Concordance for The family.

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1.   tails/familyOOrich J% v/I^ <2t- ^/^ THE FAMILY, t^^ /^r^ BY <^>i?^^ REV. AUGUSTE RICHE
2. S. a reiace, , , • . • « • s The Family, / 18 before Jesus Christ, • The Fami
3. mily, / 18 before Jesus Christ, • The Family 21 Condition of the Family, ..... . . W
4. ist, • The Family 21 Condition of the Family, ..... . . Woman in the Pagan 33 Condit
5. 33 Condition of the Child in the Pagan Family, . , 47 55 The The Christian Family, Ch
6. gan Family, . , 47 55 The The Christian Family, Christian Woman, Family, . 77 The Chil
7. The Christian Family, Christian Woman, Family, . 77 The Child in the Christian 87 IO4
8. e Child in the Christian 87 IO4 132 The Family in Contemporary Society, Christianity,
9. Contemporary Society, Christianity, The Family without PREFACE. HE in most widely spre
10. as actually become a conviction in very many minds. this prejudice, 5 To combat and
11. by examining what society was the pagan world in regard to the particular question hi
12. ty was the pagan world in regard to the particular question his attention. which engaged H
13. ace, he studied society in present that state, still and demonstrated retains all it
14. eas are dogma, study worship — with a particular on the worship of the Virgin Mary and o
15. Virgin Mary and on virginity civil — man, the family, society or the state, and
16. ary and on virginity civil — man, the family, society or the state, and reli- gious
17. vil — man, the family, society or the state, and reli- gious society or the Church.
18. s on the religious orders and Christian art complete the plan. In his general intro
19. eed, the general character of his book. One not in reader. thing was, how ever, r t
20. that questions treated in sible under a form inacces- to certain classes of readers.
21. is book — amongst others, that of the family —and he did so with a all view to the
22. e its raised, Reverend Sir, to our holy religion a fine monument, sublime which has base
23. portions, in the worship in spirit and truth which she consecrates to its the glory
24. ich she consecrates to its the glory of God; admirable in- terior dispositions, in
25. faction she gives to all the wants of ; man, the family, and society its capital, i
26. he gives to all the wants of ; man, the family, and society its capital, in fine, in t
27. lied to the various conditions of human life ! With what clearness of perception, wh
28. our intentions, 14 to offer to Preface. God the expression of my this zeal. " grati
29. "Archbishop of Bordeaux!' Almost at the same time Bishop to Dupanloup wrote " It Abb
30. bishop of Bordeaux!' Almost at the same time Bishop to Dupanloup wrote " It Abbe Ric
31. hat you have broached in this work, and one of the most important that can be treat
32. been able to read of announces a grave will, I and not, lofty work, which doubt do
33. nd not, lofty work, which doubt do real good, and dispel more : 5 Preface. 1 than on
34. od, and dispel more : 5 Preface. 1 than one sad misconception, more than one prejud
35. 1 than one sad misconception, more than one prejudice. I hope, Reve- rend Sir, that
36. prejudice. I hope, Reve- rend Sir, that God will bless your do efforts, and that to
37. udice. I hope, Reve- rend Sir, that God will bless your do efforts, and that to the
38. r do efforts, and that to the this book will honor souls." Church and enlighten In a
39. efforts, and that to the this book will honor souls." Church and enlighten In another
40. you have made the object of your book. Many others it in our ; time have broached b
41. t of your book. Many others it in our ; time have broached before you f6 Preface. it
42. - With so vast a programme required the art of condensing, the secret of which you
43. the principles of doc- the teachings of history, the solutions of controversy. To those
44. innumerable recollec; to those who have will not read, will teach many things. Both
45. ollec; to those who have will not read, will teach many things. Both it one and the
46. hose who have will not read, will teach many things. Both it one and the other read
47. t read, will teach many things. Both it one and the other read with 7 Preface. the
48. teach many things. Both it one and the other read with 7 Preface. the 1 greater prof
49. face. the 1 greater profit it that they will read with pleasure, because you in have
50. ater profit it that they will read with pleasure, because you in have succeeded out bein
51. sure, because you in have succeeded out being dry. " being brief with- The passages y
52. you in have succeeded out being dry. " being brief with- The passages you have bor'
53. m prise my * Conferences sur- me by the honor you have as it done them. They are, wer
54. le. "Hh Henry, *, Bishop of Nimes." THE FAMILY. O WEVER perfect he is supposed to be,
55. fect he is supposed to be, theless, not Man is, never- complete whilst he possesses
56. e qualities and the virtues of personal life. On the in threshold of life he finds h
57. f personal life. On the in threshold of life he finds himself the family, and that s
58. threshold of life he finds himself the family, and that situation cret ates for less
59. those of the In fact, dividual. it the family is, as were, the heart of the great soc
60. it body. that forms, maintains, 18 The Family. and vivifies ; 19 indi- each particula
61. he Family. and vivifies ; 19 indi- each particular vidual and that work of individual in p
62. its result greatness and strength. The family : is composed of three elements the fat
63. l its relations, that its morality, the happiness of members, and the advantages they pro
64. ese different relations, first, was the state of the family in the ; ancient world se
65. relations, first, was the state of the family in the ; ancient world secondly, what w
66. he state of the family in the ; ancient world secondly, what was 20 The Family. the r
67. ancient world secondly, what was 20 The Family. the regeneration produced by Jesus Chr
68. dly, what is the actual position of the family under the in- fluence of Christianity l
69. on of the divinity of Jesus Christ. THE FAMILY BEFORE JESUS CHRIST, MARRIAGE IN PAGAN
70. MARRIAGE IN PAGAN ANTIQUITY. N order to form to ourselves a just idea of the family
71. TY. N order to form to ourselves a just idea of the family before Christianity, it i
72. to form to ourselves a just idea of the family before Christianity, it is al- ways its
73. age as well as at that period, in usin law, 2X two sorts of 22 marriages, The Fami
74. law, 2X two sorts of 22 marriages, The Family. the patrician and the plebeian marriag
75. by father, or guardian, in presence The Family. of five witnesses. this sale It is 23
76. real, since woman its sold was only an one of the but ef- smallest fects Roman coi
77. ly household furniture the use of which one would give up for a time. With that pow
78. he use of which one would give up for a time. With that power and those rights the m
79. those rights the most moderate use the man could make of them was But simply to re
80. that case she would not recover 24 The Family. liberty. her She only returned to her
81. se she would not recover 24 The Family. liberty. her She only returned to her fathers t
82. fathers tutelage or that of her nearest relation. As them. to slaves, we have elsewhere
83. edis- public the citizens became so The Family. justed with it, 25 and the population
84. stianity rendered them useless. Another cause of the dissolution of the family in anc
85. Another cause of the dissolution of the family in ancient times was divorce. In the th
86. arties last agreed together. was 26 The Family. that, thought standing where a good i,
87. Family. that, thought standing where a good i, uder- no longer existed, there was n
88. e the Romans had carried divorce to The Family. 27 tne most shameful lengths of im- mo
89. ons equal and it might be demand- ed by one or the other of the parties. Repudiatio
