Concordance for The fate of the Dane and other stories / by Anna Hanson Dorsey.

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1.   d interest and fascinating reality that will hold the reader to the end. 12mo. Cloth
2. story depicts the gradual passage of a soul from the darkness of error to the light
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14. THE FATE OF THE DANE, Cloth, $1.50. and other Stories. 1 vol. 12mo. Four of Mrs. Dors
15. f. is Tom Boy a story of convent school life, describing a little world in is replet
16. onvent school life, describing a little world in is replete with fun, pathos, and chi
17. is replete with fun, pathos, and child experience which not all fiction. THE STUDENT OF B
18. $1.50. is of a distinguished Protestant family in old Virginia, whose clear intellect
19. free. JOHN MURPHY & CO., BALTIMORE. The Fate of the Dane AND OTHER STORIES. BY ANNA
20. O., BALTIMORE. The Fate of the Dane AND OTHER STORIES. BY ANNA HANSON DOKSEY, The Fat
21. HER STORIES. BY ANNA HANSON DOKSEY, The Fate of the Dane. A Brave Girl. The Story of
22. ; — r-&r-t THE DRUID'S TOWER; OR, THE FATE OF THE DANE. CHAPTER " Let Erin I. reme
23. nger Ere the emerald gem of the western world Was set in the crown of the stranger."
24. them through departed generations. They will tell you in the most graphic style, and
25. e, and you happen to understand the old language of Erin, so rich in all that expresses
26. of Erin, so rich in all that expresses emotion or passion, you will hear wild, poetica
27. that expresses emotion or passion, you will hear wild, poetical, and thrilling word
28. he Baltic, if i we venture to assert, a man, in Ireland, who has not heard, 2 THE D
29. . year after year, their beautiful They will point to the gray ruins of the Dan- and
30. ows might have swept them away from the memory of the living, if the Danish ruins, the
31. of ghastly lights flitting here and THE FATE OF THE DANE. 3 there through the ruins,
32. g arches which ages ago echoed with the death cry of slaughtered Danes nor could you
33. along the shore, to go under the lee of one of those mounds, or in the neighborhood
34. those mounds, or in the neighborhood of one of their ruined castles. Yes! the. peop
35. em about as well as in later times they love the Saxon, and good reason they have to
36. in later times they love the Saxon, and good reason they have to swear by St. Patric
37. ntly a foreigner and a gentleman, and a man clad in the boatman, stood together ben
38. in the boatman, stood together beneath one of the cliffs which line the shores of
39. in a quiet voice. " And surely now yer honor won't be there'll afther crossing to In
40. he brawny chief-loving eye. " It's your honor that 'ud have rayson to be f re- afeard
41. as to not thankful to anybody alive for being onaisy concerning me — it breeds ill
42. eather than this." " I don't doubt your*courage an instant, Owen. You have been a safe
43. ot fear to trust you * By t my body and soul, An effeminate man., THE FATE OF THE DA
44. * By t my body and soul, An effeminate man., THE FATE OF THE DANE. now. $ Get out
45. body and soul, An effeminate man., THE FATE OF THE DANE. now. $ Get out your oars l
46. DANE. now. $ Get out your oars lend me one, and with Heaven's help we'll soon land
47. d with Heaven's help we'll soon land at will go. We — Inniscathy." Hould, sir," ex
48. Inniscathy." Hould, sir," exclaimed the man, starting back with a terrified counten
49. hy. " The Pundit is there Does not your honor see the I dare not go. " smoke " sailin
50. aughed the gentleman. " He may be, your honor, or his grandfather, maybe. Anywise he'
51. him," Anywise, divil or Pundit, I'm not one to put yer honor at a deshort, * if you
52. divil or Pundit, I'm not one to put yer honor at a deshort, * if you're bent on goin\
53. 're bent on goin\ Thanks to the priest, God bless him, and my mother may her bed be
54. me prayers at a venture," he said, more good-humoredly, as he * At loss. — 6 the D
55. where is he from ? Asia ? " Whirra, yer honor, it's more than I can tell. Some says h
56. than I can tell. Some says he's a wise man from the North some that he's one of th
57. wise man from the North some that he's one of the unfortunates that used to tache
58. ht* their letthers, when it was worth a man's life to do it, and being detected by
59. eir letthers, when it was worth a man's life to do it, and being detected by the spi
60. it was worth a man's life to do it, and being detected by the spies that was set on t
61. ilish style that he got crazy. Some say one thing, some another, but it's not consi
62. to fall in with him. I can't make your honor incense it, but it's as true as the gos
63. undering landward, * Poor children. THE FATE OF THE DANE. 7 he seemed to be counting
64. en moored in the ordinary way. now, yer honor. It's neck or nothing stay or drown, wi
65. divil of a Pundit to the fore, like an evil spirit, ready to pounce down upon us li
66. on us like a kite on a hen-roost. Where will your honor spend the night? " " I shall
67. a kite on a hen-roost. Where will your honor spend the night? " " I shall pay the Pu
68. flesh and blood, I'd do it anyhow, yer honor's not to be brow-beat, and, der chorp a
69. , stranger in Ireland, at shouldn't yer honor, for my friends in demaned myself to Am
70. rsaid sich an occasion, bedad. ever yer honor leads the way." " Thank you, Owen," " ;
71. his hand, faithful friend you're a true man and a but you had better remain here an
72. every direction, un" but you're til his form was lost in the darkness not going to o
73. re, without wasting ball and powder, in time to lind a hand." And Owen Daily dragged
74. entrance. not assert that he felt as We will bravely as he assumed, or that he did n
75. n America, or that he had selected some other We only know that he acted like a brave
76. ellow in sacrificing his supersti- TPIE FATE OF THE DANE. Q tious fears to the safet
77. s fears to the safety and protection of one who was a stranger in a strange land. O
78. onsible, in a measure, for the national honor. re- He would not individually have bro
79. respectability of his country, for the world so with the best and most chivalrous in
80. thick over the scene, and not a living being in sight, he jumped to the conclusion t
81. s conducted their affairs this might be one of their haunts, and the Pundit a scare
82. Ribbonmen, who there schemed and ; THE FATE OF THE DANE. II plotted Agrarian outrag
83. e men, whose oppressions resulted in so many legal murders. He wondered where his wi
84. until morning but Mr. Wilmot possessed one of those firm, calm natures, which, ins
85. e firm, calm natures, which, instead of being deterred by difficulties, are only inci
86. "1 would and tell them that so far from being an Excise man, or one of the Coastguard
87. l them that so far from being an Excise man, or one of the Coastguard, I was an Ame
88. hat so far from being an Excise man, or one of the Coastguard, I was an American, a
89. andsomely to take me to France." " Very good as far as it goes," replies Caution—
90. mugglers and Ribbonmen, you find really one who, having made over " Bethis soul to
91. ally one who, having made over " Bethis soul to the devil, practises magic ? " ter s
92. magic ? " ter still. A Colt's revolver will be quite equal to him, so let me pass.
93. ll was silent, and he went on until his progress was impeded by a low, narrow door. It w
94. leaned forward, his nose, which was of good and prominent dimensions, saluted the d
95. a low, stone table in tattered an aged man arrayed Oriental attire. his long, whit
96. th a weak, quavering voice he showed no emotion of ; 3 THE FATE OF THE DANE. said, as 1
97. g voice he showed no emotion of ; 3 THE FATE OF THE DANE. said, as 1 he waved his ha
98. he waved his hand, " Thou hast come in good time. I have been expecting thee." " I
99. aved his hand, " Thou hast come in good time. I have been expecting thee." " I notic
100. waiting patiently for thee. Hitherto no one has answered it. Now I know the time is
101. no one has answered it. Now I know the time is at hand," he replied solemnly. I " I
102. imself that Owny's suggestion about the Evil One might, by a bare possibility, be co
103. f that Owny's suggestion about the Evil One might, by a bare possibility, be correc
104. hatever he might say, he would at least sign nothing for he was addicted to some old
105. some old superstitious ideas about his soul which he valued. " No I am very not too
106. d to inhabit the body of a Druid, whose soul passed away at midnight in He had commi
107. d committed sacrilege, and if his cell. Fate had not released him in time, he would
108. his cell. Fate had not released him in time, he would have received the punishment
109. him in time, he would have received the punishment due to his crimes. As it was I expiated
110. I expiated them in chains and darkWhen justice was satisfied I was released ness. and
111. was a flourished and prospered. common justice, I — boast that, * Quid sit jus cleri
112. r still and became mad yes, stranger of Fate, a raving — ! — madman — then a
113. ian— then fury — then — but you a will know Time anon. am now in Pundit repute
114. n fury — then — but you a will know Time anon. am now in Pundit repute ; one of
115. ow Time anon. am now in Pundit repute ; one of India. high caste, and held flies hi
116. east and he was silent. Mr. flies," THE FATE OF THE DANE. Wilmot knew hopelessly the
117. the safest that the unfortunate old ; 1 man was mad and having once heard that it i
118. spot I had laid it centuries ago. Thou art young, and more active than I climb up
119. umor the peculiar fancy of the daft old man, proceeded to do as he roll of 16 THE d
120. ; rough stone projections allowed him, being obliged to descend backward; and leapin
121. end backward; and leaping from the last one, he glanced around and discovered that
122. smell of brimstone around him. Had the Evil One claimed him, body and all, while he
123. l of brimstone around him. Had the Evil One claimed him, body and all, while he was
124. ture of supernatural existence, whether evil or good he could not determine the sard
125. supernatural existence, whether evil or good he could not determine the sardonic lau
126. of brimstone did not incline him to the opinion that it was anything heavenly. Just the
127. rapidly as the down — — ; — 7 THE FATE OF THE DANE. 1 dashed wildly into the r
128. im like a " wounded in owl. is What the world the matter, Owny, my man," asked Mr. Wi
129. " wounded in owl. is What the world the matter, Owny, my man," asked Mr. Wilmot with a
130. is What the world the matter, Owny, my man," asked Mr. Wilmot with a smile he coul
131. d not suppress. An' what is it all, yer honor? I'd like to be knowing myself," he rep
132. in a distracted manner. " Thanks be to God and the saints your honor's I like to s
133. " Thanks be to God and the saints your honor's I like to safe an' well as to myself,
134. mot. " you seen the Pundit?" asked your honor, after you 1 Why, you see, left me beya
135. he spot. So up I come, scared out of my life, to the Tower an' there I was standin'
136. t as sure as divil of a Pundit and your honor, flutterin' of life, there came a on al
137. a Pundit and your honor, flutterin' of life, there came a on all, it, flash of ligh
138. THE DRUID'S TOWER; OR, might find your honor sound an' well, I made bould to come up
139. eatable. Their keen appetite did ample justice to the ridiculous look' ; ! ; ; ; ! ing
140. sleep. Mr. Wilmot, excited to wake- THE FATE OF THE DANE. fulness 19 by the strange
141. and not knowing how soon the insane old man might return, thought he would open and
142. the monastic ruins, and his disordered imagination had woven it in with the fantastic ture
143. tastic ture creatures of his distracted mind. Z&f* &/&f'&7t-~~~-' Cer?W€9*' 20 THE
144. ata some fragments from the archives of one of the Inniscathy monasteries. He unrol
145. nasteries. He unrolled and glanced over one and another, and threw them aside then
146. nt on with his researches." — — THE FATE OF THE DANE. " It is 21 Hobson's choice
147. he said, slowly Ha! unrolling the last one •" this, or nothing. good Latin The F
148. ing the last one •" this, or nothing. good Latin The Fate of the Fairly written Da
149. e •" this, or nothing. good Latin The Fate of the Fairly written Dane, it is calle
150. Fairly written Dane, it is called. This will do finely " saying which, he settled hi
151. vitality altars and homes was over, the death throes were hushed, and we were the sla
152. blood had been shed to defend them. The will of the oppressor became our Law. Soon e
153. m. The will of the oppressor became our Law. Soon every district in the Land, in ;
154. m whom he was to receive orders for the government of his people, for we were yet too prou
155. tted a Danish soldier. Nothing that the citizen or farmer possessed could he call his o
156. there died of starvation and cold. ters Religion and let- were interdicted ; the nobilit
157. ladies were not allowed to receive the education proper for their state. Reading and eve
158. receive the education proper for their state. Reading and every kind of Literary ins
159. n were forbidden to the common peo- THE FATE OF THE DANE. pie. 2$ But it did not end
160. annually to the receivers of Turgesius, one ounce of gold, and this was exacted wit
161. ir — — homes, and regardless of the virtue of their tie, daughters, or the sacredn
162. es and daughters away from their proand love, leaving madness and broken tection hea
163. at of the unfortunate monarch, that the same moat and fortifications enclosed both.
164. d fortifications enclosed both. habita- One state, evening, Turgesius, weary of aff
165. rtifications enclosed both. habita- One state, evening, Turgesius, weary of affairs o
166. fter its and the blue shadows crept THE FATE OF THE DANE. nous track free, ; 25 the
167. beaten back the bitter emotions of his soul, but, a strong angel wrestled with him
168. ter emotions of his soul, but, a strong angel wrestled with him now ; his heart beat
169. d up hoarsely from his oppressed bosom. Nature could not endure such a conflict long t
170. uld not endure such a conflict long the angel of mercy touched the fountain of his so
171. el of mercy touched the fountain of his soul, and slowly a few large tears stole ove
172. with an uncertain air but observing no one, was turning — ! ! ; 26 THE DRUID'S T
173. was thrown a loose flowing robe of the same color, bordered with pearls, and claspe
174. is own impotence to aid them filled his soul with a bitterness like unto death. " Ca
175. ed his soul with a bitterness like unto death. " Can all hope of struggled like a cha
176. indignation of a noble and unconquered will, crimsoned her cheeks and brow. " Lord,
177. livest, shall I cease to hope, for Thou art mighty and strong to THE FATE OF THE DA
178. , for Thou art mighty and strong to THE FATE OF THE DANE. deliver. 2J Deliver us fro
179. er. 2J Deliver us from our enemies, — God. Behold, I offer Father thee myself a v
180. r thee myself a victim and country." my peace-offering for my Was it the brightness o
181. that glorious prayer, flowingback from God in light upon her ? Then she crept sile
182. r to-day ? " No he is not yet returned. God forbid any harm should befall Ingomar "
183. ! Forbid it, indeed. At the risk of his life he almost daily brings me tidings and m
184. a thousand fears took possession of his mind. " The Danish king, Turgesius comes " c
185. well moulded, but defaced by more than one malignant line, as were self the fair p
186. ther's mouth by a sinister Leatha, with one arm about her gazed with at neck, an th
187. t is no wonder thou smiles of the fair. art so patient," said Turgesius, with an in
188. said with agree but ; " Captivity and a soul ill to- my lord. Leatha, retire " said
189. atha, retire " said King Mal- achy. THE FATE OF THE DANE. " It is ; 29 one of thy pr
190. chy. THE FATE OF THE DANE. " It is ; 29 one of thy prerogatives to complain but fly
191. fly not, fair maiden, I knew not, on my honor, that anything so lovely, had e'er birt
192. fealty is due to my father and king. I will no longer interrupt the interview thou
193. rded, Chieftain, because she is like my soul and honor, a dear and sacred I love her
194. eftain, because she is like my soul and honor, a dear and sacred I love her as did th
195. my soul and honor, a dear and sacred I love her as did the Roman, gift from Heaven.
196. his daughter in the Forum, to save her honor," said the king, lifting his gray head
197. is gray head proudly up. " Henceforth I will share thy cares for her safety/' said T
198. ossible, and if it, there be a spark of honor left, I will appeal to by a day a day w
199. f it, there be a spark of honor left, I will appeal to by a day a day which, if it c
200. hyself, but to the bitter lessons which experience has taught me." " Nay nay trust me the
201. ely. But how is this fair bird lodged ? evil will seeming trust postpone the in his
202. But how is this fair bird lodged ? evil will seeming trust postpone the in his inten
203. rust postpone the in his intentions. It will at least — be the blackest : — —
204. r, or deprived her of a single If so, I will punish with death of this whom- soever
205. r of a single If so, I will punish with death of this whom- soever has been guilty or
206. his whom- soever has been guilty or any other favor in offence against one " who hath
207. y or any other favor in offence against one " who hath found my eyes," asked Turges
208. ged, and has everything befit- ting her state — except Freedom " ! replied the king
209. ed the king bitterly. " The fortunes of war are inevitable bright-plumaged bird whi
210. ght-plumaged bird which snared her cage will be so fine large and beautiful, and suc
211. nd devotion shall wait on her, that she will forget Freedom." — — but this our d
212. destiny has and gilded — so — "Then will she be recreant to her blood 1 THE FATE
213. will she be recreant to her blood 1 THE FATE OF THE DANE. 3 muttered King Malachy in
214. ut it is only the jewel of an honorable love, that could win response from the daugh
215. thy captives, sir chief thy — — — honor be our safeguard/' " Fear no harm, my L
216. eautiful daughter for me and tell her I will pffer — — my homage inclination of
217. ealing an arched aperture which stood a man, in the prime of manhood, whose swarthy
218. OR, sion of welcome, hands towards him. art Ingomar, I am glad thou here have stran
219. ears and anxieties which beset him. The other sat with his head bowed, and as motionl
220. ed, and as motionless as stone. His was one of those natures, which, calm on the su
221. none the less. heard came on him like a death-blow bitter and horrible was the though
222. in sentiments of lust " — — — THE FATE OF THE DANE. against the fair blossom o
223. els for the this frightful strait first time silent ? " asked the king. " I dared I
224. peak —what should I say ? swear by my life and soul that Turgesius shall never acc
225. hat should I say ? swear by my life and soul that Turgesius shall never accomplish h
226. is a how, and may to be prevented. our God, whom we have faithfully served, Althou
227. ." " I it it, causes instant unless all death. else fails to am cheered by thee, Ingo
228. of strange hope vibrating through my " being what meaneth it ? " Perchance one of th
229. y " being what meaneth it ? " Perchance one of the strong angels of God stands by t
230. " Perchance one of the strong angels of God stands by to aid us may the God of Host
231. gels of God stands by to aid us may the God of Hosts not prelude the dawn. may —
232. let who I narrowly escaped the pickets will strike first. I had barely of the Dane
233. gomar — — — — — the King. THE FATE OF THE DANE. 35 CHAPTER Daily did Turge
234. chaste ears with the protestations of a love which she scorned. His air of mock defe
235. ogance of his assumed power, filled her mind with disgust and bitter resent- ment ;
236. single eloquent appeal she made to his honor was met by a levity so coarse as to hum
237. arpened by anger he could trust only in God he saw no other deliverer but even his
238. er he could trust only in God he saw no other deliverer but even his faith was often
239. fears that like tempests swept over his soul. ; — — And Turgesius felt himself s
240. his royal honors in the presence of his family and court, thought that the cup of his
241. eive the Danish chieftain's offer as an honor, and assured him that he only required
242. required a short period to consider the matter and triumph over old prejudices which w
243. n hour beyond what was agreeable to his pleasure own ; inclinations : these were his cap
244. his vassals ? how dare they thwart his One he first evening, having sought Leatha
245. a and found in her with her father, the same apartment where saw them, he accosted t
246. a ness and levity. new mood ruling his mind. Leatha's heart sank the soul of the ki
247. uling his mind. Leatha's heart sank the soul of the king, but preserving his calm ex
248. orm which he felt was coming. rior, THE FATE OF THE DANE. 37 " Fair lady,'' said the
249. m to suppose for a moment that it was a chance sound which had drifted up from ; them.
