Concordance for The fate of Father Sheehy.

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1.   *! ii n i.i w p» * immmmmm ^ol^~ i THE FATE OF FATHER SHEEHY. % Mt IN of Cij^ptarg 
2. SHEEHY. % Mt IN of Cij^ptarg THE OLDEN TIME. BY MRS. — J. AUTHOR OF THE "BLARES A
3. STREET, % ^ ^Coltections^ Special ^ THE FATE OF FATHEK SEEEHT. CHAPTER Would that ''
4. HEK SEEEHT. CHAPTER Would that ''the I. fate of Sheehy'' were only a legend apocrybu
5. rtain it stands recorded on the page of history, and •is inscribed in characters of b
6. f the Catholic people of Ireland. It is one of the darkest and most revolting pages
7. es in the annals of any nation, and its memory hangs a fearful shadow over the hills a
8. long since the ended, and the national religion religion which Nicholas Sheehy loved an
9. ce the ended, and the national religion religion which Nicholas Sheehy loved and practis
10. — been transferred from the stage of life but the doom of to the historic page Fa
11. is unmerited sufferings and ignominious death, are still remembered with intense affe
12. e died. of the Tipperary peasant is the memory of this devoted priest, and may we not
13. as often steeled that heart, and nerved many a strong arm with yet greater strength
14. us, — sympathizing — the Celtic — man most heart, and utterly- with the op- p
15. y; for they, indeed, "leaned side,'' to virtue's rash, and sprang, to extent, from his
16. , he might have escaped, at least, with life. And yet, when^we come power to conside
17. and its ministers, and the — 4 ; THE FATE OF state unhappy of the country at the
18. ministers, and the — 4 ; THE FATE OF state unhappy of the country at the period in
19. od, Nicholas was sent to France for his education, it being then a capital crime in those
20. as sent to France for his education, it being then a capital crime in those penal day
21. ntrust with his son s tuition. Catholic education was forbidden under the most severe pen
22. means of doing so, were reduced to the necessity of sending their sons to Louvain or St.
23. or St. Omers, Salamanca or VallaOf that time well might Davis dolid. sing : <^ Oh we
24. and peer, Fresh cruelties were made by law, And, fiird with hate, Our senate sate
25. w." Nicholas Sheeliy early manifested a desire to embrace the priestly state, and whil
26. fested a desire to embrace the priestly state, and while still young was admitted to
27. ad with the consecrated oil that it was one day to be severed from its trunk by a p
28. s destined to fall beneath the sword of justice. But what do I say ? justice ! no let m
29. e sword of justice. But what do I say ? justice ! no let me not so far prostitute that
30. efore the altar in the vigour — 6 THE FATE OF aad the bloom of youth, his fine ova
31. Maker his young heart glowing with the love of God, and with charity towards all Ye
32. is young heart glowing with the love of God, and with charity towards all Yet had a
33. nd with charity towards all Yet had any one been able mankind. to draw aside at the
34. not have shrunk from contemplating his fate^^ —his martyrdom. was only a limited,
35. dreds continually braved the terrors of death and torture to bestow on the poor, sufi
36. ng Catholics Of this the consolation of religion. of zealous young priests number was Fa
37. priests number was Father Sheehy, which time he had been '' at least for several yea
38. EHY. 7 people in the doctrines of their religion. He had been arrested each time and for
39. eir religion. He had been arrested each time and formally tried, but, by some means
40. d formally tried, but, by some means or other, had. as often escaped conviction. He w
41. he county. These men, amongst whom But, same qualities that were numbered, to their
42. t several ministers of the Church 8 THE FATE OF by. law established, were banded tog
43. nisters of the Church 8 THE FATE OF by. law established, were banded together in an
44. ates, '' minister's money," and various other assessments, imposed on the people for
45. ll in operation, and if, perchance, any one of them manifested the — slightest de
46. ne of them manifested the — slightest desire to assist his oppressed brethren, it wa
47. r — was so they believed them neither law nor justice were starving trampled on a
48. s so they believed them neither law nor justice were starving trampled on and outraged
49. elves together, resolved to make common cause against the common enemy. Had it not be
50. but the whole country would have become one scene of anarchy and bloodshed, for the
51. treated as the vilest criminals, and in many cases put to an ignominious death. Fath
52. and in many cases put to an ignominious death. Father Sheehy, then, had long been bot
53. ay. He was looked upon as a troublesome man, a dangerous man, because he feared not
54. upon as a troublesome man, a dangerous man, because he feared not to advocate the
55. , because he feared not to advocate the cause of the poor, and because his character
56. the country for miles and miles around. Many an attempt had been made, as I have alr
57. already shown, to get him out of 10 THE FATE OF the way, but Heaven had so far prese
58. assword of the night, and greeting each other with the secret grasp of sworn brotherh
59. e very lowest classes, judging by their language and deportThey already far outnumbered
60. erce excitement of the hour, and 12 THE FATE OF the increasing consciousness of stre
61. very side. " By the Lord Harry T' cried one gigantic peasant, as he brandished a hu
62. bedience to this order (for Darby was a man high in authority amongst the Whiteboys
63. ed as though stung by an ! ! — '^Why, God bless my soul. Father Doyle, is it you
64. stung by an ! ! — '^Why, God bless my soul. Father Doyle, is it you I have here 1
65. oing to do a civil thing/' returned the man, persisted the priest evasively. " But
66. ect was in view. " Nothin', in the wide world, your reverence, only to pay Shaun Mesk
67. er Doyle, as I'm a !" the That's livin' man this blessed night." " Blessed night so
68. t most impressive tone, '^you may thank God that went on, in a * This was the name
69. mselves of their organization. 14 I THE FATE OP discovered your intention in time to
70. HE FATE OP discovered your intention in time to prevent its execution ; for I know y
71. prevent its execution ; for I know you will not go against my bidding wlien I tell
72. turn quietly to your homes. Alas what a change has been wrought in you by suffering an
73. d, a fearful massacre would follow, and many of yourselves would lose your lives, wh
74. advised by me, and return To-morrow you will to your homes. rejoice for having obeye
75. er Doyle, we'll not be said by you this time '' \" But I command you as a priest of
76. owardly crime " Ay !" shouted more than one hoarse voice, as if the speakers were g
77. here the night, an' Father Sheehy, long life to him !" — B 16 isn^t THE FATE OF to
78. long life to him !" — B 16 isn^t THE FATE OF to the fore to prevent us. if An^ ma
79. , and begged me to hasten hither. Thank God !" he fervently added, " thank God I am
80. hank God !" he fervently added, " thank God I am not too late Meanwhile the crowd h
81. d his arms towards the people, his back being turned towards the village. ''Once more
82. hrilling adjure you by country and your religion, to turn back while yet your hands are
83. hat you propose to do, and the curse of God shall fall ! solemnity, ''and the love
84. f God shall fall ! solemnity, ''and the love you bear your — FATHER SHEEHY. heavil
85. yours ding, ^ ; 17 do ; my bid- and you will have my blessing and the blessing of Go
86. ll have my blessing and the blessing of God T' A backward motion of the crowd was s
87. as the poor fellows were, there was not one who did not shrink from the dread alter
88. im and incurring For a moment there was God's anger. a sullen murmur of disapprobat
89. his aged eyes. '' Thanks be to Thee, he God murmured, *' thanks that Thou hast his
90. hou hast his appearance !'' from 18 THE FATE OF permitted me to save these poor un-
91. existence more wretched still. When, my God when wilt Thou vouchsafe to lighten the
92. e they Lord how long T And then the old man slowly turned and retraced his steps to
93. self quickly on his arm. am thankful to God and to you,'' he said, ^' that you have
94. ever men were w^arranted in taking the law into their own hands, it would be these
95. an any people ever did before under the same circumstances. — ! FATHER SHEEHY. 19
96. liem, and I would willingly lay down my life to better their condition. From my Nobo
97. ir condition. From my Nobody doubts it, man, nobody doubts it,'' returned Father Do
98. urned Father Doyle, with " But now,'^ a good-humoured smile. '' he added, you must l
99. till, ril go and look for a bed in some other part of the house. Good night, '' and G
100. a bed in some other part of the house. Good night, '' and God bless you T' A few da
101. r part of the house. Good night, '' and God bless you T' A few days after, on a raw
102. mall table at his right hand, his burly form encased in a dressing-gown of rich broc
103. as almost to conceal her face. ! 20 THE FATE OF Dropping a low curtsey, and a " sarv
104. on his thin, sharp features. '*Well, my good woman,'' said the portly rector, ''what
105. me ? You had better be quick, !" as my time is exceedingly precious '' I suppose yo
106. erful great meetin' that took place the other night on the commons abroad," began the
107. at of thaf?" " Why, nothing, plase your honor, only I thought you might be wantin' wi
108. t for respectable evidence, seeing that many undoubted criminals do escape in these
109. ays for want of evidence. Of course, my good woman, we are most anxious to procure w
110. s provided they be of decent character. Mind that, I say l'' "To be sure, your rever
111. run the rector, the risk of telling the truth, at a time scarcely find one individual
112. or, the risk of telling the truth, at a time scarcely find one individual bold enoug
113. ling the truth, at a time scarcely find one individual bold enough to come forward
114. give testimony " name is McCarthy, your honor's "And who may when we can V My reveren
115. question me on the table. —Ann 22 THE FATE OF Troth, I wouldn^t, sir, an' it isn't
116. OF Troth, I wouldn^t, sir, an' it isn't many could say that for themselves.'' '^ Wel
117. n short, ''but against whom can you, or will you swear T *' Why, to be sure. 111 swe
118. sure. 111 swear against please'' !" any one you priest, sir, for —but seeing the
119. tor frown, she quickly added — '' the one " The priest T cried the rector, starti
120. that s under Sure I got the hood sorra one else. a peep at her face this very minn
121. everence to the fair, she's as she took many a one before now.'' '' Silence, you sco
122. e to the fair, she's as she took many a one before now.'' '' Silence, you scoundrel
123. and do what I told you." " In coorse I will, sir ;" and Lanty : was now somewhat mo
124. ir ;" and Lanty : was now somewhat more One glance was enough, and — ! sidled out
125. dled out of the room, muttering, 24 THE FATE OF ''dacent woman! wisha, then, whatll
126. ''dacent woman! wisha, then, whatll the world come to at last T " And now, honest wom
127. answer, *' I don't bother my head about religion one way or the other all's alike to me.
128. ' I don't bother my head about religion one way or the other all's alike to me. But
129. r my head about religion one way or the other all's alike to me. But, for your honors
130. eye. *' But I suppose you are aware, my good woman, that we have oiie witness pay!''