90. nd it might be demand- ed by one or the other of the parties. Repudiation was an slav
91. aration of the parties, who went 28 The Family. Qach their own way in consequence of t
92. the inter- vention of the ministers of religion was again necessary, because they alone
93. ty, annulment was extremely simple. the form of a sale, it Concluded in was nullifie
94. The wife had been, as the juriscon- The Family. suits said, 29 is mancipated ; that to
95. t necessarily had, in the limits of the law, an irrevocable character. it But In wa
96. d with took her, he left He her, and no one 30 The Family. to call had a right him
97. her, he left He her, and no one 30 The Family. to call had a right him to account res
98. mally pleaded such separations. So much being said, it must be remarked that divorce
99. ge. Under the reign of the emperors The Family. there were families of say, 3 many wom
100. e Family. there were families of say, 3 many women of the first Rome who might, so t
101. r husit bands and happened to more than one husband, on returning home in after a l
102. house only the wife of anEvidently, as other. Martial ob- served, the woman who marr
103. al ob- served, the woman who married so many law. times and so easily was not : marr
104. - served, the woman who married so many law. times and so easily was not : married
105. ch moreover, quite at their ease 32 The Family. regard was the conduct of the patricia
106. her when and men like Maecenas, Cicero, other grave personages, were sub- sequently s
107. were sub- sequently seen to act in this man- ner with the same facility, people tho
108. y seen to act in this man- ner with the same facility, people thought themselves suf
109. mity, or simply satiety, was enough The Family. to 33 cause divorce or repudiation* No
110. y satiety, was enough The Family. to 33 cause divorce or repudiation* Now, with such
111. iage, and consequently no more debauch. family. It was a universal CONDITION OF THE WO
112. ently no more debauch. family. It was a universal CONDITION OF THE WOMAN IN THE PAGAN FAM
113. sal CONDITION OF THE WOMAN IN THE PAGAN FAMILY. What we may is have hitherto said of t
114. hat we may is have hitherto said of the state of the woman in marriage already give u
115. he woman in marriage already give us an idea of her ; abasement and degradation but
116. ive traditions, which blamed the 34 The Family. as the cause of the original it woman
117. which blamed the 34 The Family. as the cause of the original it woman fall ; but cer
118. onsidered as it woman that the equal of man, and in even placed her a degree of inf
119. ute- where and always under the lage of man. in Before her marriage, the family, sh
120. age of man. in Before her marriage, the family, she was the property of her father, an
121. of her father, and consequently un- The Family. 35 der a tutelage which no majority de
122. r. had, however, the title of mother of family, even children ; when she had no title
123. erely signified that she was 36 the The Family. mother of the slaves of the In fact as
124. ther of the slaves of the In fact as in law, she herself. house. was never mistress
125. htea, of own children. For the rest, in one case as in the other, she was deprived
126. en. For the rest, in one case as in the other, she was deprived of the right of prope
127. exorable subjection of the woman to the man ceased not even at the death of the hus
128. woman to the man ceased not even at the death of the husband. Be- fore his death the
129. the death of the husband. Be- fore his death the latter had a right The Family. to g
130. re his death the latter had a right The Family. to give his wife a tutor of his $7 own
131. id their that she shared in dependence, relation to those under whose lived, guardianshi
132. and consequently her. was denied fine, life In the woman passed her whole in the sl
133. fe In the woman passed her whole in the slavery of man. The property of her father befo
134. oman passed her whole in the slavery of man. The property of her father before 38 T
135. he property of her father before 38 The Family. her marriage, the property of her husb
136. she passed from hand to hand, like any other property, and she could belong to all s
137. without ever belonging to her- In this state of personal abase- ment, it is easy to
138. perate she found no indemnity ; and, as other compensation within her reach than that
139. n within her reach than that of sensual pleasure, it was not surprising that she should
140. rush into it with avidity. This was The Family. precisely 39 what happened. Luxury whe
141. ent in voluptuousness, these became the life grand business of with the wo- man of c
142. the life grand business of with the wo- man of civilized antiquity. is And, as even
143. slave of her husband or in took a cruel pleasure exercising slaves her tyranny over subj
144. a cruel pleasure exercising slaves her tyranny over subject to her. the who were Even
145. cesses of this kind were carried in the world of pagan not attempt to women. We shall
146. t to women. We shall remove the veil of history that hides 4Q so The Family. much corru
147. he veil of history that hides 4Q so The Family. much corruption. in The heart heaves w
148. f the most reliable historians ? In the time of the public a law Roman re- had been
149. istorians ? In the time of the public a law Roman re- had been passed for- bidding
150. nts chariots, of divers ; and games but law Oppia was obliged to yield to the ever
151. selves, women gave themselves up to The Family. 41 the most frantic excesses of luxury
152. luxury. A free woman devoted her whole time to dress, banquets, and diversions ; an
153. i- natural defects and give ficial some beauty. Besides these there were ornamenters w
154. mmand a whole troop of slaves, it whose duty was to drive her chariot, to carry her,
155. iot, to carry her, to follow and 42 The Family. and to run to precede her, any and eve
156. r, any and every where at the slightest sign of her will or her caprice. It was said
157. very where at the slightest sign of her will or her caprice. It was said proverbiall
158. s ! A all prompt and instantly terrible punishment reminded them of them. tation that was
159. en went so far as to She throw her* The Family. self 43 them, upon them and her strike
160. to chastise easily. •so them the more Many as to even carried cruelty far have pub
161. post or hung up by the hair and 44 The Family. that undet* their own eyes, and whilst
162. nder the emperors, publicly without any one raising his voice to denounce such infa
163. em Con- only as mere exaggerations. The Family. science had nothing to do in 45 the ma
164. only as mere exaggerations. The Family. science had nothing to do in 45 the matter, nor
165. ly. science had nothing to do in 45 the matter, nor justice neither. It was a caprice
166. had nothing to do in 45 the matter, nor justice neither. It was a caprice that had pass
167. o the usages of a people others who had many refinements of more monstrous. all With
168. , as well as their wrists, they 4.6 The Family. like wore golden bracelets fashioned s
169. egradation. She was so dethat by public opinion itself dedis- bauchery had become guste
170. who was created to be the companion of man was no longer thought worthy of being e
171. of man was no longer thought worthy of being even the sport of his passions. And in
172. assions. And in so it came to pass that man himself came to prostitute himself her
173. had CONDITION OF THE CHILD IN THE PAGAN FAMILY. 5gj{Y the condition of the woit man is
174. FAMILY. 5gj{Y the condition of the woit man is in the pagan family easy to imagine
175. ndition of the woit man is in the pagan family easy to imagine what fate must have bee
176. n the pagan family easy to imagine what fate must have been the child. It of the was
177. her slave, over whom In the head of the family exerfull cised the right of ownership.