250. sentence of separation us, even for the honor of associating her with thee in thy pow
251. ed while her clear, lustrous eyes, with truth and purity, smote his guilty soul. " Th
252. with truth and purity, smote his guilty soul. " There are terms, then. Name them," h
253. ou dost not require too fair means than will The terms on which thine in : consent t
254. ts oppressed inhabitants may breathe in peace. Restore my father to his throne and cr
255. my vows and thee, so that which I ; — love is saved." gathered with every word on
256. e maiden, are as lofty as Methinks thou art dreaming. I cannot argue with one so fi
257. thou art dreaming. I cannot argue with one so filled with heroic visions. But as I
258. to subjection by force and the skill of war, so shall I keep possession of it and t
259. not thyself about useless ceremonies, I will none of them. Forget not that I rule he
260. here ; the flight of a free eagle. ; my will is the law of all who are subject to me
261. light of a free eagle. ; my will is the law of all who are subject to me ; therefor
262. e, exasperate me no longer by fresh THE FATE OF THE DANE. delay, or, ! 39 by Thor I
263. OF THE DANE. delay, or, ! 39 by Thor I will tear this dove from thy eyrie by force,
264. , and leave an old and royal captive in peace/' " Thy daughter or none, Malachy. Baff
265. . " I throw myself and my griefs on thy honor, Turgesius," plead the king. " My honor
266. honor, Turgesius," plead the king. " My honor shall not harm thee, old man, rest assu
267. ng. " My honor shall not harm thee, old man, rest assured," replied Turgesius with
268. ng laugh. To-morrow, be prepared." " We will be prepared, Turgesius," said Leatha, w
269. rant and oppressor, for the servants of God never call on him in vain." " 40 THE DR
270. s well," he replied surlily. "As to thy God, I fear him not." " Turgesius, I implor
271. I fear him not." " Turgesius, I implore one day's delay," said the king, who had su
272. take me for a fool? Be ready, beautiful one, to return with me to thy new home to-m
273. or a single day's freedom. Consider how many thousand things a maiden has to attend
274. atha with assumed cheerful; " In vain I will not ! ness. " I yield to thy entreaties
275. ors and riches them, but, methinks, all will I provide for them a happiness own. The
276. methinks, all will I provide for them a happiness own. They are my guests and ; heap on b
277. th them. Let them come as her ladies of honor; thus, her atto King Malachy, provide f
278. King Malachy, provide fifteen tendants will be of her own choice." A loud, harsh la
279. half of through the lofty chamber. Each one started and gazed around, pale and conf
280. ry, drew his sword and rage, rang 1 THE FATE OF THE DANE. stood in 4 an attitude of
281. a hiding-place left spy ; however, this one seemeth friendly to thy ests," replied
282. was outstretched to gather her graceful form to his bosom in a rude embrace, but she
283. r light in his eye than it had worn for many a weary day. All this was reported to T
284. oidery. In groups of two and three, the other Danish chiefs were standing or sitting
285. nd fro, from an near the turret — THE FATE OF THE DANE. apartment beyond kept, to
286. re the royal robes were of rooms on the other side, which Leatha occupied with her ma
287. ied in their aspect. woman flitted from one to another, whispering — some sharp,
288. ference Was it to the despair, or their fate The king started from his chair when he
289. other sun rises o'er the blue wave Erin will have burst her chains, and all will be
290. rin will have burst her chains, and all will be well " Her voice sounded strangely l
291. Here the dark woman paused, and leading one of the veiled maidens to Turgesius, sai
292. spite, mother it their coming. : ; THE FATE OF THE DANE. 45 must be hard to be reft
293. THE DANE. 45 must be hard to be reft of one so peerless as LeaBut lift the envious
294. ius passed his arm around the shrinking form, and telling his companions to select e
295. cen blade in each guilty heart, and the death-throe on their white, shivering lips.*
296. ile women, fifteen young chiefs, in the beauty and glory of manhood, stood exultant ov
297. ensued, except Turreserved for another fate. darkest* who was Thus the hour which h
298. ery who had almost despaired of freeThe time had come to throw off the yoke, those I
299. and and their hereditary homes from the tyranny of the oppressor. The Danes, knowing th
300. wing that their chief was in irons, and many of their commanders killed, became pani
301. lled, became panic-stricken ; and Their courage forsook them they were routed with scar
302. ppressed foes, who, after the barbarous custom of the times, put them to THE FATE OF T
303. us custom of the times, put them to THE FATE OF THE DANE. who 47 indiscriminate slau
304. valor, f Malachy now took the reins of government into his hands, and called the Estates
305. hort defence and prosperity of Ireland. time the country became cleared of hostile s
306. ed by Dane to be found in all the land. Liberty was proclaimed the remnant of the clerg
307. d caves where they had been hiding, and many who had fled to France returned college
308. re eign sovereigns announcing the happy change in To Charles the Bold, of his own king
309. ce, which he purposed doing." There was one joyous interruption to all these grave
310. all these grave and pressing affairs of State the nuptials of the princess Leatha, wh
311. f the princess Leatha, who had been the cause, under Providence, of the liberation of
312. nd musical with the song of — ; ; THE FATE OF THE DANE. 49 the nightingale in the
313. gay companions to think over her great happiness and calm her emotions by gazing from th
314. e he wished her joy in swift steps, and happiness in the life to come. She would have rep
315. oy in swift steps, and happiness in the life to come. She would have replied in swee
316. flitted none could tell whither. * * * life Then came a terrible retribution. King
317. he would-be destroyer of his daughter's honor. He assembled his court, his great chie
318. Mr. Wilmot closing the manuscript, the same " Lough where the fisherman strays the
319. ning, When And sees the round towers of other days In the wave beneath him shining."
320. th him shining." Moore. * Historic. THE FATE OF THE DANE. 5 CHAPTER V. Mr. WlLMOT ro
321. dn't have missed this adventure for the world, or the possession of this ancient manu
322. ssion of this ancient manuscript, which will prove that I am not drawing on my imagi
323. will prove that I am not drawing on my imagination when I relate it," said Mr. Wilmot, gaz
324. leasant murmur. Neagh. Come, Owny, it's time to get up." But Owen was sound asleep,
325. : was to cross himself devoutly with, a God be thanked for all his mercies " his se
326. eartily re" ; turned. " And it did your honor say " ? it was Lough Neagh you are goin
327. at." by a mile or two, and a place your honor's two eyes never looked forenent " I'm
328. the waves." " It's there, is to be your honor. They do say, that has a right to know,
329. is, and the fountain got a fresh in it one day and overflowed all the country roun
330. weathers altogether clear." " I hope it will be clear weather while we are there, Ow
331. g hard " ? "It might be, ,your divils ; honor; of it's there's many ghosts of them Da
332. , ,your divils ; honor; of it's there's many ghosts of them Danes haunting the not s
333. e to go anigh mounds and cairns and THE FATE OF THE DANE. 53 the morasses after nigh
334. t's traps together, making merry at the same time over their late adventure, as if d
335. raps together, making merry at the same time over their late adventure, as if determ
336. left ill impression of Ireland upon his mind. But that gentleman's epigastric region
337. and Rome, but in this desolate land of beauty, which sat like a chained captive by th
338. phenomenon which is not recorded by any other nation the world ever knew that of a pe
339. is not recorded by any other nation the world ever knew that of a people unsubdued by
340. s of centuries who never did, and never will, fraternize with those who have robbed
341. had perused with curious and attentive mind the history of the land he was sojourni
342. sed with curious and attentive mind the history of the land he was sojourning in he did
343. not know — until then that she had a history. He had thought, in common ; with his c
344. rded the much as he would have two done one of the old ruined Condes of Spain, whos
345. e he quaffs ale and sings snatches of " God save the Queen, " thinks with contempt
346. ant for means to purchase another." THE FATE OF THE DANE. 55 " Thank your honor, but
347. " THE FATE OF THE DANE. 55 " Thank your honor, but by the token of the fut prints and
348. ge by some plundarin' thief that had no other way of getting to the mainland an' I'll
349. ting to the mainland an' I'll tell your honor what," said Owen, taking off his hat an
350. omes over, or some travellers like your honor, unless your honor can swim." wouldn't
351. travellers like your honor, unless your honor can swim." wouldn't begridge " I can mu
352. far as that at any rate prefer waiting good chance to get off, rather than risk my
353. as that at any rate prefer waiting good chance to get off, rather than risk my life on
354. chance to get off, rather than risk my life on such odds," said Mr. Wilmot. " Bedad
355. ith a cutter like my own an' there's no other betune this and the Pigeon House like ;
356. e Pigeon House like ; ; ; it. See, your honor, ; how she springs like a wild troth, s
357. at rivalled a steam-whistle. In a short time the boat was moored, and Owen's hand wa
358. hael Riorden came in an outlandish ould man, from Inniscathy, until an' tould us th
359. The Pundit," shouted Owen. " Then, your honor, I was well nigh crazy, for I was sure
360. was well nigh crazy, for I was sure yer honor and Owen there had been murthered so wi
361. f for Inniscathy, an' thanks But, be to God, you're both safe an' sound. look there
362. e an' sound. look there, sir," said the man pointing toward the coast. They turned,
363. which would have as readily avenged the death of the boat before the sun ; The fate o
364. death of the boat before the sun ; The fate of the Dane. of the stranger as of thei
365. rs he had succeeded in removing all his family thither, and if our readers Wilmot are
366. ough interested to know more of them we will give them letters of introduction to Me
367. dealers in New York. Their children are being educated at the best schools and the tw
368. ry for their old age and for those whom God has given them, but by their example an
369. and precept guide them in the paths of virtue and ; 58 religion, all THE FATE OF THE
370. de them in the paths of virtue and ; 58 religion, all THE FATE OF THE DANE. and while th
371. hs of virtue and ; 58 religion, all THE FATE OF THE DANE. and while they command the
372. e they command the respect citizens, of good their devotion to the distant and their
373. nd beautiful land, as our best but see, one and friend, Mr. Wilmot, can tell ye all
374. th of her saints, by forgetting the and being ashamed of the ould mother earth that t
375. ers rest in. The day of her deliverance will come, boys, and we who have loved her i
376. of happier times was wanting; and, had one been near enough, a dull and weary look
377. ons France before the Empire. conscript law rigidly enforced had more than decimate
378. e in fair less fury of the who The held Revolution, for the great Emperor must continue at
379. ent royal dynasties that sneered at the man who held them uneasy on their thrones.
380. n in the plans of their friends who had cause to tremble, for the whole thing had bee
381. by the secret police, and arrests were being made right and left, which involved the
382. . " Some poor fellows," muttered an old man in originated it, the coarse threadbare
383. ing or two. The sans-culottes had given one of his sons to be murdered by the guill
384. illotine; Bonaparte had conscripted the other, who perished at Austerlitz and he hate
385. t to serve young France; maybe heroic a man who thought he could per- work out her
386. could per- work out her deliverance by one blow, and 4 illed THE STORY OF A BRAVE
387. s no odds, they'll be butchered all the same if the Christ Himself ; stood in the wa
388. ist Himself ; stood in the way of their evil counsels, they'd put HIM to death." ful
389. their evil counsels, they'd put HIM to death." full of bitter This man's heart was c
390. put HIM to death." full of bitter This man's heart was curses which was impotent t
391. represented thousands of others in the same case, who in their weakness and cried f
392. turning of that mill which measures out God's justice, " grinding slowly but exceed
393. g of that mill which measures out God's justice, " grinding slowly but exceeding small.
394. ns condemned to the gates galleys or to death its awaited their punishment, and over
395. s galleys or to death its awaited their punishment, and over iron-plated might have been w
396. e was their THE PRISONER AND HER CHILD. being high-born, or, 5 as the sans-culottes c
397. ismounted, and handed a paper to the on duty, who, having examined it closely, gave
398. st and back in the shadow there stood a man of cadaverous and sinister aspect, whos
399. riage, and to the astonishment of every one two females a woman of noble presence a
400. home had been too sudden to allow them time to clothe themselves properly for the j
401. ts folds. Only their heads were visible one, covered with heavy tresses of black si
402. partially di- — — ; shevelled ; the other, with long loose curls that blonde and
403. breast, young girl, placed close to the other's was veiled from the rude gaze of the
404. d her. " Here are two, we expected only one. Lift up your head, young one, and let
405. cted only one. Lift up your head, young one, and let me see who you — are," said
406. pompous who had I risen with much all's other scum from the gutters of Paris during t
407. ve no business but the : with you." " I will not leave my mother," cried the young g
408. together. " I them both, more think you will. I have no orders to imprison " you/' O
409. her breast, as she turned a face whose beauty was disfigured by jailer. I grief towar
410. rders, madame," interrupted the rudely. man : 8 THE STORY OF A BRAVE " It is GIRL.
411. the prison of the Bicetre," growled the man. " It is possible and I tell you that I
412. y?" " But if you take her from me where will she go ? " asked the distressed mother,
413. . You " That's gruffly, " didn't ask my opinion " about assassinating the Emperor, did
414. er mother, a pure and noble lady, whose life, — THE PRISONER AND HER CHILD. unstai
415. PRISONER AND HER CHILD. unstained by an evil " so, 9 its thought, had sought she? th
416. ought, had sought she? that is greatest happiness in the good of others. It Your mother b
417. she? that is greatest happiness in the good of others. It Your mother but it is inn
418. rn is me a question for the tribunal of justice to decide. What ; a man does his wife a
419. tribunal of justice to decide. What ; a man does his wife apt to have a hand in is
420. t days ago he, Georges Cadoudal and the other conspirators, were sentenced." Both mot
421. cted with his odious occupation, " have courage, madame, and obey with a good grace. I
422. " have courage, madame, and obey with a good grace. I do not wish to use which are t
423. lieutenant of the : prison guards. Oh, one moment just one moment " sobbed the dis
424. he : prison guards. Oh, one moment just one moment " sobbed the distressed mother a
425. as they " ! — ! stood clasped in each other's arms. " Not another one," roared the
426. ped in each other's arms. " Not another one," roared the brutal officer. do your du
427. ne," roared the brutal officer. do your duty." Several gendarmes came forward to enf
428. se let me go into the ! " Guards, — ! same cell with it ? my mamma; who For the lo
429. me cell with it ? my mamma; who For the love ; will know ! it? who will see Mother,
430. with it ? my mamma; who For the love ; will know ! it? who will see Mother, messieu
431. who For the love ; will know ! it? who will see Mother, messieurs gendarmes, let me
432. et me stay " Go, my poor child there is One above who is the help of the desolate,"
433. it so close and gloomy." " But you you will be there, and yet you tell me to go oh,
434. d yet you tell me to go oh, I cannot, I will not " she sobbed — ; ! distractedly.
435. But military orders are inexorable and one of them, even while he dashed off a tea
436. let us end it," and seizing the slight form of the young girl in his brawny arms, t
437. 4A/?i ^ngjyr Parr- CHAPTER When II. AN ANGEL WHISPER. Marie recovered her consciousn
438. behind her, " do not scream so, or they will drive you farther away." " I don't care
439. he bars of the iron-plated prison 12 AN ANGEL WHISPER. gates. " I 1 want her, I tell
440. ates. " I 1 want her, I tell you, and I will make too in so much noise that they wil
441. ill make too in so much noise that they will shut me up the prison." "Yes, but not w
442. wn eyes from which tears were streaming one after another. " Are you, too, in troub
443. have such sorrows, and you so young The good God will surely " pity you. But tell me
444. such sorrows, and you so young The good God will surely " pity you. But tell me, wh
445. sorrows, and you so young The good God will surely " pity you. But tell me, what is
446. ly " pity you. But tell me, what is the other grief? " I have a father, and those cru
447. " And a father also She answered by the same " sign. And you are not separated from
448. father also She answered by the same " sign. And you are not separated from them, p
449. ! embrace Oh, how happy The thought of happiness that until lately been her own, made th
450. exclaimed Marie, " Susette, at — ; AN ANGEL WHISPER. with sudden hope. " 15 Then he
451. dly she had never felt so sorry for any one in her life before, for it was the firs
452. never felt so sorry for any one in her life before, for it was the first time she h
453. n her life before, for it was the first time she had ever seen a young girl in distr
454. " do you shake your head so sadly, Suno one heard is sette? " Because madame, ; —
455. emoiselle indeed my father is not a bad man." At this moment the sound of a large b
456. not be uneasy be sure they so delicate will not forget her." " My poor mamma ! she
457. elongs to thy Confraternity, and out of love for thee always kept thy shrine beautif
458. thy shrine beautiful with flowers." " I will offer my Aves for her this " evening/'
459. on, when, perhaps, I shall never see my good papa again Oh, " no, no ; ; ; ; ! — !
460. elle, die." if you do not could eat you will " And do you think I live with such do
461. ive with such do eat ? Oh, you are very good, but you don't know what a dreadful gri
462. nother officer and fresh guards were on duty in place of those who had been there al
463. relieved. After they went away, ; ; AN ANGEL WHISPER. and everything fell 1 into its
464. daily young lieutenant who was waiting Justice, report to take to the Bureau of the Mi
465. him what was the latest news in Paris. One or two other officers belonging to the
466. as the latest news in Paris. One or two other officers belonging to the garrison at B
467. points in the city, after saluting each other now sauntered up, and and passing some
468. nothing else." then?" This is the first chance you have given me/' he retorted, lighti
469. e galloping to the four quarters of the world and miss it entirely. Or do "Come you j
470. 8 1 THE STORY OF A BRAVE " If GIRL. you will be quiet one minute I will tell you som
471. OF A BRAVE " If GIRL. you will be quiet one minute I will tell you something that w
472. If GIRL. you will be quiet one minute I will tell you something that will surprise y
473. e minute I will tell you something that will surprise you for my own relief, for I'm
474. h Lieutenant Prevost, the importance of one who has someat St. thing of startling i
475. ay I was on guard Cloud ; and having AN ANGEL WHISPER. nothing to amuse I I9 me in th
476. late athad read tempt on the Emperor's life, the same thing over and over again, as
477. d read tempt on the Emperor's life, the same thing over and over again, as if every
478. thing over and over again, as if every soul in Paris had not already heard all the
479. ching her, thinking what a happy Prince man Louis ought to be, a quick footstep sou
480. od the Emperor, who had entered without being announced, ; as usual. * Hortense, the
481. mperor ; without waiting to enquire the cause of what seemed to him a tragic amusemen
482. ess. was as curious as the Emperor, and being a member of the Empress' household whil
483. mber of the Empress' household while on duty at St. Cloud, my duties giving me admit
484. following him there, where, mixing with other people who were passing up and down, in
485. husband, for who com- was sentenced to death the other day AN ANGEL WHISPER. plicity
486. for who com- was sentenced to death the other day AN ANGEL WHISPER. plicity in that a
487. was sentenced to death the other day AN ANGEL WHISPER. plicity in that assassination
488. been taken by surprise, no doubt it was one of those merciful little plots for whic
489. ose merciful little plots for which the good Empress is famous, for he stood, —
490. angry, and altogether stern, while the other ladies present, including the Empress,
491. nected with this conspiracy against hrs life, was in utter ignorance of it up to the
492. was in utter ignorance of it up to the time the attempt was made; and although her
493. lines, that his heart themselves so " ' many prayers for mercy. Enough, enough, mada
494. eet. husband did not wish to destroy my life, I can forHasten to him, madame, and gi
495. on the part of the Emperor " exclaimed one of the officers. " Come, gentlemen, let
496. s health." " Done," they answered, with one accord. "Long live the Emperor!" and th
497. d of the guard-room. Marie had not lost one word that had passed, they had gone awa
498. ette, who had been wondering and felt a will " frightened at her strange apathetic s
499. f you all please." "And some meat, too. will bring you AN ANGEL WHISPER. 23 my dinne
500. "And some meat, too. will bring you AN ANGEL WHISPER. 23 my dinner," she replied, jo
501. d, returned in a few minutes holding in one hand a bowl of smoking soup, and in the
502. hand a bowl of smoking soup, and in the other a plate of bread and meat and a glass f
503. r a plate of bread and meat and a glass family. of wine. Entirely absorbed by the proj
504. which " It is not she tried to slip on one of Susette's. your soup or your bread a
505. s, your care, your kind, genAh, how can one pay for such things tle words. Ah, now
506. e words. Ah, now I know what it is when one in great sorrow finds a soul to pity th
507. it is when one in great sorrow finds a soul to pity their misfortunes This is my fi
508. RAVE GIRL. I thought it was only bodily pain that could make one weep, but I know no
509. it was only bodily pain that could make one weep, but I know now that a trouble of
510. ferings. Susette, I shall never see any one in distress without trying, as you have
511. you have done, to console them and they will bless me as I bless you, mon amie. Now
512. it." I wish I to, or to in- give you I pain, mademoiselle, but dare not, deed dare
513. rge calling " Susette " was heard, this time more loudly and in angry tones, and wit
514. s, and without another word she has! AN ANGEL WHISPER. 25 tened away, throwing a kiss
515. tte and her caressing voice kept up her courage but now that she was gone, when she fou
516. her senses. felt as if she were But the idea suggested by the conversation of the of
517. me Polignac had taken possession of her mind, and the thought that there was no time
518. mind, and the thought that there was no time to lose in carrying her plan into execu
519. her plan into execution reanimated her courage and stimulated her strength. She got up
520. took possession of her it was the first time in her life that the poor child had bee
521. ion of her it was the first time in her life that the poor child had been left unpro
522. rotected or separated from her mother's love and presence the tenderest care and the
523. g left to be wished for. But now what a change Alone in the streets of a great wicked
524. unaided it to find the place she in her mind to go to? God sees " she whispered, and
525. ind the place she in her mind to go to? God sees " she whispered, and our blessed L
526. ispered, and our blessed Lady of Loreto will surely pity me. Mamma has always taught
527. eaven. " ! ! ! ; How naturally does the soul assert all ! its exist- ence and depend
528. des out buoyantly upon the tide, so the soul deprived of all earthly support its fin
529. support its finds only in the mercy of God true element. Grief teaches to even a l
530. its finds only in the mercy of God true element. Grief teaches to even a little child m
531. es to even a little child more than the wisdom of sages. 'C^^jy **??£ec y z/& r2_ ^Aa
532. s and a noble pious purpose her through many difficulties which alternately terrify,
533. her object, goes as she is directed by one and another towards St. Cloud, I will t
534. by one and another towards St. Cloud, I will tell you something about it as it was i
535. es, and as it stood in its grandeur and beauty on that fair June day of 1804. The pal-
536. L. where he and devoted the rest of his life to devout meditation and prayer. There
537. river, called Novigentum, but after his death and canonization the name was altered t
538. cts and associations than St. Cloud, or one more worthy the attention of the curiou
539. onaparte at the head Subseof the French government was effected. quently, in 181 5, the ca
540. igned the famous decree that caused the revolution of July, and it was here that he receiv
541. buildings, nected irregularly with and other spacious wings conthem. The centre pres
542. hem. The centre presents a grand fagade one hundred and forty feet in length by sev
543. t by Jerome de Gondy, a rich banker his death it became the property of four Archbish
544. rty of four Archbishops of Paris of the same family, and was renowned In 1658 for th
545. f four Archbishops of Paris of the same family, and was renowned In 1658 for the exten
546. was renowned In 1658 for the extent and beauty of its gardens. ; Louis XIV. purchased
547. did no expense ; residence of the their family until Dukes of Orleans continued in 178
548. t was Napoleon's favorite residence, it being the scene of his first elevation. It wa
549. at Paris. It would take up its half the space of my little art, nar- rative to descri
550. take up its half the space of my little art, nar- rative to describe the magnificen
551. m and that are most remarkable and in I will the events that transpired them. There
552. nts that transpired them. There is only one refer to particu- 30 larly, THE STORY O
553. fusion of rich gilding everywhere gives one an idea of the splendor of the epoch wh
554. of rich gilding everywhere gives one an idea of the splendor of the epoch when it wa
555. mosaic tables and Egyptian vases, with other curious and elegant things, complete it
556. - partements of the king," which at the time my story opens were occupied by Josephi
557. tood that the Emperor, who had restored religion as well as order to France, had a the h
558. ses on Sundays and fete days. There was one beautiful head, one pure, noble heart t
559. ete days. There was one beautiful head, one pure, noble heart that sometimes bowed
560. tever This premight be, fostered in her fate. noble heart the virtues of mercy and b
561. nd benevolence already planted there by nature. 32 THE STORY OF A BRAVE The palace of
562. ded by extensive and magnificent parks, one of which, the Pare Reserve, begins at t
563. s by the most celebrated artists of the time of Louis XIV. The Grand Pare stretches
564. scenes of the whatever the fortunes of war to scar and despoil them. art, combined
565. rtunes of war to scar and despoil them. art, combined with the aid place at that pe
566. at period, may have done since All that nature and of trees, rockwork, cascades, pictu
567. utiful, had been done and done well. On one of the finest and most commanding local
568. heir breasts the Cross of the Legion of Honor, and who since the discovery of the con
569. destruction gave a double look at every one who passed them by on their way to his
570. rought Paris literally to his feet, and many of the old noblesse who had held proudl
571. egitimists, thought the act so kindly a one that they came out of their retreats in
572. y came out of their retreats in all the state of their old-fashioned rusty cburt dres
573. ld-fashioned rusty cburt dresses of the time of Marie Antoinette bows and courtesies
574. e hour when they would be relieved from duty. Opposite the gate of the Parc> near th
575. 4 CLOUD. 35 Conspiracies still ! " said one, striking his flint to relight his pipe
576. o relight his pipe. " Bast ! they bring happiness to our Emperor, these conspiracies," re
577. hrust under your In the field of battle one knows what left ribs to expect, and kee
578. nt to the enemy that he may fall like a man if a bullet strikes but in peace, in a
579. l like a man if a bullet strikes but in peace, in a man's own house that goes beyond
580. if a bullet strikes but in peace, in a man's own house that goes beyond happiness,
581. , in a man's own house that goes beyond happiness, ; ! ; ! " Pretty ma limits " ! when Br
582. mits " ! when Brugaud said that Emperor happiness, he was not it brought our wrong," said
583. infernal ; machine made him Consul for life that which they have just discovered ha
584. ng on in your absence," replied Brugaud good-humoredly " but as a good comrade shoul
585. plied Brugaud good-humoredly " but as a good comrade should, I'm going to tell you a
586. army on the coasts of France, and while one assassinated Bonaparte the other two we
587. nd while one assassinated Bonaparte the other two were to make themselves masters of
588. ivision of the prize and raised a civil war in France." " It's lucky the conspiracy
589. acy was discovered in ; — ! ! — ! ; time," said an old scarred veteran, resting
590. d air, and in so sweet a voice that not one of the soldiers thought of addressing a
591. , mademoiselle, they answered. " Oh, my God, I thank Thee!" she exclaimed, as, almo
592. entry-box. " But tell me, monsieur, can one get to speak with the Em- perorr mademo
593. ma petite ; cross at the right and you will see a glass door where you must knock a
594. lass door where you must knock and some one will come, to whom you must make known
595. door where you must knock and some one will come, to whom you must make known your
596. ow, and he conjectured that she came an idea which was contradicted, howto beg, " Wh
597. n I am sorry to impossible for you to " Will you that it will be speak with the Empe
598. mpossible for you to " Will you that it will be speak with the Emperor." tell tell y
599. must go, and quickly too " answered the man impatiently. " Bast ! If I let ; ! " Oh
600. GIRL. perhaps have obeyed, for all her courage gave way at the humiliating idea of bei
601. her courage gave way at the humiliating idea of being driven away, when she saw an u
602. age gave way at the humiliating idea of being driven away, when she saw an usher of t
603. heart touched the rested his attention. man and ? " " What can I do for you, mademo
604. you wish so ! much " to see Oh, my him? God!" " cried the poor child, aston- ished
605. d, aston- ished that the anguish of her soul so plainly ex- pressed in her face and
606. ce and her tears did not reveal the sad cause of her grief " what do I want to ; you
607. father, General Lajolais, condemned to death by him !" There was such an abandon of
608. t refuse to let me speak Emperor." " No one would dare disturb the Emperor when he
609. ame Louis," pleaded Marie, recalling to mind the praises she had heard accorded to t
610. the " — of Josephine's daughter. " I will selle. do the best Follow me," I can sa
611. s of music scattered around, as if some one had just left off playing, ; 42 MADAME
612. s Hortense," whispered the usher; "have courage, mademoiselle, do not be she is very go
613. ge, mademoiselle, do not be she is very good, and afraid to tell your griefs will be
614. ry good, and afraid to tell your griefs will be kind to you even if she can do nothi
615. rincess Hortense took possession of her mind. She trembled and felt that her strengt
616. rage her she must die, for her father's life was her's alternate waves of parching h
617. e by the fleeting of so much " precious time which might be fatal to her " purpose,
618. that, madame/' cried Marie, who saw no other hope of deliverance for her do not say
619. ones. " It would only expose you to new pain were you to see him." I " Oh, my God no
620. w pain were you to see him." I " Oh, my God no I will not believe my dear father gu
621. re you to see him." I " Oh, my God no I will not believe my dear father guilty if I
622. lieve my dear father guilty if I did my courage would abandon me, I should die," said M
623. and with a friendly pressure, seated he will ! —— — ; — herself beside her.
