Concordance for Fabiola, or, The church of the catacombs.

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1.   THE CHURCH OF THE CATACOMBS. PART FIRST PEACE. CHAPTER THE CHRISTIAN is I. we will en
2. T PEACE. CHAPTER THE CHRISTIAN is I. we will enter in with our friend, or " shadow,"
3. on the pavement of which we read, with pleasure, in Mosaic, the greeting SALVE, or WELC
4. and making their way towards gardens on one side, or Sallust's on the other, to enj
5. ardens on one side, or Sallust's on the other, to enjoy their evening walk, and learn
6. l woods, bearing candelabra, lamps, and other household implements of bronze or silve
7. ts, vases, tripods, and objects of mere art. On the walls are paintings evidently o
8. ye which could offend the most delicate mind. Here and there an empty niche, or a co
9. esian was covering the ; sufficient for many lordly dwellings, by the erection of hi
10. from Sallust's garden just alluded to. particular spot in the Canfpns Martins to which we
11. spot in the Canfpns Martins to which we will direct our steps, is one whose situatio
12. s to which we will direct our steps, is one whose situation is so definite, that we
13. e, that we i-urately describe it to any one acquainted with the topo- The graphy of
14. epublican times there by a large square space in the Campus Martius, surrounded board
15. e clearly traceable and it occupied the space now covered by the Doria and Verospi pa
16. rnament, not high, and In the middle of one side of this scarcely broken by windows
17. eyond. Through an arch, opposite to the one whereby we have entered, we catch a gli
18. the place, where we see, for the first time, that we are in no enchanted hall, but
19. sits a matron not beyond the middle of life, whose features, noble yet mild, show t
20. and not Kci/nirntuin, which denotes the state of widowhood a jewel or precious orname
21. thin the upper hem of her dress. At the time that we discover her she is busily enga
22. he Pompeian Court in the Crystal Palace will have familiarized many ; ; ; ; ; reader
23. e Crystal Palace will have familiarized many ; ; ; ; ; readers with tbe foime of an
24. . morning houra lardis. ; and ; i yon 1 will Che subject (I v, antv, in truth. i so
25. i yon 1 will Che subject (I v, antv, in truth. i so cold or insipid tra hope it is no
26. -wrong It I ompanioiiM. ! was not what truth what i-an Q lin i beroountebends si: i-
27. word 'Chris. At id 'faith' instead of 'truth.' 'phil, at the second, I saw take, I s
28. ' 1, in a n years igp, whisper', with ! form and manliness ; there are Beware, my ,"
29. r ,. a in hj s 1 d has se; him for some time in silence, as i. ;se of his unusual de
30. e. I cannot under rudge against me, the cause of which on the contrary, 1 )id much so
31. hem with of ' was not merely a maternal emotion that was agitating her bosom; it was no
32. ither was it the joy having for her son one, in brow. It i <>!' those evil feelings
33. r her son one, in brow. It i <>!' those evil feelings which are usually their bad en
34. heerfully added, 'And now, my comrades, good-bye, and may all ; happiness attend you
35. w, my comrades, good-bye, and may all ; happiness attend you. I part from you, as I have
36. ied Corvinus, now purple in the you, in peace.' " face with fury ' but. The boy's cou
37. ot tell the rest!" "I entreat you, for .God's sake, and for the love you bear your
38. treat you, for .God's sake, and for the love you bear your father's memory," said th
39. and for the love you bear your father's memory," said the mother, placing her hand " u
40. * ardly worshipper abode from us, but I will find you out till then bear this token
41. h an ago; for surely, with much greater justice than the mother of tin; Gracchi showed
42. the fervor of a mother's supplication. Many a pious parent has devcted her infant s
43. m the cradle to the holiest and noblest state that earth possesses has prayed and lon
44. gave up or offered their children, not one, but ninny, yea all, to be victims whol
45. ms whole-burnt, rather than priests, to God ? It was some such thought as this whic
46. the name of 'coward!' It surely was an evil spirit. I felt that I was strong enough
47. ned. And what was passing in that boy's mind, as he too remained silent and abstract
48. d the It was the hardest straggle of my life ; never were flesh and blood so strong
49. flesh and blood so strong within me. O God may " they never be again so tremendous
50. the trembling matron. He replied, " My good angel conquered the demon at my I thoug
51. trembling matron. He replied, " My good angel conquered the demon at my I thought of
52. th my hand to Corvinus, and said, ' May God forgive you, as I freely and fully do a
53. of a church in his boring gate of Home. honor to rise in faithful ages on the banks o
54. ain his ashes, by Pope Honorius I. J No idea that his name would be enrolled in ever
55. s picture, crowned with rays, hung over many altars, as the boy- tables against him.
56. hristian youth, who looked upon it as a matter of course that he must always obey God'
57. tter of course that he must always obey God's lav/ and His Gospel and only felt hap
58. appy that he had that day performed his duty, when it under circumstances of more th
59. f a vision; her eyes what he would havw angel's to be. Silently, and almost unknowing
60. spirit, who had shielded him ever from evil or might he not well see in her the liv
61. d for Christ." and saw him ; it with ti virtue, r's <>i- a.ir racy of thy of thy mar-
62. thy mar- nobler gifts. That hour thank God, haa come She gazed upon it fondly, and
63. of his heart, that its waters The whole family thus seemed that thoii has put off the
64. replaced her treasure in the orth as a man for thou canst think and speak, yea, an
65. en not so and the future combatant thou art too sincere and hon- martyr was consecr
66. ently expressed, that it was a glorious duty to die for the faith, if thou hadst not
67. nd feel it," interrupted " What greater happiness can a Christian desire on earth ?" " Ye
68. What greater happiness can a Christian desire on earth ?" " Yes, my child, thou sayes
69. know it must have been .ily, not merely pain, harder for thy young patrician blood t
70. ain, with the cross npon thy shoulders; one step more, and thou wilt plant it on it
71. inal and the EsIt was that of Fabius, a man of the eqm quiline hills. order, whose
72. of the eqm quiline hills. order, whose family, by farming the revenues of Asiatic pro
73. to ide him? Though I never enjoyed the happiness of r before my mind? ng him, has not Ha
74. er enjoyed the happiness of r before my mind? ng him, has not Has he not been the ve
75. obtain for me, not fame, not distinclot wealth, not earthly joy, but what he valued mo
76. valued more than ' had amassed immense wealth. His house was larger and It cou' more
77. rger and It cou' more splendid than the one we have just visited. a third large per
78. mense apartments and besides possessing many treasures of European art, it abounded
79. s possessing many treasures of European art, it abounded with the rarest production
80. s beyond the Indian ocean, of monstrous form and fabulous descent. Fabius himself, t
81. ver determined thoroughly to enjoy this life. dreamt of any other. Believing in noth
82. ughly to enjoy this life. dreamt of any other. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping,
83. eving in nothing, yet worshipping, as a matter of course, on all proper occasions, wha
84. er deity have its turn, he passed for a man as good as Ids neighbors and no one had
85. y have its turn, he passed for a man as good as Ids neighbors and no one had a right
86. r a man as good as Ids neighbors and no one had a right to exact more. The. ,u part
87. . The. ,u part of his day was passed at one or other of the great 1 1 > ; i "What t
88. ,u part of his day was passed at one or other of the great 1 1 > ; i "What that, my i
89. ld in his own, may be poured . . out in love of his Redeemer, and '" in ih." "Enough
90. es implied in their name, com[ in their many adjuncts the equivalents of clubs. KHUS
91. and whiled away Ms hom sauntered for a time into the Forum to hear some orator spea
92. ome orator speakocnte pleading, or into one of the many public ing, or ionable worl
93. speakocnte pleading, or into one of the many public ing, or ionable world of return-
94. one of the many public ing, or ionable world of return- ing with a holy hood, He obe
95. ed, or p y, : ihcr, up du re. among the many parasites on the look-out with (:. trea
96. did luxury, and the sole heiress of his wealth. This is his year vre are supposed to v
97. remote from the better periods of Roman art, for example, that of the Antonines, as
98. ini, Rnffaole, or Doimtello. Yet in how many Italian palaces are served works by the
99. Fabiola. *. As we have done before, we will conduct the reader at once into her apa
100. site and curious, in native and foreign art. A refined taste directing ample longer
101. silver mirror with a handle, and in the other a strange instrument for BO fair a hand
102. laid with silver, in a room of Cyzicene form that is, having glass windows to the gr
103. plishment they are supposed to possess. One is a black not of the degraded negro st
104. t of the degraded negro stock, but from one of those races, such as the Abyssinians
105. deal with minds. We persons or features will, therefore, content ourselves with sayi
106. ot considered inferior in appearance to other ladies of her rank, age, and fortune, a
107. of her rank, age, and fortune, and had many aspirants for her hand. But she was a c
108. n empress all that surrounded her, with one or two exceptions, and exacted humblo ;
109. duties which now devolve upon her. The other two are garrulous, light, and make grea
110. mistress, or try to promote the suit of one or other of the profligate candidates f
111. s, or try to promote the suit of one or other of the profligate candidates for her ha
112. umf on your guests ! " It has cost : me many trials before I homage from all that ap
113. ought up in indulgence by her careless, good-natured father she had been provided wi
114. adorned presume to aspire to so high an honor. I should be satisfied to ; with every
115. ver known what it was to deny herself a desire. look from outside the door, and see th
116. f gold from Asia. Nothing can equal its beauty ; nor, I may Having been left so much t
117. believed in nothing beyond the present life, and thought of nothing except its refi
118. the very pride threw a shield over her virtue ness of heathen society, as she despise
119. a con- temptuous smile, "what would you desire ? and what have you to praise of your o
120. raise of your own doing ?" " Nothing to desire, noble lady, but that you may be ever h
121. t conscious of having done more than my duty," was the modest and sincere reply.* ;
122. that you are not over given to praise. One seldom hears " a soft word from your mo
123. ong descriptions, trust that our reader will believe that they are requisite, " And
124. to put him ut the hi possession of the state of material and social period of our na
125. and social period of our narrative and will make this the ; a; what she thought a r
126. d and refined for an age of in arts and good tni;N-, we beg to remind him, that the
127. e been bought by me at a high I have as good s price, that you might serve me as 7 p
128. hall, whether ;/" like it or not. A new idea, inure. 1. y will but that of her mistr
129. like it or not. A new idea, inure. 1. y will but that of her mistress, wlien IhT tli
130. nity, belongs to you. All this you have time, health, vigor, body, ami breath. life,
131. time, health, vigor, body, ami breath. life, bought with your gold, and it has beco
132. wn what no h can purchase, no chains of slavery fetter, no limit of life contain." " An
133. o chains of slavery fetter, no limit of life contain." " And pray what is that?" "A
134. contain." " And pray what is that?" "A soul!" " A soul !" re-echoed the astonished
135. " And pray what is that?" "A soul!" " A soul !" re-echoed the astonished Fabiola, wh
136. ound me, which shrinks sensitively from one so lowly and so insignificant as I. But
137. But if I must answer -she pans. simple truth to your antli from her mistress bade !g
138. ior. utiniie "then I put it to your own judgment, w' a poor slave, who holds an unqi; >f
139. ing intelligence, whose "True," replied life "my > t measure of existence dwelling i
140. existence dwelling is above the Di'ity, immortality, whose only true pi whose only rightful
141. r lower in is skies, KS of thought than one who, however gifted, own she claims no
142. nal songsters that bent without hope of liberty against the gilded bars of that cage."*
143. ith fury she felt herself for the first time in her life, rebuked, humbled by a slav
144. felt herself for the first time in her life, rebuked, humbled by a slave. She grasp
145. what is allied to it, as disease is to death. And therefore it abhors all flattery,
146. ot, " ; either is impossible to me. The other two could understand but little of all
147. learn all this folly? Who prate in this many years, spiritual existences are the man
148. Or do you really fancy that when, after death, your corpse will be thrown on the heap
149. ncy that when, after death, your corpse will be thrown on the heap of slaves .who ha
150. gain tinued, this evening." scourged to death, to be burnt in one ignominious pile, a
151. ing." scourged to death, to be burnt in one ignominious pile, and when the mingled
152. mon pit, you mil survive as a conscious being, and have still a life of joy *nd freed
153. as a conscious being, and have still a life of joy *nd freedom to be lived ?" " Non
154. to be lived ?" " Non omnis moriar,'* as one of your poets says," replied lady but w
155. vividly described, there is a hand that will pick out each charred fragment of my fr
156. of my frame. And there is a power that will call to reckoning the four winds of hea
157. e in this my body, not as yours, or any one's bondswoman, but free, and joyful, THE
158. ok place an apparition in you for every duty ? You must be cured of them. In what Fa
159. se? I never read of it in cut short the one, acd prevented the other. The interior
160. in cut short the one, acd prevented the other. The interior chambers in a Borne house
161. rtains any Greek or Latin author." " In one belonging to my own land, a school in w
162. at future ideal existence ing standing, death ; already, even now, you presume to cla
163. already, even now, you presume to claim equality door-curtain, a figure, which she immed
164. eyond nil surrounding in every grace of form and lineament, affection, and embellish
165. d lineament, affection, and embellishes life and rested upon one, unseen by all else
166. n, and embellishes life and rested upon one, unseen by all else, but to her <, and
167. ound a valuable emerald ring, which the good priest Polycarp thought must have been
168. -TU i is. i. t Church. i. Not all of me will die. t Job xii. 27. t ''Thy eyes an: th
169. eir sensitive xpression . est cousin, I will ouo feeling to tin her es her warm and
170. ness to those about her, for her unseen love. When Syra saw this beautiful vision, l
171. this beautiful vision, like that of an angel, But the child took her before her, she
172. ve you from a repetition of your p.iin. Will "Any in "Then think that my request?" m
173. about ymi." "You are mistaken, Agnes. I will master pride for and own, that I shall
174. her. It hi a new feeling in me towards one in her station." " But I think, Fabiola
175. uld make her sappier than she it is you will allow is her name. You will is." ; "No
176. e it is you will allow is her name. You will is." ; "No doubt, dear Agnes yon have t
177. and cheerfully anxious to discharge his duty. And for such she was, with cordial aff
178. its haughty exer- there seems to be no one who thinks of commanding. Come, cise. O
179. e who thinks of commanding. Come, cise. One of these was her old nurse and i'reodwo
180. t in that mysterious chamber, which you will syue, who directed all her private hoii
181. Home. you make everybody and everything love you. Another was her young visitor, who
182. to dine, and I was anxious to have some one with whom fore her, nay, as if she hear
183. , as if she heard speaking to her, some one people I could have the excuse of a dut
184. one people I could have the excuse of a duty to converse. Yet I own I delicately bel
185. come to pass have some curiosity about one of our new guests. and, at any vius, of
186. ests. and, at any vius, of whose grace, wealth, and accomplishments I hear so rate, if
187. ho or what he is, or the sort of person one would like to see near one so you reall
188. rt of person one would like to see near one so you really must let me have her. " w
189. kind parents willingly allow me high an opinion of your good sense to believe such a th
190. lingly allow me high an opinion of your good sense to believe such a therefore, make
191. y allow me high an opinion of your good sense to believe such a therefore, make no ap
192. you have come to me as usual," said the other play- sible.' But as to Syra's devotedn
193. fever, it required the lash to make the other slaves apas if you were every day a bri
194. were every day a bride. be celebrating one eternal espousal. But, good heavens wha
195. celebrating one eternal espousal. But, good heavens what proach me while that poor
196. red spot it looks like "And did you not love her for this ?" If so let rn<> change y
197. not love her for this ?" If so let rn<> change your dress at once." blood. " Not for t
198. r dress at once." blood. " Not for the "Love her! Love a slave, child! Of course, I
199. once." blood. " Not for the "Love her! Love a slave, child! Of course, I took care
200. that she foolishly shares her The whole truth flashed upon Fabiola's mind. Agnes had
201. The whole truth flashed upon Fabiola's mind. Agnes had What a seen all and humbled
202. u then wish to exhibit proof to all the world strange fancy, "Dearest Fabiola," excla
203. st, to join our my father has called in one or table to- two new tender look which
204. lesson of fortitude and of elevation of mind, learnt such as few patrician philosoph
205. osophers can teach us." "What a strange idea? Indeed, Agnes, I have often thought th
206. om a slave, ourselves, endowed with the same ami the same organization. Thus far you
207. urselves, endowed with the same ami the same organization. Thus far you will admit,
208. ami the same organization. Thus far you will admit, at any rate, to go no higher, Th
209. at any rate, to go no higher, Then they form and if God, from whom comes our ;ily pa
210. to go no higher, Then they form and if God, from whom comes our ;ily part of tin l
211. d, from whom comes our ;ily part of tin life, is thereby our Father, He is theirs as
212. ost irresistible of petitioners. But we will not bargain together. Send some one to-
213. we will not bargain together. Send some one to-morrow, to see my father's steward,
214. ow, to see my father's steward, and all will be right. And now, this great piece of
215. . And now, this great piece of business being settled between us, let us go down to o
216. rgotten to put on your jewels." " Never mind them I will do without them for once. I
217. ut on your jewels." " Never mind them I will do without them for once. I feel no tas
218. of ! ; " CHAPTER VL THE BANQtTET. their being allowed to move, to act, to think, or t
219. leful of friends was always mailo. We ; will therefore content ourselves with saying
220. site in arrangement and material and we will confine ourselves entirely to such inci
221. anners, lint apparently goodin a, short time quietly p v ,,f the two ladies entered
222. g to me. come, I dare say you have some one already in view." Come, During most of
223. dress, which was meant to be thoroughly good-natured, as it was perfectly worldly, A
224. as perfectly worldly, Agnes appeared in one of her abstracted moods, her bewitched
225. miling ecstasy, as if attending to some one else, but never losing the thread of th
226. swered Fabius "Oh, yes, most certainly, one who has already pledged me to him by hi
227. le of pagan Koine, the obscurity of his history, and the suddenness of his apparition,
228. ired a feeling of mistrust, and gave an idea that his ; ; ; exterior softness only c
229. ast, Fabioln nnd Agnes were together on one side, the two younger guests last descr
230. ; their position about three parts of a being round table OIK unencumbered by the sty
231. ou must tell me your secret. Your first love, no doubt may it last long and make you
232. ne was a heavy, thick-necked ing to the other guests. : "What news " I looked in at t
233. toSallust's gardens, and found them the other day, on my way last year. There is an i
234. g columns." Boman sophist, or dealer in universal knowledge, named Calpurnius ; another,
235. " Boman sophist, or dealer in universal knowledge, named Calpurnius ; another, Proculus,
236. us ; another, Proculus, a mere lover of good fare, often at the house. Two more rema
237. cimen of a noble-hearted youth, full of honor and generous thoughts strong and brave,
238. d even persons condemned to to come and labor at Chersonesus, who can possibly be spa
239. and Christians, thus set to the work, : will soon finish it." "And why Christians be
240. sh it." "And why Christians better than other criminals?" asked, ; with some curiosit
241. at once pray how ?" " naturally do not love "Ordinary convicts," answered he, their
242. ge for marriage, according to the Roman law. I have seen young cheerful and obedien
243. e resemblance to tlio letter C, the old form of X. curia u <>!' rur: < '.\TACOMJIS.