131. best, fool an' all as he is, for every one knows what makes you hard on the priest
132. " An' haven't vou the assurance of the same ould gintleman to go up on a let him ta
133. heehy put her out o' the 26 chapel, THE FATE OP or cursed her, or something that way
134. mething that way, on account o' the bad life she led, an' ever since she's on the wa
135. tlawed creature like myself? If I'm not good enough for such dirty work as that, I'm
136. gh for such dirty work as that, I'm not good for anything. So give me no more o' you
137. itnesses. On or off, Mr. Hewitson 1 an' mind, if I'm to do the business, sir, you mu
138. Sir 27 Thomas soon after coming in, the good news was speedily communicated to him,
139. ough of whiskey and tobaccy to pass the time. All's one to Moll Dunlea, if she only
140. key and tobaccy to pass the time. All's one to Moll Dunlea, if she only gets the no
141. lea, if she only gets the nourishment/' Being assured that she would have whatever sh
142. On the following day a small de- 28 THE FATE OP tachment of soldiers was sent out in
143. heehy, but their search He was, for the time, unsuccessful. had said Mass that morni
144. concealed in a neighbouring cottage, a quantity of straw being heaped against the door
145. ighbouring cottage, a quantity of straw being heaped against the door of a sort of ce
146. t of cellar, wherein he was placed. For many days the search was repeated, and as of
147. iscovery^ Sometimes he narrowly escaped being caught, for his haunts began to be know
148. tion was issued to the effect, that any one who should henceforward harbour or assi
149. f the people, so that FATHEK SHEEHY. 29 many began to shrink from lodging the persec
150. endly homestead to procure refreshment. One evening he determined to make his way t
151. ed him that the farmer's wife, a pious, good woman, was at the point of death, and,
152. pious, good woman, was at the point of death, and, though strongly urged not to go,
153. thing should prevent him from doing his duty. ^^No,'' said he to his brother-in-law,
154. duty. ^^No,'' said he to his brother-in-law, Thomas Burke, " Ally Boyce shall not d
155. Church, if I can only reach her alive. Many a time has she ministered to my wants,
156. , if I can only reach her alive. Many a time has she ministered to my wants, and she
157. ve been a houseless wanderer, and, with God's help. Til not desert her now in her h
158. not desert her now in her hour of need. God's blessing be with you, Thomas,'' and h
159. , Thomas,'' and he wrung the — 30 THE FATE OF outstretched hand with even unusual
160. ed hand with even unusual ''I won't say good-bye to "warmth. Kitty, for I know she'd
161. she'd be only trying to persuade my see love, me not to go. Give her anyhow, and sho
162. . Give her anyhow, and should you never life, me again in !'' don't forget me in you
163. e in your prayers. So now, here goes in God's name " But, for God's sake. Father Ni
164. now, here goes in God's name " But, for God's sake. Father Nicholas, dear, let me g
165. ve a long road to travel '' Not for the world, Tom, not for the world would I consent
166. '' Not for the world, Tom, not for the world would I consent to what you propose. ch
167. Eemember your and that, after wife and God, your first Not a step farther, duty is
168. and God, your first Not a step farther, duty is to them. if there be danger, I I ins
169. nsist upon it And gently pushit alone." will meet — brother-in-law into the house,
170. pushit alone." will meet — brother-in-law into the house, he closed the door, and
171. use, he closed the door, and making the sign of the cross upon his forehead and ing:
172. — FATHER SHEEHY. 31 excursion, not a soul ventured, or dared venture, to leave th
173. o Boyce's house. The road was shaded on one side by a high hawthorn hedge, and he h
174. without appearing to notice them, when one of them called out "Why, then, Father S
175. s your hurry this fine evening T actual necessity. is : " It 32 THE FATE OF "Maybe his re
176. ng T actual necessity. is : " It 32 THE FATE OF "Maybe his reverence is goin' over t
177. ingly. ''Well, at any rate, he can take time to give us his blessinV suggested the t
178. in a few minutes we'll introduce you to one o' the self, man alive, or we'll you, s
179. we'll introduce you to one o' the self, man alive, or we'll you, sir, though you do
180. at's no wonder anyking's officers. It's truth I tell — FATHER SHEEHY. how, for it s
181. he rascally Whiteboys to hide in V said one of the men in a low voice, as though he
182. only venture out in the dark.'' By this time they were full in front of the ruins, t
183. churchyard vault, c — — — 34 THE FATE OF sort of when a within. commotion was
184. d noise was heard within the building a man in a white shirt stood in the dark door
185. inquired the T priest, seeing that the man who had FATHER SHEEHY. 35 appeared at t
186. I thought you had a party here/^ "Sorra one but myself, plase your reverence/^ said
187. sojers a'most within call, an' I hadn't time to go look for help. As God would have
188. ' I hadn't time to go look for help. As God would have it, I thought of this ould b
189. *' I went out, you see, sir, to 36 THE FATE OF that they must a' thought there was
190. nge rascals did run for it thanks be to God that I got your reverence — safe out
191. — safe out o' their clutches." " An' many thanks !" to you, too, my said the prie
192. aid the priest, with trusty friend deep emotion, as he shook the sinewy hand of the hon
193. ow let us hasten to your poor wife, and God grant we may be in time !" Boyce quickl
194. r poor wife, and God grant we may be in time !" Boyce quickly took off the shirt whi
195. still alive, and Father Sheehy had the happiness of administering to her the last solemn
196. stering to her the last solemn rites of religion. Two hours after she breathed her last,
197. aled. In all the grief of the afflicted family, his safety was not forgotten. What was
198. bes of the soldiers. seen —the 38 THE FATE OF CHAPTER IL THE CHURCHYAED OF SHANDRA
199. one place of tombs/' In Father Sheehy's time it was occupied by a farmer named Griff
200. iffith, who was a kind-hearted, upright man, though a Protestant. The priest had at
201. though a Protestant. The priest had at one time rendered him a signal service, and
202. ugh a Protestant. The priest had at one time rendered him a signal service, and Grif
203. ignal service, and Griffith was not the man to forget it. He had been known to say
204. her Sheehy was a wronged and persecuted man, at the same time expressing a wish tha
205. as a wronged and persecuted man, at the same time expressing a wish that he could do
206. wronged and persecuted man, at the same time expressing a wish that he could do anyt
207. do anything to assist him. His — — good dispositions were speedily put to the t
208. ions were speedily put to the test, for one evening, about an hour before sundown,
209. huge wallet slung over his shoulder. *' Good evening, Billy/' said the pretended beg
210. uT' earthen floor. " Why, then, indeed, good man, you have the odds of me," said Gri
211. arthen floor. " Why, then, indeed, good man, you have the odds of me," said Grifiit
212. k involuntarily. *'Why, as I'm a livin' man, it's Father Sheehy himself." "Sure eno
213. hat is to say, turned beggar. 40 ^' THE FATE OF But what in the world brings you her
214. ggar. 40 ^' THE FATE OF But what in the world brings you here T asked Griffith in gre
215. ore them ; so I must put an end to this state of things, for I cannot bear to see my
216. for I cannot bear to see my account. I will give myself up but not to these vulture
217. ite to Dublin and get back an answer, I will then disburden my friends of a heavy ch
218. heavy charge. You are a Protestant they will not suspect you of harbouring me, Griff
219. suspect you of harbouring me, Griffith will you afford me a shelter ? I know you ar
220. others suffer on — — ! incapable of being tempted by the reward offered for my ap
221. d that William Griffith never forgets a good turn, if it was the Pope himself that d
222. that did it.^ But where I'd just in the world can I hide you ? as soon the children d
223. re not to be relied on unless the whole family were in the secret. They were then stan
224. der i^ the grave-yard belonging to some family now extinct ? I have heard people say s
225. ight probably •# : — — — 42 THE FATE OF be able to admit me into the house a
226. knowing anything of it T " The plan's a good one, sir !'' said Griffith, in a melanc
227. ng anything of it T " The plan's a good one, sir !'' said Griffith, in a melancholy
228. ion if it could be helped. But I see no other prospect for concealment, and as I have
229. r willingly or knowingly injured living man, I have no reason to shrink from abidin
230. drink, an' a few hours' comBut the boys will soon fortable rest. 231. hidingplace for a few hours, till your family are gone to bed. Just show me the door
232. ing dead are safer company for a doomed man like me than many of the living ? ha! h
233. r company for a doomed man like me than many of the living ? ha! har His laugh was w
234. pointing to a low, narrow door, which, being a little lower than the surface of the
235. with a single bound, and lifting 44 THE FATE OF the worm-eaten door aside looked int
236. te myself now in the dim light from any one passing the I road by keeping close to
237. ouse, my worthy friend, for I hear some one coming down the road.'' In this strange
238. profit himself, I too may by a brief It will sojourn in this dreary place. prepare m
239. y place. prepare me for the approaching time when I shall be called upon to enter th
240. hen I shall be called upon to enter the world of spirits. Let me, then, endeavour to
241. . between the two worlds a link between death and life let me consider how I stand be
242. the two worlds a link between death and life let me consider how I stand before God
243. life let me consider how I stand before God how I am prepared to account for my ste
244. for my stewardship at the bar of Divine Justice/' Engaged in such meditations as these
245. ns as these he heeded not the flight of time, nor sighed for a return to the busy, b
246. ghed for a return to the busy, bustling world. But the aff^airs of men even — —
247. ere the power of his enemies — 46 THK FATE OF was supreme and despotic. An answer,
248. osal, came, addressed to his brother-in-law, who brought That it evening Father She
249. o Griffith. companied by his brother-in-law, for the house of Mr. O'Callaghan, a ma
250. ther Sheehy^s departure, his brother-in-law came up to him, and said in a low voice
251. : him with going up to town to-day. He will re- — FATHER SHEEHY. maia as near 47
252. prayer of the righteous availeth much/ God be with you till I see you again, and i
253. st to surrounding objects, his thoughts being intent on the probable issue of his app
254. approaching trial. But his trust was in God, and however it might end, he resolved
255. the great Judge of all, the — 48 THE FATE OF Disposer of events, and, therefore,
256. prison called for/' closed, he thanked God that he was not in Clonmel jail, but at
257. he was not in Clonmel jail, but at the same time he made an offering of himself to
258. as not in Clonmel jail, but at the same time he made an offering of himself to God,
259. time he made an offering of himself to God, saying " Lord ! do with me what thou :
260. agrarian disturbances in the South, the government of the day had appointed a special comm
261. ial commission to examine into the real state of the case, and to try the offenders (
262. posed) who had been taken into custody. Many of the most respectable Catholics had b
263. not plunged in mourning by the loss of many useful lives, it was not the fault of t
264. esses, for certainly they all did their duty and did it well so well, in fact, that
265. rict * Plowden relates this fact in his History of Ireland, and Dr. Madden mentions it
266. nd Times of the United Irishmen. 50 THE FATE OF and keen Pleas, legal sense of justi
267. n. 50 THE FATE OF and keen Pleas, legal sense of justice of the acumen of Sir Richard
268. FATE OF and keen Pleas, legal sense of justice of the acumen of Sir Richard Acton, Lor
269. acumen of Sir Richard Acton, Lord Chief Justice Common who had been sent The to preside
270. worthy partizanship of all praise, at a time when ran so high that it was deemed a c
271. s far above the gross prejudices of the time when seated on the bench he divested hi
272. actual merits of the case before him.* Many of the accused were, therefore, honoura
273. erefore, honourably acquitted, and they being, as may be supposed, the most respectab
274. nviction in banishment or all was great death. was morning, a mild, fair morning, and
275. what they're about, my lord," said the man, " but they're a and I don't half like
276. ll, suppose they be," replied the Chief Justice, ''you need not look so terrified. From
277. I have seen of them, they are far from being the bloodset, wild-looking 62 THE FATE
278. being the bloodset, wild-looking 62 THE FATE OP they are represented. !" thirsty sav
279. !" thirsty savages Drive on, Eobin The man obeyed for a moment, but had only gone
280. * Please your lordship, Fm afraid of my life to go on. Your lordship knows very well
281. dship knows very well how they hate the law and all belonging to it, and it's short
282. " With your permission, Sir Eichard, I will walk on before the carriage, and see wh
283. e what they are about. If they have any evil intention in awaiting us here, it must
284. EEHY. 53 perary Whiteboys have no great love for the like law or its administrators,
285. iteboys have no great love for the like law or its administrators, and I not this a
286. mblage, evidently Nay,'' said the Chief Justice, calmly, " if their intention be hostil
287. be hostile we cannot escape them, and I will not conyou should expose yourself even
288. s danger but we shall soon know how the matter stands. Drive drive on, I say on, Eobin
289. nds. Drive drive on, I say on, Eobin no one sent that now — ! ! will harm you T L
290. on, Eobin no one sent that now — ! ! will harm you T Lord, Sir Richard, here they
291. ey'll kill us all, my lord sinner. they will, they will ! Oh then, wasn't I the unlu
292. us all, my lord sinner. they will, they will ! Oh then, wasn't I the unlucky man to
293. ey will ! Oh then, wasn't I the unlucky man to undertake to drive a judge's carriag
294. awny arms of the tall mountaineers, and many loud voices were heard on either '' sid
295. n T Acton Robin was — "0 ! — 54 THE FATE OF scarcely able to keep his seat on he
296. te words in reply. Yes/' said the Chief Justice, putting his head out of the window, ''
297. siness! oh, then, sorra business in the world wide, your lordship's honor, only to th
298. ness in the world wide, your lordship's honor, only to thank you from our hearts out
299. d round the carriage windows ** My very good friends, you take me somewhat by surpri
300. itude. As a judge I have simply done my duty, favouring neither one side nor the oth
301. simply done my duty, favouring neither one side nor the other." **An* that's jist
302. uty, favouring neither one side nor the other." **An* that's jist what we want to :
303. want no favour, but only a fair thrial. Justice, my lord, justice is all we ask, and th
304. t only a fair thrial. Justice, my lord, justice is all we ask, and that s what your lor
305. at your lordship gave us. May the great God in heaven have mercy on you when you st
306. s to pray for you, too, bekase you gave law an' justice to the people.'' '' Ay !" c
307. y for you, too, bekase you gave law an' justice to the people.'' '' Ay !" cried one tal
308. justice to the people.'' '' Ay !" cried one taller than the rest, being, indeed, ou
309. ' Ay !" cried one taller than the rest, being, indeed, our acquaintance. Darby Mullen
310. n' magisthrates was — 66 all like THE FATE OF his lordship, there needn't be any W
311. in Tipperary, or anywhere else for that matter T' Here some women, crushing their way
312. ! — astore '' I" May the blessin' o' God be about him '' an' his, now an' for ev
313. you !" roared a stentorian voice, and a space being cleared, the horses were in a twi
314. roared a stentorian voice, and a space being cleared, the horses were in a twinkling
315. that wasn't afeared or ashamed to do us justice Acton for ever !" "Three cheers more, b
316. Y. show his lordship 57 jintle- and the other !'' The a Tipperary cheer is three chee
317. rst who appeared at the window. But the man drew back almost indignantly. " Take it
318. k my health this raw, chilly morning.'' man what your lordship, not a rap we'll tak
319. drinkin' your health, well do it, plase God, at our own expense. Now you may drive
320. , ! ! "No, — that's plain." 58 '* THE FATE OF Farewell, then/' said Sir Eicbard, t
321. carriage rolled " You have taught me to love away. and reverence your virtues, and t
322. owner. ** I tell you,'' said the Chief Justice, as, sinking back on his seat, he drew
323. he drew a long breath, " I tell you, my good sir, — there is a fearful moral to be
324. le to the calm, grave face of the Chief Justice, and made his *' companion laugh hearti
325. l others '?" '' Well, really, Eobin, my good fellow," said Sir Richard, with his usu
326. of those men were Whiteboys." 60 '' THE FATE OF yet they drew our carriage/' said he
327. is, Eobin,'' said the barrister, with a good-humoured laugh, ''just this, that the d
328. presented. But be off now and there's a good fellow, see to the horses for we have a
329. orses enjoyed their feed, "what is your opinion of the priest Sheehy 1 What manner of m
330. riest Sheehy 1 What manner of manner of man do you take him to be ^ " Just the sort
331. you take him to be ^ " Just the sort of man who cannot be tolerated by the petty ty
332. ep the people under their heel. He is a man of ardent temperament, bold and reckles
333. fold wrongs. I take 61 him warm-hearted man, but imprudent withal, inasmuch as he t
334. r and hate him." to be a high-souled, A time. new subject was started of per- haps m
335. rance of Bridge, the crownwitness. This man, it will be remembered from Moll Dunlea
336. Bridge, the crownwitness. This man, it will be remembered from Moll Dunlea s conver
337. self been arrested for Whiteboyism, and being known to all the country round as a sim
338. , and wholly incapable of either 62 THE FATE OF conceiving or execnting a malicious
339. repeatedly denied ject of any kind. all knowledge of the affairs of the Whiteboys, but hi
340. , under pretence of making him tell the truth, till they finally succeeded in forcing
341. hey suggested to him. Father Sheehy was one of the first mentioned in these dictate
342. n, however, Bridge disappeared, and his fate became an inscrutable mystery to the wh
343. rutable mystery to the whole community. Man, woman, and child talked of the event,
344. orthcoming, '' for,'' said they to each other, " it happens well for poor Father Shee
345. it happens well for poor Father Sheehy. God keep him out o' the way till the thrial
346. over anyhow, for the crature hasn't the sense but to swear whatever they bid him, an'
347. all know how it ud Ay, but what in the world has come of him, Paddy T asked our old
348. d our old acquaintance, Darby Mullen. " God knows I'd be sorry for anything bad to
349. ear o' swearing what he knew wasn't the truth % Myself thinks he hadn't so much cuten
350. s he hadn't so much cuteness in him/' " God knows, Darby, God know^s," " But, anyho
351. h cuteness in him/' " God knows, Darby, God know^s," " But, anyhow, replied Paddy C
352. e a dhraw'' in a tone which indicated a desire to change the subject. Once escaped fro
353. ' in a tone which indicated a desire to change the subject. Once escaped from the clut
354. his enemies. Father 64 their effect THE FATE OF on those about him. He was at j&rst
355. ppearance at the approaching trial. " I will never believe,'^ said the goodnatured T
356. e goodnatured Town-Major, " that such a man as he is guilty of the crimes laid to h
357. mes laid to his charge. I have had some experience of those over-zealous worthies in the S
358. on, surely, of the old proverb, that *' many a good father has a bad son." FATHER SH
359. ely, of the old proverb, that *' many a good father has a bad son." FATHER SHEEHY. i
360. y was speedily informed that until such time as his trial came on, he was at liberty
361. ch time as his trial came on, he was at liberty to go where he ''Agreed!'' not quit the
362. t he would appear when called, and with many expressions of heartfelt gratitude to t
363. usly by him, he withdrew, almost a free man. * * * ^ ^ * pleased, provided he did N
364. eehy was brought up for trial, the case being put back 66 THE FATE OF from time to ti
365. r trial, the case being put back 66 THE FATE OF from time to time under one pretence
366. case being put back 66 THE FATE OF from time to time under one pretence or another.
