Concordance for The fair maid of Connaught and other tales for catholic youth / by Kate Duval Hughes.

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1.   <» J ) > 1 ^ ^ •=*)» :' Connau AND OTHER TALES FOR CATHOLIC YOUTH. BY ATE DUVAL 
2. 1 "EULALIE, OR THE LiTTLE MiSER/* ''The Good Old Priest ''Lies in - 6S 73 & the Snuf
3. ty/' - 128 » - - 166 . of CHAPTER ^^ I Life is real! And * Life is earnest! the gra
4. 6 . of CHAPTER ^^ I Life is real! And * Life is earnest! the grave is not its goal j
5. ave is not its goal j not spoken of the soul" in the ; Dust thou art, to dust return
6. spoken of the soul" in the ; Dust thou art, to dust returnethy Was Kathleen stood
7. l, A truly beautistrong, yet lithe made form, draped in the dark blue cloak; the hoo
8. features were purely classical in their beauty. The limpid whiteness of her complexion
9. h the blue veins were traced in all the aristocracy of blue blood,was almost unearthly in p
10. The repose ; of that sweet face told of one who possessed the ! 8 THE FAIR MAID OF
11. ID OF CONNAUGHT. of kingdom brow and er God within, and tlie liigli-toned earnest e
12. her to live. She had just returned from one of her missions of love ed, —such lov
13. st returned from one of her missions of love ed, —such love visit to as our Savior
14. one of her missions of love ed, —such love visit to as our Savior preach- when he
15. s our Savior preach- when he told us to love our neighbor as our- selves; her daily
16. ung girl as she knelt beside her, " May God's best blessing ever rest on ye." And t
17. her sister with a tender confiding look one hand swept back a wealth of hair from a
18. er confiding look one hand swept back a wealth of hair from a low, fair, candid brow,
19. rom a low, fair, candid brow, while the other grasped her sister's arm here, "Come
20. cas- uistry, by which she tried, as so many other women have done, to prop up their
21. uistry, by which she tried, as so many other women have done, to prop up their case
22. eir case with the argument of the great love that the other sex bears for them; whic
23. the argument of the great love that the other sex bears for them; which so often turn
24. and then test the strength of their own love, to see if it be strong enough to endur
25. things, and fight the great " Battle of Life" side by side, there would not be so ma
26. fe" side by side, there would not be so many failures. But unfortunately, women are
27. o, frequently, wake from their dream of happiness, to find themselves shipwrecked on some
28. ily, "I am not like you I know that you will be a nun everybody says so" and she gav
29. that says I must not stay. charm in the world for me I shall have no cred^ the misera
30. me I shall have no cred^ the miserable world full of it in giving it up vanity and t
31. E FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT, the whirl for one to endure, moment to reflect —and the
32. as guarded with such precever since the death of our dear moth- The girls were mother
33. our years difference in their age, Eily being only six- Kathleen had just passed her
34. ay, and her quiet manner and reflective mind made her seem older still. Their strong
35. and strong in his integrity and undying love for his two daughters. John Daly was ma
36. de of that stuff that never bent to the will of another conscious of his own integri
37. F CONNAUGHT. see this stern ister to 13 man come little out of himself and mindelic
38. always frail who be- and delicate, but one winter she declined more rapidly, and w
39. ere just peeping out, she died suddenly one day, leaving her two little girls to th
40. The heart that is a cottage was near ; world^ it here,** And I said if there's peace
41. world^ it here,** And I said if there's peace Elm cottage, to be found in this humble
42. , rambling house, with large rooms, and many doors and windows, not certainly of the
43. rn construction, but it had been in the family for many generations, and each member a
44. tion, but it had been in the family for many generations, and each member and posses
45. aly from his grand-parents he was not a man to spend any money foolishly, and as th
46. . would have been quite as sweet by any other name, for it was truly the abode of pea
47. her name, for it was truly the abode of peace and happiness, and that cheerful conten
48. for it was truly the abode of peace and happiness, and that cheerful contentment, which i
49. ntentment, which is always the greatest wealth. A large square porch, supported by pil
50. iano treasured most carefully. stood in one corner, for both the girls were fond of
51. weet voices. But the inner room was the life and sunshine Here Eily trilled her swee
52. to and all said "Welcome " all breathed peace and joy. Here was the home room, where
53. hildren, as he had done all his married life. It was in this room that he always ble
54. kitchen where they took their meals on one side of the room by a long low window,
55. female servant, who had lived with the family over forty years, was generally engaged
56. n herself and so I must devote a little time and space to her definition. She came f
57. and so I must devote a little time and space to her definition. She came from Connem
58. t devote a little time and space to her definition. She came from Connemara and — THE FA
59. very uncertain; judging from the first time that she came to tlie Daly family —sh
60. e first time that she came to tlie Daly family —she was must have been to be so old.
61. either read nor write, she was in every sense of the word, the tian; truest chris- be
62. ll respected her, and wished to imitate one, whose life was that of sincere and una
63. d her, and wished to imitate one, whose life was that of sincere and unaffected piet
64. or woe— it Vv-as always " Glory be to God" throwing up her hands at the same time
65. be to God" throwing up her hands at the same time, as though to praise God for ?J1 H
66. God" throwing up her hands at the same time, as though to praise God for ?J1 His ac
67. s at the same time, as though to praise God for ?J1 His acts. "The Christ's love in
68. ise God for ?J1 His acts. "The Christ's love in all her aisy way is always the best"
69. ad done much hard work in her John Daly life, were quite slender and shapely. cliief
70. f ; — always said of the kernel truly good, is Winny — the sweet" — and was ^^
71. and was much cherished aad beloved the family, and was looked upon not so lis:lit muc
72. ouse-hold. must not forget to introduce one other of John Daly's retainer s, and th
73. -hold. must not forget to introduce one other of John Daly's retainer s, and these tw
74. eighteen years of age, strong, healthy, good humored, and good hearted. He drove the
75. age, strong, healthy, good humored, and good hearted. He drove the car, attended to
76. than to say, that if his course through life was always goyerned by his nose, that i
77. e thoroughly straight forward. When any one was speaking to him, he would look most
78. ently and undestrai^T^ht viatingly into one corner of the ceiling, as though trying
79. believe in making a show to please the world. lie was contented if his children were
80. use or admiration of the multitude. His mind was very much exercised, and his by the
81. rictly forheart troubled at the present time, 20 THE FAIK MAID OF CONNAUGHT. liiin b
82. m, or Eily to see him. Rory O'llare was one irresolute cliaracters tliat of tlie we
83. cliaracters tliat of tlie weakest, most one conld possibly describe; lie thing, if
84. thing was achieved— constantly making good resolvesconstantly shifting from them
85. d have liked to have been someonly some one could have watched him until point, as
86. he could only look back upon more than one-third of his life passed in wavering an
87. ok back upon more than one-third of his life passed in wavering and uncertain steps,
88. tain steps, that had led him nowhere in particular, and liad gained him nothing. His love
89. cular, and liad gained him nothing. His love for Eily, if you could give it that nam
90. John Daly, with sweet little his strong good sense, could not brook the idea, for on
91. Daly, with sweet little his strong good sense, could not brook the idea, for one sing
92. strong good sense, could not brook the idea, for one single instant, of his innocen
93. od sense, could not brook the idea, for one single instant, of his innocent, confid
94. stant, of his innocent, confiding Eily, being ship- wrecked in this cruel manner upon
95. red in some port, where her comfort and happiness would be secured, and where he could, w
96. NAUGHT. 21 CHAPTER III. Tlie Parting. " One touch of nature makes the whole worldTc
97. APTER III. Tlie Parting. " One touch of nature makes the whole worldTcinP was an "ince
98. re, bound about in all the abundance of wealth, rippling up here, and curling down the
99. nd curling down there, until the little one had to laugli, herself, at the determin
100. perch to perch, with his head first on one side and then on the other; then meetin
101. head first on one side and then on the other; then meeting Winny, who had been follo
102. anxious brow, she burst into tears. May God direct you to said Winny following her
103. bless you, the best to the wean," —" God door my Mavourneen," and the little one
104. God door my Mavourneen," and the little one was folded in the old woman's arms befo
105. the senses or satiate the heart. Great nature seemed to open her arms and say: all "H
106. thout preference, that all may live and love and delight." The clear blue vault of h
107. ere, and the rich and varied was lifted beauty of the scene. The in its grass was as e
108. every daisy seemed to head in star-like beauty, to welcome the sweet little one, and t
109. ike beauty, to welcome the sweet little one, and the hare-bell shook its tremulous
110. brought ness her to a lane, whose rural beauty was enough to entice any one to seek it
111. e rural beauty was enough to entice any one to seek it, and linger long; where natu
112. one to seek it, and linger long; where nature seemed to have laid some cunning plan t
113. veliness where in the human heart might love to rest. perfect avenue was formed of t
114. s, and hyacinths with all their odorous beauty till some parts looked like a gay parte
115. lie was so fond, and with that youthful desire to grasp the beautiful and the enjoymen
116. he enjoyment of the hour, while passing life —she stopped —gathered—ran down t
117. he was literally laden with a wreath of nature's choicest gifts, her pockets, arms and
118. eld it in his ''Why must it be the last time Eily ? I care more for you than any gir
119. care more for you than any girl in the world." ''Do you?" the thought said Eily, loo
120. , looking away sadly flashed across her mind, though she scarcely the last time," sh
121. her mind, though she scarcely the last time," she — understood it herself is —
122. n her, to make himself deserving of her love, thoughts or the respect and confidence
123. onfidence of her dear father —a great many crowded together rapidly in her mind, a
124. at many crowded together rapidly in her mind, as she stood there weak and wavering,
125. leless, but she seemed to grow suddenly many years older in a very short space of ti
126. ddenly many years older in a very short space of time. "What are you going to do Eory
127. ny years older in a very short space of time. "What are you going to do Eory ?" said
128. s though he might find something in the space beyond. heart beat quickly Eily was sil
129. she was now although it was only to say good-bye and it must come to an end quickly.
130. rk. Still if she had thought it was her duty to stand by such a being, who was not a
131. ught it was her duty to stand by such a being, who was not able to be even a half of
132. THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. she was too good, and loyal, and true, to draw back from
133. commandments ; engraven there, and the one with jpromise above all others, and the
134. art, were ever in goodness-his faithful love, and tender care the contrast still —
135. ore odious. At this moment, when filial love and duty were struggling for the master
136. s. At this moment, when filial love and duty were struggling for the mastery, the te
137. lly Eily's silence, and w^ished to make one more appeal. "My people don't do what i
138. re telling her something out of a book. knowledge did not extend quite so far, and it see
139. ' COIsTNAUGHT. 27 —— ; seemed more angel tlian mortal, in all its simplicity and
140. best, would make me the happiest." " I mind me of girls," said Eory boldly, " who w
141. ad a random shot pierced her heart, for one moment she could not have suffered more
142. ve suffered more anguish; —her slight form grew taller and taller, as she up in he
143. she seemed to be a spirit from another world. " Do you mean that^Eory ? " said Eily
144. r helplessly. " Is that the way you say good-bye to a fellow ? said Rory. She let he
145. ory. She let her hands fall stood still one moment his hat back, —^pushed against
146. IR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. and said softly " Good-bye Eory/' turned slowly round and tott
147. by Kathleen's brave spirit, and strong will. The autumn was ushered in, with bright
148. twilights, and great preparations were being liiade throughout the country for the g
149. a long plume, only served to enhance a beauty so particularly rare and uncommon, whil
150. e had sworn never -to forget, always to love her. passed; —Just and then the two m
151. at tlie beauti" I say, Guy, who is that beauty? ful girl. She has a brow that would gr
152. d stand alone in her peerless grace and beauty among a million London belles." " Ha Gu
153. FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. ! I should not mind having a flirtation with the damsel. tl
154. k I could woo and win her, and spend mj time pleasantly." '^Tou" said Guy between hi
155. alm astonishment; he felt for the first time in life, that lie had met at last a sup
156. nishment; he felt for the first time in life, that lie had met at last a superior be
157. fe, that lie had met at last a superior being; something THF FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT.
