, as I said before, why utterly
892. uct the working out people of a who let principle which to their : mind was felt clearly
893. of a who let principle which to their : mind was felt clearly right and although the
894. viour * had yet wrought was the genuine experience of an intelligent who at the time had n
895. experience of an intelligent who at the time had never heard of the doctrine of the
896. n all its simplifollows What Protestant mind, city. — — THE FLEMMINGS. 145 a mir
897. a divine priesthood —and fact at the same time a figure and a fact : the figure a
898. vine priesthood —and fact at the same time a figure and a fact : the figure and pr
899. miraculous feast, and cared than for no other manifestations from Him ' such ' materi
900. e rough waves of the sea, they beheld a form advancing towards their ship, and they
901. tterly at vari- ance with every natural law ; and they did not know ' Him, until He
902. ok Him into the ship a lesson, seems to one, of faith to His own disciples, all, so
903. fter turned back and walked with Him no life, more. is The third point to be conside
904. ch He declares Himself to be the Son of God, and enforces the necessity of ' believ
905. to be the Son of God, and enforces the necessity of ' believing in Him,' as a condition
906. THE FLEMMINGS. 147 great and mysterious one of the partaking of His body and blood.
907. e you have seen miracles, but befilled. Labor not for meat which perisheth, but for t
908. ut for that which endureth unto eternal life which the Son of man will give you. For
909. reth unto eternal life which the Son of man will give you. For Him hath God the cau
910. unto eternal life which the Son of man will give you. For Him hath God the cause yo
911. Son of man will give you. For Him hath God the cause you did eat of the loaves, an
912. man will give you. For Him hath God the cause you did eat of the loaves, and were the
913. im. : do, that we may work the works of God ? they said to " This is the work of Go
914. od ? they said to " This is the work of God, that you believe in Him whom He hath s
915. He hath sent Jesus answered them. What sign dost Thou show us that we may see, and
916. : said to them. The reader must keep in mind that these impressions are the unaided
917. d results of an uninstructed Protestant experience, * and the writer is only transferring
918. MINGS. : Me and him that cometh to Me I will not cast out Because I came down from h
919. came down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of Him that sent Me. Now
920. heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of Him that sent Me. Now this is the wi
921. ll of Him that sent Me. Now this is the will of the Father who sent Me, that of all
922. again at the last day. And this is the will of my Father that sent Me that every on
923. ll of my Father that sent Me that every one that seeth the Son and believeth in Him
924. elieveth in Him, * may have everlasting life, and I will raise him up on the last da
925. Him, * may have everlasting life, and I will raise him up on the last day." " Then t
926. sus answered and said unto them '• No man can come to Me, except the Father, who
927. er, who hath sent Me, draw him :f and I will raise him up at the last And they shall
928. t It is written in the prophets day. of God. Every one that hath heard of the Fathe
929. tten in the prophets day. of God. Every one that hath heard of the Father, and hath
930. hath learned cometh to Me. Not that any man hath seen the Father, but he who is of
931. hath seen the Father, but he who is of God, he hath seen the Father. Amen, amen I
932. u he that believeth in Me, hath eternal life" ; — — : : : : "Now," said the Elde
933. grave all, gentle eyes with unspeakable love upon them as they sat reverently listen
934. Father,' who had been ; sent to do the will of the Father,' and so on and how He in
935. d absolute condition inheriting eternal life. Do we believe Him to be the Son of the
936. t by compulsion, nor by laying the free-will under any necessity, but by the strong
937. , nor by laying the free-will under any necessity, but by the strong sweet motions of hea
938. 149 We believe that ! How all, can any one, who be- lieves the Bible at quickly. "
939. that Flemming Son us. And He is the of God, and our Redeemer who died for our salv
940. s enough. It is all that is required of God is not pleased with subleties." " No Go
941. od is not pleased with subleties." " No God is not pleased with subtleties," said t
942. rent. There are no half-way doings with God. tirely not only in We must believe en-
943. t believe en- His existence, but in His law reChrist His Son. vealed to us " by Jes
944. sounds symbolic or figurain a mystical sense to our ; and can be adapted comprehensi
945. but I believe with all the power of my soul that He was teaching a substan- tial tr
946. ul that He was teaching a substan- tial truth, hence I am no longer satisfied with ei
947. isfied with either type or fehadow, and will seek for the substance, which is Himsel
948. e substance, which is Himself under the form of bread. He speaks of three sorts of b
949. : Moses gave them not bread from Heaven life.' am the of Here now we have the third
950. ch cometh down from heaven not die. any man eat of it he may I am the ing bread whi
951. own from heaven. he shall live If : any man eat of this bread, forever and the brea
952. is bread, forever and the bread which I life will give, is My flesh for the of the w
953. ead, forever and the bread which I life will give, is My flesh for the of the world.
954. e will give, is My flesh for the of the world.' " When the Jews heard these sayings,
955. mongst themselves, thinking in a carnal sense, He meant ?' His : flesh and said to on
956. se, He meant ?' His : flesh and said to one another ' How can this man give us His
957. and said to one another ' How can this man give us His flesh to eat Here was the t
958. n give us His flesh to eat Here was the time and opportunity for Jesus to have ex- p
959. He spoke a parable, or meant His words sense ; to be understood in a figurative that
960. of He was speaking through them to all time, and would have been the work to leave
961. en the work to leave of a devil and not God them in error on so vital a question. H
962. atified by the solemnity an oath, the : same mystery : ' Amen, amen I say unto you s
963. x- cept you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, you have life in
964. n of man, and drink His blood, you have life in you.' Who was the Son Jesus Christ.
965. you.' Who was the Son Jesus Christ. of man? Himself. "Who was He? The Son Then mus
966. was He? The Son Then must we also beof God. We believe this. lieve Him when He tel
967. words : Who ' He that eateth lasting My life flesh : and drinketh will raise My bloo
968. th lasting My life flesh : and drinketh will raise My blood ; hath ever- and I him u
969. e Father live so he that eateth Me, the same also shall by Me. This is the bread whi
970. did not believe they had been taught of God, but profited nothing. in "We believe H
971. hing. in "We believe Him as the Eternal Truth, the true Son of God, might the Eedeeme
972. m as the Eternal Truth, the true Son of God, might the Eedeemer who assumed flesh t
973. esh for us, then we must flesh. believe life Him . when He tells us that to inherit
974. symbols. There must be somewhere among God's people a solution of my difficulty. T
975. people a solution of my difficulty. The truth cannot perish. ; know nothing beyond Co
976. not know where, or I how, to seek this life-giving bread. My ship is tossed on wate
977. n the darkness and uncertainty is of my soul I see Him afar off; He yet but a spirit
978. for I know not who holds the divine and life-giving legacy He has bequeathed me, the
979. at " THE FLEMMINGS. and awful and blood life 153 trust, the miraculous feast of the
980. t past. has troubled my it it spiritual life for stifle it some years I have sought
981. the flesh profiteth nothing. The words life.' I have spoken to you are the spirit a
982. see that spirit, grace, it bestows and life, inasmuch as in partaking of for He abi
983. is own, worthy by of inheriting eternal life ? Paul says that whosoever shall eat of
984. Flemming ! you are wresting the word ! God to your own ruin if I fear that you are
985. ed countenance with a look of ineffable love and pity. sions to " Oh, what delufor c
986. ns to " Oh, what delufor come to such a soul ! Husband, send Father Bay." " Father t
987. s and gave me no comfort or light. Only God I look for Himself can aid me. Him to s
988. s how earnestly I seek Him slay me, yet will I trust ; and though He He me Him. I ca
989. believe' for all that, and I know that God will suffer me off to perish through ig
990. ieve' for all that, and I know that God will suffer me off to perish through ignoran
991. they are too narrow for the needs of my soul." !" " But, father, consider cried Mrs.
992. ider 155 how you are looked young it as one strong in up to by old and the faith, a
993. and the faith, and what a hurt falling will be to souls to see you away from it wil
994. ill be to souls to see you away from it will pure and simple Gospel doctrines, to ru
995. ld true-blooded it think of the hurt it will be to your and the disgrace dear will b
996. t will be to your and the disgrace dear will bring upon your family — Oh, me ! I n
997. the disgrace dear will bring upon your family — Oh, me ! I never heard of such a dr
998. er heard of such a dreadful thing in my life. And the girls if —I'm sure off their
999. irls if —I'm sure off their prospects will be ruined you go and backslide in this
1000. elder, kindly and gravely, "I must not labor for the meat that perisheth, but life.
1001. labor for the meat that perisheth, but life. for the bread of eternal I will abide
1002.h, but life. for the bread of eternal I will abide in the to believe in promise of H
1003.commands me ; Him. I am groping for the truth, which must be somewhere on God's earth
1004.r the truth, which must be somewhere on God's earth joice, if and if I find it by H
1005.ar me !" bewailed Mrs. Flemming, " what will that will righteous man, Father Eay, sa
1006.ewailed Mrs. Flemming, " what will that will righteous man, Father Eay, say ? What D
1007.emming, " what will that will righteous man, Father Eay, say ? What Deacon do? What
1008. Father Eay, say ? What Deacon do? What will John Wilde think? [ never ÂŁad such a s
1009. think? [ never ÂŁad such a shock in my life. Why, Elder !" she cried, growing irate
1010.FLEMMINGS. I'm glad to it does ; it's a good sign, Elder Flem- ining, it have someth
1011.INGS. I'm glad to it does ; it's a good sign, Elder Flem- ining, it have something p
1012.n, Elder Flem- ining, it have something pain your conscience; ' shows that you are n
1013.ere. a cold spot on my heart idola- the time, that wouldn't let it me forget even fo
1014. I have felt so. I wish had been in the good old times for him, with his crosses and
1015.would probably have got a " rise in the world," as they say out in Nebraska when a ma
1016.ld," as they say out in Nebraska when a man is hung. " Only see, now, how God has p
1017.hen a man is hung. " Only see, now, how God has punished us I was a for sheltering
1018.rish papists going about destroying the peace of christian families." Then to her Mrs
1019.y thought, and it seemed to them that a being driven. curtain had been suddenly rent
1020.ch, and taking his accustomed said: "We will have family worship "then he turned ; o
1021.king his accustomed said: "We will have family worship "then he turned ; over the leav
1022. mortal unrest after which, around him; soul, from the fulness of his own upon his b
1023.va bade him and * their mother a tender good night and went away. Psalm lxvi. Mrs. "
1024.k-room " and sat down to think, but his mind his was so tempest-tost that he could n
1025.epare the new terms of partner; the old one expiring ten days hence it all, would g
1026.at he could do to to his desk, out what virtue there was in algebra for a troubled min
1027.tue there was in algebra for a troubled mind. So thinking, he went and had in turnin
1028.in the sacrament when tute it ; can any one belive He promised to instithat He woul
1029.athing ." The to them the legacy of His love?* strong man's soul trembled as he read
1030.to them the legacy of His love?* strong man's soul trembled as he read "What was le
1031.m the legacy of His love?* strong man's soul trembled as he read "What was leaving t
1032. anew if ; he must see it all, and find other questions of his soul could be answered
1033.it all, and find other questions of his soul could be answered it ; by and forgettin
1034.ould be answered it ; by and forgetting time and rest, he stood at his desk leaning
1035. its con- so full and satisfying to his mind, until with a sudden upflirting of ligh
1036.e, burnt down to only, the socket, gave one flash of light and ex- pired, leaving f
1037.ness. Exterior darkness the lamp of his soul was alight, its shadows were fleeing be
1038. strong, strange power into the ways of truth, and his very blood pulsed with a stop.
1039.r wearire- ness, wondering what was the matter with her, membered, and put out her han
1040. with a look of such THE FLEMMINGS. 161 peace and joy and a smile of sncli perfect re
1041.ubts entirely silenced by a copy of the same work which she got from an ignorant Iri
1042.think making use of "Gropings after the Truth," by Dr. Hunt- ington. 162 THE FLEMMING
1043.of tone " This is a way for a Christian man ! to spend the night, sleeping in a cha
1044.d become is you " !" ; but that a small matter." Why, mother, I believe I have spent t
1045., and got so interested in ing. how the time was passreally don't know when I fell a
1046. diadems of kings. He deep drew a long, happiness ; full breath, an inspiration of it was
1047.ng." " Yes," she said, shortly; "it's a good day. I'm glad you found interest among
1048.lad you found interest among your books one that could you so much. I hope the soun
1049.o much. I hope the sound doctrine of it will bring things right. Better put out that
1050.you haven't forgot feel like the day to change slick —when you going to your room to
1051.ured air and left the room. " Clothe my soul, O Lord, in fresh garments this day," h
1052.," he whispered as the door closed. the man's soul, through the things looked falle
1053.whispered as the door closed. the man's soul, through the things looked fallen A gre
1054.hrough the things looked fallen A great peace filled medium felt of if which all more
1055.en so long of doctrine ; risen upon his life ; as —having page buffetted and tosse
1056. suddenly found safe port as he for his soul for had turned page of that book so pro
1057.ounder, and perpetuated through all its time by His power. assured him that ferent r
1058.gions ; His natural reason had long ago God for, cannot be the author of dif- being
1059.o God for, cannot be the author of dif- being the Eternal Truth, ; He cannot reveal c
1060.be the author of dif- being the Eternal Truth, ; He cannot reveal contradictory doctr
1061.veal contradictory doctrines at the and being same time the Eternal Wisdom and the Go
1062.ontradictory doctrines at the and being same time the Eternal Wisdom and the God of
1063.dictory doctrines at the and being same time the Eternal Wisdom and the God of Peace
1064. at the and being same time the Eternal Wisdom and the God of Peace, He cannot establi
1065.ng same time the Eternal Wisdom and the God of Peace, He cannot establish a kingdom
1066. time the Eternal Wisdom and the God of Peace, He cannot establish a kingdom divided
1067.ded against itself.* The result of this reasoning was, its that consequently to be worthy
1068. the Church of Christ must be doctrine, one in worship, itself One: one in and one
1069.ust be doctrine, one in worship, itself One: one in and one in government. This mar
1070.e doctrine, one in worship, itself One: one in and one in government. This mark of
1071. one in worship, itself One: one in and one in government. This mark of unity in th
1072. worship, itself One: one in and one in government. This mark of unity in the true Church,
1073.eason, was made his still more clear to mind from certain passages, which over and o
1074.ng of Himself in the char- acter of the good Shepherd, says : "I have other : sheep
1075.er of the good Shepherd, says : "I have other : sheep (the Gentiles), which are not o
1076.g, and they My voice and there shall be One Fold and One Shepall herd.* To the same
1077.y voice and there shall be One Fold and One Shepall herd.* To the same effect addre
1078. One Fold and One Shepall herd.* To the same effect addressing His heavenly Father,
1079.e says : "I pray for that shall believe art in Me, that they may be One, as thou Fa
1080.all believe art in Me, that they may be One, as thou Father in Thee."t Me, and I In
1081.ting the unity of the Church, writes We being : many, are One Body in Chkist, and eve
1082. unity of the Church, writes We being : many, are One Body in Chkist, and every one
1083.the Church, writes We being : many, are One Body in Chkist, and every one memThere
1084.many, are One Body in Chkist, and every one memThere bers one of another.^ is Again
1085. in Chkist, and every one memThere bers one of another.^ is Again, he declares ; on
1086.ne of another.^ is Again, he declares ; one Body, and one Spirit as you are called
1087.^ is Again, he declares ; one Body, and one Spirit as you are called in one hope of
1088.dy, and one Spirit as you are called in one hope of your calling: One Lord, One Fai
1089.are called in one hope of your calling: One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism.ll The set
1090. in one hope of your calling: One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism.ll The settled convi
1091.e of your calling: One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism.ll The settled convictions of "
1092.tled convictions of "Wolfret Flemming's mind, from a study of the Bible alone, had l
1093.there and ; must necessarily be a unity government ; of faith, doctrine, but he was withou
1094.ld satisfy the immortal cravings of his soul for truth and consolation, was to be fo
1095.y the immortal cravings of his soul for truth and consolation, was to be found, until
1096.FLEMMINGS. how greedily it drank in the knowledge of the Truth how gladly his eyes bright
1097.eedily it drank in the knowledge of the Truth how gladly his eyes brightened in the l
1098. in the light risen out of darkness how soul expanded ; ; ; how his his weary heart
1099.s glorious land he sought to ! Oh, what peace was know with a certainty, which it did
1100.tainty, which it did not once enter his mind to doubt,' that there was indeed a Divi
1101.th ; a Church —holy, apostolic, ; and universal ; a sheepfold having One Shepherd Chris
1102.c, ; and universal ; a sheepfold having One Shepherd Christ is a Creed acknowledgin
1103.is a Creed acknowledging and confessing one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism ; a Body o
1104. acknowledging and confessing one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism ; a Body of which th
1105.ing and confessing one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism ; a Body of which the head ; a
1106. which the head ; a great, holy, divine truth, containing and all covering truth ; a
1107.vine truth, containing and all covering truth ; a Church endowed with all the its God
1108.ides through all ; upon whose altars He time, offering Himself from the " rising of
1109.f the sun unto the going down of ;" the same, a perpetual sacrifice to the Father th
1110.he guest of His children; the "bread of life" which is a guerdon of everlasting salv
1111.It eat worthily of was all plain to the man's clear and logical : mind, and as he f
1112. plain to the man's clear and logical : mind, and as he finished the book he exclaim
1113.shed the book he exclaimed " If this is being a Eoman Catholic, then, my God, ; THE F
1114.his is being a Eoman Catholic, then, my God, ; THE FLEMMINGS. I 167 am one —heart
1115.then, my God, ; THE FLEMMINGS. I 167 am one —heart and soul. There is nothing lef
1116.HE FLEMMINGS. I 167 am one —heart and soul. There is nothing left If the Catholic
1117.is, or infidelity. gion be not the true one, then all religion is a lie. But it is
1118.ity. gion be not the true one, then all religion is a lie. But it is true. it I feel it
1119.rue. it I feel it ; in the depths of my soul, it stirring to new life my reason resp
1120.e depths of my soul, it stirring to new life my reason responds to it. my heart thri
1121.t. my heart thrills responsive to it My mind sub- mits to with gladness and freedom.