367. ng put back 66 THE FATE OF from time to time under one pretence or another. During a
368. 66 THE FATE OF from time to time under one pretence or another. During all that lo
369. d the comfort, moreover, of seeing from time to time, and especially his favourite c
370. mfort, moreover, of seeing from time to time, and especially his favourite cousin, M
371. constantly with him. But at length the time came when his fate was to be decided, a
372. m. But at length the time came when his fate was to be decided, and the summons was
373. s a notice from the court that my trial will come on on the 10th just four days from
374. y boy V — ' ! FATHER SHEEHY. ** 67 My God how ! O'Brien, much unfortunate !" crie
375. betray ! the confidence of the generous man who voluntarily answered for my appear-
376. 1 For shame, Martin O'Brien Certainly I will appear, in God's holy name, and leaving
377. tin O'Brien Certainly I will appear, in God's holy name, and leaving to Him the iss
378. But I have just got news from home that will increase your danger, and that very con
379. s made away with in fact murdered 1" ** Good God !" exclaimed the priest, and a mome
380. e away with in fact murdered 1" ** Good God !" exclaimed the priest, and a momentar
381. entary paleness overspread his face. '* Good God can that be true ? Poor simple fell
382. y paleness overspread his face. '* Good God can that be true ? Poor simple fellow C
383. be true ? Poor simple fellow Could any one be found wicked enough to lay violent h
384. less and so " A — ! ! simple T 68 THE FATE OF " I know not, my dear I sir/' replie
385. '' ''but !'' much fear that the report will come hard on you/' cried the priest, '^
386. f treason, they can still retain you as being accessory to the murder, whether real o
387. ty for me makes you too apprehensive of evil/^ And then he changed the conversation
388. ien renewed his request, and during the time which intervened before the trial, he u
389. resenting to him, and with some show of justice, that self-preservation is a sacred law
390. ice, that self-preservation is a sacred law of nature, and that it was his duty to
391. at self-preservation is a sacred law of nature, and that it was his duty to adopt the
392. cred law of nature, and that it was his duty to adopt the only means that remained t
393. You are not bound,'" said he, '' before God or man, to throw yourself on destructio
394. not bound,'" said he, '' before God or man, to throw yourself on destruction, whic
395. hrow yourself on destruction, which you will assuredly do if you stand your trial, f
396. ce to ensure your conviction. Innocence will not save you should their wretched info
397. wretched informers swear against you as being cognizant of the murder. As to the amou
398. us, and repay him with thanks, which we will do were it to beggar the whole connexio
399. ole connexion. Go, then, in the name of God, and thus defeat the malice of those wh
400. s of honour alike command me — 70 THE FATE OF : to remain and confront my accusers
401. ledged and cannot be forfeited, end the matter how it may. Go, Martin, urge me no more
402. artin, urge me no more, if you value my peace of mind, for I cannot and will not do w
403. ge me no more, if you value my peace of mind, for I cannot and will not do what you
404. alue my peace of mind, for I cannot and will not do what you ask. I will not shrink
405. cannot and will not do what you ask. I will not shrink from a trial as though I wer
406. hat here, at least, I shall have a fair chance/' "Av, but that devilish rumour that s
407. at against you, and prove it home, then God have mercy on as they will your soul, f
408. it home, then God have mercy on as they will your soul, for I know they're fit for a
409. hen God have mercy on as they will your soul, for I know they're fit for anything, a
410. or I know they're fit for anything, and will carry their point by fair — — means
411. air — — means or foul/' " Nonsense, man, nonsense f said the priest, with a fai
412. ts- be it done unto me according to His will !" And he reverently raised his hat and
413. swer. is fear V — He the great 72 THE FATE OF CHAPTER LAW AND The 10th III. JUSTIC
414. — He the great 72 THE FATE OF CHAPTER LAW AND The 10th III. JUSTICE. of February
415. E FATE OF CHAPTER LAW AND The 10th III. JUSTICE. of February came on clear and cold, an
416. ary came on clear and cold, and, before many of its hours had passed away, the Eev,
417. charge was a sonable practices. serious one, no doubt, and even the stoutest heart
418. th, and that clear blue eye was full of life and spirit, while his fine aquiline nos
419. at seven o'clock in the evening. Chief Justice Gore rose to address the jury, he said
420. e jury, he said it gave him no ordinary pleasure to assure them that the Court was unani
421. ord pronounced than retired, — 74 THE FATE OP one wild, enthusiastic cheer rang ou
422. ounced than retired, — 74 THE FATE OP one wild, enthusiastic cheer rang out from
423. ther Sheehy manifested not the smallest change of countenance, but stood leaning again
424. e drama was not yet concluded the Chief Justice arose to address the prisoner. At that
425. hat moment Father Sheehy looked towards one of his chief opponents, who had come al
426. ce an exulting smile which boded him no good. His eye wandered on to the Chief Justi
427. good. His eye wandered on to the Chief Justice, and he was convinced that there was so
428. ce of the judge had undergone a serious change. After a momentary — pause he said :
429. ontained in the indictment, and by this time you should have been free, had not a fr
430. hould have been free, had not a fresh - one, too, obstacle presented itself jury, "
431. ged a few words in a low voice with the other two judges a deathlike silence pervaded
432. '^ Nicholas Sheehy it is now my painful duty to remand you to prison you are charged
433. mand you to prison you are charged with being accessory to the wilful and deliberate
434. ies of persecution, and deprived of all chance of escape. — but his eye was still un
435. oment's pale, He was — 76 silence THE FATE OF he bowed low to the Chief Justice, t
436. e THE FATE OF he bowed low to the Chief Justice, then to each of the other two, and las
437. the Chief Justice, then to each of the other two, and lastly to the jury. '^My Lord
438. and lastly to the jury. '^My Lord Chief Justice,^^ he length, as it is '' not at all su
439. here if acquitted I should be with some other charge. Such a charge as this no one w^
440. other charge. Such a charge as this no one w^ho knows me could have I anticipated,
441. knows me could have I anticipated, but God's will be done accept this grievous hum
442. me could have I anticipated, but God's will be done accept this grievous humiliatio
443. n as coming from His paternal hand, and will only pray Him to turn the hearts of —
444. which my trial has been conducted, and will ever pray that the righteous Judge of a
445. by those who have not shrunk from doing justice to an oppressed and persecuted man. I a
446. justice to an oppressed and persecuted man. I am now ready to submit to whatever f
447. n. I am now ready to submit to whatever fate awaits me, al- those who FATHER SHEETIY
448. John Bridge were indeed murdered, which God forbid, I have had neither act or part
449. ration avails nothing before a Court of Justice, but ledge of, owe it to my reputation
450. ledge of, owe it to my reputation as a man, and more as a priest of the Most High
451. , and more as a priest of the Most High God, and that God, who seeth the heart, kno
452. a priest of the Most High God, and that God, who seeth the heart, knoweth that I do
453. Sheehy !" replied the humane !'' Chief Justice, *'it is not for me to express an opini
454. stice, *'it is not for me to express an opinion of any sort in this matter, but this T
455. express an opinion of any sort in this matter, but this T will say, that I have seldo
456. of any sort in this matter, but this T will say, that I have seldom performed a mor
457. I have seldom performed a more painful duty than that of remanding you to prison. M
458. ded, addressing that functionary, " you will take the prisoner at the bar again into
459. the bar again into custody, until such time as he be brought up for trial.'' The of
460. ate the crowd. Father Sheehy A ! 78 THE FATE OF and lie left the dock, warning gestu
461. nt turned before — who their believed opinion, him guilty of this new crime, they too
462. him guilty of this new crime, they took good care to conceal for not one dissentient
463. they took good care to conceal for not one dissentient sooner had the prisoner qui
464. -hunting, bloodthirsty magistrates goes one of them, boys let him hear how well the
465. d oft-renewed cheer which ascended from many thousand voices at the men- FATHER SHEE
466. t well have our day, and a black day it will be for him, the popish villain ; that's
467. ivered Gore, if he was again sitting in judgment but he shan't, for we'll lose a fall fo
468. onmel. This trying the fellow in Dublin will never do, and I knew that all along.''
469. was by torchsoul of — H , — 80 THE FATE OF light that he passed those gloomy ga
470. gates which were to him the portals of fate. They closed behind him, and as the ech
471. through all his body, and for the first time in his life his heart sank within him,
472. his body, and for the first time in his life his heart sank within him, for he felt
473. , for he felt as though the icy hand of death were already grasping him, and that the
474. grasping him, and that the warm, living world was shut out for ever. Bat his depressi
475. erings and humiliation here the greater will be my reward hereafter, provided God gi
476. r will be my reward hereafter, provided God gives me the grace to sanctify them by
477. y conCourage, my secrating them to Him. soul heaven lies beyond the dark porlet us n
478. dark porlet us not shrink from tals of death the passage, since Christ Himself has s
479. ntation. It is very questionable if any one individual there was who really believe
480. ndeed was, but it is quite certain that many — affected to believe it. was not alo
481. he priest ous opportunity for involving many of 82 til THE FATE OF in one em common
482. tunity for involving many of 82 til THE FATE OF in one em common ruin. At first he h
483. involving many of 82 til THE FATE OF in one em common ruin. At first he had only co
484. on ruin. At first he had only companion one Edward Meighan, who was accused of havi
485. ore his trial camic on, and during that time he bore his sufi'erings with amazing fo
486. tting on a lone bench against the wall, being unable to walk. Being there on busi-
487. against the wall, being unable to walk. Being there on busi- — FATHER SHEEHY. ness
488. n busi- — FATHER SHEEHY. ness with 83 one of the turnkeys, the gentleman ventured
489. belly, as I came here from Dublin." '' God bless my soul. Father Sheehy ! is that
490. came here from Dublin." '' God bless my soul. Father Sheehy ! is that the case V ask
491. r Sheehy ! is that the case V asked the other in unaffected astonishment, while the t
492. gay laugh, "but take care don't let any one here — — see it you sympathizing wi
493. he ruin of you, priest indeed it would. God away now ; but a word in your and go ea
494. go we'll defeat these fellows yet, with God's help." sir, dear bless you, my — 84
495. " sir, dear bless you, my — 84 *' THE FATE OF That you may, I pray God," was the f
496. 84 *' THE FATE OF That you may, I pray God," was the fervent answer, as the gentle
497. atch of an old hymn tune, which was his custom when he wanted to grief/' as the Irish
498. EHY. defence, — ; 85 and he urged the necessity of summoning all the witnesses whose ev
499. Why, what need is there of troubling so many will not two or three respectable witne
500. what need is there of troubling so many will not two or three respectable witnesses
501. ed; and what can be clearer than that 1 Will any jury even an Orange packed jury dar
502. ly that/' interrupted his me are 86 THE FATE OF '' but there are two or three able t
503. id Father Sheehy, ^^that may be, but it will be enough for me to establish the fact
504. der ; and the fewer witnesses I have it will be all the better, for I cannot consent
505. better, for I cannot consent to let so many persons draw down on themselves the ven
506. ving then awaited my trial— it was my duty to do so, and we must never be deterred
507. e must never be deterred from doing our duty." O'Brien was here abruptly informed th
508. ed this I FATHER SHEEHY. 87 that it was time for him to go, and there the conversati
509. notions were of the noblest and purest nature we have any one without absoseen, to ex
510. e noblest and purest nature we have any one without absoseen, to expose lute necess
511. ny one without absoseen, to expose lute necessity to the hatred and malice unwilling, as
512. tred and malice unwilling, as of his —being own persecutors ; but still we cannot h
513. d to give their evidence, for it is now matter of history that, during the whole time
514. their evidence, for it is now matter of history that, during the whole time of his tria
515. atter of history that, during the whole time of his trial, the court-house was surro
516. en, headed by certain of the — 88 THE FATE OF vile Oraiige magistrates themselves
517. nd pale dismay was on the face of every one who favoured the Catholic party, or was
518. atholic party, or was interested in the fate of those who lay thus at the mercy of t
519. approval, while Moll Dunlea was in her element, romping and carousing amongst the sold
520. gst the soldiers. She had taken up with one in particular, whose name was Brady, an
521. soldiers. She had taken up with one in particular, whose name was Brady, and he being a n
522. articular, whose name was Brady, and he being a nominal Catholic, either felt or affe
523. or affected to feel an interest in the fate of Father Sheehy. One evening when they
524. interest in the fate of Father Sheehy. One evening when they were all assem- —
525. 9 guard-room it was the evening all but one before the trial Brady suddenly asked M
526. I'll prove it against a thousand that I will ay, an' what's more, he'll hang for it,
527. e, he'll hang for it, an' I'll have the pleasure of seein' him." •' Why, what harm did
528. d he ever do — — — — — 90 THE FATE OF you, Moll V* inquired the soldier in
529. inquired the soldier in a coaxing tone, being desirous of reaching the bottom of the
530. ive up a boy she was livin' with at the time. Sorra a word o' lie I'm tell in', Jim.
531. mer's day troth I am, an' Jack Lonergan will tell you as well as ? an' — myself."
532. standing and unblemished honour. What a state of society it was when such a man as
533. t a state of society it was when such a man as — Father Sheehy, his cousin Edmund
534. es For a day or two before the trial no one was allowed to see either Father Sheehy
535. f friends crowded into the town, yet no one ventured to speak above his breath of t
536. unceremoniously when Mr. — 92 " " THE FATE OT joined their company. This gentleman
537. or afFectiDg reserve in his presence. " Good morning, gentlemen," said the new-comer
538. er some matters of importance/' ** What time sort of a calendar have we pretty full,
539. y no," returned O'Cal" Since you ask my opinion, I laghan. our hands. FATHER SHEEHY. mu
540. best neighbours and even friends. I am one of those who do not believe the people
541. ole civilized there is a country in the world where such a state of things could exis
542. is a country in the world where such a state of things could exist, save this unfort
543. tion of the neighbourhood in error, the man Bridge was no more murdered than I was,
544. if he were murdered at all, which I for one do not believe, I would stake my life f
545. or one do not believe, I would stake my life for it that this unfortunate priest kne
546. s altogether mistaken, this day's trial will prove it so." ''On what authority do yo
547. thority do you ground your very decided opinion, Mr, O'Callaghan ? " inquired William B
548. ours." what authority!" repeated 94 THE FATE OF O'CaJlaghan, with honest indignation
549. is testimony undoubted as it must be— will put your crown witnesses to the blush,
550. he courthouse. You^U soon see what your opinion is worth !'^ said the baronet with a ma
551. judge that public most part the Orange opinion was against the The jury was to a man c
552. inion was against the The jury was to a man comprisoners. rabid Orangemen, the ofl&
553. &cers posed of of the court were of the same school, so that they had the game entir
554. prosecution were separately visited by one of the magistrates muffled up in a larg
555. p in a large cloak. The visit over, the same personage had a long conversation with
556. personage had a long conversation with one of his brethren, and its tenor might be
557. l along, for the fellow has the name of being a good Catholic that is to say, a staun
558. for the fellow has the name of being a good Catholic that is to say, a staunch papi
559. he might listen to reason, now G 96 THE FATE OF There is yet that the trial is so ne
560. There is yet that the trial is so near. time ^if he could only be got to confess, an
561. . Is there none of the witnesses on the other side that could be turned to account?"