158. if she had ever b§en to the races. The same calm, wondering exThe same half-scornfu
159. e races. The same calm, wondering exThe same half-scornful pity pression met him. pl
160. , as his were, in his nervous rage, and being so completely nonplussed in his vain ar
161. te throat, bowed and looked on in great beauty and silent wonder. But in the midst of
162. y fine cattle here " By all means, with will you show them to me i '' pleasure," sai
163. ans, with will you show them to me i '' pleasure," said Mr. Daly, proud to display what
164. s. " Come this way. Lord Eversly, and I will show you the finest milch cows on the g
165. attle. farmer's pride, dwelling on each good point Yery good." said with emphasis. a
166. pride, dwelling on each good point Yery good." said with emphasis. at the horses, Th
167. rkably fine this year. " I'll warrant a good many of these will pass and be sold for
168. y fine this year. " I'll warrant a good many of these will pass and be sold for Devo
169. ar. " I'll warrant a good many of these will pass and be sold for Devonshire mutton
170. ief to an Englishman when in trouble of mind, or when making any calculaHis tions, o
171. ived into his pockets. did not lihe the idea of being shaken on his jpedes-^ ^aZ—a
172. o his pockets. did not lihe the idea of being shaken on his jpedes-^ ^aZ—and he rem
173. e wished now that he had not wasted his time in running up from Dublin to this confo
174. fying. : — — possible that after so many successful seasons in London where ever
175. uccessful seasons in London where every beauty seemed to smile upon him, and and atten
176. would be glad to have him for a son-in-law; for Lord Eversly's estates were unincu
177. his British pride, and wounded his self-love; we will return to the two girls and Mr
178. sh pride, and wounded his self-love; we will return to the two girls and Mr. Thorn.
179. ps, nneqnaled at the present day in any other portion of the globe. His ancestors, fr
180. rtion of the globe. His ancestors, from one generation to another back, had always
181. t and independent competency crowned by good consciences and light and happy hearts.
182. Yet they were all united in the bond of good fellowship and that strong and abiding
183. fellowship and that strong and abiding law of 38 THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. " Kit
184. helped on the farm, and vied with each other in being good to the old people, who we
185. n the farm, and vied with each other in being good to the old people, who were now in
186. farm, and vied with each other in being good to the old people, who were now in decl
187. were fine manly specimens of young men, being nearly all six feet in height, and broa
188. ther excelled them all in his masculine beauty. His stature and fine bearing would hav
189. etori6 would have enabled him to make a good special pleader in any of the courts, h
190. nimity of his fresh heart and contented mind, and in his in- genuous face you saw on
191. n his in- genuous face you saw only the desire for honest labor and daily bread, a goo
192. face you saw only the desire for honest labor and daily bread, a good wife and happy
193. ire for honest labor and daily bread, a good wife and happy The smooth fair brow was
194. y The smooth fair brow was not wrinkled family. by any of the '^eating cares of life,"
195. family. by any of the '^eating cares of life," and the deep, clear blue eye spoke on
196. nd honest worth. His vigorous and manly beauty bore ample testimony to the purity of h
197. re ample testimony to the purity of his life, while his intelligent conversation sho
198. THE FAIR MAID OF CONNAUGHT. though his education 39 had been limited, yet he clearly und
199. e two families had been old friends for many years. At last Mr. Daly joined them; an
200. orn, and come home with us to supper; I will send you into town again to'' I fear I
201. the drive home faster with you all the same." air, The horses sniffed the and trave
202. " , " we are always glad to see you." I will." Thank you, ^ j 40 THE FAIR MAID OF CO
203. T. CHAPTER YI An old fashioned Wooing ^ Love is a little fragile flower That in the
204. in an hour. The flower grows in pensive beauty Without a thought or ca/re^ Until its p
205. isturbed by a vision of manly grace and beauty that iiourished about in her dreams, an
206. e whole scene lay before her in radiant beauty, she thought again, that life was still
207. radiant beauty, she thought again, that life was still, with all its ups and downs,
208. ry bright in store for her; and a great many visions of earthly happiness and comfor
209. er; and a great many visions of earthly happiness and comfort, ease and prosperity and mu
210. ultiplied blessings crowded in upon her mind as she sat down in the early morning su
211. f. With that possibility growing in her mind came such a train of glorious and brigh
212. ould be to his father's heart if such a good young man as Michael Thorn would take a
213. his father's heart if such a good young man as Michael Thorn would take a fancy to
214. here, then," continued Mr. Daly, "Thorn many sons at home that Michael could live an
215. ld feel like a fish out of water in any other." "Yes," continued Kathleen, "that woul
216. dear father, to have in your old age, a good son and then dear father, like Michael
217. s and I should not have kept you in the world pining so long for your rest, if I had
218. to our dear Lord," said Kathleen, " You will do so," said her father gravely. sadly.
219. Truly Kathleen off by contact with the world. Mavourneen you have kept yourself 'uns
220. have kept yourself 'unspotted from the world.' " " I hope so, father, my heart has n
221. they set out after breakfast, taking by chance, the road that led to the lane, down wh
222. when Kathleen exclaimed: " If you don't mind, Eily, I will turn as I round and go on
223. exclaimed: " If you don't mind, Eily, I will turn as I round and go on to Ballinaslo
224. hey seemed so entirely absorbed in each other, much to all Kathleen's great amuse- me
225. g a little of the high and expressing a desire for some beautiful wild flowers in a wo
226. — glancing glee. The birds sang their love songs all over head, and the flowers le
227. and the flowers lent the atmosphere of love. their sweet odors for the passing hour
228. mute grasp of ling that honest hand, a world of sparkfelt and bestowing protection;
229. troubled by' emotions of a most unquiet nature. They wandered on, till they came to a
230. qukff the cool water made Michael from one of her newly invented drinking cups. Mi
231. never grew weary, and Eily's confiding happiness ever on the increase, knew no alloy. A
232. urling and winding about in its silvery beauty rippling on, and seeming to echo all th
233. like to stay here all day, but Kathleen will expect me home to dinner." "I am always
234. is face. ''Yes, I am, and I should like life." to make my with the happiness sure fo
235. should like life." to make my with the happiness sure for "How?" said Eily, stopping her
236. topping her play water. " By asking you one simple question." that?" said "What "It
237. tle hand in own, and holding it fast. " Will you he ray own " true wife^ Eily f The
238. osom heaved with a wild, yet suppressed emotion, and when she raised her eyes to meet h
239. ght soon " and his ardent and impetuous nature had carried him off in imagination to t
240. impetuous nature had carried him off in imagination to the church and be was carrying her h
241. id Eily, " and 'tis true." " Ah and you will be true, dear one, for Hf e ? You for w
242. true." " Ah and you will be true, dear one, for Hf e ? You for will never I'll hav
243. l be true, dear one, for Hf e ? You for will never I'll have cause to regret those w
244. for Hf e ? You for will never I'll have cause to regret those words, be good and true
245. ll have cause to regret those words, be good and true to you, Eily." that. "I know I
246. the side of the babbling brook but this time the music of the waters was changed the
247. of satisfied, trusting hearts of There love and peaceful contentment and home. seem
248. s that two loving souls had melted into one and had found a great happiness. 48 THE
249. d melted into one and had found a great happiness. 48 THE FAIK MAID OF CONNAUGHT. CHAPTEE
250. FAIK MAID OF CONNAUGHT. CHAPTEEYIL bnt one shadow hoYerlng over Eily's brightened
251. know all about Eorj There "was O'Hare. life "With the true instinct of a true woman
252. of that; and it seemed to her ingenuous mind, that it was would be much " " THE FAIR
253. irst 49 and story. last whole paramount duty to tell the Having nerved and braced he
254. found an opportunity of unburdening her mind and usual, heart. One evening Michael h
255. unburdening her mind and usual, heart. One evening Michael had bid one lingered lo
256. ual, heart. One evening Michael had bid one lingered longer than to the gate, to an
257. wo weeks now before the wedding. " That will be the happiest day of said Michael, ^^
258. appiest day of said Michael, ^^and I my life," hope it will be the same to you Eily.
259. said Michael, ^^and I my life," hope it will be the same to you Eily." " I hope so,"
260. , ^^and I my life," hope it will be the same to you Eily." " I hope so," said Eily,"
261. ell. He was a worthless fellow, and the family were glad to see if he would betto send
262. the twilight was deepening Michael had one hand upon the gate-latch, where it had
263. go, that the gate remained closed; the other hand clasped Eily's hand, while she pla
264. he trees, and out beyond into the empty space. ""What is the matter, Eily? What are y
265. ond into the empty space. ""What is the matter, Eily? What are you — — thinking of
266. ed. But now she would have to find some other way, Here was a dilemma! — — some o
267. r way, Here was a dilemma! — — some other words, and poor Eily was pressed, sore
268. more I nervously. ever cared "Would you mind had quivering like —"would you mind I
269. u mind had quivering like —"would you mind I told you I him—once?" Eily did wait
270. aited exclaimed answer. —"I "No," not mind Michael should more firmly — would no
271. ot hurt me in the you may have had your many head—many it, Michael, if you thought
272. n the you may have had your many head—many it, Michael, if you thought for Eory ?
273. believed you, because I know you to be good and true. You have given me your wJiole
274. we must go on trusting till the end of life.'' have told that —^Tou me The tears
275. t and blinked and winked, as — — —one slight much as to say, " It is all One
276. one slight much as to say, " It is all One heartfelt pressure last right swung to
277. artfelt pressure last right swung to —one more good-night—and the gate opened a
278. ressure last right swung to —one more good-night—and the gate opened and hinges.