1122.cept because I believe in Jesus Christ. God in the Thou hast enlightened me while I
1123. enlightened me while I dwelt shadow of death Thou has led me thus far ! ; 1 see the
1124. afar off from still communion with the One Fold and lead in." me nearer, until I m
1125.xperi- ment, to ascertain their natural cause, and finally when almost worn sleepless
1126.rty, stolid indifference of the and the world to the great principles of science, hav
1127.nd the world to the great principles of science, have suddenly and in the most unexpect
1128. be applied to the ; grand march of the world's progress read of their exceeding and
1129.ied to the ; grand march of the world's progress read of their exceeding and exultant yo
1130.eding and exultant you have joy, of the sense of triumph and delight which almost kil
1131.FLEMMINGS. than nought, to the profound peace and content which flowed in and pervade
1132. which flowed in and pervaded the whole being of the man who sat there in his little
1133. in and pervaded the whole being of the man who sat there in his little workshop re
1134.inding, as he read, the solution of his soul's great problem. Just before the day da
1135.When Elder Flemming came into glorified family room, brightened by the cheerful noisy
1136.ife had for the last thirty been in the habit of placing them years ; there was his t
1137.oment all a certain assurance that this change would involve perhaps turn this domesti
1138.ould involve perhaps turn this domestic peace into gloom, and disperse forever the ea
1139.gloom, and disperse forever the earthly happiness of his household. He could THE JFLEMMIN
1140.y crucial is seeing that the kingdom of God not of this for world, and he that ente
1141.that the kingdom of God not of this for world, and he that enters and conflict. must
1142.be prepared sacrifice It is only when a soul enters into the true Church that real s
1143.that real sacrifice is made. To go from one denomination tainly involves or from on
1144.ne denomination tainly involves or from one communo nion to another scarcely excite
1145.ely excites remark, and cer- no radical change ; of opinion, revolution in faith it is
1146.remark, and cer- no radical change ; of opinion, revolution in faith it is looked upon
1147.nd cer- no radical change ; of opinion, revolution in faith it is looked upon by Protestan
1148.ise of freedom of conscience but when a man comes out from among them to become a C
1149.n, warfare, and sacrifice his ; ; whole being, intellectual and its spiritual, slough
1150. its spiritual, sloughs off its old all life, its old association of ideas, will, er
1151.all life, its old association of ideas, will, errors and arrogance of and submits wi
1152.ame, worldly considerations, honors, or family ties, riches, human respect in any this
1153.es, human respect in any this faith ; : form can compromise the integrity of if they
1154.ed or he must, pel, turn like the young man spoken of in the Gos- back and go sorro
1155. sorrowful away. To become a Catholic a man must be prepared to sacrifice not only
1156.conclu- sively that the kingdom of this world, with is its human rate earth, inventio
1157. came in with their pleasant smiles and good morning kiss, and, shortly after, ; Mrs
1158.de her, seated —he close upon a lower one. Mrs. Flemming said nothing but her sou
1159.one. Mrs. Flemming said nothing but her soul had been sorely exercised. " Suppose,"
1160.least twenty times, " he should give up family prayer ? Perhaps he feel ; will. But I
1161.ve up family prayer ? Perhaps he feel ; will. But I for will go in, and seem to no d
1162.yer ? Perhaps he feel ; will. But I for will go in, and seem to no difference. it is
1163.. it is Come, Kuby," she had said aloud family worship. " come, time Don't keep father
1164. had said aloud family worship. " come, time Don't keep father waiting." Her mind wa
1165.e, time Don't keep father waiting." Her mind was soon placed at ease by seeing her h
1166.d as he were in the very it presence of God. " No doubt," she thought, " ;" was the
1167. night and she thanked he had sat up it God, without knowing all it, for what, that
1168. right hand and signed himself with the sign of the cross in the . name of the adora
1169.ss is the stand- ard of Christ, and the sign of our belief in Him, to use in it in t
1170.his way to help me at all times to bear mind His death and passion," replied the Eld
1171.o help me at all times to bear mind His death and passion," replied the Elder, his gr
1172.MINGS. But that is popery. It is like : being a papist — a am a papist, my Roman Ca
1173.pist, my Roman Catholic." " I " wife in other words, I am Lord have mercy on me ; !"
1174.rward and caught her in She had fainted life. —the first second time in time was w
1175.e had fainted life. —the first second time in time was when her healthy, happy The
1176.inted life. —the first second time in time was when her healthy, happy The the dyi
1177.rence, the anti- thesis of all that was good and pure, lifted religiously little and
1178.little and- morally. The Elder the limp form very tenderly in his strong arms and la
1179.their mother, always so full of strong, life, cheerful so unselfish in her ceaseless
1180.LEMMINGS. their comfort 173 in such and happiness, stricken down a way. " Mother," said F
1181.ttle reasonable talk together over this matter. "When you come to know what good cause
1182.his matter. "When you come to know what good cause no longer blame " I I have to cha
1183.atter. "When you come to know what good cause no longer blame " I I have to change, y
1184.ood cause no longer blame " I I have to change, you will me or be unhappy about ! it."
1185. longer blame " I I have to change, you will me or be unhappy about ! it." would rat
1186.t I am prepared to sacrifice everything life itself on the face of the earth —yea,
1187.little ; There was but talk, every fin- one being full of his own thoughts the Elde
1188.le ; There was but talk, every fin- one being full of his own thoughts the Elder ishe
1189.gain signed himself reverently with the sign of the Cross, gave thanks, and left 174
1190.t an idle bone in their bodies, and was one of the principles of their life to put
1191. and was one of the principles of their life to put all ; duty before the so their d
1192.e principles of their life to put all ; duty before the so their domestic affairs re
1193.ir domestic affairs received attention, same scrupulous its and everything was arran
1194.atches no loving lit- romp with each It other, flitting here and there like sunbeams
1195.How did it happen ? And they asked each other over their sewing. how did it happen ?"
1196.what had come of it." " Father is not a man to plunge recklessly into THE FLEMMINGS
1197.pe ; " even if he should, he is not the one to stand by them just for the sake of m
1198.. Flemming. " If father has changed his religion, it depend upon he has good reasons for
1199.ged his religion, it depend upon he has good reasons for doing so," said Eva : " and
1200.ng so," said Eva : " and I hope that he will explain it all to us, for it must be a
1201. I don't know that father is much about religion I only know a good and just man, who ha
1202.er is much about religion I only know a good and just man, who has served God withou
1203.ut religion I only know a good and just man, who has served God without guile ever
1204.now a good and just man, who has served God without guile ever since I can remember
1205. aspiration, whenever I have thought of being religious, was to be like him," replied
1206.ight be part of the so far," said Hope. change, " I believe with him I," quietly And a
1207. it I believe as He said meant it. "How many Eva ?" pounds of butter did you churn,
1208.f course." Then they ; to talking about other domestic matters Elder, before and at d
1209.tic matters Elder, before and at dinner time the and after meat, made the si^n of th
1210.y miserable. all " After these years of peace, happiness, and family visited with suc
1211.able. all " After these years of peace, happiness, and family visited with such a trial !
1212.er these years of peace, happiness, and family visited with such a trial !" harmony, t
1213.not yet extinct —against the Catholic religion, who one's self an open disbe- can unde
1214.t —against the Catholic religion, who one's self an open disbe- can understand th
1215.ve been half as scandalous, or oanned a man more completely than for him to It Proc
1216.e days. lot was in reality the Catholic religion which these people, who served God earn
1217.religion which these people, who served God earnestly according to their lights, we
1218.uch, to suit their own purposes, taking good care that they should not be undeceived
1219. should not be undeceived. The Catholic religion, as it is, was as sealed a book to them
1220.come within reason ; human " above that being a dead letter, about which she gave her
1221.refathers for her pilgrims was not only good Besides it enough, but the best for her
1222.ut the best for her." was a comfortable religion, which gave one great liberty of action
1223. was a comfortable religion, which gave one great liberty of action in the sharp al
1224.fortable religion, which gave one great liberty of action in the sharp all commerce of
1225. of action in the sharp all commerce of life, provided things were done in a decorou
1226.was not too exacting in its demands for God for while they claimed certain portions
1227.nfettered ; by any higher that troubled life law than the law their conscience of th
1228.ered ; by any higher that troubled life law than the law their conscience of the la
1229. higher that troubled life law than the law their conscience of the land and all gr
1230.was — and it it was the best and only one faith she knew of outlines of —Mrs. F
1231.the meagre ; what she called her it was good for the enough for her, had been good e
1232.s good for the enough for her, had been good enough ancestral of Flemmings and the a
1233.ithful to their calling, stern in their opposition to everything that even savored of Pope
1234.ed of Popery, and fore- handed with the world. been happy together She and her husban
1235.ttle woman had said only left ' a short time back, " There was truly nothing for ful
1236.t of the fiery threatened him, body and soul, with utter ruin. That night they were
1237.t faithfully like her but Eeuben was in one of the dreamiest of his dreamy moods he
1238.evellings. flame, his fancy last At had many high Mrs. Flemming said : "I should thi
1239., to read portions of " Yes, to you you will listen." you can read what you like. Th
1240. no book belonging to this house, thank God, that can't 180 THE FLEMMINGS. Cliristi
1241.hat can't 180 THE FLEMMINGS. Cliristian family. be read to a " Is there anything it ab
1242.ast night." Mrs. Flemming, thinking was one of the old volumes from their own book-
1243.nd repeated declarations concerning the nature of the sacrament which He promised them
1244. New Testament, which shall be shed for many sins.' unto the remission of we always
1245.and wine we are to partake of the bread memory of His sufferings and death." it," "He
1246. the bread memory of His sufferings and death." it," "He does not say that, or mean r
1247.ration of Him, or inti- mate that was a symbol His passion and death. He said, This is
1248. mate that was a symbol His passion and death. He said, This is He gave them that whi
1249. which shall be shed for sion of sins.' many unto the remis- How can we disbelieve t
1250. and explicit declaration of the Son of God, without ac- cusing Him not only of pre
1251.aught. It was a solemn moment; it was a time fraught with the ransom consummation ha
1252.summation hands of the salvation of the world, for all time He was to pay for the and
1253. of the salvation of the world, for all time He was to pay for the and He was giving
1254.all who partook worthily of everlasting life. an assurance ing in Can we —believfo
1255. Can we —believfor Him as the Eternal Truth —imagine one instant that on this sol
1256.for Him as the Eternal Truth —imagine one instant that on this solemn occasion, a
1257.ouldn't believe such a doctrine to save life," my said Mrs. Flemming excitedly, " no
1258.ve this than to believe that the of Son God assumed the flesh and nature of did ?"
1259.at the of Son God assumed the flesh and nature of did ?" of man for our salvation, as
1260.sumed the flesh and nature of did ?" of man for our salvation, as He " No. Of the g
1261. Mary words of the Incarnation, yet how many doubt of her Son, ! whom they profess t
1262.hom they profess to believe the Eternal Truth Strange inconsistency of man !" : THE F
1263. Eternal Truth Strange inconsistency of man !" : THE FLEMMINGS. " 183 Did you say t
1264.how you'll relish ' it. Martin Luther,* one of his epistles on the subject in quest
1265.how much throw I have labored in my own mind ' to over- this doctrine of the let Bea
1266.s purpose.' Hence he contined, till his death, to con- demn shafts those Protestants
1267.ther the rallying cry of the Protestant world. They re- gard him as the apostle of th
1268.ther set up the tribunal of his private judgment on the sense of the Scriptures, in oppo
1269.tribunal of his private judgment on the sense of the Scriptures, in opposition to the
1270.ment on the sense of the Scriptures, in opposition to the authority of the Church, ancient
1271., than his disciples, proceeding on his principle, undertook to prove from plain texts of
1272.ched against him and still against each other, with the utmost virulence, w each of t
1273.rine and conduct on the written word of God alone. ; In in : vain did Luther claim
1274.gan the Reformation in Switzerland some time after Luther began it in the latter cal
1275.ed of his sal- A disciple of Luther, in quality of the just, maintained that the proper
1276.ll say, they ran shall changes) at your death, these passages of Scripture, and when
1277.how you withstand hell.'' 35 ' Him ? He will plunge you headlong into In vain did he
1278.threaten to return back to the Catholic religion : ' If you continue,' he says, ' in the
1279.,' he says, ' in these measures of your will recant common I say.'t deliberations, I
1280. I have written or and for leave you. ' Mind what All in vain he had put the Bible i
1281. in vain he had put the Bible into each man's hand to exit plain for himself.' This
1282.a book against the Ileal Presence, when one wishes the other : to see break his nec
1283.the Ileal Presence, when one wishes the other : to see break his neck, and the other
1284. other : to see break his neck, and the other retorts thee broken ' May 1 on the whee
1285.sy, p. 36. ; 186 THE FLEMMINGS. showing one the way, as one making the crookfed pat
1286. THE FLEMMINGS. showing one the way, as one making the crookfed paths straight, was
1287.ing, I know that you are a hard- headed man, and that once you have made up your mi
1288.an, and that once you have made up your mind to a thing there's ; no power on earth
1289.ing there's ; no power on earth can so, change you I've no hope to do but I tell you y
1290. you've broken my heart and ruined your family All I ask of mark my words is to —you
1291. wife. " Neither, I hope, you give this matter a cool, intelligent investiga- tion, ea
1292.have counted the cost and it made up my mind —made up fully. It would be THE FLEMM
1293.l profit to 187 if me to gain the whole world I lose my own soul," said Wolfert Flemm
1294.e to gain the whole world I lose my own soul," said Wolfert Flemming emphatically. ;
1295.d you "According to the serve lose your soul ?" she asked you have always been a goo
1296.oul ?" she asked you have always been a good man, serving God." light I had, felt fo
1297." she asked you have always been a good man, serving God." light I had, felt for mo
1298.ou have always been a good man, serving God." light I had, felt for mother, I tried
1299.ight I had, felt for mother, I tried to God ; but I have years past that there ; wa
1300. and now that I have discovered a true, soul-satisfying faith, one which every facul
1301.scovered a true, soul-satisfying faith, one which every faculty of to as divine and
1302.f to as divine and necessary it, for my mind responds my salvation, I shall all if â
1303. is the way for me, and climb up by any other I should be like a thief and a robber,
1304.er," said Eva, " should be glad to of a religion all know something and sublime that for
1305. "And " I too, father," said Hope. like truth." "All that I have heard sounds To save
1306." "All that I have heard sounds To save time," replied the Elder, while his eyes bri
1307. his daughters turned with it confiding love towards him, " I will read aloud as eve
1308.with it confiding love towards him, " I will read aloud as every night to you. Then
1309.can talk it over replied we read" "That will be much better," Hope. ; 188 THE FLEMMI
1310. indeed. I shall have everything ready, will all be fixed by Monday night shall some
1311.Mrs, Flemming to herself. things in the world, to come into this houselike to hold !
1312.his houselike to hold ! I do believe it will kill me." Hope and Eeuben went at to me
1313.ndian She almost wished that the her to death, to have trial. woman had choked Ray mi
1314.was again absent, his heart misgave him man had it he sure that the at length yield
1315.e old He was staid going to give ; They man, he meant that them His own body and no
1316.tood that their Lord spoke a figurative sense ; but no ! and con- ceit of their heart
1317.first ten thousand times worse than his state of sin." THE FLEMMINGS. 191 The old man
1318. thousand times worse than his state of sin." THE FLEMMINGS. 191 The old man's utte
1319.ate of sin." THE FLEMMINGS. 191 The old man's utterances were full of blended ire f
1320.ole But, drift of his meaning. when the time came, she went up with the rest to rece
1321.the New it ment which shall be shed for many unto the remis- sion of sins," her impu
1322.that was left over, after the rite, was being given to the sexton's wife to make toas
1323.nk that symbolized and commemorated the death of the Saviour, she drank a few drops,
1324.aying as she could, consistent with the truth, yet to give enough them " to understan
1325.; Elder Flemming was not is she said to one is is " he in excellent health." " He h
1326.neathen, she replied " He not here, be- cause he has changed his opinion on some doct
1327. not here, be- cause he has changed his opinion on some doctrinal points which he think
1328.uavered, and she had nearly broke down, soul but the brave, loving that to little wa
1329.ing that to little was determined —no matter what might at liberty to say her husban
1330.s determined —no matter what might at liberty to say her husband — they should find
1331.ve Before they were out of sight, every man, woman, and child there knew that Elder
1332.e CHAPTER XIV. SACRIFICE. I was sitting one built summer evening in a pavilion upon
1333. sang, or seemed to sing, in ecstasy of peace, gaz- ing out the while at the rose-tin
1334. the noisy turbulent ocean was like the peace that had its abode in the soul of Wolfe
1335.ike the peace that had its abode in the soul of Wolfert Flemming. Disturbing element
1336.im, and there were moments when his own nature beat like great waves against his soul,
1337.ature beat like great waves against his soul, and his out-look in the future seemed
1338.5 singer, brooding in the depths of his soul, never ceased peace, hymns of he could
1339.in the depths of his soul, never ceased peace, hymns of he could not hear them, but w
1340.hem, but when the dismnrmuring blissful life cords of and nature ceased, they thrill
1341.dismnrmuring blissful life cords of and nature ceased, they thrilled through every ave
1342.ey thrilled through every avenue of his being, consoling him with the sublime conscio
1343. eternal Bock of Ages. And in this deep peace, he learned to " possess his soul in pa
1344.deep peace, he learned to " possess his soul in patience," knowing that how- ever te
1345. the trial which his wife's distress of mind on account of his change of it faith ca
1346.fe's distress of mind on account of his change of it faith caused him— and was not a
1347.faith caused him— and was not a light one —he thought that nothing could pain o
1348.ht one —he thought that nothing could pain or disturb him to the same degree, but
1349.othing could pain or disturb him to the same degree, but to he was mistaken. Old Fat
1350.Father Ray came down see him, losing no time. He came on Monday morning, and with a
1351.ope, "and I wish to see him alone." " I will go and fetch my father directly. He w o
1352.ked in quaver- ing tones. " There is no change in me. I am satisfied with ; pure gospe
1353.stiffly then a came surging through her mind, of anguish, she ! and with a low cry F
1354.y ! sobbed me. : " Oh, Father Eay !" it will kill My hus- band has turned papist The
1355. My hus- band has turned papist The old man was *' startled and nearly frightened o
1356.as *' startled and nearly frightened of emotion, by such an unexpected outburst she had
1357. the room before he entered it. No ming one was present at this interview. lea his
1358.h this of the utter futility of arguing man who assured all, —had —grave, calm
1359., calm and above all scripture, reason, history, and, faith, with which to rebut and cr
1360. and crush out ; that he could say this man whose sense of reli- gion was so pure,
1361. out ; that he could say this man whose sense of reli- gion was so pure, whose moral
1362. of reli- gion was so pure, whose moral nature was so grand, whose conscience was so u
1363.to his darkened and idolatries." narrow mind were " damnable Baffled and wounded —
1364.and swalhappiness of his that above all life, lowed the last earthly tie destroy- in
1365.d the last earthly tie destroy- ing the one mortal others he had held most dear for
1366.mortal others he had held most dear for time and eternity. " That's what's come of i
1367.hers he had held most dear for time and eternity. " That's what's come of it all," said
1368.st breathless on the spot where the old man had parted from him, then turned to com
1369.re before then she knew that he had had life a fierce struggle in his inner powers o
1370.d he heard the sweet whispers faith and peace. He did not refer to his stormy intervi
1371.en won't come see ; he does " I hope he will," answered Hope. " I don't see why he s
1372.don't see why he shouldn't. My father's change of religion can't affect the business i
1373.why he shouldn't. My father's change of religion can't affect the business in which they
1374.h they've been enI think it gaged in so many years. will be a most unreasonable thin
1375.en enI think it gaged in so many years. will be a most unreasonable thing in the Dea
1376.ben !" asked Mrs. Flemming, sharply, to change the conversation, for every ref- erence
1377. for every ref- erence to her husband's change of faith was like a stab. " Where can t
1378. " I have not seen Ruby since breakfast time. ; I hope he is not going to have a sic
1379.ving room and sat down to think not the time." — Reuben and trial his feeble, usel
1380.€” Reuben and trial his feeble, useless life, which gene- caused her much anxious co
1381.h had upon her, almost imagined to be a judgment from heaven to punish her for having be
1382.y. But Reuben could not be found of the family ; no one had uneasy about still seen hi
1383.n could not be found of the family ; no one had uneasy about still seen him since e
1384.im since early in the morning, and each one began to feel seriously him. Dinner tim
1385.one began to feel seriously him. Dinner time came and passed, and he did rot come. M
1386.sing Lis forehead. 1 But where in ! the world have you been, !" Reuben ? said Mrs. Do
1387. by idiosyncrasies which made the boy's life a perpetual mystery to her. !" "You sho
1388.d I never did see the like of you in my life exclaimed Mrs. Flemming. " Gold, I gues
1389.E FLEMMINGS. this your vagaries, listen one beats. Soft stone ! But now to what I h
1390.tone ! But now to what I have to say. I will sinful have no waste of more such time.