178. its fathers feet. If the 48 latter The Family. took it up, it was understood and cons
179. , that he recognized to preserve its it life. it on the it contrary, he left his fee
180. ed, the unfortunate crealittle ture had chance of any other hunger, or fate than to di
181. unate crealittle ture had chance of any other hunger, or fate than to die of cold or
182. ture had chance of any other hunger, or fate than to die of cold or be devoured by d
183. . from public In the best conditions of family The Family. life 49 the child so remain
184. ic In the best conditions of family The Family. life 49 the child so remained the pro-
185. e best conditions of family The Family. life 49 the child so remained the pro- perty
186. was nowise accountable for fact, to the law In the use he made of him. the paternal
187. as slaves, and also to even have put to death, chough they had occupied the very high
188. c. We may add that this absolute 50 The Family. father over his child to the in it pow
189. ve in to some equivocal prothe which no one heeded life. affairs of " As to the Rom
190. me equivocal prothe which no one heeded life. affairs of " As to the Roman Sex- legi
191. f " As to the Roman Sex- legislators in particular," says tus Empiricus, " they had render
192. until they had emancipated them, in the same way that they emancipat- ed their slave
193. hey emancipat- ed their slaves." In the time of the emperors, it is true, the rigor
194. ue, the rigor of the ancient legis- The Family. lation 5 1 was softened by some laws r
195. was accord- ance with the ideas of the time, people easily shut their eyes, and so
196. ficent laws in favor of children 52 Thz Family. still the father had his the right to
197. his abuse of paternal the extension the law gave, as tc the persons subject to it.
198. re, born of the marriage of sons or The Family, grandsons. It 53 reached even to daugh
199. ons. It 53 reached even to daughters-in-law, married or emancipated, who thus becam
200. the grand-daughters of their fathqrs-in-law. The law could not recognize the author
201. -daughters of their fathqrs-in-law. The law could not recognize the authority of a
202. t recognize the authority of a son in a family over his wife and children, because, te
203. under that of her father. With the full liberty of divorce, this 54 The Family. union h
204. he full liberty of divorce, this 54 The Family. union had no other security for stabil
205. vorce, this 54 The Family. union had no other security for stability than the caprice
206. slaves, subject, body and goods, to the despotism of the husband or father. In a word, wo
207. the his house. antiquity, Such was the family when Jesus Christ ap- peared on earth.
208. ist ap- peared on earth. TH£ CHRISTIAN FAMILY. CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE. HE dissolution of
209. RISTIAN MARRIAGE. HE dissolution of the family as well as the servitude of the woman a
210. the woman and all, the child under the despotism of the man, came, above from the vices
211. l, the child under the despotism of the man, came, above from the vices and abuses
212. principles, which 55 He Himself 56 The Family. consecrated by His authority, namely,
213. need of placing under the protection of religion the union of man and woman, and had a r
214. the protection of religion the union of man and woman, and had a religious ceremony
215. made it a sacrament. " Husbands," wrote one of His apostles to the Ephesians, " lov
216. one of His apostles to the Ephesians, " love your wives, as Christ also loved the Ch
217. th his wife, loveth himself. his For no man ever hated but nourisheth as also it ow
218. embers of His and ot His flesh, His The Family. bones. 57 For this cause shall a man l
219. esh, His The Family. bones. 57 For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother
220. amily. bones. 57 For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall
221. e to his wife, and they shall be two in one : flesh. This is a \ great sacrament bu
222. s sacramental union and it not only the man who it is elevated by the grace of the
223. man * Ephes. shares v. 25. in an 58 The Family. Doubtless the the is equal measure. ma
224. ly. Doubtless the the is equal measure. man remains always head of the the woman, a
225. the hus- band is in this respect in the same is is condition.f Hence the wife no his
226. wife no his longer the slave of sister man ; ; she it and companion dignity and is
227. at * Ephes. v. 23. t 1 Cor. vii. 4. The Family. the Church self. is 59 to Jesus Christ
228. 9 to Jesus Christ Him- What ! a type of love and re- spect The unity of marriage was
229. pect The unity of marriage was a second principle which flowed quite naturally from the s
230. nning, marriage single was the union of one with one single woman. man example of b
231. rriage single was the union of one with one single woman. man example of bigamy tha
232. the union of one with one single woman. man example of bigamy that historically The
233. t was given by Lamech. deluge After the God allowed a plurality of wives, but is no
234. institution in this respect. The 60 The Family. reasons which had previously justified
235. n. And at the coming of the Messiah the world a in multitude of peoples every stage o
236. tised tradition, it on the authority of custom, and law. was these depraved nations Je
237. ion, it on the authority of custom, and law. was these depraved nations Jesus Chris
238. Him whether to put it was lawful for a man away his wife for every : cause, He ans
239. ful for a man away his wife for every : cause, He answered them " Have ye not read th
240. hem " Have ye not read that He who made man from the beginning made them male The F
241. n from the beginning made them male The Family. and female ? cause, shall : 6 And He s
242. made them male The Family. and female ? cause, shall : 6 And He said For this a man l
243. cause, shall : 6 And He said For this a man leave father and shall mother, and shal
244. his wife, and they two therefore be in one flesh ; now they are not two, but one f
245. n one flesh ; now they are not two, but one flesh." * They shall be two in one sing
246. but one flesh." * They shall be two in one single flesh; two, and not more. Jesus
247. hrist, therefore, wulled that the wife, man could have but one single according to
248. ulled that the wife, man could have but one single according to the observation of
249. ver, in too well justified —moreto by other considerations taken the order of natur
250. other considerations taken the order of nature —not be at * St, Matt. xix. 4, and fo
251. t. xix. 4, and following verses. 62 The Family. if least understood, not respected in
252. indissolubility of marriage. This third principle was so repulsive to independence, and t
253. He made accepted by the whole Christian world. The a very same day on which the Phari
254. y the whole Christian world. The a very same day on which the Pharisees came to ask
255. which the Pharisees came to ask Him if man some could put away his wife for grave
256. ed to : them but that the two were make one flesh, He added " What therefore God ha
257. ke one flesh, He added " What therefore God hath joined together, The Family. let 6
258. therefore God hath joined together, The Family. let 63 " no man put asunder." Pharisee
259. oined together, The Family. let 63 " no man put asunder." Pharisees Why then," aske