562. standing." ** have succeeded in getting one —a farmer of tolerable 1" And his nam
563. FATHER SHEEHY. 97 gaining over of that man is the making T know him very well of u
564. f a papist, but I believe he is neither one thing nor the other, a sort of amphibio
565. believe he is neither one thing nor the other, a sort of amphibious animal that can l
566. ing nor the other, a sort of amphibious animal that can live in either church as it se
567. ave given him a high — price '' Of) 5 life, my friend, nothing less/' " Why, how i
568. y, how is that 1 I heard nothing of his being in jeopardy " Oh but it was easy to put
569. o put him in, when we found that he was one of Sheehy's main witnesses. The fear of
570. of Sheehy's main witnesses. The fear of death will bring a man to reason when His V !
571. ehy's main witnesses. The fear of death will bring a man to reason when His V ! mone
572. tnesses. The fear of death will bring a man to reason when His V ! money will have
573. ring a man to reason when His V ! money will have no effect, so we sent and had him
574. s word would have no effect in point of law, yet it would be made a handle of — h
575. if anything came against us.'' ; 98 THE FATE OP ''And, besides, we can do without hi
576. ar the I think there's little doubt but time. have our badger caught this time we we
577. t but time. have our badger caught this time we weWe here on our own ground, and we
578. own ground, and we have another sort of man than Gore on the bench. The only thing
579. rue we have three ^plumpers against his one, but then the question is, whether ther
580. rector musingly, *'and we have not much time to reflect upon it, for already I see t
581. , and the result of their deliberations will be seen hereafter. On coming out of the
582. rst they met in the street sisters, was one of Father Sheehy^ Mrs. Green, leaning o
583. ut orders from some of the magistrates. Will you be so kind as to get us in 1 My wif
584. es, but women 100 the occasions are THE FATE OF worst spectators on such they are ap
585. se, if anything excites their feelings. Good morning." ** Oh, my brother my doomed
586. ther the unhappy sister, " is there not one of your own kith or kin to be present w
587. kin to be present when you're tried for life or death ? May God forgive you, gentlem
588. e present when you're tried for life or death ? May God forgive you, gentlemeu, that'
589. en you're tried for life or death ? May God forgive you, gentlemeu, that's all / sa
590. gentlemeu, that's all / say. But there will come a day for all this, be assured the
591. me a day for all this, be assured there will V' Her husband drew her away, while the
592. - repressed his anger, he was a prudent man, and well knew that any expression of r
593. rested. Well leave them in the hands of God, darling, and let Him judge them. But T
594. nd let Him judge them. But Tm afraid it will go hard with his reverence this very da
595. y, for they have it arranged so that no one can get in without their knowledge at l
596. so that no one can get in without their knowledge at least no one that could be of servic
597. in without their knowledge at least no one that could be of service to Father Nich
598. , is it possible that any judge or jury will take their w^ord their oath against suc
599. e their w^ord their oath against such a man as Father Sheehy 1 Come 102 THE FATE OF
600. h a man as Father Sheehy 1 Come 102 THE FATE OF away, dear, come away, I can't stand
601. moved away. FATHER 8HBEHY. 103 CHAPTER LAW AKD IV. JUSTICE AS OPPOSED TO E^VCH OTH
602. FATHER 8HBEHY. 103 CHAPTER LAW AKD IV. JUSTICE AS OPPOSED TO E^VCH OTHER. The first tr
603. LAW AKD IV. JUSTICE AS OPPOSED TO E^VCH OTHER. The first trial that came on was that
604. n, involving as it did the sacrifice of principle. The two magistrates whom we have seen
605. tempting to bribe Meighan knew not that one of their brethren had already tried and
606. in the morning, as Meighan — 104 THE FATE OF sat alone in his dreary cell, thinki
607. usband and father in opened, and in but one Meighan stood up and made a low bow, wh
608. isoner such a position, came— not the other returned, after carefully closing the d
609. mes on to-day V '' Of coorse I am, your honor it — I know it well/' ever occurred t
610. w no gettin' out without a thrial every one knows that!" " And yet there is a way,"
611. You know me, sir, an' I know you ; it's many a long day since you knew I was neither
612. ither afeared nor ashamed to profess my religion, an' it's just as long since I knew tha
613. st as long since I knew that you had no love for Catholics an would go any length to
614. Catholics an would go any length to see one of us out of the way. Say what you have
615. stand your trial *' Well not much, your honor, not much. There's no one knows better
616. much, your honor, not much. There's no one knows better than yourself that innocen
617. nty to prove that I — — V ! 106 THE FATE OI" had nothing to do with this murder,
618. I know well nor his reverence neither ; God help us both !" "You say you have no ho
619. ke away with Bridge, and you are a free man ay " and a rich one *'Dont say another
620. and you are a free man ay " and a rich one *'Dont say another word!" cried Meighan
621. id Meighan, in a voice half choked with emotion '' Oh indeed Although I am in I do then
622. it. jail for mui'der (here he made the sign of the cross on his forehead), God hasn
623. the sign of the cross on his forehead), God hasn t given me up that way.^^ *' Life
624. , God hasn t given me up that way.^^ *' Life is very sweet " said the magistrate, "
625. '' before Td consent to swear away any one's life, an' the priest's above all och,
626. fore Td consent to swear away any one's life, an' the priest's above all och, then.
627. clasping his hands together, '* did any one ever hear sich a thing as them to ask N
628. as the babe unborn ocli, then, is there justice in heaven? for if there isn't, God help
629. justice in heaven? for if there isn't, God help us all. Ay that 'id be a hearin' e
630. himself guilty of sich a crime 108 THE FATE OF an swearin' Til that Father Sheehy b
631. at it is, sir,'' he added with a sudden change of manner '' the sooner you take yourse
632. o remember them, an' I could never look one o' them in the face if I thought even f
633. ute of doin' the likes o' that. If it's God's will they must all bear up agin their
634. doin' the likes o' that. If it's God's will they must all bear up agin their heavy
635. amed of an* that Id be the shame o' the world if I tould a lie, an' swore to it, to a
636. ' swore to it, to add a few years to my life. Don't be uneasy about my family for I
637. rs to my life. Don't be uneasy about my family for I know they're a great trouble to y
638. he place, so you'll be only losin' your time." " Well, depend upon it, both you and
639. well not be the last either, while the law is in the hands of you an' the like of
640. xchanged between them, and then the old man raised his eyes to heaven, and pointed
641. a bill-hook, at a A ! — — ! 110 THE FATE OF " Oh, then, cried the prisoner, Sign
642. Signal from Father Sheehy, glory be to time, *'if God ! " for the first that doesn'
643. m Father Sheehy, glory be to time, *'if God ! " for the first that doesn't beat all
644. that doesn't beat all the swearin ever man or mortal heard isn't it a wonder that
645. irra ! is it him is it Ned to split any one's skull oh sweet — — ! mother Mary,
646. Then followed Lonergan, appearance. who being no more than sixteen, and small in stat
647. y closed. *'Well! but we have plenty of good, decent witnesses," said the father of
648. oice to those about him. ''Thanks be to God! poor Ned has no want of evidence these
649. ^ Husht! husht! Atty,'' said a friend " God help near him, in a low whisper. us all
650. a low whisper. us all there is not much law for us any one o' them blackguards that
651. us all there is not much law for us any one o' them blackguards that we heard swear
652. t we heard swearin' such barefaced lies will be worth half-a-dozen of Ned's witnesse
653. for all they'll be swearin' the blessed truth. But, husht, we must keep silent or wel
654. defence were — ! — numerous and of good character, and furnished overwhelming p
655. , it was proved beyond a doubt that the same H 112 THE FATE OF Bridge had not been m
656. beyond a doubt that the same H 112 THE FATE OF Bridge had not been murdered, nor ev
657. at night, having been seen by more than one individual some days later, and two men
658. about to leave the country for fear of being taken by the soldiers. Such a body of c
659. , and it was not strange to see the old man, his father, raise his hands and eyes t
660. d eyes to heaven with a fervent ''thank God!^' when the last witness for his son ha
661. at the two cases were so he too thanked God that Father Sheehy might yet escape. Bu
662. or the prosecution, he declared all the other closely connected, — unsatisfactory,
663. looked towards his father. The poor old man was still there, leaning on his stick h
664. h might attract observation, and be the cause of his being expelled from the court-ho
665. ct observation, and be the cause of his being expelled from the court-house. After a
666. s father. " Och, then, isn't there some good Christian there that'll see to the poor
667. tian there that'll see to the poor ould man —the poor, heart-broken ould is there
668. the poor, heart-broken ould is there, man /' " Ay, in throth, Ned !'' said — 11
669. Ay, in throth, Ned !'' said — 114 THE FATE OF one and another, and several sturdy
670. hroth, Ned !'' said — 114 THE FATE OF one and another, and several sturdy farmers
671. l sturdy farmers gathered round the old man. *' Don't be frettin about him, for he'
672. bout him, for he'll never want a friend God pity him an' '^ you an' us all for the
673. pity him an' '^ you an' us all for the matter o' that! " Well !" said poor Meighan, w
674. , sure enough, if this is laiv it i^iit justice but it isn t the same in the other worl
675. laiv it i^iit justice but it isn t the same in the other world there well get justi
676. it justice but it isn t the same in the other world there well get justice an' sure t
677. tice but it isn t the same in the other world there well get justice an' sure that's
678. same in the other world there well get justice an' sure that's There'll be no perjured
679. could I say only repeat again, which I will do to my last breath, that I never harm
680. hat I never harmed John Bridge, nor any other man '?~an God knows that as well as I d
681. never harmed John Bridge, nor any other man '?~an God knows that as well as I do."
682. ed John Bridge, nor any other man '?~an God knows that as well as I do." "' Take hi
683. sound rose higher and higher during the time that inter- — — — — — A vened
684. r was brought in and placed at the bar, many voices were heard in various parts of t
685. ehy dear but, ochone you ve only a poor chance afther how they've thrated Ned Meighan/
686. swear whatever comes before them, an' a man s life isn't worth twopence in their ha
687. whatever comes before them, an' a man s life isn't worth twopence in their hands." B
688. curiosity on his face, but he remained time to time, as the wretched witnesses proc
689. ty on his face, but he remained time to time, as the wretched witnesses proceeded wi
690. o; perfectly silent. From how any human being and relate could imagine such barefaced
691. barefaced falsehoods 116 sworn to, THE FATE OF moreover, on the Holy Evangelists. T
692. ntered the dock. The witnesses were the same who had sworn against Meighan ; and whe
693. er tone '' Thou knowest, oh, Omniscient God, that I never saw this unhappy woman ti
694. moment, though from her scandalous — life I was obliged to excommunicate her." Ye
695. ately Meighan had been condemned on the same testi- FATHER SHEEHY. 117 mony, notwith
696. thstanding his having abundant proof of being entirely innocent, yet still did Father
697. ullest height, after the examination of one of these hired witnesses, when he heard
698. ning over to his lawyer, " why this was one of my witnesses ; he knows very well th
699. was murdered on the night in question. Good God can he, too, consent to go ! agains
700. murdered on the night in question. Good God can he, too, consent to go ! against hi
701. ers, fearing that the pri! '* ! 118 THE FATE OF soner might have other witnesses bro
702. ! '* ! 118 THE FATE OF soner might have other witnesses brought forward in his place,
703. if his dereliction were known to him in time, had purHerbert Avas posely kept it con
704. s posely kept it concealed. evidently a man of timid, irresolute character, and now
705. and now when he was swearing in direct opposition to his conscience, there was a tremor i
706. on in his whole demeanour, that spoke a mind ill at ease. It is true, his testimony
707. , his testimony was not very important, being indeed rather of a negative than a posi
708. was gained, the prisoner was robbed of one of his best witnesses. Once, and once o
709. ^^ said he, "do you forget that Herbert God sees and hears you ? '' The judge stern
710. gain — is reached his '' ear. ! Thank God your conscience I see yet you are alrea
711. yet you are already tortured. Go, poor man go and do penance and may God forgive y
712. Go, poor man go and do penance and may God forgive you, as I do." The prosecution
713. ed the witness table. Mr. Keating was a man in the prime of life, with a singularly
714. . Mr. Keating was a man in the prime of life, with a singularly handsome countenance
715. ter, together with that look 120 of THE FATE OF benevolence which lends such a charm
716. tious habiliments which distinguish the man of education and of good standing in so
717. abiliments which distinguish the man of education and of good standing in society from th
718. distinguish the man of education and of good standing in society from the ephemeral
719. m, seem their to devote energies to the one great business of "dressing fashionably
720. use during the night slept at his house Being asked without his knowledge. could he t
721. pt at his house Being asked without his knowledge. could he then swear positively that th
722. as somewhat advanced.'' *^ Thanks be to God!'' murmured the prisoner, " they cannot
723. strongly impressed with the conclusive nature of this evidence. From the body of the
724. of gladness, that made the roof ring ; many voices, too, were heard calling out ''
725. ere heard calling out '' : Long — 122 life THE FATE OF to your honor ! it's you th
726. calling out '' : Long — 122 life THE FATE OF to your honor ! it's you that can Su
727. : Long — 122 life THE FATE OF to your honor ! it's you that can Success to you, Mr.