244. them, and most justly because it is the will of the divine emperors that their lot s
245. (1. plain." that I admire this sort of justice," replied Fa" but what a I am most stra
246. rious to know what can be the motive or cause of this stubiola; I "I cannot say man t
247. cause of this stubiola; I "I cannot say man torn by a most powerful beaHt, or u nob
248. he soldier replied, "depend upon it, it will be on the side of the not on that of th
249. ounder of which flourished CHAPTER "VTL many years ago in Chaldea. His doctrines wer
250. s doctrines were brought to Home at the time of Vespasian by two brothers named Pete
251. Paul. Some maintain that these were the same twin DUBWO the latter part of the conve
252. ws that won her heart ? He thought over many, but could find no anthe second of thes
253. he second of these brothers, seeing the other's victims give swer. The gift of rich j
254. rmer was discovered Suddenly the bright idea flashed through his mind that Fulvius,
255. nly the bright idea flashed through his mind that Fulvius, who daily exhibited new a
256. ! : ; 1 . followers, whom pre- they had many, made the cross their symbol and adore
257. re- they had many, made the cross their symbol and adore it, and they think it the gre
258. dore it, and they think it the greatest honor to suffer stripes, and even ignominious
259. to suffer stripes, and even ignominious death as the best means of being like their t
260. ignominious death as the best means of being like their teachers and, as they fancy,
261. " observed Proeulus, " that the ThermsB will be finished soon, and we shall have glo
262. id, Fulvius, that the divine Dioclesian will sport. himself come to the dedication ?
263. not have to wait so long ; already, for other purposes, have orders been sent to Numi
264. my fault I had delighted with the noble will there ! and so sents. He, moreover, not
265. s of the two, and astonish his daughter one day by the sagacity he had displayed Bu
266. humble scenes and follow Syra from the time that she left her young mistress's apar
267. he presented herself to Euphrosyne, the good-natured nurse was shocked at the cruel
268. th a noble mistress, and Mich a learned one Why, Calpuruius himself would be afraid
269. s, yon gave me could I contemplate with pleasure, in cold blood, the struggle* if it des
270. the spectacles which you call noble. I will draw my sword No, willingly against any
271. against any enemy of the princes or the state but I would as readily draw it against
272. nd rushed Pale, sick, which had drunken man, to , to his lodgings. and staggering,
273. nted to the stains of blood. Tliat dark man said nothing; but his swarthy countenan
274. aster's was ashy and livid. " It is the same, no doubt," at length spoke the attenda
275. n tongue "but she is certainly dead." " Art thou quite sure, Eurotas ?" asked the m
276. eenest of his hawk's looks. "As sure as man can be of what he has not seen himself.
277. find this ? And whence this blood ?" "I will tell thee all to-morrow lam too sick to
278. s eyes had never 'tunned with the outer world. D 1 " Sit down, dear Citcilia," said S
279. have brought it here for you." " " you will fare sumptuously." How How so ? I think
280. e it is a treat to me to see ; ! " Why, truth, greater you enjoy anything than to enj
281. elf." Xo, dear Syra, no it must not be. God has wished me to be poor, and I must tr
282. me to be poor, and I must try to do His will. I could no more think of eating the fo
283. ong us I can obtain that of the poor. I love to ' ; v.ithyou your pittimutnin*, whic
284. which I know is given me in charity by one poor like myself. I procure for you the
285. onsolation of feeling that I am, before God, still only a poor blind thing. I think
286. l only a poor blind thing. I think ,.11 love me better thus, than if feeding on luxu
287. uch better and wiser you are than I, my good child It shall be as you wish. I will g
288. y good child It shall be as you wish. I will give the dish to my companions, and, in
289. t been shed now." " Tut, tut this is no time for dreams or fancies. Did anyone see t
290. see thee pick the the thing up ?" " No one, I am sure." " Then we are safe better
291. e better in our hands than in others. A good night's rest will give us better counse
292. nds than in others. A good night's rest will give us better counsel." "True, Eurotas
293. th at once his devoted guardian and his evil genius. Fulvius tossed about, and moane
294. ! ; : ; "Thanks, thanks, dear sister I will await your return." Syra went to the ma
295. omi.ig out. iilind friend, when she saw one of the noble guests of her mistiv.^s's
296. rm, while ou the summit of the mast the same scarf streams out, like a pennant, unru
297. dst the sea-birds that shriek around, a form with a torch in her hand, and black fla
298. n in fiery letters, NEMESIS.* But it is time to return to our other acquaintance in
299. MESIS.* But it is time to return to our other acquaintance in the house of Fabius. Af
300. her bosom, then quivered as if about to one another, a shiver her frame, while pers
301. oft, her whole action so motherly, that one would have thought it was a parent mini
302. v. mce by her gesture. Ions of wile on one siil:' vohm'-e The heart of Fabiola was
303. h:ul never Lma mid In". 1 "God it. s, "i" all ; "And do "It ; snob a t
304. ; 1 think, now, I asked me if I did not love a slave. xrald almost love Syra. I half
305. if I did not love a slave. xrald almost love Syra. I half regret that I have agreed
306. chief thought and the occupation of my life,. I will try to win her by <'o. by assi
307. ought and the occupation of my life,. I will try to win her by <'o. by assiduity, ev
308. -day. And when all is exhausted, I havo one resource more." "What is that ?" both a
309. What is that ?" both asked. "To give my life for her conversion. I know that a slave
310. disdain such humble victims. But be thu life it will for her soul is placed in His h
311. such humble victims. But be thu life it will for her soul is placed in His hands. An
312. ictims. But be thu life it will for her soul is placed in His hands. And oh, 313. oor iu lady)," said Agnes. ed, generous virtue "You have conquered, sister Syrn. (oh n
314. a look of arch ; "say that she has said one very wicked thing, and told laugh i , .
315. ike st. only do so by finding some some one still poorer and That thought makes her
316. Agnes, It have you present, to hear the good news I bring to Syra. Fabiola has allow
317. Syra. Fabiola has allowed me to become will iiiiike i/nu happy too. your mistress,
318. round Syra's neck, exclaimed : "Oh, how good. you will now be, dear Syra !" But Syra
319. 's neck, exclaimed : "Oh, how good. you will now be, dear Syra !" But Syra was deepl
320. and replied with faltering " Oh voice, good and gentle lady, you have been kind ind
321. pardon me if I enlo think so much about one like me. treat you to remain as I am ;
322. Ceecilia, I am shall be free, Cuecilia cause I declined eating some trumpery delicac
323. given up lib the free exercise of your religion, and have offered to give up life itsel
324. r religion, and have offered to give up life itself, for the salvation of one who is
325. ve up life itself, for the salvation of one who is your tyrant and tormentor. Oh, f
326. the three that Agnes's litter was : TV one who could have seen the the noble lady,
327. ther 1" fore, "See how these Christians love quite stay ?" asked Agnes. "Because," r
328. o abide with I own this is find, in the state wherein we have been called.* not the o
329. o much the more clear is it to me, that God has willed me to serve Him in this cond
330. re eagerly, "we can easily manage it. I will not free you, and you shall be my bondw
331. ou, and you shall be my bondwoman. That will be just the same." "No, no," said Syra,
332. be my bondwoman. That will be just the same." "No, no," said Syra, smiling, "that w
333. e." "No, no," said Syra, smiling, "that will never do. Our great 'Servants, be subje
334. s are 'H with all fear, not only to the good and gentle, but also to the froward. "t
335. am far from saying that my mistress is one of these; but you, noble Lady Agnes, ar
336. ese; but you, noble Lady Agnes, are too good and gentle Where would be my cross, if
337. t know how proud and headstrong I am by nature; and I should fear for myself, if I had
338. ould fear for myself, if I had not some pain and humilia; : happy here." "But why wi
339. the door, and see Agnes linger a little time about and listen to the merry conversat
340. ks as it has grown dark, panied home by one of her attendants, and the girl is amus
341. that on this very account night are the same to her, and the appointed guide to thre
342. h she walks in if thus we pass a little time before safety at all hours ; re-enterin
343. d torches, are running for something or other that is every direction, looking Euphro
344. than ever to possess such a treasure of virtue, and said, "I see, Syra, that no motive
345. I may improve by your advice and ex you will not refuse such a request." " And there
346. rereplied the slave, "you can never be. will appeal to yourself from your request. Y
347. equest. You know Livelier. What a noble soul, and what a splendid intellect she poss
348. t she had taken it off, and put it o;< (one it, and she '.veil as Euphro Tlu> reade
349. t, and she '.veil as Euphro Tlu> reader will i , Indeed, sin for she scorned to tell
350. as Euphro Tlu> reader will i , Indeed, sin for she scorned to tell a lie. The kind
351. . 1 Pet. ii. 11. Kuphrosyue had all the good hi the servants iute -end. : and manj 1
352. fell even searched, to i Syrti's great pain and confusion; and then :i only towards
353. Iio 1'nr moment Could have '!e her owji soul. of purloining Then Syra's i conversati
354. Moor to be opened annoy the poor girl. being oi'ten again through her mind it was pa
355. or girl. being oi'ten again through her mind it was painful to her, yet she could no
356. felt ns if that day were a dims in her life. Her pride had been humbled by a and he
357. Her pride had been humbled by a and her mind softened, she knew not how. Had her eye
358. rbs at full inoon for if plucked at any other time, they -would not 3 virtues to proc
359. full inoon for if plucked at any other time, they -would not 3 virtues to procure d
360. ill all Buch as consulted her imaginary art. was given up, and Syra found herself a
361. slave (prayer and willing sacrifice of life breathed upwards together), which, when
362. struck the crystal footstool of a this world, < mercy-seat in heaven, fell down agai
363. onclusion, she determined to commit the matter entirely to God, and sought that repose
364. rmined to commit the matter entirely to God, and sought that repose which a good co
365. to God, and sought that repose which a good conscience-was sure to render balmy and
366. ervices had been rendered to her by her other two servants and Euphrosyne, she dismis
367. such as she it betrayed some scheme or art, of -which Agnes might She resolved to
368. hich glowed golden fruit. midst of this space she saw the poor blind girl, with her l
369. w the poor blind girl, with her look of happiness on her cheerful countenance, seated on
370. enance, seated on the ground ; while on one side, Agnes, with her sweetest simple l
371. h her sweetest simple looks, and on the other, Syra, with her quiet patient smile, hu
372. essed her. Fabiola felt an irresistible desire to be with them it seemed to her that t
373. brilliant, and most refreshing. Oh, for courage to plunge into this stream, through whi
374. d be crossed, and land in safety on the other side and still they beckoned, urging he
375. unning into, and underwoveii with, each other; and this dark veil grew and grew, till
376. opposite conclusion to She made up her mind to prevent any access to Agnes, at leas
377. then bl.imed herself for having brought one so young into which of-en met at her fa
378. istinctly traceable oi< ue.iiiiy at the same moment that l-'ulvii >uch, had come to
379. rself. "How ever u foolish from all the other word escapes his lips, it an, I cheerfu
380. line, the two hills taking in the whole space now occupied bv the Coliseum. Vespasian
381. : 1 i, How absteniioi: :, at the how if other edifices, -with ite materials. Th palac
382. ten times of visitation, v.\ the square space, nvi and plauied with and hasten hours
383. s Still ;uid (lowers. By the left, this time i|>al they hud reached 8 of keeping you
384. s, constructed by Alexander Severus in. honor of his mother, MamnuBa, whose name they
385. iseum, or Flavian amphitheatre, rose at one side, in ; all its completeness and the
386. es him into his friendship. ear. On the other side, the lofty building called the Sop
387. hly glory rose unheeded before the such prudence and considerateness, as gave confidence
388. the thv the innocence and candor of his mind. But he well saw the his last discourse
389. arded, he said to his companion, "Every time so brilliantly, as if on purpose to dra
390. and bright, completion of the greatest prophecy of the Gospel the destruc- what must th
391. agine it to be like a that another arch will one day arise to commemorate no less ri
392. it to be like a that another arch will one day arise to commemorate no less richly
393. a victory over the second enemy of our religion, the heathen points of golden thread ma
394. ; t ,, ; ! pire, as the Christianity " God forbid I would shed the last drop of my
395. on it, when the empire is converted, it will not be by such gradual growth as we now
396. st sanguine longings, forecast; but all will exclaim This is the change of the right
397. ecast; but all will exclaim This is the change of the right hand of the ! means of est
398. e, Sebastian," said the youth, with the same look up to his friend, as a few evening
399. ade "A : Most High " !' doubt; but your idea of a Christian triumphal arch supposes
400. s, my thoughts, I own, turn towards the family of one of the Augusti, as showing a sli
401. ghts, I own, turn towards the family of one of the Augusti, as showing a slight ger
402. stantius Chlorus." "But, Sebastian, how many of even our learned and good men will s
403. stian, how many of even our learned and good men will say, nay do say, if you speak
404. w many of even our learned and good men will say, nay do say, if you speak thus to t
405. Why, they ask, should we not expect the same results now ?" : mother's inspired gaze
406. UOLA thnt is tlie ; OR ; musie Omt or n time, must accompany us to our bro! tri- ih!
407. hen Paneratius again .-; iv ill your We will not, ho, the entire dialogue. Of the sl
408. " till sai.l, Not immediately and thoy will drop in one by ible, come into my chamb
409. , Not immediately and thoy will drop in one by ible, come into my chamber, whore no
410. e, come into my chamber, whore none : ' will interrupt us." ilie terrace, and entere
411. ius," said the officer, to have my sage opinion ?" I dare say," replied the youth, bash
412. hfully, .!<-, "for a bold find generous man like you but an important one to an uns
413. generous man like you but an important one to an unskilful and weak boy like me."
414. tried to direct a cool interrogatory to one stretched upon the rack, and quhei agon
415. tched upon the rack, and quhei agony on one side, while the last sentence of beatin
416. ating to with bullet-laden scourges was being exc< to sleep calmly after such scenes,
417. ition, was not an of the bar could ; "A good and virtuous one, I and rise with npj o
418. of the bar could ; "A good and virtuous one, I and rise with npj occupation to whic
419. at every word. "You are aware I have a quantity ol plate at home be supposed to aspire.
420. ruel, but because he was a cold-hearted man, not of pity or partiality. His tribuna
421. up, and of no use to anybody. I have no one to whom all this should descend. I am,
422. ss and the indigent. Why should wait my death, to have what by reversion is theirs ?
423. el spectacles I him, and angry when any one got off. He grew up sottish, coarse, an
424. ated and freckled countenance and blear one of which eyes, closed, announced him to
425. e united in himself a pertain amount of animal courage and strength, and a considerabl
426. d in himself a pertain amount of animal courage and strength, and a considerable measur
427. experienced ia hiiuself a, generous No one hod feeling, and he had never curbed an
428. hod feeling, and he had never curbed an evil passion. ever offended him, whom he did
429. d blessed him for his brutal contumely. Justice and mercy, good and evil done to him, w
430. is brutal contumely. Justice and mercy, good and evil done to him, were equally odio
431. contumely. Justice and mercy, good and evil done to him, were equally odious to hin
432. re of no value to me whatever. But they will be to the poor, especially in the hard
433. of Oh, no fear about that ; to tell the truth, I feared it sumptuous and impertinent
434. feared it sumptuous and impertinent in one of Tertullus had no fortune to give him
435. m, and he seemed to have genius to make one. To become possessed of one, however, w
436. ius to make one. To become possessed of one, however, was all-important to his mind
437. one, however, was all-important to his mind ; for wealth, as the means little felic
438. er, was all-important to his mind ; for wealth, as the means little felicity. ; of gra
439. ake himself a way in society, he sought other means, more kindred to A ! his mind, fo
440. ht other means, more kindred to A ! his mind, for the attainment of his ambitious or
441. onversation with the black sires. slave will best explain. But why I require gold-du
442. t the Meta Sudans again, for the fourth time, at this inconvenient hour. What news h
443. u, to get the distribution made at Rome other house and as from a say from one who ne
444. Rome other house and as from a say from one who needs ; None, except that after to-
445. mouths." sires to remain unknown." " I will serve you with delight, my good and tru
446. n." " I will serve you with delight, my good and truly noble h, did you not hear the
447. gain, and with an epithet expressive of will." no good versin.- coached the window s
448. with an epithet expressive of will." no good versin.- coached the window so close tw
449. that the cornice between ; them i and a man. -/lit, ir seeing After the speakers, e
450. fortune. What expense can these things cause ?" " Very great indeed. The most precio
451. ious ingredients are And do you think I will go requisite, and must be paid for. suc
452. ir success. *(jt;i " They considered it duty to catch, if possible, the thread nrt:
453. ow can I ? You know I am not cut out by nature, or fitted by accomplishments, to muke
454. would rather trust to the power of your one's affections. no you one piece of advic
455. power of your one's affections. no you one piece of advice if you have which you c
456. , you mean." " depend upon it, there is one They cannot be separated that is irretJ
457. hing which you may bring with you black art." " Then let " p let 'i'li"y rid is ii
458. 'i'li"y rid is ii ! ; Hi to It work. I will i your hini ma give ; Christian money.