260. . xix. 3, r,nd following verses. 64 The Family. This doctrine was clear and posi> tive
261. recurred " on another occasion. Every- one," said He, " that putteth his wife, awa
262. such 10, Luke xvi. 18. t 1 Cor. n : The Family. 65 formal declarations* no answer coul
263. ght, as well as sanctity unity and I by virtue of the sacrament. St. * This passage fr
264. legitimate separation. Now, the 66 The Family. The theory was easy, we shall it be a
265. sy, we shall it be a told; but does not history give practical denial in fact ? What ha
266. e who, having put away his wife for any cause whatever, even that of adultery, marrie
267. that he forbidden to marry another The Family 6y Has provoked more than objections. I
268. rdance of Paul the ; quoted above: "The man bound by lives law of marriage while he
269. ; quoted above: "The man bound by lives law of marriage while her husband she marry
270. age while her husband she marry another life, if during her husband's See ii. she sh
271. t ^ vol. p. 671, No. 1,065. 68 all The Family. the force of his authority, and in the
272. ra- ment of marriage was accepted as an honor done to humanity, and the natural incli
273. f which they had been the V object. The Family 69 The unity of marriage prevailed like
274. cendency throughout the whole Christian world that it not only destroyed simultaneous
275. d even to minish successive polygamy by particular decrees, doubtless exagger- ated, but w
276. The indissolubility of marriage yo The Family. barrier that was the most restrained t
277. ey have often attacked it fiercely, and many a desperate effort they have made to it
278. im or her or who is no longer worthy of love esteem? Why to live should in we be who
279. ? Why, should Jesus Christ and His The Family. Church be more severe spect than all ?
280. and a multitude of others fell like so many accusations and indis- protestations so
281. indis- protestations solubility, on the law of and they insolently de- manded erful
282. tself was ing on the ruins of the pagan world, to whose instincts some sa- J2 tisfact
283. ts some sa- J2 tisfaction nally, in The Family. ought to be given. Fi- modern times, s
284. ertain times, and in certain countries, particular churches ap- pear to have tolerated leg
285. ation which authorized for it, and of a custom which had ages become general, one can
286. a custom which had ages become general, one can The Family, J$ understand that thos
287. ch had ages become general, one can The Family, J$ understand that those churches did
288. uthority with the It utmost caution and prudence. was a condescension to the weak- ness
289. as all defended them against Summing up history on this 74 question, at these The Famil
290. story on this 74 question, at these The Family. we arrive incontestably : three conclu
291. the Church constantly main- tained the law of indissolubility and regulated the ri
292. of marriage new due attacks of heresy, revolution ; philosophy, and efforts is and to her
293. new due attacks of heresy, revolution ; philosophy, and efforts is and to her the definiti
294. d to her the definitive triumph of that principle which existed in the begin- The Family.
295. inciple which existed in the begin- The Family. ning, 75 re- and which Jesus Christ es
296. ore # Christianity done nothing for the family than to give for bases to marriage the
297. s, in woman ceased to be the sport ; of man's caprice she resumed her place in the
298. 's caprice she resumed her place in the family with the dignity ? which became her; an
299. ves snatched away from the care and the education of the au- h /6 The Family. Nevertheles
300. e and the education of the au- h /6 The Family. Nevertheless, thors of their being. Je
301. he Family. Nevertheless, thors of their being. Jesus Christ did not confine to this r
302. e- claring that all are equal in before God, and brethren Jesus Christ, His Son, wi
303. was evidently going to the root of the evil, its and destroying, at base, the slave
304. evil, its and destroying, at base, the slavery of woman. But, independently of that ge
305. eneral doctrine, the 11 Redeemer yS The Family. all, of the world chose, amongst a wom
306. 11 Redeemer yS The Family. all, of the world chose, amongst a woman who was to be Hi
307. ter tua! Behold your Mother And mankind love left received, indeed, with and it resp
308. espect, the inheritance ; by the Son of God and it The Family. found that in giving
309. eritance ; by the Son of God and it The Family. found that in giving- to the 79 Mother
310. eration and affection it owed her it as being also its own Mother, included thus in t
311. so its own Mother, included thus in the same respect and the same love the entire se
312. cluded thus in the same respect and the same love the entire sex to which she belong
313. d thus in the same respect and the same love the entire sex to which she belonged. s
314. to which she belonged. still How could man have it despised woman, when was a woma
315. t despised woman, when was a woman whom God had chosen to make Himself man like him
316. man whom God had chosen to make Himself man like him, and that it was also a woman
317. is per- sonal example. During the years life of His public He allowed wo- 8o The Fam
318. ife of His public He allowed wo- 8o The Family. to follow men Him in His journey- ing
319. cent woman He wished to raise up by His justice: His mercy extended even to the sinful
320. sinful and repentant woman and, that no one might be mistaken as to the degree in w
321. - stated her, He gave marks of very The Family. special 8 the sinful predilection it t
322. day before was to be at the foot of her good Master s cross — the so sins day afte
323. so sins day after her conversion, when many were disciples had fled trembling; and
324. d fled trembling; and even now, behold, many forgiven her because she loved much.* T
325. St service vii. of the Luke 47. 82 The Family. followed them. women who went so They
326. hey began grow* they had especially the honor of seconding the priests in helping the
327. ch vaunted and deeds Greeks Romans. The Family. 83 seen Then were Christian wives gain
328. hen were Christian wives gaining to the religion of Christ the hearts of their husbands
329. ows consecrate to the practice of their good works the remainder of life. Then did y
330. ce of their good works the remainder of life. Then did young maidens give to live in
331. id young maidens give to live in the up family joys honor of virginity and in the serv
332. dens give to live in the up family joys honor of virginity and in the service of all
333. women who, although reduced to exterior slavery, com- manded the respect and admiration
334. an empethe had to grant to woman 84 The Family. which paganism her. It legal emancipat
335. on had always denied was only an act of justice and of reparation. Hence this emancipat
336. ciples volved no such consequences. The Family, was by an inversion of that Christian
337. consecration of which the great social revolution had commenced This is three centuries b
338. centuries before. what those per- sons will not understand who accuse Constantine a
339. is accounts for the existence of 86 The Family. laws even in Roman are our own days. T
340. , and those last as long &s that divine religion."* sur la * " Reeherches Condition ii.