728. ou that can Success to you, Mr. Keating Many s the good turn your honor done before
729. Success to you, Mr. Keating Many s the good turn your honor done before now, but th
730. , Mr. Keating Many s the good turn your honor done before now, but this '* God reward
731. your honor done before now, but this '* God reward you, is the best of all 1" sir/'
732. o say '* An' sure I could sw^ear to the same thing I was talkin' to him that evenin'
733. on the lawn at Turbrid T' tell ! : the truth. — and soforth. Mr. Keating was cross
734. him his evidence was plain, unvarnished truth, and he was not the man to be embar-
735. , unvarnished truth, and he was not the man to be embar- — rassed by the quibblin
736. o go down V* "Ay, you may go!" said the man **I — PATHi^R SHEEHY. 123 of law snap
737. the man **I — PATHi^R SHEEHY. 123 of law snappishly, ^*we have done with you." J
738. and glancing over its contents, " such being the case, I have to inform this worship
739. how come I on your ? Who has I 124 THE FATE OF dared to accuse me of crime T He spo
740. ndure this 1 thou suflFer this innocent man to be made the victim of these men's ha
741. be involved in my ruin because he loved justice, and gave testimony to the truth % Oh,
742. oved justice, and gave testimony to the truth % Oh, Lord oh. Lord I beseech thee that
743. vidual, !" *' inadmissible," " Gracious God — — — ! — whose one able, — b
744. " Gracious God — — — ! — whose one able, — but, life is of small moment
745. — — ! — whose one able, — but, life is of small moment to any life is valup
746. — but, life is of small moment to any life is valupersecutors of our and let not t
747. rsecutors of our and let not the oh, my God, his faith take spoke almost aloud, at
748. s faith take spoke almost aloud, at the same time covering his it away.'' He — FAT
749. th take spoke almost aloud, at the same time covering his it away.'' He — FATHER S
750. ands, as though to shut out the visible world, and for a mo- was a death-like silence
751. the visible world, and for a mo- was a death-like silence in It was but a moment the
752. alue of my evidence may the Allmerciful God protect you, for your last earthly hope
753. tfully to the judge, myself not to that man, who has so conveniently found my name
754. o do, but to your lordship, — 126 THE FATE OF and this honourable Court, I must be
755. of it, with reaside. gard to myself, I will bear my fate as and as I now a Christia
756. reaside. gard to myself, I will bear my fate as and as I now a Christian and a man s
757. fate as and as I now a Christian and a man see that my reverend friend is doomed,
758. nly pray that he and I may meet in that world where Justice reigns supreme. Men you c
759. t he and I may meet in that world where Justice reigns supreme. Men you can now put on
760. hless with anger " my lord, is not this man's insolence deserving of punishment
761. s not this man's insolence deserving of punishment — ; ; — ! V FATHER SHEEHY. *' 127 a
762. h, chains, until and there kept in such time as his trial comes Our reverend friend
763. quested him to pray for him and his — family. " The blessing of God, and my blessing
764. m and his — family. " The blessing of God, and my blessing, be about you and your
765. t, Mr. Keating, something tells me that God will not give you over to the Philistin
766. r. Keating, something tells me that God will not give you over to the Philistines. d
767. the Philistines. dren shall tell Go in peace, for your chilnot now be fatherless you
768. the word, " farewell!'' till he 128 THE FATE OF sight. was hurried out of turned pri
769. e silent. Dare not again to disturb the peace of Prisoner," '' he with the court/' Th
770. gues might have been heard in more than one place amongst the crowd. ^'Why, then, P
771. crowd. ^'Why, then, Paddy Cusack," said one farmer, in a low voice, to his neighbou
772. 129 chris- to spake to him about young one V be sure I did/' replied honest Paddy,
773. ating himself, that's so high up in the world ? And bedad it's hard to say they'd let
774. e off aisy, that s only a poor cottier, God help me V' '' Ay but aren't you bound t
775. '' Ay but aren't you bound to tell the truth," persisted his friend, *'and "To — !
776. uld give would be of no use none in the world. Moll Dunlea and Jackey Lonergan the de
777. d to do the dirty job but for an honest man to go up and tell God's thruth, as his
778. but for an honest man to go up and tell God's thruth, as his conscience" bids him,
779. Paddy — — 130 bargain. THE PATE OF God help poor Father Sheehy, !" any way con
780. evidence might not be allowed to stand good. He was roughly and sternly answered "n
781. s the jury. He spoke for a considerable time dwelling particularly on the well-known
782. emagogue and a political agitator, as a man who encouraged the ignorant and misguid
783. e murder of Bridge, and described it as being of the most atrocious kind. It had been
784. ts and Irienda of humanity, to do their duty Btraint, When and rebel authorities. FA
785. of the *' There is abundant evidence/' time. " of the prisoner s guilt, but he said
786. son, on a charge of a precisely similar nature. Gentlemen of the jury, the case is now
787. is now in your hands, and I am sure you will decide justly and according to the evid
788. becoming dignity of mien, to decide the fate of the celebrated Father Sheehy, the fa
789. od mute and motionless, — 132 his THE FATE OF head thrown slightly forward, and hi
790. His eyes were fixed on vacancy, for his mind was far from the present scene far, far
791. and ; ochone ! ochone ! gave note that many a heart, even in that packed assemblage
792. s to heaven, and said, ** Even this, my God even this can I ! FATHER SHEEHY. bear a
793. s whatsoever Thou wilt, whether they be good or evil/ so long Thou keepest me in the
794. ever Thou wilt, whether they be good or evil/ so long Thou keepest me in the state o
795. or evil/ so long Thou keepest me in the state of grace, I can cheerfully submit to Th
796. trates hurried out to congratulate each other on their success, and were to be seen h
797. s Thomas, he hadn't his Dublin mob this time at his back ; it was easy to see that w
798. too, and ! — , ; 134 it is .$;• THE FATE OF well we have him snugly trapped «&b
799. anion in misfortune. An old gray-haired man and a young fair-faced woman were with
800. ; they could only weep and look at each other in mournful silence — the silence of
801. you in the court-house, father dear an' God help us all, it was you I was thinkin'
802. t was you I was thinkin' of most o' the time, except when poor Biddy an the children
803. black day to you, ma colleen dhas ! an' one that you never thought But clon t cry s
804. rmurin or repinin* ; if this wasn't the will o' God it 'id never come to pass, so le
805. r repinin* ; if this wasn't the will o' God it 'id never come to pass, so let us th
806. h a fresh burst of tears, ''what in the world put it in any one's mind to swear murde
807. ears, ''what in the world put it in any one's mind to swear murder against you f oc
808. ''what in the world put it in any one's mind to swear murder against you f och och ^
809. when they're now thryin' Sbeehy for the same offence. it would be no way strange if
810. offence. it would be no way strange if God would rain down fire from heaven, and c
811. Oh, then, him in guilty too '? An' they will, father, you may be — 136 , THE FATE
812. will, father, you may be — 136 , THE FATE OF Bure they will/' said Edward earnest
813. may be — 136 , THE FATE OF Bure they will/' said Edward earnestly; '' they're ben
814. t Am, an if I would that they'd save my life ay without ever a thrial at all, an' ma
815. ver a thrial at all, an' make me a rich man besides/' refused to do it?'' cried ^'
816. ed ^' An you the wife and father in the same breath, and with startling earnestness,
817. h know very well that I wouldn't listen God sees only I was to such an offer handcu
818. d I foremost, prisoner an all as I was. will, by hook or by crook. one o' — ! '? !
819. ll as I was. will, by hook or by crook. one o' — ! '? ! — would indeed —worse
820. they'll to be sure son,'' said the old man fervently ; ''if you consented to do si
821. ing you'd — FATHER SHEEHY. 137 be the death of your father, but now I'm proud an' h
822. roud an' happy proud an happy though my one son is in your place, Ned Meighan I can
823. an bear all now!" murmured the poor old man. — ! and the heart-broken wife fell o
824. band's outstretched arms " thanks be to God you had the grace too, "An' me Ned, me
825. oor, sorrowful woman all the days of my life if they take you from us, it but then F
826. then Fm thankful withal have done your duty to God that you agra gal, an' to his re
827. thankful withal have done your duty to God that you agra gal, an' to his reverence
828. hen when I think when I ." think of the time that's comin ''Come away, both of you,
829. t's comin ''Come away, both of you, the time's expired !" growled a voice at the doo
830. r, Oh ! — and in a moment daughter-in-law without being allowed to B^jfaretveU! t
831. and in a moment daughter-in-law without being allowed to B^jfaretveU! the old man and
832. t being allowed to B^jfaretveU! the old man and his were hurried away — 138 THE F
833. n and his were hurried away — 138 THE FATE OF CHAPTER V. THE LAST ACT OF THE TRAaE
834. came first. He received the sentence of death with surprising fortitude, considering
835. prising fortitude, considering him as a man without education. But though wholly ig
836. itude, considering him as a man without education. But though wholly ignorant of book-lea
837. ines of the Christian faith, and such a man can never be called uneducated, for he
838. lled uneducated, for he is educated for eternity. His wife was present, and so was his f
839. sentence pronounced, they clung to each other, as though for support ; one deep, hear
840. to each other, as though for support ; one deep, heartbreaking groan from the old
841. deep, heartbreaking groan from the old man, and a single exclamation of *' Oh, God
842. man, and a single exclamation of *' Oh, God pity us, God pity us !" from the pale l
843. ngle exclamation of *' Oh, God pity us, God pity us !" from the pale lips of poor B
844. around as though to see w^as there any one face that he that of a friend. There we
845. ce that he that of a friend. There were many, for the trial was over, and the prison
846. ognize as kindly eye was beaming on him many more were filled with tears as they gaz
847. the latter shrank not — 140 *' *' THE FATE OF Sheehy!'^ said the judge; Nicholas h
848. you any reason to offer why sentence of death should not be passed V said the priest,
849. that was not steeled by prejudice ''my good lord! I am aware that your question is
850. I am aware that your question is a mere form, and that anything I can or could say W
851. to the date of the supposed murder, the man was seen alive and in good health, and
852. d murder, the man was seen alive and in good health, and took leave of his friends t
853. o great that the judgQ upon you V '' My good lord — — — FATHER SHEEHY. was obl
854. interfere, and commanded silent, under pain of being exTo the from the courthouse.
855. re, and commanded silent, under pain of being exTo the from the courthouse. " This is
856. hen myself and another are to be put to death for a crime which never was committed b
857. crime which never was committed by any one. Knowing, or at least believing this to
858. unhappy men who persecute me even unto death not the slightest illwill ; I leave the
859. l ; I leave them in the hands of a just God, knowing that He will deal with them ac
860. he hands of a just God, knowing that He will deal with them according to their deser
861. serts That is all I have to say I leave God to distinguish between the innocent and
862. until latest ! ! my moment — 142 THE FATE OF The judge had listened with evident
863. becomes deep, guttural voice my painful duty to pronounce the awful sentence which t
864. pronounce the awful sentence which the law prescribes. Since you seem disposed to
865. Saturday next, the : 15th inst, and may God have mercy on your soul, and grant you
866. th inst, and may God have mercy on your soul, and grant you a sight of the !" enormi
867. st, "and I thank your lordship for your good wishes. Doubtless I have much to answer
868. btless I have much to answer for before God, since we are all sinful creatures at t
869. e unto it, I am wholly innocent. To His justice I fearlessly and with all confidence gi
870. vermore^ and may FATHER SHEEHY, 143 His will be done on earth as it is in heaven !'^
871. r Sheehy and Meighan had outraged every sense of justice, being the very climax of sh
872. and Meighan had outraged every sense of justice, being the very climax of shameless cor
873. an had outraged every sense of justice, being the very climax of shameless corruption
874. rruption, and a direct violation of all law, human and divine. There were few men o
875. tim of his high-souled generosity and ; mind. K — 144 undisguised their all THE FA
876. nd. K — 144 undisguised their all THE FATE OF sympathy with them It required, in s
877. n tion, certain destruc- without even a chance of saving of religious intolerpolitical
878. eat stretch of favour his own immediate family were permitted to see him, and also Fat
879. the joy which awaits the blessed in the other world^ in that world whither he was has
880. y which awaits the blessed in the other world^ in that world whither he was hastening
881. the blessed in the other world^ in that world whither he was hastening. He studiously
882. y diverted their minds from the violent death which awaited him, His demeanour was th
883. HER SHEEHY. 145 and dwelt on the joy of being released from the miseries of this life
884. eing released from the miseries of this life, the bliss of shaking ojff " this morta
885. rtal coil/' and putting on the robes of immortality. " And then," said he, which that need
886. eed not friends ! as for the dark stain will rest on character, even *' my distress
887. I feel assured that the all- righteous God will clear up this fearful mystery, and
888. eel assured that the all- righteous God will clear up this fearful mystery, and show
889. st parted with his two sisters and some other dear friends, of whom he begged that th
890. " as I am to-morrow to appear before my God, I would rather be left Let none to und
891. d fain break asunder now of my own free will those bonds of earthly affection which
892. those bonds of earthly affection which death those 'cords of Adam' will rend to-morr
893. ction which death those 'cords of Adam' will rend to-morrow. Go now, my sisters and
894. d to-morrow. Go now, my sisters and may God bless you and yours^ I — — ! 146 TH
895. less you and yours^ I — — ! 146 THE FATE OF safe into the port of and guide you
896. so tian's hope. bitterly — shame why one would ! for think you had but that litt
897. end continually in view so as to avoid sin, as much as in you lies, and I will ven
898. void sin, as much as in you lies, and I will venture to predict a happy meeting for
899. py meeting for us all, knowing that the God whom we serve delights in showing mercy
900. to the contrite sinner. Farewell, be of good cheer and forget not to pray for me whe
901. eir heads, again exhorted them to be of good heart, to which they only replied by a
902. FATHER SHEEHY* afraid it's 147 joy or pleasure well ever have in this world after such
903. joy or pleasure well ever have in this world after such a little blow as this" the L
904. tty dear, how the younger. When I think will we stand it at all ? that to-morrow the
905. w the best of brothers is to die such a death, and his life sworn away by such vermin
906. rothers is to die such a death, and his life sworn away by such vermin, too oh, bles
907. if my poor brain was turning f' By this time the afflicted sisters had reached the s
908. heehy told him : with a smile " Just in time, Martin, to hear last will my and testa
909. le " Just in time, Martin, to hear last will my and testament.'' O'Brien wrung his o
910. THE PATE OF "^^ extreme penalty of the law'' said he, laying a strong emphasis on
911. strong emphasis on the last word, "you will bury all of this poor body that you may
912. e my lodging there some months ago. You will make my grave close by that old vault,
913. protection of a poor, persecuted priest will be remembered even in heaven, if I am s
914. rge old- and his children. this You (it will also give him watch,'' was a it is fash
915. m watch,'' was a it is fashioned silver one), the only my my treasure I possess on
916. s little ivory crucifix/' drawing forth one which he wore on his neck. FATHER SHEEH
917. ur legacy dear fellow/' Then you are to death. take possession, but I have worn it fo
918. take possession, but I have worn it for many a year, and I cannot part with it it ti
919. very highly, for they were given while life me when life was warm and young within
920. for they were given while life me when life was warm and young within me by one of
921. en life was warm and young within me by one of the professors in Louvain. My Brevia
922. ssors in Louvain. My Breviary and a few other books I have given to Father Doyle, and
923. tle thought of this when discussing the matter on Arran-quay, as we walked along, look