1391. will sinful have no waste of more such time. shiftless doings, and You ; can't work
1392. the dairy, and how Indeed you shall. I will posilife. tively put a stop to this aim
1393.. When you do to let me know may; be it will stuff the pillows with." Beuben and the
1394.n, sat looking thoughtfully at and like one speaking in her sleep, said : " It is e
1395.gifted, half helpless, and best beloved one asleep, of her children. Reuben was not
1396.rry to them with supper." row " for the time, the And forgetting her great sorlittle
1397.ld first portrait ?" said " This is the time I ever heard the proud-looking old lady
1398.e nobility on earth could make a nobler man than my Eva. " I'm prouder of him than
1399.ered to havo heard her father tell some one, years before, that So I," said " am Ho
1400.isinherited her only child for marrying one ; and that the picture had not been kep
1401. not been kept out of reverence for her memory, but because it was painted by Hans Hol
1402.nd con- sidered to be a master piece of art, besides which the picture itself was r
1403. " Ruby is the living image of her. for being a little little mother has good reason
1404.r. for being a little little mother has good reason It spiteful. seems a like retrib
1405. " Milner's End of Controversy " to his family. Hope and Eva, with closer to him, thei
1406.oom to bathe his feet and go to bed, he being feverish after his day's tramp, and she
1407., and she did not return until pray ei- time. CHAPTER LETTERS. XV. It did not take l
1408. is THE FLEMMINGS. not a pleasant word, being a term of reproac always used by our se
1409.aning to dread that they and despise in religion nor could they have comprehended the wo
1410.y, ; have saved their lives hence these good people thought that their Elder had giv
1411.eir Elder had given himself up body and soul to certain destruction. There had never
1412.e little who had always secretly envied man ; his good fame, which set him by conse
1413.ho had always secretly envied man ; his good fame, which set him by consent above th
1414.eless character, i and could not bear j idea of severing their intercourse with him,
1415., they would feel bo^nd to do; while to many the event afforded a new and highly spi
1416.J; it. of that day against the Catholic religion, can imagine it more r vividly than *my
1417.tely connected with Deacon Sneathen was one tidings. of the first to hear the He wa
1418. ask Father ment about the partnership, state c( Kay confidential questions in relati
1419. state c( Kay confidential questions in relation to the erratic nind the Elder seemed to
1420. that it him all about in pretty strong language* \, But the Deacon, never remarkably qu
1421.S. head oi surgical operation to get an idea in the certain people," and Deacon Snea
1422.ertain people," and Deacon Sneathen was one : of that unfortunate class, with this
1423.te class, with this difference when the idea did get into his head, it took full pos
1424. sion of him, to the exclusion of every other, and be- came the motive power stood it
1425.me the motive power stood it all of his being. He under- now. His old friend and form
1426. in business, the expected to looked up man whose son his only daughter marry, the
1427. whose son his only daughter marry, the man whom he had always and likened in his t
1428.e had always and likened in his to, own mind to one of the apostles, had gone and tu
1429.ways and likened in his to, own mind to one of the apostles, had gone and turned Pa
1430.tcoat pocket, r his mouth, and with his courage renew ed " like an eagle's," he sat dow
1431.illing to renoo the pardnership. If you will give up poppery and be what you was bef
1432.hich you must let me know. But if not I will take into% pardnership a Bosting man wi
1433.I will take into% pardnership a Bosting man with a big capitol, that will put up St
1434. a Bosting man with a big capitol, that will put up Steam Sawmills at the Pines, and
1435.ft in prayer, for which latter the Lord will prosper the bisness. Your obedient serv
1436.syntax, and prosody, did not intentions will not fall a hair-breadth short of his it
1437.o display his epistolary talent to some one, he unlocked his door, and went down si
1438. making doughnuts, for the stomach, and other comforting things after telling and the
1439.hair, her chin in the air and her whole being thrilled with a delightful excitement,
1440.ll that she could say. For once speech. life she was bereft of volubility of of Huld
1441.and write a letter like that, to such a man if as Elder Flemming, and throw he's hi
1442. it is, if up and whatever to a I think will let it must be better than your religio
1443.nk will let it must be better than your religion, which you go and do such a thing too."
1444. which you go and do such a thing too." good man, and your old friend " I'll box you
1445.h you go and do such a thing too." good man, and your old friend " I'll box your wo
1446.l, and all the ! 212 THE FLEMMINGS. all other battles that you over, training clays m
1447. Day, were iought for, if it wa'n't for liberty of conscience, to keep people from bein
1448.erty of conscience, to keep people from being hung and quartered, they happen not to
1449.usiness, nor in have no Papist in my my family either; do you hear that?" he exclaimed
1450.antly. " I hear you ; but that does not change my opinion you ivill in the least. And
1451. hear you ; but that does not change my opinion you ivill in the least. And if you don'
1452.least. And if you don't take care, have one in your family more than you count on."
1453.f you don't take care, have one in your family more than you count on." "Huldy Sneathe
1454." " If the bears ever eat me, aunty, it will be when they come after you and get sca
1455.13 I am sorry I spoke ; you — if that will do any good but don't send it." " Don't
1456.y I spoke ; you — if that will do any good but don't send it." " Don't meddle with
1457.f goods ; and I reckon Miss Debby. " It will wasn't for Nick Flemming you wouldn't b
1458.ded, and the color both unreaI shall go will let came back cheeks and in hues of bri
1459.y the spirit but strength to put took a good her threat into execution, she long sta
1460. to you, Huldy Sueatlien tlien held her peace. all like Hulclah did not behave at a m
1461.reatening her aunt as she did ; but her nature had been engaged, ever since she could
1462.ed, ever since she could remember, in a life-long conflict with an injudicious train
1463.y on her side in this instance, she had justice. Particularly im- proper to the — if
1464.letter informing me of your decision in relation to The the partnership hitherto existin
1465.him. In fact, he don't Wal I've done my duty." ! 216 THE FLEMMINGS. far Flemming's r
1466.y." ! 216 THE FLEMMINGS. far Flemming's religion was too above all sordid- ness to be dr
1467.all. Then he wrote another letter, this one to Patrick McCue, in which he told him
1468.cCue, in which he told him of the great change wrought in his religious sentiments by
1469.results to him, and asked him to select other Catholic books, doctrinal and devotiona
1470.e risk and asking the blessing Almighty God on his intention, he rode over to "VVie
1471.lemming, let- who had never ters in his life, received more than one or two day ; to
1472.er ters in his life, received more than one or two day ; to get three in one one fr
1473.e than one or two day ; to get three in one one from his father, which alone to thi
1474.an one or two day ; to get three in one one from his father, which alone to think o
1475. have given him enough months to come ; one from his Deacon Sneathen, telling him t
1476.had not been for the and the and meant, being nothing less than the his best earthly
1477.ote, " that or together. " to You know, mind I it is no use father Aunt Deb. either.
1478.ans. Not all the George Merrills in the world, if every one of them wore a crown, and
1479. George Merrills in the world, if every one of them wore a crown, and had Alladeen'
1480.deen's lamp to boot, could induce me to change ! 218 THE FLEMMINGS. mind. I don't care
1481.nduce me to change ! 218 THE FLEMMINGS. mind. I don't care a snap off, ; my and if y
1482.nt. he, " is trouble in a heap. all his life ex- " Here," thought My father, of all
1483. thought My father, of all men in ; the world, to go and turn Catholic the business b
1484.ttle of fish for a little whom ! girl A man to jump into. I wonder if I am awake ?
1485.for how takes it? that. She hasn't much love Papist —I know But his my father's ri
1486.now But his my father's right to do own soul but, by George it's mighty inconvenient
1487. know that he must have had weighty and good reasons for what he has * * * Whew !" T
1488. Then Nicholas Flemdone ming doubled up one fist, and holding the Deacon's letter i
1489. the Deacon's letter in the palm of his other hand he pounded it, what he pleases abo
1490. he has been in communion, to join some other Protestant it sect holding different do
1491.ry for him to present a "certificate of good membership" from and however loth his f
1492.hey look upon as a simple exer- cise of liberty of conscience, and which they conof sid
1493. conscience, and which they conof sider one of the most sacred prerogatives a free-
1494.acred prerogatives a free-born American citizen. He suffers neither in reputation or es
1495.nists. But the case is different when a man becomes a convert to the Catholic faith
1496. this broad free land of ours —where "liberty of conscience" is the political boast o
1497.e of the pulpit— anathema. For when a man becomes a Catholic he enters not only i
1498.0 entirely THE FLEMMINGS. new spiritual life, but must be prepared for ties the pain
1499.red for ties the painful rending of old one pleasant. many which made the He begins
1500.he painful rending of old one pleasant. many which made the He begins a warfare of g
1501.he He begins a warfare of grace against nature. It is a religion it is which accepts n
1502.arfare of grace against nature. It is a religion it is which accepts no ; compromise, be
1503.ompromise, because divine a faith which will, must reign supreme intellect, in the s
1504.l, must reign supreme intellect, in the soul, and over the and being of its children
1505.ntellect, in the soul, and over the and being of its children it, —which being in h
1506. and being of its children it, —which being in holy. sweet subjection to become ele
1507.t meaning, which can be explained in no other way than that the kingdom of Christ upo
1508.rth, which is the Holy Catholic Church, being not all of this world, the thousand con
1509. Catholic Church, being not all of this world, the thousand contradictory sects whose
1510.ventions — and, consequently conflict world ; — are engaged in perpetual against
1511.earning "Why and said is it that when a man eminent it is talents becomes a Catholi
1512.hort of actual atheism." less repute Of other converts going over to they declare the
1513.and their Rome was for wider license to sin, for ;" which they could get ablution b
1514. of employment and turned army which is one of the distinctive marks of the true Ch
1515.d : army " is of the suffering poor, of will whom our Lord The poor ye no surer and
1516.lways have with you." There test of the truth of the Catholic religion than this undy
1517.There test of the truth of the Catholic religion than this undying, ceaseless persecutio
1518.ves in it its warfare with the faithful soul, enabling to exclaim : in the ; end " I
1519.laim : in the ; end " I have fought the good fight" then to go covered with the glor
1520.conflict to receive its eternal reward. Many " err through the accident of their bir
1521.dings; some sincerely believing they do God a service" when they persecute His peo-
1522.rike blindly against a divine faith and truth, and which not even ! the " gates of he
1523.g all into deep waters standing ; but a peace passing inner life human under- filled
1524.rs standing ; but a peace passing inner life human under- filled his and gave him co
1525.fe human under- filled his and gave him courage* There was a The out-look was not cheer
1526.ouse, in erecting a. new stone barn and other outhouses, and in enriching and fencing
1527.hope to this serious accom- In addition cause for anxiety, the light there was his wi
1528.feverish excitement, he of drooping, at other times glowing and brilliant with was an
1529.tiny into the case resulted in the sage opinion that " he must be let alone. He was too
1530.o could not decide whether the case was one of inertia, or, what was worse, softeni
1531.rtia, or, what was worse, softening his liberty, of the brain." all Ruby had which abov
1532.t making a mystery her heart to her un- happiness, and she wondered with a dull ache at i
1533.n in the light young and to bear, happy life was no words burden for him and they co
1534. not."* Altogether the situation of the family at the Old Homestead was grave. ; But W
1535.nted the cost and come weal or woe, the peace of his soul was undisturbed, his faith
1536. and come weal or woe, the peace of his soul was undisturbed, his faith unshaken. "
1537.y missed her presence, but deplored the cause; even the great tortoiseshell cat, feet
1538.hich was wont to sleep curled up at her one night mounted quietly into sat, seemed
1539.isode occurred every night, and like no one disturbed Griselda, who, her famous nam
1540.y heard that the Catholic faith was the one, only true, and holy apostolic faith, e
1541.upon Convinced of the divine origin and truth of its the Church, a belief in dogmas n
1542.ey could first believe otherwise —and God experienced for the is time in their li
1543.rwise —and God experienced for the is time in their lives all that grace supernatu
1544.natural, and above ; worldly reason and philosophy are not to be that the high mysteries o
1545.believed it, and if would have suffered death rather than deny faith in it. They had
1546. rather than deny faith in it. They had many talks together over their sewing in the
1547.tion, which in itself affords a certain pleasure to intelligent minds, but the dawn and
1548.ent minds, but the dawn and awaksupreme will ing of a spiritual life which already i
1549.and awaksupreme will ing of a spiritual life which already inspired them to place th
1550.ch already inspired them to place their will in subjection to the and service of God
1551.ill in subjection to the and service of God. And Eva daily meditated on the picture
1552.MINGS. 227 and tenderest motive of lier soul, the model by of Jesus which she was in
1553. interiorly striving to fashion her own life. She was the sinless Mother ; through H
1554.eternal woe as Eve. She suffered in her soul all that her Son suffered in His body,
1555.old Missis- room was not an ideal and " Peace" or " Charity," but an image of the hol
1556.her spirit, and ask with timid yearning love the intercession of the Mother of Jesus
1557.s. After 228 a to little THE FLEMMINGS. time tlie family got to know wliere for be f
1558.28 a to little THE FLEMMINGS. time tlie family got to know wliere for be found when sh
1559. her, of content and sat there full and peace, thinking and thinking all sweet Virgin
1560.st sight of. earthly things were there. One day her mother Mrs. Flemming stood on t
1561. the statue. " It represents the Mother life of Jesus ; and I was thinking of her ho
1562.ate them." " She was no better than any other converted woman. I don't deny that she
1563.paying her honors which are due only to God, *This was said to me by an intellige t
1564.pel so " sitting under the teachings of many years," in her grave, sweet way, is it
1565.h her father's, " idolatry for me Is to love you, to think of you, to desire to rese
1566. me Is to love you, to think of you, to desire to resemble you, and to ask the aid of
1567.creature the worship which is it due to God sick, to do this?" It " It is a differe
1568.ent thing entirely. makes me such false reasoning," she replied, nervously. if it is " De
1569.ar mother, not idolatry for it is me to love you and try try for sinless to imitate
1570. imitate your virtues, not idola- me to love the Mother of Jesus who was life and ho
1571. me to love the Mother of Jesus who was life and holy, and try to model my poor on h
1572. of it ; it would all take a miracle to change my opinions about these new-fangled sup
1573.on the weeping in the bitterness of her soul and wondering no longer that the Jews,
1574.ering no longer that the Jews, in their time of affliction, used to put ashes upon t
1575., to which, until the perversion of her family, she had been a stranger. "Eva," said h
1576.other tells me that you spend much your time in old Missisquoi's room. Be careful, f
1577.e has been a leak in the roof this long time which should have been mended." "Is the
1578.it is not very perceptible ; however, I will see to used. is I am glad the room is A
1579.canny !" that in a house, he said, with one of his old pleasant smiles. Then came a
1580.iding. him he would not have sought His family wished ; to spare himself the humiliati
1581.ctation and that at the last curiosity, many of them hoping to moment he would had f
1582. that was in him," which carried to the mind of each one present the conviction that
1583.him," which carried to the mind of each one present the conviction that the man was
1584.ach one present the conviction that the man was speaking the " words of truth and s
1585.hat the man was speaking the " words of truth and soberness." He went over the whole
1586.mple of his religious expe- and graphic language how his doubts were first awakened by o
1587. various sects composing the Protestant world still ; how he became in far still more
1588.simple terms, told them how at last his soul had found more rest, as " under the sha
1589.d to His heart kindled ; still them the truth inspired him with strange eloquence, an
1590.oquence, and, without a word that could pain or offend the bitterest Puritan there,
1591.fluency and pathos who listened to him. Many anger, were filled with wonder at the s
1592.his knees, as it were the well in which truth abode. Miss Debby " sat in the seat of
1593.re thought his father had made his case good and defended it ably ; heads proudly, E
1594.no fell from his Reuben, who had or the other in the interest one way spiritual distu
1595.n, who had or the other in the interest one way spiritual disturbance in the family
1596.st one way spiritual disturbance in the family, had slipped off directly after dinner
1597.d slipped off directly after dinner for one of his solitary rambles, and could not
1598.y felt at her noticing people of public opinion. who were actually under the ban But Hu
1599.stances, : in his broad palm and said " God bless you child." Then she stood chatti
1600.pe," said Huldah, old familiar tones. a Good-by all." Then she turned to Miss Debby,
1601. to Miss Debby, and in hearing of every one said : " I declare ! I thought the bear
1602.not a it. shadow crowned He ; was not a man given to building castles in Spain but
1603.them they would bear the impress of her good taste. He knew how good, THE ELEMMINGS.