459. not as dark as I am in skin, fully His language and mine are sufficiently allied for in
460. to be able to converse. He has asked me many questions he would purchase my liberty,
461. me many questions he would purchase my liberty, about poisons, and pretended WITEX the
462. ose of the and from the wink of the old man's awful to concert proper measures, in
463. s to Koine to be employed in plain. the same line." Sebastian, enjoying the unbounde
464. he palace. Numerous conversion jiully " One way, however, is easy." been made but s
465. d there had " What is that ?" wholesale one effected, the particulars of which lire
466. nuine acts of this glorious soldier. In virtue of tempt in vain to run down with the f
467. ith the fleetest horses bat which^ laws many Christians were seized and brought to t
468. ed and brought to trial, often ended in death. Two brothers, Marcus and 3! if you loo
469. , and rushed to "Yes, and a most fierce one; such as has never been before." save t
470. of a strong room in the house of the in one or two good fat ones, half whose care t
471. room in the house of the in one or two good fat ones, half whose care they had been
472. look about for pounce upon them, get a good was generally left to that officer and
473. re of their confiscation, and come with one good handful to father of the two youth
474. f their confiscation, and come with one good handful to father of the two youths, ha
475. stly smile as she proceeded: "I suspect one of my fellow-servants is one. Oh, how I
476. "I suspect one of my fellow-servants is one. Oh, how I detest her I" " What makes y
477. their threatened doom m ; there ness. " Good what next ?" "Then she cares not for mo
478. ebastian the youths snatched from their fate. that of tin's crowd not one would be f
479. rom their fate. that of tin's crowd not one would be found whom a siofficial duty,
480. ot one would be found whom a siofficial duty, or a hope of pardon, or hatred of Chri
481. he ? If thr. wn"_!:I thus be offered to God instead of two, so all that lie dread.
482. uncovered head, and displayed his by an emotion of tender grief, as he looked upon the
483. ubdued by its power yet all was lost if one re; ; ; mained behind. He saw the dange
484. prisoned for Him whose been a spirit of peace, such as visited Peter in his dungeon a
485. ho have was Nicostratus's office "it is time for thee to depart. I canalready your f
486. and of tears?" impel these young men to death but my duty is imperative, The two yout
487. " impel these young men to death but my duty is imperative, The two youths hung down
488. the least of Christ's servants how then will you stand the angry glance of the Lord,
489. that terrible day, when He, in return, will deny you before His angels ? When, inst
490. d of standing manfully before Him, like good and faithful servants, as to-morrow ye
491. t have stronger evidences than even thy virtue." "Oh, speak to him then, thou !* said
492. I saw her "For six years," replied the other, with a faltering voice, "her once eloq
493. aven then burst forth hi these words "O God Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the be
494. the beginning of "Wait in patience, my good old man," said Sebastian, with the kind
495. nning of "Wait in patience, my good old man," said Sebastian, with the kindest look
496. eeded ; intrust it for once to the with God's grace, thou too shalt soon. Your fath
497. worthy of Me. your aged parents eternal life by your own loss of it. Will silent pra
498. ts eternal life by your own loss of it. Will silent prayer, with his right hand made
499. Christians by abandoning Christianity ? Will sign of the cross, saying "Zoe, speak d
500. tians by abandoning Christianity ? Will sign of the cross, saying "Zoe, speak dost t
501. f the Cross by deserting its standard ? Will you teach them that its doctrines are m
502. k that Nicostratus uttered, as he threw life, by preferring life to them ? Do you wa
503. ttered, as he threw life, by preferring life to them ? Do you want to gain for them,
504. u want to gain for them, not the mortal life of the perishable body, but the eternal
505. of the perishable body, but the eternal life himself on his knees, and bathed Sebast
506. parents to misery and sorrow ? Does thy religion command this, and dost thou call it hol
507. and dost thou call it holy ?" : ; young man, whoever thou art," exclaimed Tranquill
508. it holy ?" : ; young man, whoever thou art," exclaimed Tranquillinus, the father o
509. ition throw your Saviour the crowns you will receive, and entreat for your parents'
510. both the brothers. " " Claudius, "said one, put on me again the chains you have ?
511. me again the chains you have ? ; of the soul Then hasten yourselves tears. down at t
512. eet of i off." "Nicostratus," added the other, "give orders for the sentenca to bo ca
513. s said, The victory was complete. Every one was gamed and immediate steps were take
514. Sebastian lost no his wife, to the full liberty of his house. tune in putting them unde
515. t'll ; Chmiui'tius that I am fn> sous I will die with them for t: religion which can
516. am fn> sous I will die with them for t: religion which can make " heroes thus of boys. "
517. of boys. "Audi," continued tho mother, "will not be separated from my husband and ch
518. iends, As they were I'aucratius home. a matter of lift- "r .tenth to V.\~-\<< a'l : Im
519. ed with interest to the account man bion; and hud "ecurred. Tranquilliuu.s'
520. greatly He was himself a victim to the same disease, and sufstruck. fered agonies o
521. isease, and sufstruck. fered agonies of pain. "If," he said, "what you relate be But
522. the lal like that Torquatus. I fear lie will give U.H trouble." "To tell tho truth,"
523. ie will give U.H trouble." "To tell tho truth," answered the soldier, " 1 would rathe
524. ember, that he ia a I can have personal experience of this -healing I certainly will not r
525. experience of this -healing I certainly will not resist its evidence." power, Sebast
526. ceding, as an experiment of its healing virtue, would have been a superstition. Sebast
527. n. Sebastian took another course, which will be later described, and Chromatius comp
528. he emperor. Tertulhis, It neophyte, and will improve in time, and by grace." As they
529. ulhis, It neophyte, and will improve in time, and by grace." As they passed into the
530. and prefect of the Prsetoso the reader will rium, had been named his successor perc
531. ve enumerated in the officer's chamber. Many of them resided in, or about, the palac
532. and for withdrawing from observation so many persons, whose change of life and retir
533. from observation so many persons, whose change of life and retirement from office woul
534. vation so many persons, whose change of life and retirement from office would excite
535. tes should join him there, and, forming one household, should go on with religious
536. d this horrid turmoil takes place every time she comes." "Indeed!" said Pancratius,
537. tius, " and can you tell me what is the religion these Africans follow ?" "I do not know
538. are conscious that we worship the only One living God in spirit and "Good as they
539. ous that we worship the only One living God in spirit and "Good as they truth, by s
540. the only One living God in spirit and "Good as they truth, by sin, who know what ca
541. living God in spirit and "Good as they truth, by sin, who know what care we take to
542. d in spirit and "Good as they truth, by sin, who know what care we take to keep our
543. ong, O Lord how long?' " So long," said Pain rat. us, pausing on the steps outside t
544. n this pale light, and until the Sun of Justice shall rise upon our country in His beau
545. tice shall rise upon our country in His beauty, and enrich we abhor? ' ! " it with His
546. lain, and far upon the sea ; Torquatus, one of the former prisoners, converted by S
547. almost contemptuously of and by degrees one white edifice after the other sparkled
548. by degrees one white edifice after the other sparkled in this flight from danger, as
549. expected, Sebastian," observed " and so will it with the rest into the country. He i
550. ant sun rises Pancratius; How beautiful will it going his own way. this benighted co
551. ighted country. fully upon it was, Only one more point remained to be decided then
552. colony, and direct its operations. ment one and another of the charms, as yot conce
553. cealed, of Here wa renewed a contest of love between the holy our till starting into
554. holy type of Borne, and have the first chance of martyrdom. But now the the city o" G
555. e of martyrdom. But now the the city o" God. Will they who live in those times see
556. martyrdom. But now the the city o" God. Will they who live in those times see differ
557. er brought in, from the Pope, these Or, will they look beatifies, and worthily value
558. iest of the title of onlv at the narrow space around tbem, and hold their hands St. P
559. rts, and leave Sebastian to the arduous duty of encourag- know dear Sebastian, but I
560. ar Sebastian, but I hop? that you and I will look ; : ; not, ing confessors, and p,
561. i!\ve!!i:ig on that, holy mount, v < of life."* lirilliantly- came completely a dead
562. rulers. ti : and hud affectionately bid one another good night, Paucratius seemed t
563. and hud affectionately bid one another good night, Paucratius seemed to hesitate a
564. ry risky then you added, that there was one ; popular fury Hence also we read of a
565. Hence also we read of a bitter p MI in one part of the empire, while other portion
566. r p MI in one part of the empire, while other portions enjoyed complete peace. Perhap
567. , while other portions enjoyed complete peace. Perhaps a few examples of the various
568. various phases of persecution n l>eii.' will illustrate the real relations of the pr
569. the real relations of the primitiv the State, bettor than mere description; and the
570. ce what he is so familiar with, that it will seem commonplace. Trajan was by no mean
571. eem commonplace. Trajan was by no means one of the cruel emperors on the contrary,
572. ough he your longing ardor to give your life for Christ." published no new edicts ag
573. d no new edicts against the Christians, many noble " And why, Pancratius, do you des
574. any noble " And why, Pancratius, do you desire so much to know this martyrs amongst th
575. n from Serenius G " Yes, most solemnly. God bless you !" anus, pro-consul of Asia.
576. s conversion to the constancy of the WE will take advantage of the holiday which Rom
577. muse- published his persecuting edicts, many Christians had sufV. Such were the s of
578. a merely didactic way, en- torments and death. Scillita in Africa, and SS. Perpetua a
579. ning the d written, and purpose in your mind which -would effectually restrain you b
580. check ; ; . : . may them for what light will follow. already prepare the very compre
581. ow. already prepare the very compressed form in which the early history of the Churc
582. very compressed form in which the early history of the Church is generally studied, and
583. m, we may easily be led to an erroneous idea of the state of This may happen in two
584. sily be led to an erroneous idea of the state of This may happen in two differour fir
585. ought down by herself to the eve of her death, form one of the most touching and exqu
586. own by herself to the eve of her death, form one of the most touching and exquisitel
587. y herself to the eve of her death, form one of the most touching and exquisitely be
588. Church. From these historical facts it will be evident that while there was from ti
589. ll be evident that while there was from time to time a more active, severe and gener
590. ident that while there was from time to time a more active, severe and general perse
591. e persecution of Severus had relaxed in other parts, it local cessations, were partia
592. for outward development or inward that religion could enorganization, none for splendor
593. condemned, be devoured by be: i On the other without an interval of peace and consol
594. : i On the other without an interval of peace and consolation. hand, we may suppose,
595. duration, but definitely separated from one antimes of complete rest. other by "id
596. ated from one antimes of complete rest. other by "id we desire to state Either of the
597. times of complete rest. other by "id we desire to state Either of these views la -.mil
598. omplete rest. other by "id we desire to state Either of these views la -.million of t
599. es of that most pregnant portion of her history. Tertullian, the oldest Christian Latin
600. illness. his crimes ; reminding him of many judgments which had fallen cruel judges
601. the Christians in various parts of the world. Yet such was the charity of these holy
602. ithout practising cruelty, by acting as other m-.i. had done. For instance, Cineius S
603. ndemnation would encourage tumults. lug one ready to yield upon the application of
604. can also easily understand how, at any particular time, a savage persecution might rage i
605. asily understand how, at any particular time, a savage persecution might rage in Gau
606. he main part of the Church was enjoying peace. But Borne was undoubtedly the place mo
607. t. To be elected Pope was equivalent to being promoted to martyrdom. Nay, oases occur
608. embling, no iie'ii morality or Christum truth, was ever pel-milled to engffl But ever
609. s consequences fell often The heiitlien world, the world of ily upon those who held i
610. ces fell often The heiitlien world, the world of ily upon those who held it. power, o
611. ho held it. power, of influence, and of state, the world which made laws as best suit
612. power, of influence, and of state, the world which made laws as best suited it, and
613. best suited it, and executed them, the world that loved earthly prosperity and hated
614. stupid, grovi interval is glorified by many noble martyrdoms. During such and anti-
615. ily worship was practised, security and peace depended much v.pon the state of popula
616. urity and peace depended much v.pon the state of popular and the penitential canons w
617. uring the pontificate tality. civilized life, could suffice to screen them from such
618. the After these digressive remarks, we will resume, and unite alms of the faithful,
619. iod of our narrative, the Church was in one of those longer intervals of comparativ
620. f those longer intervals of comparative peace, which gave opporFrom the death of Vale
621. arative peace, which gave opporFrom the death of Valerian, in tunity for great develo
622. y a mysterious system, which spread, no one could see how, and exercised an influen
623. , and exercised an influence derived no one whence. Families were startled at findi
624. n or daughter to hare embraced this new law, with which they wei aware that they ha
625. had often seen Fulvius at the baths and other places of public resort, had admired an
626. moroseness, he could never have found A custom of ancient Roman life will remove on ob
627. er have found A custom of ancient Roman life will remove on objection courage to add
628. ve found A custom of ancient Roman life will remove on objection courage to address
629. ent Roman life will remove on objection courage to address him, had he not now discover
630. missed. Hundreds might thus liance with one who otherwise might prove a dangerouo r
631. or the back entrance, and little or the space round his theatre, in the neighborhood
632. ther important phenomenon in the social life lately destroyed the scene, as it was c
633. d The garof the early Christians, which one would hardly know how to Dioclesi;in ha
634. s of the martyrs, and in ecclesiastical history. It which formed a delicious shade. Sta
635. tained, that persons were moving in the religion from her husband. Yet Tertulliau suppos
636. r mansions contained. Thus we know that many of the titles in Borne were Tertullian
637. not been thrown away ; upon the sordid mind tianity arose Her own hatred of Chris-
638. a Christian, and had manumitted all her other slaves but, feeling it wrong to turn so
639. ther Jubala (her proper name), upon the world, ; highest society, were occupying cons
640. t not your taite secretly, before every other food ; and if he you wm.m i know <-, ."
641. vi. c. 4:i. wife i.'iviuff communion to one another. 1>< < . 11. 20 FABl'iLA : OR W
642. m a plain-spoke even but we are both of one trade, on the Arii -.ance They app. you
643. ey app. your clovernr. cheerful and not one asked me i'<>r and both consequently- o
644. sked me i'<>r and both consequently- of one mind." "It is very strange; and I shoul
645. me i'<>r and both consequently- of one mind." "It is very strange; and I should lik
646. as well put your hand Humph! How could one manage to get in ?" It is more graceful
647. o the folds of your topi. "I have it! I will take oil' my shots, screw up one leg li
648. it! I will take oil' my shots, screw up one leg like "Cut this matter sh< >rt, sir.