341. el. ch. vii. THE CHILD IN THE CHRISTIAN FAMILY. 5 €Sf: HE one wife to was not the on
342. LD IN THE CHRISTIAN FAMILY. 5 €Sf: HE one wife to was not the only be reinstated
343. ly be reinstated Beside her in the 8 %M family. and with her there was the child, that
344. and with her there was the child, that other slave of antiquity, of whom will, the f
345. that other slave of antiquity, of whom will, the father might dispose at and over l
346. l, the father might dispose at and over life whom he had the right of People have of
347. had the right of People have often and death. spoken of the reinstatement of the chi
348. an doctrines, but they have 88 not, The Family. perhaps, traced as they ought its that
349. here that it is seen to commence with a principle re- of dignity and a character of spect
350. character of spect which only required time to develop itself in order to arrive at
351. d, first, we see in Jesus Christ taking pleasure children. being amongst around braces H
352. Jesus Christ taking pleasure children. being amongst around braces He lets them come
353. sus with these keeps. them near Him The Family. sweet 89 the little words : " Suffer c
354. to me: he for of such is the kingdom of God." calls * Another child, time a in litt
355. kingdom of God." calls * Another child, time a in little and, placing Him " the. I m
356. hall receive heaven. And little he that one such child in my little r name, receive
357. ut he that shalh ones better scandalize one of these that believe in me, *St. it w
358. me, *St. it w ere Markx. 14. 90 for The Family. him that a mill-stone his should be ha
359. he sea. See that little you despise not one of these ones ; for I say to you, that
360. is in heaven."* first was assuredly the time that the child was heard in spoken of t
361. that of the dignity of to the was made world by the Saviour Jesus. * St. Matt, xviii
362. St. Matt, xviii. 2, and following. The Family. But what strengthened trine in practic
363. istered to them, never- theless, at any time that ; their life was in danger and the
364. ever- theless, at any time that ; their life was in danger and the practice thus, of
365. made of a new-born infant a child a of God and of His Church, creature 92 The Fami
366. God and of His Church, creature 92 The Family. ransomed by the blood of Jesus Christ,
367. nnocence of it He was, as were, an that angel of God. frail Not only was creature no
368. of it He was, as were, an that angel of God. frail Not only was creature no longer
369. t of getting rid of it by exposition or death, but it was surrounded by a ship; in it
370. its breast veneration, a tabernacle The Family. consecrated by the 93 grace of the sac
371. h was fulfilled ; from the day on which God gave Himself to man in the person of a
372. om the day on which God gave Himself to man in the person of a Son of in Man, and w
373. elf to man in the person of a Son of in Man, and was born ness of infancy fine, ; t
374. ; the weakin from the day, when little God might be babe in seen as a the arms of
375. sus Christ, when they had adored 94 The Family. in His Saviour fancy ; the graces of i
376. regard to childhood that customs should change, and the child take the place that belo
377. cipated by marriage, and became the The Family. dependent head of a not family. 95 He
378. the The Family. dependent head of a not family. 95 He only exercised the authority a h
379. the authority a husband, but the in of law also paternal in his in- recognised aut
380. hority default; him it the and was only death, —after replace his for stance in —
381. is children: This is not all. Under the same was influence a grave modification made
382. cation made in the Roman legislation in relation to children whose parents conditions. b
383. ifferent the rigor of the ancient child law, in the was always : placed the worst c
384. ry was thenceforth the case. The 96 The Family. union of serfs and the daughten of col
385. the of colonists free with daughters of liberty for parents procured the children born
386. gressive movement towards and political liberty. As rents to the barbarous custom be- f
387. ical liberty. As rents to the barbarous custom be- fore mentioned, to which allowed pa
388. f to attacking it indirectly by the The Family. respect, ligious 97 reit . the dignity
389. itings of bishops, and by most eloquent other side, apologists. legislation On itself
390. a deserted child had been taken by a no one could ever not even its third person, a
391. it, father, and that the 98 latter The Family. should be for ever deprived of paterna
392. n this dared against not the go further custom of exposing deeplylater, children, so g
393. ng an which compelled every father of a family to support his children, un- der pain o
394. family to support his children, un- der pain of death to whoever edict should expose
395. o support his children, un- der pain of death to whoever edict should expose them. a
396. till, under the influence of the ideas. same Christian and his Constantine successor
397. onstantine successors restrained by The Family. 99 law the excessive power of fathers
398. successors restrained by The Family. 99 law the excessive power of fathers over the
399. g on their natural Thus the head of the family was always honored and respected by his
400. new laws under the action of ioo v The Family. was that Christianity made in re- gard
401. elves to regulate their position in the family and in society, and, to that end, their
402. retained the chil- even at the present time dren were placed under a canopy in Holy
403. reparation which made natural chil- The Family. dren legitimate by placing juridically
404. il power, the and, under His influence, family was soon found to be its regenerated. H
405. laws. The woman remained subject to the man within certain limits, which are ; only
406. rtain limits, which are ; only those of nature but her weak- ness was no longer abused
407. ness was no longer abused. As a 102 The Family. daughter, she was respected by her par
408. her sex person of the Virgin Mother of God. side On the other Christian childhood
409. f the Virgin Mother of God. side On the other Christian childhood derived the same ad
410. e other Christian childhood derived the same advantages and the privileges from the
411. s and the privileges from the influence same and # the protection of the Child- God
412. same and # the protection of the Child- God The Family. 10 And thus it was that Chr
413. # the protection of the Child- God The Family. 10 And thus it was that Christianity c
414. r, mother, and child, har- monized them one with the other in their mutual relation
415. d child, har- monized them one with the other in their mutual relations, and placed t
416. their mutual relations, and placed the family on a new basis. THE FAMILY IN CONTEMPOR
417. d placed the family on a new basis. THE FAMILY IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY. FTER eighteen
418. FTER eighteen centuries of progressive labor under the action of Christianity, the f