624. d of this conspiracy and was accused of being mixed up in it. No, you cannot realize
625. f I had not had my mamma to conFinally, one day oh, that dreadful day sole. we were
626. our room filled with You gendarmes, and one of them said to mamma must come with us
627. : ' tening to a word, without giving us time to get our hats or gloves, they a carri
628. found myself suddenly all alone in the world, without help, without protection, a Ah
629. a Ah, madame, poor, weak child without courage my heart felt frozen like ice, and ever
630. it was all true. Then I thought of the good God and prayed I asked the help of our
631. as all true. Then I thought of the good God and prayed I asked the help of our Bles
632. ask of of strength Heaven the favor and courage to reach you or the EmI knew that if I
633. you or the EmI knew that if I could see one or the press. other of you my father wo
634. w that if I could see one or the press. other of you my father would be saved, and no
635. : cool hand, she said " Well, we calm, will see my child, what can be done. But be
636. amma dungeon and my father sentenced to death." and utter distress in Marie's accents
637. f : There was such a volume of here ; I will go to my mother's apartments and if it
638. o my mother's apartments and if it we " will consult together to see be possible to
639. d ! how " greatly she is to be pitied " God alone can know that," said Marie, with
640. d Marie, with an accent of such earnest truth and pathos that the Empress looked atte
641. ere, mademoiselle?" asked Josephine. No one, mamma," Hortense hastened to say ; " s
642. t, I shall soon be forever alone in the world." " Indeed, my child, I promise to do t
643. ow that you pity me, but my who, oh, my God, can mother's love and care I " And als
644. e, but my who, oh, my God, can mother's love and care I " And also," ; ! — restore
645. LOUIS AND THE EMPRESS. " 49 Mamma, you will manage you not it so she can speak to t
646. not it so she can speak to the Emperor, will eagerly. ? " asked Hortense extremely s
647. ine. " But, eagerly. " To-morrow or the time tated mamma, consider may be executed.'
648. rtense, conceal her presence from every one, for if Bonaparte should hear she is he
649. would fail. Then to-morrow to-morrow we will try what we can do." Then Josephine wen
650. without food and without sleep, little one ? " said Hortense, in tones of gentle r
651. be perhaps the last of my Oh, father's life kept me chained to the spot. that God w
652. life kept me chained to the spot. that God would lend to my words power to soft" e
653. e Emperor about you. Be patient, little one, and have courage. "And I, I go again t
654. t you. Be patient, little one, and have courage. "And I, I go again to pray to the good
655. rage. "And I, I go again to pray to the good God and our Blessed Lady," answered Mar
656. "And I, I go again to pray to the good God and our Blessed Lady," answered Marie,
657. elineations, symbolizing the virtues of Truth, Justice and Mercy, painted by Antoine
658. ions, symbolizing the virtues of Truth, Justice and Mercy, painted by Antoine Coypel, o
659. e and Mercy, painted by Antoine Coypel, one of the masters of decorative art of tha
660. oypel, one of the masters of decorative art of that period the floor ; was of polis
661. sity, merely to look upon the great and world-renowned Napoleon others had petitions
662. sent ; ; a few were there on matters of life and death some came to solicit favors,
663. a few were there on matters of life and death some came to solicit favors, and beside
664. on, sire! household, 53 were present on duty while others were simply there on the q
665. ung stood in the shallow em- brasure of one of the windows about galerie, conversin
666. of a new prima donna. They chaffed each other good-naturedly, and their persiflage wa
667. ew prima donna. They chaffed each other good-naturedly, and their persiflage was sea
668. he Em- how richly she is dressed, peror will be furious." " He swore that he'd grant
669. ir She is very beautiful, and even more good than beautiful See how respectfully eve
670. an beautiful See how respectfully every one high and low salutes her, and how graci
671. s their There's no hauteur in her noble soul, homage she is like her mother, and use
672. y But who is that young girl with to do good. her? Notice, De Sainville, there is so
673. rs with heavy golden tresses There's no sign of life in her that I see except her ey
674. heavy golden tresses There's no sign of life in her that I see except her eyes, and
675. lain she neither sees nor thinks of any one here. She must have had and she a great
676. he beautiful Hortense. " Come, ; little one," Hortense whispered to her is all char
677. se whispered to her is all charge " I " courage that you need now." know, madame. I sha
678. belied her words. " Do not fear that I will leave you," said her friend, who, to gi
679. L. appeared as if all the powers of her being and mind were concentrated in her motio
680. d as if all the powers of her being and mind were concentrated in her motionless tha
681. t vigilant eyes. Louis had also need of courage, for the Emperor would not allow Joseph
682. vening before, and commanded her, under pain of his serious displeasure, not to agai
683. name the subject to him He deserves his fate." Hortense had made great sacrifices in
684. rifices in complying with the Emperor's desire for her to marry his brother, and he wa
685. t he had " acted contrary to his better judgment in having yielded to their entreaties f
686. ajoled into showing clemency to another one of the traitors and assassins. Enough o
687. ething for marrying his brother, and he will not, at least, beat the prospective Que
688. " Oh, my dear Hortense, you are a noble soul — — it will remind him of but take
689. rtense, you are a noble soul — — it will remind him of but take care thwarted. p
690. an ! ! Bonaparte I ; is very vindictive will when But cannot, I I not forbid your Go
691. But cannot, I I not forbid your Go then will kneel here and pray the Queen of Angels
692. o touch Bonaparte's heart. " Thank you, good mamma " said Hortense, embracing her mo
693. ps upon ! her cheek. " It " You give me courage." affair must be some weighty that keep
694. g girl answered Capt. Lavalette, in the same that lovely believe who low tone. they
695. me's eyes are bent on her with It is as good as a romance, the tenderest pity. "I do
696. he tenderest pity. "I don't Lavalette." time people had grown weary of waiting, and
697. had grown weary of waiting, and having time to look into the face of affairs and we
698. ir chances of success, their this By no one smiled no one felt in the least like sp
699. success, their this By no one smiled no one felt in the least like speaking the low
700. he Emperor, followed by the Minister of War and several members of his Privy Counci
701. , in quick, ner- vous tones. " The only one whose head is covered," an- swered Hort
702. o more she had eyes and thought but for one person in the crowd around her, and, da
703. " I conjure you to listen to me by the memory of your own father, sire, It is my fath
704. m your hands pity an unhappy ! ; 59 his life is sire, in child ! who Sire, asks for
705. for ! nothing but the " pity! pardon ! life of her father — grace " Let me pass,
706. thought of self she thought only of the life so dear to her that was in such deadly
707. look upon me, I sire ! Do Oh, just turn one not, do not leave me or shall die." The
708. of this childish voice pleading for the life of a father that the Emperor could no l
709. seemed to await the / ! GIRL. issues of life and death while in the terrible pause l
710. await the / ! GIRL. issues of life and death while in the terrible pause long to her
711. he said, in severe accents, the second time your father has " been guilty of crimes
712. has " been guilty of crimes against the state ? "I know!" 'she found voice to say, no
713. e forced her to speak. " But, sire, the time he was innocent." But this time he is n
714. re, the time he was innocent." But this time he is not, you admit?" said Bonaparte,
715. ! Oh, It sire, grant me my all father's life or I shall die here at your feet," she
716. as dacious sweetness, favor, sire/' " I will I not angry, and with au: said " There
717. not angry, and with au: said " There is one more hear no more. Remember, Hortense,
718. et her stay there ; it is but just that one of a family of traitors should suffer,'
719. ay there ; it is but just that one of a family of traitors should suffer,'' Emperor, w
720. do in this bitter uncertainty but, like one blind in the wilderness, conburg ? for
721. , who had served two generations of the family of Lajolais, was there, pale, trembling
722. ere were her husband and child ? Of the fate of her husband she dared not think. Tor
723. an unrest that she felt an irresistible desire to run run until she dropped dead. But
724. oy. After the first transports, of this family, who had come together again as from th
725. together again as from the very jaws of death, General Lajolais presented Captain Lav
726. My heart is too full to thank you as I desire, monsieur/' said Madame Lajolais, grace
727. to me by : measure, then, the extent of love for them. I my grat- itude my can never
728. E STORY OF A BRAVE GIRL. witnessing the family, joy of your reunion with your of and a
729. arie your hands on this compact, in the good old German fashion/' If Captain Lavalet
730. e so now, when, with face irradiated by happiness, she placed her hand in his with a shy,
731. st air. After dinner, to which they did justice after their long and bitter fast, they
732. s and Marie loved Here Marie, questheir beauty and fragrance. tioned by her parents, r
733. strange faces and tears, with a burning pain in her heart, all through. After she re
734. show they had braved the Emperor's dis; pleasure in assisting her in her labor of love a
735. s dis; pleasure in assisting her in her labor of love and finally described the scene
736. easure in assisting her in her labor of love and finally described the scene between
737. Marie in the hall of audience, as well emotion would allow, while Gen. Lajolais and hi
738. or the blessing of a child so brave and good. The brave and amiable soldier made his
739. to come to Strasburg, as something of a relation nearer than that of a friend. as his ;
740. blooming girl of nineteen, who, full of life and cheerful spirits, has to bewail dai
741. d cheerful spirits, has to bewail daily being obliged to live in so gloomy a place, w
742. loomy a place, where the presence of so many saucy soldiers, always ready to be fami
743. F A BRAVE GIRL. winter clothing for the family. a sensible " Susette best is evi- dent
744. ted, and argues with her mother, is who good woman and knows what is for her welfare
745. well go to St. Lazare at once, for any good her reputation will ever do her again,"
746. re at once, for any good her reputation will ever do her again," answered Dame Chori
747. ys do leak out some- Nor fit in all the other things to : a fur collar, rib- bons, an
748. t now, a-wanting " ? "There's some fine quality outside Susette, " replied the door-kee
749. RM. " Susette ! 6? What is sort of fine quality? Man, woman " or child it? A gentleman
750. ette ! 6? What is sort of fine quality? Man, woman " or child it? A gentleman Go, S
751. man in livery," and, ; Recollect we are mind you, no nonsense. honest folk, and neve
752. sense. honest folk, and never had a our family since the Deluge. offered, I rogue or d
753. ntances, when she never saw them in her life before. But when the lady got out of th
754. 8 THE STORY OF A BRAVE it GIRL. was not one that she ought to know now could it be?
755. willing to come and help me, seeing how good you were to me once before." " I will c
756. w good you were to me once before." " I will come most gladly, madame, if my father
757. THE STORM. and mother fully ; 69 joyit will consent, " replied Susette, ! " but sto
758. me, ! if you- please. in, am so happy ! Will you please walk le you and Monsieur Col
759. have to be in this gloomy place all the time, with only soldiers and prison walls an
760. Lavalette, especially since Mother Cho- mind was made easy about the mysterious bund
761. atment of a friend than a domestic. was one of the great Emperor's favorite officer
762. aithful servants. _ sacrificed the only being -re?er?fa~/7»^ Cc wiser?* 4ZZ=a-2jV 7?
763. at woman having ten groats, if she lose one groat doth not light a candle and sweep
764. unt by years, nor can it be measured by time. It seems like a century ago when somet
765. y intimate associations with Manuel and soul his family, in the hope that some stric
766. e associations with Manuel and soul his family, in the hope that some stricken may, li
767. y, like myself, find the consolation of being guided to a knowledge of the true faith
768. nd the consolation of being guided to a knowledge of the true faith, and that some weary,
769. el was, through a strange and ceaseless love he had for the 1 2 THE STORY OF MANUEL.
770. he had for the 1 2 THE STORY OF MANUEL. God Blessed Mother of sins —which, throug
771. abroad with over his shone which never life, mother and only brother. We were accom
772. nting to we were in accord with the our happiness beautiful and picturesque around us, an
773. ow the exquisite village ; transport of being en rapport with nature. We were surely
774. ge ; transport of being en rapport with nature. We were surely too happy, we had not a
775. We were surely too happy, we had not a desire beyond our daily life, in fact we were
776. y, we had not a desire beyond our daily life, in fact we were people who had never g
777. ught to the solemn realities of another life than this the very idea of death terrif
778. ties of another life than this the very idea of death terrified us, and like the anc
779. another life than this the very idea of death terrified us, and like the ancient Gree
780. the glorious sea! THE STORY OF MANUEL. One evening my mother and I 3 walked down t
781. rly that bright balmy morning, when all nature was so full of brightness and harmony,
782. inhale the pure sun-tinted air. It was time for them to be in sight and I thought h
783. hink of full no peril for himself ; saw one upon the was just and while watched, of
784. st their boats out. would only lose her life, that would not help and if their boats
785. white sails, bearing such a freight of life, hope and love, and guided by two joyou
786. earing such a freight of life, hope and love, and guided by two joyous, noble spirit
787. Sea Bird," but a sodden thing empty of life. There was nothing lost of spars or rig
788. o dear lives worth the treasures of the world to us, which were dashed out so suddenl
789. hing the sea where the two perished and one night, with the full moon shining upon
790. e ; quiet smiling sea, she died without sign or sound. I thought she slept, and thre
791. ntenance, a rested look that naught but death can give, and I knew without touching h
792. er marble fingers or frozen brow that " life's fitful fever" was over for evermore.