279. — of the hand, its nowP latch clicked form hurried up the gravel walk to the porch
280. the hall door closed and all was hushed peace and night. in silence — — — — T
281. usy too, but seemed in a sort of dreamy happiness, and Michael claimed a great deal of he
282. and Michael claimed a great deal of her time. John Daly was much occupied too, in ex
283. with them. The parish church was about one mile distant it from the farm; was a ra
284. them the wife of Michael Thorn, and the same httle Eily at home the sunshine of the
285. ouse. There was a hushed brightness and happiness about Eily she walked quietly, and spok
286. of wife and the rank of matron; and the sense of the great duties and obligations bel
287. s belonging to them no doubt filled her mind, and engrossed her thoughts; but she on
288. sweet picture of perfect innocence and beauty, and descending she presented herself f
289. Eily smiling gently as she passed from one to the other crossed over to where her
290. ng gently as she passed from one to the other crossed over to where her father stood
291. h he clasped the " You are, indeed, all one in his arms. that a fond parent could l
292. s arms. that a fond parent could little desire. May every blessing fall on your young
293. n, he added: "Here she is, Michael take good care of her and may you see bright days
294. y placed her ael's little strong arm —one of Michael Thorn's brothers Kathleen an
295. hand confidingly on Mich- acted as best man, from Ballinasloe were the bridesmaids.
296. idesmaids. They all passed out in quiet happiness and set out for the parish church. Fath
297. iven in a most impressive manner by the good old father. Eily with downcast eyes, an
298. 's arm, and followed by the rest of the family Winny and Pat — — bringing up the r
299. with the sweetest She stopped to greet many of them, for they were her scholars. Th
300. felt blessing to the young and innocent one who had just received the sacrament flo
301. crament flowers to scatter in her path. one who passed through the door of the litt
302. OF CONNAUGHT. CHAPTER ** rX. fleeting : Art u long^ and time is And our hearts tho'
303. APTER ** rX. fleeting : Art u long^ and time is And our hearts tho' strong and brave
304. the growing household. Winny is in her element among the young brood over whom she rul
305. penses her favors with great equity and justice —but does not allow that her childher
306. at they are the most blessed weans that God ever or bestowed on any parents. — 58
307. bridal dress her beautiful hair was cut habit, cap and veil only seemed to make her l
308. y and mercy. She never wearied in doing good. The aged and infirm little children mo
309. away carrying with them, each their own particular consolation, and showering bles- and th
310. g bles- and the black robed her queenly form, and off, — — — — — — ings
311. r, a deaf ear to their who never turned many wants and miseries— and untiring zeal
312. had inherited her mother's delicacy of constitution — seen flitted perhaps in that uneart
313. s she about on her heavenly missions of love and —her slight form grew thinner and
314. enly missions of love and —her slight form grew thinner and thin- ner until she lo
315. - ner until she looked in her spiritual beauty and though she were truly a spirit from
316. she passed her people with her shadowy form, little brightness, as THE FAIR MAID OF
317. the old would stop and say: " Soon she will vanish from our midst there's a look of
318. too true were these prophetic warnings. One day she was — — — — — unable
319. w and joy. Eily and her father had paid many visits to Ballinasloe lately, to see th
320. ons and advice to Eily were full of the beauty of holiness and the sorrow of the fathe
321. though deep, was chastened and subdued. One morning they were sent for in haste she
322. ed her last. They reached there only in time to see that lovely face calm in the rep
323. calm in the repose of the last sleep of death. There she lay in all her heavenly beau
324. eath. There she lay in all her heavenly beauty, which the dark who was flight. Her —
325. ch the dark who was flight. Her — — habit only enhanced; the slender white finger
326. AUGHT. It folded on her breast. was not death, but the sweet sleep of an angel. You f
327. as not death, but the sweet sleep of an angel. You felt with all its " Tell me my sou
328. gel. You felt with all its " Tell me my soul, can this be force that line death ? "
329. me my soul, can this be force that line death ? " No- it was the sleep of the angels.
330. arms folded. On his face you read-^'My God I gave her to Thee long ago." Two or th
331. d dread of the ! — solemn presence of Death. " Come in, children," said the mother
332. s." The children approached, holding by one another, they drew nearer and kissed he
333. e forth. There she lay in calm majestic beauty a sweet smile played about her mouth. F
334. ed, she lessons very poorly, passed her time in reading fairy tales or plays instead
335. annoys me extremely; you must, my dear one, child, My give much application to thi
336. ufficiently well practised, so that you will be able to draw this map well when you
337. . Promise were near yon; lose for, if I time in my absence, work as if I believed th
338. d to your business and be happy, dear I will mamma. finished, atlas." not leave will
339. will mamma. finished, atlas." not leave will my map correct it until it is and I eve
340. s, she went to look There she saw upfor one in her father's study. on the table fou
341. and the engravings: it was the ''Swiss Family Eobinson." The child wished to read onl
342. elmed by the fault that she had not the courage to confess, on hearing her mother appro
343. Oh mercy my ! ! child, : with confusion pain in ; "I am suffering horribly with my r
344. na istered astonished at such excessive pain without intermission. leaves, He ordere
345. brought the four volumes of the "Swiss Family Robinson," that he had bought the eveni
346. medy lasted for five days, during which time Madame Durozel did all in her power to
347. foot, resolved to assure herself of the truth. — THE LAME FOOT. 65 In the evening,
348. nd drew from her slight exclamations of pain. placed on the other foot. He "You said
349. ght exclamations of pain. placed on the other foot. He "You said he. suffer, then, al
350. He "You said he. suffer, then, all the time, my child?" "A little less than yesterd
351. n yesterday doctor," replied the little one, with a perfectly composed air. " And t
352. ith a perfectly composed air. " And the other foot, how is that ? ^ " Oh perfectly we
353. ssing to the has perfear that formed an evil this miracle still ! But I very much mo
354. acle still ! But I very much more grave will be the result of all this, and which wi
355. ll be the result of all this, and which will demand all your care." And taking his h
356. enne, who perceived then, for the first time, the trick that her nurse had played. S
357. you have passed in your bed '^ ? No, in truth, dear mamma," replied Adrienne, ; sobbi
358. grading, that it always leaves upon the soul a stain most diffiin your word ? Ah ! T
359. LAME cult to efface ; FOOT. 67 and the idea alone that you know how to lie^ fills m
360. ow to lie^ fills me with grief." "Dear, good mother, punish me, for I have but do no
361. oof, to regain it, I assure you and you will see. Oh above all, above all, do not gr
362. e studies with great diligence, and the peace and happiness of the family, troubled f
363. with great diligence, and the peace and happiness of the family, troubled for a time by t
364. nce, and the peace and happiness of the family, troubled for a time by this incident,
365. happiness of the family, troubled for a time by this incident, are now But the poor
366. ight qualities were tarnished by miser. one great defect: she was a miser at ten ye
367. ou say, gentle impossible " This odious vice ! (one for which there is no excuse) di
368. gentle impossible " This odious vice ! (one for which there is no excuse) did not r
369. t she deprived herself of the matchless happiness of giving ; then she gave her- between
370. giving ; then she gave her- between her good heart, which led her to help the poor,
371. which led her to help the poor, and her love of money which, alas prevented her alwa
372. lalie when she was little, and from the time of her infancy, had married a carpenter
373. o see her every day. The doc- tors, not being able to save her, permitted them to gra
374. ims and fancies: and the sick woman had many. " " " — 69 EULALIE. When gerly; but
375. y nursed her, and whom nevertheless, so One day, — it much. was toward the end of
376. e disturbed than usual. " What ? is the matter with you to-day, my dear so un- nurse,"
377. Yes ! ; tell me —do ! have a foolish desire to taste a melon, and I cannot help cry
378. " It is this: you know, my dear little one, melons are very rare at this season; i
379. yself that; I cannot console myself for being deprived of ing melons this year." " Co
380. ole yourself dear." tast- "Why, —they will not always be so 70 " Yes; but then EUL
381. so 70 " Yes; but then EULALIE. —where will I be ? " and the tears poor I woman wep
382. r nurse. took three beautiful pieces of one franc each; but at the moment, when abo
383. ? Must I die, then, without having had one Struck with these words, Eulalie looked
384. to die than to be a ! burden upon your family. If I had only one mouthful of melon, t
385. burden upon your family. If I had only one mouthful of melon, to restore my appeti
386. returned home, perfectly resolved, this time, to give a last satisfaction to the fai
387. o the faithful nurse who had taken such good care of her in her infancy. again the s
388. aily duties. down to attend to her From time to time she put her hand in her pocket,
389. ies. down to attend to her From time to time she put her hand in her pocket, to have
390. put her hand in her pocket, to have the pleasure of feeling the three pieces; later stil
391. most shameful avarice. " Id tJpiest ox. One beautiful spring morning the carriage o
392. e ran to the Priest's house, to see the good old priest who had baptized her, and wh
393. short, she did not return until dinner time. "Well, " my child," said ? Madame Lema
394. " said ? Madame Lemaire, how " is ! our good pastor Oh mamma, he is very thin, and v
395. y thin, and very pale." " 7i " said THE GOOD OLD TRIEST. He is not at all well, tlie
396. he has not been kept warm enough for a man of his age, and for more than six month
397. u see, madame, the snow remained a long time on the ground this year; work was scarc
398. and food also, for the The heart of the good potatoes were frozen. priest bled on se
399. tove that was lit in the evening; every one came to warm themselves at their ease.
400. heir ease. As he knew very well that no one had enough to eat in the town, he contr
401. in the town, he contrived to have some good soup made, and everyone had their porri
402. o others." "Mamma" know now why I " THE GOOD OLD PRIEST. 75 have not seen his beauti
403. large silver snufi-box, should now use one of ; birch bark instead.'^ i has sold e
404. k instead.'^ i has sold everything, the good man, even his three spoons and his larg
405. tead.'^ i has sold everything, the good man, even his three spoons and his large si
406. all the poor people of his parish." The good priest came in the evening, to pay a vi
407. e evening, when Sarah kissed her mother good night, she said, gazing at her with a m
408. gave me a little money, when he bade me good-bye." " Yes, certainly, my child; I wil
409. ood-bye." " Yes, certainly, my child; I will permit you to buy back the snuff box of
410. it you to buy back the snuff box of our good pastor! We will go to-morrow, without d
411. ck the snuff box of our good pastor! We will go to-morrow, without delay, to the cit
412. cast his first glance when he " 76 THE GOOD OLD PRIEST. awakened and before which h
413. rst morning prayer. Embrace me, my dear one I am most happy that we have had the sa
414. ne I am most happy that we have had the same idea. We must set out very early to-mor
415. am most happy that we have had the same idea. We must set out very early to-morrow m
416. o-morrow morning, in order to return in time for dinner and you know that the route
417. as awake before day; the hope of giving pleasure to the venerable and the fear of not be
418. re to the venerable and the fear of not being able to find again the snuff box, agita
419. day, for it w^as a true masterpiece of art. On returning home, Sarah and her mothe
420. ng home, Sarah and her mother found the good priest reading his breviary, and waitin
421. in the alcove in the parsonage. The old man who took snuff very frequently, had his
422. t dinner, whilst very busy telling of a family who had just been ruined by fire, Sarah
423. ruined by fire, Sarah substituted, THE GOOD OLD witliont his perceiving it, PRIEST.