419. r under the action of Christianity, the family ought nificent now to present a if magh
420. such In this field not the the case. of family, with all the good seed sown his by Jes
421. t the the case. of family, with all the good seed sown his by Jesus Christ and in de
422. 4 the has been sown Men, jealous of The Family. the 105 good effected by the Gospel, s
423. own Men, jealous of The Family. the 105 good effected by the Gospel, stifle ; have e
424. l, stifle ; have endeavored to grasp of evil it in the doctrines and hence come the
425. it in the doctrines and hence come the many miseries and the many world. pollutions
426. nd hence come the many miseries and the many world. pollutions which even now blight
427. nce come the many miseries and the many world. pollutions which even now blight the f
428. d. pollutions which even now blight the family in the Christian And the yet, notwithst
429. anding all the efforts of the spirit of evil against Christian family, the head of t
430. of the spirit of evil against Christian family, the head of that family, the father, h
431. inst Christian family, the head of that family, the father, has remained in what Chris
432. conjugal in the power, as they existed world, have in become so impossible the custo
433. sible the customs that of the Christian world people do not even 106 The Family. of d
434. istian world people do not even 106 The Family. of dream recurring to them it by avowe
435. lute power which he in formerly had the family, the Gospel had given him an authority
436. t from of the the day on which the head family laid down of his own accord The Family.
437. family laid down of his own accord The Family. that sceptre 107 which Jesus Christ ha
438. day when he would only and by reason by nature fell —then he like a dethroned king.
439. ing. The outrageous abuses of the pagan family were no longer allowed -him, and he los
440. longer allowed -him, and he lost at the same time the only authority possible to now
441. r allowed -him, and he lost at the same time the only authority possible to now him
442. in in fact, do we not see forgetful too many families of Christianity? Having lost h
443. ng lost his Chris- tian rights over his family, he who ought to be its head endeavors
444. he theories of reason, the instincts of nature. He struggles, 108 finally, The Family.
445. nature. He struggles, 108 finally, The Family. by all human means But against the rev
446. What, that the then, is the result? the family head of as he becomes as pagan can in t
447. g is privacy of home, a day sure to The Family. « 109 come when succeed their in the
448. when succeed their in the slaves of the family breaking the chain of it bondage; and t
449. dage; and then is that to the wise tian life, arrangement of Chrisafterwards, to and
450. ngement of Chrisafterwards, to and, the despotism of authority, inevitably succeeds a com
451. eds a complete anarchy. In this new its state the pilot as a family is directed by ba
452. y. In this new its state the pilot as a family is directed by bark with- out a helm. t
453. rected by bark with- out a helm. there. God is no longer about Everything drifts wi
454. t order and without subordination. That family is no longer is a body of which the hus
455. art, and the children the limbs. ; Each one is, wants as it to be the head the hear
456. heart ; were, paralyzed and the no The Family. to limbs refuse obey. The hus- band ha
457. father his wife, over his children, any other rights than those which the law externa
458. , any other rights than those which the law externally secures to him. ternally the
459. s to him. ternally there is In- no more law, no more principle, no more authority,
460. nally there is In- no more law, no more principle, no more authority, is whose exercise r
461. ty, is whose exercise respected. The in family then resembles one of those little stat
462. respected. The in family then resembles one of those little states whose subjects a
463. ity, and yet keeping at their head as a matter of form the phan- tom of a sovereign. f
464. et keeping at their head as a matter of form the phan- tom of a sovereign. families
465. of a sovereign. families there are How many live in just who such a way ! How many
466. many live in just who such a way ! How many who that seem, outwardly, to enjoy unin
467. inter- rupted harmony, and inwardly The Family. in writhe in the desperate convulsions
468. first of Chris- would seem that r 1 The Family. the lightness of her education, the se
469. at r 1 The Family. the lightness of her education, the sensuality of her habits, the capr
470. from the Gospel. Well, no. still Wosees man, considered as such, mans strength bow
471. ; and woe to the dare to insult ! rash man who would the modesty of her virginity
472. she had and, even undergo in pri- X The Family. vate humiliations bitter 113 that woul
473. tions bitter 113 that would emstill her life, she would re- ceive outwardly those ma
474. e no has whitened longer with she is is same sentiment But none may regarded. forget
475. n her brow and the triple crown of age, experience. it trial, And, on these titles, is som
476. feet. It is almost veneration. 't ! And man is yet it must be acknowher personality
477. the ledged that in no longer degree of honor where the religion of Jesus 1 14 The Fa
478. in no longer degree of honor where the religion of Jesus 1 14 The Family. ; Christ had
479. or where the religion of Jesus 1 14 The Family. ; Christ had placed her and it is by h
480. and, in antagonism, the predominance of soul over body. realized the type of Then is
481. truly woman as por- trayed by the Wise Man, under il : divine inspiration She hath
482. hand to and stretched out her hands The Family. poor. 1 15 Strength and beauty are her
483. nds The Family. poor. 1 15 Strength and beauty are her clothing, and she shall laugh i
484. atter day. She hath opened her mouth to wisdom, and the law of clemency is on her tong
485. ath opened her mouth to wisdom, and the law of clemency is on her tongue. She hath
486. is her. is Favor vain : deceitful, and beauty the woman shall cially that feareth the
487. xi. 17, and following verses. i ; 6 The Family. strong cross at become Christ's the fo
488. s, effeminacy in manners and customs of life. is Here certainly what characterizes t
489. aracterizes the woman of our days. Some will try to justify this femi- The Family. n
490. Some will try to justify this femi- The Family. nine indolence of 117 and inactivity b
491. 117 and inactivity by and be feebleness constitution bodily debility; but we should the much
492. elieve that is the effeminacy of the it soul that enervates it body. Howin ever may
493. ength. Lulled in the sen- suality of an education without energy, accustomed to lavish ex
494. an exaggerated toilet, the woman of the world begins by feeling her physical strength
495. yzed within her, and shrinking 1 18 The Family. sacrifice. from any sort of that is Bu
496. any sort of that is But is not all. The soul weighed down, and sinks with the senses