793. t had at last fallen ; I lived like had life and motion, but everything else seemed
794. evening sun might shed his last like ; one an automaton in I a dream. I moved abou
795. s and passed like the benediction of an angel above the quiet dead. It seemed not so
796. I gathered up the sad relics of my lost life, and without an object beyond a restles
797. ory with it me — for somehow every in one seemed to know centre of — but my gri
798. w centre of — but my grief was the my being, no exterior influences- could it, nor
799. d become the sole living instinct of my being to be alone with my sorrows, to veil th
800. o or three days in advance of her usual time, there was no one to meet me, at which
801. advance of her usual time, there was no one to meet me, at which I was not sorry, f
802. otion and smells. I had an irresistible desire to feel the solid earth under my feet a
803. like a new sensation to me, I having a desire to do anything; and walking briskly wit
804. ing my dead face, I felt something like life stirring in my veins, but not my heart
805. y, I scarcely knew where, there were so many changes, new streets, new buildings, an
806. streets, new buildings, an increase of wealth and splendor all around me there were m
807. e up the stone steps and sat down under one of the old trees to rest but it was gro
808. est but it was growing late besides, no one knew me there, and if any one saw me a
809. sides, no one knew me there, and if any one saw me a white-haired stranger making s
810. e distant roofs there was a hum of busy life everywhere the sound of quick feet hurr
811. , and beautiful faces and forms full of life and happiness flitted past me. Oh my Go
812. utiful faces and forms full of life and happiness flitted past me. Oh my God how desolate
813. fe and happiness flitted past me. Oh my God how desolate I felt All that I loved sl
814. stopped in the midst of this stream of life to consider what it was that brought me
815. setting sun THE STORY OF MANUEL. was a life-sized image of the CRUCIFIED, extended
816. invited me wounded feet besought me Oh God here was a sorrow, an anguish, an aband
817. ne for me, the guilty I was overcome my soul cast off her fetters and with a strange
818. t last, a sanctuary, a rest, and had no desire to move but some one touched me on ; ;
819. est, and had no desire to move but some one touched me on ; ; ; ; the shoulder, say
820. ghtly foreign accent " My child ! it is time you should go. The church " I door must
821. t me sfay, sir," I pleaded anything/' ; will not hurt " Impossible," said the priest
822. me stay." ferings won for me. Then the good priest fell to talking with me and, str
823. nt friends, but now I told this strange man, upon whose face I had never looked bef
824. had never looked before, all the woful history without reserve, and it was like lettin
825. that it was growing dark; and when the good Father told me I might come again on th
826. . This was the beginning of my Catholic life. It was truly a resurrection to a new l
827. e. It was truly a resurrection to a new life for up to that time, I repeat, I was mo
828. surrection to a new life for up to that time, I repeat, I was morally dead. To my gr
829. le ones called me " Aunt," and it was a happiness to have ; ; ; 12 THE STORY OF MANUEL. e
830. ever knew, and there was a rare, noble beauty in his face, unlike the tender prettine
831. so full of innocence and seri- touched one as with sacred memories to sit and watc
832. of the Redemptorists, and at last found courage to seek an interview who in time litera
833. und courage to seek an interview who in time literally and figuwith Father R rativel
834. dead, and I lived as new and strange a life, in ousness, that it ; , contrast "With
835. ness, that it ; , contrast "With my old life, as is the life beyond the grave to tho
836. , contrast "With my old life, as is the life beyond the grave to those who are led t
837. al rest. Pardon my egotism. I had it in mind describe certain scenes in another to i
838. certain scenes in another to illustrate life than mine, Mother of Jesus stands by he
839. s that some sorrow-stricken, despairing soul might be led by ; then I my experience
840. airing soul might be led by ; then I my experience to seek, voluntarily, the solace 3 THE
841. I discovered, and which led me into the one true fold. it — £^t/ C^tt^ /^ •o C
842. , and as she never had been sick in the memory of any of the family, an excited commit
843. d been sick in the memory of any of the family, an excited committee of the whole woul
844. have gone forthwith to see what was the matter. and then she dropped her work upon her
845. de the red grapes, there a deep crimson one against a purple cluster, with geran- i
846. eatures with such a spiritual glow that one to haye seen her then would have suppos
847. then would have supposed that the first life-storm that THE STORY OF MANUEL. and 1 s
848. ight feast his He would eyes upon their beauty while he ate. " How beautiful come in t
849. sque dress and white plaited frills the man, whose hand he held, in velveteen jacke
850. hile upon the door-mat, and the strange man stood looking at the lady, who wondered
851. wanted, while s"he scanned the singular beauty of his face. He said a few words in Ita
852. observing the of his cheeks. remarkable beauty of his large dark-blue eyes ; ; his str
853. o doubt the painters of Italy have lost one of their best models." " an old picture
854. at Manuel, where did you meet him, this man? " -she asked. "Found up " mamma/' her
855. n and let him rest himself, then come I will give you some supper for him." to me, M
856. of upsetting something, carried to the man, who sat looking around him at the beau
857. is ; ! ; I — ! ! — — ; ! ; 20 got other THE STORY OF MANUEL. fish to fry, ; hon
858. ou won't go to heaven because you don't love the poor," exclaimed the boy, with indi
859. so like the repasts Golden Age, so like many he had enjoyed under his own sunlit Mrs
860. l boy, the pict- uresque costume of the man, and the no less picturesque costume of
861. , arose a deep thankfulness to Almighty God for having ! — — ; implanted in her
862. ng ! — — ; implanted in her child's nature those generous THE STORY OF MANUEL. and
863. tears filled her eyes, thinking of the world and its rough places over which his sen
864. sitive heart must pass, for the boy had one of those finely organized natures which
865. p capacity for enjoyment and suffering, one of those ductile minds easily influence
866. y by the semblance of anything noble or good. She was growing sad over her thoughts
867. was written in Italian but having some knowledge of Latin, she makes out a word here and
868. to her. What we do to the poor for the love of Him, too we do unto our Lord/' Some
869. y it might be so, but Manuel was unlike other children his earliest infancy in many r
870. other children his earliest infancy in many respects. From he had been the companio
871. ded by everything that was beautiful in religion and art. Pictures representing some of
872. hing that was beautiful in religion and art. Pictures representing some of the joyf
873. dead Christ " rare old crucifixes, and one picture of the*' Mater Dolorosa," hung
874. n there was no rest until his mother no one else would do came and sat down and too
875. th a great and But singularly developed love for the beautiful. more strange was the
876. made for him. Above it was suspended an angel, and a large star made of Under it was
877. e, and of her of a precious playmate as one who would be kind to him because he lov
878. anuel especially, were full of a tender love for our Lord, and he was always on the
879. o something for Him. If a lame or blind man or a distressed woman or child met him
880. holy Mother for him to give up his own will immediately and when sick and impatient
881. other to this end but she forgot that a time must come when the spell of these holy
882. uences would be broken by the boy's own knowledge of good and evil, ; ; ; — — ; when
883. be broken by the boy's own knowledge of good and evil, ; ; ; — — ; when the into
884. by the boy's own knowledge of good and evil, ; ; ; — — ; when the into life lat
885. and evil, ; ; ; — — ; when the into life latent evil in his nature and begin the
886. ; ; — — ; when the into life latent evil in his nature and begin the warfare in
887. ; when the into life latent evil in his nature and begin the warfare in ends only with
888. and begin the warfare in ends only with life. She saw no signs of this yet, he was s
889. about by her watchful would spring the soul which 26 care ; THE STORY OF MANUEL. th
890. E STORY OF MANUEL. the sanctuary of his soul was kept so pure by her ceaseless vigil
891. ndly thought there could be no germs of evil in his lovely nature. But her labor of
892. could be no germs of evil in his lovely nature. But her labor of love did not go for n
893. s of evil in his lovely nature. But her labor of love did not go for nothing. CHAPTER
894. in his lovely nature. But her labor of love did not go for nothing. CHAPTER III. NO
895. ot go for nothing. CHAPTER III. NOT THY WILL, BUT MINE. ANOTHER fair peared changed.
896. cept the pigeons, there was no sound or sign of life in the beautiful garden. It was
897. pigeons, there was no sound or sign of life in the beautiful garden. It was a silen
898. metime There were the rich ; ; ! — or other, like a noiseless ghost, into every one
899. her, like a noiseless ghost, into every one's life. Presently a beggar child came t
900. ike a noiseless ghost, into every one's life. Presently a beggar child came to the g
901. f such dat Mannel is dyin\ Somethin' or other he's cotch from " you poor white trash.
902. He wouldn't drive you off empty, nuther will I." So saying she trudged into the kitc
903. nd rocking herself to and fro as is the custom of her fell on the half-cut race in gre
904. self. She had been preserving; and, not being very strong, was so overcome with fatig
905. his wooden horse and gun he played from one end ; ; of the garden to the other, muc
906. d from one end ; ; of the garden to the other, much Soon of the time unafter his der
907. e garden to the other, much Soon of the time unafter his der the long grape arbor. w
908. nestling beside hef very gently he drew one of her hands up to his cheek and fell a
909. and a deep stupor. Terrified almost to death, she , who alarmed the family and sent
910. almost to death, she , who alarmed the family and sent for Dr. B came without delay,
911. dle in them, asking quiet questions the time. Congestion of the brain," he whispered
912. d Mr. H " I fear not. But while there's life, you know, , . we must hope and do our
913. , . we must hope and do our best." " My God " was all that Mr. ! H , in a low voice
914. of that young mother's heart was it the life of her first-born — and, not entirely
915. ht hope. marble image not a movement or sign to indicate life ex cept the heavy brea
916. mage not a movement or sign to indicate life ex cept the heavy breathing and the mot
917. f anxious vigils passed, but brought no change. The boy's long silken eyelashes lay li
918. ked even more like chiselled marble. No change. Another night and day of ceaseless att
919. t give up forted. — my child." " But, will of my is it dear child, suppose to take
920. to take it should be the evils Almighty God to him from the to come, not better to
921. rous act of contrition now. ! Say: ' My God Thou slay.me, yet will I hast given; if
922. now. ! Say: ' My God Thou slay.me, yet will I hast given; if it is Thy will to take
923. me, yet will I hast given; if it is Thy will to take him, blessed be trust Thy name:
924. l say holy," replied his tears with the good old priest, hers. now mingling always b
925. lopment of the boy's noble and generous nature. " I never saw," he continued, "such ob
926. And docility and sweetness in my whole life. yet he was sprightly, merry, I Manuel
927. traits that spoke of him in my class of theology as an example, a perfect model of obedi
928. , innocence, simple faith and docility, good to imitate. Oh, my child think of what
929. ossom you have reared for the garden of God " " " Oh, no, no I cannot, cannot give
930. ll the mother's sad refrain. I ! ! ! my memory — ! girls— think of them!" said the
931. is is my boy, my first-born. Why should God take him from i THE STORY OF MANUEL. me
932. pered, if with it her to his, " he dies will be cruel, cruel Father Regis could say
933. t of the hunter all except the pangs of nature, which almost rent ; ; ; Father Regis s
934. oy's fair forehead, signing it with the sign of the cross, then went back to his Sem
935. acle, pray for the afflicted mother and family. There was a change in the child that n
936. fflicted mother and family. There was a change in the child that night. It became appa
937. ten o'clock, and the doctor said it was death Then a deep, white, bitter stillness se
938. ir embraces. with him a little while. I will not stay long." They all left the room,
939. rned in her eyes could warm him back to life. Then she gathered up his fair alabaste
940. her help or go with him. his mother Oh, God oh, God! how cruel! Would that I might
941. or go with him. his mother Oh, God oh, God! how cruel! Would that I might die for
942. " ^ I went into the room to prepare the medicine ordered by the doctor. They had told me
943. us dose to be administered at a certain time it was, he said, our last hope and I kn
944. , our last hope and I knew there was no time to Almighty God might bless the means t
945. nd I knew there was no time to Almighty God might bless the means to spare. our lit
946. bed with the table-spoon containing the medicine in side the child ; — ! — ! — ; ;
947. o torture him now. " See how useless it will While there's life soon be over." we mu
948. " See how useless it will While there's life soon be over." we must do what we can.
949. on be over." we must do what we can. It will THE STORY OF MANUEL. Don't hinder me, M
950. iriam replied. ; 35 I it may save him," Good-by, my little boy good-by," said Mrs. c
951. t may save him," Good-by, my little boy good-by," said Mrs. calmly kissing the ice-c
952. t to her during the night, reporting no change but to comfort her by the news that Man
953. twardly in They went very calm, but her soul agonized with her child's life. God for
954. but her soul agonized with her child's life. God for For his life. Do not forget th
955. er soul agonized with her child's life. God for For his life. Do not forget this. H
956. with her child's life. God for For his life. Do not forget this. Her wild prayers h
957. er wild prayers had no reference to the will of God she offered no price or conditio
958. prayers had no reference to the will of God she offered no price or conditions, off
959. simply and passionately asked that his life might be spared. Ah, with what bitter a
960. h me as Thou wilt, ! O awful and mighty God, but spare my child You created, You ca
961. u can restore him from the very jaws of death; You can raise him even from the dead.
962. hours of the watchmen at night and the state of the this period. weather were Some f
963. but to watch and wait until his little life, like the morning star, faded into a "
964. " ,1 ! ; ! her. " Do not go," he cried. life. " It is only the ; last flash-up of Sp
965. flash-up of Spare yourself, Miriam " it will soon be over ! But the child called his
966. him, whispering " : Manuel, my precious one, do you " know me ? do you know me? He
967. The rest of they us thought still that death was approaching had seen this sudden aw
968. g and flickering^ then the dying out of life's flame before. But she knew that it wa
969. flame before. But she knew that it was life, and not death she, she felt that her w
970. But she knew that it was life, and not death she, she felt that her wild prayers had
971. in obeying his directions, and said the medicine had but I don't undoubtedly saved the b
972. but I don't undoubtedly saved the boy's life know. She always thought it was her pra
973. led on, and I began to see how Almighty God answers prayers made without reference
974. yers made without reference to His holy will, I believed with Not for three nights,
975. ever left his sight. She would allow no one else to enter the room or come near him
976. snatched from her again at any moment. One day, Nannie— not daring to do otherwi
977. main, forlorn and shipwrecked brother, life's Seeing, shall take heart again." —L
978. rt again." —Longfellow. traits, es- I LOVE to remember Manuel's noble pecially his
979. had grown to be an integral part of his being, which kept the thought of his Blessed
980. layfel- lows — sleeping or w aking, a sense of whether she were pleased or displeas
981. absent. Every surrounding of his young life tended to foster his pious disposition,
982. aminating dormant evils inherent in his nature were undeveloped and scarcely suspected
983. careful of the boy. ; He for a child of many graces but I see in his sensi- tive, ex
984. excitable temperament a great capacity good or evil. Ask the assistance of Jesus an
985. le temperament a great capacity good or evil. Ask the assistance of Jesus and Mary,
986. tarnish the unsul; lied fairness of his soul. A great trial befell us all about this
987. A great trial befell us all about this time. who had spent the best years of his li
988. me. who had spent the best years of his life in the Community of which he was the Su
989. with respect who was regarded by hfs as one nearer than all others, consoler, advis
990. nitents and friends great blow to the H family, whom he had ; instructed and received
991. had baptized, and into whose heads the idea of losing him had never entered but it
992. ars and regrets of a whole city and, in one sense, his place was never supplied to
993. and regrets of a whole city and, in one sense, his place was never supplied to them.
994. L. Then a day came, all 41 too soon for one so young and so sensitively organized,
995. ant care of his mother, who had now two other children who claimed her tenderness and
996. shy, and growing unfit for the work-day world into whose rough battles he must inevit
997. ament were subjected to an ordeal whose evil inA training in fluences marred his ent
998. training in fluences marred his entire life. to his nature and its idioevery Way an
999. fluences marred his entire life. to his nature and its idioevery Way antagonistic sync
1000.ipline, although they did not radically change the essential good traits of his lovely
1001. did not radically change the essential good traits of his lovely character, warped
1002.ave him that which of all things in the world is most ; to be dreaded, a false consci
1003. a false conscience, which, leaving all other ill results out of the question, made h
1004.n a great degree discriminating between good and All this evil principles, and, as a
1005.iscriminating between good and All this evil principles, and, as a natural result, h
1006.wer future as little known to us unseen world. We may have sunshine to-day, but overh
1007.brightness, but we are marching all the same towards the black shadows, the crucifix
1008.wandered too far astray for safety, and will go down with our wrecks to * * * perish
1009.o * * * perish without succor or hope * family, who had all along been so The H prospe
1010.t misfortunes which seemed to sweep the world from under their feet. There was nothin
1011.ine sacraments, tient submission to the will of There were many anxious and embitter
1012.nt submission to the will of There were many anxious and embittering cares there wer
1013.h became part and parcel of their daily life. God. : — THE STORY OF MANUEL. Under
1014.me part and parcel of their daily life. God. : — THE STORY OF MANUEL. Under this
1015.le but crude and impracticable ideas of good, which caused him to fall an easy prey
1016.hich caused him to fall an easy prey to many of the Anything wearing the fallacies o
1017.ne purpose, touched the key-note of his being, and led him to overlook underlying pri
1018.he could ; work in what seemed to him a good cause, without compromising the integri
1019.uld ; work in what seemed to him a good cause, without compromising the integrity of
1020.ng the integrity of his faith. For some time the sacraments were his safeguard and h
1021.ous poison little by little entered his soul, and we discovered in time, from his co
1022. entered his soul, and we discovered in time, from his conversations, that our boy w
1023.rom his conversations, that our boy was being led astray by false principles embodied
1024.seemed to appeal fairly to the American mind, but which in fact were aimed with dead
1025.ith deadly purpose against the Catholic religion. Manuel adopted their theories, which i
1026.only This was a noble but impracticable idea, which can only exist in Utopian theori
1027. him, but then the thought would come " One or two failures should not dishearten m
1028. care of myself, though. ought to enjoy life without making beasts of themselves, an
1029.separated him farther and ther from his family and friends — although his love for t
1030.his family and friends — although his love for their love and interest in him, nev
1031.friends — although his love for their love and interest in him, never He clung to
1032., never He clung to his mother with the love of ceased. old he never shook off entir
1033.much to her that he would concede to no other, and patiently listened to whatever she
1034. THE STORY OF MANUEL. 45 ; might say in opposition to his favorite theories and she did no
1035. may believe that. He was now a bearded man, and, like most American youth, he asse
1036.ich he mistook for manly indehe dropped one pendence and at length— alas — ! ;
1037. his faith ; and, fall- ing into modern progress, railed openly against the Pope and wha
1038. to their dangers he thought they meant progress, and the consequent elevation of mankin
1039.ded every his errors, new discovery and change of sentiment to his mother, who though
1040.d she could do nothing but tell him the truth without compromise, and protest against
1041.with all the force and eloquence of her nature. There were many prayers and Masses off
1042.and eloquence of her nature. There were many prayers and Masses offered for Manuel's
1043.ered for Manuel's conversion there were many friends of the clergy who would have co
1044.ed them whenever he could do so without being offensively rude, so that humanly speak
1045.trayed from the safe fold, staining his soul with sin, and plunging into new — ; 4
1046.m the safe fold, staining his soul with sin, and plunging into new — ; 46 THE STO
1047.pplying the term because it is a divine quality, the exercise of which in Manuel's case
1048.he would come to his mother for another one. I have often heard " Don't be uneasy a
1049.You someI should hear I me defending my religion always do that, mother, whatever glad t
1050.riment a human it is the most dangerous being can attempt," she answered gravely. The
1051.nd now, to add to our trials about him, Man- THE STORY OF MANUEL. uel's health ' 47
1052.vulsions which seriously threatened his life. What could we do at such times, when h
1053.inual danger of a sudden and unprovided death, but began to decline ; ask the interce
1054.; ask the intercession of the Mother of God that he and restoration What a respite
1055.e would by some miracle of the grace of God be prepared to meet the peril. was offe
1056.the peril. was offered employAbout this time Mr. H ment in a neighboring city, to wh
1057.ighboring city, to which he removed The change was beneficial to all of his family. us
1058.The change was beneficial to all of his family. us, and something like the old happy d
1059.nuel also received an appointment under Government, much to his satisfaction and ours, for
1060.ive him- more true and healthy views of life. And for a while our expectations were
1061.kindred spirits around him, full of the same wild undisciplined ideas, and he formed
1062.ed him still farther from any lingering desire he might His mother, overhave towards h
1063. might His mother, overhave towards his religion. wearied with sorrowful anxieties about
1064.; the only consolation of his afflicted family. Manuel felt his father's death keenly,
1065.licted family. Manuel felt his father's death keenly, and vowed to supply his place t
1066.ch he set earnestly to, work to do. His love for his mother was deep and trusting, a
1067.ary patience. She never compromised the truth by the most remote admission that his f
1068.hem the tests of the Catholic faith and history it seemed so useless then, so utterly b
1069.ontrasted with the general tenor of his life. creature some suffering, forlorn Nothi
1070.rer senger ; for, as strange who had no other mesas it may seem, he thought it a drea
1071.eem, he thought it a dreadful thing for one to die without spiritual assistance, an
1072.rgyman, he not only advised to send for one, but volunteered to go fetch him. Fathe
1073.peaking of Manuel's peculiarities, said one day " Don't be too much cast down about
1074.ut to Miriam him. There is much that is good and acceptable to Heaven underlying all
1075. all that makes you so unhappy Almighty God will take Manuel's good works into acco
1076. that makes you so unhappy Almighty God will take Manuel's good works into account,
1077.unhappy Almighty God will take Manuel's good works into account, depend upon that an
1078. you least expect it, perhaps, your son will become a changed man and a good Catholi
1079.perhaps, your son will become a changed man and a good Catholic. , : ; ; Meanwhile
1080.our son will become a changed man and a good Catholic. , : ; ; Meanwhile Sacrifice."