924. thought, but, for myself, I Shansoul to God, if he will to body — — 150 ; THE F
925. t, for myself, I Shansoul to God, if he will to body — — 150 ; THE FATE OF can s
926. d, if he will to body — — 150 ; THE FATE OF can safely say that I never dreamed
927. hat I have always had a misgiving on my mind, ever since I heard the report of Bridg
928. murder. That report is the unfortunate cause of this dreadful catastrophe/' Martin,
929. l/' replied the priest briskly ; ** the cause lies farther back, and may be traced to
930. ther. My only grief is for poor Keating God knows what is to become of him— FATHE
931. EHY. and this 151 unfortunate leaves so many helpless Meighan, who mourners But I tr
932. pless Meighan, who mourners But I trust God will behind him. provide for them, sinc
933. s Meighan, who mourners But I trust God will behind him. provide for them, since He
934. that he*ll not be tried here." '' Thank God for that same !'' ex- claimed Father Sh
935. t be tried here." '' Thank God for that same !'' ex- claimed Father Sheehy with ferv
936. fervour. " He has, then, a much better chance of escape ; that he I is truly rejoiced
937. tinually ofiered up on his behalf, that God might reward his goodness even in this
938. might reward his goodness even in this life by delivering him from the hands You, M
939. outed the evidence brought against him, being chiefly the same miscreants who had pro
940. brought against him, being chiefly the same miscreants who had prosecuted Father Sh
941. uted Father Sheehy* The consequence 152 will THE FATE OF pay a visit as soon as poss
942. er Sheehy* The consequence 152 will THE FATE OF pay a visit as soon as possible afte
943. airs are now arranged, and I am at full liberty to attend to ' the one thing needful/ m
944. I am at full liberty to attend to ' the one thing needful/ my Father final preparat
945. eedful/ my Father final preparation for eternity. Doyle promised to come back this eveni
946. now, my my friends, myself awhile ; my soul must needs prepare to meet the bridegro
947. e His approbation before He ascends the God be with tribunal of judgment. He then y
948. He ascends the God be with tribunal of judgment. He then you till we meet again.'' shoo
949. .'' shook the hand of each in turn, and will leave you me to was that the injured ge
950. undergo the murHe was attended derer s punishment. — wind of March wild, was careering
951. il, and there stood side by side, while one loud, long shout of sorrowful greeting
952. nd groans were heard on every side, and many a convulsive sob even from the bosom of
953. use he always stood up for us ! 154 THE FATE OF that he's brought to this untimely e
954. ught to this untimely end ! The Lord be good an merciful to him as he was to us, any
955. us all your blessin' sure it's the last time we can ask it of you, an' Bore hearts w
956. f you, an' Bore hearts we have for that same/' Father Sheehy s eyes filled with tear
957. e front of the board, ! ; hand made the sign of the cross over the heads of the crow
958. of the crowd below. **May the Almighty God, before whose judgment-seat I am about
959. w. **May the Almighty God, before whose judgment-seat I am about to appear, bless and pr
960. t ! obtained. I need scarcely tell you, good people, that I die entirely innocent of
961. r those who have persecuted me, even to death, and the jury who condemned me on such
962. forgive and pity my them and would not change place with any one of them for all the
963. hem and would not change place with any one of them for all the riches of the earth
964. ll, FATHER SHEEHY. I leave to it 155 my God — He will re-establish time. In concl
965. SHEEHY. I leave to it 155 my God — He will re-establish time. In conclusion, I pra
966. it 155 my God — He will re-establish time. In conclusion, I pray you all to retir
967. text for fresh persecution/^ in His own good then shook hands with the priest, and b
968. other, and he had ceased to breathe the pain of death was passed Heaven in mercy had
969. nd he had ceased to breathe the pain of death was passed Heaven in mercy had made it
970. hat filled the air around. May the Lord God of Hosts have mercy on your soul, Nicho
971. he Lord God of Hosts have mercy on your soul, Nicholas Sheehy !'* exclaimed Father D
972. heard by the people in the street. "He will not refuse you that justice " which you
973. he street. "He will not refuse you that justice " which your fellow-men withheld from
974. llow-men withheld from — 156 you. THE FATE OF melanclioly death was yours, but you
975. om — 156 you. THE FATE OF melanclioly death was yours, but your soul has, I trust,
976. F melanclioly death was yours, but your soul has, I trust, found favour before God,
977. soul has, I trust, found favour before God, for you were indeed free A from guile/
978. n and quartered; and while the task was being accomplished, Edward Meighan was brough
979. prayer for those who had sworn away his life, for the jury who had condemned him on
980. speak the thruth to the very last. That good priest has been put to death wrongfully
981. last. That good priest has been put to death wrongfully, — FATHER SHEEHY. an' 157
982. ' 157 when they done it to him that was God's own servant, they may well do it am p
983. , —thanks to theman that I'm as great God, though, to me sinful I innocent of thi
984. freely forgive all my enemies, and pray God to have mercy on my soul, an the Blesse
985. emies, and pray God to have mercy on my soul, an the Blessed Virgin, an' all the sai
986. m I leave behind/' He was launched into eternity almost before the words were uttered no
987. e struggled in the agony of his violent death, and then all was still — all, at lea
988. y Meighan and his miserable daughter-in-law had taken refuge. few of their neighbou
989. ords or no impression on the ; 158 a:HB fate of heart-broken sufferers, who could on
990. k into each others eyes, and grasp each other's hands in silence — their anguish wa
991. sh was fai too great for words, and not one tear did either shed. Their faces were
992. ir eyes wild and bloodshot, and the old man's thin, gray — hair hung unheeded aro
993. ir hearts. — mourners that frail, old man, tottering on the verge of the grave, a
994. as now wrenched from them, and stiff in death,^ and the kindly heart that loved them
995. and dead. And if he had died a natural death if he had died with his friends around
996. eling in prayer, and closed his eyes in peace, what would it have been ? at — —
997. ion entered minds, but afterwards, when time had somewhat dulled the acute anguish o
998. ving had the priest." *' Sure he died a good Christian, as he lived. Father Doyle ha
999. en him the rites o' the Church, an' the good God be praised for it, he died an innoc
1000.m the rites o' the Church, an' the good God be praised for it, he died an innocent
1001. be praised for it, he died an innocent man. May the Lord be good and . merciful to
1002.e died an innocent man. May the Lord be good and . merciful to your soul, Ned Meigha
1003.the Lord be good and . merciful to your soul, Ned Meighan.*' Such was the winding up
1004.d Meighan.*' Such was the winding up of many a conversation amongst the friends and
1005.d was dispersed at the point i. ieb THE FATE OF of the bayonet tlie streets of the o
1006.g, and their silence was the silence of death, for the majority of the inhabitants ha
1007.ect for the innocent victims of unj ust law. Everything wore an aspect of mourning,
1008.r all the natural effect of the fearful death which had parted soul and body. The Cat
1009.t of the fearful death which had parted soul and body. The Catholics who had occasio
1010.liday,'' and their leaders pledged each other iii' foaming tankards to the further su
1011. tankards to the further success of the good cause, and the greater downMany of fall
1012.ards to the further success of the good cause, and the greater downMany of fall of Po
1013.low give him his warmest corner,'' said one big, burly Orangeman, as he tossed off
1014.son!" cried another, as he followed the other s example, and swallowed his potation,
1015.d smacked his 4ips approvingly. 162 THE FATE all 6"t And how that faction did exult,
1016.the prostrate Catholics, and boast that many more of them would share the fate of Sh
1017. that many more of them would share the fate of Sheehy and " We Meighan before all w
1018.say, '* and therell be more in for this same affair before the week's over," And it
1019.only a few days had passed when several other Catholics of respectable standing were
1020.spectable standing were arrested on the same charge, two of them being ; relatives o
1021.rrested on the same charge, two of them being ; relatives of Father Sheehy. these, On
1022.ng ; relatives of Father Sheehy. these, One of Eoger Sheehy, was acquitted out of v
1023.cusation, a little while after However, God saw fit to bring him unharmed out of th
1024. James Buxton, both of whom were men of education, and in good circumstances. Seven or ei
1025.h of whom were men of education, and in good circumstances. Seven or eight others we
1026. jail harrowing the hearts and souls of Many applications had the people. Many been
1027.ls of Many applications had the people. Many been made by his friends to have it rem
1028.s prediction. But, by a special 164 THE FATE OF ordination of retributive Justice, "
1029.4 THE FATE OF ordination of retributive Justice, "before that head was withdrawn from t
1030.ithdrawn from the public gaze, scarcely one individual who sat on Father Sheehy's j
1031.iseases all, too loathsome to mention ; one in a state of raving madness, biting an
1032.ll, too loathsome to mention ; one in a state of raving madness, biting and gnawing h
1033. ; and so on of all the rest, with only one or two exceptions.* As for the miserabl
1034.serable witnesses who had sworn away so many innocent lives, their fate was just wha
1035.worn away so many innocent lives, their fate was just what might be expected. The wr
1036., Parrack-street, the victim of his own evil courses. Poor, poor wretch, he was stil
1037. ' < - FATHER SHEEHY. tBe thread of his life was cut short the avenging hand of God.
1038.life was cut short the avenging hand of God. •% 4k 4k ^ 4k w^ 4E: ^vr •jv* 165
1039.»? •jx. It was seven years after the death of Father Sheehy, when a native of Clog
1040.rvals their whiskey-puneh, our Clogheen man suddenly fixed his eyes on the face of
1041. suddenly fixed his eyes on the face of one who just then came into the shop. Start
1042.omer by the *' breast. "Tell me, honest man!'' he exclaimed^ you not from Tipperary
1043.d r "Why, then, indeed I am,'' said the other, looking askance at his assailant, and
1044.his assailant, and endeavouring, at the same time, to are shake • - off his grasp.
1045.ssailant, and endeavouring, at the same time, to are shake • - off his grasp. ' We
1046.you ever in Clogheen V pcr-^ " IG6 THT3 FATE OF still sisted Peter Crowly. fast, hol
1047. oh, bedad if I had a shillin for every time I was in it, it's myself 'id be the ric
1048. was in it, it's myself 'id be the rich man all out. Why, man alive, I was bred an'
1049.yself 'id be the rich man all out. Why, man alive, I was bred an' born athin two or
1050. or three miles place.'* *' — o' that same And your name V^ asked Crowly, with a s
1051.ve trembling that indicated the deepest emotion. '' Why, one id think you were some law
1052. indicated the deepest emotion. '' Why, one id think you were some lawyer or anothe
1053.for a ghost/ ''Arrah, then, what in the world wide put that in your head % Faith, dea
1054.ear, yourself looks as much like a dead man as I do. Ghost, indeed no more it ''1 k
1055.w — — ! ghost than another, for the matter that/' '' o' An' how did you get here a
1056.. Didn't I run away to Cork for fear o' being taken an' put in again for what you kno
1057.what you know. Faix I got enough o' the law, for the very flesh was torn off my bac
1058.e. Father Sheehy." " Ah, then, but that same goin' away *' 168 of yours an' the . TH
1059.oin' away *' 168 of yours an' the . THE FATE OF was the unlucky move, all out, manes
1060.was the unlucky move, all out, manes o' many valuable lives away." " Why, Lord bless
1061.got up that you were murdered, for that same. " "Why, just this," said Growly, — t
1062.sper, '' listen here, Father Sheehy was one o' the Jive An exclamation of horror es
1063. Christ be about us !'' and he made the sign of the " An' cross on his forehead and
1064.oss on his forehead and chest. the only one that ever hurted me was '' ! ! FATHER S
1065.ddenly asked of Crowly, *^ was there no one to go for ad an' prove that I wasn't ki
1066.sn't killed at all ; sure didn't I tell many a one that I was goin' to lave the coun
1067.lled at all ; sure didn't I tell many a one that I was goin' to lave the counthry,
1068., an' well thought of by the people. If God doesn't rain down vengeance on them all
1069.ranch, then I'll say he s not a just *^ God after all !" Is John little Brien, the
1070. recovered the shock of these , 170 THE FATE OB^ *' strange tidings. Sure if he's a
1071. strange tidings. Sure if he's a living man, couldn't he clear every one o' them, i
1072.s a living man, couldn't he clear every one o' them, if there wasn't another but hi
1073. that's above, an' sees all that's done one comfort." was ! — "And do you really
1074.en were executed for the murder of this man here, whom I have known off and on for
1075.own off and on for six or seven years ; one of them a Catholic priest, too, in a Ca
1076.a long pole over the jail-gate the last time I was in Clonmel, an' I suppose it's th
1077.country as that. If that is the sort of law you have in Ireland, people don't take
1078. beginning to try of late days. an' get justice for themselves, when it won't be given
1079.st only combine, together, an' take the law into their wonder the hands, and make I
1080.der the hands, and make I — 172 ; THE FATE OF hands, own justice when they can't e
1081.make I — 172 ; THE FATE OF hands, own justice when they can't expect from them that's
1082.t put a rope round his neck that was so good and kind to every one. ! ! 1 but I hope
1083.neck that was so good and kind to every one. ! ! 1 but I hope he i^ happy anyway, f
1084.ope he i^ happy anyway, for if he isn't God help Och, the world that's all / say! w
1085.yway, for if he isn't God help Och, the world that's all / say! wasn't it quare too,
1086. magistrates that I seen you " Oh ! for God'^ sake, don't !" cried , FATHER SHEEHY.
1087.he place belonging to the king so every one tells me ; and if they knew I was here
1088.e alive. Couldn't you go to the States, man alive and then there'd be no danger of
1089.consent, so great was his terror of the law^ and he seemed to be under the im-? pre
1090.twenty years it had remained the dreary sign-post of Clonmel jail. Many of the frien
1091.d the dreary sign-post of Clonmel jail. Many of the friends of the family accompanie
1092.lonmel jail. Many of the friends of the family accompanied her on this — — 174 THE
1093.accompanied her on this — — 174 THE FATE OF melancholy errand, and a box being p
1094.HE FATE OF melancholy errand, and a box being prepared for th,e purpose, the head was
1095. which reminds us of the hold which his memory has to this day on the affections of th
1096.ncy are with those beyond the flood the memory of the functionaries who so unjustly wi
1097. Thurles has redeemed the glory of that good, old, faithful county, where the nation
1098.ld, faithful county, where the national religion was so oppressed and trampled on, and i
1099.rom This was written in 1851. M 176 THE FATE 0? the Irisli, have been kindly sent us
1100.to those who have been following '' The Fate of Father Sheehy'^ in our columns, we g
1101.orrespondent states, by a member of the family of the lamented Father Sheehy. It seems
1102.gh pole in front of Clonmel tions jail. Many to applica* have the head removed, but
1103.vain. At the end of that long period of time the devoted sister succeeded in stealin
1104.ro' darkness gleam- Martyr' d to Erin's cause by men unholy, Marcyr'd, like Christ hi
1105.ly, Marcyr'd, like Christ his Lord, for justice solely; Dark doom of grief to many a mo
1106.r justice solely; Dark doom of grief to many a mother's daughter. From Knockmaoldown
1107.the borders of the county Cork. 178 THK FATE OF FATHER SHEEHY. All pray 'rs for pity
1108. dark dwelling; And some, oh, righteous God impious and I Of Sheehy's daring, Pour'
1109.he picture of Ireland 110 years ago has many features not very dissimilar to that wh
1110.rts, which, iu later times, have broken many a link of that chain. Of those that rem
1111.now engaged in a supreme effort to snap one of them the strong feudal link, which h
1112., worst clothed people in the civilized world." Year by year t|xe terribly ; — 180
1113.ENDIX. drain of her population the true wealth of has been depleting her more and more
1114.of emigration. Even the achievements of science, which advance the material well-being
1115.cience, which advance the material well-being of other nations, work For example, the
1116.hich advance the material well-being of other nations, work For example, the applicat
1117. a means of tion of steam to navigation wealth to self-governed nations— only afford
1118.ompelled h6r people to resolve that the time has come to put an end to this system.