497. ks with the senses in that heaviness of matter the ; mind rejects great thoughts, ; th
498. enses in that heaviness of matter the ; mind rejects great thoughts, ; the heart gen
499. er- haps, in the reading that feeds the mind and heart of Behold her daily tions ; t
500. her of ness and the uselessness her The Family. life, 1 19 if she be a woman of the wo
501. ess and the uselessness her The Family. life, 1 19 if she be a woman of the world, f
502. ly. life, 1 19 if she be a woman of the world, free and independent. evenings frivolo
503. man requires long rest. Hence for every one has been at work several hours when she
504. es on getting up. that It is she has no time to pray as It is she ought. too late. A
505. ning, to begin again as on the 1 20 The Family. day previous. day, So passes day week,
506. lides after after week ; after year and life so away the whole world. of this woman
507. ; after year and life so away the whole world. of this woman of the As to the woman Y
508. ingers but what does she do for for her mind, her heart, in those long days of toil
509. hing, or almost nothing. After physical labor she has need of recruiting her strength
510. ion, and she gathers on her way through life some transient enjoyments. After The Fa
511. fe some transient enjoyments. After The Family, that she has no other wants. 121 And s
512. ents. After The Family, that she has no other wants. 121 And so life, pass away her y
513. that she has no other wants. 121 And so life, pass away her youth and her deception,
514. man of the people, that woman in of the world, light far I regard them Gospel. . the
515. ly in longer esteemed proportion to the love^ ; bestowed on them is and, when love e
516. e love^ ; bestowed on them is and, when love extinguished by habit and the is frosts
517. them is and, when love extinguished by habit and the is frosts of age, there no long
518. rosts of age, there no longer a 122 The Family. crown on the head of these women. It T
519. far as Christianity has influenced the family. Christian To-day, as ages, in the firs
520. To-day, as ages, in the first when the family remains child is faithful to Jesus Chri
521. hrist, the as considered the visible is angel of the hearth, and he spected as re- mu
522. istianity only there in theory —-then life it is the pagan and natural again the t
523. hence two exaggera- tions in a contrary sense, but both breaking in on the Christian
524. the former case, the by weak- 1 24 The Family. becomes the victim of force in ness, a
525. r, is it not still ? the victim of that family idolatry You make a ridiculous of your
526. for is up, as were, on a pedeto all the world all. admire. This not In order to deins
527. re quickly vanity and sions all its its other pas- — in order to embalm with an inc
528. te still — you that its make child; a world proportionate to the inclinations its a
529. nclinations its age and the of balls, a world with The theatres, its Fam ily. its 125
530. Fam ily. its 125 banquets, matinees ; a world that turns gives it its head, and a dis
531. one in T Instead of stifling that young nature that inclinations therein, were budding
532. have excited ; the insatiable passions will and now can you find that nothing 1 26
533. satisfy them. table consequence of this education, it will come to pass that nothing ; ca
534. table consequence of this education, it will come to pass that nothing ; can please
535. that nothing ; can please your children will that they ask of you impossible things
536. they ask of you impossible things they will accuse you injustice that of ty- ranny
537. their whims and fancies. Then down they will set themlife selves as victims of the f
538. ves as victims of the for you have made will them. They will grow discouraged, and e
539. f the for you have made will them. They will grow discouraged, and elsewhere end by
540. where end by seeking in —perchance of vice the independence emotions, shameful nei
541. s Is not that what we see every day The Family. around those us ? 127 And whence come
542. ace falls that and the desolation of so many families? From is the fact that Jesus ;
543. cting on the actual condi- tions of the family in general, medi- tating on the superio
544. y tains over the its it still re- pagan family, and on decline, also, when compared wi
545. also, when compared with ages, that the family of more Christian all we have often tho
546. all we have often thought that 128 The Family. all good and that evil are equally exi
547. often thought that 128 The Family. all good and that evil are equally exit plained
548. that 128 The Family. all good and that evil are equally exit plained by marriage, a
549. s tised in our days. is prac of the The evil family — that is to say, the abuse, o
550. ed in our days. is prac of the The evil family — that is to say, the abuse, or aband
551. ; the the exactions, the cupidity, self-will, and insubordination of all the child
552. before is and above plea- in marriage, religion, money and sure virtue, compatibility o
553. - in marriage, religion, money and sure virtue, compatibility of temper, are matters o
554. r, rather, of no importance. Spiri- The Family. tually, 129 is marriage, as a sacramen
555. , as a sacrament, no longer, to a great many, anything more than a mere formality. P
556. an a mere formality. People forget that one condition, requisite for participating
557. of the nuptial benediction, ; purity of soul and, too often, they come to the foot o
558. . Evidently, it is not to bless in that God must then interpose the marriage to the
559. pair cast into the vicissitudes of the family, with the 130 The Family. of their inex
560. situdes of the family, with the 130 The Family. of their inexperithat, only resources
561. eri- riage we must ority of the present family over the family of pagan ages. all, Yes
562. st ority of the present family over the family of pagan ages. all, Yes ; for, notwiths
563. beneficent in- fluence over the entire family. Not which only has the controls tion,
564. e- ments in regard to the woman and The Family. the child; but there in still *3l circ
565. m Jesus Christ, and which maintains its life in conditions never known to the ancien
566. n conditions never known to the ancient world. THE FAMILY WITHOUT CHRISTIANITY. : F i
567. s never known to the ancient world. THE FAMILY WITHOUT CHRISTIANITY. : F impiety succe
568. per- suading Christ that the is is the world that not God and it Gospel but a myth,
569. hrist that the is is the world that not God and it Gospel but a myth, is easy to fo
570. asy to foresee what would become of the family, and it needs no great its clearness of
571. k in to the conditions itself which the family found pre- vious to the coming of Chris
572. ol- great Christian current 132 has The Family. lowed in society a to channel too fill
573. hristianity, moreover, has ex- cited in liberty man and a feeling of personal dignity w
574. ity, moreover, has ex- cited in liberty man and a feeling of personal dignity which
575. ich into has the passed sympathetically life, usages of and which must be indestruct