1081.tholic. , : ; ; Meanwhile Sacrifice." I will remember him : daily in the " Manuel, a
1082.t with has small-pox. 4 I Father R poor man who told me, and I am 50 THE STORY OF M
1083.e ? " Suppose I should, mother ? is the man to he has nobody to give him even a dri
1084.n armful wood at night to some freezing family ; a bundle of half-worn but comfortable
1085.rments that he would make a raid on the family chest for, to other destitute ones some
1086.make a raid on the family chest for, to other destitute ones sometimes he would colle
1087. last penny, to pay the rent for a poor family, who were threatened by a cruel landlor
1088.ere threatened by a cruel landlord with being turned out homeless in the bitter, incl
1089.illing to contribute towards satisfied. good an I object, and he was don't wish to g
1090.on't wish to give the impression that : Man- uel devoted his entire leisure to good
1091. Man- uel devoted his entire leisure to good works they were the episodes of his err
1092.s they were the episodes of his erratic life, alternating with his reckless and ofte
1093.ught of Aglae and Boniface, who through many years of sin and disregard of their Chr
1094.and Boniface, who through many years of sin and disregard of their Christian duties
1095.eyond all by a true conversion and holy death. Manuel's health continued to give us a
1096.m to be care- but he seemed reckless of life, unconcerned about the future, and inte
1097.association and divine hope. His way of life was a continual grief and trial to us h
1098.more easily imagined than described but one had to forbear. It would have been an e
1099.e had to forbear. It would have been an evil thing to have snapped the tie that boun
1100. on his list of sins he still loved his family with a clinging and deep ; ; ; ; 52 aff
1101.y and generously divided Ah, there were many virhis means with them. tues in our poo
1102.ld under the " hay and stubble " of his nature and ; ; although he tried us to the utm
1103. him, and bore with him, hoping all the time and trusting that a day would come —
1104.sults then. " It is making me a better *man, mother," he would say. " Your religion
1105.ter *man, mother," he would say. " Your religion was all-sufficient for that, my There i
1106.nt for that, my There is no need of the mind, no need of son. the soul, no help fall
1107.o need of the mind, no need of son. the soul, no help fallen nature can crave, that
1108.o need of son. the soul, no help fallen nature can crave, that the Catholic religion d
1109.len nature can crave, that the Catholic religion does not supply in full measure, " pres
1110. greater than that of the Church. Where will you find benevolence and charity so uni
1111. generous and unselfish manner, for the love of Godgood institutions, but don't
1112.s and unselfish manner, for the love of Godgood institutions, but don't All my
1113.nselfish manner, for the love of Godgood institutions, but don't All my requires
1114.ive him of — ; it." "Never so help me God. That I'll never do, come what may. But
1115.fret, mother here's my medal, and if it will make you happy I'll say ; — a ' Hail
1116.ppy I'll say ; — a ' Hail Mary' every time night." sat silent for I go to the Lodg
1117.sat silent for I go to the Lodge. after Good She some time room, her eyes fixed on t
1118. I go to the Lodge. after Good She some time room, her eyes fixed on the looking. fi
1119.usted than usually painful moaned, " My God " — ! Her thoughts were more I could
1120.ore I could see that " ! at last she my God What is it, Miriam ? " " Do you remembe
1121.s hope, for when did she ever abandon a soul who asked her assistance ? Manuel frequ
1122.tly does this, and I do not believe she will ever abandon him, but pursue him with h
1123.er abandon him, but pursue him with her love until she leads him back to the feet of
1124." And so we talked, comforting — each other in our sorrow until late in the night,
1125.rsion. Manuel grew more reckless of his life than ever. His peculiar ideas of humani
1126.liar ideas of humanity, combined with a love for adventure, led him about this time
1127. love for adventure, led him about this time into the wildest enthusiasm about the g
1128.e into the wildest enthusiasm about the good that might be done by a well-organized
1129.d fire department. He entered heart and soul into the matter, and was present as an
1130.ent. He entered heart and soul into the matter, and was present as an active fireman a
1131.e brought home mangled or dead. How his life was preserved through all the scenes of
1132.bling wall, comfort yourself. fire-bell Good night." One evening he spent an hour or
1133.omfort yourself. fire-bell Good night." One evening he spent an hour or two with us
1134.nd he answered some observation made by one of us in this wise " I saw my old colle
1135. this wise " I saw my old college mate, Will Carey, to-day, and he's preparing for t
1136.ring for the priesthood but what in the world do you think that he made me promise ve
1137.ion drifted ; : — ; him?" " Something good, I'm very sure." I " Well, don't know a
1138. be glad, mother, for there are a great many things to be considered before that tim
1139.any things to be considered before that time comes. Hes going to be a great and shin
1140.hurch though, whatever be. ; I may He's good there's no flummery or nonsense about h
1141. no flummery or nonsense about him he's good in the grain, and means all ; " 56 THE
1142.We had to be careful when Manuel was in one of those rare moods, lest we said too m
1143. herself ; but she only said : that you will return his visit, Manuel ? " Oh, yes; I
1144.be sure to split on. Now I must be off. Good night." This came down for a like a dou
1145.OF MANUEL. " * * * Care ; 57 upon care. other severe attack of Manuel has had anillne
1146. a priest, but it threw him into such a state of excitement and passion that we thoug
1147.hope of his Suppose he should pass into eternity recovery. * * * Through the mercy of Go
1148.ty recovery. * * * Through the mercy of God as he is? Manuel is spared. He is now c
1149. his mother to allude to the subject of religion to him again. * * * " But we hope in sp
1150.him to the sweet care of Mary. — ! We life are thankful for his there's hope.' * *
1151.e thankful for his there's hope.' * * * life, for ' while there's left Manuel has us
1152.egion heretofore unvisited by the white man, and peopled by hostile tribes of savag
1153.die out there in the wilderness with no one near to help his poor soul Suppose he s
1154.rness with no one near to help his poor soul Suppose he should di% without even a de
1155.ul Suppose he should di% without even a desire to be restored to his faith without ! '
1156.Could it not pass us, who have had such war heavy sorrows, without wounding and sca
1157.unfitted him entirely He gave for field duty or hardships of any sort. it up, and we
1158.aws governing the perils and chances of war are inevitable. Why should he escape th
1159.ven him a ; ! ' ; ; aside the hurtling, death-dealing missiles ; — noth- THE STORY
1160.the constant brooding thought of sudden death, and fort each other. ! ! everlasting l
1161. thought of sudden death, and fort each other. ! ! everlasting loss to one! * * -* He
1162.ort each other. ! ! everlasting loss to one! * * -* He our erring but dearly loved
1163.tters ! come if faithfully, but as each one comes we wonder there will ever be anot
1164., but as each one comes we wonder there will ever be another/' " Yesterday Saved thr
1165.re his medal that was all. There was no sign of change in his thoughts or habits. Bu
1166.edal that was all. There was no sign of change in his thoughts or habits. But he was a
1167.houghts or habits. But he was a strange being, reticent of ! ; ; everything except hi
1168.pt his faults his ; sedulous to conceal good acts, and now more than ever opposed to
1169.TORY OF MANUEL. The President wrote the war it his discharge, — for at that was i
1170. on as usual. Looking back and weighing one thing after another, I almost believe t
1171.another, I almost believe that Manuel's life was ; miraculously preserved ! Oh, the
1172.aculously preserved ! Oh, the deathless love of Mary She will lose no groat. She lig
1173.ed ! Oh, the deathless love of Mary She will lose no groat. She lights the lamp of h
1174.se no groat. She lights the lamp of her love when one is missing, and looks for it,
1175.t. She lights the lamp of her love when one is missing, and looks for it, never giv
1176.is found infinite Oh, the patience ! of God ! ! &^ z? a CHAPTER " V. SHE TRIMS THE
1177. CHAPTER " V. SHE TRIMS THE LAMP OF HER LOVE AND SEARCHETH DILIGENTLY FOR THE LOST G
1178.her window is "THIS lovely !" said H at one afterthe romantic view spr§ad out for
1179. any way. could see that he was full of emotion, too trust himself to speak. " ' full t
1180.ecorate the walls of his room, and some other little plans he had for the winter. He
1181.. He is to come out often to see us for one thing and I do not see the use, Miriam,
1182.sighing, and anticipating all manner of evil as you do. I ; protest against it. It i
1183.all me " I might be happy ought to be I will try, try all the more, because I think
1184.e you have noticed too think there is a change in Manuel ? " she said, looking ; —
1185.sonal appearance, which always knew was one of his odd affectations. Why, he's gett
1186.; you, about his looks his health seems good altogether there's much to comfort us,"
1187.ke don't be forever borrowing trouble! "Man- was never in better health, and every
1188.- was never in better health, and every one marks the improvement/' uel " I am fool
1189.lor in his face. But should like to see will take comfort* Bettine. yesterday ing Yo
1190.ud by prais; Manuel he said that he was one of the most attentive and efficient cle
1191.so much of his salary to his brother-in-law every cel I month to can- them. That is
1192.ery cel I month to can- them. That is a good sign. Do you know dreamed last night th
1193.el I month to can- them. That is a good sign. Do you know dreamed last night that he
1194.I saw him as plain as I ever did in his life again. looking fair and innocent and lo
1195.ed to. 1 was very happy living that old time over, but when I awoke the dream made m
1196.he dream made me sad somehow." " It's a sign that he's going to become what he was t
1197.d under the hay and stubble of Manuel's nature. ; ' 64 He'll THE STORY OF MANUEL. come
1198., I have faith to believe. Let us trust God who gives great promises to ; such as r
1199.assistance." Then we fell to talking of other things. We were spending the winter in
1200.sual that autumn ; we were in all so in love with " Moss-Hill," that, one it sunny,
1201.all so in love with " Moss-Hill," that, one it sunny, glorious day in October, fami
1202. one it sunny, glorious day in October, family council to was decided stay during the
1203. the plan, and the only drawback to our happiness was the thought but Mr. R whose untirin
1204.ked upon him as a model of all that was good, reminded us that we could see Manuel w
1205.ought him out ; , every evening. Yes, a change had certainly come over Manuel. He was
1206.t rare episodes now of the old reckless life, and he had in a measure broken off the
1207. the associations which gave us so much pain. But the change brought him no nearer t
1208.ons which gave us so much pain. But the change brought him no nearer to his faith. He
1209.er, but they always and discomfort. His habit of proHis mother fanity seemed to grow
1210.ften forgetting himself he broke out in language terrible to He was always hear and left
1211. not help it excusing it, I believe the habit of swearing had so grown upon him that
1212.ard to avoid it; but if suppressed was, one minute, it cropped out the next. Miriam
1213.iriam received a short note from Manuel one day. He had been quite sick, he wrote,
1214.rsuaded her that there was not much the matter, and I went. I found him sitting up, bu
1215.ing up, but looking pallid and ended in pain ; ; — ; ; • feeble. " I'm glad to s
1216. your nonsense, and " come back to your religion. As it is " Enough of that," he said, f
1217.." " I know no such thing. The grace of God, and her pleading," I said, pointing to
1218.dream of, Manuel. But what has been the matter?" " God only knows the doctor don't. I
1219.anuel. But what has been the matter?" " God only knows the doctor don't. I never ha
1220.hem swollen out of all shape. " Do they pain you, dear? " " "Like the very old like
1221.'t get my breath, and such a mortal " I pain here," he said, pointing to his heart.
1222.bought him some delicacies, and engaged one of the former servants of the family to
1223.gaged one of the former servants of the family to attend to He then talked over some h
1224. saw such agony and such a struggle for life, and such a determined will. He could n
1225.truggle for life, and such a determined will. He could not lie down, or even recline
1226.ine but with the pallor and coldness of death upon him, and gasping for breath, he st
1227.me, write a up into bundles letters and other his desk, turn over his papers, little,
1228. at my feet," continued the doctor. his family were Catholics, and I proposed to him t
1229.nd for a priest, but he declined seeing one. I told still him that he was in danger
1230.told still him that he was in danger of death ; but he declined, saying that a priest
1231. more about it, knowing how the in that matter. I left him about I there was another p
1232. as I that never was so surprised in my life was to find him alive I when I returned
1233.on't think there's a possibility of his being a well man He had I better be with his
1234.ere's a possibility of his being a well man He had I better be with his friends." "
1235. has a complication of diseases, either one prove suddenly fatal. I am sorry to pai
1236.one prove suddenly fatal. I am sorry to pain you, madam, but I never deceive in such
1237. Moss-Hill" with such news! I said. How Will " it be safe to take him to the country
1238.et about again, but I I bade the doctor good-day, and back I found myself near the p
1239.n ; was deceived. had seen him when his life hung, as it were, on a thread when ther
1240. distress and make me afraid but by the time I got in sight of the bright lights of
1241., but he told me once when there was no one present except ourselves, that his nigh
1242.well but I'm afraid he found me a tough one to deal with. He pitched into Masonry,
1243.ed I did. swore a little, but he didn't mind that, and he's " coming to see me again
1244., for left with scarcely a hope that he will ever be He concealed nothing restored t
1245.ave, solid sorrow for the errors of his life he declared himself to be ; me ; a Cath
1246. for his devotion to the Holy Mother of God, there is something remarkable in it. B
1247. in it. But, my child, all those graces will, I fear, prove fruitless to him, becaus
1248.use he declares most positively that he will never renounce the only obstacle that d
1249.e with my eyes, and know to be two, are one, and expect me to believe such an absur
1250. the to die for the faith ' ; : , ! ; ; same though." Father T don't fail to pray fo
1251.h yes, , : — THE STORY OF MANUEL. the time whispering I : ' 73 "The end is near."
1252.ch for thy lost treasure help the stray one of thy Son's flock far away Mother of G
1253.e of thy Son's flock far away Mother of God ! ; in the tangled wilderness It " ! wa
1254.tems with their bitter-sweet odor, like memory, nodded in the sunshine beside the radi
1255.it seems so associated with Manuel. The beauty and mildness of the day brought Miriam
1256.their richly-tinted foliage. We had had good news from Manuel the evening before he
1257.s, like a tempest; and, looking for the cause, we saw thousands of crows, flying in t
1258.sions, all shouting and cawing for dear life, as they pitched and tumbled themselves
1259. pitched and tumbled themselves, with " many a flirt and flutter," into the cedar tr
1260.; ; ; the strange uproar. " What in the world does gardener, it mean, Bettine " ? ask
1261. see crows do dat ar way it's a sartain sign of fallin' weather an' a hard freeze. D
1262.lin' weather an' a hard freeze. Dey got sense enough, dey Dey knows of superior wisdo
1263.sense enough, dey Dey knows of superior wisdom, " as he ! has!" " But what do they com
1264.en. I 'speck dey's tried it sometime or other, an' found 'twouldn't do. You know 'spe
1265.ery mild, uncle Jeff surely the weather will not change for two or three days," said
1266. uncle Jeff surely the weather will not change for two or three days," said miriam anx
1267.* ; ; boy. to-morrow mornin', sure; dis time tomorrow dere will be a heavy fall of s
1268.w mornin', sure; dis time tomorrow dere will be a heavy fall of snow 'pend upon dat
1269.den a stiff freeze. Don't want no truer sign dan dat *ar," he said then went on " 'F
1270.ther, I reckon. There's no more certain sign than the crows, when they go on like th
1271.e, mamma at any rate it is betthe drive will do him ter for him to come to-day good
1272. will do him ter for him to come to-day good it is so pleasant," replied Mrs. R " Un
1273.y towels and sucks my oranges but never mind that. Get her a blazing bright dress an
1274.t you ; ; " call them — for the ; — other woman who attends to my has meals she h
1275.tends to my has meals she has been very good to me. and made I nice things without e
1276.at he asked, and he distributed his his nature did all little offerings, then he came
1277.ack in a ; in all my I when It makes me good and happy." was bones. feel like old ti
1278.ast but I enjoy Christmas for all that. will really don't I know what would happen C
1279.inaround her. dow up beside you. Manuel will take cold." " Mabel thinks she's " Nons
1280.aughed got her baby here. The air feels good, and gives me breath." So the window re
1281.So the window remained open, but by the time we got to Moss-Hill, the weather had ch
1282.. " Oh yes, rest all I am sure that you will. You only it need and quiet," she said,
1283. ; doors to-night." " I shall enjoy the same character now. ful, and looked so He be
1284., that ing, we felt and needed only and time to recover fully. That night after the
1285.t takes said Do you remember me back so many years ago ! — — ; : ! ! ! THE STORY
1286. covery. us no hopes of Manuel's re- He will said, " He may possibly get I over thin
1287.r, which may occur at any moment. It is one of those cases in which it is imthat he
1288.escing. He spent Christmas day with the family, and enjoyed the happiness of the child
1289.as day with the family, and enjoyed the happiness of the children, dearly loved. whom he
1290.wful mother a few days later, and after being silent some time, suddenly asked her: "
1291.days later, and after being silent some time, suddenly asked her: " Mother, should a
1292., should anything happen to " me, where will you bury me ? " Why do you ask such a q
1293.e laid in unconsecrated ground. A sharp pain wrung her heart there seemed to sitting
1294. longed to tell him all that was in her mind about it but she feared to do so lest t
1295.n him. " I have two burial lots, Manuel one of said them at Oakneath, the Protestan
1296.ther with a deep affection but when the time comes, which I trust is far distant, 1
1297.and knew that he slept He would have no one with him, and but little. we could only
1298.ve over him, wonder His bad ing all the time what we should do. symptoms increased a
1299.. and respects Father Carey, and if any one can do my poor child good he is the one
1300.ey, and if any one can do my poor child good he is the one." We did not know how Man
1301.one can do my poor child good he is the one." We did not know how Manuel would rece
1302. him a friendly visit, and we were in a state of feverish anxiety as to the result. T
1303. feverish anxiety as to the result. The good young clergyman came his heart ; ; ; 84
1304.or Manuel was touched by his coming his soul. through the inclement weather such a d
1305.nry, which was the only obstacle to his being restored to his " He assured me," added
1306.added he, " in the faith. most positive language that he would never, under any circumst
1307. sorry, Mrs. H that I have to go now. I will come again in a day or two." " Do so, m
1308.y much excited during our conversation. will offer the Holy Sacrifice for him to-mor
1309.d. " Well, yes. deal. to see him again, Man- You Seeing him excited me a good know,
1310.again, Man- You Seeing him excited me a good know, mother, I don't like to be medto,
1311.se, it is out of the question." " It is good to have such a friend, my child," she a
1312.the day. I go to his door and ask if he will have anything. Nothing/ he answers; 'go
1313.would only let me watch with him But he will have no one." Friday. This morning Manu
1314.t me watch with him But he will have no one." Friday. This morning Manuel came down
1315.im, ' ! dressed, ready to drive into in-law, town with his brother- who having grea
1316.hose dreadful paroxysms of coughing and pain to hear his wild expressions of profani
1317.ly/is almost more than we can bear. Oh, God bring peace to our darling We cease, hi
1318.st more than we can bear. Oh, God bring peace to our darling We cease, his mother and
1319.ody in our overwhelming anxiety for his soul. So far the powers of evil have triumph
1320.iety for his soul. So far the powers of evil have triumphed, and God's strong angels
1321. the powers of evil have triumphed, and God's strong angels must fight for us, or a
1322.strong angels must fight for us, or all will be lost. The Blessed Mother of our Rede
1323.d Mother of our Redeemer cannot, oh she will not cease interceding for one who, what
1324., oh she will not cease interceding for one who, whatever else his sins, has never
1325.led on Manuel to move into another room one into which the sun shines all day. It h
1326.lf to-day, more calm and tranquil, with many of his pleasant, affectionate ; : ! ! !
1327.ly said sweet to think, Manuel, that an angel visitant had come to us thismorning/ "
1328.ut it it might make her unhappy. It was one of those strange illusions, but the ple
1329.it might have been for a moment visible one of 'those fair, strong messengers of he
1330.ging about him to defend and shield his soul, and keep back the almost triumphant po
1331.ep back the almost triumphant powers of evil that were now pressing closer and neare
1332.ntil the supreme moment arrived when by God's grace he voluntarily yielded his will
1333. God's grace he voluntarily yielded his will to the requisitions of the Divine Law.
1334. will to the requisitions of the Divine Law. Something happened very soon, which ma
1335.hing happened very soon, which makes me love to think pleasant, child, to : : How my
1336. and has long intervals of freedom from pain. The doctor thinks him improving, and h
1337.ks him improving, and hopes now that he will get over this attack. But there is some
1338. that he is surely passing away, and my soul is filled with a tender and inexpressib
1339.impart hope and consolation to each ; ; other dear object of our affection seems to h
1340.nd our reach. ; but alas ! this All her desire, poor soul! safety; everything else thi
1341. ; but alas ! this All her desire, poor soul! safety; everything else this is for he
1342.see him to-day, but stayed only a short time. He asked Manuel if he 89 90 THE STORY
1343.eady said." "Then I must go. My classes will be waiting if you want me at Good-by, M
1344.asses will be waiting if you want me at Good-by, Manuel for me. any time, day or nig
1345. want me at Good-by, Manuel for me. any time, day or night, send for me and I'll com
1346.s mother were left alone together. you, Will; I "Thank shall I heard them in earnest
1347.tion for some at last given her the all time, and hoped that he had lorig-desired op
1348. to make some preparations, whether for life or death, for the future. But no he was
1349. some preparations, whether for life or death, for the future. But no he was talking
1350.h a sad but serene THE STORY OF MANUEL. emotion, which not, I 9 hoped would so tranquil
1351.body was tortured with an indescribable pain, which excited him nearly to frenzy. At
1352.d sleep. But half the infinite mercy of God spared him. A little after daylight sat
1353. dark hair,-and kissed his pale cheek; "God has spared us 'another day/ " He made n
1354.rs preceding it.* Manuel's room was the family rendezvous, where every one came solici
1355. was the family rendezvous, where every one came solicitous to do something to chee
1356.awny," the dog, had two rabbits and how many hundred birds came every day to be fed
1357.e gloom which gathered around the young life fleeting away, and the ; heart of the p
1358.still. Her heart was overwhelmed with a sense of sorrow and woe- " 94 THE STORY OF MA
1359.he suddenly asked, " do you believe the soul, after death, accompanies the body into
1360.asked, " do you believe the soul, after death, accompanies the body into the grave?"
1361." " No," she answered quickly. It's the soul which gives life to the body. While the
1362.ered quickly. It's the soul which gives life to the body. While the soul remains the
1363.which gives life to the body. While the soul remains there is no death. It is the se
1364.ody. While the soul remains there is no death. It is the separation of the soul and b
1365.s no death. It is the separation of the soul and body which makes death. " I thought
1366.ration of the soul and body which makes death. " I thought so " he said, then was qui
1367.k wisely for his was a strange, erratic nature to deal with, and she must deal with it
1368.with, and she must deal with it only as God inspired her. She knew that Masonry had
1369. cut it off that he might enter eternal life, it must be of his own free will, but s
1370.ternal life, it must be of his own free will, but she must help him the best she did
1371.moment had arrived, when out of the I ; God THE STORY OF MANUEL. 95 depths of his s
1372.d THE STORY OF MANUEL. 95 depths of his soul he cried for aid, and trusting in God s
1373. soul he cried for aid, and trusting in God she said "It is an easy thing, Manuel,
1374.quish MaI have read in your papers that many sonry. : distinguished men have done it
1375.ssitate a betrayal of secrets, whatever will, may be. It only requires an effort of
1376.rt of and some moral gether from it." " courage to break away alto- My God ! mother, it
1377.m it." " courage to break away alto- My God ! mother, it ? how you " talk ! What ca
1378. that Masonry is a human invention that will crumble away beneath your feet at the a
1379.ay beneath your feet at the approach of death, as the sands upon the sea-shore crumbl
1380.e faith and all the help it affords the soul in its holy sacraments which strengthen
1381.ts holy sacraments which strengthen the soul for its last conflict, which give her c
1382.l for its last conflict, which give her courage, consolation, and light in the very glo
1383.olation, and light in the very gloom of death's shadow, and plead for it whither it g
1384. Manuel, to approach these soulhealing, life-giving sacraments when Father Carey " c
1385.mes, yes, my darling and if I, motherly duty, have been sometimes through stern, and
1386.urt or hindered you, forgive me, for my love never wavered." " Mother don't! don't!