424. , while large tears his cheeks. down " "Will you," said he, " excuse the weakness of
425. aid he, " excuse the weakness of an old man? My mother always used this box as long
426. him. My daughter," is the he to her, " God to will bless for the purest ioicense t
427. y daughter," is the he to her, " God to will bless for the purest ioicense that one
428. will bless for the purest ioicense that one cam, offer Him^ borP happiness that we
429. ioicense that one cam, offer Him^ borP happiness that we give our neigh- Sister Anne Jos
430. d how displeasing lying was to Almighty God, and how much produced in the world. "
431. ighty God, and how much produced in the world. " Sister," one of the best scholars sa
432. much produced in the world. " Sister," one of the best scholars said to her one da
433. ," one of the best scholars said to her one day, " I assure you that we never tell
434. e. You may lie by omitting to speak the truth when a lie might ; your neighbor, you m
435. after, Sister the lie, Aime Joseph very one who had said observed tliat she never t
436. very closely, the perceived that, every time that she pretended to wipe her mouth, s
437. he child continued to move her arm, and one would think that she was sewing with ze
438. saw that she held it upside down. Again one more who " lied in action ! you laugh a
439. not know, my children, that you must be good, above all? Without dear little My ones
440. ing." that, for The Sister had remarked one of her scholars, of the some time, who
441. marked one of her scholars, of the some time, who was very mild, and very She reproa
442. ched her; industrious, never arrived in time for the opening morning class. and ! LI
443. blame her negligence. I hear that this good little one renders a service every day
444. egligence. I hear that this good little one renders a service every day to a sick n
445. to a sick neighYou all knew it, and not one came to tell bor. me; and you have let
446. ^ because you have omitted to speak the truth when you would have done much good by m
447. the truth when you would have done much good by making it known. Recollect well, my
448. le to your neighLouise lived. bor ; for God neighbor as thyself.^ has said " : ' Th
449. as thyself.^ has said " : ' Thou sJialt love thy There lived in Paris a young marrie
450. he was what they call in follies of the world. France une mondaine^ which means a ver
451. ich means a very worldly She passed her time in making visits, person. and in entert
452. she passed an beautiful jewels. endless time in arranging her hair, polishing her an
453. nd perfuming her whole person. She took particular care of her hands, which were very beau
454. e nails, sleeping. She did not pass any time even with her children, but gave them u
455. ever had any money to give as ahns, nor time to think of the poor; for she spent eve
456. tisfy her vanity; she did not even find time to render a service to any one. She had
457. en find time to render a service to any one. She had an uncle, who was an excellent
458. t, using the most forcible and eloquent language, in order to touch her heart which, ala
459. ronger than the affection that she felt One m.orning he attack. ror; she called on
460. worthy priest was struck, for the first time, with the beauty and extreme whiteness
461. as struck, for the first time, with the beauty and extreme whiteness of the hands of h
462. ou no longer with my useless sermons; I will be silent then. " " : ! 84 henceforth.
463. h. VANITY. However, I keep silence upon one condition, which will be very easy for
464. keep silence upon one condition, which will be very easy for you to fulfil: it is,
465. e times Hands, you wiU decay Hands, you will decay Hands, you will decay "Be assured
466. decay Hands, you will decay Hands, you will decay "Be assured I will not fail to do
467. cay Hands, you will decay "Be assured I will not fail to do so; but let me ' ! ! ' y
468. you that I think it is a very singular idea! "As you wish, my dear niece; old men o
469. attaching much while importance to it. One morning, however, cay " ! she listened
470. d pronouncing three times, " Hands, you will de- My uncle was right," men thought sh
471. d to some new reflection. " Indeed they will decay, nevertheless," cried she in a lo
472. if they should see them then." Another time she reflected: "But, if my hands decay,
473. : "But, if my hands decay, my body also will decay Of what use will my beautiful orn
474. ay, my body also will decay Of what use will my beautiful ornaments be tlien, which
475. be tlien, which now are my glory and my happiness ? On this day she closed her doors to v
476. have done ? And passing over her entire life in her memory, she could not recollect
477. And passing over her entire life in her memory, she could not recollect to leave this
478. , she could not recollect to leave this world, shall I me what a single good action,
479. ve this world, shall I me what a single good action, not the slightest duty fulfille
480. a single good action, not the slightest duty fulfilled: nothing, in short, that she
481. lliant entertainment that was given the same evening. On casting a last glance at he
482. f the drawing-room, and she experienced one When Madame moment of lively pleasure,
483. ienced one When Madame moment of lively pleasure, in observing that, in the midst of the
484. aving looked around, and examined every one, she commenced thinking that these gay
485. y men and these silly women, devoted to pleasure, would soon become nothing more than du
486. hem, day decay. " like her hands, would one What replj will they make to our Lord,"
487. " like her hands, would one What replj will they make to our Lord," said she to her
488. elf, "when he demands an account of the soul that he gave them ? Then she thought of
489. thought of her mother, so pious, and so good to every one. Then the beauty of all th
490. mother, so pious, and so good to every one. Then the beauty of all this sparkling
491. ous, and so good to every one. Then the beauty of all this sparkling youth disappeared
492. self such as she would be at the day of judgment, and her heart was troubled. Not findin
493. her heart was troubled. Not finding any pleasure in this entertainment, she left it. On
494. ir eider-down coverlet, she thought how many little children had no covering? for th
495. de, came in this morning to see her, by chance. He found her combing the fair hair of
496. g the fair hair of her little girl. The good priest, going toward her with his heart
497. "finish yonr work, and sustain me in my good resolutions Guided by yon, these by you
498. ese by your pious counsels hands, which will one day decay, shall henceforth sow ben
499. y your pious counsels hands, which will one day decay, shall henceforth sow benefit
500. uties now, " ! Oh my ! in order that it God may not reject my soul when will have l
501. in order that it God may not reject my soul when will have left this perishable bod
502. that it God may not reject my soul when will have left this perishable body, that I
503. ody, that I have idolized for so long a time. Madame Bercy persevered, and became th
504. d became the most devoted mother of her family, whom the poor and unfortunate blessed
505. hen she compared the actual and present happiness that she was deriving from the faithful
506. she now had renounced, she said to the good priest, with the most heartfelt gratitu
507. two years of age, he was already an old man when his only son had reached the age o
508. had reached the age of ten years. This good peasant, tle dilapidated cabin; named F
509. o Paris to seek his fortune: a wagoner, one ; 90 GRATITUDE AND INTEGKITY. of his fr
510. t accustomed to climb our mountains, he will be able to do the errands better than a
511. errands better than another and then I will establish him in the street St Honore,
512. orter Ohassin, who is young, and a very good man I tell you that he will make friend
513. Ohassin, who is young, and a very good man I tell you that he will make friends wi
514. and a very good man I tell you that he will make friends with Bourgingnon, and that
515. e friends with Bourgingnon, and that he will be very useful to little ; ; "Your ; .
516. ing the journey, which was a very happy one, he often wept Notwithstanding his grie
517. han Clermont. 91 The wagoner, according same day, to the to promise, presented him,
518. r Chassin ; ; ; inspired them w^ith the desire to see his proterje. Every one was char
519. h the desire to see his proterje. Every one was charmed with the sprightliness and
520. liness and the refinement of the little one from A uvergne; they promised to engage
521. h the streets Bourgingnon acquired this knowledge quickly, thanks to the advice and infor
522. e, endured the most painful fatigues of labor, the agonies of misery, and the torment
523. expense by the departure of his by the particular efforts of Bourgingnon, but he had form
524. aid, " the consolation of leaving him a good little sum for an inheritance." least,
525. le sum for an inheritance." least, This idea gave great courage to Furcy, notwitlist
526. heritance." least, This idea gave great courage to Furcy, notwitlistanding the exhausti
527. he exhaustion of his physical strength. One morning, in the month of December, he w
528. summit was inhabited by the respectable family of Pinon."^ ''Alas!" said Furcy raising
529. rt of little republic, having their own particular laws, and of whom the father or the gra
530. om the father or the grandfather of the family was the chief. Their dress, their piety
531. rough a happy forgetfulness that the Ps.evolution left them to live on the crest of this
532. n the crest of this mountain, in order, peace, and a happy security, so much greater,
533. much greater, because it was founded on religion and filial * A community celebrated for
534. aid Him who always hears us, he invoked God, and asked Him to bless his son; then r
535. his son; then resigning himself to his fate, and trusting in Divine Providence, he
536. non, return- ing to the mountain in his pleasure car, perceived old man; he approached,
537. tain in his pleasure car, perceived old man; he approached, and seeing that he had
538. t once; and when he looked at the young man, whose mild physiognomy expressed so mu
539. n, he believed that he saw a liberating angel. Arrived at the dwelling of the Pinon s
540. DE AND INTEGRITY. as a which served the family. dining-room and parlor for all remarke
541. and wearing on their heads long old The man white veils; this modest ornament disti
542. shing them from the married women. Each one held in her hand a distaff and spun. Th
543. h offered the contrast of severe, grave experience, perhaps a the old man. proach, with su
544. re, grave experience, perhaps a the old man. proach, with such sweet and timid inno
545. rls hastened to build up the to the old man. There was always in this house a separ
546. masters of this for immense farm; from time immemorial, in each generation, some yo
547. ch generation, some young member of the family entered the seminary, and became a prie
548. o this peaceful asylum. epoch there was one there of eighty-six years of age. As Fu
549. better in the afternoon, he expressed a desire to receive the blessing of the pious an
550. oy, mingled with hope, on seeing an old man who was twentyfour years older than him
551. yfour years older than himself; and his soul was filled with sweet consolation when
552. ook quite a long walk. The chief of the family led Furcy back to the house, and seated
553. ness of —who was travelling with some other persons, and who did not wish to leave
554. Furcy: when not offer you the place of honor: you see it is oc- cupied by a sick str
555. ed the march- ioness, who accepted with pleasure, as well as the friends whom she had br
556. placed themselves at the table with the good admired their natural politeness. They
557. formed deep cavities or tunnels, where one could descend, and at the bottom of whi
558. uld descend, and at the bottom of which one sometimes found some large chestnut tre
559. rge chestnut trees. They boasted of the beauty of the grotto of Eoyat, with its numpea
560. ntains of pitch and those which had the quality of quickly petrifying the vegetable or
561. of quickly petrifying the vegetable or animal substances that were plunged in it, rec
562. om them a sediment which acquired, with time, an excessive hardness. One of the youn
563. ired, with time, an excessive hardness. One of the young Pinons tensive woodland, m
564. logy on the excastle the estate and the beauty of the of Randan. on GKATITUDE AND INTE
565. nd these inhabitants a remembrance that time could never efface; and a few days afte
566. the road to his little cabin. While the good old man was employing failing strength
567. to his little cabin. While the good old man was employing failing strength to incre
568. what clothed him, and, in the course of time, coats, vests, and stockings; and he re
569. ch his father, w^hom he found in pretty good the end of seven At 98 GKATITUDE AND IN
570. Autumn, Bourgingnon set found there the same asylum, the same patrons, and he never
571. on set found there the same asylum, the same patrons, and he never deviated from his
572. patrons, and he never deviated from his good career: his conduct was out again to re
573. return to Paris. He always as pure, his life as active, as formerly. to give Oue day
574. s active, as formerly. to give Oue day, one of his patrons came him a letter to tak
575. usin. "I know," added he, "that you are good and industrious I will admit you with p
576. e, "that you are good and industrious I will admit you with pleasure ; ; ; into this
577. d and industrious I will admit you with pleasure ; ; ; into this interesting society : t
578. ; into this interesting society : this will be adopting you among the number of my
579. At the moment when he was leaving, the good Abbe detained him, to attach to his but
580. r five months in Paris, at possessor of one the end of which time, the hundred crow
581. s, at possessor of one the end of which time, the hundred crowns, he went to rejoin
582. as very sad: was in the most deplorable state of health; however, he received with a
583. him. " My child," said he to him, " you will find this after me, for I feel that I h
584. me, for I feel that I have but a short time to live." " Oh my father ! " cried Bour
585. tablish it: I shall earn more." The old man bowed his head, and did not re ply; but
586. ding all the most tender cares, the old man declined sensibly. Feeling it himself,
587. clined sensibly. Feeling it himself, he one morning called his son, and, drawing fr
588. dear child," said he to him, "here are one thousand francs that I have laid up for
589. aid up for you; you have gained by your labor the greater part of this sum, which bel
590. u are only in your thirteenth year, you will make, I am sure, a good use of this mon