1604. impress of her good taste. He knew how good, THE ELEMMINGS. without pretence, she w
1605. best room How could credit to his Hope good to admire them, ? and give taste It was
1606.d have thought fair, scarcely worthy of one so so good and beautiful. of the time T
1607.ught fair, scarcely worthy of one so so good and beautiful. of the time Then all lif
1608.of one so so good and beautiful. of the time Then all life, he went on dreaming when
1609.ood and beautiful. of the time Then all life, he went on dreaming when her home shou
1610.to rights once more. So we see that the man had ambition too was is in ; but it for
1611. capacity difference be- there ple, the mind of these quiet practical peo- who appar
1612.ful structures sprung into existence by virtue of rubbing the lamp they carry about, h
1613.eir aspirations. John Wilde was a happy man the day he caught sight of the old gabl
1614.t of all endowing her with these and if other of his worldly goods he had been master
1615.s worldly goods he had been master of a world he would have it thought worth nothing
1616.and it fell chill into the warm, loving nature the man. But he had enough sulking, to
1617. chill into the warm, loving nature the man. But he had enough sulking, to do outsi
1618. to live alone, and get used I had a to one another without anybody meddling. hard
1619. another without anybody meddling. hard time with kin, my ; mother-in-law and other
1620.ing. hard time with kin, my ; mother-in-law and other step- who came nigh breaking
1621.d time with kin, my ; mother-in-law and other step- who came nigh breaking my happine
1622.d other step- who came nigh breaking my happiness and and I determined then never to if h
1623. could help it ; and I won't, for human nature is human nature, just as certain as twi
1624. and I won't, for human nature is human nature, just as certain as twice one makes two
1625. human nature, just as certain as twice one makes two ; — and we mightn't underst
1626.o ; — and we mightn't understand each other then, where would you be ?" Mrs. Wilde
1627., seems like there's like something the matter. this before. You never met me Surely,
1628.have heard of such jealousies Make your mind easy on that score, John. Should Hope F
1629.on. Hope well? Is there ?" anything the matter at Elder Flemmings' "Finish your supper
1630.pe ! too —professed pitied openly the same idolatrous creed ; All of them, except
1631. Mrs. Flem- who was much stiff by every one, but ; who and kept very and silent abo
1632. about her troubles Reuben— he such a good convinced thing in it stuck by his moth
1633.Father Kay right out that " the fact of man as his father becoming a Catholic Mm th
1634.d if it come up It to his ideas of what religion should be, he would go with them at the
1635.t the risk of everything. was the first religion he had heard he thought of," he said, "
1636. he thought of," he said, " that cost a man anything, and that a man was ready it t
1637. " that cost a man anything, and that a man was ready it to lose all for ; therefor
1638.de was a conscientious Puritan, serving God according to his lights, and believing
1639.d against It was a great blow all young man. His mother said this to him and too, r
1640.o, repeating his him that expressed the same told distress, own unuttered thoughts,
1641.ome upon him It an earthquake, tumbling life down bear. the fair fabric of his about
1642. with a crash. was almost more than the man could floor all His mother heard him wa
1643.; night and when, towards daylight, not being able any longer, she laid to bear these
1644. ; may be Hope won't, You go and have a good, long talk over 246 it THE FLEMMINGS. s
1645.ipiseogee have faith in as to expect to change them. ! But, John, trust in the Lord Hi
1646.he Lord His arm is strong in Him and He will not fail you your hour of need. all, it
1647.ant to believe that, after to pass that will will come you and Hope Flem! ming I've
1648.o believe that, after to pass that will will come you and Hope Flem! ming I've not b
1649.ome you and Hope Flem! ming I've not be man and wife I tell you, John, trouble bell
1650.fe I tell you, John, trouble bells shed many a bitter tear since all this came about
1651.with fit you and Hope, and the children God might see to send you. But lay down it'
1652.hile, honey! rest It It won't ease your mind, but your body. must be near daybreak,
1653. is that just before dawn." 247 And the good woman drew his head to her bosom as she
1654.rown curls, with a prayer in her inmost soul that God in His mercy would pity her ch
1655., with a prayer in her inmost soul that God in His mercy would pity her child and a
1656.d pity her child and avert trial of his life ; from him this great which meant, whic
1657.which she was from their stand-point, a desire that Hope Flem- ming would cast aside t
1658.of hope and John Wilde, like a drowning man grasping bility that things at float- i
1659.iving up Hope. It is strange that it He will couldn't stand that. never free once oc
1660.rt, might not be willing compromise her happiness — as well as he knowing how widely th
1661. in no wise from the cordial welcome of other days ; there was no change outwardly th
1662.al welcome of other days ; there was no change outwardly that he could see, and yet th
1663.re w as a r heavy troubled look full of life in her large black eyes once so ! and s
1664.d seemed times again. But presently the family one after another went away to their va
1665.d times again. But presently the family one after another went away to their variou
1666. "I —he watching her, full of a great love and sorrow. have heard strange news sin
1667.all others of your household, yoursaid. life self included, Hope," he I " It is true
1668.s true. am also a Catholic for and Tell death, John," she replied, in firm low tones.
1669.rm low tones. "How heard of claimed. in God's ! name did it all happen? me, Hope It
1670.ns for becoming a Catholic clear to his mind, but not to his faith. Then he discusse
1671. his faith. Then he discussed the whole matter with he argued and pleaded, and appeale
1672.by the regard she ought to feel for his happiness^ to abandon the errors and led, idolatr
1673.to which she had been and return to the religion taught by the gospel; almost his wife a
1674.earthly con- sideration or motive could change her conviction of the truth of the Cath
1675.tive could change her conviction of the truth of the Catholic religion far ; and that
1676.conviction of the truth of the Catholic religion far ; and that so rest from relapsing i
1677. give up things, even you, John, unless God by His grace converts you to this holy
1678. I have no thought of changing, Hope. I God all all forbid. am satisfied with what
1679.things that Papists believe, to save my life," he said in low husky tones. is " The
1680.self. to read a least, book which I and will Or come down of evenings let us read to
1681.read togother," she said pityingly. " I will do that, Hope," said the poor fellow "
1682.n I do, 252 THE FLEMMINGS. if or in any other way, until I was to try from now for do
1683.r doomsday." " Try, John ; try for your soul's sake — and the sake of our happines
1684.our soul's sake — and the sake of our happiness," voice. she said, in a low it " You kn
1685., in a low it " You know how impossible will be for us to marry, entertaining religi
1686.ted to all the demands is of reason and soul, that I repeat there no to earthly moti
1687. is to implore you to examine this holy will which you find based and founded and it
1688.t 'is a hard, knee as strangers to each other." bitter case," said John "Wilde, bring
1689.ell you," she said, her voice lous with emotion. " I cannot tell you all tent of this b
1690.itterness. trial to. me, or give you an idea of Remember, John, that you have to los
1691. dear to me ; but not to gain the whole world would THE FLEMMINGS. I consent to lose
1692.nt to lose peril." 253 even place it my soul, or in " Hope," he said at last, raidin
1693.n that sud- den, instantaneous, extatic change of soul and nature which you call conve
1694.- den, instantaneous, extatic change of soul and nature which you call conversion, a
1695.stantaneous, extatic change of soul and nature which you call conversion, and which ha
1696.h has always seemed such an unutterable state that I could never think of otherwise t
1697.r- sion is a deliberate response of the will to the grace of God, placing itself und
1698.te response of the will to the grace of God, placing itself under subjection to Rel
1699.God, placing itself under subjection to Religion His is will to work out the soul's salv
1700.elf under subjection to Religion His is will to work out the soul's salvation. a war
1701.to Religion His is will to work out the soul's salvation. a warfare, not a duel. It
1702.lvation. a warfare, not a duel. It is a science which we its must learn with simplicity
1703.rom very rudiments, grace assisting our will. First the all, seed, then the plant, t
1704.ath, which can only advance a step at a time, stumbling and often falling back at th
1705.LEMMINGS. incessant warfare with I must labor my own nature as I go that and work out
1706.essant warfare with I must labor my own nature as I go that and work out my salvation
1707.verned in every motive and act of my is life by the thought of the end for strive. w
1708.Christ, I This reason what the Catholic religion and my own teaches " me about conversio
1709.n." all Could you not do ?" that in the religion you have abandoned " No, John. he asked
1710.isfied that the Church to faith, divine law. which I belong has a divine origin and
1711.nd not divided against herself ; but is one, holy, true and immutable and —having
1712. holy, true and immutable and —having one Lord, one reason. Faith, and one Baptis
1713.e and immutable and —having one Lord, one reason. Faith, and one Baptism. Everyth
1714.having one Lord, one reason. Faith, and one Baptism. Everything must be clear to Al
1715.ound its my faith to my in the Catholic religion. tions are, I What other consola- do no
1716.he Catholic religion. tions are, I What other consola- do not know experimentally, no
1717.ing to receive the Sacraments." had the happiness " Hope, I see that you are irretrievabl
1718.irretrievably joined to errors. your My God ! it is a bitter trial to me after all
1719.l these years of looking forward to the time when you would be my broken up " Don't
1720.hat I were even willing to my faith and happiness by marrying you THE FLEMMINGS. which. I
1721.age, with a gulf as wide and as deep as death suddenly sprung between us. It is more
1722.n stand I" "The her eyes back. grace of God bridges over deeper and wider gulfs tha
1723. up and walked room. to and fro the The man's anguish was very deep, the woso, man'
1724. man's anguish was very deep, the woso, man's equally the difference being that her
1725. the woso, man's equally the difference being that hers spirit of sacrifice for was c
1726.ce for was consecrated by a sublime the love of God, while his was the result of err
1727.as consecrated by a sublime the love of God, while his was the result of error and
1728.go away like this, Hope," he said at "I will at least come and read that book with y
1729. excuse you have for your unaccountable change. I can do no more." have nothing else t
1730.ing else to offer, John. "I A religious change except from the very highest and best o
1731.ieve that even for at noontide. rity of mind my sake you 256 THE FLEMMINGS. sin- wou
1732. of mind my sake you 256 THE FLEMMINGS. sin- would profess a creed which you could
1733. how the crucial tests were hurting her nature. " I can yield nothing, not to the smal
1734.ent occurrence forty years ago, as some will remember — and the Boston post-office
1735.t to the sidewalk, and shouldering each other get nearer and be the first in their ea
1736.ming crisis in anxiety ; some with hope life the occasion of them, formed a the mora
1737.occasion of them, formed a the moral of many out of which their real natures looked
1738.ch the eager countenances of them every emotion suddenly intensified, every eye moved w
1739.the terrific storms which had swept the world's waters that winter of tempest and wre
1740.fraught with joy or dole to them ; last one that came told of increased pallor and
1741.for news from the Bourse and London Ex- change ; here were merchant-princes who had br
1742.hope relatives, friends, all of hearing good news from distant husbands, brothers. M
1743. emigrants mostly from Ireland and Ger- many, men and women almost dead with homesic
1744.But in this motley crowd there was only one with THE FLEMMINGS. 259 whom we have to
1745.e have to do ; a tall, round-shouldered man with grizzly red hair and beard, who wa
1746. basket which came in contact. provoked many a sharp and muttered oath from those wi
1747.ith whose ribs its corners it ; But the man could not help better than half a he wa
1748.at surging sea of faces could be called one. genius, But he was a good-humored his
1749.uld be called one. genius, But he was a good-humored his jokes, full of and now and
1750.rtunity and edging his way an inch at a time, he got to the window, and asked the ti
1751." Misthress Noona McCue, my own mother, God County Meath, Ireland," bless her, at C
1752. bless her, at Clanmoosie, answered the man. "Is the letter for your mother ?" " No
1753.r I'm expecting ; is from the dear ould soul not to get it !" and I shall be sorely
1754. sorely disappinted off his replied the man, taking hat to mop his face. ! 260 THE
1755. FLEMMINGS. , what's "And what in the d man ?" shouted the exasperated clerk. " Pat
1756.ou, Patrick McCue and letter, tell next time you come to inquire for a a fellow who
1757. handing him a letter, but not the out. one he expected, as he afterwards found He
1758.as he read ; then " Glory be to " burst God and the Blessed Virgin from his lips, a
1759. door. ; shouted the clerk " here's an- other letter for Patrick McCue. " That's from
1760. the mother of of it, From Ireland." me God bless her. — Take good care it your h
1761.om Ireland." me God bless her. — Take good care it your honor, I'll be round for "
1762.d bless her. — Take good care it your honor, I'll be round for " this evening !" he
1763.ow, with be converted, and be ! no more idea of the holy Catholic Faith than canniba
1764.eard Faith, of Christianity in of Chiny life. my and it'll do me good to send ; them
1765.ty in of Chiny life. my and it'll do me good to send ; them books." Patrick McCue wa
1766. words sounded incoherent and with- out sense to them, and they moved could out of hi
1767.ly he, and the letter which him was the one written almost to him some it weeks bef
1768.there was converted to the Catholic was good hope said Patrick ; for thinking his en
1769. he came to a church, the door of which being open, he marched reverently up the towa
1770.ion his thanks to Almighty benefactors. God for the conversion of his Then and risi
1771.ked strangely like tears " Thanks be to God !" said Patrick still McCue, standing a
1772. full of a zeal and joy for it which no language on earth can describe, belonged to the
1773.be, belonged to the realms of the still soul, Patrick McCue, lugging his basket and
1774.rebuff from the prelate, who was indeed good 264 shepherd and dingy little THE FLEMM
1775.nd modern lore on abstruse questions in theology treatise and philosophy, and many a ric
1776.ruse questions in theology treatise and philosophy, and many a rich in volumes collected h
1777.n theology treatise and philosophy, and many a rich in volumes collected here worth
1778.inner as well as the saint; and to each one the good Bishop listened ; patiently an
1779. well as the saint; and to each one the good Bishop listened ; patiently and sympath
1780.turned Dan. " Tell her to come in, poor soul ; then fetch some coals in, and if I ri
1781.ricks to secure him an hour's quiet the same time save the household expenses. THE F
1782. to secure him an hour's quiet the same time save the household expenses. THE FLEMMI
1783. and kiss the consecrated ring upon the good "I sit prelate's finger. am glad to see
1784.relate's finger. am glad to see you, my man ; but won't you down ?" Thanks ; said t
1785.ut better nor " if I was sitting." Very good, my friend ; but I think if you'll noti
1786. have, and consider that be apt to give will me a crick in it if 1 sit here looking
1787.if 1 sit here looking up at you —why, man, you must be de- scended from the Kerry
1788.e- scended from the Kerry giants —you will take that 266 THE FLEMMINGS. chair besi
1789.shing all over his face and head. ; The good Bishop laughed point " ; he had gained
1790.emming's letter to the Bishop, and with many digressions to the right and to the lef
1791.til he fully understood the pith of the matter; and, deeply interested, he —as soon
1792.rom beginning to end. Then he said : is good news, excellent news, McCue. "What do y
1793.?" Why, don't you see, your Grace, that being an ignoramus, with nothing to boast of
1794. I set about myself." ' You made a very good hit in leaving End of Controversy' with
1795.of Controversy' with your Puritan But I will of course write a list for you. You did
1796. come to me ; it was a wise thought, my God has honored you it greatly in allowing
1797.nored you it greatly in allowing you as will were to become the instrument of the so
1798.hat the throw himself down and kiss the good man's feet rested on, his great, tender
1799.he throw himself down and kiss the good man's feet rested on, his great, tender Iri
1800.. yet, There was sjmething on Patrick's mind little and waxing a bold under the grac
1801.nd he began : " There is, if your Grace will be so good " — . But I'm thankful ; t
1802. : " There is, if your Grace will be so good " — . But I'm thankful ; to see your
1803.my aches and pains like the rest of the world." "It must be a great incumbrance to yo
1804.replied the little Bishop, whose genial nature delighted in a innocent recreation. " W
1805.cCue, assuming a most conhe screwed his courage up thought fidential attitude, while to
1806.t, " I've your Grace, seein' how fleshy many you are, how a time, in the name of the
1807., seein' how fleshy many you are, how a time, in the name of the world ye ever got u
1808.you are, how a time, in the name of the world ye ever got up that long laddher, some
1809. ye ever got up that long laddher, some time ago, to the loft where the two men were
1810.ng needs had made all perils to his own life or limb sink into insignificance. Patri
1811.re, me how I did get up a and a greater one how I got down —the ladder creaked an
1812.•quarry to hear the confession of the man who kilt himself and broke every bone i
1813.hed some of him!" " Oh ! well, well, my man ! there were your brave countrymen ther
1814.ho with the ance of Almighty It assist- God helped me to do His work. to the just w
1815.ishop. And no wondher your charity. — God reward your lordship It's a meracle alt
1816. the tight-rope itself if some for poor soul at the other end of it should call your
1817.ope itself if some for poor soul at the other end of it should call your assistance "
1818. it should call your assistance " !" !" God forbid such a thing happening said the
1819. forbid such a thing happening said the good Bishop, diverted beyond measure uine si
1820.d beyond measure uine simplicity of the man. " I should at the gen- have to try* yo
1821.cked up his basket, standing before the good who said : "I should like to learn some
1822.forget hereafter to call me what all my good the children in Boston do, ' Father Ben
1823., ' Father Ben.' I like that above all. God bless you, my child." And Bishop gave h
1824.r and more elated than he had ever been life. in his whole Without going home to res
1825.rish his coun- Gentleman in Search of a Religion," favorite, art, : by tryman and on Cat
1826.man in Search of a Religion," favorite, art, : by tryman and on Catholic old master
1827.s was Reuben, with Patrick McCue's best love," written upon the fly-leaf; then he bo
1828.g with the bookseller's receipt and the change left and prolonged his delight many til
1829.e change left and prolonged his delight many til nails in the top of by putting twic
1830.baton. a field-marshal's And he gave so many directions and charges about the safety
1831.I'll get to-night from the ould mother, God bless her, that's lying waitin' for off
1832.He was, he firmly believed, a converted man, posit sessed of that inward light agai
1833. true believer to err would it be then" mind. for —he ; argued— "to ; " of what
1834.imple gospel doctrines are I cannot, if good enough against me and conscience, even
1835. the sake of Hope." It is true that the man's mind had become some- what enlightene
1836.ake of Hope." It is true that the man's mind had become some- what enlightened, and
1837.frankly admitted that the Flemmings had good ; reasons to show for their change of f
1838.gs had good ; reasons to show for their change of faith best and only result attained
1839.ook had come that day upon the Catholic religion as a Christian sect —a great advance
1840.e of himself and Hope. Seeing the daily life Flemmings, life, and noting their right
1841. Hope. Seeing the daily life Flemmings, life, and noting their righteous, cheerful w
1842.ous, cheerful way of and how the inward peace of their souls permeated every act and
1843. very existence —he could not for the life of him see the wide gulf that separated
1844.felt ; more consoled he inwardly up his mind, if and finally Hope would consent to m
1845.befaith, little He told her as much, in good, manly but she gave no assent to the pl
1846.d say quite discouraged him. About this time the Elders and the Deacons of his sect,
1847.on by old Father Ray, began to make his time uncomfortable by the affairs in hand. w
1848.nd in pub- THE FLEMMINGS. lie ; 275 his being so much with the Flemmings was in itsel
1849. Popish books and spend- ing hours at a time in religious conversation with the bann
1850.Flem- ming would marry him, not all the world should He was a staunch believer in the
1851.ct now or henceforth of ever having any other belief, and with that they must remain
1852.the true, tender heart of the of all to man were the pleadings and tears fears, exc
1853. could only believe as the than at that time. Flemming's do," he said one day hotly
1854.n at that time. Flemming's do," he said one day hotly to his mother, " I'd stand th
1855.dn't believe those doctrines to save my life. Hope shall I almost wish I could, for
1856. I almost wish I could, for the sake of peace and my own marry happiness. But for all
1857. for the sake of peace and my own marry happiness. But for all that, if Komanist though s
1858. that, if Komanist though she her, be—will And consent, I come what will." constan
1859.her, be—will And consent, I come what will." constant to his down to the " Old Hom
1860.ully purpose, he went straight over the matter, weighing all that was for and THE FLEM
1861.MMINGS. against it 277 in her own clear mind, had come, with them both ; many that i
1862. clear mind, had come, with them both ; many that it a sharp pang, to the deliberate
1863.berate conclusion would be best for the happiness of that all should be finally over betw
1864.which gave the coup de his grace to the man's hopes, putting an end to torture of u
1865. tone, almost choked You have ruined my life, Hope Flemming, unless God helps me. I
1866.e ruined my life, Hope Flemming, unless God helps me. I have done all with emotion
1867.less God helps me. I have done all with emotion : " and promised to all that lay in the
1868. and you have trodden my power my great love under foot, sacrificed me to a fanatici
1869.lpless, sick at heart but strong in the will to do right, what was she did not speak
1870.grief or shields us neither fictions of nature, its sting; it from cross or but it los
1871. sweet distilling balm for the faithful soul who seeks strength and resig- nation in
1872.mperfections are consumed, and heals at life last the deep wounds of her which have
1873.eaven. ; Sorrows are not accidents they form the very woof which is woven life into
1874. they form the very woof which is woven life into the ; warp of life. They develop t
1875. which is woven life into the ; warp of life. They develop the soul's and every son
1876.to the ; warp of life. They develop the soul's and every son of man who must be woul
1877.hey develop the soul's and every son of man who must be would attain the true end b
1878.the true end baptized with fire. of his being " It is," writes one,* "the law of our
1879.ith fire. of his being " It is," writes one,* "the law of our humanity, as that of
1880.f his being " It is," writes one,* "the law of our humanity, as that of Christ, tha
1881. meaning which to learn is concealed in pain, has yet Cross, manifested as the what
1882., has yet Cross, manifested as the what life is. The necessity of the highest life,
1883.ss, manifested as the what life is. The necessity of the highest life, alone interprets i
1884.t life is. The necessity of the highest life, alone interprets it." Hope Flemming's
1885.ght her where to seek and help. And the pain of her it was neither it light or fleet
1886.es and the elasticity from her step for many a long day, leaving the peace of her so
1887.r step for many a long day, leaving the peace of her soul undisturbed grets by re- an
1888.ny a long day, leaving the peace of her soul undisturbed grets by re- and strengthen
1889.they were wrong and she right, and what good rea- —in her own opinion—she had to
1890.right, and what good rea- —in her own opinion—she had to and troubled—in what rea
1891.d all went about her daily domestic her life, tasks as she had been doing the never
1892.o individual comforts and needs of each one of her household, and ordering : — TH
1893.a ; strong, healthful race, and did not mind that none of them except Nicholas, who
1894. them except Nicholas, who was growling one day over his dinner when Mrs. Flemming
1895.ns, much trouble would be spared in the world. As a man makes his bed so he must lie.