649. shots, screw up one leg like "Cut this matter sh< >rt, sir. Again I ask, what do you
650. " and he whispered into his ear, " That will are a spy and an informer." hardly succ
651. r." hardly succeed depend upon it every one of " What these people is known at the
652. . but she is better known than they, as being a her parents who are you ?" to : . i ;
653. f the Baths of Novatus. at leisure." We will talk more Corvinus returned home, not i
654. ed a garment shabbier than his >wu from one of his father's slaves, and was at the
655. at the appointed He had to wait a long time, a:id >y the first dawn of day. most lo
656. uted Corvinus, iis hood over his face. "Good morning, comrade I fear I have kept you
657. erefore, to panion, Hashed through lias mind. Corvinns. "If you are sure these peopl
658. lady before, and house, try your plan. will venture by the front door. Thus we shal
659. front door. Thus we shall have B double chance." "Do you know what I am " thinking, Fu
660. of to enter the house of Agnes, either will with the so, fox, we take a more "It be
661. age, was At that isfxnent a rcjy feeble man, .aching, supported by a young and chee
662. sented noble lines of ancestry, and her family was not one of recent conversion, but h
663. nes of ancestry, and her family was not one of recent conversion, but had for As in
664. professed the faith. was cherished the memory of ancestors who had w: a "We are just
665. ri r steps, or held high offices in the state, so in this, and other Chi how "Thank y
666. h offices in the state, so in this, and other Chi how "Thank you, my child,!' replied
667. k you, my child,!' replied the poor old man pride, the remembrance of those relatio
668. y appear surprising when we reflect how many a soldier goes through a whole i ; all
669. hildhood tu pass to i run in and ont, i many times a day, and how many i a family re
670. in and ont, i many times a day, and how many i a family remains untainted throi over
671. t, i many times a day, and how many i a family remains untainted throi over bo surpris
672. y on This in of the Church, through old family SO Mons, long unbroken chains of tradit
673. er All the honors and the hopes of this family centred now in whoso name is already kn
674. ess such a docility and intelligence of mind, and such simplicity and innocence of c
675. ad grown to the up the common object of love, and almost of entire house, from her p
676. r warp, the compact virtuousness of her nature but her good qualities expanded, with a
677. pact virtuousness of her nature but her good qualities expanded, with a wellbalanced
678. er, had ripened into combined grace and wisdom. all her parents' virtuous thoughts, an
679. s thoughts, and cared as little for the world as they. She lived with them in a small
680. and jewels among the poor, without its being known to whom they belonged. He had not
681. d, the distribution had to take place ; other regions had sent their poor, accompanie
682. dwelling. For, notwithstanding the :an law "on the inheritance of womea,"t now qui
683. he words, "Deo gratias" (" Thanks be to God"). This was not merely a Christian, but
684. ources, large personal additions to the family property. In general, of course, the he
685. rty. In general, of course, the heathen world, who visited, attributed appearances to
686. lculated what immense accunralations of wealth, the miserly parents must be putting by
687. ous charity, which the church carof its life. It was under the care and ried on as d
688. poor and infirm. The men were ranged on one side, the women on the other. Under the
689. re ranged on one side, the women on the other. Under the portico at the end were tabl
690. re of the sick, poor, and strangers, in one of the seven regions into which Pope Ca
691. d divided the committing each region to one of the city for this purpose seven deac
692. ho came from a distance, recommended by other churches; and a frugal table was provid
693. cts of martyrs, procured or compiled by one of the seven notaries, kept for that of
694. ar spot within the porticoes. But as no one recognized or claimed Corvinus for one
695. one recognized or claimed Corvinus for one of his poor, he was at These officers A
696. ncqtip miilieioni furc-rel," ' that no one ' > length left alone in the middle of
697. the middle of the court. Even his dull mind could feel the anomalous situation into
698. such violators of domestic city, whose duty it was of a nobleman's righte, an intru
699. ke battle-axes against him. He had only one consolation it was evident he was not k
700. lied Lve in a whining tone. " to mortal soul Never, as long as I live, will 1 " that
701. o mortal soul Never, as long as I live, will 1 " that I came into this dreadful plac
702. : Friend, you probably do not belong to one of the regions invited here to-day. Whe
703. dwelling-house. Keparatus looked in the same direction, civil, ; : The answer gave t
704. asked Reparatus to retire), much in the same position as they had hist met, only tha
705. t door, He found it, according to Koman custom, unlocked ; and, indeed, no one could h
706. oman custom, unlocked ; and, indeed, no one could have suspected the possibility of
707. of age, clad in a peasant's garment. No one else was near, and he thought it an exc
708. strong suspicion which had crossed his mind. cordingly, he thus addressed the littl
709. n for relief, joined in crying out, you will not send him away fasting and unsuccore
710. e you can receive it unknown." " Then I will tell you the truth I came in here merel
711. it unknown." " Then I will tell you the truth I came in here merely for a freak ; and
712. trician's house. " For the gods' sakes, good Pancratius, do not inflict such all bri
713. nsions to influence or power." " Pardon punishment." You know, Cervinus, that your own fat
714. erself, " I entreat you by all that you love, by all that you hold sacred, not to di
715. would be crushed and ruined forever. I will go on my knees and beg your pardon for
716. r pardon for my former injuries, if you will only be merciful." "Hold, hold, Corvinu
717. t was long forgotBut hear me now. Every one but the blind around you ten. There wil
718. one but the blind around you ten. There will be n hundred is a witness to this outra
719. m near behold a very difAgnes looked as one entranced her ey; over the affections o
720. r part of the ymriual, leading He whose beauty sun and moon in their lofty Graua- THE
721. ity he could ever expect of opening his mind (affection it could finished Syrian mak
722. ards towards him, with an air plied the other, as they re-entered the house. The two
723. egs unintentional mistake, and no doubt will quiet.y retire." Say- would carry him,
724. this, she withdrew. Each knew that the other had Sebastian, with his calm but energe
725. ought you ?" conclusion, that there was one fold at least in Borne, which " that "
726. n-age, met the lady of the house at the same place with you, her noble cousin's tabl
727. right to wait upon her, ha common with other voluntary clients." " But not at so unr
728. n the longest familiarity, still less a one dinner's ac- from the Church, it was by
729. r bear- ages, wished to retire from the world.* Indeed we would naturally ing towards
730. ake sure for yourself of the fortune of one or the clear their hearts and houses fo
731. ving There is nothing like hav- phrase, other of Home's richest heiresses. from both
732. emselves to earth, and betwo strings to one's bow." ing come the spoil of the impio
733. meekness, his blood would have light of good worku to shine before men, while the ha
734. a the secret, which only He " It is not good for either of us, Fulvius, that you rem
735. dismissal of the noble lady whom noble family publicly valued, sold, and, in their pr
736. f the poor. lie added, now, Fulvius, in peace ; and remember that individual right ha
737. of the left and the huirthy conduct. I will spare you.if you know how and modesty o
738. eetly. that you Now, again I say, go in peace." was prepared, Dionysius the priest, w
739. pared, Dionysius the priest, who at the same tin; But he had no sooner let go his gr
740. is appearance, and seated in a chair at one end of the court, the intended intervie
741. . From the "Dear brethren, our merciful God has touched the heart of and coarse cha
742. stributed St. I'uuhiius ot Nola did the same. militi all i servo fldem." "i'.tbia im
743. ist's sake. kno-\T. lie is ho is I some one who loves not to have his 'e-ik Who muc
744. treasury. "Accept, then, ns a sift from God, who has inspired this and which charit
745. ly recite for those who give, or do, us good." During' this brief address, poor Panc
746. hill-side, and look ever and anon, from one's book, ovr varyFor, as the breeze swee
747. g himself as large as possible. And his emotion did all the rich chestnut, the reddenin
748. untain, hill, and cried out, as if with one voice, "Retribuere dignare, Doinine, om
749. hes of greensward; and you have a faint idea of the edly large. Abundant food was al
750. edifying scene. It was yet early indeed many partook not of food, as a still more de
751. Then, mingle with these the innumerable other colors that tinge the picture, from tho
752. lks. his hand, and giving him a hurried good day, tripped away superintends all and
753. soon lost to his sight. The bag seemed many suffer, that perhaps one only may enjoy
754. he bag seemed many suffer, that perhaps one only may enjoy. At last the dusty roads
755. turned the corner, laugh the drivers of other days were not more smooth-tongued than
756. were not more smooth-tongued than some one a good trick, and those of ours, we may
757. not more smooth-tongued than some one a good trick, and those of ours, we may imagin
758. overed a solution of the problem of his wealth. one among these. Sabine, Tusculan, and
759. solution of the problem of his wealth. one among these. Sabine, Tusculan, and Alba
760. ashes sparks of radiance over awakening nature, a Mrecenas or a Horace might respectiv
761. tium, and so on to THE month Bajse, and other fashionable watering-places round Vesuv
762. d finds his bed spread with mol- was to one of these " tendereyos of Italy, "as Pli
763. ny calls its because forming its truest beauty, that Fabiol; hastened, before the rush
764. es, remarkable, like her house, for the good taste which ai-r than Ophir supplied to
765. the richest of shores, like a from the world ho is visiting and pearing, radiant mes
766. ed and enamelled frame, relieved by the will soon come back, and gladden us cheering
767. . from others the song or harp-notes of family then crisp slender tendrils, excursioni
768. f murmuring and chattering, in the most good-natured way imaginable, along the side
769. y solid lu. flight of virtuous da moral truth, or a more piv;: whom she had long admi
770. d's m latent but infallible standard of truth, some master-] ness. His daughter was,
771. , a stock of books, some old favorites, other lighter was wrong, vicious or even inac
772. not yet in :i condition together with a quantity of smaller familiar works of art, such
773. a quantity of smaller familiar works of art, such to learn, that the meanest and le
774. rning hours were spent in the cherished wisdom, intellectual light, and heavenly privi
775. October, that, which she selected first one volume and then another. But any reclin
776. ery amusing, and only just come out. It will Still more astonished was she at learni
777. astonished was she at learning that the liberty. " to both of us. reason was attachment
778. of her in illness. She saw that it was one She was therefore at first inclined to
779. s, even towards oppressive light of all virtue masters ;* but these were always accoun
780. and what were a few dozen cases, in as many down the book with a calm resolution, a
781. a calm resolution, and said "Do not, my good mistress, ask me to read to yon from ce
782. sk me to read to yon from centuries, of love, compared with the daily ten thousand o
783. r me to recite, nor for you to palpable one that book. at hand, and it struck her S
784. at hand, and it struck her She waited a time, and hear." forcibly. Fabiola was aston
785. t. Syra pursued all her duties with the same simple dili- perusal, formed part of cu
786. all classical writers dAnd what rule of virtue could have made that reading this. slav
787. de hourly visi pronounced impossible to love a slave. And she had also discovered a
788. give that there wax such a thing in the world as disinterested love, her. affection t
789. h a thing in the world as disinterested love, her. affection that asked for no retur
790. ion with her slave, after the memorable one which we have recounted, had satisfied
791. ere are plenty of foul crimi a superior education. She was too delicate to question her o
792. ed actions described in the book but it will not indii to commit them. her early his
793. ill not indii to commit them. her early history, especially as masters often had And, i
794. n authors with ease and ele"Not for the world." gance, and wrote well in both languag
795. to give her a upon them separate room, mind; the greatest of comforts to the poor m
796. to the poor maid and she employed with pleasure." " What then ?" ur herself as a Still
797. . secretary and reader. " That ceive no change in her conduct, no image is foulness, t
798. mistress and what is the action of the mind, of Fabius, for reasons which will be e
799. the mind, of Fabius, for reasons which will be explained later, seldom paid more th
800. ius Matt. lii. 11. OK :.i I call it the soul, but thought? A passion which i And whn
801. s, to principles of for painful results will ensue. But if only the d action exist,
802. ountain, OB though she were testing the truth of Syra's v "And they sound like the tr
803. th of Syra's v "And they sound like the truth," she added; "for could falsehood be mo
804. could falsehood be more beautiful than truth ? But what an awful been alone, has nev
805. ancy of a proud or cliildish brain, hat one has ncrcr oneself, !od," nnswei. Aith s
806. disappointed. some down so is striking principle, to into what she much as she once hud
807. ho about the nio: :d>le of the Olympian family ? Do you think they have anything to do
808. spoke not of gods and goddesses, but of one only ; from the observation of One that
809. t of one only ; from the observation of One that knows no imperfection. Terrible th
810. no imperfection. Terrible thought, that one is living, if you say true, under the s
811. is but a shadow, for he enters not the soul It is enough to make one any evening co
812. nters not the soul It is enough to make one any evening commit self-destruction, to
813. a, in your system?" "He has no name but GOD and that only men have given like an ea
814. quailing foe. Afte^ a struggle, -visi; nature, His origin, His attributes." "And what
815. came over her. She seemed for the first time to feel the presence of One greater "Si
816. the first time to feel the presence of One greater "Simple , as light is His natur
817. f One greater "Simple , as light is His nature, one and the same every- indivisible, u
818. eater "Simple , as light is His nature, one and the same every- indivisible, undeni
819. e , as light is His nature, one and the same every- indivisible, undeniable, penetra
820. ending has ceased. Power, and unerring judgment belong to Him by His nature, and are as
821. unerring judgment belong to Him by His nature, and are as unlimited and unrestrained
822. e, and He uing; exist after all >rn, He will love, justice too, thnn herself, some o
823. d He uing; exist after all >rn, He will love, justice too, thnn herself, some one wh
824. ing; exist after all >rn, He will love, justice too, thnn herself, some one whom she fe
825. l love, justice too, thnn herself, some one whom she feared, yet whom she would wis
826. she feared, yet whom she would wish to love. She bowed down her mind, she bent her
827. would wish to love. She bowed down her mind, she bent her intelligence to His feet
828. and her heart too owned, for the first time, that it had a Master, and a Lord. Syra
829. watched the workings of her mistress's mind. She knew how much depended on their is
830. e but the opening ; i pupil's religious progress was involved in the recognition of the
831. was involved in the recognition of the truth before her ; and she fervently prayed f
832. been bowed down in accompaniment to her mind, and with graceful kindness said, " Syr
833. ; & made vocal by another's breath. Her knowledge you must have much more to teach me." "
834. so often noticed you have opened a new world, and a new life, to my thoughts. and th
835. you have opened a new world, and a new life, to my thoughts. and though in the chil
836. hild it was more tender and A sphere of virtue beyond the opinions and the judgments o
837. the East should be thought the land of poetry or encourage us a feeling that, were we
838. ed from the tude, we should be ever the same, because that influence on us it tensio
839. that influence on us it tension of her mind, she quid, ia as light a tone as she mu
840. could "But, Syra, can you think, that a Being such plcs, in guiding us, and could not
841. lions of creatures?" outwardly virtuous life, is mere deceit, and positive wickednes
842. ul, from its rough sides not light upon other subjects, till to-day obscure to me. Te
843. ht ?" bation,) "standing by. us when no other eye can : il ii, ir, 1 1 1 ; > I'ing th
844. l this, to would it y which lie . ..lie one le ii nmk '
845. t was my noble lady ; though ; Tin: arn other considerations involved in the id CHURC
846. day, Syra ?" said the mistress, with an emotion quite new to her. The poor inaid was ov
847. t she prevented her, and, for the first time iu her life, Fabiola threw herself upon
848. ted her, and, for the first time iu her life, Fabiola threw herself upon a slave's n
849. r V The next morning had been fixed for one of those visits * used to be annually p
850. io his villa Campania, . i : a number " One thing more, Syra dare one address, by w
851. : a number " One thing more, Syra dare one address, by worship, this whom you have
852. hod I His might, His kindness, and His wisdom, we live and move and have our being. H
853. s wisdom, we live and move and have our being. Hence, one may address Him, not as far
854. ive and move and have our being. Hence, one may address Him, not as far off, but as
855. ining with his country slaves, but that many of him ; that if numerous, the pre- \ m
856. ion seemed to be trenching " " pleasing duty of courtesy to a most kind f hood and s
857. ment. In a light country carriage, with good horses. Fabiola si i ; ross the "] upon
858. covered with box, arbutus, an. " I fear one must needs obtain a Victim rels, reliev
859. en place, which at first she cou'd n be good enough for Jupiter, or a goat for Bacch
860. inded her, tli; villa had entirely lost one of its most characteristic orna brought
861. ought me to know ?" " It must indeed be one the number of beautiful statues which s
862. d gave it the now become quite an empty one, of Ad A'tatuaa.* " And what can that b
863. d last seen limping with gout. hale old man, courteously received her, and inquired
864. mentioned his intention to her. Ch deep sense of responsibility, under arhieh you mus
865. alarm, and asked her to u kept with the same speak as well as act, you have a real m
866. very thought " of mine is seen, it is a truth which I have in which formerly nymphs a
867. nd, turning to Chroraatius, she said my mind has need of rest. " "Why, what on earth
868. XVIL "My dear young lady," answered the good-humored old gentleman, "do not be so an
869. figTHE CHSISTIAN COMMUNITY. ures to any one ?" "If you thought so," replied she, "
870. ne with them all ?" rest of the day her mind was alternately agitated and calm. "Why
871. gitated and calm. "Why, to tell you the truth, I have had them brought under When she
872. ked steadily on the grand view of moral life which the hammer." her mind had grasped
873. ew of moral life which the hammer." her mind had grasped, she found on unusual tranq
874. abont it ? You discovery of a great the knowledge of which guided her into a new know the
875. s mier, but .nashed, pulverized to also one of the most fervent of Christi. If you
876. connection with i the palace, his great courage do. niui ble him to ! tence, by adding,
877. o tell me." wise, have been long of the same opinion. " uere works of art?" Why, tha
878. l me." wise, have been long of the same opinion. " uere works of art?" Why, that you ha
879. ng of the same opinion. " uere works of art?" Why, that you have a quantity of peop
880. ere works of art?" Why, that you have a quantity of people living with you, " Because th
881. and lead quite a philosophical sort of life, forming a pretences; and us you would
882. w. tors, but belonging to quite another family, so did I these precs to a higher conne
883. ou Neither could I run a risk, of their being bought for the con- keep most unfashion
884. no amusements, and live tinuance of the same imposture." most abstemiously in fact,
885. end, is it not an imhope they do us the justice to add that we pay our " j to continue
886. , laughing. " ami " How kind of them !" will see that I have planted palm-trees all
887. palm-trees all about; you rejoined the good-humored old judge. " and, as soon as th
888. ful interest in our concerns. the villa will take the title of Ad Palmas* instead."
889. is it not strange, my dear young " That will be a pretty name," said Fabiola, who li
890. irhborhood, a training-school, in which many were being prepared, as as others I beg
891. , a training-school, in which many were being prepared, as as others I beg your pardo
892. the great combat of faith, martyrdom to death. They who had irreproachable, nobody ga
893. affairs, and never even by them before God's judgment-seat, in token of their vict
894. rs, and never even by them before God's judgment-seat, in token of their victory talk ab
895. and at once there springs up a over the world. Many were the palm-branches shortly to
896. once there springs up a over the world. Many were the palm-branches shortly to be vu
897. tian retreat. But we must here give the history of the demolition of Chro- needs fly ab
898. , as a means of obtaining a cure of the same ''d not be; and another course complain
899. is really your object and your mode of life here, ; my good friend ?" "We spend our
900. object and your mode of life here, ; my good friend ?" "We spend our time in the cul
901. here, ; my good friend ?" "We spend our time in the cultivation of our higher faculW
902. variety of ways; somr some write, some labor in the gardens and I assure vou no hire
903. beautiful songs together, all breathing virtue and purity, and read most improving boo
904. Calais." Jub. nil-: ciirxcn n/<< Tin: C good old man placed befor she wrote a fe-n t
905. Jub. nil-: ciirxcn n/<< Tin: C good old man placed befor she wrote a fe-n the paper
906. erson within our reach ; this winter we will endeavour to clothe all the nuked, ;md
907. deed, a very generous, though very new, idea in our times and no doubt you will be w
908. new, idea in our times and no doubt you will be well laughed at for your pains, and
909. ur pains, and abused ou all sides. They will even say worse of you than they do now,
910. ght in t'e: finest fibres, across which truth might weave the richest .1 him It could
911. y called by that name." "Let me ask you one question. of reading ness, of his words
912. time over them I could not have patience to
913. oo much, as enemies of all intellectual progress, as you interruption, madam," he said,
914. e myself a Certainly, I am most anxious chance of nearer acquaintance with them. " as
915. Well, dear Fabiola, I thought just the same about them " an. once, but I have much
916. " an. once, but I have much altered my opinion of late. only afford to travel on foot,
917. e. only afford to travel on foot, or by chance " This is, indeed, strange since, as pr
918. ould it be tnl< must have had to punish many of these wretched people for Fabiola, h
919. ir constant transgression of the laws." liberty, if I should offer to defray the expens
920. ver the cheerful countenance of the old man, and a tear stood in his eye. He though
921. , who hud once persecuted the Church of God. Fabioia saw the change, and was distre
922. uted the Church of God. Fabioia saw the change, and was distressed. In the most affect
923. , and disappeared by a side alley, >. I One purpose of my visit to you was, to ask
924. re is a Yes," replied Chromatius, young man starting Come into the library, and wri
925. table in the middle of the room a young man was seated, transcribing a large ; in h
926. it r.s useless, wlieu she pel that the other side of the vellum wos written on a;. o
927. , and she proceeded to read them, first time she perused the following words from a
928. d a letter to her father in Rome." " It will always give me great pleasure," replied
929. n Rome." " It will always give me great pleasure," replied the young man, "to serve the
930. e me great pleasure," replied the young man, "to serve the noble Fabiola or her ill
931. judge, rather surprised. " " I had the honor, when very young, as my father had had
932. of * "I do g-'H'l to thei, say to you, love yotir enemies hate you, nuil pray for t
933. dently for some book, lay on the table. One of these the There wus no post in th .'