591. eenth year, you will make, I am sure, a good use of this money: it may be the beginn
592. father." "Yes," said Bourgingnon make a good use of it." sobbing, "I 'will After utt
593. on make a good use of it." sobbing, "I 'will After uttering these words, he threw hi
594. bureau, but which had a lock and key on one of the drawers. Then falling back on hi
595. Then falling back on his straw bed, the good old man ately for a priest. ordered his
596. ing back on his straw bed, the good old man ately for a priest. ordered his son to
597. duties with an edifying piety, the old man had still time to embrace his son, and
598. n edifying piety, the old man had still time to embrace his son, and to press him to
599. struck with paralysis, and lost, at the same time, his consciousness and speech. The
600. k with paralysis, and lost, at the same time, his consciousness and speech. The deso
601. him to persevere, and assured him that God would reward it. The physician found Fu
602. able to relieve him," he said; ''but it will be neces- sary to prescribe a treatment
603. es- sary to prescribe a treatment which will cost a great deal." " Spare nothing," s
604. liberality seven or eight louis, and as one nurse was not enough, he sent for a sec
605. for three montlis in condition; it liis same son spared nothing to relieve him: was
606. id, at last falling into the agonies of death, expired in the arms of his son, who sp
607. re were only left for Bourgingnon about one hundred francs; but he consoled himself
608. n Paris, to whom he sometimes wrote. In one of he related to him a part of what Bou
609. urgingnon had done for his father. This relation was acquainted with M. de Villiers, the
610. n order to older, the Porter Chas- show sin his gratitude to his patrons. As Bourgi
611. otel; Chassin recommended to them, in a particular- manner, his young friend, for whom he
612. riend, for whom he obtained from them a particular service, which was worth much money to
613. francs. He pursued his career with the same success and the same good luck, without
614. is career with the same success and the same good luck, without losing a single patr
615. reer with the same success and the same good luck, without losing a single patron, a
616. le patron, and always encouraged by the good Chassin with a paternal zeal. He succee
617. alms among the poor, and to give, from time to time, help to his unfortunate countr
618. ong the poor, and to give, from time to time, help to his unfortunate countrymen. He
619. hout doubt, to reward an industrious to virtue, life, entirely consecrated to work and
620. bt, to reward an industrious to virtue, life, entirely consecrated to work and most
621. ted to work and most unexpected manner. One day, in one of his rounds, he fell and
622. and most unexpected manner. One day, in one of his rounds, he fell and received a v
623. ent for a notary, and dictated to him a will, in which, declaring that he had neithe
624. d neither brother, nor sister, nor near relation, that he knew of, he disposed of the su
625. ; four hundred francs for the poor; and one thousand crowns for his benefactor and
626. hours after having made and signed his will, he received a visit from Chassin, who
627. , surrounded by all the consolations of religion and friendship, and strengthened by the
628. se of Chassin when they brought him the will of his friend, and the thousand crowns
629. eathed to him. After reflecting a short time, "ISTo," said he, ''I will not keep thi
630. ting a short time, "ISTo," said he, ''I will not keep this money: my friend w^as onl
631. country, without knowing it, some poor relation, and it is of that that I wish to infor
632. myself." Completely occupied with this idea, Chassin wrote immediately to Auvergne,
633. ths, that there existed, near Thiers, a relation, though very far removed, of Bourgingno
634. immediately the thousand crowns to this man. He did not boast of this action; but,
635. of this action; but, as he had employed many persons in the searches that he had mad
636. , he had no need of such a sum, with so good a master, who would not let him want fo
637. s old days. M. de Yilliers related this history to many persons, among others to M. Mar
638. M. de Yilliers related this history to many persons, among others to M. Marmontel,
639. otel. They had just instituted, a short time before, at the French academy, a prize
640. in was very much astonished when he saw one morning some deputies from the French a
641. gold medal, as a homage rendered to his virtue. this Chassin, understanding nothing of
642. oved how much Chassin was worthy of the honor that they awarded him. This adventure m
643. his adventure made a great noise; every one wished to see Chassin, and even great l
644. took his portrait, which they placed in one of the halls of the French academy. Pro
645. toxicate him: he found the prize of his virtue in the affection of his excellent maste
646. n became M. de Yilliers placed him upon one of his estates, and gave him a servant.
647. age, until the end of — — his long life, was perfectly happy* CFDanl, "Wlien Ja
648. tablished themselves. de Varonne, whose history I am going to relate to you, was of an
649. going to relate to you, was of an Irish family, who had followed James II. into exile.
650. e King. slightest prospect of her hopes being realized. THE FAITHFUL SERVANT. 109 she
651. possible for her to remain blind to her fate. Her situation had been was deplorable;
652. , piece by piece; there remained now no other resource. Her taste for solitude, her s
653. iety, and particuShe larly so since the death of her husband. found herself, then, wi
654. ie true Dispenser of consolations could change her fate, and of graces, to Him who or
655. penser of consolations could change her fate, and of graces, to Him who or give her
656. with patience. She knelt and prayed to God with confidence; on rising, she was no
657. she felt a sweet calm spring up in her soul, and she looked with firm eyes on all t
658. . " Ah well," said she, " since we must one day severity of it ; ! lose this frail
659. this frail existence, what does last it matter, whether we be crushed by the er condit
660. we die under a canopy, or upon straw ? Will ; 110 THE FAITHFUL SEliVANT. death be m
661. raw ? Will ; 110 THE FAITHFUL SEliVANT. death be more painful, because I liave noth?
662. o sacrifice to make. Abandoned by every one, I shall only think of ; Him who rules
663. ve the universe ; I shall see Him near, death, as me, to reward me, and I shall wait
664. s benefits." fortitude !" it "What dren life : you will say, my dear chil- " Is a li
665. " fortitude !" it "What dren life : you will say, my dear chil- " Is a little imposs
666. e was no affection liad for her in this world. Besides, religion can give this sublim
667. on liad for her in this world. Besides, religion can give this sublime resignation, and
668. acquainted with tliis Ambrose. Ho was a man of forty years of age, who for twenty y
669. is duties, and liis always caused liini good conduct generally, to be regarded as an
670. rally, to be regarded as an excel- lent being, and a very valuable servant. They reco
671. concealed the most tender and elevated soul. Madame de Varonne, some time after the
672. elevated soul. Madame de Varonne, some time after the death of her husband, had sen
673. Madame de Varonne, some time after the death of her husband, had sent away the peopl
674. e, I wish to speak to you." The tone of emotion with which Madame de floor, Varonne pro
675. nd looking said he, his mistress : " My God ! Madame," what has happened ? '' Ambro
676. sh to die in your service leave you, no matter what happens." " Ambrose, you do not kn
677. away with them. I have not a mercenary soul, I Ah well, ; ! Madame." " But, Ambrose
678. nsion ? That is more true ,however, ah, good God we must respect and adore the decre
679. ? That is more true ,however, ah, good God we must respect and adore the decrees o
680. nd submit to them without murmuring, my good Ambrose. However, in my misfortune, I e
681. d Ambrose. However, in my misfortune, I experience a great consolation : cannot be." " Not
682. of feeling perfectly resigned, while so many beings upon earth, so many virtuous fam
683. ed, while so many beings upon earth, so many virtuous families, find them- selves in
684. uous families, find them- selves in the same situation in which I am placed. THE FAI
685. t least, 113 have no children : I alone will suffer. It is little to suffer." " No,
686. I have never doubted your attachment; I will not abuse it now. This is all am waitin
687. or three months. Seek for This is all I will work, I will sew. Germain some customer
688. hs. Seek for This is all I will work, I will sew. Germain some customers. that I ask
689. rs. that I ask of you, and all that you will in St. me be able to do for me." Ambros
690. finished speaking, he fell at her feet. good mistress," cried he, receive the vow of
691. engage to serve you until the end of my life, and with a better heart, wdtli more re
692. have provided for me, you have made my life happy. I have very often abused your ki
693. h my bad disposition. ^'Ah ! my ! 114 I will THE FAITHFUL SERVANT. repair tliem, be
694. it; I only ask length of days from the good God to accomplish it." In finishing the
695. I only ask length of days from the good God to accomplish it." In finishing these w
696. t upon the Mantel, he said: " Thanhs to God, thanks to you, Madame, and to your goo
697. God, thanks to you, Madame, and to your good deceased husband, there are there, in T
698. nger, I return it to you; money is only good for that. I know well that this little
699. ut, I would go to the house of Nicault, one of my countrymen, who is a coppersmith,
700. HFUL SERVANT. 115 worked with him now I will work ! for a recreation. in earnest, Ah
701. on. in earnest, Ah! well, and with what courage." " Ah this is too much " cried Madame
702. s too much " cried Madame de Yaronne. " Good Ambrose, in what a sad condi! tion fate
703. Good Ambrose, in what a sad condi! tion fate has placed yon "' ! am content with it,
704. se, Madame can become reconciled to her change position." '' "I '* if of Your attachme
705. r for me " Suffer when working when you labor, you become useful, such sufferings wil
706. bor, you become useful, such sufferings will make me very ! ! happy. Nicault, From t
707. to-morrow I commence to work. who is a good man, will not let me want for it. He is
708. orrow I commence to work. who is a good man, will not let me want for it. He is est
709. I commence to work. who is a good man, will not let me want for it. He is establish
710. e is established in St. Germain, with a good credit, and he is now in need of a good
711. good credit, and he is now in need of a good workman. I am strong, I can do well the
712. I can do well the work of two, and all will be for the best." Madame de Yaronne, no
713. e for the best." Madame de Yaronne, not being able to find words with which to testif
714. NT. de Yaronne to it. She found there a good bed, a large and very comfortable arm-c
715. contained her linen, her dresses, and a quantity of thread, with which to work; a silver
716. l that I have been able to find that is good for the price that madame wished to giv
717. to give for her lodging. There is only one room; but the servant will sleep on a m
718. There is only one room; but the servant will sleep on a mattress, rolled under Madam
719. But, my dear Ambrose " Oh this servant will not cost you ! — much ; : she will is
720. nt will not cost you ! — much ; : she will is only a child of thirteen years of ag
721. T. not give lier 117 any wages, and she will always stay with Madame. As for me, I h
722. lt, who is rich, and, more than that, a good man, lets me sleep in his house; it is
723. ho is rich, and, more than that, a good man, lets me sleep in his house; it is only
724. use; it is only two steps from here; he will feed me, and give me twenty cents a day
725. in; so, with twenty cents a day, madame will be able to live easily, as she will hav
726. ame will be able to live easily, as she will have some provisions and a little money
727. l of whom I have had Her father and the honor to speak to Madame. mother are poor, bu
728. rious they have six children and Madame will do a very good action in taking this on
729. six children and Madame will do a very good action in taking this one in her servic
730. ll do a very good action in taking this one in her service.'' After this preamble,
731. Suzanna to behave well at last he bade good-bye to Madame de Yaronne and went to th
732. all tliat bottom of Madame de Varoime's soul ? She was filled with gratitude and adm
733. se that she experienced from the sudden change in the manners and in the disposition o
734. and in the disposition of Ambrose. This man, always so abrupt, so coarse, appeared
735. d passed at tlie Wlio could no more the same; since he became her benefactor, he was
736. heroism, and his heart had learned, in one moment, the tenderness and respect that
737. sacred are the obligations that our own good deeds impose upon us, and that one is n
738. own good deeds impose upon us, and that one is not truly generous if he humiliates,
739. s, in the least degree, the unfortunate one that he is assisting. The day after tha
740. at work; but he came in the evening for one moment, and begged Madame de Varonne to
741. ow sweet his dreams For this is what we experience in doing a good action. Let us judge, t
742. r this is what we experience in doing a good action. Let us judge, therefore, how in
743. and spoke of something in his conduct; Time produced no change from last it during
744. ething in his conduct; Time produced no change from last it during four entire years h
745. years he was never seen to deviate for one single instant. At the moment approache
746. pproached when Madame de Yaronne was to experience the most heartrending grief. One evenin
747. experience the most heartrending grief. One evening, while waiting for Ambrose, as
748. this news Madame de Varonne begged the same time she ordered Suzan- servant to lead
749. news Madame de Varonne begged the same time she ordered Suzan- servant to lead her
750. t, Madame, risk breaking still you, you will your neck; and then you could not " THE
751. u were comfortable Ambrose was not in a state to reply to Madame de Yaronne; for almo
752. me with despair. He approached the sick man, examined him attentively, and said tha
753. d sent for him when it was Judge of the state of mind of Madame too late. de Yaronne,
754. r him when it was Judge of the state of mind of Madame too late. de Yaronne, when sh
755. uriosity having prescribed for the sick man and promised to return at noon. Ton may
756. me de Varonne did not leave Ambrose for one moment. She passed forty-eight hours at
757. believed .he found him better, and the same evening he declared that he thought Amb
758. d his curiosity, and related to him her history. Three days after the doctor, leaving .