576. still, what be rav- age and ruin would family, still in the were the principal basis
577. is And not first, it Jesus Christ were God, very evident that marriage would no lo
578. il contract, contract, analogous to any other whereby a couple would mutually 134 The
579. whereby a couple would mutually 134 The Family. in bind themselves family, the bonds o
580. ally 134 The Family. in bind themselves family, the bonds of the conditions under as i
581. y though they bound themselves tion. It will, is any other associa- perhaps, be said
582. bound themselves tion. It will, is any other associa- perhaps, be said that this in
583. arriage humanly bad, exist and that the family can never therein in natural and perman
584. natural and legal in marriage; were The Family. religion banished from it 135 and God
585. and legal in marriage; were The Family. religion banished from it 135 and God it no long
586. mily. religion banished from it 135 and God it no longer there, undoubtedly would s
587. ete disappearance of Christianity, what other ceremony 136 The Family. could be found
588. ristianity, what other ceremony 136 The Family. could be found that would not be ridic
589. nothing more marriage, then, ; between God and man would ? there be no religious i
590. more marriage, then, ; between God and man would ? there be no religious intervent
591. asual, transient coupling together of a man and a woman, who would idolize each oth
592. man and a woman, who would idolize each other one day, to de- spise and, perhaps, cur
593. d a woman, who would idolize each other one day, to de- spise and, perhaps, curse e
594. , to de- spise and, perhaps, curse each other the next. Now, in these conditions, see
595. nditions, see what would become, in the family, The Family. of those 137 : who are wea
596. e what would become, in the family, The Family. of those 137 : who are weakest First,
597. ra- ment of Marriage, she would have no other guarantee, outwardly, than decorum, law
598. her guarantee, outwardly, than decorum, law, and policy. Mary being nothing more th
599. ly, than decorum, law, and policy. Mary being nothing more than the mother of a man,
600. being nothing more than the mother of a man, devotion to her would fall soon disapp
601. that Jesus would it be to woman 138 The Family, all Christ honored her, Mis life, in t
602. The Family, all Christ honored her, Mis life, in the person of Mary, and that He tho
603. r to all mankind at the moment ? of His death on the Cross That would have been somet
604. ion could really exist between that wo- man and humanity It is ? true that ages and
605. y Christian woman has found her re- The Family. 139 instatement and her glorification
606. m the it moment it was proved to the in world that had been mistaken tions for these
607. ception of a dignity, 140 with only The Family. its charms of a day, and weakness, wit
608. charms of a day, and weakness, with its life-long we ask a what would woman become i
609. ong we ask a what would woman become in world without principles and without faith, i
610. could not long resist the current of ; despotism and luxury fall and soon she would back
611. and soon she would back into the double slavery of her own weakness and the brutality o
612. e situation that woman would occupy The Family. 141 by the denial of the divinity of C
613. denial of the divinity of Christ in the world, is that in which she finds herself in
614. n weak. is When we see what made of wo- man by polygamy amongst Asia the once Chris
615. of in the heretical Europe and America, idea of the genera! we may form an infallibl
616. and America, idea of the genera! we may form an infallibly fall, degradation into wh
617. d be no longer clothed, by bap- 142 The Family. tism, with the angelic robe of inno- c
618. on his brow the seal of the children of God ; after- wards, he would have no more,
619. d have no more, to strengthen his young soul, the divine bread of the Eucharist, and
620. the words and the example of the Son of God were no in fine, there longer the shiel
621. abuse of and strength, the rigor of the law, the charms of his age ; ah ! I know in
622. now in the he might yet take refuge The Family. arms of heart ! 143 his father or on h
623. n his mothers yes, but not always. How- many children are there neither father who h
624. ate as exile of the beings then, in the world And were Christ no longer in the heart
625. r and mother, those children of the Roi man Empire, who less, lived, neverthein und
626. under a perpetual tutelage, of absolute slavery, a state and in whose death might be de
627. petual tutelage, of absolute slavery, a state and in whose death might be decreed, 14
628. absolute slavery, a state and in whose death might be decreed, 144 The Family. anger
629. n whose death might be decreed, 144 The Family. anger and impatience, by the sole deci
630. ines? Once more, on the ex- no, no, the happiness and the fate of the child cannot rest c
631. n the ex- no, no, the happiness and the fate of the child cannot rest clusively natu
632. on of the fa- ther and mother; and when God, Christ, when Jesus would be no The Foi
633. er, longer found there, we may from the experience of the past, as from that of the presen
634. hood would be unhappily exposed, in the family, to all sorts ral of unnatu- barbarity.
635. when the child grew up when the young- man or the young girl arrived at the indepe
636. of age and strength, then would be the time of reaction, the time for reprisals ; r
637. then would be the time of reaction, the time for reprisals ; reaction and reprisals
638. essed, ing that there was no longer any principle capable of restraining them. We have al
639. ed the insubordination and re- I4;6 The Family. youth when in it bellion of lives no l
640. of and the unchaining of nations ? its evil It would certainly outdo the excesses o
641. excesses of pagan youth ; for, with the same natural tendencies to evil, it could no
642. or, with the same natural tendencies to evil, it could not now be restrained, as tha
643. ined, as that had been, by the absolute despotism of paternal authority. The so results w
644. the observation of present times, that one asks is how it possible for certain min
645. t possible for certain minds to de- Ike Family. lude After 147 this themselves that, o
646. k from the ruin they would bring on the family by denying the divinity of Jesus Christ
647. ing the divinity of Jesus Christ in the world? . . . Perhaps so; but even in if there
648. we may rest the conviction ; that they will not succeed for the truth of God it is
649. on ; that they will not succeed for the truth of God it is not at the mercy of for ev
650. they will not succeed for the truth of God it is not at the mercy of for ever."*1
651. Books may be renewed week only. 3. for one lose Students who damage or books must
652. fine of posed for overdue. 5. two cents will be imeach day that the book is Reserved
653. ng. Failure to return a Reserve book on time subjects the borrower to a fine of 15 c

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/