934. ghts amidst these shifting uuse him? :. will trouble myself no more on it ; >Out it
935. mnds B. iilemUd paiadox? I Or rather I -will very like one of her bciuitii'ul, but 1
936. paiadox? I Or rather I -will very like one of her bciuitii'ul, but 1 did they deli
937. en mo by her : for me, though they The' sin : beyond them, to the shady porticoes a
938. than fresh autumn vineyards, ]., uud | cause of words. So one else, who may such har
939. vineyards, ]., uud | cause of words. So one else, who may such harperplexity, }ievo
940. hristian, have again to do with th. his mind became abstracted, it saw, in a dark as
941. him off', and receive from the kiss of peace ere he departed. May it not prove oi Ma
942. ce ere he departed. May it not prove oi Many t of in his ear, Gethseniam Some whispe
943. got that all tin uit the nificence, its beauty. ones to a living and panting mass of h
944. .; whose passions they enkindled, whose evil desires they inflamed, wiioso ambition
945. mused obedience, knelt down, kissed the good priest's and obtained his blessing; the
946. and have his wings unscathed! It was in one of his abstracted moods that he journey
947. ng, with an inlet of the him, and in it one solitary and motionless skiff. The sigh
948. sight at once melted, it brought to his memory a story of his childhood, true or false
949. atus, mounted on his mule-, Once upon a time there was a bold young fisherman living
950. living on the coast of southern Italy. One night, M he found that his father and b
951. which led to the gate. Long after every one else had i a 1 -i. the house, Chromatin
952. n a spiral commencing an and a narrower one. A horrible :d: the wild which v, As th
953. v, As the villa asleep; but, after some time, was aw: at a distance. He looked round
954. llej" in this inannci- to spiritual pel-will lie drawn on gradually destruction? are
955. uction? are my present thoughts, by any chance, an outer circle, which has caught me,
956. atus looked over his letters, anil drew one out for the town. He was taken to a lit
957. l, during which he learned the master's history. A native of Fundi, he had started the
958. me acquainted at an early period of our history, among the rich, and not too powerful a
959. ut finding a persecu- fair division. We will aid one another. id und tion imminent,
960. g a persecu- fair division. We will aid one another. id und tion imminent, and his
961. y discovered, he had dis- rough means I will keep my counsel as to nn'm-. lin posed
962. res and his future prospects. A strange idea dashed Fabius now stepped forward, with
963. rd, with a hearty " How nre through the mind of Torquatus, that some day that inform
964. ness in the town, he would couth bow), "will a* you, I ho; not allow his host to acc
965. accompany him for, "Xoi Mil," said the good-natured Uni.dit to fulfil Fabiola's com
966. in the city with whom yon could quick, change his horses at each relay, and travel th
967. us turned pale, and drew away Fabius to one side, good and more of evil contained,
968. pale, and drew away Fabius to one side, good and more of evil contained, than in any
969. ay Fabius to one side, good and more of evil contained, than in any province of the
970. vince of the while he said "To tell the truth, BO "I hope," answered Faoius, snme-.di
971. But, com. ily she were out of my house. good humor, "I really thought you were struc
972. d on my little cousin A found it, ! but will build temples in public instead of skul
973. pectable lodging, suited to the present state of his purse and easily found one. Fabi
974. ent state of his purse and easily found one. Fabius, we have said, did not accompan
975. and rarely visited her there. he had no love for green fields or running brooks ; t.
976. d with her. :d deep drink of profligate life SUIT' ; ; now at once to the Fulvius st
977. ed "And if it was so, I saw made up her mind, that no good slu. : i "Say you come; t
978. was so, I saw made up her mind, that no good slu. : i "Say you come; to so ? Then th
979. und a ths of Titus, he saw two men in a sin: After u moment's look, 'thcr. temple e
980. for ; r. when ad I FABIOLA; OH IT, you will yon have cotbiD by tli. whatever Fabiol
981. r Corvinus looked at the poor Christian other, no matter whom. with the sort of grin
982. looked at the poor Christian other, no matter whom. with the sort of grin of delight,
983. ht gaze upon the vermin that he finds " will wait on you without fail," replied Fulv
984. And in his trap in a morning Here was a man ready to hand, to Oorvinus with y put o
985. But the Fabius, as he turned away. \Ve will not describe the banquet further than t
986. ter a long fast, it sees a fly, IT, for one, kept himself cool. plump with others'
987. stians and thus goaded on the reluctant mind ready to turn traitor, had long been hi
988. eady to turn traitor, had long been his desire and study. of Dioelesian to become thei
989. become their fiercest persecutor. Every one Here, he was sure, was one, if he could
990. cutor. Every one Here, he was sure, was one, if he could only manage him. n to see
991. only manage him. n to see that, before many months were over, the imperial How did
992. tians to be convinced, that no genuine one would have allowed and iiud in Maxiniia
993. from the down, recourage too heroic to be common. discovered Chr
994. e common. discovered Christian, as from one pest-stricken. He felt alone Even the m
995. st liberal found reasons for Christians being ex- and depressed, when Fulvius, who ha
996. en Fulvius, who had whispered a word to One could not bear Corvinus, went upto him,
997. onsiderately, in drawing out gress this man thought them opposed to the real glory
998. aration which may prove dangerous." " I will " I fear excited that considered them a
999. excited that considered them a foreign element, that ought to I < I ; , ; ; ; I ,- . ;
1000. . ; : ; empire, be eliminated from it. One thought their doctrine detestable, anot
1001.so called, where both sides came to the same conclusion, Fulvius, after having glanc
1002.ion, Fulvius, after having glanced from one to the other of the a, stand to had by
1003.s, after having glanced from one to the other of the a, stand to had by turns, was an
1004. and flushed. Wine had given him a rash courage, which pale some stroug principle restr
1005. a rash courage, which pale some stroug principle restrained. Now he clenched his hand, p
1006.it to his breast now he bit his lip. At one time he crumbling the bread between his
1007.o his breast now he bit his lip. At one time he crumbling the bread between his fing
1008. at another, he The youth was fixed his evil eye upon Torquatus. silent ; but his co
1009. ; " These Christians hate could,' said one. k off, unconsciously, a cup of wine. u
1010.hen Fulvius, with a cool calculation of time and words, added, in bitter sarcasm "Ay
1011.hem playfully down, talking in the mean time on " Dear me !" he " what indifferent s
1012.g, It is well I am not playing with any one, or I should throws " have been ruined.
1013. first temptation to resume a renounced vice. " I fear you are not a better hand tha
1014.," said he indifferently ! : ; : ! here will give you a chance, low." if you will st
1015.ferently ! : ; : ! here will give you a chance, low." if you will stake something very
1016.re will give you a chance, low." if you will stake something very ; est tone, and lo
1017. ; est tone, and look. '," answered the other, with great excitement, "I am myi-elf a
1018.renounced gambling. Once, indeed but no matter. " " Come said whom Fulvius had to on,
1019.won. Fulvius made him drink still, from time to time, and he became very talkative.
1020.vius made him drink still, from time to time, and he became very talkative. " Corvin
1021.entioned ?" himself, " Who ?" asked the other, surprised. " the " Yes, it was," conti
1022.y began to throw thaii himself. A young man opened his mouth as he cratius ?" The H
1023. for ruy faith ; but I won't betray any one that I won't." '. I ; ; ; ; tians know
1024.ct of the city, loose upon you, (and no one elso can now restrain him after such pr
1025.er such provocation), and to-morrow you will be standing before his father's tribuna
1026.e his father's tribunal to die for that religion which you have betrayed and disgraced.
1027. advantage and he was the more col: not courage to follow the prodigal in repentance, a
1028.odigal in repentance, as he had done in sin. Hope was dead in him; for he had relap
1029.m; for he had relapsed into his capital sin, and scarcely felt remorse. Forum ? " T
1030.cely felt remorse. Forum ? " The fallen man had your Christianity before the judgme
1031.en man had your Christianity before the judgment-seat ; ; lected of the two. He thought
1032.s looked up, and started. He rubsaw the good Polycarp behind his adversary's chair.
1033.self, to that cleansed, but ill-guarded soul is mended. You shall have house, and fo
1034.red in, all that was holy, all that was good, departed. At length, worked up, by rep
1035.ughts of and money to play with, if you will only do my bidding." "And what is that?
1036.answered, "Neither." " Come, then, what will you do?" asked Fulvius, mastering him w
1037. do?" asked Fulvius, mastering him with one of his falcon glances. ' ; prepared him
1038., "A traitor at hist " Call it what you will; that or death! Ay, death by inches, I
1039.t hist " Call it what you will; that or death! Ay, death by inches, I hear Corvinus p
1040.ll it what you will; that or death! Ay, death by inches, I hear Corvinus pacing impat
1041.court. Quick! which is it to be ?" "Not death! Oh, no! any thing but that! " Fulvius
1042.lky and fretting home, he returned your religion, and you have betrayed it, too." to Tor
1043.xcitement. The apartment seemed to They will forgive me still. God "Silence; utter n
1044.t seemed to They will forgive me still. God "Silence; utter not His name: you are d
1045.d of his destroyers and of himself, Who will look at you? will your Christian friend
1046.s and of himself, Who will look at you? will your Christian friends? the desolatenes
1047.d nevertheless you arc a Christian; you will be torn to reprobate, rolled like dark
1048.e, rolled like dark billows through his soul, each Unable to sustain himself longer
1049.ain himself longer pieces by some cruel death for it; yet you will not be wor- coming
1050.ces by some cruel death for it; yet you will not be wor- coming hi turn uppermost. s
1051.g hi turn uppermost. shipped by them as one of their martyrs. You are a hypo- on hi
1052.t have you to Fulvius found him in this state, and touched his shoulder to " rouse hi
1053.et your fellow Chrisof your lif e. your peace, ! ; " ; ) : FABIOLA; OR in PART SECOXD
1054.LLECLA QVE ORDEV BENDET DE BIANOBA/ The other son was making a rough design, in which
1055.e to an old These varied occupations in one family might have surprised a modern, b
1056. an old These varied occupations in one family might have surprised a modern, but they
1057.youthful visitor; he well knew that the family belonged to the honorable religious cra
1058.he lector, or reader. But although this opinion is untenable, it is CHAPTER I. THE scen
1059.therto led our reader have been laid in one of those slippery truces, rather than p
1060.e of those slippery truces, rather than peace, which often intervened between persecu
1061.tion and persecution. Already rumors of war have crossed our path, and The roar of
1062.threats of Corvinus have brought us the same news, that before long the horrors of p
1063. before long the horrors of persecution will re-appear, and Christian blood will hav
1064.ion will re-appear, and Christian blood will have to flow in a fuller and nobler str
1065.itherto watered the Paradise of the New Law. The Church, ever calmly provident, can
1066.er calmly provident, cannot neglect the many signs of a threatened combat, nor the p
1067. leave positive signs of improvement or change as time went on, gives ns reason to con
1068.itive signs of improvement or change as time went on, gives ns reason to conclude th
1069.d venerable works were carried on under one direction, and probably by some body as
1070.s that this occupation was continued in particular families; grandfather, father, and sons
1071., and sons, having carried it on in the same place, t We can thus easily understand
1072. even jurisdiction, in that underground world. Though the Church provided space for t
1073.round world. Though the Church provided space for the burial of all her children, it
1074.towards the end of October that a young man, not unknown to us, closely muffled up
1075.the immediate vicinity of the Forum. As vice is unfortunately too often linked with
1076.the neatest dwelling in the street; and being particularly struck with the cleanlines
1077.cularly struck with the cleanliness and good order of one beyond the rest, he It was
1078. with the cleanliness and good order of one beyond the rest, he It was opened by an
1079.nd the rest, he It was opened by an old man, boldly knocked at its door. whose name
1080.lm, it was solemnly sad. He looked like one who had lived much among the dead, and
1081.ord to pay a better do hand. This was a good woman who kept a shop in the f, i. and
1082.ome rich, especially as left We glyptic art; his I " " From New Street. Polleola wh
1083. St. Sebastian's. " of work on which we will Ireely in draw. Holiltt<. tThe number,
1084.hat the superb mausoleums of sovereigns will fall to utter decay, and yet the memory
1085.s will fall to utter decay, and yet the memory of a market- wife descend to distant ag
1086.son for thinking thus?" How differently one would wish to treat a martyr's body!" "
1087.scribe common "By no means uncommon, my good young master. lam sure a pious youth li
1088.I would sooner commit to the beeping of memory of the pious poor than that of the wick
1089.l inscription brought us to put up; you will see the writer and engraver were differ
1090.graver were different people. It "Never mind is What added the old man, now quite ch
1091.e. It "Never mind is What added the old man, now quite cheerful. 'That is not sayin
1092.on the Nomentan way. I believe it is in memory of a most sweet child, " whose death is
1093.n memory of a most sweet child, " whose death is deeply felt by its virtuous parents.
1094.ved eighteen years and seven mouths. In peace." He continued: "What a glorious youth,
1095.h an age." " No doubt," replied the old man; "But I dare say you have always though
1096.e closing the tomb himseif lying in the same bed. of Bestitutus, the body of a boy n
1097.ly prayers." "Amen," answered the pious family. But Pancratius, attracted by a certain
1098.'s voice, turned round, and saw the old man vigorously trying to cut off the end of
1099.hat is the brawny hand across his eyes. matter, my good " " old friend ? said the yout
1100.brawny hand across his eyes. matter, my good " " old friend ? said the youth kindly.
1101. this epitaph Well, we were pressed for time ; and we thought pity him ? the youth o
1102.n I. likely you may have to perform the same office for me one of these days ?" "Oh,
1103. have to perform the same office for me one of these days ?" "Oh, no, I hope not,"
1104.ch a posHow the sibility. Surely my own time must come sooner. " old trees are spare
1105. almost faint to think of either." into one's * In the cemetery of St. Agnes, piece
1106.me more for their dead than the heathen world did for its gods." "What are your painf
1107. it is all simple enough to take arms a good child \ like Dionysius, wrapped in his
1108.the torn flesh and broken t These terms will be explained later. limbs of such anoth
1109.this tomb was discovered unvlolated. On being the bones, white, bright, and polished
1110.du." " A favor from me ?" asked the old man surprised. " Yes you will have to begin
1111. asked the old man surprised. " Yes you will have to begin your work immediately,! s
1112. so well. Nothing would give me greater pleasure." answered Diogenes, somewhat flattered
1113.ut still more " After I pleased by this love for what he so much loved. ; : is, that
1114.v.sor, that all may act in concert." "I will not fail, Pancratius," replied Diogenes
1115. Callistus. hour before mid-day, and we will go together. " " But I shall not be alo
1116. IN . DOMINO youths, recently baptized, desire much to become acquainted with our ceme
1117. initiate them there." friends of yours will be always welcome. their names, that we
1118.n of Chromatius, the late prefect ; the other is a young man named Torquatus.' Severu
1119.the late prefect ; the other is a young man named Torquatus.' Severus started a lit
1120.ou quite sure about Mm, Paucratius ?" " One public scene, taking part in general af
1121. in general affairs. Her house, besides being, or rather containing, a title or paroc
1122.or parochial church, was now honored by being the residence of the supreme Pontiff. T
1123. his to a us as though we had neglected one, whose charand thoughts opened this lit
1124.ose charand thoughts opened this little history, the pious Lucina. He were indeed of th
1125.deed of that quiet, unobtrusive f ^^ues nature, which affords little scope for appeari
1126.llus might feed at home. This loathsome punishment soon caused his death. Only a trifle, i
1127.is loathsome punishment soon caused his death. Only a trifle, indeed. But as I was go
1128.ow of duties, Lucina quietly passed her life. seemed to be attained. Her son had off
1129.ttained. Her son had offered himself to God them Majus's inscription for it." " Her
1130.erus, not a little surprised to find in one corner, ai; that early hour this Torqua
1131.r, when some charitable unknown person (God bless him !) gave large alms to the poo
1132. gave large alms to the poor there. Not good company I thought, and at such an hour
1133.oned in our last chapter took place. It will be sufficient to say, that in it full i
1134.persecution ; and to each was intrusted one cemetery or more, in whose subterrranea
1135.ot a little, but innocently, proud. The good old excavator seemed rather more cheery
1136.e this subterranean for himself and hia family, that trust in the Lord." Lately found
1137.syllable should be omitted in the name, one easily slurred in pronouncing it. tutat
1138.ding officer of << . coming perse>n The man who wishes keep his excavation it it M
1139.us BI to get the sand out of the ground will may i>o to the surface will hav ; order
1140. the ground will may i>o to the surface will hav ; orders more briskly, or more deci
1141.s Ilia of easiest possible Is I . ; and will as ample as is consistent, wit round Bo
1142.ent tombs that lined the road) into the same villa on the right hand. Here The catac
1143.red all questions put to him, but, from time to time, gave intelligent little lectur
1144.questions put to him, but, from time to time, gave intelligent little lectures, on s
1145.orm our friends, if we digest the whole matter of these into a more connected besides,
1146.ese into a more connected besides, they will wish to know something of the subsequen
1147.ish to know something of the subsequent history of those wonderful excavations, into na
1148.and third below, all constructed on the same principle. A catacomb may be divided in
1149.hird below, all constructed on the same principle. A catacomb may be divided into three p
1150.rs, and these again by others, so as to form a complete labyrinth, or net-work, of s
1151.uman body, from a child to a full-grown man, laid with its side to the gallery. Som
1152. to the gallery. Sometimes there are as many as fourteen, sometimes as few as three
1153.as few as three or four, of these rows, one above the other. They are evidently so
1154.e or four, of these rows, one above the other. They are evidently so made to measure,
1155.y the side of the grave, while this was being dug. When the corpse, wrapped up, as we
1156.d may be seen in museums and churches ; many of the latter have been copied and publ
1157.d does the interment in the it is ; The history of the early Christian cemeteries, the
1158. the eight century the* down to our own time, when we have reason to hope that a new
1159.have reason to hope that a new epoch is being commenced. We have generally avoided us
1160.se it might mislead our readers into an idea that this was ; ; crypts. either the or
1161.meteriiim ad Sanctam Cother names, had among them that of Ad Catacu
1162.of S8. Peter and Paul having been for a time Hermes, &c. ; catacombs range, and how
1163., and how are its limits determined. We will try to content him, as briefly as possi
1164.xisting near the cemetery. This of that particular then was still cemetery, anywhere anter
1165.ticularly made by the and speaks of our being buried with Him in baptism, it was natu
1166.ded to the rising The again. word to in peace," " the deposition of ," are the expres
1167.t is, the dead are but left there for a time, till called for again, as a pledge, or
1168. suggests that it is only a place where many lie, as in a dormitory, slumbering for
1169.hese two the lastly, but must have been custom of burning the dead inspired abhorrence
1170.ve we a hint that this mode was, at any time, adopted by ; r insertions into tin- Ch
1171.elongs to a period of still flourishing art. the symbolical taste itself, are chara
1172.ent For this peculiar taste declined as time went on. period. of ten thouAlthough in
1173.mperors Another curious and interesting custom furnishes us with dates on tombs. At th
1174.ably coin, a ; press plaster, was left. Many of these objects especially where no in
1175.ere no inscription continue to be found many have been long collected. But it is not
1176.date. This is sometimes of Domitian, or other early emperors. with It may be asked, w
1177.es of natural piety, there is certainty one constantly recorded on sepulchral inscr
1178.ull date of a person's land, if want of space prevented death being given, we should
1179.rson's land, if want of space prevented death being given, we should prefer chronicli
1180. land, if want of space prevented death being given, we should prefer chronicling the
1181.cal. day of the month when it occurred. one cares about remembering the day on whic
1182.s necessary. In a cemetery close to the one in which we have left our of their depa
1183.gether, belonging " Deposition of dead. One in Greek, after mentioning the the Cale
1184. . "... This is Nonee of Jane : Live in peace, and pray for us." a third VICTORIA ISS
1185.ICTORIA ISSPIRITVS REFRICERER tETl TVS (good). IN BONO enjoyment." " Victoria, be re
1186. of Cullistus. It is rePwetextatus, not many yards from that -written with Greek let
1187.with Greek letters markable, first, for being in Latin, ; then, for contain!: " .iony
1188.xist, iiu but before mentioning them we will glance at the changes which this devoti
1189.t the crumbling in galleries; and, from time to time, funnel-shaped apertures the va
1190.umbling in galleries; and, from time to time, funnel-shaped apertures the vaults wer
1191.city, visited each of these churches, a custom yet to grope his practised; descended b
1192.. that St. Ambrose, St. Gaudentius, and other bishops, should have found it so diffic
1193.logues compiled in the fourth century ; one, no Koman Pontiffs, the other of marAft
1194.h century ; one, no Koman Pontiffs, the other of marAfter these comes throe distinct
1195.catacombs during the si period of their history, we will give a brief account of one di
1196.ring the si period of their history, we will give a brief account of one discovery,
1197.istory, we will give a brief account of one discovery, in the cemetery where we hav
1198.of its contents. below, a distinguished form and that as the itineraries St. Gregory
1199.fore them. The place was unknown at the peace of the Church, till discovered by Divin
1200.by Divine manifestation. But instead of being permitted to enter again into this hall
1201.had taken place while preparations were being made for oblation of the holy Eucharist
1202.emetery of Callistus, this, and not the one at St. Sebastian's, a few hundred yards
1203.a few hundred yards off, must claim the honor of that name. He went further, and fore
1204.t the tomb which would account for that idea for it was known that his body rested i
1205.dj was found to lead at once to a wider space, carefully secured by brick- work of th
1206.carefully secured by brick- work of the time of peace, and provided with On the left
1207.y secured by brick- work of the time of peace, and provided with On the left was a to
1208.s, however, large and ample; and except one, very high above it, there were no othe
1209. one, very high above it, there were no other graves below, or over, or at the sides.