759. out hastily, Ambrose in a convalescent state. herself However, Madame de Varonne fou
760. ays; but then Ambrose would not be in a state to commence work again, and she shudder
761. again, and she shuddered to think that necessity compelled him to work, at the risk of f
762. iving; his me him has destroyed his his life; happiness, and shall die may it cost
763. his me him has destroyed his his life; happiness, and shall die may it cost — to witho
764. vents be possible forme according to my will, it ? would it ever to liquidate pay th
765. to liquidate pay the sacred debt. Q od God alone knows how alone can recompense a
766. alone knows how alone can recompense a virtue so sublime." One evening when Madame de
767. ne can recompense a virtue so sublime." One evening when Madame de Yaronne was deep
768. the door-step. ^Madame,' 4t is here.' ^Will you be kind enough to that I ask her th
769. T. 125 At tliis moment tliey heard some one softly knocking at the door. Madame de
770. or. Madame de Varonne rose with extreme emotion, to go and open it. perfectly beautiful
771. all, to inform him." " You have entire liberty," replied the to stranger, " In the fea
772. tude. your friend, on your mission of I will remain here until your return, 126 I TH
773. e she found him still in a convalescent state, and much better. " Oh Ambrose, she exc
774. to repair all your suffering." him the good fortune of the king having bestowed the
775. d now " said Madame Varonne, care of "1 will take you my good Ambrose, my good and f
776. me Varonne, care of "1 will take you my good Ambrose, my good and faithful servant."
777. of "1 will take you my good Ambrose, my good and faithful servant." Descending the d
778. ption. Felicia, occupied only with tlie education of her two daughters, lived in the boso
779. ters, lived in the bosom of her amiable family, whom she loved dearly, seeing only her
780. ch day she congratulated herself on her happiness. Inclined to study, gifted with a sweet
781. gifted with a sweet and tender-hearted soul, she never rifice knew what hatred was.
782. iendship had not a right her. Indeed no one despised pomp and fortune more than she
783. , as it may influ- ence the rest of her life; her education, often Camilla, a ill. b
784. y influ- ence the rest of her life; her education, often Camilla, a ill. being unfinished
785. e; her education, often Camilla, a ill. being unfinished, remains imperfect. short ti
786. ng unfinished, remains imperfect. short time after her marriage, fell dangerously An
787. Felicia's health, which she felt a long time after the recovery of her daughter. of
788. in Paris, in the hands of her motherin-law, and set out for England with Natalie,
789. n. She was a widow her husband, a young man of distinguished birthj had been disinh
790. o leave to his wife a small pension for life still ; a circumstance rendered more af
791. rl. Felicia and Natalie occupied the It same room. ; Natalie was some time after the
792. ed the It same room. ; Natalie was some time after they had retired was sleeping sou
793. ired," replied the waitingmaid. " Oh my God what will become of her ! unhappy daugh
794. plied the waitingmaid. " Oh my God what will become of her ! unhappy daughter nate.?
795. eciate her misfortune. ly is knows what death child. is. She scarceShe loved her good
796. eath child. is. She scarceShe loved her good mother, for there never was a more tend
797. r, who has just breathed her last "Just God! cried Felicia, "let us take away the c
798. er, without help. Ah from the depths of eternity, I love to think so, you still may see
799. help. Ah from the depths of eternity, I love to think so, you still may see and hear
800. nk so, you still may see and hear me. I will take the care of your child I will neve
801. e. I will take the care of your child I will never let her forget her w^ho gave her
802. never let her forget her w^ho gave her life each day she will implore the mercy of
803. get her w^ho gave her life each day she will implore the mercy of the Supreme Being
804. e will implore the mercy of the Supreme Being for her mother." In finishing these wor
805. roached the cradle with the most lively emotion. curtain concealed the child. "With a t
806. vered the innocent little orphan, whose beauty and angelic and touching face she conte
807. ace Poor child in vain, when you awake, will you ask for your mother ! but neverthel
808. your mother ! but nevertheless, another will replace her. Yes, I adopt you you shall
809. her, and had risen ; : ; promise me to love her." Natalie threw herself on her knee
810. yes the whole night sleep but should we desire when the remembrance of a good action i
811. uld we desire when the remembrance of a good action it ? ieprives us of At seven in
812. hink of her situation, Natalie, and you will experience the same feeling." "When Pam
813. of her situation, Natalie, and you will experience the same feeling." "When Pamela was dre
814. n, Natalie, and you will experience the same feeling." "When Pamela was dressed, she
815. ed on hearing her say to health!" : "My God, please restore mamma "Do not say that
816. uffers no longer " cried Pamela, " O my God I thank thee These words troubled the s
817. d I thank thee These words troubled the soul of Felicia. "My child," said she, "say
818. my please make mamma happy, and let her God Felicia, " for ! ! ! soul rest in peace
819. y, and let her God Felicia, " for ! ! ! soul rest in peace." Pamela repeated this pr
820. r God Felicia, " for ! ! ! soul rest in peace." Pamela repeated this prayer with touc
821. Let me," : PAMELA. said glie, 135 " ask God again to grant join me the favor of soo
822. England and returned to France. All her family congratulated her on the adoption of th
823. a. It was impossible to see her without being interested in her, or to know her witho
824. ted her herself, and related to her the history of her unhappy mother. This sad story c
825. a pos; 136 PAMELA. ; sessed an elevated soul feelings, she when she spoke of her no
826. hen she spoke of her no longer used the language or the expressions of childhood. One mi
827. nguage or the expressions of childhood. One might relate a thousand charming traits
828. elate a thousand charming traits of her many line and delicate answers, a crowd of h
829. charm, which penetrated into your very soul. You might see Pamela many times before
830. to your very soul. You might see Pamela many times before perceiving if her features
831. r if she was beautiful, or only pretty. One was only struck with her interesting an
832. arge brown with long, black eye lashes. One could say nothing of her eyes they only
833. er eyes they only spoke She had all the desire to please of her expression. eyes, ; an
834. and to oblige, which is always given to one so studious, naturally good; she was ge
835. ays given to one so studious, naturally good; she was generous, short, one found in
836. aturally good; she was generous, short, one found in her qualities and charms whose
837. in the house. Pamela, with the greatest desire to obey, forgot continually this prohib
838. " " 138 PAMELA. Felicia, following tins custom, One morning examined Pamela's pockets,
839. PAMELA. Felicia, following tins custom, One morning examined Pamela's pockets, and
840. I ran immediately " What Without taking time to pick ! — this moment up your sciss
841. thought "Mamma, only of you, and of the pleasure of seeing you." In pronouncing these wo
842. o her. am sure that there not a word of truth in that you have just told me; leave th
843. cia had, in spite of herself, more than one distraction. She turned her head many t
844. an one distraction. She turned her head many times toward the door, and at last saw
845. r eyes red and tearful; the poor little one knelt down humbly on Mie steps of the s
846. t to "This place is go forward. yet too good for me," replied Felicia: she Pamela. T
847. Pamela. This humility touched to made a sign Pamela to approach. The poor child wept
848. we found on the floor, as she said." '' Good Pamela '' cried Felicia, taking her in
849. an never be so with me." "Who would not love a child capable of such an attachment a
850. ma," she would say;^^your sleep does me good. When I know by your breathing that you
851. er a thousand times less." There was no good or fine feeling that was a stranger to
852. ought to be the fruit of reflection and education. She scarcely remembered England; she l
853. nd; she loved Felicia too dearly not to love France; but she never forgot that she w
854. her country a most virtuous attachment. One day, when she was eight years old, Feli
855. laying quietly near her. There was then war with England; suddenly Felicia heard th
856. wishing to look into the depths of her soul, said " We mnst know why there was such
857. cried she, ^'pardon my grief! I do not love France less, but I was born in Eng- Thi
858. born in Eng- This singular feeling for one of her age touched Felicia deeply. "My
859. ed a fault, you have fulfilled a sacred duty. Preserve always for your country, and
860. ntry, and for that of your father, this Love the French you should tender interest d
861. la and penetrated her with joy, and the same evening, before retiring, she added to
862. etiring, she added to her prayers tliis one: " My Grod grant that the English and F
863. e English and French may no longer hate one another, and that they may never do eac
864. nother, and that they may never do each other any harm." ! PAMELA. "With sucli a good
865. ther any harm." ! PAMELA. "With sucli a good heart, it 143 was impossible that Pamel
866. ssess a sincere and tender Certain that God saw and heard her piety. every instant
867. d heard her piety. every instant of her life, she never committed any fault without
868. she accused herself to Felicia: " Would God pardon me," said she, '4f I was wanting
869. pen your heart to those whom you little love ! Mamma will give .sin- me, perhaps, a
870. t to those whom you little love ! Mamma will give .sin- me, perhaps, a cerity of pen
871. whom you little love ! Mamma will give .sin- me, perhaps, a cerity of penance; but
872. , perhaps, a cerity of penance; but she will speak, she will reason with me, she wil
873. ity of penance; but she will speak, she will reason with me, she will praise the her
874. ill speak, she will reason with me, she will praise the her Pamela, she will embrace
875. me, she will praise the her Pamela, she will embrace me a thousand times; and this e
876. shall have asked for her blessing, she will it with still more tenderness than usua
877. be separated from her bene- above every other pleasure, that of being with her, even
878. arated from her bene- above every other pleasure, that of being with her, even without s
879. ne- above every other pleasure, that of being with her, even without speaking to fact
880. e noise. PAMELA. and witliout making to time, however, Felicia, tlie least From time
881. time, however, Felicia, tlie least From time she would rise softly, and approaching
882. amela loved reading, especially natural history and botany. She wrote well, and as to h
883. d as to her style, they scarcely had to form it; for with so able talent, and that s
884. ^eet address PAMELA. tender and sweet a soul, 145 could she write ? how without tast
885. w without taste, or fail in strengh and imagination all She had preserved the ingenuousness
886. impossible to exceed her in running; no one walked better, or danced with more She
887. She often worked in secret for ways the same. strength. the poor; she merited the pr
888. hose sweet and benevolent virtues which philosophy teaches men, and which nature gives to
889. which philosophy teaches men, and which nature gives to women." Natalie was seven year
890. Camilla. These two daughters made much happiness for their mother. But this pure felicit
891. t affliction: She had a young sister-in-law named Alex- 146 andrine, who, PAMELA. b
892. and her talents, was the delight of her family. Suffering for six months with a debili
893. a long absence, to follow a daughter-in-law, to w^hom her care seemed to have becom
894. ps, when you re- ceive this letter, she will be dead. O my daughter! become of your
895. ! become of your unhappy brother? "What will become of me, with his grief and my own
896. s angelic creature that we are about to will ! What lose, we have only known imperfe
897. tly. A tran- PAMELA. quil and fortunate life, 147 such as hers has been, could not b
898. e shone with a great light. You have no idea of her fortitude, of her sessed; wherea
899. that was necessary to prevent him from being alarmed; then she fell into a deep reve
900. old me in tlie parlor; slie me her that life, my had mother, during the two last yea
901. s unfortunate Woman, weeping; from that time I took care of I her myself. Please, de
902. . Pray send kissed it token of my Julie will give you her address. to-morrow to my s
903. r lap. Zennire " she said, " Mamma, you love dogs, I give her to you; promise me to
904. ou; promise me to keep her always." You will know, my daughter, how to appreciate !