1387.Y OF MANUEL. 97 were made stronger than death, and as endless as eternity. came in to
1388. stronger than death, and as endless as eternity. came in to see and chat with the dear
1389.ed with grave composure to the cheerful one, they ; One by conversation bubbling ar
1390.e composure to the cheerful one, they ; One by conversation bubbling around him. te
1391.alk, lis- like to in hear you but don't mind me, I'm in a quiet he said, the city re
1392.t you are strong enough, you had better change your quarters to my room where there is
1393.that this coal heat oppresses you. " ,, time, " that to-morrow, be glad to do so. Th
1394.This is the only sort of fire fit for a man to sit by," he said, in a well-satisfie
1395.e did seem won- derfully he enjoyed the change and to be lying there once more in her
1396.; ; ; tranquil mood ; so commending her cause to Al- mighty God, she took up a book,
1397.; so commending her cause to Al- mighty God, she took up a book, thinking to read,
1398.l upon the following verses : " — But God gives patience, Love learns strength, A
1399. verses : " — But God gives patience, Love learns strength, And Faith remembers pr
1400. And Hope itself can smile at length On other hopes gone from us. Love, strong as Dea
1401. at length On other hopes gone from us. Love, strong as Death, shall conquer Death,
1402.her hopes gone from us. Love, strong as Death, shall conquer Death, Through struggle
1403.s. Love, strong as Death, shall conquer Death, Through struggle stills made more glor
1404. be difficult, for in the depths of her soul she felt that if Almighty God would sav
1405.s of her soul she felt that if Almighty God would save him she could give him up wi
1406.. " It's a book of Elizabeth Browning's poetry. " Shall I read some of it aloud ? " No
1407.n sent her by the Prioress of V a short time be! This has been a day of days! Such C
1408.een a day of days! Such Contrary to our will not anticipate. fore, a scapular of the
1409.f it Mount : Carmel, and holding child, will up, said to him " My " " If put this ab
1410.ht I was so sick in town, or about that time I don't know, though, what has become o
1411.in the way of ; his reconciliation with God. The ; family, except Miriam, went down
1412.of ; his reconciliation with God. The ; family, except Miriam, went down to dinner she
1413. that you have my heartfelt H sympathy. God bless and help you." " Oh, Father Carey
1414.HE STORY OF MANUEL. " I fear I it IOI I will not have time be useless to do so." sha
1415.NUEL. " I fear I it IOI I will not have time be useless to do so." shall ; indeed th
1416. " Oh no ; don't say that. I understand Man- uel's 'no,' better than you do. Only t
1417.Oh, Father Carey, do you think Almighty God will not take these things his ! into a
1418.Father Carey, do you think Almighty God will not take these things his ! into accoun
1419.dal of our Blessed Lady," continued the good priest, taking a medal from his side-po
1420.ssing it " get Manuel to put this on. I will come up I " He will. again before I go.
1421.l to put this on. I will come up I " He will. again before I go." She went in to Man
1422.red the sinless Mother of Jesus, by her love it for Him, to succor her dying son, sh
1423.of a longing, silent land irrepressible desire to say something of such force and powe
1424.by the enemy of his ! ! Ah how much 102 soul THE STORY OF MANUEL. would break the da
1425.ed him like a snared bird, and give him liberty to seek the true end of his creation bu
1426.out hearing your confession. I have had many bitter trials, as you know but if you w
1427.y bitter trials, as you know but if you will only make your peace with God I shall f
1428.you know but if you will only make your peace with God I shall feel more than recompe
1429.t if you will only make your peace with God I shall feel more than recompensed for
1430.d his large beautiful weary expression. God's angel, standing by, drew nearer the s
1431.large beautiful weary expression. God's angel, standing by, drew nearer the strugglin
1432.standing by, drew nearer the struggling soul drew nearer to the rescue and his Mothe
1433.en watched tenderly while she plead his cause eyes, with a sad, ; with her Divine Son
1434.almost mor; bid dislike to a display of emotion of any sort, and she restrained the ten
1435.a gaze as if he wished to read her very soul. " What is it, Manuel ?" I " It is all
1436.know what you think about she tell it." Good God! how could should she say? hers. hi
1437.what you think about she tell it." Good God! how could should she say? hers. him? W
1438.his eyes she He seemed to hang for very life would say. He w assure of hearing the f
1439.He w assure of hearing the from on what truth, whatever it might be, for she had neve
1440.even in the smallest affair, in all his life. And how much depended on what she migh
1441.ng, I shall have to account to Almighty God for the answer I make you. I must tell
1442. answer I make you. I must tell you the truth. Your condition is most critical, and t
1443. 104 " THE STORY OF MANUEL. settles the matter," he whispered, so low that she could s
1444. could scarcely hear him. "Ah, my child God alone knows what is best ! That sometim
1445.xtreme Unction but when such is not His good pleasure, He gives them the far more ex
1446.e Unction but when such is not His good pleasure, He gives them the far more exceeding g
1447. more exceeding great reward of eternal life." Just at this moment Father Carey ente
1448. into my chamber, her hands folded like one in a dream she stood an instant without
1449.d for us. ; He ; prayer for her child's soul. to kneel I where 1 was sitting, except
1450. rowful Mysteries of the Rosary for the same tention. hour passed my little clock st
1451.rly beside herself with joy. In a short time Father Carey opened the door, and, cros
1452.me Unction, and the Holy Viaticum." The good priest was much af- An ; ; ; ! ; : ! ;
1453.o elevated that had she not been in the habit of keeping a strict discipline over her
1454.e to her lips, and that all thoughts of death, grief and separation were lost, as in
1455.ut she only I said, as we folded each : other for an instant in a Bettine is felt ! w
1456.e, the joy that heaven over a repentant soul." The glad news soon flew through the h
1457.m the looks of joy in every countenance one might have thought that a bridal was ab
1458.ht have thought that a bridal was about being celebrated, so filled was every- heart
1459.ated, so filled was every- heart with a happiness unalloyed by earthly emotions. But Manu
1460. presence. We knew that he would prefer being alone during the solemn rites, so I onl
1461.eshment and strength to tears : 106 his soul, THE STORY OF MANUEL. washing it purer
1462.rtfelt devotion and thankfulness in the soul-touching rites. rest knelt outside, It
1463.y, the struggle was over, the powers of evil vanquished by the divine strength of th
1464.ous excitement, and he, " possessed his soul in peace." "Ten came abouL He " When I
1465.tement, and he, " possessed his soul in peace." "Ten came abouL He " When I came up t
1466.her Carey told : me how it r ; the last time, he would go to confession, and he answ
1467.ous to me, and I can hardly realize it. God's ways are truly wonderHis mercy endure
1468.ercy endureth forever.' ful, and A deep peace has settled upon Manuel. I love to thin
1469.A deep peace has settled upon Manuel. I love to think that it was through the powerf
1470. very last, unsubdued, and all when his will appeared seemed so utterly hopeless, he
1471.e again, even in his worst paroxysms of pain. He would only lift his eyes to the cru
1472.r," he said with grave emphasis. " With God's help I mean to live a new life, if He
1473. " With God's help I mean to live a new life, if He spare me." " Oh, my child, He wi
1474.fe, if He spare me." " Oh, my child, He will surely help you " ! " " I believe that
1475.rely help you " ! " " I believe that He will, mother. I shall try to be a true serva
1476.placed under her special protection and being perish lost how could she let you the w
1477. now. " Mother, I shall have a dreadful time if I ever get r ; : THE STORY OF MANUEL
1478.back to the Mason but ; 109 shall Every other man there is a I it will make no differ
1479.o the Mason but ; 109 shall Every other man there is a I it will make no difference
1480.9 shall Every other man there is a I it will make no difference to me stand by what
1481.to me stand by what I have done to-day, God helpoffice. , ing me." This was his con
1482.had been done through a slavish fear of death, but as one ; who of living to enter in
1483.through a slavish fear of death, but as one ; who of living to enter into the " fig
1484.of living to enter into the " fight the good fight " unto conflict again, and the en
1485.nflict again, and the end. But Almighty God willed it otherwise yet had hope ; He s
1486.le, and taking him to* Himself when his soul was " white as snow " and crowned with
1487. recollectedness and humility befitting one about entering into the presence of his
1488. the plenary indulgence for the hour of death. At this ; making no complaint time, a
1489.of death. At this ; making no complaint time, a pious Holy Face of nun sent Miriam a
1490.ed with blood a mortal sadness which no language can describe. As Manuel side, his sat,
1491.cheeks pallid and sunken, there was the same unutterably sad and patient look upon h
1492. it, and I shall never forget it, and I love to believe that by looked with tender p
1493.rona of golden light, fit emblem of the peace which at last crowned the passion of th
1494.t last crowned the passion of the young life slowly sinking into the unseen, relentl
1495. the plenary indulgence for the hour of death Manuel was perfectly calm and conscious
1496.his features then came rest. All was of death. ; ; ; — over. * ** who came to the d
1497.sed through the valley of the shadow of death and still prayed, not knowing in, how i
1498.her that her child * * * rest. Then the good priest and our dear R , who had been mo
1499.l than Phidias ever chiselled. The rare beauty of his early life was perfectly restore
1500.chiselled. The rare beauty of his early life was perfectly restored, and when his mo
1501.h child, sleep to His bedarling, loved/ Good night, my my good night." * * * That ni
1502.His bedarling, loved/ Good night, my my good night." * * * That night I watched with
1503.hat night I watched with others. It was one 112 THE STORY OF MANUEL. when it is of
1504.ccession of plaintive moans, as of some one stricken with woe. Search was made, and
1505.to capture that branches of a tree. its life might be it but with a frightened cry i
1506.over our dead. * * * And so our beloved one passed away, saved the infinite compass
1507.ved the infinite compassion of Almighty God ; by and the intercession of JESUS and
1508. faintest suggestion that may visit the soul ; for seems lost, and the heart Ipows d
1509. the heart Ipows down and sinks under a sense of its utter unfitness and unworthiness
1510.unworthiness to invoke even the name of God, she, jealous of the honor of her Son,
1511.en the name of God, she, jealous of the honor of her Son, and rememberall when ing th
1512.ly sketches darling was brought back to God, would never have been given to the wor
1513.God, would never have been given to the world but for a promise made to a saintly fri
1514.have related, and who thought it was my duty to do so, for the encouragement and edi
1515. and edification of others, and for the honor of the Blessed Virgin, through whose po
1516.e was preserved and saved. Pray for the soul of Manuel. VnM^rLiGuturri J^crriv^njb f
1517.near sunset as two men stand talking on one of the lower terraces of the public gar
1518.he mountain side, looks- down, with its time-worn walls and turrets, like a grim war
1519. grotesque rocks which by some freak of nature pave its bed. The glow of sunset is ove
1520.rts. out his idyls ories. Here a poet's soul might dream undisturbed, and here even
1521. make perfect the restful and delicious sense of peace imparted by the hour and scene
1522.fect the restful and delicious sense of peace imparted by the hour and scene, the sil
1523. heavenward, city, while a upon the gay pleasure-seekers in the gardens, upon the groups
1524.es, peasants, and the toil-worn sons of labor and all, as if with one accord, kneel i
1525.-worn sons of labor and all, as if with one accord, kneel in reverent homage, saint
1526.rent homage, saint and sinner alike, in honor of that supreme moment which announced
1527.t supreme moment which announced to the world solemn stillness falls ; ; upon the a S
1528.gain towards the valley. is We see that one of them past middle age, a man of grave
1529.see that one of them past middle age, a man of grave, ab- THE MAD PENITENT OF TODL
1530.tracted, but gentle ; 3 countenance the other, in the first glow of early manhood, wi
1531.at rich creamy tint sometimes The elder man had seen in Southern Italy. spent his l
1532.n had seen in Southern Italy. spent his life in endeavoring to master the science of
1533.t his life in endeavoring to master the science of the stars astrology, as it was calle
1534.t-wings for sublime flights which would one day fill the world with his fame. Both
1535.me flights which would one day fill the world with his fame. Both stand silent, the a
1536.his calculations, the poet steeping his soul glowing loveliness outspread before him
1537.and over, to the bottom but there is no one to laugh at them, in the ; : the panic
1538.gh at them, in the ; : the panic is too universal. friends The two hasten forward, and ha
1539.hion, dash towards them, handsome young man in richly — embroidered garments of g
1540.pice overlooking the valley a hun- With one impulse the and friends spring forward,
1541.n shoulder and flank, they stand quiet. Many persons their dread of danger past now
1542.ll known as the only son of the richest man in Umbria, whose prodigality and escapa
1543.ich he had conducted her, and from whom other women stand aloof but to find and thank
1544.rasp theirs, and thanks them in earnest language for saving his companion and himself fr
1545.and himself from a certain and terrible death. But the outstretched hand is unnoticed
1546. requite the service done me to-day, it will be only necessary to present or send th
1547.h upon thy cheek, Alighieri " that thou art shocked by my rudeness " I must confess
1548. birth, but the only son of the richest man in Umbria, I " see ! ; more's the pity
1549.ion and gold give him great power to do evil, for which he has a large capacity, and
1550.se." Dear Maestro, follies of youth ? " art thou not severe on the Who may have " i
1551.in reserve for knows what Heaven " even one like him ? Towards the follies of youth
1552. youth I am lenient, but I must judge a man by his virtues or vices," " Listen, Ali
1553.ues or vices," " Listen, Alighieri that man was the reply. whose life we have just
1554.Alighieri that man was the reply. whose life we have just saved is Jacques dei Ben:
1555.breath pollutes the air. She is lost to virtue, to shame, and to all womanliness, and
1556.nd rich raiment, which are the price of sin, before the eyes of the It had been fai
1557.d let them be dashed to pieces." " " If God, the All-seeing, were not over all said
1558.not over all said Alighieri, making the Sign of the Cross. " The future, which He kn
1559.Benedetti is preserved this day for any good end, it will be a miracle,'' " Don't un
1560.preserved this day for any good end, it will be a miracle,'' " Don't undersaid the o
1561. miracle,'' " Don't undersaid the older man, laughing. stand, because I am incredul
1562.t such things are hard to realize." The man hath touched me strangely, and I will o
1563.he man hath touched me strangely, and I will offer a decade of Ave Marias daily for
1564.faith ; low tones. Men in those ages in life, were not ashamed of talking religion e
1565.es in life, were not ashamed of talking religion entered into their daily it ; this stra
1566.knowledge their obedience to the Divine law as revealed to the Church. " Our Blesse
1567.cing upwards for an instant but in that one glance he ; ! ; 8 THE MAD PENITENT of t
1568., as far as his eyes could pierce. This man, Bartolomeo Tasti, had spent the best y
1569. Tasti, had spent the best years of his life in studying the movements of the heaven
1570.d that he was master of the more occult science ogy. It is certain of astrol- that many
1571.ence ogy. It is certain of astrol- that many of his predictions had been verified, a
1572.tions had been verified, and the common mind regarded him. with awe, as one whose kn
1573. common mind regarded him. with awe, as one whose knowledge of hidden things was in
1574.nd regarded him. with awe, as one whose knowledge of hidden things was indisputable some
1575., ; ; Maestro, of if only to read I the poetry of the heavens, but one of have an enga
1576.o read I the poetry of the heavens, but one of have an engagement at the house thy
1577. " " But how didst No divination in the matter. I met Gondolfo I to-day, and he told m
1578.Francis Assisi, whose monastery crowned one of the hills back of the town. The one,
1579. one of the hills back of the town. The one, enthused over her strange dreamy lovel
1580. idealized her at once in the poetic as mind of Alighieri ; the other spoke of her o
1581.n the poetic as mind of Alighieri ; the other spoke of her one unsoiled by the world,
1582.d of Alighieri ; the other spoke of her one unsoiled by the world, who had never kn
1583. other spoke of her one unsoiled by the world, who had never known earthly love, and
1584. the world, who had never known earthly love, and whose highest happiness was to be
1585.r known earthly love, and whose highest happiness was to be in the Adorable Presence that
1586.ion with the Virgin without stain. "She will devote herself to heaven," the good mon
1587.She will devote herself to heaven," the good monk said, folding his hands with a smi
1588.ds with a smile of complacency " such a soul is ; 10 THE MAD PENITENT OF a true TODI
1589.a convent : such perfection, his poetic mind imagined, would win Heaven in by auster
1590. and prayers Italians more souls to the world than she could hope to do in the cloist
1591.t " a beautiful woman is the thought of God " why then, he reasoned, should she not
1592.reasoned, should she not, like a bright particular ; star, be willing to let her light shi
1593.d in the perfection of His work? So, as one set apart for heaven, Alighieri gazed u
1594.til her fair image was imprinted on his imagination so that vividly, that in later He years
1595.ater He years, clothing Beatrice in her beauty, the world saw her in the " Divine Come
1596.s, clothing Beatrice in her beauty, the world saw her in the " Divine Comedy." But th
1597.l maiden was not destined to Heaven had other work for her to the cloister. do, which
1598.the numerous paintings of scenes in the life of the beloved St. Francis which kindle
1599.o pray the holy places dedicated in his honor. And here, wandering among the deliciou
1600.ncis," feeling heart moved with strange emotion by the pathos of the account of the Sai
1601.n the swallows, those little birds that love the light, and hate darkness, though th
1602.indows and roof." Likewise did immortal honor in the "Divine Comedy," which seems par
1603.olded, her countenance clcfthed in such peace as the world cannot give, unseeing * In
1604.untenance clcfthed in such peace as the world cannot give, unseeing * In Catholic cou
1605. Catholic countres during Mass, it is a custom for ladies to unglove 12 THE MAD PENITE
1606.t the fair Julia entered into his ideal world, which was peopled by angels and images
1607.opled by angels and images of spiritual beauty never dreamed of by man before. He had
1608.of spiritual beauty never dreamed of by man before. He had seen other women famed f
1609.r dreamed of by man before. He had seen other women famed for their beauty, but never
1610.He had seen other women famed for their beauty, but never one who produced upon him an
1611.women famed for their beauty, but never one who produced upon him an impression lik
1612. charms had stirred the sensuous in his nature, but her loveliness was something set a
1613.is perfect physique, the bold audacious beauty of his face, his rich attire, and the g
1614.y of his face, his rich attire, and the good nature which threw bows and or smiles t
1615.his face, his rich attire, and the good nature which threw bows and or smiles to his f
1616. silver to the beggars, with the grace. same careless, reckless, winning The poet's
1617.nobservant, acknowledging by no look or sign ; THE MAD PENITENT OF that he ; TODI. 1
1618.hat he felt assured was rolling through space towards him for had not all his computa
1619.the three years that have glided by the world appeared to have moved on without chang
1620.world appeared to have moved on without change in the old city perched on the mountain
1621.rance with that of lilacs and roses and other sweet-smelling blooms, which, wafted so
1622.y the wind, sometimes mingled, reminded one of a harmony of delicious odors played
1623.rs far up the mountain, prayed when the world slept, and the sweet bells rang out the
1624.valley to remember the Incarnation, and honor the Virgin without stain through whom R
1625. through whom Redemption was brought to man. In the busy marts of traffic, and in t
1626. marts of traffic, and in the haunts of pleasure, the same crowds jostled each other, wh
1627.fic, and in the haunts of pleasure, the same crowds jostled each other, while in the
1628. pleasure, the same crowds jostled each other, while in the silent, shadowy churches,
1629.he wrestling and chariot-races, tests ; other feats of the athletes, the and the dari
1630.e But it was very quiet now of everyday life. every one was complaining of the dulln
1631. very quiet now of everyday life. every one was complaining of the dullness, and wi
1632.away at his villa on Had he been at the other side of the valley. home, some of his w
1633.ness which precedes the earthquake, and one day when all Todi was growing weary to
1634. day when all Todi was growing weary to death of the condition of affairs, a sensatio
1635.prodigal exas travagance, by gaming and other expensive vices, and that there was not
1636. by his shortly after grandfather. ruin One morning, their was made public, the old
1637.rash came the silent anguish of the old man hurting him more than the most violent
1638.shot up and expired, and the stricken 1 man beheld only the sad, pathetic expressio
1639.sed and registered a vow, known only to God, a vow which he fulfilled to Rethe lett
1640.fted it, he stooped and kissed the dead man's feet he dared not desecrate that poor
1641.e who had brought such bitterness, even death itself, to him who had never reproached
1642.arose, and left the apartment a changed man all his energies, hitherto ; — misspe
1643.— misspent, concentrated into an iron will, which th e turned the whole current of
1644.the whole current of his himself in his life. He secluded own apartment, leaving to
1645.. He secluded own apartment, leaving to good monks of St. Francis, to whom his fathe
1646. offered for the repose of the departed soul, and a grand Requiem Mass was celebrate
1647.OD1. a place of "refreshment, light and peace." funeral, as The at in a was customary
1648.chlight. in Italy, took place night, by One figure wrapped black cloak walked by th
1649. sounded upon his ears, but no tear, no sign of emotion was visible in his face; he
1650. upon his ears, but no tear, no sign of emotion was visible in his face; he was as stil
1651.ear which he stood. People touched each other to notice him, and wondered at his hear
1652.fact we are all blind to the mystery of God'3 ways, and cry out wildly, " Lo here "
1653.ely, through human means. But there was one present, closely veiled, at the sepultu
1654.d fain have whispered sympathy but that being impossible, ; THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI.