1896.uble would be spared in the world. As a man makes his bed so he must lie. You've al
1897.ces." This was more than the for a long time, little woman had said and Nicholas not
1898.ttle, whistling under his breath at the same time. If THE FLEMMINGS. finished his di
1899. whistling under his breath at the same time. If THE FLEMMINGS. finished his dinner
1900.would have done anything to restore her peace of sturdy, awkward way ; mind even for
1901.tore her peace of sturdy, awkward way ; mind even for a moment but he was quite at a
1902.ng to Huldah's indifference to gos- pel truth and her determination to marry spite of
1903. spite of everything. him in And Huldah will be very rich when her life father dies.
1904.n And Huldah will be very rich when her life father dies. The Deacon holds only a wh
1905. out of it now but she and Nick ; don't mind waiting, for they'll have it all some d
1906.e hard, practical thoughts of her son's good prospects came now and then through the
1907. instead of bread, for which the hungry soul was starving Reuben, indifferent to all
1908. hand, or the astonished glance of some one near him, or just a the sharp whisper o
1909.toms cropping out of the mystery of his life, about which he was dreaming and thinki
1910.ch he was dreaming and thinking all the time. to pass that while all the rest of the
1911.they might feel towards the rest of her family their friendly interest in her was unch
1912.ather Ray's praying publicly for her as one under ; 284 THE FLEMMINGS. tribulation.
1913.g all it all with those who did it, the time in her inmost heart that there was not
1914.n her inmost heart that there was not a man among them whoso them all, walk before
1915. among them whoso them all, walk before God was so pure and upright as her husband'
1916.ttle alone with the instincts of a wild animal she hid herself, wishing none to see he
1917., moral, temit poral and social, of the family, hoping that would put to son might his
1918.an, half strange tenets allowed a scope other Unitarian of —whose ; liberality towa
1919.nce he did not care a twig for Eva's it being a Catholic; but he did care, and took s
1920.ning old souls might as well save their time for something better ; for were not eng
1921.ose very marry you to save footprints I love, I wouldn't your life." George Merill b
1922.save footprints I love, I wouldn't your life." George Merill burst out laughing; of
1923.ldren had turned Papists, and spent her time relating her as- tounding dreams, which
1924.she called " visions," and telling of " death-watches " and mysterious tapwhich appea
1925.e young fellow, his generous, unselfish love, holding her hand in his, " I have hear
1926.ing to come I and ask Eva once more she will marry me. have to go back to-morrow I h
1927.ys and have to hurry off to be there in time." " I can promise you nothing, George,"
1928.go into the parlor I wish you well, I I will send if Eva don't lic." to you. mind he
1929. I will send if Eva don't lic." to you. mind her being a Pa am sure, a Roman you Cat
1930.end if Eva don't lic." to you. mind her being a Pa am sure, a Roman you Catho- " I sh
1931. sure, a Roman you Catho- " I shouldn't mind it if she were a Pagan ; she 288 THE FL
1932.ouse together. " Go into th§ parlor. I will send Eva in," re- peated Mrs. Flemming,
1933. the iron— over the windowsis in Some one the parlor wishing to see you, Eva," sa
1934.€” almost mean, for this was the in her life it ; deception she had ever practiced h
1935.er conscience. Eva, but the hope of the good that might come of reconciled and quiet
1936. had no thought of George Merill in her mind, put in the last tack, looped back the
1937.s and his generous devotion, unlike the world around her, Eva hesitated in answering
1938.he for all that shrunk from giving only pain in return he offered ; then in a sweet,
1939.y : way put an end to his hopes, saying pain, as I "I am is sorry to inflict am cons
1940.you, and there may be something in your mind on that score. But let no us thought of
1941. for I fore tell you honestly, bewife ; God, that I'd as lief my should be a it Rom
1942.ity so did her repug; nance to give him pain increase answered, and but he must be E
1943.f the devotion of a true like and noble nature your own; but as for me, is the only an
1944. never marry —be assured of that, you will and some day, perhaps not derstand far
1945.stant, un- much that seems heartless to will give you now, and pardon. shall your ge
1946.ou now, and pardon. shall your generous soul me full I shall never forget you, my br
1947.rother, and pray that your nobleness of soul be rewarded tenfold. I thank you for co
1948. you for coming hour of our trial, when other friends and neighbors stand aloof it â€
1949.nvinces me that there does exist in the world noble unselfishness and true constancy,
1950.on yourself. part us —part as friends life." ; and if prayers will help you, mine
1951.part as friends life." ; and if prayers will help you, mine shall abide with you as
1952.my it dearest hopes. Ours is a long and will take a tedious time to smooth away the
1953. Ours is a long and will take a tedious time to smooth away the remembrance parting.
1954.bitter I cannot understand you, Eva but good- by — it is useless to defer going,"
1955.oing," he said, holding out his hand. " Good-by, my friend and brother," she answere
1956.ssed away out saddened and disappointed man. of her sight, a "Is George Merill gone
1957.ry and be trust that dear mother. I you will see it all come out right at last. You
1958. see it all come out right at last. You will at least keep your daughters the longer
1959.ughters the longer." daughters are like other wolife "Nonsense. My own ; men, and sho
1960.omfortable homes of their and / am like other mothers, last and would be glad when my
1961.delivered herself, the disappointed wo- man went away thought fire to solace hersel
1962.ork-room," where, after the rest of the family had retird to rest, it spent half the n
1963.e was for all he wanted until he should experience the in the reward of Faith substance of
1964.ll as true fold of Christ, moment when, being made inwardly a member of the had been
1965. hunger- he would receive the "Bread of Life" for which his soul ing. And how in thi
1966.ceive the "Bread of Life" for which his soul ing. And how in this strangely ! had Pr
1967.ve written and sent a money-letter to a man whose who might business made him a ver
1968.as we know, Patrick McCue had got right change to a fraction. the letter, and here wer
1969. Gen" The Travels tleman in Search of a Religion," by Tommy Art in Moore," and began to
1970.eman in Search of a Religion," by Tommy Art in Moore," and began to read, nay, to d
1971.o be forever coming up in some shape or other to torment her She began to think so. T
1972. brushing rights in the "work- room," a labor of love which she had always restill co
1973. rights in the "work- room," a labor of love which she had always restill continued,
1974. instinctive curiosity it and a natural desire to see what low voice. read it was. " T
1975.nted and Misrepresented," she read in a will " Here are two if sides at last, and I
1976.le doubts, here represents the Catholic religion according to Protestant ideas, there re
1977.ll its wonderful simplicity and sublime truth. The first pleased her throughout ; her
1978.ased her throughout ; her whole Puritan nature the second she would ig- have dismissed
1979.nd like a moral pendulum side, kept her mind vibrating from side to ing if, after al
1980.ccasioned her. by her resistance to the truth it disturbance that She had grown, in a
1981.band and children towards none of their love her. She had ; lost —and was thankful
1982.to express circumstances of their daily life. She watched 296 THE FLEMMINGS. with je
1983.making herself miserable with- out just cause. Never before had Mrs. Flemming never s
1984.ver before had Mrs. Flemming never seen religion more beautifully exemplified than in th
1985.o sweet a patience ; or with such noble courage all life never had she seen in until no
1986.tience ; or with such noble courage all life never had she seen in until now the act
1987.w the active fruits of a true spiritual life, ripening in the eternal sunshine of a
1988.hat the beings she most loved on On the other hand, without the remotest idea of foll
1989.On the other hand, without the remotest idea of following their example, she felt wi
1990.esentment the treatment her husband and family had met with from her brethren —their
1991.had met with from her brethren —their life-long friends and neighbors. " One would
1992.heir life-long friends and neighbors. " One would suppose," she would think to hers
1993.which fevered her ; THE FLEMMINGS. very soul, the poor literally little 297 felt wom
1994.t Flemming and his daughters lived in a state of ecstasy, lifted high above the reach
1995.ouls, and helped to rise them when they life fell — to look away from the sav- ory
1996.messes of Egypt, with hope, towards the man- na of eternal ; to bear, with their sa
1997.thout complaint — and, in the name of God, " fight the fect good fight " which wo
1998.d, in the name of God, " fight the fect good fight " which would in the end per- the
1999.hey found the Catholic spiritual trials religion no shield against human or but of it ta
2000.ught them how to bear the thorny passes life, and how to sanctify their nature will,
2001. passes life, and how to sanctify their nature will, by subfind con- mission to the Di
2002. life, and how to sanctify their nature will, by subfind con- mission to the Divine
2003.to the Divine solation and where to and peace when the earthly reed on which Their fa
2004.ment. And they cheered and held up each other's hands, never allowing a despondent to
2005.and she was crying over it, thinking no one saw her when her Aunt Debby's sharp voi
2006.atch the pison. cussed the land for the sin of them you'll I b'lieve the Lord has d
2007.d of such difficulties, and knew at the time that the profits of his business, stead
2008.e was stranded high and dry, without an idea of how he he should get afloat once mor
2009.ive up everything rather than wrong any man. Some months lay before him, and if his
2010.cute him on account of his changing his religion, which he had good reason to fear they
2011.his changing his religion, which he had good reason to fear they would, he hoped to
2012.ther the mortgage on his property. This man was blessed with large hope and greater
2013. and greater faith, and, as he told his family, he " would make every exertion to stav
2014. themselves, as he do, to submit to the will of was trying to God, how- ever the aff
2015. to submit to the will of was trying to God, how- ever the affair might result." He
2016.out a mile and a half away, rented to a man named Wilbur, who was rent, in arrears
2017.mediately, but it it, would give people time and find out how it it to talk and thin
2018.d be to advantage to buy this, still in time for his needs. Besides dollars there wa
2019.nd them. at their door, The wolf was of time and it was only a question enter. how s
2020.pproach of what they called retributive justice on the heads of these offenders, satisf
2021.cher having died six months before, any one to Nick might as and the Committee bein
2022. one to Nick might as and the Committee being unable supply his place well ; to get !
2023.heir stupid old heads for them." " Have courage a ! if your good act has called forth m
2024.s for them." " Have courage a ! if your good act has called forth mean and ignoble o
2025.d act has called forth mean and ignoble one, how can it hurt THE FLEMMINGS you?" sa
2026.father, and I believe that " There's in time I shall," replied Nicholas. certain : o
2027.e I shall," replied Nicholas. certain : one thing if I can't believe enough to beco
2028.d mother ?" she spot on each cheek. " I will, ; they're your friends," after for say
2029.. " Nicholas," said his father, glad to change the this subject, " I want you to go do
2030.and see. It's me but Wilbur's an honest man." don't you do as others do ?" interrup
2031.ssed for another's shortcoming." " He ; will pay me " if he can, mother," answered F
2032.ently. He's an industrious, honest all. man * but seasons of misfortune come to us
2033.us He's out of work, and has had a sick family for months. Yes, let us bear one anothe
2034.ick family for months. Yes, let us bear one another's burdens, and be merciful —
2035. merciful — lest, should we be in the same case, the sting of remorse be added to
2036.in the clouds," she answered, " and the logic of I don't common sense is all that I t
2037.ered, " and the logic of I don't common sense is all that I think a man has any right
2038.on't common sense is all that I think a man has any right to for the sake of a stra
2039. stranger. understand. distress his own family " But I ex- pect nothing but trouble no
2040.e noticed for the the black silken hair time among many threads of white, which touc
2041.or the the black silken hair time among many threads of white, which touched the man
2042.any threads of white, which touched the man's heart, and he sighed, for he understo
2043.s of your children." " According to the world, mother," he answered, THE FLEMMINGS. i
2044. 305 low even tones, " according to the world, just, mother, your reproaches are serv
2045.nd well de- but according to the divine law, things wear a different aspect. They w
2046.r a different aspect. They who it serve God must ; expect tribulation, and bear for
2047.n, and bear for His sake all, they must love Him before and above giving up not thei
2048.est — aye, all things ; —for the am love of Him. Y/e are in His hands is and I a
2049.king herself in her room, " Fox's had a good of cry, after which she read Book Marty
2050.s" until it got too dark to distinguish one letter from another. Nicholas came back
2051. seams of felling given her for certain punishment misdemeanors by that inexorable woman.
2052.out fear terruption, quite like the old time, when ;" the " course of their true lov
2053.ime, when ;" the " course of their true love" did "run smooth but Nicholas had been
2054.d up there under the old hemlocks, with God's sky bending over them and the if lis-
2055.d there they occasionally met and shake world, their fists in the face of the making
2056.d, so long as they felt assured of each other's constancy, best. hoping for the " rat
2057.xplained the misfortunes impending over family ; his and the warm-hearted, generous it
2058. grieved at that for the THE FLEMMINGS. time in her life 307 benumbed to speak — b
2059.that for the THE FLEMMINGS. time in her life 307 benumbed to speak — but not too m
2060.so to think. The forces of her physical life seemed to be absorbed by her brain, she
2061.ut I tell you, Nick, I'm sorry for your good, noble father, and the rest of them, an
2062.r, and see what can be done. shall hear Good- by, Nicholas, you from me soon." And f
2063.d I won't have you asking favors Sit my family, or bringing yourself into trouble on t
2064.ay when Huldah said " Nicholas Flemming love ! how dare you say such a thing to me w
2065.see you so seldom ? ! Trust me, Nick —mind no half ; trust — and if let it me go
2066., should come into your thoughts at any time that I'm mean enough to want to throw y
2067.d see what I can make out : Depend upon one thing telling to ' I shall need no seco
2068. Donna Angeletta. How " nonsensical for matter-of- fact lovers like you and I !" said
2069. said Huldah, with her old merry laugh. Good night." ; And she held out her hand, wh
2070.shrunken ; and worn-out garments of the family and selecting the knew would be useful
2071.them into a compact bundle and when the man crept away, she, best of them, such as
2072. poor to give much help ; 310 to others will ; THE FLEMMINGS. but the little we may
2073. Miss' Flemming. I know it," swered the man, astonished and overcome, while tears r
2074.ars rolled over his thin cheeks ; " and God bless you. if The Elder ' couldn't have
2075. my goods shall be touched for the rent God spares me to get on my legs strong agin
2076.me to get on my legs strong agin, And I religion shall have every cent of it with intere
2077. with interest. you what, ma'am, I wish other people's 'round here would crop out acc
2078.nd here would crop out accordin' to the same rule his'n does, much as they all abuse
2079.se a cent—not a ma'am, — so help me God. wife." Thank you any longer for the wi
2080.talking " now," answered Mrs. Flemming. Good-by, and me know if I can do anything to
2081.sweetened the felt bitter waters of her soul to have that of what she had done she d
2082.she had done she did for the sake ; and love God but ; she did not feel this her act
2083.ad done she did for the sake ; and love God but ; she did not feel this her act was
2084.mpulse of simple humanity sanctified —good and beautiful in itself, but unall by t
2085.motive without which nobility of act or will, all grandeur of purpose, all heroic sa
2086.d not use of Jesus herself. Not so with principle her husband and daughters, to whose liv
2087.sband and daughters, to whose lives the love had become the animating of and the swe
2088. real condition of the poverty-stricken family " Mill Farm/' they did not let their ow
2089.ad they gave of and with words of their good cheer. They gave the labor hands they w
2090.ords of their good cheer. They gave the labor hands they watched and tended the helpl
2091. cracked delf — shone again and found time, now and then, to sit beside Mrs. "Wilb
2092.eside Mrs. "Wilbur and read some of the soul-touching devotions for the sick from th
2093.ch woman seemed to derive much com- The time devoted by Hope and Eva to these works
2094., to the sweet conscious- ness of doing good, gave them a piness such as they new se
2095.od, gave them a piness such as they new sense of hapexperi- had never imagined or to
2096.rom the all far spring to last the poor family through the succeeding day, chop their
2097.heir gratitude took, thereby giving the good Flemmings a ence of life, and affording
2098.eby giving the good Flemmings a ence of life, and affording new experiMrs. Flemming
2099.cipate. 314 THE FLEMMINGS. oyer a piece One day Hope and Eva were busy New-Englande
2100.iving room," as say. The outlook of the family inevitable. was gloomy, and ruin seemed
2101.in out of the storm — knitting as for life, a stitch and a tear very often togethe
2102.She thought perhaps had unsettled I his mind. am going to be very happy at home " to
2103.is old pleas- ant smile. You have heard good news ?" said Hope, look- ing up eagerly
2104.ok- ing up eagerly. THE FLEMMINGS. " In one sense, yes " ; 315 in another, no," he
2105.ing up eagerly. THE FLEMMINGS. " In one sense, yes " ; 315 in another, no," he replie
2106., that in the dark years of the past my soul used to be moved, strangely moved, when
2107. Testament or the New I came across any prophecy or passage alluding to the Blessed Moth
2108.ed Mother of Jesus. I spoke of it to no one then, stifle for I feared it ; was and
2109.erence for her, without knowing what or being able to define its significance. meant
2110.e. meant Since I have been brought to a knowledge of the True Faith, it is all plain, con
2111.come to believe that she was caring for soul in those days my and leading me through
2112.am ; going to hold high festival in her honor to-day birthday of pecially to and ever
2113.ay birthday of pecially to and every my life, henceforth, I shall devote esHer, my p
2114.r lighted the wax candle you made, Eva, honor, of the we will say the Litany and read
2115. candle you made, Eva, honor, of the we will say the Litany and read the Office Eosa
2116., exclaimed Eva, unable to restrain her emotion, as she ran and threw her arms about hi
2117.congratulate you, dearest father, and I will am sure that Our dear Lady you temporal
2118.essed Mother of this may obtain for you many returns happy day." at last "And heaven
2119.ing, his whole countenance beaming with happiness. And heaven, at last," repeated Hope in
2120.tinguish the the Faith professed by her family. She stood on the borders of the "new e
2121.der the cross, she was sometimes almost God and die ;" and above all did of Catholi
2122.to her feet a " stumbling-block, to her mind foolishness." But this could not cloud
2123.lishness." But this could not cloud the happiness of the group kneeling so devoutly at th
2124.rt Flemming said that night he was just one year old, and this was his first birthd
2125.old, and this was his first birthday —one which he should remember in Eternity, C
2126.hday —one which he should remember in Eternity, CHAPTER MRS. XXI. FLEMMING IS GLAD OF
2127.ldah Sneathen began to exhibit a fever, change which not only kept Nicholas in a but a
2128.dah, who had THE FLEMMINGS. all 319 her life been blessed with a good, wholesome fle
2129.S. all 319 her life been blessed with a good, wholesome flesh-pots, appetite, and de
2130.as anything worse than indolence, until one day she laid her poor head quietly back
2131.l, Deborah ! It's no such nonyou; and I sense as that. It's Nicholas, I tell won't ha
2132.iff; if "I forgot all about that Barker will; why, Huldy was to die off to-day, like
2133.ngely off. was up, and he stood was the matter with Huldah, she little kept it to hers
2134.r trouble to ; was the very and if last one she could tell he chose to mount his hi
2135.to herself, which, ;" then Huldah had a good cry when was over, seemed to do her goo
2136.ood cry when was over, seemed to do her good, for she bounced up, began to brush her
2137.ng, and saying now and then sure it "It will come to-morrow. But maybe Nick if I am
2138.ome to-morrow. But maybe Nick if I am ; will. I shall hear from him to-morrow will t
2139.; will. I shall hear from him to-morrow will then I shall be so happy ! be here this
2140. before, to sell. She counted on for it good round sum wool for ; it, was almost as
2141. a store carpet lot of then there was a good — the wool from their sheep was alway
2142.m-like islands glimpse of the lake, and one of farther, in the distance, the like a
2143.st all The old house the early autumnal beauty, looking as it did a century before, â€
2144.—looking it as it did when the oldest man and woman it; living in those parts fir
2145.membered in the land, looking as of did one short year before, when the very name i
2146.name its Flemming was a power and every one in the little it world around spoke of
2147. a power and every one in the little it world around spoke of out with pride. inmates
2148. inmates and pointed But we know what a change had come upon them, and why. The Flemmi
2149.t the this Kingdom of Heaven" is not of world ; and, knowing this, had entered all in
2150.taken up the cross, and in its They had good but it strength they were ready to make
2151.ternal I think you it know all this, so good a thing that bears repetition. One day
2152. so good a thing that bears repetition. One day Wolfert Flemming came home from a j
2153.me from a journey he had taken to see a man who had written to him about the purcha
2154.Farm ;" came home disappointed, for the man had changed his mind and bought other p
2155.sappointed, for the man had changed his mind and bought other property. After caring
2156.the man had changed his mind and bought other property. After caring for — his tire
2157.ere seemed to silent than he had. be no one in the house —everything was so and h
2158.ing was so and he thought it would be a good opportunity for him to spend a half hou
2159.pot consecrated by prayer to the Mother God, the clamor of worldly cares and the an
2160. shipwreck and ruin ebbed away from the man's weary heart they could ; come " only
2161.r ;" and as a sweet calm settled on his soul, he realized the full significance of t
2162. realized the full significance of that peace which "the world cannot give, nor take
2163.l significance of that peace which "the world cannot give, nor take away ;" and grew
2164.mpared with ; this, the affairs of this life sunk into nothingness and he realized,
2165.e, the dual struggle and warfare of his being —the strugsoul gle of nature for peri
2166.re of his being —the strugsoul gle of nature for perishable goods, the warfare of hi
2167.or perishable goods, the warfare of his soul for an immortal heritage ; and he thoug
2168.s Be not disquieted, Oh my for the Lord will thy helper in the day of trouble. His h
2169.imply referred things to the divine 326 will, THE FLEMMINGS. while doing all that ju
2170.ll, THE FLEMMINGS. while doing all that justice to his family dein manded and human pru
2171.GS. while doing all that justice to his family dein manded and human prudence required
2172.ice to his family dein manded and human prudence required— assured the depths of his s
2173.e required— assured the depths of his soul that if the worst that he dreaded shoul
2174.en, the blow would be sanctified to the good of him and his household through Him wh
2175.l things for them. Thus reposing on the will of God, without a single visionary thou
2176. for them. Thus reposing on the will of God, without a single visionary thought or
2177.pose, he felt ; that he could bear with courage whatever befell not bear, sustained wha
2178.it? by the strength found Faith and the peace born of calmed, refreshed and thankful.