1119.an end to this system. Yes, the popular will has advanced this burning question; if
1120. Whether the present Parliament has the wisdom and patriotism to make that settlement
1121.ettlement on such an equitable basis as will satisfy the just requirements of the ca
1122.y the just requirements of the case, or will let the golden opportunity pass, fritte
1123.n opportunity pass, frittering away its time—-one of the two great English parties
1124.unity pass, frittering away its time—-one of the two great English parties trying
1125.ittle would satisfy the people, and the other, how much they may safely a nation —
1126. APPENDIX. 181 Parliament fail, another one, legitimately convoked in the capital o
1127.ut to show how, in the case of Ireland, history is in some respects repeating itself In
1128.n for Ireland But the spirit of the age will fiot permit the Father Sheehy of to-day
1129.wever willing e might be to emulate the Fate of Father Sheehy, Priest, Patriot, and
1130.he footsteps of dis- and ignorance. The same interests which reduced the people to m
1131.of the day, who ventured to espouse the cause of the parties who had the courage and
1132.se the cause of the parties who had the courage and humanity to interfere in behalf of
1133.e namcj pf APPENDIX. Sheehy, a this 183 man of unblemished character, virtues even
1134.shed character, virtues even to and the memory of whose day is held in the highest ven
1135.most foully mur- dered, and the name of law desecrated by the formal sanction of hi
1136.esecrated by the formal sanction of his death. He was said to be inimical to the coll
1137.r these offences they persecuted to the death a minister of the gospel, who had neith
1138.l, who had neither offended against its law nor against the laws of his country. Mr
1139.nce in whatever concerns the poor to no law but that of his will."-fThe flame of re
1140.erns the poor to no law but that of his will."-fThe flame of resistance to their opp
1141.n the parish of Newcastle, and from his time to the present they have been unknown t
1142.IX. speculative rise of rents about the same time. The atrocious acts they (the Whit
1143.peculative rise of rents about the same time. The atrocious acts they (the Whiteboys
1144.indignation. Acts were passed for their punishment which seemed calcuThis lated for the me
1145.arbary, arose to such a height, that by one (law) they were to be hanged, under cer
1146.y, arose to such a height, that by one (law) they were to be hanged, under certain
1147. following session, marks the spirit of punishment; while others remain yet the law of the
1148.punishment; while others remain yet the law of the land, that would, if executed, t
1149. Ireland," speaks of the country at the time he wrote, 1777: "Instead of being in a
1150.at the time he wrote, 1777: "Instead of being in a progressive state of improvement,
1151.777: "Instead of being in a progressive state of improvement, as verging to depopulat
1152.nce, or blindly asserting the rights of nature in nocturnal insurrections, attended wi
1153.for apprehensions and discoveries. This evil must, nevertheless, originate from ; AP
1154.ginate from ; APPENDIX. 185 gome otTier cause than mere depravity of nature for, to s
1155.ome otTier cause than mere depravity of nature for, to suppose that a set of people sh
1156.ople should conspire to run the risk of being hauged and gibbeted for the mere pleasu
1157. being hauged and gibbeted for the mere pleasure of doing mischief to their neighbours,
1158. most clear and explicit account of the cause of those agrarian disturbances, is to b
1159.of making their bargains tolerable. The law, indeed, is open to redress them but th
1160.culty if these wretches should apply to law, what could they do in this case ? They
1161. of their sufferings to feel the deep a sense less pungent call of virtue nay, they t
1162.l the deep a sense less pungent call of virtue nay, they thought equity was on their s
1163. price but four guineas, that is ninety-one shillings: the daily wages for labourer
1164.in that part of the kingdom than in any other, from the number of wet and broken days
1165. are paid. What an aggravation does And will the this make in the account. best crop
1166.nt. best crop enable them to maintain a family, often of six or eight persons, under t
1167.earning, is brought to the disagreeable necessity of chaflFering with a set of poor wretc
1168.rgain, or forego the support of his own family. This business grows irksome to him, an
1169.grows irksome to him, and he seeks some one person who will take the whole trouble
1170.o him, and he seeks some one person who will take the whole trouble upon him. The di
1171.hat ought to have subsisted with mutual good-will between the two countries. In 1760
1172.ught to have subsisted with mutual good-will between the two countries. In 1760, a v
1173.natural protectors, and they regard the law without respect, because it is administ
1174. faces of the poor," their outrages, it will be found by melan- choly experience, ar
1175.rages, it will be found by melan- choly experience, are more violent, ungovernable,driftle
1176.cter than those that are excited by any other species of oppression. So it was with t
1177. want of those means must have been the cause. The Commons, in accordance with the Vi
1178.mittee " to inquire into the causes and progress of the Popish insurrec^ tion in the pro
1179.oters In their as, "Treason against the State/' "pretended grievances no traces of op
1180.s," having been dealt with according to law, the country was restored to that kind
1181.f interference in their behalf before a justice of the peace, or the appearance at the
1182.in their behalf before a justice of the peace, or the appearance at the trial ; N 192
1183. the appearance at the trial ; N 192 of one of seen, APPENDIX. them as a witness, a
1184.en, APPENDIX. them as a witness, and it will be even as a legal adviser of the party
1185.ompromise his character, and to put his life in peril. The turpitude of involving me
1186.eans of defence on the trial, which the law allowed, but which they were unable to
1187.he practice terminate with the troubled time they lived in. In 1798, the same princi
1188.oubled time they lived in. In 1798, the same principle was not only acted on by magi
1189.d time they lived in. In 1798, the same principle was not only acted on by magistrates, b
1190.ccurrences often convey a less accurate idea of the events in question, than the par
1191.dea of the events in question, than the particular details of the fate or sufferings of on
1192.ion, than the particular details of the fate or sufferings of one of those actors or
1193.ar details of the fate or sufferings of one of those actors or victims in the strif
1194. actors or victims in the strife, whose history is bound up with the events that excite
1195.ed by the rulers of the country between one class of the community and another, and
1196. the neighbouring districts were in the habit of scouring the country at the head of
1197.y at another calamitous period of Irish history, and in the getting up of the prosecuti
1198. France at an early age to receive that education which it was a capital offence to commu
1199.was a capital offence to communicate to one of his creed He was well descended, and
1200.ormer, and therefore to be suspected of being privy to his murder. The magistrates an
1201.at the preceding trials of the rioters. One of the few impartial and humane judges
1202.sh bench, Sir Richard Acton, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, had been sent upon
1203.he trials were conducted with a show of justice that was extremely offensive to the loc
1204.land with respect and honour; and if no other eulogy on his character were recorded,
1205.men, and children, thanking him for the justice and the fairness of his conduct in the
1206. of his conduct in the discharge of his duty, and pouring blessings on him as a just
1207.touching exhibition, and * Plowden's '* one, it ii., might History of Ireland," vol
1208., and * Plowden's '* one, it ii., might History of Ireland," vol. page 139. ; APPENDIX.
1209.softened the rancour of the enemies But justice and huof these poor people. manity were
1210.pressors, and the administration of the law under the influence of either was a eou
1211.r. Sheehy, it was necessary to show the state of publix) feeling, not only in the dis
1212.cessary for him to secrete himself. The government had been prevailed upon to issue a proc
1213.cquainting him " that he would save the government the reward offered justice, offering a
1214. save the government the reward offered justice, offering a 198 for taking APPENDIX. hi
1215.e of his enemies were too prevalent for justice), but in the Court of King's Bench in D
1216.appears by a subsequent pamphlet by the same author. Dr. Curry (a parallel between t
1217.o notes of the trials were taken at the time, and that it is only to this account of
1218.s Sheehy, a Popish priest, charged with being concerned in several treasonable practi
1219.s kingdom, for the apprehending of whom government offered a reward of £800, was brought
1220.e Court of King's Bench. The Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, then, was the Righ
1221.the Right Honourable John Gore ; Second Justice, Mr. Christopher Robinson ; Third Justi
1222.stice, Mr. Christopher Robinson ; Third Justice, William Scott, Esq. The indictment cha
1223.bellion. The witnesses produced were, a man of the name of John Toohy, who had been
1224.It would be difficult to comprehend the nature or extent of the wickedness exhibited i
1225.uasion in the neighbourhood who had the good fortune to escape being similarly impli
1226.hood who had the good fortune to escape being similarly implicated. The enclosing of
1227.rishioners of Father Sheehy. About that time the tithes of two Protestant clergymen,
1228.ance to this * The above-named fact and many others connected with the private histo
1229. many others connected with the private history of the persons referred to in this Memo
1230.this Memoir, were communicated to me by one of the oldest inhabitants of Clogheen,
1231. of the oldest inhabitants of Clogheen, one most thoroughly acquainted with those t
1232.M'Grath, a land surveyor, a relative of one of the persons persecuted and repeatedl
1233. Clonmel. bold and fearless advocate of justice and humanity, a man whose misfortune it
1234.ess advocate of justice and humanity, a man whose misfortune it was in times like t
1235.material particulars, yet concurring in one point, the influence of Sheehy over his
1236.at might rid them of the annoyance of a man of an independent mind, and by his impl
1237.he annoyance of a man of an independent mind, and by his implication give additional
1238.e in. He had been frequently obliged to change his abode to avoid the rigorous searche
1239.he grandson of his faithful friend, and one not of his own creed it is to be rememb
1240.t, a gentleman in the commission of the peace, Mr. Cornelius O'Callaghan, to whom he
1241. surrendered himThis gentleman gave him one of his self. horses to convey him to Du
1242.ell it is to keep the administration of justice in pure hands, that rapacious villany m
1243. of by con- victions and confiscations. One of the earliest charges of Whiteboyism
1244.ldisposed persons and disturbers of the peace, on the second day of March, in the sec
1245.adjoining their lands at Dromlemmon The custom of first " presenting" a Popish priest
1246.had been thus *' presented'' before any other charge was brought against him. APPENDI
1247.as Sheehy was again indicted, and seven other persons out on bail were included in th
1248.ersons out on bail were included in the same indictment, wherein it set forth, " tha
1249.y, did assault John Bridge, against the peace." At the General Assizes held at Clonme
1250.1765, before Chief Baron Willes and Mr. Justice Tennison, the following bills found at
1251.soners are deserving of notice ; for it will be found, that to enter into sureties f
1252.ound, that to enter into sureties for a man marked out for ruin by the Clonmel cons
1253.ficial records is to be met with in the history of any similar conspiracy The preceding
1254.erms entered into by Father Sheehy with Government, and 206 by which a him. APPENDIX, tria
1255.tted. He had redeemed his pledge to the Government, he had given himself up, stood his tri
1256.e verdict pronounced, than the faith of Government was broken with him. The unfortunate ma
1257.nt was broken with him. The unfortunate man was informed by the Chief Justice that
1258.fortunate man was informed by the Chief Justice that a charge of murder was brought aga
1259.ien, on account of his intelligence and prudence, had been chosen by the friends of the
1260.erson of less enviable notoriety in the same office at a later period. His innocence
1261.f responsible for his appearance at the time appointed for his trial. While he was a
1262.urgently pressed him to put himself the same day on board a packet for England. O'Br
1263.208 lin, it is to APPENDIX. be borne in mind, was only five months after the alleged
1264.hs after the alleged murder, and at the time of his departure from Clogheen, it is p
1265.O'Brien, that Father Sheehy had then no knowledge of the murder, and the probability is,
1266.igour. In this condition he was seen by one of his old friends, and while this gent
1267.ay fromDublin. He said,laughiDg, "Never mind, we will defeat these fellows;" and he
1268.blin. He said,laughiDg, "Never mind, we will defeat these fellows;" and he struck up
1269.he trial as Mrs. Mary Brady, the latter being the name of a soldier of the light hors
1270. John Bagnell, Mr. William Bagnell, and other persons obnoxious to them, was first pr
1271.ubsequently the murder was committed by one of the party, named Edmund Meighan, of
1272. and Meighan were tried separately. The same evidence for the prosecution was produc
1273.s produced on both trials. The notes of one of the jurors, taken at the trial of Me
1274.herefore, the account is to be taken as one, the leaning of which was certainly tow
1275.ames Farrell's call, into a field ; saw many people in the field to wit, Edmund Meig
1276.'Grath, Thomas Harman, John Butler, and many others, drawn up in a rank, as if to be
1277.onging to Connor's son, or Ross, at The same Ballybuskin, and buried him in a plough
1278.y was found hiding in the ditch, At the time and put up behind Nicholas Sheehy. John
1279. knew not of any rewards to be given by Government; remembers Clogheen ; ; fair in October
1280. with James Buxton, and returned to the same place ; lived with James Buxton for thr
1281.ommittal, and after the murder, a short time before he went to Dublin. ; ; ; John Lo
1282.rath, John Butler, Nicholas Sheehy, and many others, in the high road to Shanbally ;
1283.irst saw them he slipped into a trench, being afraid of his life was discovered in th
1284.pped into a trench, being afraid of his life was discovered in the trench by Thomas
1285.chael Guinan is not very certain of the time of the murder of Bridge, but heard he w
1286.a not recollect when, but it was on the same night that he saw the corpse, but did n
1287.idge was night, very soon after. on the same When he was taken from behind Nicholas
1288.ht she followed them to Shanbally saw a man wrapped in a blanket, dead she then and
1289.re she followed them. She recollects no other words of the prisoner ; in about eight
1290.er she saw them bring the corpse in the same way as before from Ballyhuskin to Bally
1291.; and second burial on the true to each other, and never first cross, to be to discov
1292. there present at the burial there were many other women there ; she was admitted, a
1293.e present at the burial there were many other women there ; she was admitted, as Mich
1294. have returned sworn. since without his knowledge; he lived in Dublin ten years, but neve
1295.May, 1763, from London received several other letters till September or October, 1763
1296.there in December, 1763; he was in very good health ; then did not think of returnin
1297.heen the 15th of April, 1763 he was the same Michael Kearney that kept Mary Brady. G
1298.fair with her two daughters, Mary Brady one of the daughters, Eleanor Dunlea the ot
1299.ne of the daughters, Eleanor Dunlea the other lay in her own house, with her two daug
1300.r own house, with her two daughters, in one bed she and her daughters went to bed a
1301.Clogheen he was not at her house at any time in 1764 no one in company with her daug
1302.not at her house at any time in 1764 no one in company with her daughter but what s
1303.hour in her house it was usual with the family to go to bed early. ; ; ; 220 1 APPENDI
1304.prisoner s house, to Avhich he went, as being his friend prisoner keeps ; Knows Edwar
1305. and a journeyman v,^ere at work in the same room where witness lay, who awoke sever
1306.id not go to sleep before ten, at which time, Meighan, the prisoner, was in the room
1307.d; prisoner sitting in the kitchen with man and maid; witiiess got cold meat in pri
1308. they began to work after night-fall no other person lay in the room without; the wit
1309. the fair, lay with the prisoner in the same bed prisoner and he w^ent to bed togeth
1310.ever applied to for his evidence by any one 3 knows not who told him of the murder;
1311.. ; John Toohy, produced Knows a second time by Counsellor Hughes. says the prisoner
1312.ctober, lived there seventeen years; no one of the name of English in Shanbally sin
1313.hanbally where English lives is ; about one-eighth of a mile from Shanbally. Daniel
1314.ally. Daniel Keefe, produced a second ; time. Knows John Butler saw him in October,
1315.morning on Sunday; was drinking all the time in the company knows not whether ; ; AP
1316. went out did not stay out an hour at a time knows not where English lives Shanbally
1317.e, but he never wrote to him, or to any one that he could hear; told him he would g
1318.at he swore. Meighan, on this evidence, being convicted, the same testimony was produ
1319. on this evidence, being convicted, the same testimony was produced Several of his a
1320.declmed to have several of them called. One person, indeed, of his own persuasion,
1321. call on to speak to his character as a man of loyalty, and this gentleman refused.