905. irtuous care of assuring herself of the fate of the unfortunate one of whom she had
906. herself of the fate of the unfortunate one of whom she had been the sole support;
907. poor woman. To see and take care of her will bring you a sweet consolation." As soon
908. ng, made herself knowm as the sister-in-law of Alexandrine. At these words the poor
909. n raised her eyes to heaven, and at the same time her face was covered with tears. "
910. sed her eyes to heaven, and at the same time her face was covered with tears. " Ah M
911. ars. " Ah Madame," cried she, " what an angel you She is very young, and yet for have
912. Indeed madame, do you know the greatest punishment that her nurse could inflict upon her ?
913. hall not feed Madame Busca; it is I who will wait as obedient as on her alone." Then
914. her nurse. You weep ladies, pursued the good woman: " "What would you do if I were t
915. u know, madame, how divinely she sings. One day I begged her to sing for me. " I on
916. which would not please my mother, but I will learn for her some beautiful hymn." In
917. sing for me several Christmas hymns In truth, madame, I believe of great beauty. Ano
918. ns In truth, madame, I believe of great beauty. Another I saw, I believe I heard, an a
919. y. Another I saw, I believe I heard, an angel! time she brought her harp, and she pla
920. her I saw, I believe I heard, an angel! time she brought her harp, and she played fo
921. e sweet Christian humanity of this dear angel was ! were no services that I was not f
922. r. For example, since you command me, I will tell you that no one such, that there c
923. you command me, I will tell you that no one such, that there could cut my nails wit
924. ia: able to speak. " Madame," said he, "will learn surely with in- " PAMELA. ^ 11 I
925. her services to Madame the daughter of one of her neighbors, and the other neighbo
926. ughter of one of her neighbors, and the other neighbors of Madame Bnsca work are as o
927. s of Madame Bnsca work are as obliging. One comes to for her, another arranges her
928. estimable sister seems to animate every one who inhabits this house. It is true tha
929. She has not described to you ty of her religion this withered and immovable all her mis
930. thout shuddering." "Ah! the unfortunate one!" cried Felicia. "What! could no one re
931. te one!" cried Felicia. "What! could no one relieve her sufferings? Is there no rem
932. emedy ? " No, madame, there is no human art that can 154 PAMELA. is relieve them; b
933. but I endure them with joy. Ah how can one be astonished at that ? For the sufferi
934. s of a moment, supported with patience, will obtain an Our reward will be proporeter
935. ith patience, will obtain an Our reward will be proporeternal happiness. tioned to o
936. ain an Our reward will be proporeternal happiness. tioned to our merits. What gratitude I
937. to our merits. What gratitude I owe to God for having placed me in a situation whe
938. g invites me to occupy myself only with eternity ! Oh ! how dear my misfortunes are to m
939. hed me from all the false goods of this world. The world exists no longer for me; it
940. all the false goods of this world. The world exists no longer for me; it can no long
941. can no longer seduce or corrupt me, my soul no longer inhabits this strange land; !
942. t is already invited to its Creator. My God it I see Thee, I hear Thy pa- me, it fo
943. me the price of an immortal crown. O my God I obey Thee with transport, I adore Thy
944. less 155 it my destiny, and I would not change for the most brilliant fate in the univ
945. would not change for the most brilliant fate in the universe." In speaking thus, thi
946. ondition of weakness and exhaustion, or one reduced by sufferings; her eyes opened
947. stiny, what would become of her without religion? What would be ^ the horror of her situ
948. old the most fright- ful despair. Cruel being see my fortitude, the calmness of my pa
949. titude, the calmness of my patience, my soul, and shudder at your bold my misfortune
950. ignation, attempt?" Felicia admired the justice of this reflection, and left the poor w
951. miration. Such is the character of true virtue. When reason alone causes us to per- fo
952. ue. When reason alone causes us to per- form a good action, then we are tempted to f
953. n reason alone causes us to per- form a good action, then we are tempted to feel pro
954. s cost us; but, when it is the grace of God which inspires us to do good, instead o
955. he grace of God which inspires us to do good, instead of admiring ourselves, we say:
956. ich proves that he is not familiar with good deeds, and consequently how much vanity
957. em. Indeed, it costs them so much, that one is forced to pardon the foolish pride t
958. mmon souls draw vanity give. from their good actions, because they find them so pain
959. eir sublime inspiration for all that is good and virtuous." PAMELA. '^ 157 This refl
960. lection," said Pamela, ''should make us love modesty very much, or at least enable t
961. rse only reveals the smallness of their soul, and their want of taste for virtue." A
962. their soul, and their want of taste for virtue." A few days after this her sister-in-l
963. e." A few days after this her sister-in-law; she conversation, Felicia re- ceived t
964. re- ceived the overwhelming news of the death of had always loved her tenderly, and t
965. stening to the sorrowful praises of the one who was the obthem. Pamela wished to ta
966. , near the poor woman. She rendered the same cares, and visited her twice a week. Fo
967. d fulfilled these touching duties, when one morning, whilst she was washing the fee
968. the door of the room opened suddenly. A man of fifty years of age, with a noble and
969. imed in English: " Thank heaven, ! this angel is a fellow country- woman The astonish
970. he hastened to wrap up the limbs of the good woman, chair, saw the stranger approach
971. housand questions about the her up. The same evening Fehcia these words: received a
972. rphan. The amiable Pamela does too much honor to her country; and to the education th
973. o much honor to her country; and to the education that she owes to you, madame, not to in
974. shman who was not unworthy to enjoy the happiness of contemplating her virtue. I am fifty
975. njoy the happiness of contemplating her virtue. I am fifty years old; so, madame, I ha
976. the feet of this unfortunate paralytic, will never my memory. They who to told me th
977. is unfortunate paralytic, will never my memory. They who to told me that she had relat
978. o you what, then, is want; : ing for my happiness "But, my child," ? replied Felicia, "if
979. daughter you permit me to consecrate my life to you what ; more could I possibly des
980. ife to you what ; more could I possibly desire said Felicia, ? '' " Let me," " receive
981. Felicia, ? '' " Let me," " receive this good Englishman me, I confess ed with him. ;
982. admiration for it, my Pamela gives the desire of becoming acquaintto appreciate He kn
983. him the name of Pamela's his offers to family. Felicia confessed frankly to him that
984. y gratitude. I cannot look at the least change in my fate without fear, since I find i
985. I cannot look at the least change in my fate without fear, since I find in the tende
986. ess." Mr. Aresley looked at Pamela with emotion, and turning toward Felicia '^ I set ou
987. ek may I dare to hope, madame, that you will permit me to recall myself sometimes to
988. resley, "and I often travel; but if you will, madame, address your letters to London
989. ondon, to the care of Mrs. Selwin, they will surely reach me." At the name of Selwin
990. rprise and asked if Mrs. Selwin had the pleasure of being acquainted with her. "I am acq
991. sked if Mrs. Selwin had the pleasure of being acquainted with her. "I am acquainted w
992. PAMELA. without taking the name of the family. I have been a widower for ten years^ a
993. rother ? " asked Felicia with ex- treme emotion. "Alas! Madame," replied Mr. Aresley, "
994. the third — " This sion, did unhappy one, carried away by a sad pas- not recogni
995. end of four years. I learned there the death of the widow of my second brother. She
996. survived her mother a few months. This man added that he did not : : ; see his wif
997. see his wife until six months after the death of my sister-in-law, and that then the
998. months after the death of my sister-in-law, and that then the child was no longer
999. at her paleness, he looked at her with emotion. Felicia, as troubled as Pamela, held o
1000.n. Felicia, as troubled as Pamela, held one of her hands in hers, and pressed this
1001.r. If you give up your right to me, you will kill me. In finishing these words, Pame
1002.d opened her eyes. Mr. Aresley seized ! one of her hands. Pamela " said he to her,
1003. 164: PAMELA. the right nor the inhuman desire to tear you away from the arms of your
1004.her; you should consecrate to her every life. moment of your you are that child, tha
1005.unate Selwin, that I have for so long a time deplored as lost, you will only find in
1006.or so long a time deplored as lost, you will only find in me a friend, a tender fath
1007.resley with that grace, that passionate emotion, Pamela threw herself into the that cha
1008.usband, she This woman had reported the death of the young Selwin, feeling sure that
1009.ated, on finding that his niece was the same young person whose virtues had made suc
1010.r own name from that day and, from that time, his affection for Pamela became so ten
1011.ite the Champs Elysees, which entire is one of the most beautiful parks in Paris. t
1012.hicket. Antoinette had in my estimation one very deplorable fault it is true the wo
1013.ne very deplorable fault it is true the world generally fault, is very lenient with a
1014.unctual she was never fection. ready in time to go anywhere she never rose in time,
1015.n time to go anywhere she never rose in time, she was never punctual at meals, she w
1016.ver punctual at meals, she was never in time for school, always tardy, always behind
1017.dy, always behind, Always running after time, instead of taking it by the " forelock
1018. for Nettie, her set mamma did not very good example, for Madame Lavalle considered
1019.y sure that I have heard her express an opinion to that effect. So that ISTettie was al
1020.owed I to carelessly fall into this bad habit, am which is so deplorable in its resul
1021.e in its results, and which leads to so many mistakes. " 1G8 PUNCTUALITY. One very b
1022.to so many mistakes. " 1G8 PUNCTUALITY. One very bright day the carriage drove up a
1023.d " exclaimed Nettie, " such a lovely I will not wait." ! morning for a drive. will