1655.y she prayed for him, offering her very life, if need be, And why ? She could not ex
1656.e help he might despair and end his own life. Then, every one was against him all bl
1657.spair and end his own life. Then, every one was against him all blamed him but ; ;
1658.his hour of trouble ? She knew that his life had been profligate, and that he had li
1659.ved in open defiance of the precepts of religion and morality, but was not this more rea
1660.ould pity him, and was not the grace of God sufficient even for such as he, else hi
1661. his kindness to beggars, ; why did the Man-God ! give to us the lesson of the prod
1662. kindness to beggars, ; why did the Man-God ! give to us the lesson of the prodigal
1663.to us the lesson of the prodigal son as time And, without ever seeing him on, passed
1664.gentle maiden need have had no dread on one point. Jacques dei Benedetti had no tho
1665.pair the fortune he had wasted, and the honor of his house this was what he had vowed
1666.d not yet reached his struck the rock ; soul, or whence would flow the waters of pen
1667.rs of penitence it had only touched his honor, filled him with bitter remorse, and in
1668.ared from men's eyes the gay resorts of pleasure saw him no longer his splendid horses,
1669. Venice, to Florence, to Marseilles and other marts of the world, he journeyed, and o
1670.e, to Marseilles and other marts of the world, he journeyed, and one or two fortunate
1671.r marts of the world, he journeyed, and one or two fortunate speculations brought h
1672.re questionable, flow into his coffers. war, Benedetti saw no As all stratagems are
1673.atagems in busi- they were allowable in one case, he thought they were so in the ot
1674.ne case, he thought they were so in the other and, then, his object he thought only o
1675.izens who used so much to to afford her pleasure Prosperity crowned his and enjoy. energ
1676.ears, what with his lucky speculations, good investments, and his untiring attention
1677.had nearly retrieved his losses and the honor of his old house, which still carried o
1678.rom the society of his old friends, and one day, to the extreme astonishment of Cou
1679.tofore strangers took possession of his mind, and 22 THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. again
1680.t was the dawning of the first virtuous love he had ever known. What these two highe
1681.d ever known. What these two higher and other, influences so moved human hearts far a
1682.ly future, but a plain. How day came in one so fair was veiled in the which all see
1683.hich all seemed made and saintly in her life could ever consent to become the bride
1684.d ever consent to become the bride of a man whose record was stained with sins and
1685.omed energy, and led by ; his imperious will, made known his sentiments to he furnis
1686. aside forever the vices of his earlier life, which he her father, to declared were
1687.outh than of a malicious preference for sin it ; whom had been the only way he knew
1688.d run therein until his father's sudden death had roused him from his mad career and
1689.led the vow he then made to restore the honor and prosperity of his name and house, h
1690. wanted a wife like Julia, who, like an angel by his side, would lead him to a better
1691.would lead him to a better and ; higher life. This conversation lasted until far int
1692.lfo probed deeply the suitor, and, past history of his daughter's stern insistence to w
1693.ed the strictest in- vestigation of his life since he had turned his back on the fol
1694.felt that he might trust his daughter's happiness to his keeping, and consented to her re
1695. receiving his addresses, saying: " Thy cause must stand upon I thy own merits, Bened
1696." Never fear, Count Gondolfo," said the other, proudly " I must have a willing bride
1697.de or none. ; ; Julia shall is my first love; if she in turn loves me I be the happi
1698. she in turn loves me I be the happiest man living. Good-night." Julia did not reje
1699. loves me I be the happiest man living. Good-night." Julia did not reject her lover'
1700.he only asked in shy, broken words, for time to consider his proposal. The delay wou
1701.s momentous question by her own unaided judgment her ideas of marriage be. ; were too ex
1702.e her lover, she knew, was not a devout man although he was observant of the outwar
1703.e was observant of the outward forms of religion, he was a worldling, proud, ambitious,
1704. worldling, proud, ambitious, and had a will of iron, alike powerful for good or evi
1705. had a will of iron, alike powerful for good or evil would it not then be risking he
1706.ill of iron, alike powerful for good or evil would it not then be risking her earthl
1707.ould it not then be risking her earthly happiness, perhaps her very salvation, to ; ; ; y
1708.ife ciples, her opinions and ideas with one whose to last had been spent as his had
1709.ector, to whom she confided all and he, being a discreet and, helpless to decide for
1710., helpless to decide for herself, she ; man, well versed in human nature, did not s
1711.erself, she ; man, well versed in human nature, did not seek by a single word to influ
1712.e aid of refused Mary conceived without sin, who never her assistance to those who
1713.and of the monks of St. Francis, and of many faithful souls among her poor, for her
1714.oor, for her intention. A rumor by this time was in the air that she was betrothed t
1715.stood what her intention " was,— and, truth to say, the holy it < ' souls were oppo
1716.irgin too fair and pure for any earthly love, and that she it, for was surely destin
1717., And now to hear that she herself with one scandal to religion, to whose life mora
1718.ar that she herself with one scandal to religion, to whose life morality and to was goin
1719. with one scandal to religion, to whose life morality and to was going had been a hi
1720.er their prayers as requested, that the will of the dear. Lord might be made manifes
1721.nifest in the case, and that fit if His good pleasure to avert least vouchsafe the g
1722.t in the case, and that fit if His good pleasure to avert least vouchsafe the grace of a
1723.shing to the destruction of her earthly happiness and the day on which the novena ended,
1724. never except on a Saint's festa had so many, old and young, thronged the sanctuary
1725. it, He would at 26 THE MAD PENITENT OF evil TODI. the danger and being upon be aver
1726.D PENITENT OF evil TODI. the danger and being upon be averted from of innocent as a v
1727.averted from of innocent as a vic- whom many them looked tim to the wicked designs o
1728.o the wicked designs of an unprincipled man, notwithstanding which they prayed arde
1729.nversion, for (as they said) if any — one ever needed such prayers and the saving
1730.ed such prayers and the saving grace of God, Jacques dei Benedetti did by which we
1731.ey suspected that he had only exchanged one form of wickedness for another, so pron
1732.uspected that he had only exchanged one form of wickedness for another, so prone are
1733.here was no miraculous interposition no sign vouchsafed to show either the approval
1734.by designs hidden from mortal eyes. how God's how His glory or The betrothal of Jul
1735.red them congratulations, and expressed many sincere hopes for their dei Benedetti f
1736.re hopes for their dei Benedetti future happiness. after, The nuptials followed shortly a
1737.oble in appearance, so perfect in manly beauty indeed they almost found it in their he
1738.ds were intoned from the altar, and the time approached for the newly wedded pair to
1739.wly wedded pair to receive the Bread of Life, every one felt a sensation of thankful
1740.air to receive the Bread of Life, every one felt a sensation of thankfulness, and d
1741.'s not given at the woman over body and soul to Satan, or he'd have dropped dead whe
1742.iend. They " don't always," mumbled the other old Let them wait as cares to, to see t
1743.wait as cares to, to see the end of it. God has His ways, and we have ours, and the
1744.day, there was nothing came so near the truth as the saying of that toothless old wom
1745.a simple, ignorant creature, whose dull mind had never ventured beyond the most comm
1746. beyond the most commonplace affairs of life, a few simple prayers and the bare anim
1747.life, a few simple prayers and the bare animal wants of her condition. " God's ways ar
1748.e bare animal wants of her condition. " God's ways are not as our ways," it will be
1749.. " God's ways are not as our ways," it will be well to remember. truth, too little
1750.our ways," it will be well to remember. truth, too little : That was a grand " God's
1751. truth, too little : That was a grand " God's ; CHAPTER The marriage tions to the c
1752. was, notwithstanding all predic- happy one. Jacques dei Beneditti idolized his wif
1753.rtues which tiful than that of made her life more beauother women. Piety, he thought
1754. however he might have been mistaken in other things, he was it ; ; not in the case o
1755.ich would have been too perfect but for one thing. It was not in his devotion his l
1756.before she discovered that although his life was morally changed he never approached
1757. Sacraments, and whenever he alluded to religion, it was, if not with a covert sneer, in
1758.ored officer of the crown and a wealthy citizen to live and entertain magnificently, to
1759. either in his official or civic inter; same good nature and generosity characterize
1760.er in his official or civic inter; same good nature and generosity characterized him
1761. his official or civic inter; same good nature and generosity characterized him now as
1762.m now as in the past, and he dealt even justice in Upon all cases over which he had jur
1763. in rare devices in gold, he offered as love-gifts to her the most costly equipages
1764. great cost for her use, and it was his pleasure and will that she should appear in magn
1765.or her use, and it was his pleasure and will that she should appear in magnificent a
1766.s, and the public gardens, her peerless beauty set off in all the splendor he so profu
1767.ner as he was, he won the hearts of the good religious on every side by his generous
1768.his wife, but chiefly because he was by nature lavish, and fond of giving and he was b
1769.and he was blessed and prayed for as no other sinner in Todi had ever been before. An
1770.e the prayers of the saints, why should one then ever faint with despondency, after
1771.s, and does not faith teach us that the time will come when the All-Father will acce
1772.d does not faith teach us that the time will come when the All-Father will accept th
1773. the time will come when the All-Father will accept the incense, and answer in. full
1774.he deepest humility, giving place to no emotion of vainglory or pride, offered her life
1775.tion of vainglory or pride, offered her life — for — aye, even his conversion. A
1776. if it made him happier? Was it not her duty to try and win him to higher and better
1777.nd then, fortified guard his daughter's happiness and consoled by all the solemn rights o
1778.nd is this the end ? less calm, thought Death, the grave, and forgetfulness Rather le
1779.orgetfulness Rather let us, then, enjoy life while it lasts let us eat, drink, and b
1780. a carcass sickens me " and he left the death-chamber to go out into the sunshine and
1781.ented air of his garden, his only grief being the tears which he knew that her loss w
1782.tears which he knew that her loss would cause to flow from the eyes of his wife, and
1783. when in an atmosphere of gay, stirring life, and surrounded by everything that coul
1784.he senses or delight the taste. But the death of the old Count, and the necessary obs
1785.le he would be obliged to submit it was one of the penalties of his rank and statio
1786.th the best grace he might, and as that death ; ; ; he could then if he found that th
1787. necessitate a trip to Venice. far as ; One year passed by ; of intolerable wearine
1788. he would hunt up some of his former of happiness, efforts to and her companions there jo
1789.nwardly under the restraints imposed by custom, and a desire to show his wife to what
1790.the restraints imposed by custom, and a desire to show his wife to what lengths he THE
1791.r its object the repose of her father's soul and the conversion of In simple mournin
1792.ender sympathy and companionship of the one being whom she best loved, Julia was al
1793.r sympathy and companionship of the one being whom she best loved, Julia was almost h
1794.part from the pomps and vanities of the world. A few friends were admitted during. th
1795.f mourning, whose aims and aspirations, being like her own, cheered and consoled her
1796.ted themselves by heroic vows, body and soul, to Heaven, the hours passed swiftly an
1797. as ever for the repose of her father's soul and the conversion of her husband. Nor
1798. with the precepts of St. James, and in other works of mercy, her time was well and p
1799.James, and in other works of mercy, her time was well and profitably occupied. days
1800.she observed that under some pretext or other, often without any, he would hurry from
1801. fond, maudlin way vague apprehensions. One with reddened face, his speech unsteady
1802.ected too much of my finds his greatest happiness in the pleasures of the world, and flie
1803.atest happiness in the pleasures of the world, and flies from solitude and devotion a
1804.o win an influence over nuns. him which will lead him to better and higher things. I
1805.lead him to better and higher things. I will henceforth forget myself, and bury exam
1806. holy Mother, to devote my lost on him. life to thy service and to an imitation of t
1807. Ay, sweet Mother of Dolors, have, even life itself, I offer myself, ! with " all I
1808.filled her with alarm. in all Never her life 36 THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. Two or thr
1809. about the pillars, filled his sensuous nature with a thrill of ecstasy. He saw no one
1810.ure with a thrill of ecstasy. He saw no one, and ran up to his wife's dressing-room
1811.id, embracing her. " How beautiful thou art, bella sposa ! and what an enchanting A
1812.evout ; little ; wife But it is have no time in fact I am extremely well satisfied t
1813.o be rid of so disagreeable My father's death gave me penance a thing. enough for a l
1814.acques, my husband, let me do penance I will gladly, and mayhap our dear Lord and wi
1815.ll gladly, and mayhap our dear Lord and will be to my will accept it." he said, laug
1816. mayhap our dear Lord and will be to my will accept it." he said, laughing, an 1 kis
1817.dom. Do penance for me, cara mia, if it will make thee happier; only don't flog thy
1818.he had in view, and she offered all the pain she suffered from it, in union with the
1819., for her husband's conversion. " It is time for thee, dear one, to change thy dress
1820.conversion. " It is time for thee, dear one, to change thy dress ; a party of frien
1821.on. " It is time for thee, dear one, to change thy dress ; a party of friends are to j
1822.es dei Benedetti, although not a devout man, led a life which completely filled out
1823.detti, although not a devout man, led a life which completely filled out his ideal o
1824.hich completely filled out his ideal of happiness. in Italy The most beautiful woman her?
1825.as gentle and yielding and did they not love each other entirely ? There seemed to h
1826.and yielding and did they not love each other entirely ? There seemed to him to be no
1827.licity. He had retrieved himself in the opinion of his fellow-citizens, who now thought
1828.who now thought leniently of his former life, and smiling said to each other "Aha! o
1829.s former life, and smiling said to each other "Aha! our Jurisconsult sowed all his wi
1830.sowed all his wild oats then See what a good and beautiful wife can do for a man." A
1831. a good and beautiful wife can do for a man." As we said before, he was devoted to
1832.." As we said before, he was devoted to art, and was ever ready to assist young and
1833.NT OF artists ; TODI. 39 and he had the honor of entertaining Alighieri, whose acquai
1834.ulsed his thanks after having saved his life. The old star-gaze/ had gone blind, and
1835.d Benedetti, u to think I am rolling in wealth and luxury while the man who saved my l
1836. rolling in wealth and luxury while the man who saved my life is without bread Alig
1837.h and luxury while the man who saved my life is without bread Alighieri, pledge thys
1838., most gladly," answered the poet, " My God " ! ! gravely. " Thou mayest if thou wi
1839. to repay a debt owe by all the laws of honor and gratitude." I "Ah, " I see!" said A
1840.e. would settle an annuity upon him for life 40 let THE MAD PENITENT OF him think it
1841.TODI. is a long-delayed debt due his is family, of which he sole representative, and t
1842. he sole representative, and that tardy justice has at length been done. Make up any ha
1843.must not appear, or even a debt due his family. be suspected of having a hand in it if
1844.does not require a moment's thought. So many thousand ducats are placed in thy hands
1845. the safest banker in Todi, to whom ; I will give thee a letter. Deposit the " money
1846.ovanni Tasti. What "I can be more plain will, ? and with a thankful heart that our i
1847.estitute," the Florentine, grasping the other's hand. " It is a debt, remember, and i
1848. " It is a debt, remember, and it is my religion to " pay wilt my ? debts," replied Bene
1849.lf " Should need overtake me, friend, I will not fail then to call upon thee, rest a
1850. : THE MAD PENITENT OF I TODI. 41 so it will not sleep until it is all settled." And
1851. had no power to relieve, his own means being the necessaries of leave barely suffici
1852. leave barely sufficient to procure him life. Now he would be able to at- him in com
1853. all owing to the noble generosity of a man he had once despised, and refused to kn
1854. was Jacques dei Benedetti, the natural man, full of generous, noble ^instincts, wh
1855.ich were un consecrated by the grace of God, and whose works were all of the earth,
1856.eat white throne " in his behalf, whose good works now being without faith were as d
1857.e " in his behalf, whose good works now being without faith were as dead as the fruit
1858.Gomorrah. vide clothing and ; ; CHAPTER One bright IV. hour when he was came home i
1859.he fact that he had been for some short time preoccupied, and almost moody, over som
1860., and almost moody, over some affair or other which he did not care to discuss. He we
1861. her fair hands had been fashioning for one day, at an rarely there, Benedetti of h
1862.r, signor." is " There there?" " I some chance then of my finding her think so, signor
1863.tanding beside him, wondering with deep emotion if he had come thilher for some his we
1864.ous purpose. "Aha, runaway! Not for the world. away, for I is I it thou? Turn back? o
1865.have great news for thee, bella sposaT "Good, I trust?" " Splendid but I will hold t
1866.posaT "Good, I trust?" " Splendid but I will hold thee in suspense until we get home
1867.tion it Thou knowest, bella sposa, that will bring me. have worn don't know which is
1868.y the royal order, which I obtained, in honor of the birth of a son to the king. He i
1869.the king. He is so devout, and keeps so many monks around him, that I had great dift
1870.o confirm him in ; but I prevailed this time, which will I hence I that the games of
1871.m in ; but I prevailed this time, which will I hence I that the games of 1268 shall
1872.een before. What sayest thou ? " " They will make our old town very gay," she timent
1873.o be built for a chosen few, ! " Gay It will be like paradise ! I among whom the wif
1874.among whom the wife of the Jurisconsult will THE MAD PENITENT OF shine the fairest o
1875.rince and Princess Doria from Rome, who will be present, the great Minister, Count T
1876. the great Minister, Count Taverno, and one or two other distinguished persons of t
1877.Minister, Count Taverno, and one or two other distinguished persons of the Court, I h
1878. color and blue, spangled with gold. It will have already sent a hundred or more men
1879. I shall be so occupied in planning the other arrangements for days to come that I sc
1880. hair. how proud I shall be to have the world see and " acknowledge thy beauty! I "Oh
1881.ave the world see and " acknowledge thy beauty! I "Oh, Jacques! why so vain of lip. me
1882.quivering " Pains thee How ? can I help being proud of of possess- thee, sweet love T
1883. being proud of of possess- thee, sweet love The very thought ing such a treasure ar
1884. arch, if such as no monhe searched the world, could hope to find " ! — a treasure
1885. heart. " for he replied, it fold- Such love is is very sweet, but ; is too much the
1886. the creature we must remember that our God a jealous God, and will have none pre-
1887.we must remember that our God a jealous God, and will have none pre- Him/' He dropp
1888.emember that our God a jealous God, and will have none pre- Him/' He dropped her han
1889. don't throw cold water, my face I when will my be holy water, into heart runs over
1890.e holy water, into heart runs over with love for albeit thee. sposa: in be good, one
1891.with love for albeit thee. sposa: in be good, one of these days, be/la fact I am not
1892.ove for albeit thee. sposa: in be good, one of these days, be/la fact I am not so b
1893.et to " No, thank our dear Lord, thou ! art not like that " " she said, laying her
1894.sweetly. judge righteously," she use of being pious ? " If the devil don't get old Sa
1895. what is the Here am I always giving to love to give. I the poor and to the Church.