2179."I am glad you suc- I hope you have had good "No," he answered, as he drew a chair t
2180.o help you, and somehow I feel that she will not refuse me," said Eva, as she brough
2181. a certain veneration for her above the other holy is women of the Bible ; but it onl
2182.cherished through past ages this tender memory and holy devotion to His holy Mother. T
2183.ing Him, is it pos- sible to divest the mind of her who was chosen by creation to be
2184.s chosen by creation to be the almighty God from His whole His Son ? Mother of Full
2185.rophet and apostle, in whom met the Old Law inter- and the New, who fulfilled proph
2186.d Law inter- and the New, who fulfilled prophecy and her lips preted the Scriptures. Fro
2187.nd her lips preted the Scriptures. From man learned the wonderful story of the Inca
2188.the Incarnation, which was confirmed by angel messengers and sealed by the birth of h
2189.s talk of this ; " talk on ; it does me good." and me good Mother too, daughter, to
2190. ; " talk on ; it does me good." and me good Mother too, daughter, to think of the R
2191.f creatures, Mary Eve was Both were and life created without sin eternal death to :
2192. was Both were and life created without sin eternal death to : Eve fell, ; entailin
2193.re and life created without sin eternal death to : Eve fell, ; entailing sin on her o
2194.ternal death to : Eve fell, ; entailing sin on her offspring to hers, by giving bir
2195.t be pardoned. Oh, wonderful ! From the time she was prom- ; THE FLEMMINGS. ised to
2196.e, womb the who was to bear in her Holy One. The women Sara, Re- becca, Esther, Deb
2197. which precedes the rising Sun the true sign of the conciliation she the rainbow, ne
2198.ation she the rainbow, new Covenant and man's rewith the Most High she is the sacer
2199. c ' tabernacle Most High/ house ' ' of God,' c blessed land ' of the Lord,' star o
2200.tiful among women,' mother of beautiful love, the most happy- of faith, of wisdom, o
2201.iful love, the most happy- of faith, of wisdom, of in holy hope, and full of grace.' S
2202.morning, to the source of the waters of life which flows from Libanus, to the azure
2203.iadem before which the is lustre of all other crowns eclipsed ! All the inspired writ
2204.ath created a new shall woman compass a man.' ! THE FLEMMINGS, 331 And here," said
2205. tones, " a creature promised by Most ' God Himself to our first parents ; at the b
2206.st parents ; at the beginto ning of the world a creature who was have part in the des
2207. part in the designs of the tion of the world ; Most High for the salva- a creature p
2208. the salva- a creature prefigured by so many illus- mysterious types trious —repre
2209.ous types trious —represented ; by so many women ; a creature called by such beaut
2210. the prophets, could not be an ordinary being. She must have had prerogatives above n
2211.wer of the Most High, conceived without sin ; it is from this assemblage of wonders
2212.ith FLEMMESTOS. —a which is in itself one of the strongest proofs of the " I beli
2213.not believe that Eve, who was to be the sin, mother of mankind, was created without
2214.eakness when Eeuben of his attacks. had one He has not been out to but has it exerc
2215.. " Father," whispered Eeuben, " " be a man yet !" " I'll Get well, my if lad ; get
2216.y to say !" he replied, " He had bought one nearer home." " I thought nothing would
2217.she replied as she the room. " It is so good to be resting here on your breast," " ;
2218.I would rather not tell you now, sir. I will show it to you when it comes." "Very we
2219.Reuben little thoughtfully. this letter will explain "I guess some of your mysteries
2220.ything; and has done put me his lots of good to see you." And Eeuben arms about his
2221.illows, shaded the candle in which some one had come looking the Benjamin of his fl
2222.mall and shapely, for cestress, all the world like the hands of his an: Lady Pendarvi
2223.irs to join of his heart, and went down family at tea. The next afternoon Hope and Eva
2224.burs were getting on. They had not been being no need—for there for several days â€
2225. not altogether ; like to give the poor family up so, putting a fresh loaf of brown br
2226.ed, " all the doors and windows were of life and no sign about it. What in the world
2227.e doors and windows were of life and no sign about it. What in the world can be the
2228. life and no sign about it. What in the world can be the matter ?" ex- claimed Eva. "
2229. about it. What in the world can be the matter ?" ex- claimed Eva. " It looks as ; if
2230.and all Eva said : " Neddy, what in the world are you shut up so tight " I'm 'fraid t
2231.pe's hand. ? Where see, 'm, ever in the world are you " Why, you you all Father Bay g
2232.ll —I declare !" exclaimed Hope. have good mind to march right in and give that un
2233.”I declare !" exclaimed Hope. have good mind to march right in and give that ungrate
2234.va " don't. It's all the THE FLEMMINGS. same, darling, if 339 you will only remember
2235.HE FLEMMINGS. same, darling, if 339 you will only remember for whose dear sake we he
2236.I think of " And lose the merit of your good works, and for " the sweet approval of
2237.m suffer vicariously for his ungrateful family," answered Hope grasping Neddy's ragged
2238.the boy, dancing with fright. "I have a mind " to," said Hope, laughing. Here —her
2239. !" exclaimed Hope. " I'm glad we had a chance to help them in their need," said Eva.
2240.he might be just a little flighty. This idea and the it lengthening shadows together
2241. shadows together, warned them that was time It to turn their faces homeward. their
2242.his father with a grave smile said " It will always be a pleasant thought, daughters
2243.old Well ! well ! — it was only human nature for them to follow their worldly intere
2244.est, THE FLEMMXNGS. mother ; discussion will do no good, and may provoke angry feeli
2245.EMMXNGS. mother ; discussion will do no good, and may provoke angry feelings," said
2246.nd. " I can't help it. I shall speak my mind," she answered. " the Hark !" exclaimed
2247. know when I shall go, though ! I don t being played fast-and-loose with." "Pshaw, Ni
2248.ht of Huldah and her secret ; " I don't mind him any more than I do an old turkey-co
2249. " There's nothing the there's not " it matter with the carpet an uneven thread in He
2250.t, not only because was a very handsome one and a good strong it piece of work, but
2251.y because was a very handsome one and a good strong it piece of work, but because wa
2252. piece of work, but because was made by one of the best women ". 344 THE FLEMMINGS.
2253. the Deacon What did he give for it ?" "One and one " of the best women," continued
2254.con What did he give for it ?" "One and one " of the best women," continued Nick, h
2255.nterruption, " of the best wives in the world." is That so ; that is all true," they
2256. to hear their mother's praises from so good and honorable a man as Deacon Green, wh
2257.'s praises from so good and honorable a man as Deacon Green, while her husband look
2258.r husband looked at her with a flush of pleasure on his calm handsome face. Then Nick ad
2259.undred dollar a dollars The Deacon paid one " yard for the carpet." Hand it over to
2260.t, " It is his." Keep mother, until the time comes to use said "Wolfert Hemming, lif
2261.s in his clear truthful eyes —for the man's heart was profoundly touched, " Very
2262. morning of course and thrash the whole family it which the he had no idea of doing, b
2263.the whole family it which the he had no idea of doing, but did young fellow good it.
2264. no idea of doing, but did young fellow good it. to say it and think that he should
2265.even selling his house — and move his family r where he w ould begin the world anew.
2266. his family r where he w ould begin the world anew." " But, father, how do you expect
2267.e hundred dollars. the money," said the man, lifting up his head and drawing a long
2268.aid lad. Be ready to start early in the Good night." " Good night, the young man. Th
2269.dy to start early in the Good night." " Good night, the young man. Then, instead of
2270.he Good night." " Good night, the young man. Then, instead of going to bed as he sh
2271.e of the things that after, that it was one there, to ; ' had brought him up settle
2272.their day's work is over, to go to each other's huts and smoke their pipes, that the
2273.s and smoke their pipes, that the ; new man wants to break up all their old habits,
2274.I never was so glad of anything in " my life." Let us pray for our enemies, and bles
2275.To throw you !' over like he did, for a man gifted in prayer little But I think the
2276. little But I think the gifted creature will be a more than he ; THE FLEMMINGS. barg
2277.ll," replied Mrs. Flemming. CBAPTEB THE MAN WITH THE HAMMER XXII. — THE LAST BITT
2278. was more than of the Looking down from one Hill, peaks of Prospect the beautiful v
2279.classes and quilting bees, with all the other gatherings in which these thrifty utile
2280.en they all felt ; the mortification of being so utterly neglected they would have be
2281.; but, human had they thinking over the cause, they were straightway consoled, and of
2282.are they thai suffer is persecution for justice sake, for theirs the kingshall evil dom
2283. justice sake, for theirs the kingshall evil dom revile of heaven. Blessed are ye wh
2284.discouraging. The outlook was " Mill No one seemed to want to buy last resource, Fa
2285. altogether. But they did not make each other miserable by desponding and worrying ov
2286.r each would end, but trying cheerfully other's burdens. Nicholas was the most gloomy
2287.two letters had nothing to do with each other. Things were in this way, when one brig
2288.ch other. Things were in this way, when one bright morning as Reuben was creeping s
2289. into a reverie half pleasant, half sad life, a dreamy mist arose out of his mental
2290.is dreams, and believing was alone with nature, yielded himself ensweet entrancement.
2291. the ; and starting round, Reuben saw " man with the hammer. A very fine, whole- so
2292. cheeks like roses. "I beg your pardon. good-naturedly. I started you considerably,
2293. rough sort of a fellow," he said, "The truth is, I live so much alone among the wood
2294.to go out to the out that he was an au- man and when he found ; thor, he felt as if
2295. found ; thor, he felt as if he had met one of the genii of " his dreams, and regar
2296.egend?" sir," "It has a true, veritable history, replied Beuben, whose eyes kiddled and
2297. eyes kiddled and whose interest in the man increased, it, if " I should be very gl
2298.NGS. "and I shall be glad to relate it. Many intelli- years ago," lie began, " a col
2299.ot of the mountains, and the lius chief man among them was named Corne- Campbell, w
2300.f them. He had the bold, quick tread of one fearlessly ; who had often wandered amo
2301.ed among the terrible hiding- places of nature and while his voice was harsh, his coun
2302.ans they received neither injury nor No cause of offence had ever arisen ; and althou
2303.object of peculiar veneration. He had a mind which education and ; motive would have
2304.eculiar veneration. He had a mind which education and ; motive would have nerved with gia
2305.taste everything which came in his way. One day he discovered some poison which had
2306.er moment hatred and 356 THE FLEMMINGS. soul. vengeance took possession of Cliocorua
2307.ated against Cornelius Campbell bright, One his balmy morning in June, Still Campbe
2308.n's hand had done the work. " In such a mind, grief, like every other emotion, was s
2309.rk. " In such a mind, grief, like every other emotion, was stormy. green spot in His
2310.In such a mind, grief, like every other emotion, was stormy. green spot in His home had
2311.stormy. green spot in His home had been life. In his wife ; him the only and childre
2312.of a from him, the remembrance of their love clung to him like the death-grapple dro
2313.nce of their love clung to him like the death-grapple drown- ing man, sinking death.
2314.o him like the death-grapple drown- ing man, sinking death. him down # into darknes
2315.e death-grapple drown- ing man, sinking death. him down # into darkness and Then terr
2316. revenge. came a wild deof ; moniac The death-groan Choand, corua would make him smil
2317.him smile in his dreams when he awaked, death seemed soul. too pitiful a ven- geance
2318.his dreams when he awaked, death seemed soul. too pitiful a ven- geance for the angu
2319.ng into his THE FLEMMINGS. " 357 At the time of tlie murder, Chocorua' s brethren we
2320.to the abyss below Spirit ' : The Great will gave it life to Chocorua, and Chocorua
2321.below Spirit ' : The Great will gave it life to Chocorua, and Chocorua not throw " '
2322.away at the command Spirit of the white man.' Then hear the Great 5 speak in the wh
2323.hen hear the Great 5 speak in the white man's thunder, exclaimed Campbell, as he po
2324. a son, and ye sky looked bright. crops evil lie ! him while the May fire the lightn
2325.your cattle ! —your graves in the red man's war-path ! —panthers howl and and t
2326.attle ! —your graves in the red man's war-path ! —panthers howl and and they hi
2327.left — his curse stays with the white man.' But uttering inaudible curses, he die
2328.ben, uneasily. "What have we here? Wait one moment !" an- swered his companion, as
2329.ble! —where you get stone?" asked the man, cracking a fragment off one of the blo
2330. asked the man, cracking a fragment off one of the blocks with his hammer, and exam
2331.t and smooth. of it." I think there's a good lot " What does your father intend doin
2332.er intend doing with it ?" inquired the man, looking keenly at Eeuben. " I don't th
2333.r. " No. They don't know how I spend my time it here ; and I haven't told them, beca
2334. the money. much, though." " seem to be Good on it crops have been got out of it som
2335.this has been a bad year, and the lives man who answered has been too sick to work
2336.Eeuben. " I know that anxious to father will be glad to see sell you ; is as soon as
2337.Eeuben in some embarrassment. " My name man is Ethan Cutter — Ethan Cutter," re-
2338.ity and when he took leave he to had as good as promised pay two thousand great news
2339.e old times nearly to an end that every one was glad, and so cheerful that again. i
2340.g up and leaving us, their dear " since will Flemming, Almighty God has been so good
2341.ir dear " since will Flemming, Almighty God has been so good to to Boston to receiv
2342.will Flemming, Almighty God has been so good to to Boston to receive baptism, we go
2343.hurch. This is the wish of my That in a will be a great happiness, father/' said Eva
2344.he wish of my That in a will be a great happiness, father/' said Eva " low voice. " It wi
2345.ss, father/' said Eva " low voice. " It will indeed," added Hope earnestly. To think
2346.eiving those august Sa! craments Oh, my God!" exclaimed "Wolfert Flem- ming, foldin
2347.." None them had ever seen him ; betray emotion like this before it was as if man's sou
2348.y emotion like this before it was as if man's soul were suddenly unveiled and he tr
2349.ion like this before it was as if man's soul were suddenly unveiled and he transfigu
2350. he transfigured before them. fallen No one spoke; an awe had upon them, and to at
2351.tairs into the little sanctuary to pour soul at the feet of Jesus and Mary. They exp
2352.her come or it What could mean? Had the man changed his mind? or was he a sharper?