1024. will not wait." ! morning for a drive. will be dressed in Next time I certainly tim
1025.ng for a drive. will be dressed in Next time I certainly time." But a child's disaps
1026.ill be dressed in Next time I certainly time." But a child's disapsorskies, pointmen
1027.ettie, and called to her. " What is the matter, little one, that you are also who was
1028.ed to her. " What is the matter, little one, that you are also who was not with mam
1029.always late. Truly thou dost think that time will wait for Time and tide wait for no
1030.s late. Truly thou dost think that time will wait for Time and tide wait for no man,
1031.thou dost think that time will wait for Time and tide wait for no man, not even thee
1032.will wait for Time and tide wait for no man, not even thee. for a pretty little gir
1033.ur wedding day." " Eh bien, so goes the world I think sometimes," he said to himself,
1034.d to himself, " that it is upside down, will ! be late — people are so careless. H
1035.g- ing up this child with no regard for time. there She should be taught that time w
1036.r time. there She should be taught that time waits for no one, that is a time for ev
1037.should be taught that time waits for no one, that is a time for everything, etc.,"
1038.t that time waits for no one, that is a time for everything, etc.," and he repeatall
1039. and he repeatall the old sayings about time down from the primer ; " and then there
1040.from the primer ; " and then there is a time to die," he well, that is a said almost
1041.vier Leblanc. How the pale rider comes? many of us are ready when How many of us are
1042.er comes? many of us are ready when How many of us are ready when late the Angel of
1043. How many of us are ready when late the Angel of Death hovers over us and is the worl
1044. of us are ready when late the Angel of Death hovers over us and is the world recedin
1045.ngel of Death hovers over us and is the world receding? We should not be too then all
1046.religieuse and did an immense amount of good, by the advise and counsel, that she ga
1047.rself, she was always compelled to coax one of the maids to take her. especial Mada
1048.al Madame Lavalle's own maid seldom had time generally fell to to attend to Nettie,
1049.ie," continued Nettie, "she tells me so many lovely ways of doing and being good, th
1050.lls me so many lovely ways of doing and being good, that I am ! sure I shall learn to
1051. so many lovely ways of doing and being good, that I am ! sure I shall learn to be t
1052.ter a while." " Ah you Julie, " only —one thing— ; are good now^ my pet," said
1053.you Julie, " only —one thing— ; are good now^ my pet," said old ^you are never i
1054.ow^ my pet," said old ^you are never in time. How time ? is iij petit jpegion^ that
1055.," said old ^you are never in time. How time ? is iij petit jpegion^ that you are al
1056.eard mamma say," said Antoinette, "that time was only made for slaves and servIf old
1057.children " Hum, Julie, fine talk to the world was made for them one, ; but here we ar
1058.ine talk to the world was made for them one, ; but here we are, little and now you
1059., ; but here we are, little and now you will see your dear aunt and many a good less
1060.and now you will see your dear aunt and many a good lesson may she teach you." Arriv
1061. you will see your dear aunt and many a good lesson may she teach you." Arrived at t
1062.r ? chiL dren, and Nettie especially. " art thou, dear one How It has been many day
1063.and Nettie especially. " art thou, dear one How It has been many days since thou we
1064.y. " art thou, dear one How It has been many days since thou wert here ? " I know it
1065.re ? " I know it, darling Tanta, out no one had time to bring me. You know how much
1066. know it, darling Tanta, out no one had time to bring me. You know how much I desire
1067.d time to bring me. You know how much I desire to be with you always." " True, the wor
1068.ire to be with you always." " True, the world has duties of its many aemands, many vo
1069.s." " True, the world has duties of its many aemands, many votaries." Have you made
1070.e world has duties of its many aemands, many votaries." Have you made any gooa resol
1071.et lingers with you ? see, ! fault, the one that " dear Tanta, it is the same old f
1072.t, the one that " dear Tanta, it is the same old fault, you know—I am never in tim
1073.ame old fault, you know—I am never in time, never ready." " Do try, cherie, to ove
1074. fault following you everywhere, you it will prevent will never accomplish anything
1075.ing you everywhere, you it will prevent will never accomplish anything ; you from ev
1076.omplish anything ; you from ever making one step forward in progress, because, you
1077.ou from ever making one step forward in progress, because, you will always be taking one
1078. step forward in progress, because, you will always be taking one step backward ever
1079.ess, because, you will always be taking one step backward every time, " Try to live
1080.lways be taking one step backward every time, " Try to live by rule, Nettie dear, it
1081.is quite as necessary, for those in the world, as for the religieuse ; to live by rul
1082.s for the religieuse ; to live by rule, will make all things easy for you, without i
1083.ll things easy for you, without it, all will be confusion. PUNCTrALITY. " 173 be pun
1084.73 be punctual without punctuality, you will ever be running after lost time, to try
1085.ty, you will ever be running after lost time, to try and make it up. And at the end
1086.o try and make it up. And at the end of life, you have nothing to look back upon, bu
1087.ity, " I consider it," continued Madame life. da Costa, " as one of the greatest evi
1088." continued Madame life. da Costa, " as one of the greatest evils in In the abPeoto
1089.to make it. You do is nothing the right time, consequently there much un- done. Il y
1090.not punctual, you are not gen- and from being inaccurate, in even the most minute mat
1091.take of it, but you must remember, dear one, that each time you are not ready, that
1092. you must remember, dear one, that each time you are not ready, that you are not pun
1093.ld try each day to take a step forward^ one step toward perfection. " One day, perh
1094. forward^ one step toward perfection. " One day, perhaps, dear Nettie, you may be c
1095. may be called upon to be the head of a family, and unless you then possess order, sys
1096.system, regularity and punctuality, you will not succeed in making a happy, well-reg
1097.ed down into heart and let us hope they will bring forth soms and fruit." " Try, dea
1098.and fruit." " Try, dear little my blos- one," said Madame da Costa, kissing Nettie
1099.se punctuality daily. Believe me, it is one of the great secrets of success. And no
1100.or a little while and may the angels of peace and order attend thee." Madame da Costa
1101.ese refiections in her heart and making many good resolutions. " To-morrow I will be
1102.efiections in her heart and making many good resolutions. " To-morrow I will begin,"
1103.ng many good resolutions. " To-morrow I will begin," eaid Nettie half out aloud, up
1104.lf out aloud, up the precious pearls of wisdom, that from the sweet lips of her saintl
1105.se at six, as you do, Julie, and than I will be1106. ; " cried the old woman, " why, little one, you will be sleepy all day." ! who hea
1107.d the old woman, " why, little one, you will be sleepy all day." ! who heard some" W
1108.ou going ; PUNCTUALITY. 175 ^^No, no, I will not, it will give me plenty of time to
1109.NCTUALITY. 175 ^^No, no, I will not, it will give me plenty of time to dress and say
1110., I will not, it will give me plenty of time to dress and say my prayers, and to tak
1111.ke a run in the garden, and then, be in time for breakfast ; and then I will not be
1112., be in time for breakfast ; and then I will not be late at school, keep up, and be
1113.d to/' ^'No, no,'^ said Antoinette, ^'I will commence toto morrow off/' ; Tanta has
1114., well,'' said Julie, ^^I expect little will be a Saint soon, and now here we are at
1115.h flowers and as Madame Lavalle entered one door, Antoinette entered the other. ; H
1116.ntered one door, Antoinette entered the other. ; Her mamma exclaimed, ; — ^^Why Net
1117.; — ^^Why Nettie ! are you under what good spell are you resting, that such a refo
1118. such a reformation has taken really in time for dinner place ?" ^^Oh ! dear mamma,
1119.rcome thnt you hatefid fault, of always being behind time I really : am shall see mam
1120.u hatefid fault, of always being behind time I really : am shall see mamma, 1 will b
1121.d time I really : am shall see mamma, 1 will be in time for breakfast, to drive and
1122.ally : am shall see mamma, 1 will be in time for breakfast, to drive and for school,
1123.ooked Nettie, and Eugene exclaimed, the matter ? what leaf.^^ is are turning over a ne
1124.ver a new found a great satisfaction in being praised, and in pleasing others, and fi
1125.t to overcome this fault, and be really good, it was such a healthy moral exercise,
1126.tions; and though we enjoy them for the time being, yet we put oif putting them into
1127.; and though we enjoy them for the time being, yet we put oif putting them into pract
1128.until we forget that we have ever had a good intentions; so lovely, ; intention. PUN
1129.ed efforts for invincible defense. some good end, are really the most armor that we
1130.sted them yes/^ gaily. "Why, ?^^ little one, were you really ready to drive to-day
1131.if you overcome said the Col., sa^d the other that terrible fault, whi(^h is so destr
1132.ult, whi(^h is so destructive to order, peace and happiness, that I will give you on
1133.h is so destructive to order, peace and happiness, that I will give you on your wedding-d
1134.e to order, peace and happiness, that I will give you on your wedding-day, promise.^
1135. now in Her visits to her dear overcome nature and self. Tanta, only served to renew h
1136.rts, which —she was were nothing to a good cause, to — 178 PUNCTUALITY. ; were t
1137.which —she was were nothing to a good cause, to — 178 PUNCTUALITY. ; were to crow
1138.e/' religious it \s as necessary in the world, as in a grew to womanhood, she was a m
1139.ble gentleman, and became the mother of many sweet children, she was like the wise w
1140.home. For you see Nettie had conquered. life. When she t9^ <%^.>^>^^l'. :^tmi>%^ Uni
1141.fine of posed for overdue. 5. two cents will be imeach day that the book is at 9 P.
1142.be returned morning. Failure to book on time subjects the borrower to a fine of 15 c

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/