1322.d the character of an agitating priest, one who was inimical to titlie proctors and
1323.ful protectors in the commission of the peace.* The innocence clearly established of
1324.f Father Sheehy was of the witnesses by one he produced, Mr. Keating, a Catholic ge
1325.that had been yet practised against the life of this doomed recourse to to deprive h
1326.ding of his persecutors to effect their man was had * After Sheehy's execution, the
1327.ouse of Dr. E the blood of the innocent man was sprinkled on his door. was remember
1328.he could not have left it in the nicrht-time without his knowledge, and, consequentl
1329. left it in the nicrht-time without his knowledge, and, consequently, that he could not b
1330. had Mr. Keating s navie on his list as one of those who were concerned in the murd
1331.to Kilkenny gaol, where he lay for some time loaded with irons, in a dark and loaths
1332.red useless to Sheehy, but also that of many others was : ; similarly dealt with, th
1333.thers was : ; similarly dealt with, the same thing, but who came to testify to who i
1334.the laid to the themselves, for fear of same treatment.*' As the crime charge of Mr.
1335.azine, of March, 1766, at page 65, this matter is treated as an ordinary occurrence, t
1336.itted the court, was, by the Lord Chief Justice's order, taken into custody, being char
1337.ef Justice's order, taken into custody, being charged with the murder of a sergeant a
1338.arged with the murder of a sergeant and man corporal in the county of Kilkenny. of
1339.on what motive, whether for the sake of justice, the A : 228 APPENDIX. fear of hanging,
1340.s (Sheehy^s) trial," we are told by the same author, " a party of horse surrounded t
1341.ing his enemies. Even after sentence of death was pronounced against him, which one w
1342.death was pronounced against him, which one would think might have fully satisfied
1343. which reminds us of the hold which his memory has to tliis day on the affections of t
1344.es, and insure convictions, came to the knowledge of this felon, and he contrived to get
1345.nto communication with Lord Carrick and other managers of the prosecution, by whom he
1346.ion, by whom he was visited, and in due time transmitted to Dublin. Having done his
1347.ered to go abroad with a fetter-lock on one of his legs. The lock was soon removed,
1348.she was kept at the barracks, her table being furnished from one of the principal hot
1349.arracks, her table being furnished from one of the principal hotels in Clorimel, th
1350. of Clogheen, the surviving relative of one of her victims, saw her in Clogheen in
1351. regiment, a miserable object, blind of one eye, and was on lier way to Cork with h
1352. origin of John Bridge, the unfortunate man whose name is connected Avith the A ear
1353.ge of Clogheen, and was brought up by a man of the name of Henry Biers. He was a si
1354.vourite, and was looked on by them as a good-natured poor fellow, who, having no fri
1355.d sworn it was deposited and though the particular circumstances of his cleft skull, which
1356.umstances of his cleft skull, which the same witnesses swore was the cause of his de
1357. which the same witnesses swore was the cause of his death, would have guided the sea
1358.me witnesses swore was the cause of his death, would have guided the search, and dist
1359.earch, and distinguished his from every other body in the place. Besides, two of Brid
1360.rry's «* Parallel," etc. 234 APPENDIX. Many years subsequently to his disappearance
1361. John Bridge was living in Newfoundland many years subsequently to the execution of
1362.tionary, there may be in support of the opinion, that he met in bis own country with an
1363. is not only evidently at variance with truth in the most material matters, but obvio
1364.viously contradictory with that of each other, and is altogether utterly unworthy of
1365.ected in the character of the witnesses one charged with felony another excommunica
1366.r excommunicated by the minister of her religion the last, whose vicious habits had rend
1367. Flannery, another ecclesiastic, in the same place, at a Dr. Egan, who then adminisl
1368.mund Sheehy, believes it to be genuine. One of the Roman Catholic clergymen of Glon
1369., who takes the deepest interest in the fate of Father Sheehy, has no doubt of its a
1370.— 236 cated, APPENDIX. entertains the same opinion; and may observe, the document
1371.36 cated, APPENDIX. entertains the same opinion; and may observe, the document bears th
1372. be executed, thanks be to the Almighty God, with whom I hope to be for evermore: I
1373. I hope to be for evermore: I would not change my lot with the highest now in the king
1374.ingdom. I die innocent of the facts for soul. which I sentenced. I beseech the great
1375.ercy on am my your benevolence to me he will grant you grace to make such use of you
1376.rant you grace to make such use of your time here that you cellor, may see and enjoy
1377.udges of the King's Recommend Bench may God bless them all under the same charge wi
1378. Bench may God bless them all under the same charge with me to them they are innocen
1379.retend to, until in the discharge of my duty one accused him.self of the said fact.
1380.d to, until in the discharge of my duty one accused him.self of the said fact. May
1381. accused him.self of the said fact. May God grant the guilty true repentance, I rec
1382.Waiters promise. I hope no more priests will be distressed for their religion, and t
1383.re priests will be distressed for their religion, and that the Koman Catholics of this k
1384.e Koman Catholics of this king- who dom will be countenanced by the Govern- ment, as
1385. seen either of them, to the best of my memory, before I saw them in the King's Bench
1386. in the King's Bench last February. May God forgive them and bless them, you, and a
1387. proof is adduced. The shortness of the time between his conviction and execution, a
1388.ty expressed of availing himself of the knowledge given him "for his own preservation/' m
1389.inst the probability of this disclosure being made subsequently to the trial. Curry t
1390.er Sheehy from adducing evidence of the man's existence or, if subsequently to it,
1391.nce of the fact of Bridge's ; ; alleged death. . " f < - APPENDIX. 339 The attempt fo
1392.a lie in his mouth." Curry expresses an opinion that Father Sheehy mistrusted the state
1393. to him in confession, and grounds that opinion on the evidence produced on his trial i
1394.s within living, is unquestionable. the knowledge of persons yet in existence. The same o
1395.wledge of persons yet in existence. The same obligations which prevented Father Shee
1396.om availing himself on his trial of the knowledge communicated to him, may have precluded
1397. less vague than the rumour of Bridge's death consequent on his disappearance, on whi
1398.le story of the luoJe and manner of his death was built by the witnesses for the pros
1399. accusers nor the accused, of their own knowledge, knew anything of that event. The whole
1400.nmel, are to be traced to the barbarous custom of inflicting torture for the purpose o
1401.l. This remnant of the barbarity of the good old times, the scourging of suspected p
1402.cently commended the advantages of, was one of the methods of paci- APPENDIX. 241 f
1403. severity, to which he was sentenced by one of their courts-martial, that led him t
1404.ence against them, by which he lost his life." The object of singling out a poor, si
1405.a poor, simple creature, who was in the habit of roaming about that part of the count
1406.iangles subservient to the interests of law and order, is plain enough. The sim- th
1407. get him out of the country own rank in life, there is ; others, in his reason to be
1408.and concealed on the premises, with the knowledge, * The name of Sherlock occurs in some
1409.tion on this subject, and of forming an opinion of the inquiries which were made on thi
1410.The result of these inquiries as to the truth of the statement of one main fact respe
1411.ies as to the truth of the statement of one main fact respecting the faith of Bridg
1412.the faith of Bridge, coincides with the opinion of every surviving friend and relative
1413.nd and relative of the Sheehys, and the other innocent men who suffered in this busin
1414. been circulated in the country, Bridge being in the habit of frequenting Sherlock's
1415.ted in the country, Bridge being in the habit of frequenting Sherlock's house, was po
1416.y now attached to Bridge's character of being an infoi^mer and a sacrilegious person.
1417.eave of his acquaintances; and the last time he was seen by 244 them was on friend o
1418.es, named Timothy Sulli- Sullivan and a man of the van, a slater. name of Michael M
1419. hands, and he was murdered by them. No other human being had act or part in this fou
1420.he was murdered by them. No other human being had act or part in this foul deed. Maho
1421.s reasons for it, were known for a long time only to his friends. The body of the mu
1422.o his friends. The body of the murdered man was thrown into a pond bridge ; at Slia
1423. unknown as the fled Mahony murderer to one individual at Clogheen an innkeeper of
1424.er of the name of Magrath, who had been one of the innocent persons sworn against b
1425.. 245 tie crime, deserves attention. By one of those guilty persons, Sheehy says th
1426.f those guilty persons, Sheehy says the state^ ment was made to him. Sullivan was a P
1427.must have been made by Mahony. From the time of Bridge's disappearance till the disc
1428.hat if any doubt remains respecting the fate of Bridge, hone whatever can be enterta
1429.cence of those who w^ere the victims of one of the foulest conspiracies on record.
1430.aracter, than to the vindication of the law by the punishment of guilt in the perso
1431.an to the vindication of the law by the punishment of guilt in the person of the actual cu
1432. deemed sufficient, not for the ends of justice, but for the purpose of striking terror
1433. party was suspected to belong, to take life for life on whatever plea of expediency
1434.s suspected to belong, to take life for life on whatever plea of expediency or polic
1435.s, and their practices were outrages on justice, and violations of the laws of their co
1436.ws of their country, and of the laws of God. Why are these acts of barbarity to be
1437.led ? the perpetration of them, to what cause are we to ascribe the happy change, but
1438. what cause are we to ascribe the happy change, but to the free expression of the disg
1439.of the book I have just referred to, so many years after the death of the victim of
1440.st referred to, so many years after the death of the victim of Protestant ascendancy
1441.s of the writer were not engaged in the matter he took up, like those of the actors in
1442.endancy were to be sustained, and it is good for the people of England to know by wh
1443.ns, and would be promoted, if happily a change had not come over the policy of the is
1444.plicable to its interests. To rule with justice can now be the only policy a government
1445.th justice can now be the only policy a government can sanction with any prospect of secur
1446.t of security for itself, or the people will submit to at the hands of any party tha
1447.dy of the community. Mr. Taylor, in his History of the Civil states, that Sheehy had be
1448.on, WarSy ; as the following references will show By the 9th of William III, passed
1449. deans, Jesuits, monks, friars, and all other regular Popish clergy, shall depart out
1450.om before the 1st day of May, 1698," on pain of transportation ; and any person so t
1451.d guilty of high treason.* This act not being thought sufficiently stringent, in 1703
1452. Popish clergy. arclibishop, bishop, or other person exercising ecclesiastical jurisd
1453. the leniency of the former measures of Government was reprobated, "The baronet (Sir Thoma
1454. to charge them with the destruction of many of his Majesty's subjects, for not havi
1455.anifestly repugnant to all the rules of prudence, justice, and humanity. Nor did his bol
1456.repugnant to all the rules of prudence, justice, and humanity. Nor did his boldness sto
1457.h arrangements for inflaming the public mind, for influencing the jury, lor intimida
1458.d Sheehy was convicted, and sentence of death, with its usual barbarous concomitants
1459.was carried from it in a swoon. The two other acts of the judicial drama were duly pe
1460.to be executed on the 3rd of May. Eight other persons were placed at the bar, who wer
1461.d at the bar, who were charged with the same crime as the prisoners who had been con
1462.ar at the ensuing assizes, to answer to other ; charges of high treason "that were ma
1463.g," Curry states, by several persons of quality in the favour of the prisoners, who, be
1464.ty in the favour of the prisoners, who, being persuaded of APPENDIX. 251 their innoce
1465.rdon, at least some mitigation of their punishment, by transportation or re- the chief and
1466.en, add new lustre to his nobility, and will be for ever remembered by them with the
1467.ugh resolute. It was impossible for any one in their circumstances to counterfeit t
1468.receive the reward prepared in the next life for those who suffer patiently for its
1469.here is " an authentic narration of the death and execution of Messrs. Sheehy, Buxton
1470.ve likewise compared with copies of the same declarations, furnished me by some of t
1471.ready for the purpose, by an order from government. Edmund Sheehy and James Buxton were pu
1472.Sheehy and James Buxton were put on the same car, James Farrell on the next, and the
1473.ived about twelve o'clock, the distance being about eleven miles. ; APPENDIX. '' 253
1474.s was erected, and that in a very short time, while the prisoners remained at a smal
1475.t necessary to execute the sentence the law of their country had doomed them to suf
1476.ffer. They were then all three put upon one car, and drawn under the gallows, where
1477.he gallows, where, after remaining some time, they were tied up, and in that situati
1478.nd afterwards handed it to the sheriff. fate with the most undaunted courage, and de
1479.e sheriff. fate with the most undaunted courage, and delivered his declaration with as
1480.s declaration with as much composure of mind as if he had been repeatino^ a prayer.
1481.y and after the criminals had hung some time, they were cut down, and the ; *'Sheehy
1482. their crimes and let selves, ; unhappy fate; Buxton, three; who had not been marrie

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/