1210.d to it ; and both covered the MARTYRIS One or two this: "ill. entries from the old
1211.the old Kalendarium in CaUisti. Komanum will illustrate Non. Mart. Lucii vt Id. Dec.
1212.itions in the cemetery of Callistus be. cause, while ac'mlly writing this chapter, we
1213.ombs and lapidary inscriptions of every one of these Popes, covery together with th
1214. together with those of St. Anthems, in one chapel of the newly-ascertained cemeter
1215.this holy pope, already mentioned, took pleasure in putting verses, which he loved to bu
1216.nly the left-hand end remains, the rest being broken off and lost. Above the tomb was
1217.art. lib. i. c. 2fl. ap. March], p. Rl. One would apply St. Damasns's epigram on th
1218.tain. Of Cornelius Martyr Bishop. 'ibex form the great bulk of his extant worts in v
1219. (ill tions of his yet extant exhibit a particular and very elegant mixed commission which
1220.ich he has appointed have done wonders' form of letters, known among antiquarians by
1221.he -wall, right of the tomb, and on the same as far as possible, to its original sta
1222.ame as far as possible, to its original state. Accurate tracin sacerdotal gar- ings a
1223.ly of Byzantine plored. To secure these good results, the Pope has, from ids work of
1224.mbs a truly imperial undertaking. It is time, however, for us to rejoin our party be
1225.ties of departed the two martyrs on the same day, might easily be led to supat the s
1226. our readers of the first period of the history of subterranean Rome, as ecclesiastical
1227.an Rome, as ecclesiastical antiquarians love to call the catacombs, has no doubt bee
1228.come now to the third period of the sad one of their desolation. later the Saracens
1229.g straight gallery, crossed, indeed, by many others, but adhered to faithwith sundry
1230.m anxiously. "I " how wonder," he said, many turns we have passed by, before leaving
1231. leaving this main gallery ?" " A great many," answered Severus, drily. " How many d
1232.t many," answered Severus, drily. " How many do you think, ten or twenty ?" " Full f
1233.ee which way they turn. hold a lamp you will find one at each angle. As to ourselves
1234.ay they turn. hold a lamp you will find one at each angle. As to ourselves, we know
1235.ity above. " have frequently named with honor, should have re-discovered two of the b
1236. the entrance to the cemetery of Calthe one being a stable and bake-house, listus,
1237. entrance to the cemetery of Calthe one being a stable and bake-house, listus, almost
1238.d bake-house, listus, almost entire the other a wine-store. One is, most probably, th
1239., almost entire the other a wine-store. One is, most probably, that built by The ea
1240.d entrances, the mere wasting action of time and weather, have left us but a wreck o
1241. purpose for the catacombs, of which so many are there found. But not content, he ke
1242.here found. But not content, he kept as good count as he could of the turns, as they
1243.f the turns, as they went; and now with one excuse, and now with another, he consta
1244. he constantly stopped, and scrutinised particular spots and But Severus had a lynx's eye
1245.Cornelius Pope, of Hi. Cyprian." On the other side, on the other Bide, on a narrow wa
1246.Hi. Cyprian." On the other side, on the other Bide, on a narrow wall projecting at a
1247.re two more similar portraits; but only one name can be deciphered, that of St. Sii
1248.ou call this?" asked Tiburtius. " It is one of the many crypts, or cubicula,* which
1249.s?" asked Tiburtius. " It is one of the many crypts, or cubicula,* which abound in o
1250.ed Diogenes; "sometimes they are merely family sepultures, but generally they contain
1251.ebrated. You are of course aware of the custom of so performing them." *LEO PRB It IOA
1252.rd it; but I know it well. It is surely one of the glorious privileges of martyrdom
1253.ed Body and precious Blood offered upon one's "Perhaps my oently baptised, may CMUl
1254.K CllCncil O/-' Tllil <'.\T.\CGod.* But let ashee, and to repose thus und
1255.tli;it I brought you into this It to so many others in the cemetery. in chamber, pre
1256.the cemetery. in chamber, preference is one of the most ancient, und coutuiiiH a mo
1257.plied the old mini, modestly, "but when one has lived sixty years, man and boy, amo
1258.y, "but when one has lived sixty years, man and boy, among things, one gets to know
1259.sixty years, man and boy, among things, one gets to know them better than others, b
1260.o know them better than others, because one loves them more. All here have been ful
1261.* is you see the multipli< you know the symbol of the sacred Gift." "Enough," resumed
1262.pinions about its origin," said the v " one finds the meaning in the worditst-lf it
1263.g of words, so as to mean 'Jesus Son of God, Savior. 't Another puts it in the symb
1264. God, Savior. 't Another puts it in the symbol ; 1 ( tl that as fish are born and live
1265. the union of the bread and the fish in one multiplication shows us how, in the Euc
1266.lied Pancratius, gently, and a favorite one. The use of Gentile images, when in the
1267.rmless, has been permitted. stance, and other pagan ornaments in this ceiling, and th
1268.d so our Lord was represented under the symbol of Orpheus, to conceal His sacred repre
1269.t," said Torquatus, "we are come to the Good Shepherd." " you see Him in the centre
1270.ntle ewe upon His left: the penitent in honor. On each side, too, you see a person ev
1271.erson evidently sent by i ; tion of the same " subject. " I see," said Torquatus, "a
1272.erd with a sheep over his shoulders the Good Shepherd that I can understand ; I reme
1273.But why is this subject such a favorite one?" asked Tibur" I have observed it in ot
1274.ne?" asked Tibur" I have observed it in other cemeteries." tius " If you will look ov
1275. it in other cemeteries." tius " If you will look over the arcosolium,"} answered Se
1276.e arcosolium,"} answered Severus, " you will see a fuller representation of the scen
1277.es," replied Tiburtius "it is that of a man apparently Is that meant to in a chest,
1278.Holy Spirit and of the salvation of the world. Such is our beginning ; and here is ou
1279.addr. to preach. sheep not of the fold. One on either side is apparently gi\ in^ no
1280.r words, but browsing quietly on, while one is turning up its eyes and head, lookin
1281.ng and listening with attention. of Him God, Kain is falling copiously on them ; th
1282. pie this "But what makes emblem such a particular favorite ?" again pressed Tiburtius. "W
1283.lar paintings, to belong chiefly to the time, when the Novatian heresy so much plagu
1284.t ?" asked Torquatus, car he was losing time. ly; for he thought "It was, and indeed
1285.wer to forgive; which are too great for God to pardon." Pancratius was not aware of
1286.!" observed Pancratius, pointing to the other side ; " and here we have another type
1287. " and here we have another type of the same consoling doctrine." " Sic veneraricr o
1288.e traitor, confused. "Surely a dreadful one," replied Pancratius, "to limit the mer
1289.ar o'er them placed revere, She beneath God'xfeet reposes, St. Optatus (adv. Farm.
1290.his is the true interpretation of The t idea that the Nor to us her soft eye clones,
1291.r. " " martyr lies "beneath the feet of God is in allusion to the Bea' nee in the B
1292.he Blessed Eucharist. The priest is the same as, in a picture close by, is reprefigu
1293.s always so much loved this type of the Good Shepherd, ready to run into the wildern
1294. said Torquatus, evidently moved, "that one Christian, and received the sacred Gift
1295. io her like a letter I'rom Tii another world; she hardly knew of what.olmvarli T. Sh
1296.out them, but she hardly durst inquire. Many visitors called the next day, aud for s
1297.er, and she it. ' away, and plunge into vice, and and" (his voice fal"almost betray
1298.ren, would not the Church reject such a one from hope ?" "No, no," answered the you
1299.eed ; thought of putting before some or other of them the mysterious sentences, but s
1300.t bring herself to do it. A lady, whose life was like her own, philosophically corre
1301.er: it felt profane to do so. A learned man, well read in all branches of science a
1302.arned man, well read in all branches of science and literature, paid her a long visit,
1303.t had quenched a flash of hope, in that man's heart. Diogenes aud Majus, who had be
1304.d, It was strange that, after all, when wisdom or consolation was to be sought, the no
1305.a. There passed over her countenance an emotion not observable to her mistress; but she
1306.probably by mistake. drive it out of my mind, which is quite perplexed by it." "Why
1307.hy should it be so, my noble lady ? Its sense seems plain enough." nat"Yes; and that
1308.sentiment: I fancy I ought to despise a man who does not resent an injury, and retu
1309.got our work to do. These young friends will excuse us, especially as they will see
1310.ends will excuse us, especially as they will see the church in good time, and in bet
1311.pecially as they will see the church in good time, and in better " order also, as th
1312.lly as they will see the church in good time, and in better " order also, as the hol
1313.orgive at most would be much; but to do good in return for evil, seems to me an unna
1314.d be much; but to do good in return for evil, seems to me an unnatural exaction from
1315. to me an unnatural exaction from human nature. Now, while I feel all this, I am consc
1316.us was much chagrined at seeing how his good father had unwittingly supplied the inf
1317.y dear mistress; but look at the simple principle; you honor it hi others, too. Do you de
1318.; but look at the simple principle; you honor it hi others, too. Do you despise, or d
1319. ? Do you, as a Roman lady, contemn, or honor, the name of Coriolanus, for his genero
1320.Syra; but then "Bless me, child! what a world we should their live in, if we When " T
1321.should their live in, if we When " That man observed to his brother, remarking, tro
1322.et: I strongly suspect him." In a short time they had removed every mark which Tor-
1323.ny was departed he told all that he had will give us quatus had made at the turnings
1324.ng the road, by blocldng up the present one and turning For this purpose they had t
1325.ful could be instructed of the intended change. were. It is very pleasant reading abou
1326.the feats of such wonderful people; but one would be very sorry to see them perform
1327.laughed heartily at the conceit. In the same good humor Syra continued "But suppose
1328.ed heartily at the conceit. In the same good humor Syra continued "But suppose we ha
1329. that we should have to send off to the other side of the world for a Theseus or a He
1330.ve to send off to the other side of the world for a Theseus or a HerIn fact, in that
1331.heseus or a HerIn fact, in that case, a man would be cules, to destroy them ? no mo
1332.US and AhiU0tU. f It is found, limp au- idea." representing our Lord "It ii usually
1333.ated, il us givn ill our title-pago. my mind anger, hatred, revenge, ambition, avari
1334. you really hold this as a common moral principle ? ( hunt thorn out, or down, with unrel
1335.n in\i . Vwill soar too high." "No, dear lady. You wer
1336.attend. maintain that inward and unseen virtue was aa necessary as the outward and vis
1337.fear to tell me all." " Well, then, the principle of that system which I profess is this:
1338.teem hithem, which Maximian Hercules in particular preferred. The usual residence the Pala
1339. very-day and comvirtue, nay, aa simple duty, whatever any other code, the purest an
1340.rtue, nay, aa simple duty, whatever any other code, the purest and sublimest that may
1341.iders heroic, and proof of transcendent virtue." "That is indeed a sublime standard to
1342." "That is indeed a sublime standard to form, of moral elevaThe tion; but mark the d
1343.hero is supported by the praises of the world: his act is recorded and transmitted to
1344.with conspiracy, and of course pu, with death. His immense property was seized by the
1345.as his house, described by Juvenal, and other writers, as of unusual size and magnifi
1346.aven, who maketh His sun to rise on the good and the bad, and raineth on the just an
1347.t and the unjust." Fabiola paused for a time, overawed: then said affectionately j s
1348."of all the churches justed. and of the state. The principal one, the prefect of the
1349.justed. and of the state. The principal one, the prefect of the city, of the city a
1350.ect of the city, of the city and of the world the mother and chief."! LitUe had broug
1351.; It would be attributing to Maximian a quality which he did not possess, were we to gi
1352.ught to be, to attempt it; but the very idea adorned, or possibly the facility of ru
1353.ng out of the city for is worth a whole philosophy. Can you lead me higher than the chase
1354.ere at length would you leave me ?" any education, endowed with little more than a brute
1355.eart should tell you, that it had found peace. been raised to the purple by his broth
1356.thrift to recklessness, addicted to the same CHAPTER VL coarse vices and foul crimes
1357.thout restraint of any passion, without sense of DELIBEBATIONS. justice, or feeling o
1358.assion, without sense of DELIBEBATIONS. justice, or feeling of humanity, this monster h
1359.eased The persecution had now been some time raging in the East to oppress, persecut
1360.ggy and wild, like tufts of to spare no one ; but cutting off the cliiefs of the re
1361.ne ; but cutting off the cliiefs of the religion first, with eyes restlessly rolling in
1362.was en the crushing blow. by penalty of death. In the semicircular apse at the upper
1363.s his work of blood, had yielded to the opinion of his counsellors, adorned, almost tre
1364.d simultaneously in every province, and government, of the West. The thundercloud, fraught
1365.e transferred by him to the head of the religion h, and respectfully: "Again, Syra, you
1366.seen, you propose as the ordinary daily virtue of every one. Men must indeed become mo
1367.e as the ordinary daily virtue of every one. Men must indeed become more than what
1368.deed become more than what osophy. Your wisdom consistent as it is my philA virtue i ;
1369.our wisdom consistent as it is my philA virtue i ; ; ' 44 FMtlul.A raised a Chair when
1370. ; ; .;ted. liy each of its whom had Li government of the State, and equally powerful over
1371.ch of its whom had Li government of the State, and equally powerful over minds as thi
1372.oleration irritated the gods, and whose evil my dominions, this sacer- dotal sway ov
1373.p to my throne, than of the election of one of these priests in Rome." * This speec
1374.emperor said: "Preyou said you had some one to propose for superintending whom made
1375.a similar meeting, he considered it his duty the youthful candidate to the grim tyra
1376.a hideous laugh, for the ten-thousandth time, to an applauding assembly the and said
1377.mes, head, and inconsistently enough of being unbelievers, and serving no God. These
1378.gh of being unbelievers, and serving no God. These tales were all most firmly belie
1379.ters knew perfectly well, they were but good sound heathen lies, very useful in keep
1380.of : Upon my word, Why, prefect, had nc idea you had such an ugly son. I should thin
1381.hould think he is just the thing; every quality of a thorough-paced, unconscien" tious
1382.age, terror and shame, he said to him: "Mind you, sirrah, I must have clean work of
1383.ll, too, if But, at length, up rose the man, who was considered to have badly serve
1384.can answer for a small fault, your head will for a greater. The know their dangerous
1385.ere my eastern tians held any monstrous principle, had their supreme pontiff worthy," he
1386.arer." in person contradicted it, every one would have laughed at the Fulvius obeye
1387.parent cheerfulness, but with real very idea, of taking his word for his own belief,
1388.belief, against the reluctance much the same as if he had been invited to go asserti
1389., but of their fore- knew not fully the cause. who, having come into Egypt in the rei
1390.ilding a great city. nn them of a great many curious histories of their ances- in hi
1391.is argument entirely on them. This uade war upon every king and people, that came i