2353.hat could mean? Had the man changed his mind? or was he a sharper? might be dead the
2354.they could do, they gravely awaited His will, praying for be. submission to it whate
2355. this evening a strange thing happened. One ap- late, as he was coming from the sta
2356.e lantern alight in his hand, a letter, man proached him, gave him a and hurried aw
2357.tick once more upon the altar of Gospel truth ; return at once to the pure, simple do
2358.rines which you have aban- doned, and I will advance whatever money you may need. El
2359.rror of thinking that I give your offer one moment's it, consideration. I have this
2360.; and suppose it is meant but I call my God me to to witness that nothing which thi
2361.e to to witness that nothing which this world contains of riches, honors, ease or fam
2362.d, handing her the letter " and lose no time." Elder Flemming !" "Land sakes!" she a
2363.ing to the with as frightened a look as evil she had seen the one himself ; indeed s
2364.ghtened a look as evil she had seen the one himself ; indeed she believed to the da
2365.; indeed she believed to the day of her death that she had seen him in the likeness o
2366.o little business to attend to, mother, time to which was unexpected, and gave me no
2367.aith — it was almost too much for the man's patience. Have you heard from that ma
2368.an's patience. Have you heard from that man ?" asked Mrs. Flemming eagerly, hoping
2369.I are in His know but ; let us trust in God we hands, and His ways are not as our w
2370., and subdued, so unlike her- that each one's heart was touched and went out with g
2371.and first flashing just as they did the time we saw their them —he talked over his
2372.lowed in silence and unchecked the very idea of 368 THE FLEMMINGS. leaving the spot
2373. their hearts; but they thought of each other, and of Him who had heavy " trial borne
2374. had heavy " trial borne the cross unto death for them; their and they resolved with
2375. help complaint or murmur. to bear with courage and patience and utter no As there are
2376.As there are no chances or accidents in God's universe," said Wolfert Flemming, " l
2377.pleasant ways, and are repugnant to our nature, let us not repine, but resign ourselve
2378.vidence, looking beyond this transitory life to the exceeding if great and eternal r
2379.S. Mrs. Flemming, contrary to her usual habit of did not go away 369 late, when the h
2380. not go away 369 late, when the hour of family prayer came, but remained listening pat
2381. tell ; strange to her Puritan ears. No one what was passing in her soul as she lis
2382.an ears. No one what was passing in her soul as she lis- tened but she was there. Sh
2383.s there. She had stayed of her own too, will, and the man's heart was gladdened in t
2384.ad stayed of her own too, will, and the man's heart was gladdened in the seek refug
2385.pe that she, would at last bosom of the One True Faith. The next day Eva went into
2386.0 " THE FLEMMINGS. And that is the very one I didn't open," replied Mrs. Flemming,
2387.ved from by the a sudden and terri- ble death gin, interposition of the Blessed Vir-
2388.d spotless ments! Everything was in the same beautiful it, order upon just as it it
2389.that he feared the worst, the afflicted family thought that the last bitter drop had b
2390.BEHIND THE CLOUD. And now the shadow of death fell heavily over the Old Homestead, an
2391.er — sorrow for the body and it all ; soul of grief for who lay there unconscious
2392.e and mother, in whom centered the deep love of the afflicted family. All the trials
2393.centered the deep love of the afflicted family. All the trials which of late had come
2394.GS. 373 prosperity, the contempt of the world, the rending asunder of strong the ties
2395.irit of sacrifice for ; submission to ; God's holy life will but here they were hel
2396.rifice for ; submission to ; God's holy life will but here they were helpless of her
2397.e for ; submission to ; God's holy life will but here they were helpless of her was
2398.ibed, and pray that if it were His holy will this bitter cup might pass from them. f
2399.bove human fears or hopes that Almighty God be- would pity her and grant her the fo
2400.. Slie Mrs. Flemming was very near unto death. lay day after day in alternate letharg
2401. from exclaimed, her ; hide, oh hide me One day she I saw her her eyes luminous wit
2402.t the tender flesh of the pure in heart life nagging, like bloodhounds, at the ! and
2403.le he be- sought Almighty ever adding : God to pity them and spare to say ' her, "
2404.d spare to say ' her, " But help me Thy will be done,' for of myself I can do nothin
2405.daily ; of Mrs. Flemming's had gone and many and kind were the inquiries friends mad
2406.made by former and old neighbors " It ; many were duty," selves ;" their offers of s
2407.rmer and old neighbors " It ; many were duty," selves ;" their offers of service. wa
2408. service. was their they thought, " she being one of them- and out fallen of human pi
2409.ce. was their they thought, " she being one of them- and out fallen of human pity f
2410.allen of human pity for the great grief family, they which had upon the backsliding si
2411.on Mrs. Flemming as the victim of their sin. Mrs. Wilde came from her distant home,
2412.her presence ; Hope and Eva were comand many were the little fingers, which, tasks o
2413.ere the little fingers, which, tasks of love deftly done by her swift had she not be
2414. mother's bedside. was a sweet She took labor of love to the girl to anticipate what
2415. bedside. was a sweet She took labor of love to the girl to anticipate what was want
2416.rry." illness in a For, even a few days family throws the best-ordered domesconfusion
2417.holas rarely exchanged a word with each other ing, indeed, except at the table, —se
2418.ble, —seldom of Mrs. meet- where each one was so occupied with the subject spoken
2419.tened, for she did not half know that a soul was ever. near her until he spoke. I sh
2420.ghtened when Huldah met them ; with the good news but alas ! the doctor came and tol
2421.ide over Implicit confidence in medical opinion of these strong-headed, healthy was not
2422.e Providence for — THE FLEMMINGS. the good of those 379 sacrifice who were willing
2423. providence upon earth His children let one endless miracle and attestation of His
2424.aint old sitting-room, dozing —for in truth he was worn out for and was only kept a
2425.oor. Thinking that might be some and an one to inquire after the health of the poor
2426.the door and opened it, there stood the man with the hammer his —carpet-bag hand
2427.ook hands, said " How d'ye do " to each other, and Wolfert Flemniing invited him in t
2428.said, of. "you thought I'd gone off for good and all, Mr. Flemming but I had some ."
2429.." for business to- night. Then he Some other time membering how much depended on 6 â
2430. business to- night. Then he Some other time membering how much depended on 6 — st
2431. the sale of her, Mill ' farm, and what happiness it would be to if she was spared, to fi
2432.ease. Just as well now, I guess, as any other time." "Well, Mr. Flemming, I sympathiz
2433.Just as well now, I guess, as any other time." "Well, Mr. Flemming, I sympathize hea
2434.heartily with you. I had a trial of the same sort once, all and know about it, but b
2435. but business it is business, and, like time and tide, waits for no man. I come up p
2436., and, like time and tide, waits for no man. I come up place to-night to conclude t
2437., and should like to settle the ' ' — matter now." Just at that moment one through h
2438. ' — matter now." Just at that moment one through her of those prolonged piercing
2439. his wife had uttered from rang through time to time all illness, the silent house â
2440.e had uttered from rang through time to time all illness, the silent house — and W
2441. is, Yery if ; well, Mr. Flemming. That will do ; that there's no one ahead of like
2442.lemming. That will do ; that there's no one ahead of like to me see, offering you I
2443. face of Wolfert Flem- ming. "I have no other bid for the farm, Mr. Cutter," " he ans
2444. offer quite liberal." "All ten, right. Good-by. I shall be up here at sharp," said
2445.the bedside looking at her. There was a change scarlet flush —he saw that The ing ly
2446.is eyes ; from her forehead. strong the man gave way —and covering his face with
2447.o pour out the emotions of his grateful soul and implore their gracious assistance.
2448.nly the type, soling him. fell upon his soul, resting over, it, and con- His devotio
2449.g, the waves laved the land saints ; of God and His and winged by faith, his spirit
2450. FLEMMINGS. and felt for tlie first 383 time that he could say in spirit will is and
2451.st 383 time that he could say in spirit will is and in truth : " God's my will. Tea
2452.t he could say in spirit will is and in truth : " God's my will. Tea ! though he slay
2453. say in spirit will is and in truth : " God's my will. Tea ! though he slay me, yet
2454.pirit will is and in truth : " God's my will. Tea ! though he slay me, yet will I tr
2455.s my will. Tea ! though he slay me, yet will I trust Him." window, As he stood a mom
2456.g the he was startled by the sound of a man's footsteps on the flagged walk below ;
2457.a stooping cealment. figure crouched if one of the old elms, as for the Who could i
2458.ay that ought to be said," answered the man from under his slouched hat. "Who amaze
2459.said Wilbur, calling him by old with an idea that was respectful and polite to do so
2460.and polite to do so ; " Elder, was that man with the r hammer up " 'Cause," here to
2461.r, was that man with the r hammer up " 'Cause," here to-night ?" "Yes; why?" answered
2462.ed, and speaking in a sharp whisper, " 'cause he's a big rascal, Elder, is tryin' to
2463. know, all I must look out for the main chance— havin' and feed. them young see, I '
2464. sick, and knowed that some of the Lake family'd be up along with her all night ; and
2465.er all night ; and I thought I'd run my chance of getting speech with — THE FLEMMING
2466.Flem- ming, who began to think that the man was fear, cer- tainly intoxicated. " Bn
2467.llow's throat, thinks they've got the ; world in a sling but when God begins to fight
2468.'ve got the ; world in a sling but when God begins to fight agin' 'em they cave in
2469.have " you sold Mill farm yet ?" it, As good as sold Wilbur," he answered, won- deri
2470.wered, won- dering more and more at the man's manner. " For how much ?" " " Two tho
2471.mphati- Thinking more and more that the man was either crazy or drunk, Wolfert Flem
2472.upon I arm to detain him, and whispered one minit, Elder. tell you what it is : the
2473.ch way the turkey-hen went, I heard the man ! with the hammer tell the other he fou
2474.eard the man ! with the hammer tell the other he found out the soapstun kerry." * " S
2475.un down yonder Mill Farm. it Bless your soul, Elder, there's hull lots of there it ;
2476.hull lots of there it ; and the way the man with the hammer found was from seeing o
2477. — oh, he's him the place was a sharp one, Elder —whips up here to see you came
2478.ame back three days ; ago, bringin' the other fellow with him measurin' and chippin'
2479. tur- key-hen say as ; and I heard that man with the hammer ' how you was a green o
2480.n with the hammer ' how you was a green one, not to know the value of your own land
2481.'ll and if I can do without do 'em this good turn as sure as it, I live ; and here I
2482.ng's heart almost stood listened to the man's strange recital. as he full He knew ;
2483.e him from present — 388 difficulties life ; THE FLEMMINGS. and make his children
2484.n ruined by a sharp ! and dishonourable man There was no reason story, why he shoul
2485.n as the sun arose, to examine into the matter himself. These were his thoughts as he
2486.hat for he was going to be so stupid as man with the hammer have Mill farm two thou
2487.answered, I'd risk while he grasped the man's hand. 'Nough said, Elder ; my life fo
2488.the man's hand. 'Nough said, Elder ; my life for any of " your folks —be sure of m
2489.e Miss' Flemmingll be on the mend soon. Good shall night." "Good night, friend. You
2490.e on the mend soon. Good shall night." "Good night, friend. You hear some- thing fro
2491.ot started once since he left the room. good news pened. ; then, instead of going to
2492.onsense, and be worried with me away my time. There's lots and lots of there, father
2493.tter happen to find it out ?" ; We met, one day, down there at the brook me to tell
2494.ve out ; summer at the Old and what the man with the boy's patience began to then s
2495.ther, Ruby, that you, idling around the time, should be of more use after of the res
2496.w it seems as if there's a chink in the world for everybody, will fit and that nobody
2497.e's a chink in the world for everybody, will fit and that nobody but the right one i
2498. will fit and that nobody but the right one in it. But I'm mighty glad, old fellow
2499.ad of anything in again, until I see my life, and never expect be mother sitting the
2500." Won't she, Nick ?" tell " I guess she will. you what it'll make them stare who hav
2501.my father to powder —because he loved God better they find out that he has lost.
2502.hey find out that he has lost. than the world —when gained more than he Whew !" old
2503.about Dives, though that and declare in God has punished father with riches, that t
2504.me nod a I guess, Nick, mother'U have a good time now, stuff- ing her pillows with s
2505.d a I guess, Nick, mother'U have a good time now, stuff- ing her pillows with soft s
2506.all the sacred faith of a father's dear love, that, should prosperity result from yo
2507.cultivate this won- derful talent which God has given you." ; THE FLEMMINGS. " O, 3
2508.d dug up and hewn out himself with such labor aj.d exertion that many a time he had f
2509.self with such labor aj.d exertion that many a time he had fallen fainting to the ea
2510.th such labor aj.d exertion that many a time he had fallen fainting to the earth whi
2511.tite of them be genuine out, the finest quality. Hurrying they walked swiftly down to t
2512.verflowing with grati- tude to Almighty God and adoring the ways of His providence,
2513.king of her, ever of her, and the great happiness that pros- perity would bring her, afte
2514. power that riches for w ould give him, good; if Almighty God prospered him he shoul
2515. for w ould give him, good; if Almighty God prospered him he should justly in the s
2516.lf as his steward and nothing more, and labor suffering ; poor and so that when the e
2517.blessed sentence faithful " "Well done, good and servant, enter thou into the joy of
2518.-by, Martha Flemming awoke once more to life and consciousness, knowing the dear fac
2519.ak that she could only look slowly from one to an- other without speaking. The She
2520. could only look slowly from one to an- other without speaking. The She is was gone.
2521.t and she well." keep everything may —mind! so ; I don't say she will —get But t
2522.thing may —mind! so ; I don't say she will —get But they felt, somehow, that Alm
2523.t But they felt, somehow, that Almighty God, in answer to their fervent prayers, wa
2524. to utter a word ; she was as pallid as death, and wasted to a alive, shadow— but a
2525.imple words, that ' "he had changed his mind about Mill' farm, and should not sell i
2526.t to dispose of the property." Then the man's fury broke loose. dis- honest schemes
2527.ose. dis- honest schemes, his dreams of wealth, his glittering castles in the air, wer
2528.w how I can excuse Nicholas, unless you will least ex- take into consideration that
2529.hosaphat !" up here putting my mother's life ! in danger, and insulting you before y
2530. Let us forget it, Nick —and forgive. God has been very good to us gratitude —
2531. Nick —and forgive. God has been very good to us gratitude — too good for us to
2532. been very good to us gratitude — too good for us to soil the of uncharitar we owe
2533.ical undertone of his that sounded like one of the minor keys of an organ. Then THE
2534.MMINGS. Nicholas said no more about the matter. felt 397 But he very well satisfied, a
2535.miniously, and he could not to save his cause of it. life, feel sorry for having been
2536.d he could not to save his cause of it. life, feel sorry for having been the Present
2537.s had not given the subject thought his mind was full ; a of single practical chaoti
2538. a of single practical chaotic ideas of wealth to be place care ; made suddenly availa
2539.ords almost took breath. away the young man's " The discovery is a valuable slowly
2540.uable slowly " but to work the quarry ; one," he answerd will require some capital
2541.t to work the quarry ; one," he answerd will require some capital —which I do not
2542.thing now, Nick, except that note which will be due in a few days, and which I canno
2543.I don't know! I and, having done divine will, all am in God's holy keeping; that I c
2544.and, having done divine will, all am in God's holy keeping; that I can, I shall awa
2545.he thought, " that with all this untold wealth lying in the earth at their very feet,
2546.try hundreds to save his credit and his honor. Of course the note would be protested
2547.no help his teeth ; for* it." The young man gnashed he would have sold himself into
2548.gnashed he would have sold himself into slavery to have saved his father —he his woul
2549.p there bought slaves, and there was no one who on he would have thought life ; it
2550.was no one who on he would have thought life ; it worth while to set a price and the
2551.ice and the fact forced itself upon his mind, trial, it that however great and humil
2552.e. Then Nicholas Flemming wished in his soul that he was a Christian in deed and in
2553. that he was a Christian in deed and in truth, with the courage and resignation to be
2554.hristian in deed and in truth, with the courage and resignation to bear nobly for God's
2555.urage and resignation to bear nobly for God's sake whatever troubles He might send.
2556.ry to bear if but ; I'll it like a I'll man, come what help may and, will, God spar
2557.ike a I'll man, come what help may and, will, God spares me, my father feet with a a
2558.I'll man, come what help may and, will, God spares me, my father feet with a again.
2559.le to explain satisfactorily, and never will —for He THE FLEMMINGS. 399 this is wh
2560.s the balance only knows why ; put into one scale, and that in the other why the in
2561.y ; put into one scale, and that in the other why the in; nocent suffer and the guilt
2562.ilty triumph and prosper why His Church world is bears the stigmata while the crowned
2563.t But she mustn't that! eat too much at time — mind People who are getting over a
2564. mustn't that! eat too much at time — mind People who are getting over a low fever
2565.hen they have enough," said the doctor, one morning as he was going away. " I'll fe
2566.I don't know what do with myself. Under God, your skill and mother's life." attenti
2567.elf. Under God, your skill and mother's life." attention have saved my " Well, I don
2568.l, I don't know about that. Your mother one time, I as- has a pretty tough constitu
2569. don't know about that. Your mother one time, I as- has a pretty tough constitution
2570.ther one time, I as- has a pretty tough constitution of her own to begin with. But I had no
2571.ulse three days. It was her tough " the constitution brought her through." " And," thought H
2572.h." " And," thought Hope, compassion of God, in answer to our prayers." But she kep
2573.od " And see here, Hope," he said, with one foot in the stirrup, " I think you migh
2574. very gently her. and lay her upon : It will rest and refresh And remember she's not
2575.sh And remember she's not thing at all. Good day." It to be excited about any- was a
2576.the thanks whicja they offered Almighty God for the restoration of the beloved one.
2577. God for the restoration of the beloved one. They gathered around her, as she lay u
2578.softly kissed, looking Her eyes patient love followed her dear ones as they to moved
2579.- which seemed to come from some higher cause than the healthful reaction of the vita
2580.y for her conversion to the True Faith. One evening Wolfert Flemming sat alone with
2581.in his, " ? would it the minister If it will, I will "No," she answered, after a pau
2582." ? would it the minister If it will, I will "No," she answered, after a pause, in w
2583.ent that a struggle was going on in her mind ; " no, I am going to tell you somethin
2584. going to tell you something that until will surprise you." "Had you " not better wa
2585.it you get stronger?" he asked. No ; it will do me good to relieve my mind. on I sha
2586.stronger?" he asked. No ; it will do me good to relieve my mind. on I shall never ge
2587.. No ; it will do me good to relieve my mind. on I shall never get stronger with thi
2588." she began, " what a bitter trial your change of religion was to me, and how deeply g
2589.n, " what a bitter trial your change of religion was to me, and how deeply grieved I was
2590.eir earthly prospects for the sake of a religion which I thought worse than idolatrous."
2591. it the issue had been a merely earthly one TEE FLEMMINGS. there's 403 no sacrifice
2592.” an which lay for all between Almighty God and our own souls eternity," he answere
2593. between Almighty God and our own souls eternity," he answered in low earnest tones. it
2594.ering suffering of lips. caused me such mind as I had never imagined, and the unchri
2595.Saviour's words concerning the Bread of Life. I tried to stop thinking about it—bu
2596.oks by stealth, torn and tossed between science, that I my mind got so my pride and my
2597.n and tossed between science, that I my mind got so my pride and my conand I used to
2598.I was going stark crazy. past that Then one night was going room — Eva's room —
2599., and on, and on> 404 in THE FLEMMINGS. mind, day and night, waking and sleeping. my
2600.that was owing, I guess, to the excited state of rible fright ! my mind, and the terr
2601. the excited state of rible fright ! my mind, and the terrible, terfell ill, An hour
2602.into the fold of Faith, for I have been one lost in the wilderness." " Oh, my God!"