1896.o the Church. I I am never happier than nature. when am giving. It is my Have ; I not
1897.ENITENT OF " TODI. 47 for Our dear Lord will requite all that is done the love of Hi
1898. Lord will requite all that is done the love of Him," she said, smoothing back the h
1899.head, and smiling brightly. " Yes, thou art good, my love, according to thy mind wa
1900., and smiling brightly. " Yes, thou art good, my love, according to thy mind way." ;
1901.ling brightly. " Yes, thou art good, my love, according to thy mind way." ; by and b
1902.hou art good, my love, according to thy mind way." ; by and by our Lord to if will s
1903.y mind way." ; by and by our Lord to if will show thee His said, re- "Wilt thou go a
1904.tell thee in order yet. There " Yes, as will be comedies, wrestling, dancing, music,
1905.ing them as cheerfully as she might any other cross, but she had only one wish upon e
1906.might any other cross, but she had only one wish upon earth, and that was for his c
1907.d penance for that she offered her very life to Almighty God, if need be her very li
1908.t she offered her very life to Almighty God, if need be her very life. It must not
1909.fe to Almighty God, if need be her very life. It must not be supposed that conversat
1910. 48 like the THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. one just related were of frequent occurrenc
1911.ds his worldliness, and try to lead his mind to graver considerations than it, those
1912.ession of disgust escaped his she would change the subject for something more congenia
1913.h glowing cheeks and brightened eyes of poetry, and art, and other aesthetic themes, h
1914.eeks and brightened eyes of poetry, and art, and other aesthetic themes, he knew th
1915.brightened eyes of poetry, and art, and other aesthetic themes, he knew that under it
1916.ient season. his perceptions, the proud pleasure-loving man was not slow to notice this
1917. perceptions, the proud pleasure-loving man was not slow to notice this exercise of
1918. by which he could know there was a new life upShe always met him with springing wit
1919.tuous instincts And in those days it or pain her devout spirit. required care and th
1920.equired care and thought, and subjected one to no little ridicule, to show distaste
1921. to show distaste for such things ; for many of the best artists sought their subjec
1922. that Jacques dei Benedetti had a noble nature, but there was a nobler life within him
1923. a noble nature, but there was a nobler life within him that only the voice of God c
1924. life within him that only the voice of God could bring out of its sealed sepulchre
1925.y, the noble, and wealthy citizens from other parts poets, philosophers, comedians, d
1926.hing else was talked of in short, every one was Days and weeks passed by. — ; ; n
1927.. pleased notwithstanding, because each one cherished and stood of an audience by h
1928.who listened open-mouthed to and cons ; many made themselves happy this, by betting
1929.s happy this, by betting on that or the other, while there were not a few who predict
1930.uilt upon the old beams of the original one, which had been blackening there in the
1931. accidents, and take a ghoulish sort of pleasure in doing it then, if something dreadful
1932.thai: ever after their oracular sayings will be held in high respect which, by the w
1933. beams under the new gallery, which was being painted and gilded by artists from Rome
1934. of rose-color and blue ? There was not one who would not have been glad to be seat
1935. was propitious, only waiting for every one to waken up to enjoy it. From the side
1936.ps she approached the Cathedral just as one of the Fathers of St. Francis ascended
1937.upreme joy the Presence of Him whom her soul adored. was Julia dei Benedetti, and th
1938.folds pearls and opals from India, each one with a spark of fire like an imprisoned
1939.with a spark of fire like an imprisoned soul glowing in its depths, gleamed in her h
1940.re more than offer homage to an : ; : ! angel." "Oh, Jacques! why so foolish? Wouldst
1941. am arrayed are thy gifts, and worn for love of thou turn ; my thee. Ah why ! should
1942.? thou wert clad in sackcloth, would it change thy beauty, thy grace, thy perfect form
1943. clad in sackcloth, would it change thy beauty, thy grace, thy perfect form, bella spo
1944.ange thy beauty, thy grace, thy perfect form, bella sposa ? No I will then be proud
1945.e, thy perfect form, bella sposa ? No I will then be proud and vain If ! " of thee,
1946.rly impossible for me to accompany thee family, to re- the amphitheatre. ceive the I h
1947.but to 54 THE MAD PENITENT OF " ? TODI. will the Prince and Princess Doria — who r
1948. from crowding upon our party, for at a time like this people push their way whereve
1949.can find standing room. Farewell, sweet one, until we meet again." He kissed her as
1950.y. It he had been kissing the and after one fond linger- was a glorious day, clear
1951.ats, from the arena to the roof. It was one wavering, beautiful mass of color, from
1952. and every heart paid willing homage to one who wore her honors and bore herself wi
1953.is lips as he saw how conspicuously her beauty shone in that great assemblage, and how
1954.ry on which he had in his vainglory and love of display expended so much thought and
1955. thought and money, with its freight of life and beauty fell, a wild, heaped-up ruin
1956.and money, with its freight of life and beauty fell, a wild, heaped-up ruin into the a
1957. crowd that thronged the arena and no ; man stayed his mad progress, for all knew h
1958.d the arena and no ; man stayed his mad progress, for all knew him, and understood the a
1959. benumbed, he found her who was all the world to him, and lifting her tenderly he con
1960.d the faultless Not the symmetry of her form, but a rough hair-shirt under which the
1961.h the tender flesh showed that recalled many a fretted scar. A cry of grief escaped
1962. him Thine own " That was all. Her pure soul passed as ! ! the prayer escaped her sh
1963.esh she had hoped to win mercy for him. Many drew near and offered assistance, but h
1964.ioned them away, and gathering the dead form to his bosom, he bore her back to their
1965.d a dumb wonder, mingled with a strange sense of humility which made him feel helples
1966. feel helpless under the mighty Hand of God, he watched, shedding no tear, uttering
1967. instant gazing down upon the matchless beauty " Leave that as of the still white face
1968. as they looked upon the beautiful dead form which they had come to prepare for the
1969.s of despair, or the beginning of a new life ? Sympathy, condolence, and religious h
1970.strait he was in ? Had not all that the world had given him crumbled in his grasp lik
1971.his grasp like a rope of sand ? of what good then were words, for was not all nothin
1972.adful blow that had wounded the natural man unto death it was as a sword that had "
1973.w that had wounded the natural man unto death it was as a sword that had " divided th
1974.il there echoed through heart and brain one only word Penance Penance Penance Was t
1975.ce Was this the solemn whisper of a new life struggling with his half-awakened consc
1976.my reflex of his grief? Not so for this one thought absorbed his grief and the memo
1977. one thought absorbed his grief and the memory of the pure being he had lost that stoo
1978.ed his grief and the memory of the pure being he had lost that stood out above all el
1979.y should he not, offered for his guilty soul. his past ! : ! ! ; ; — 59 60 THE MAD
1980.ENT OF TODI. ? henceforth, continue the good work himself. . he asked "AyeP* pretty
1981. thou make tempter, "a ! What would the world say, coward, but that thou hast gone ma
1982.coward, but that thou hast gone mad ? " art Then his pride, his ambition, his love
1983." art Then his pride, his ambition, his love of ease and luxury, his devotion to the
1984.y, his devotion to the beautiful in and nature, his epicurean appetites, his im- patie
1985.uish and lead him captive once more but nature was giving place ; " an to a new-born,
1986.lace ; " an to a new-born, supernatural principle within, not yet revealed to him, and on
1987.d have led him to look upon the saintly beauty of his dead wife as she reposed among l
1988.ung himself prostrate and lifted up his soul in a strong cry to God that her penance
1989.d lifted up his soul in a strong cry to God that her penance and prayers might avai
1990. It was his first prayer, and a strange peace fell upon him, and a sentiment of humil
1991.air grown nearly white, and his stately form so bowed within a few it days, that peo
1992.ling music of Palestrina's Requiem, the soul-thrilling Dies Irce, and the prayers fo
1993.almost veiled the holy place, reminding one of the angel in John's vision, who stoo
1994.ed the holy place, reminding one of the angel in John's vision, who stood before the
1995. he * the saints. . . Or how the silent form under lilies, its velvet pall and was l
1996.this can be well imagined. But when the world, weary of a week's mourning and seclusi
1997.g ceremonies which had occupied them so many days, hastened from the Cathedral, when
1998.e saints which ascended before v. 3> 4- God from the hand of the angel." Apocalypse
1999.efore v. 3> 4- God from the hand of the angel." Apocalypse, 62 roof, THE MAD PENITENT
2000.ffin-lid of her whom he had so loved in life, he made another and holier vow than th
2001.he made another and holier vow than the one made years before at the feet of his de
2002.ving here they would separate until the judgment day; she was Heaven's own, ; and he fru
2003. in idyls of the every earthly hope and desire, of everything that could hold his and
2004.f he offered himself humbly to Almighty God, His to be moulded and fashioned as He
2005.whom his ambition, his prodigality, his love of splendor and his greed of wealth had
2006., his love of splendor and his greed of wealth had been known goods and distributed hi
2007.he poor and then^ dressed in rags, like one distraught, he haunted from his earlies
2008.ega- their former respect for the great man of Todi withheld them from anything out
2009.ay in silence, unheeding their insults. One day, like the prophet Jeremias who appe
2010.Jerusalem with a yoke about his neck, a symbol of her approaching captivity, the poor
2011. were a few who shouted in derision and many were touched and saddened as they behel
2012.d saddened as they beheld the miserable state to which his envied destiny had fallen.
2013.NT OF TODI. He is not mad/' said a holy man who knew ; he is doing penance." No, he
2014. was not mad, but so overwhelmed with a sense of the guilt and impenitence of his pas
2015.f the guilt and impenitence of his past life that he was willing to be as a fool and
2016.en, here in this city where, forgetting God, and setting holy things aside, he had
2017.nd here he would humiliate himself, and state make such poor reparation as he could f
2018.he spent profusely, and the stir of gay life that he kept us perpetually in, one way
2019.ay life that he kept us perpetually in, one way or another, the place has grown as
2020.ot alienate or dispose of as he had his other property, he bestowed the use of on a b
2021. give themselves, if need were, for the liberty of their brethren held in bondage by th
2022., " of his THE MAD PENITENT OF insanity will, ; TODI. 65 certainly for when he recov
2023.ertainly for when he recovers, as he he will not have a shelter for his head." But n
2024.ad." But none knew of Jacopone's hidden life, of to the sick and destitute how he we
2025.i Benedetti went abroad, and strangers, many of whom had witnessed his former splend
2026.them, feeling that for his sins and the time wasted in folly he deserved porter of i
2027. in folly he deserved porter of it all. One morning the the Franciscan Monastery ap
2028. hands into his loose sleeves. He was a man of holy, ascetic life, but looked upon
2029. sleeves. He was a man of holy, ascetic life, but looked upon all novelties as a del
2030.s/' answered the porter. " Very well. I will let him hear the Abbot's pleasure when
2031.y well. I will let him hear the Abbot's pleasure when I know it. Tell him so, Brother ;
2032.ee this mad beggar, for whom we pray as one of our benefactors. At any rate, by our
2033.things sometimes he may his coming, and evil. I may our Blessed in Lady of deliver u
2034. Montserrat, and come near dragging his soul to hell " ! By this time the Prior had
2035.r dragging his soul to hell " ! By this time the Prior had got to the Abbot's seated
2036.o enter. The Abbot was was a tall, dark man, with a strong face he which ; every li
2037.trong face he which ; every line told a history of conflict, and of a de- termined .wil
2038.ory of conflict, and of a de- termined .will, and of a nature held in check as with
2039., and of a de- termined .will, and of a nature held in check as with bit and bridle. H
2040.ance inquiring why he was interrupted " One is at unwonted hour. the gate, Reverend
2041.y prove a distraction thou sayest so ?" will I will him Name him/' he said briefly.
2042. a distraction thou sayest so ?" will I will him Name him/' he said briefly. " Jacop
2043. Prior. " Jacopone Bring him hither, my good Prior. Jacopone must never be kept wait
2044.e and church he so beautified " ! ; in 'time past ; and let me ' tell thee what I fe
2045.that when is Christ comes, ' some of us will be cast out of the as Kingdom will whil
2046.f us will be cast out of the as Kingdom will while the mad penitent, he known, be re
2047. ground in granting an interview with a man of whose eccentricities he had heard so
2048.of whose eccentricities he had heard so many marvels. The Abbot arose from his chair
2049. who saw him the rare perfection of his form and features, which the artists declare
2050.ch the artists declared came nearer the beauty of the ideal classic type than any they
2051.ice that trem- — bled with suppressed emotion, for on a figure of such utter humility
2052. be seated " he said. " If thou wilt, I will remain so it is more fitting, as I have
2053.it best pleases thee, my son ; but what God's holy name?" " Having fulfilled a vow,
2054.ilence, until the unseen monitor of his soul swiftly weighed the matter and gave him
2055.monitor of his soul swiftly weighed the matter and gave him speech. " My son, dost tho
2056.l who enter here have to learn the holy science of obedience?" he asked, his voice stea
2057.I know right well, lord Abbot ; it is a science. most desire to be dost thou taught,",
2058.ell, lord Abbot ; it is a science. most desire to be dost thou taught,", was the humru
2059. jewels on his gray, tangled beard. The good Abbot's impulse was to kneel beside the
2060. But he the supernatural virtues of the man. only said " : Be comforted, St. my son
2061.cis or out of such penitence I as thine will in the will consider end win heaven for
2062.f such penitence I as thine will in the will consider end win heaven for thee. thy a
2063.me go hither again on next Monday and I will make known in peace, the decision to th
2064.on next Monday and I will make known in peace, the decision to thee. Now, my son, and
2065.the Virgin ; abode in his heart neither time nor place ever drew the veil of forgetf
2066.ow she rewarded her servant at last the world knows, and will continue to know until
2067.er servant at last the world knows, and will continue to know until the sublime chan
2068.ION.) FIRST of all, as be imagined, the good Abbot laid his perplexities before Heav
2069.merly whom civil he had known as a rich man, a this dignitary, and. as a generous b
2070.w terrible a thing it would be to bring one into the Order of devotion, who by mad
2071.of devotion, who by mad eccentrici- and other singularities, would disturb the peace
2072. other singularities, would disturb the peace and regularity of the commuIn nity, and
2073.t be vouchsafed to him whereby the holy will of God would be made manifest, and fina
2074.chsafed to him whereby the holy will of God would be made manifest, and finally he
2075.w that his prayers would be answered in God's own time and way, for had He not prom
2076. prayers would be answered in God's own time and way, for had He not promised to giv
2077.or admission to the Order, and the case being a peculiar one he desired to hear what
2078.he Order, and the case being a peculiar one he desired to hear what they might have
2079.rejudice of his own, but solely for the good and well-being of the community and as
2080.s own, but solely for the good and well-being of the community and as he was a man wh
2081.-being of the community and as he was a man whose life was without guile, and whose
2082.the community and as he was a man whose life was without guile, and whose piety and
2083.o them all, his words had great weight. one and another discussed the question, and
2084.by the Abbot weighed equally. when each one had given an opinion, without offered c
2085.hed equally. when each one had given an opinion, without offered clearly ; 74 THE MAD P
2086.d at, an aged monk who had received the habit from the Blessed Francis himself, who h
2087.voice might utter, and almost awed that one so aged should seek to address them. "
2088.rive back from your gates this penitent soul whose madness, if madness ye think craz
2089.rks of penance, and because walked with God but does the world think now that he wa
2090.nd because walked with God but does the world think now that he was mad ? Beware, I s
2091. Beware, I say, of giving this penitent man a stone when in all humility he asks fo
2092. in all humility he asks for bread this man whose repentance is only equalled by th
2093.sert, until he grew to look like a wild animal, and was taken by hunters one day, and
2094.a wild animal, and was taken by hunters one day, and led by a rope around his neck,
2095. known his founder, of ! ' ; whom men ; state, but accepting his sins, until it it al
2096.who by a supernatural light behold what sin really is, and try to expiate theirs by
2097.ine, and feel that if they tried to all eternity they could never do it unaided by the m
2098.im whom their sins My lord pierced unto death upon the Cross? Abbot, in Christ's name
2099.me shut not the door upon this penitent soul, who seeks to complete here that which
2100.lete here that which he has with heroic courage begun. He is such an one as the blessed
2101.ith heroic courage begun. He is such an one as the blessed Francis would have taken
2102. almost as if they had sounded from the other world. Silence reigned, broken presentl
2103.t as if they had sounded from the other world. Silence reigned, broken presently by t
2104. Abbot " Brother Fidelis, thy words are good now let all who oppose lift up the righ
2105.as spoken, the lamplight, then fell. no one moved, until the Abbot, rising from his
2106.ng from his chair said " It is the holy will of God that Jacques dei Benedetti, know
2107.his chair said " It is the holy will of God that Jacques dei Benedetti, known as Ja
2108.n Lady Sorrows after Now, the brethren, peace." On Monday morning, first early Mass,
2109.the second Mass should begin, felt some one touch him upon the shoulder, and turnin
2110.m upon the shoulder, and turning he saw one of the servants of the monastery, who p
2111. him, meekly awaiting his blessing, the good monk could but think: " So our Divine L
2112.d, and the most abject of men, Isaias a Man of sorrows and acquainted with infirmit
2113.eemed Him not.' But I must remember the duty laid upon me by my I must try this man'
2114.duty laid upon me by my I must try this man's spirit by the Superiors rules of holy
2115. rules of holy obedience, and to begin, will see if 4 : : ; ; he be ready to *put as
2116.n he was nevertheless a true servant of God, zealous for His glory, and for that of
2117. monk as directed, he looked after " He will not look so crazy when him, thinking wi
2118.m, thinking with joy." : he gets on the habit, and has that wild, tangled beard taken
2119.hird century, which he was copying. Ah, good Prior! hadst thou known of the floods o
2120.s that had drenched that poor beard for many years^ and listened to the soul-touchin
2121.ard for many years^ and listened to the soul-touching prayers that had breathed thro
2122.rtainly not have despised it He had but one request to make when he entered his nov
2123. retain the name of Jacopone, it as the one best accepted suited to him, and all wa
2124.weetly obedient to author- ity, holy in life, that life if his and willing if need b
2125.ient to author- ity, holy in life, that life if his and willing if need be to give b
2126.by; 78 THE MAD PENITENT OF TODI. and as time went on he, without self-seeking, won f
2127. a strange, reverential After a certain time, when his vocation had been proved by t
2128.e himself priesthood, but filled with a sense of his unworthiness, he shrank tremblin
2129.s, he shrank trembling from so great an honor, and made his vows as a brother-servant
2130.sources, which seemed as far removed in one sense from the poor monk of St. Francis
2131.ces, which seemed as far removed in one sense from the poor monk of St. Francis as Ho
2132.oor monk of St. Francis as How Almighty God the East is from the West. fit to try H
2133.ays tell us. News came to the monastery one day that the Pope was dead, and that th
2134.s for the tiara proposed, and that each one had powerful support, within the Concla
2135.rowned heads, each of whom desired from one motive or another to have his choice el
2136.every morning to obtain the blessing of God upon the deliberations of the Conclave
2137.cribed, as the rest did. session of his mind, so that every breath was a prayer, and
2138.the night strong cries went up from his soul that Almighty God would come But how co
2139.ies went up from his soul that Almighty God would come But how could to the deliver
2140.endom of the suspense which held all in pain ? We shall see. At last, after a prolon
2141.ng, "for," said the people, " so holy a man must be the choice of Heaven!" But Jaco
2142." But Jacopone did not rejoice his very soul was stricken with sadness that a holy s
2143.f to overcome this strange solely whose mind, things, would fail ; anxiety that so b
2144. PENITENT OF " I TODI. 8 feared for his soul, lord Abbot, and my warn him," he repli
2145.ot, and my warn him," he replied, But I will obey thee henceforth." humbly. The abbo
2146.hem? Then re- membering Jacopone's holy life, he bethought him of the prophets of ol
2147.nd counsel them — and he rested ! the matter in the hands of God, praying that no wo
2148. he rested ! the matter in the hands of God, praying that no would come of it. Pope
2149.rigue daily brought to his notice, with other untold and wearisome duties, made his h
2150.y burden, so utterly was he unfitted to evil ! ; cope with the difficulties of his e
2151.such ; distractions — as him that his soul was tempest-tossed, and his mind confus
2152.at his soul was tempest-tossed, and his mind confused so with his meditations. Alas
2153.itations. Alas alas! would not Almighty God vouchsafe to him some sign by which he
2154. not Almighty God vouchsafe to him some sign by which he might know whether for his
2155. by which he might know whether for his soul's sake he might not lay down his heavy
2156.heavy cross, or whether it was His holy will that he should bear it to the end ? One
2157.ill that he should bear it to the end ? One afternoon, when the audiences, the wear
2158.rd, plead for attention, and for sake I will see what message it brings." the seal ;
2159.eamed from his eyes. The letter was the one written by Jacopone, that Jacopone of w
2160. in THE MAD PENITENT OF the desert from time to time, and TODI. 83 in eloquent and b
2161.MAD PENITENT OF the desert from time to time, and TODI. 83 in eloquent and burning w
2162.emplative seclusion of his cell for the government of Christendom, and bade him remember h
2163.y heart, came forth from thy mouth that will, that word which on thy neck laid a yok
2164.y neck laid a yoke heavy enough to make one dread thy damnation. Beware of incumben
2165.ad and re-read the letter. Was this the sign he had asked? Wrestling in prayer, with
2166.ssions he was called- — overcome by a sense of his the magnitude of the dangers fly
2167.tude of the dangers fly threatening his soul, he determined to without bet- Rome, le
2168.he tiara and the Chair of Peter to some one * These extracts from that remarkable l
2169.upon the Church. I, Abbot, but the holy will of God," answered Jacopone, humbly. " D
2170. Church. I, Abbot, but the holy will of God," answered Jacopone, humbly. " Do penan
2171.ce, do penance, until the Lord restores peace to Christendom by sending us a head aft
2172.r His own heart; and remember that thou art only a poor monk, who has no right to m
2173.great or small, outside the rule of thy life. Go in peace," replied the Abbot. Jacop
2174.ll, outside the rule of thy life. Go in peace," replied the Abbot. Jacopone never shr
2175. from penance it was the delight of his soul, in which he found peace. Yes, he would
2176. delight of his soul, in which he found peace. Yes, he would do penance joyfully, but
2177.ommotion presently subsided view of the necessity of electing another Pope, and after the
2178. moning him to appear at the bar of the Universal Council. The poor lay-brother of St. Fr
2179.d the bark of Peter was raised, had the evil fortune (how, or why, we are 86 THE MAD
2180.ed all the humility and patience of his soul to bear, and although hungering and thi
2181.tion bravely, willing to bear all, even death itself, submissive to the holy will of
2182.en death itself, submissive to the holy will of God, and even accepting with joy his
2183. itself, submissive to the holy will of God, and even accepting with joy his His im
2184.bitterly bewailing the sins of his past life, he found such peace and consolation as
2185.he sins of his past life, he found such peace and consolation as he had never known b
2186.e is called, spent the remainder of his life in prayer, mortifications and humility,
2187.s and humility, meditating, and writing many quaint poems full of a burning love of
2188.ing many quaint poems full of a burning love of God and a tender, compassionate love
2189. quaint poems full of a burning love of God and a tender, compassionate love for ma
2190.love of God and a tender, compassionate love for mankind. It is recorded that Alighi
2191.ot return He was now vor and his an old man, but his ardor and fer- spirit of penan
2192.nged, was here that not long before his death he composed that wonderful hymn to the
2193.that reads it does not feel the burning love and indeand it scribable penitence that
2194.ompassion for the Sor- by this penitent soul, the best part of whose life was spent
2195.s penitent soul, the best part of whose life was spent in meditating upon them? Who,
2196.tating upon them? Who, until the end of time, can listen to the sublime hymn without
2197.ot enter without some hesitation on the life of this extraordinary man, who passed f
2198.ation on the life of this extraordinary man, who passed from the cloister to the pr
2199.ainful as it is to dethe outline of the life of * Fjederick Ozanam* Professor at the
2200.be a period when the Church was passing war with the through Pope, the age fiery tr

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/