1392.as a famous plot-hunter, a It was their principle, if they sort of stoat, to id destroyed
1393.onspirators out of their nests, or suck one to the sword and this was all be- their
1394. this so far and yet city, to put every cause they were under the government of their
1395. to put every cause they were under the government of their ambitious you have had plenty
1396.aul, called also Paul, These Christians will afford you plenty of game so make yours
1397.sharp before you. The domination of the same priesthood, and are quite as ready to-
1398. as ready to- property of the convicted will be divided between the accusers day, un
1399.eat Roman and the treasury unless I see particular reasons for taking the empire, burn us
1400. the sacred and Most thought that these particular reasons would turn out to A thrill of h
1401.ful in the alistnrt," rem Fabiola; "but death would overtake us before, we could half
1402.our principles of con< CHAPTEE VIL DARK DEATH. days after Fabiola returned from the c
1403. returned from the country, Sebasit his duty to wait upon her, to communicate so muc
1404.. We have already observed, that of the many noble youths whom Fubiola had met hi he
1405.ul of others, blending so completely in one character nobleness and simplicity, hig
1406.haracter nobleness and simplicity, high wisdom and practical sense, he seemed to her t
1407.d simplicity, high wisdom and practical sense, he seemed to her the most finished typ
1408. to her the most finished type of manly virtue, one which would not easily suffer by t
1409.the most finished type of manly virtue, one which would not easily suffer by time,
1410.e, one which would not easily suffer by time, nor weary by miliarity. fa- better cou
1411.or weary by miliarity. fa- better could death find us, though not t,v.< doing oar dut
1412.ath find us, though not t,v.< doing oar duty, oven if not to its part," resumed the
1413., "I am of tin; old KpicMi- rean poet's mind. This world is a banquet, from which I
1414.tin; old KpicMi- rean poet's mind. This world is a banquet, from which I shall be rea
1415.salur and not till then. I wish to read life's book through, and close it calmly onl
1416.astian wished to speak to her alone, in one of the halls below, When, book comes bu
1417.but in the middle of the volu wherever 'death may happen to be written. But on the ne
1418.ge begins the illuminated book of a new life without a last of this world's ' "No, n
1419.ok of a new life without a last of this world's ' "No, no, gentle lady," exclaimed Se
1420.n anticipating fancy. I speak of vulgar death, as it Sebastian, fearing rather the ph
1421.t between the two dabblers hi the black art, the princi- sumption, racking me by sl
1422. of a reluctant dupe. He of course said form let it come; it comes from a hand that
1423.et it come; it comes from a hand that I love." nothing of what related to the Christ
1424.iciently she was already annoyed by the many candidates for her hand, he felt regret
1425.tes for her hand, he felt regret at the idea, that he was going to add another, yet
1426.her, she was soon depressed again, upon being told, it was the vulgar and stupid Corv
1427.." "I understand you," replied Fabiola, good humoredly; "yon are a brave soldier, an
1428.s such. You must be always prepared for death from a thousand casualties: tin: sel- d
1429.y, upon the weak. You no doubt glorious fate, on receiving in the enemy, and falling
1430. in the enemy, and falling covered with honor. You look to the soldier's funeral pile
1431.trophies erected over it. To you, after death, comes more mercifully, and are musing
1432.f glory." "And do you really mean, that death, BO contemplated, would be welcomed by
1433.ich you have unfolded so disagreeable a matter, and the tenderness with which you have
1434.rness with which you have treated every one "I feel," she said at last to Sebastian
1435.Sebastian, conduct her to her new homo, will my exulting heart be, when death, under
1436.w homo, will my exulting heart be, when death, under whatever form, throws back the g
1437.ng heart be, when death, under whatever form, throws back the gates, iron on this si
1438. side, but golden on the And I care not other, which lead to a new and p rennial life
1439.ther, which lead to a new and p rennial life. gifts, to coming with rich of you to c
1440. "what I should have done for any human being save him, if possible, from pain or dan
1441.human being save him, if possible, from pain or danger." "Your friends, I hope you m
1442.een, save through the fleshless ribs of death ?" "No," replied Sebastian "for it is H
1443.r succor him ? Certainly I would. While God sends His sunshine and His rain equally
1444.nemies, as upon His friends, shall weak man frame another rule of justice ? " At th
1445.s, shall weak man frame another rule of justice ? " At these words Fabiola wondered; th
1446.e not in earnest, Sebastian. If you saw one How very like Syra's doctrines she thou
1447. there that you learnt these For I have one near me, who is yet, by her own princip
1448.d her Fnbiola in a gloomy and searching form. l 'her father? lit'.' \Yhither was he
1449.hrough by that unseen eye which Had lie One glance had told her Her father was dead
1450.ening to the dei.iils of their master's death. crowd which Torquatus was the bearer t
1451. his spirits at Baiae, where a party of good livers anxiously awaited him and where
1452.wenty hours was a corpse. his undivided wealth to his only child. In fine, the body wa
1453.o his only child. In fine, the body waa being embalmed when the courier started, and
1454.ry that he had spoken as he had done of death; and left the house with mournful thoug
1455.ousness. Then the buoyancy of youth and mind bore her up again to the surface niul h
1456.p again to the surface niul her view of life, to the horizon, was as of a boundless
1457.till once more roused to wakefulness of mind. Again and again she was thus tossed up
1458.s tossed up and down, between transient death and life, while her attendants applied
1459.p and down, between transient death and life, while her attendants applied remedies
1460.administer restoratives to her. In this state she reniaiued long a stupor, fixed and
1461.turn of tears, in nursing her shattered mind and ; which Sebastian and Syra had desc
1462.t, dud put away the reflection from her mind. Oh, for a ray from some unknown light,
1463.nto the grave, and show her what it was Poetry had pretended to enlighten it, and even
1464.enlighten it, and even but had only, in truth, reglorify it mained at the door, as a
1465.with drooping head, and torch reversed. Science had stepped in, and come out scared, wi
1466.ad only discovered a charnel-house. And philosophy had barely ventured to wander round and
1467.till veiled. Oh, for something, or some one, better than all these, to remove the d
1468. the vision of light, clothed in mortal form, translucid and radiant, rising from th
1469.have remained the grosser qualiities of matter, without impairing the essence of its n
1470.r, without impairing the essence of its nature. Spiritualised and free, lovely and glo
1471.ds of ancient battle done by Israel for God; like crystal fountains springing into
1472.eoples creation with joyous and undying life. And how knows she this ? Because One,
1473. life. And how knows she this ? Because One, greater and better than poet, sage, or
1474. descended first into the dark couch of death, had blessed it, as He had done the cra
1475. and made infancy sacred rendering also death a holy thing, and its place a He went i
1476. be an object of dread to the Christian soul for it continued what He had made the f
1477.e the furrow into which the seed of it, immortality must needs be cast. The time was not co
1478.it, immortality must needs be cast. The time was not come for speaking of these thin
1479.have no ; ; ; ; ; 1 1 Day succeeded day death, till hope. in ; ; ' 1. i 1 ; < Euphros
1480.one watched her. The former had, tic to time, put in the commonplaces of heathen cou
1481.er, in this tribulation ; that a bright angel by spices of Arabia, ended in her gathe
1482.aster urn, and placed in a niche of the family sepulchre, with the name inscribed of t
1483.tues of the hospitable, and industrious citizen with the false morality of those men ca
1484.r dangerous principles into every noble family, and spreading disloyalty and immoralit
1485., who would have been sorry to exchange one goblet of Falernian for an amphora* of
1486., "oh! that the gods would hasten the i other cares mercifully roused her. The corpse
1487.camo to /'///; CHURCH OF THE CATACOMBS. good lost, 47 to a gambling-hall in Thermae,
1488.ther. Fubiola hod to apply her vigorous mind to examine, and close her father's comp
1489. and oppression, in thn transactions of one whom the world had applauded as the ref
1490.on, in thn transactions of one whom the world had applauded as the refection, lie was
1491.take our reader back a few steps in the history of Torquatus. On the morning after his
1492. Fulvius at his bed-side. got hold of a good hawk, was come to tame him, and train h
1493. dove for him, in return for a well-fed slavery. With all the coolness of a practised h
1494. practised hand, he brought back to his memory every circumstance of the preceding nig
1495.t. When that struggle between grace and sin took place in his soul, which Sevenis n
1496.between grace and sin took place in his soul, which Sevenis noticed, it was the imag
1497.istians of Rome. Once possessed of this knowledge, h' sure no disguise would conceal them
1498. eyes and he would easily pick them up, one by one. He therefore : web, and added m
1499.nd he would easily pick them up, one by one. He therefore : web, and added many mor
1500.e by one. He therefore : web, and added many more meshes to it. The position of Torq
1501.sition of Torquatus was this if he made one step towards Christianity, which Fulviu
1502.d faithful to his cruelly punished with death. compact of treason, he should want for
1503. Fulvius "an early walk, and fresh air, will do you good." The poor wretch consented
1504. early walk, and fresh air, will do you good." The poor wretch consented and they ha
1505. the great function that should collect many priests and deacons round the Pope. He
1506.X. THE OKDINATION IN DECEMBER. read the history of the early Popes will have fact, reco
1507.ER. read the history of the early Popes will have fact, recorded almost invariably o
1508.outh of December, wherein he created so many priests and deacons, and so many bishop
1509.ted so many priests and deacons, and so many bishops for different places. The first
1510.rd was evidently to furnish pastors for other dioceses. In later times, the ember-day
1511.nd it, with engines of torture of every form. Torquatus shrunk in, ; back. "Come tio
1512.There is no fire put on yet, and nobody will hurt you, unless you happen to be a wic
1513.called, the bishops of all parts of the world. "Now, Catulus," said Corvinus, "tell t
1514.inued essentially for the Catulus, with good heart, showed him round his museum same
1515.good heart, showed him round his museum same purpose. and no end of horrors, explain
1516. explaining everything with such hearty good-will, of jokes not quite fit for record
1517.aining everything with such hearty good-will, of jokes not quite fit for record, tha
1518.in a pair of sharp pincers, and another time brought down a mallet within an inch of
1519.ons in this month that is, of It was to one of these that we have course, in differ
1520.iry. And we cannot but think that tho a will be interesting to the Christian antiqua
1521. not only bishops but martyrs to govern other chu to a St. Laurence his diaconate, or
1522. national or personal prepossession, we will follow a learned living antiquarian, wh
1523.ii. because in it lived the illustrious family of that name. The centurion whom St. Pe
1524.on whom St. Peter converted! belo' this family: mid possibly to him the apostle owed h
1525.tro\V< - : <>i; ther conclude, that the law was not retrospective, and that the of
1526. it had been first erected, though from time to time it might i- hiiv .' u at Rome t
1527.been first erected, though from time to time it might i- hiiv .' u at Rome to the he
1528.157, forms an interesting period in its history, for two reasons. church First, that Po
1529. called tho the designation, for a long time, of the carThis shows that the church d
1530.merates them among his familiar friends time, and suffered martyrdom, the holy and l
1531.ns meet ?" he judge. is asked by the in one place? Pudens, the house became the pro
1532.nterrogated where he lived, As in every other city, so in Rome, tho eucharistic sacri
1533.tic sacrifice was offered originally in one place by the bishop. And even after mor
1534. communion was brought to them from the one altar by the deacons and distributed by
1535.cond as the Timotine. nor do I know any other place but the one I have mentime, tione
1536.. nor do I know any other place but the one I have mentime, tioned." The Timotine o
1537.hs were part of the house of the Pudens family, and are those at which we have Novasai
1538.aid that Fulvius and Corvinus met early one morning. tus and Timotheus were the bro
1539.n and the Timotine, as they passed from one bro- known ; to another. St. Justin, th
1540.erefore, lived on this spot, and, as he other in Rome, attended divine worship there.
1541.es of which he gave the name of "title. will be apparent to anyone looking at tion o
1542.ere celeChurch or oratory, the house of God and the brated, was truly, to the Chris
1543.ted by the pouring of oil altar, set up law of Evaristus is done to this dny (for t
1544.facts are elicited from this narrative. One an altar in to that time there was only
1545.this narrative. One an altar in to that time there was only one church with the Rome
1546.an altar in to that time there was only one church with the Rome and no doubt has e
1547.me church was not Aiiother is, that the one altar till then existing altar used by
1548.id, How terrible that, And the house of God, and the gate of heaven. no other than
1549.ouse of God, and the gate of heaven. no other than and set . . in the morning, took t
1550. strangers who come as guests, who, "in one word, undertakes to provide for all in
1551.vide for all in want." This could be no other than the bishop or pope himof hospitali
1552.he holy Pope Stephen (A.D. 257) and his family, with many baptised the tribune Nemesiu
1553.Stephen (A.D. 257) and his family, with many baptised the tribune Nemesius And here
1554.h vessels of the church to the poor. In time this is name has given way and no doubt
1555.as given way and no doubt can first the same ; Pudentiana was, for the cathedral of
1556. in martyrologies, or in ecclesiastical history, abundant traces of all the orders, Its
1557.een ,l assicat uses of word used is the same as in St. Justin. h altar has lately ma
1558.he La' PlldelitmuaV. tti I'min.l tc, bo one of which be,- it would natui-aUy be exp
1559.inly Imv quoted it.* t' . a handmaid of God and CINNAMIVS OPAS QVI LECTOR VIXIT IN
1560.- D- MACEDONIVS EXORCISTA DE KATOLICA-t God? Otlicrwi.se, the more tender her age,
1561.e more tender her age, the less won her state of maidenhood. But although thin, the n
1562.hin, the nubile age, according to Koman law, was the one at which such dedication t
1563.le age, according to Koman law, was the one at which such dedication to God was per
1564.was the one at which such dedication to God was permitted l>y the Church, she reser
1565.e Church permitted the anticipation, by many of thai consecration, years, riod, in o
1566.secrutio. difference was, however, that one order was not necessarily passage, or s
1567. or ; There was not, therefore, ife, in one of these lesser orders. that frequent a
1568.for herself this holiest The superhuman wisdom which had ever exhibited itself in her
1569.xhibited itself in her words and But on one, more than the rest, he fixed his pierc
1570.required, and which he exhibited in his death for law, which prescribed a delay of mo
1571.and which he exhibited in his death for law, which prescribed a delay of more than
1572.cteristic which could fulfilling of her desire. petition. have betrayed the chief shep
1573. was evidently prospering, owing to the prudence and grace with which it was conducted.