2603.n one lost in the wilderness." " Oh, my God!" murmured the man, almost over- come,
2604.ilderness." " Oh, my God!" murmured the man, almost over- come, "how can I thank Th
2605. bowed his head, and what passed in his soul was known only to Him by whose grace sa
2606.d. ! THE FLEMMINGS. " Wife, this is 405 good news he said at for ; the very best I e
2607.or ; the very best I ever heard in " my life," last. Help me, and pray me," said Mrs
2608.." " Truly are hope ; we united now, in one faith and one together, dear wife, we w
2609. hope ; we united now, in one faith and one together, dear wife, we will work out o
2610.e faith and one together, dear wife, we will work out our ; salvation and together,
2611.I hope ere long, we, with our children, will be received into the One True Fold, and
2612.our children, will be received into the One True Fold, and partake of the Bread of
2613.ld, and partake of the Bread of Eternal Life. Oh, wife ! this moment foreshadows hea
2614.giving were so it. blended that earthly language could not express I will leave it to yo
2615.at earthly language could not express I will leave it to you to imagine the joy of M
2616. of the angels in heaven over a rescued soul One ing, day before the note fell due,
2617.he angels in heaven over a rescued soul One ing, day before the note fell due, Nich
2618. brought in two from the post-office —one for his father, and Eva was up stairs w
2619.Wolfert Flemming was reading in his old one for Reuben. ; : 406 THE FLEMMINGS. Luth
2620.er for you, father, for you, and here's one Euby, from your do, friend, Patrick McC
2621. of land they're going to build the new State House on ; and I send you five thousand
2622.t until I ask you for the principal. It will be no use to send shall it back, becaus
2623.tend to throw away the balance abroad ; good time while I'm of the five thou- so if
2624.to throw away the balance abroad ; good time while I'm of the five thou- so if you d
2625.t back, which won't be for three years. love to all the family, my and ask them to t
2626.n't be for three years. love to all the family, my and ask them to think of the wander
2627.you letter for see Huldah — bless her soul — ! tell her I thank her for the havi
2628.e having written, and didn't answer her same reasons given above. I have written to
2629.over the pages of the old Bible. fallen One had it. on the is floor, and the cat wa
2630.sing himself as from a dream. Thanks be God! thanks be " It's just like to God!" !"
2631.s be God! thanks be " It's just like to God!" !" George Merill said Hope, laugh- in
2632.; and sent him several highly favorable art criti- cisms, which he had cut from the
2633. Atlantic. of all the kind I can't tell one-half and appreciative things that were
2634.aid about it ; Buby was filled with new life ; THE KLEMMINGS. he knew now that he ha
2635.now that he had not been idling his 409 life away, but had been blindly working out
2636. and making much of the talent Almighty God had given him. " I must go up and tell
2637. while lit an describable expression of peace face, " not to night. up his noble all
2638.eble, and joy might us, make her again. God is very good to my children. Huldah, de
2639.y might us, make her again. God is very good to my children. Huldah, dear child, I t
2640.e since I particularly know how easy it will be for me to repay him when I begin to
2641. him when I begin to work the quarry. I will go up and send Eva to you. Tell her ,"
2642.communious with her ; offering herself, soul and body, as her handmaid and servant,
2643.the Psalm Conjitemini Domino* at prayer time all ; nothing could felt ; have express
2644.bout the room. never was so happy in my life. How jolly it will be to-morrow, when m
2645.r was so happy in my life. How jolly it will be to-morrow, when mother knows what ha
2646.r others." And did, indeed, her; and no one ever heard her speak of John Wilde agai
2647. " I tell you, father, that I feel like one risen from the dead, in a two-fold sens
2648. one risen from the dead, in a two-fold sense. What day of the month is it ?' "The fi
2649.blithely. to fret and repine, us. since God has been so good and merciful to I shal
2650.t and repine, us. since God has been so good and merciful to I shall be now at to go
2651." are you strong enough do to hear some good news ?" It will " I guess I am. me good
2652. enough do to hear some good news ?" It will " I guess I am. me good," she replied w
2653.good news ?" It will " I guess I am. me good," she replied with an expectant look. "
2654.ich half frightened him. it " That is ! good news. through me ! Why, father how it c
2655.e and it was only after Cutter came the other day, to pay for the farm, that I heard
2656., as scarcely comprehending how, by any chance upon earth, that shiftless, ungrateful
2657. upon earth, that shiftless, ungrateful man had got to be mixed up in their affairs
2658.ow her great bear, Nick, had served the-man-with-the-hammer, she laughed out, and s
2659.o cordial could have done me half the ! good that your news has. Oh, hus- band her,
2660.help me to thank patient and merciful." God He has been so And kneeling down beside
2661. out the adoration and gratitude of his soul to God for all His mercies, for all the
2662. adoration and gratitude of his soul to God for all His mercies, for all the trials
2663.r the gift of faith all, he thanked Him life, which had been vouchsafed to him and h
2664.from her bed of sickness, his in up her soul with genuine faith, true humility and f
2665.rvent gratitude unto the Giver of every good and perfect gift. The prayer ; tranquil
2666.as chrism refreshes and strengthens the soul. "Now, wife, God bless you," he said, a
2667.s and strengthens the soul. "Now, wife, God bless you," he said, as ; he leant over
2668.to Plymouth pay that and attend to some other business." wallet, father. Be careful o
2669.nking how natural the cautious, thrifty nature of the was to hear little woman croppin
2670.ping out once more. best his took it as one of the symptoms of a healthy recovery,
2671. it, but there was genuine gratitude on one hand, and a sincere, reverent affection
2672. a sincere, reverent affection upon the other, which, fused together on that occasion
2673.uced a confidence between the two until death separated which continued and ripened t
2674.ted which continued and ripened them —many, many years afterwards Huldah's of the
2675.ich continued and ripened them —many, many years afterwards Huldah's of the dairy
2676.ry modest account of her management and other domestic matters which must have been u
2677.ng's 416 THE FLEMMINGS. and brought her many healthy the old thrifty heart good, ste
2678. her many healthy the old thrifty heart good, steps forward into busy ways to of lif
2679.ood, steps forward into busy ways to of life When there were no more questions littl
2680.to thank you. that You'll make my boy a good wife to father —I know — and ; be a
2681.r old days and I pray that you deserve. God may bless and reward you it as As I has
2682.you it as As I has turned out, it was a good thing that you ! wrote to George Merill
2683.e kissed her tento me, child, in bring- God has been good ing me out of the darknes
2684.tento me, child, in bring- God has been good ing me out of the darkness of error int
2685.he day here, THE FLEMMINGS. 417 when we will talk over everything." And when Huldah
2686.d yet how wonderfully had the mercy and love His creatures been of Almighty God towa
2687.and love His creatures been of Almighty God towards in their regard. illustrated al
2688. thought, do of things work together !" good them who love and serve Him nothing of
2689.f things work together !" good them who love and serve Him nothing of it Mrs. Flemmi
2690. it was like " deep calling unto deep a life full was truly a new birth, into of con
2691.the its new-born humility which had had soul. birth in her They were very happy sitt
2692.ere very happy sitting around her, each one relating his or her personal experience
2693., each one relating his or her personal experience during the dark sorrowful days just pas
2694.coal sketch of Nick running off all the-man-with-the- hammer, which made them " lau
2695.u serve for ? my board in that way " It will have to be planed to get that thing off
2696.d Mrs. after 419 Hemming to he went out will u ; he is a perfect riddle to me, lives
2697. before him which he if determined, all life were spared him, should aspirations. fu
2698.tricity to his steps, which made the of life young blood leap with the strong impetu
2699. through his veins, and strength to his being. imparted new and Mrs. Flemming did not
2700.ed new and Mrs. Flemming did not in her nature to under- comprehend this ; it was not
2701. said " it was a pity, a great waste of time, in her opinion. He might ; have chosen
2702.s a pity, a great waste of time, in her opinion. He might ; have chosen some more usefu
2703.olden liair for THE FLEMMINGS. the last time, kissed him, blessed go, sad to think h
2704. the farm matters in care of the years, man who his sister, had been working there
2705. who his sister, had been working there many and who took charge lishment fert of th
2706.k charge lishment fert of the dairy and other affairs be- longing to the feminine dep
2707.artment of the estab- — and ; all the family went to Boston. Wolto Patrick Flemming
2708. with a carriage figure of the delight, good Irishman, his face and his big hands ou
2709.defies description, and I leave to your imagination. I should be glad to tell you of fun so
2710.o such things, laughed and cried at the same time. of love that night were to last a
2711.h things, laughed and cried at the same time. of love that night were to last acts g
2712. laughed and cried at the same time. of love that night were to last acts go and inf
2713.rds conduct them into his presence. The good Bishop received Wolfert Flemming and hi
2714.ishop received Wolfert Flemming and his family with friendly welcome and great emotion
2715. family with friendly welcome and great emotion and, after a long conversation with the
2716.ts * A literal fact. 422 THE FLEMMINGS. life, they seemed to enter a new on a new ea
2717. themselves in the presence of Almighty God and examine the records of their consou
2718.examine the records of their consouls ! science, to "search Jerusalem with lamps," to h
2719.nce, and the necesfruits of faith ; own good works as the all they ac- cepted with j
2720. cepted with joy a spiritual help, to " life, the ceaseless responsibilities of cour
2721.lities of courageously determined, with God's their salvation with fear work out ;"
2722. pressed together and to running over." desire, There was nothing left for them nothin
2723.g imperfect or meaningless in this holy religion into whose fold they were led ; and, if
2724.haron and —spangled between, wherever one could be placed, with twinkling lights
2725., with twinkling lights ! Fair image of peace and holiness well might thy children, w
2726.hat wonderful night when, through thee, God was reconciled with man by the begotten
2727., through thee, God was reconciled with man by the begotten Son ! birth of His only
2728.owest whispers and ! 424 THE FLEMMINGS. honor which they pay thee for the sake of thy
2729. the deadly wound inflicted by Eve upon man- by giving birth ! to the Saviour, God'
2730. man- by giving birth ! to the Saviour, God's only-be- gotten Son thee ! — and th
2731.manger forget thee, ! had they been The world can never ! O it sinless Mother and and
2732.o gaze of thy wonderful Son, ; upon thy beauty and think the Man-God, who was crucifie
2733.ul Son, ; upon thy beauty and think the Man-God, who was crucified for its salvatio
2734.on, ; upon thy beauty and think the Man-God, who was crucified for its salvation an
2735. bears thee, in its hidden thoughts the memory of O sweet Maid of —a memory, Be- whi
2736.ghts the memory of O sweet Maid of —a memory, Be- which, times without number, bring
2737. with the humble there were none of any other class in those days in Boston who were
2738. days in Boston who were members of the One True Fold. The congregation was like th
2739. thither from the messengers ! hills by angel Their faith was the same, and they had
2740.rs ! hills by angel Their faith was the same, and they had also for their consolatio
2741. loud sonorous tones, as ; inviting the world to listen then followed the Offertory,
2742.and wine, which by the power of Almight God, and the words of consecration, into th
2743. of our converts on this occasion of an angel only could portray the sweet ly consola
2744.”father, mother, daughters and When the good Bishop approached where they knelt, he
2745.e golden embroidery of his vestments as Life. he administered to them the Bread of E
2746.inery to take back with him but by this time the soapstone quarry got to be talked a
2747.itual depths and sweetness of that holy religion which even the most liberal-minded sens
2748.on for every fear it was, indeed and in truth, the " substance of things hoped for" u
2749. Old Homestead full of the joy of a new life, united in faith as they had ever been
2750.wing a picturesque group of con- tadina one of them stopped to admire the diaits mo
2751.lden, rose-tinted haze of evening ; the other paused upon the terrace which overhangs
2752.ber, towards the golden West. About the same moment they Walking both started to lea
2753.site directions, they came against each other with such impetus that they were near f
2754.** merry laugh. !" Hilloa exclaimed the other, emerging from the cloud of dust their
2755.ief— " George Merill — where in the world— " John Wilde ! ! What brought you he
2756.u " look like a Bedouin?" " I feel like one. Come let us go and sit under the laure
2757. the laurels by the fountain and have a good, sensible " New-England Now, tell talk.
2758.he sick of this it ; and trying my best sign, to un- Sphynx but she made no to and I
2759. of their far-off home in the west- ern world came fluttering into their hearts like
2760.o their cotes; and they questioned each other as to the latest news. " I got a letter
2761.e news about the Flemmings. about their good I suppose you have heard tune. for- I w
2762.d." " Yes, I heard about that streak of good luck, or rather I read of it in a Bosto
2763.mons on the subject of my uncon- verted state and total depravity that I don't take t
2764.ough to have taken them to heart. I got one letter from of." Huldah Sneathen about
2765.ter from of." Huldah Sneathen about the time you speak Both were ries silent for a l
2766.full of sadness and the ghosts of their love's young dreams. " My mother wrote to me
2767.ow Sister Monica. There's no mistake in being Eva. I should re- you know, John, how I
2768.ill sadly. " "When my mother wrote, the family were in Boston, and the news came to he
2769.o no doubt had it second hand from some one else who was misinformed," answered Joh
2770.our lodgings." tell "John, tholic ?" me one thing ; Eoman Ca- asked George Merill,
2771.at him. friend "I and looking am, thank God," was the reply. ! " Well I suppose it'
2772.as the reply. ! " Well I suppose it's a good thing, old fellow. else, I'd as lief be
2773.e of creed or THE FLEMMINGS. as systems good enough in their 433 the moral condition
2774.on, and accompanied to the house of the soul which, trembling on the borders of time
2775.soul which, trembling on the borders of time, was only waiting to be it strengthened
2776.aiting to be it strengthened with the " life-giving Bread/' as passed through the sh
2777.Bread/' as passed through the shadow of death into the presence of this Him who decla
2778. Him who declared that " whoever eat of life." Bread should have eternal " Now tell
2779.hich John around them. special This was one of George Merill's luxuries, and dearly
2780.ome, 'Milner's End of Controversy,' and other Catholic books, solely to find out Hope
2781., as you know, she thought best for the happiness of both, differing so widely in religio
2782.ge, ; it came near ruining me, body and soul it was the ; bitter- est trial I ever h
2783. or ever expect to have and my faith in God was shaken to its foundations. Then str
2784.oad, and endeavor to forget my hopeless love, in foreign travel among scenes. But it
2785.anted, and unconscious of it About this time I formed the acquaintance of a young En
2786.ally expended and determined devote his life to enter the Society of Jesus to the se
2787.ociety of Jesus to the service of ; and God. I knew no- thing of his history then t
2788.e of ; and God. I knew no- thing of his history then that I but it happened one day ser
2789.his history then that I but it happened one day service was able ill, to do him a l
2790. we grew more and more attached to each other, I found out his religion then we began
2791.attached to each other, I found out his religion then we began to discuss the subject, a
2792.the Gesu, then I saw him only occasion- One day, towards the close of Lent, on Fri-
2793.liseum to see the " stations." He, with other scholastics from the there. Gesu, was I
2794.t as near him as I could, hoping to ex; change a few words with him on our way back bu
2795. enough, George, to prevail with me, by God's grace ; and the day on which he recei
2796.ed the Holy Viaticum, I received at the Life. same time, in his presence, the Bread
2797. Holy Viaticum, I received at the Life. same time, in his presence, the Bread of Ind
2798. Viaticum, I received at the Life. same time, in his presence, the Bread of Independ
2799. the hallowed grave of to look out into life with a firm, healthful purpose. I could
2800.t bear to leave my friend, out of whose death new life. my tie soul had risen into a
2801.leave my friend, out of whose death new life. my tie soul had risen into a It was a
2802.nd, out of whose death new life. my tie soul had risen into a It was a sacred which
2803.me and ; my conversion I had still less desire to return. Until to-night, I believe th
2804.eve that she herself to had consecrated life." 5 ' Almighty God in a religious "No "
2805. to had consecrated life." 5 ' Almighty God in a religious "No " ; it was Eva, John
2806.ent with me, unless she has changed her mind." She hasn't changed her mind, John tha
2807.anged her mind." She hasn't changed her mind, John that. ; depend upon I congratulat
2808.I congratulate you, old fellow; upon my soul, I do," exclaimed " George Merill, with
2809.ncerity. Here you are is settled in the matter of religion, which with ; a good thing
2810.ere you are is settled in the matter of religion, which with ; a good thing to begin and
2811. the matter of religion, which with ; a good thing to begin and you will go back and
2812.ch with ; a good thing to begin and you will go back and more than realize the hopes
2813.brave words, and promises write to each other frequently; John Wilde thanking God in
2814.h other frequently; John Wilde thanking God in his heart of hearts for the fair ; p
2815.ul and lonely, and ft half believing in Fate. * * * little ft ft ft ft I have, reall
2816.but more to tell; but tell my narrative will be incomplete unless I If that little.
2817.I If that little. you remember the last time Nick Flemming came back from "The Pines
2818." strike among the lumbermen, which the man gifted in prayer " felt to some purpose
2819. further restrict their privi- upon him one night and gave him a beating which brui
2820.ousand dollars, which he had drawn from time to time under the 438 pretext of using
2821.ollars, which he had drawn from time to time under the 438 pretext of using THE FLEM
2822. for the construction of the up to this time had not more than two feet above the fo
2823.is blood in such a ferment, that by the time he managed to get all the details of th
2824.f the affair into his head with a clear idea of the situation, he found it more than
2825.ed in having for their guest. The young man —just sent, ordained —had Mien into
2826.ed —had Mien into such a pre- carious state of health, that with the Bishop's con-
2827. and by the advice in to of his medical man, he ac- cepted the invitation of Wolfer
2828.Wolfert Flemming, who was Boston at the time, to return home with hills. him spend t
2829.spend the summer months in the bracing, life-restoring air of the New Hampshire in t
2830.in the old The wedding was a very quiet one, and the young couple went to house-kee
2831.THE FLEMMINGS. such a Iialo of 439 pure happiness throughout her whole being that she was
2832.439 pure happiness throughout her whole being that she was more cheerful and blithe t
2833.band's home a very happy and attractive one. Miss Debby lived on real intelligence,
2834. that herself disgraced and demeaned by being Nothing softened obliged to live with P
2835.on or kindness could sweeten her bitter nature, and she grumbled and fretted and end o
2836.iving yond all their thanks to Almighty God, whose providence had directed It all t
2837.marriage when John Wilde came home, nor many days arrival that after his Hope Flemmi
2838.n say no more than that there was great happiness and soon a Catholic wedding in the Old
2839.ils that used to be held there over the fate of unfortunate Catholics who had mercy
2840." was determined on. Now of behold ! At one end of the room, in front the tiled fir
2841.estors of the Flemmings had taken, with other rich spoils, from some Spanish It galle
2842.al Mass Patrick McCue, an honored ; the family — and guest it —being present also
2843.onored ; the family — and guest it —being present also the Wilburs, seen. who tho
2844.ever Bread that feast of the of Eternal Life, which the of that Flemmings and Patric
2845. "Wilde and his bride, a holy and happy one Eva, far away in her ! novitiate in the
2846. spirit with theirs, and prayed for the happiness, temporal and eternal, of her dear ones
2847.conversion, and she deindeed, it clined being present at the wedding ; was more than
2848.er- and she was very happy, and ashamed One day John was unpacking a box which Geor
2849.t a rich silk robe, such as are worn by man- 442 darins of the THE FLEMMINGS. first
2850. yes," but ice ; But broke the and from time talks to time after that they had Catho
2851. ; But broke the and from time talks to time after that they had Catholic religion a
2852.ks to time after that they had Catholic religion and its many about the doctrines. Mrs.
2853.that they had Catholic religion and its many about the doctrines. Mrs. Wilde, now ve
2854. and waiting any hour for the coming of death, is prepared with the best dispositions
2855. Soon after Hope's wedding, she noticed one day that the portrait of old Lady Penda
2856.as it all a Catholic." And you knew the time ?" to " Yes, and I should have been gla
2857.ness it ; to me. could. I can't see the good of and never her But he's happy ; and I
2858.lbur now Wolfert Flemming's factor, and one of the The Flemthriving men of the neig
2859.INGS. and feathered and almost murdered will mobs, the Church grow and flour- ish â€
2860.st pay for them. 4. A fine of two cents will be imposed for each day that the book i
2861. Failure to return a Reserve 5. book on time subjects the borrower to a fine of 15 c

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/