1574.which was between him and the In peohis mind the features and figure and still more
1575.vius impressed well in the palm, should state. Marcelh'nnus, the twin brothers, fello
1576.low-converts of Torquatus, ever, should desire to come toHis nuptial before < death. T
1577.d desire to come toHis nuptial before < death. They to bear the full-grown lily, this
1578.stirs as he ple, J the may choose, that man is my prize. And abroad, disguised I kn
1579.em. Syra as a dependant, and Agnes as a relation, had put on mourning upon Fabiua's deat
1580.tion, had put on mourning upon Fabiua's death; and hence no change of habit CHAPTEE X
1581.rning upon Fabiua's death; and hence no change of habit CHAPTEE XL PAVSA BET PRAETIOSA
1582. Fabiua's death; and hence no change of habit CHAPTEE XL PAVSA BET PRAETIOSA PRIE IVN
1583.would raise suspicion in his daughter's mind of their having taken some secret, or s
1584.t was onK a day or two before the happy one of their spiritual nuptials, that Syra
1585.nt to keep all charitable, It now ? the good things to yourself. " Do you call that
1586.even months aud tight days. Interred in peace the tenth day before the caleiida of Ma
1587., can," replied Syra, laughing. " Never mind about the seeing. But tell me, how will
1588.mind about the seeing. But tell me, how will From St. Paul's. t " Macedonian, n exor
1589.ra gave her an exact description of the habit their color und form. ? be dressed What
1590.escription of the habit their color und form. ? be dressed What have you " and i.r;i
1591.arry nor give in marriage, to tread the same chaste path to heaven which the Incarna
1592.feelingly deority of virginity to every other state scribed the happiness of having n
1593.gly deority of virginity to every other state scribed the happiness of having no love
1594.ginity to every other state scribed the happiness of having no love on earth but one, whi
1595.tate scribed the happiness of having no love on earth but one, which instead of fadi
1596.appiness of having no love on earth but one, which instead of fading, opens out int
1597.which instead of fading, opens out into immortality, in heaven. For bliss, he observed, is
1598.is but the expanded flower which Divine love bears on earth. After this brief discou
1599.utely the short ceremonial. " Wo.l now, one question more," resumed the blir.d girl
1600.are becoming quite worldly." 'Never you mind," replied Crecilia, "if people choose t
1601. of Agnes, iu the hospital of which the good priest Dionysius lived. She found him a
1602. blind friend; she dates for this great honor, the holy Pontiff proceeded to bless th
1603.he foot of the altar, was motionless in one of her radiant raptures, gazing fixedly
1604.f consecration to Jesus Christ, my only love on earth, under the care of these two h
1605.r blind CoBcilia. When she heard of the happiness that awaited Syra, she had flown, ns we
1606.came The blessings were spoken, and the habit and veil put on when they asked her if
1607.t a poor girl, and do you think my Lord will ?>e offended if I ask Him to crown me,
1608.ide at home and persecution period, yet many continued Still there was a place in ch
1609.aud they often met aud devot apart, for particular instruction ; pleased to be crowned Him
1610.nds to put on hers but a and amidst moi sign from the Pontiff checked them she was l
1611.ways taught, that the very queenship of virtue is innocence crowned by penance. ; ; ;
1612.espectful, but freer air than usual, as one already as;1613.erything in it breathed contentment and happiness. It was one of those genial days which
1614.athed contentment and happiness. It was one of those genial days which a Roman wint
1615.December. Everything seemed to know and love the gentle mistress of tho place. The d
1616.rbs which she brought them with evident pleasure ; but none owned her kindly sway so muc
1617.en to me," replied Agnes, borne back in mind to the morning's scene " and no sun iu
1618. the morning's scene " and no sun iu my life has ever given me fairer it can only gi
1619.ver given me fairer it can only give me one more ; fair." flattered, as if the comp
1620.oubt you mean, of youi " espousals with one who may have won your heart. " That is
1621.ed, a peaceful day ; ; ; "Yes it is the sign my beloved has placed upon my countenan
1622.r but himself."* "And who is this happy being? I was not without hopes, nor will I re
1623.ppy being? I was not without hopes, nor will I renounce them yet, that I have a plac
1624."Madam," he said, you are trifling with one who sincerely brightness of heaven, han
1625.best autliorih its splendour within her soul, she saw at once, in the scene, the the
1626.o finish without its clouds it devotion one whose love is chaste, whose caresses pu
1627.ithout its clouds it devotion one whose love is chaste, whose caresses pure, whose w
1628.e three spoke together of the morning's happiness, and of the happier morning of which it
1629. "that dare T with disdain, the mime of one virtue is ,>nor er untarnished, whose f
1630.at dare T with disdain, the mime of one virtue is ,>nor er untarnished, whose ffe us u
1631.rounds, giving and most minutely to the one whom h." had pi to the edict. This man
1632. one whom h." had pi to the edict. This man words. had bi for his post on account o
1633.was to spare nobody, but to prevent any one's interself into my kinswoman's house,
1634.se ?" " " who, by allowing my cousin to One," replied the lady, "And who Kalinin or
1635.And who Kalinin or beer,* in the merest animal consciousness, that it was his business
1636. it was his business, not an unpleasant one, to spear, or sabre, some one or other
1637.npleasant one, to spear, or sabre, some one or other before morning. The night was
1638.nt one, to spear, or sabre, some one or other before morning. The night was raw and ;
1639. innocent child, feels herself bound in honor and duty Daciau wrapped himself in his
1640.child, feels herself bound in honor and duty Daciau wrapped himself in his cloak, an
1641. were at play, but how soon it would be time to cut the present his teeth, muttered
1642.nce recognised and welcomed. " Come how good of you thus in, my noble young masters
1643. you thus in, my noble young masters to honor my poor dwelling I hardly dare offer yo
1644.dare offer you our plain by ; ! The day being at length arrived for its publication i
1645.ublication in Eome, fare ' ; but if you will partake of it you will indeed give us a
1646.e ' ; but if you will partake of it you will indeed give us a Corvinus fully felt th
1647.been received from Nicodemia, Christian love-feast." kindly, father Diogenes," answe
1648.glad to eat something. In the meantime, one of your youths can go out and cater for
1649.d torn down a and had manfully suffered death for his boldness. Corvinus was determin
1650.wine." Saying this he gave his purse to one. of the sons, with instructions to brin
1651.tter provisions than he knew the simple family usually enjoyed. They sat down and Panc
1652. of saying something, addressed the old man. " Good Diogenes, I have heard Sebastia
1653.ing something, addressed the old man. " Good Diogenes, I have heard Sebastian say th
1654.r Christ. Tell ; we must have something good self ; me precious document, Corvinus,
1655.ny of the Pannoniau cohort, destroy the same cunning " With " It is now pleasure," a
1656.roy the same cunning " With " It is now pleasure," answered the old man. nearly since it
1657." It is now pleasure," answered the old man. nearly since it happened,* and as I wa
1658.e venerable Pontiff SixtuB was going to death, and Laurentius ! ; mans, whose uncouth
1659.s!" 'Ai and patens.* besides an immense quantity of silver thnist it into the bla/.iii'-
1660., " how did he endure his shrunk, first one letter or word coming up, then another
1661.ost harrowing spectacle I have ever but one stronger than Csasars, the Lord of lord
1662.ars, the Lord of lords beheld in all my life. But to look into his countenance was t
1663. was to neither counsel nor strength of man shall prevail against Him. His head was
1664.ecause it contained blasphemies against God and His hotion flowed down it; but the
1665., was made no calculation on that head. Death for Christ, whether in heaven. so impre
1666.e in Pancratius, "and as soon whether a death-blow would at once stun them out of exi
1667. think that I could stand what he or as God pleases they should have to writhe for
1668.prove the perpetrators of this deed. In truth, it had its ridicuany thing; for you ar
1669. boy," exclaimed the centurion, full of emotion, and looking tenderly on the youth, who
1670.aving risen from his seat, had placed " God will the officer's shoulders. give you
1671.g risen from his seat, had placed " God will the officer's shoulders. give you stren
1672. as looked a upon has already given you courage. But we must not forget our night's wor
1673.uite over your head; so ter night. Now, good Diogenes, put more wood on the fire, an
1674.ajar." " Go, go, my sons," said the old man, "and God speed you! whatever you are a
1675.o, go, my sons," said the old man, "and God speed you! whatever you are about, I am
1676.ment, was partly, that reason for their being there might be apparent, partly to keep
1677.ollections of Diogenes's youth, and the good old fervent times, as Pancratius would
1678.he well-known " thanks to salutation of God;" aud Sebastian entered, and if Diogene
1679.s of the fellow's tale. It is not every one that feat But pniy, sirrah, why did you
1680.d you not give the alarm, and rouse the other guards to pur- ' who could have perform
1681.rviuus, but well within " This business will his teeth ; then added go hard with you
1682.o hard with you; "First, Master try, we will fight any living : it is a capital offe
1683.on which to his side, and for the first time confronted after looking at it for some
1684.t for some moments, exclaimed: to let a man come up and speak to you, without givin
1685.e right." "Come, sir, this is no joking matter. Tell me, at once, who came here last n
1686.e they were, and what they did." " Why, one of them was but a stripling, a boy, tal
1687.hat you miss, while I was busy with the other." " And what of him ? What was he like
1688.emembered that I had to run through any one that came near Two wizards, or goblins,
1689.lins, or worse." or Numen, it's all the same, I suppose. A letter make any differenc
1690. call myself Hermann, and they mean the same. How should / know your nice points of
1691.. How should / know your nice points of language ?" Corvinus was enraged at himself for
1692.telli' Nomen can't ; gent praetorian on duty, instead of a sottish, savage foreigner
1693.," he said, in the worst of humors, you will have to answer to the emperor for all t
1694." as to that, we are pretty well in the same boat," (Corvinus turned pale, for he kn
1695.e had seen at school, in pos session of one of his : not you rush on him with your
1696.g menaced, Some admired tha there was a universal uproar. board, so generally reckoned co
1697.mself ; THE CHURCH OF occupied with the same theme. In the great Antoniau .1 over. g
1698.iers. "What a S about the edict !" said one. all TJUJE CATACOMJJ& all K know what a
1699.h would have sufficed each by itself to cause death ?" "No, that is quite a false rep
1700.d have sufficed each by itself to cause death ?" "No, that is quite a false report,"
1701.to tlve soldier, who drove his lance at one, and it passed clean through her, and s
1702.any wound in her. He then hacked at the other with his sword, but he might as well ha
1703.e hod been brought down." 'Wonderful !" many exclaimed, "What extraordinary people t
1704. answer these questions. I learnt more, one day after dinner, about these Christian
1705.ns from you, than I had heard in all my life before. What a wonderful memory you mus
1706.in all my life before. What a wonderful memory you must have, to remember so accuratel
1707.emember so accurately the genealogy and history of that barbarous people Is what Scauru
1708.s, they 1> that they have only to go to one of those priests, own the crime, !i for
1709.in the chorus. is incompatible with the man who thinks lie ean be pardoned safety o
1710.hinks lie ean be pardoned safety of the state. another man of every crime, is capable
1711.e pardoned safety of the state. another man of every crime, is capable of committin
1712.ny." " And " this A by ; new and is the cause of that, no doubt," observed Fulvius, t
1713.. But even so, I would gladly give them one chance of escape. " " And what is that
1714.t even so, I would gladly give them one chance of escape. " " And what is that ?" snee
1715. ?" sneeringly asked Fulvius. " That no one should be allowed to join in destroying
1716.r from crime than they. I would have no one rise his hand against them, who cannot
1717. child, a profligate, a thief. For with being one of these, no one charges the poor ;
1718., a profligate, a thief. For with being one of these, no one charges the poor ; Chr
1719. thief. For with being one of these, no one charges the poor ; Christians."* 1 foll
1720.ughts got vent in familiar would make a man fly in the air, it would be only necess
1721.in which air predominates more than the other words of prayer. three elements. Such f
1722. believing at ing to Pythagoras. These, being gathered when the sun is in once every
1723.ainst us treasuring up, from Libra, the nature of which is to balance even heavy thing
1724.d flown up inanswered him at his side " Good youth, whoever thou art to the sky, and
1725. at his side " Good youth, whoever thou art to the sky, and come down again, would
1726.deed, that the Thessalian witches go at pleasure the clouds, from place to place, which
1727.e done spreading thereon clay which, in man's hands, would only have through blinde
1728.f men's "Then, as to the Christians you will remember, excellent souls. Let us be tr
1729.e account to which you have done me the honor to allude, which was at the deified Fab
1730.ost important evidence bearii g on this matter, record- this first day of danger ?" "
1731.at I have been named guide of the ed in history. It is quite certain, that here in Rome
1732.as sometimes called Simon Peter, and at other cemetery Pray, times Simon Magus, actua
1733.r which reason he was to be her to stay one moment. "There is ; ; ; ; ' : ; ; ; ; ;
1734.s to have most extraordinary power over nature. Thus, for example, they think they can
1735.ould they be slaves, over their masters time for rest. Long before daybreak, the Chr
1736.r some yearn' disuse, had been put into good repair and order by the/v.v.vo/ r.s-, ]
1737.athered tree}) spirit from the bread of life. In churches, as yet may be seen in the
1738.lergy in preparing their flocks for, to many, ; The faithful felt, not as from the w
1739. then performed was essentially, and in many details, the same as they daily witness
1740.s essentially, and in many details, the same as they daily witness at the Catholic a
1741. consecration, the communion alike, but many of the prayers were identical so that t
1742.l more the priest reciting them, in the same language as the Boman Church of the cat
1743.e the priest reciting them, in the same language as the Boman Church of the catacombs ep
1744.asion which we are describing, when the time came for giving the kiss of peace a gen
1745.en the time came for giving the kiss of peace a genuine embrace of brotherly love sob
1746.of peace a genuine embrace of brotherly love sobs could be heard, and bursts of tear
1747.elf, parts of ferrets iu " the warren I will be the sportsman outside. In the meanti
1748.red information ; a parting salutation. Many a youth clung to his father's neck, sca
1749.their palm-branches together in heaven. many to the proper quarter. Sebastian, after
1750.ore, had proceeded, according to almost universal custom, to the baths, to invigor- how w
1751.roceeded, according to almost universal custom, to the baths, to invigor- how would mo
1752.d also to remove the fervor of that new love, which fear of long separation en- from
1753.diate assault, and accents of faith and love. Then extending in his hand an of getti
1754. ! orarium, or white linen the bread of life, cloth, he received in it a provision o
1755.or the first events of the morning were being discussed, and where Fultime, poor Syra
1756.r blind girl, who would not attract the same quatus calla had been narrowly watched
1757.possible, to its destination. There was one crnvtery called ad seztiim i'hilippi, w
1758.e been situated six miles from Rome but many were three miles from the But, in fact,
1759. 11); and Pelt i liola confirms this by many arguments ChriBtiancr Keel. I'olit'U, t
1760.ancr Keel. I'olit'U, torn. iii. p. 20). time hastening across the fields, so as to a
1761.ombs, we stopped Rliort of the sub!' In cause Severus would not let it be betrayed to
1762. now assembled, uni tins trnoted on the principle oonunon to ]t chief pastor. all such ex
1763. which we hare before described, placed one on each side of a orrnngenv ; n the of
1764.heir doors, or rather be found opposite one another. At the end of one will mi arco
1765.und opposite one another. At the end of one will mi arcosolium or alinr-tomb: and t
1766.opposite one another. At the end of one will mi arcosolium or alinr-tomb: and the pr
1767.der charge of the ontiarii,* and in the other the women, under the care of the <1: Th
1768.e sexes at divfeie worship !>led. was a matter of jealous discipline in t'.ie early Ch
1769.t parts or ornamented the entrances. In one the instance, indeed in the chief basil
1770."I am a soldier, and not ar Bring me my man into the light of day, mid 1 will fig.
1771. me my man into the light of day, mid 1 will fig. hand to hand, and foot to foot but
1772.to hand, and foot to foot but I have no love for stifled or poisoned, like vermin in
1773. speech found favor with the s ildiers. One said, may be hundreds of these skulking
1774.ebastian sent his message, was like the one discovered in the cemeteryof St. Agnes.
1775.and by the flat pilasters in the men's, one of these sur- The basilica, in eloquenc
1776. listen to that voice !" " Hush !" said one, . faces having in it a small niche for
1777.lowing verses : : presbytery. half each other division, from which it This is a chanc
1778.st a lofty-arched tomb in its wall, and many " waters : Dum ; meas ut edant appropri
1779. a thousand. my bane, the ought to know cause of all hist night's curse and this day'
1780. " light our torches," But, stop," said one, "Hark!" said a second, while they were
1781.HE Ck-METEUT os ST. AONKK. A Choi r, or chance), w th episcopal chiiir (a) and benches
1782.of scratch]; " I have heard it for some time. ; B. Division tor liftmen, sepfrom ill
1783.thed in a dark dress, so as to resemble one of those bronze B! which have the head
1784.mities of white marble, and ; ; startle one, when it first " seen ; Who A A can be
1785.o living forms. ?" the men whispered to one put out by a draught of wind, or a stro
1786.hem: another. " " " sorceress," replied one. Tlie geniua loci,"* observed another.
1787.evpr:'p.-ired for closing the road eral other stout workmen were stationed, in case o
1788.on him, for a fool or a traitor. " Stay one mo" It is I entreat you," he said. poss
1789. by a remarkable tomb a rds within it I will juat step into one or two of the last c
1790.b a rds within it I will juat step into one or two of the last corridors, and see."
1791.d pay for our disappointment." ; " some one at least CHAPTER run; XVTI. ; FIRST FLO
1792.." " But the enemy may seize you." " No matter," she answered laughing " ; my being ta
1793.o matter," she answered laughing " ; my being taken rcay save ' ; True but others can
1794.lazing torches into the side galleries, one here and one heard the account of his s
1795.s into the side galleries, one here and one heard the account of his sudden disappe
1796.up He had no doubt whatever, in his own mind, that he here of the gloomy corridor. F
1797.erved to shed brightness on monuof that virtue which had never failed to save the ; du
1798. at me, woman, and tell me '. j i'i the truth." " I must tell you the truth without l
1799.j i'i the truth." " I must tell you the truth without looking at yoTi, sir,'' answere
1800.er the features of Fulvius tin possible emotion, just aa much as the wave that runs, pn
1801.playful breeze, over the ripe meadow. A knowledge had Hashed into his mind, n chic had fa
1802.meadow. A knowledge had Hashed into his mind, n chic had fallen inio Ilia hand. " It
1803. n chic had fallen inio Ilia hand. " It will be " iW ridiculous," he said, twenty ;"
1804. ;.;u-I. Return to your quarters, and I will nee you are well rewar.iej. You, Corvin
1805.re l<> your father, mid tell him all. I will follow in a carriage with the captive."
1806.tlnii i would imagine, with him; on any one who It was as he had oalonlatad. else w
1807.li >iw ies : v;ik the n <>tthat . i any one : her " What is is thy name, child ?" ;
1808.better motives to propose to me thnn my life," she replied. " What is for the very t
1809. for which I most d and Mis Divine your history ? Whence do you come ?" "I have no hist
1810.tory ? Whence do you come ?" "I have no history. My parents were poor, and brought Son,
1811.rs old, as they came to pray, " I thank God that I am in discharge of a vow made in
1812.ons. It was on that memorable day, when many Christians were buried at their tomb, b
1813.cast down upon them. My parents had the happiness least thou canst not thank thy God, tha
1814.appiness least thou canst not thank thy God, that He has made thee " to be of the n
1815.an all the rest, I thank Him daily and "God became my only Father then, and His Cat
1816.t thou think it a Church my mother. The one feeds the birds ox iie air, the blessin
1817.ie air, the blessing never to have seen other nurses the weaklings of the flock. I ha
1818.I have never wanted the face of a human being, or the sun, or the earth ? What for an
1819. I have seen Do you remember very early one sun is to you, which I know to be local
1820.ning in the autumn, leading a poor lame man along the direction of its rays. And th
1821.s Patricius ?" countenance of intensest beauty, and smiles upon me ever. She blushed a
1822. And I know it to be that of Him whom I love with unJ tier put into the poor old man
1823.ove with unJ tier put into the poor old man's purse her own share of the alms? affe
1824.he alms? affection. I would not for the world have its splendor di You have owned you
1825.es, nor my gaze on it dr>wn gently. " I love Him too much, not to wish to aside by e
1826.rs at once, or I must try what a little pain about whom Torquatus had been able or w
1827.us had been able or willing to tell him will do. That will soon tame thee." " Pain ?
1828.le or willing to tell him will do. That will soon tame thee." " Pain ?" she echoed i
1829.m will do. That will soon tame thee." " Pain ?" she echoed innocently. nothing, was
1830.st yield, or he would be avenged. "Yes, pain. Hast thou never felt it? hast thou nev
1831.ever felt it? hast thou never been " Do one in thy life ?" After a pause, looking a
1832.t? hast thou never been " Do one in thy life ?" After a pause, looking at her steadf
1833.e going ?" Oh, no Christians never hurt one another." " Before the The rack was sta
1834. he made judge of earth, I suppose, who will send me to a sign to Catulus to place h
1835.earth, I suppose, who will send me to a sign to Catulus to place her upon it. The ex
1836. she mode no resistance, token from the soul to the countenance, but a smile. she wa
1837.een conversing with her. If ther to her fate. drizzling day, like the same person pr
1838.er to her fate. drizzling day, like the same person preceding evening. The weather,
1839.a sterner voice. " Neither torments nor death," firmly replied the victim tir-d sever
1840. the altar, "shall separate me from the love of Chris! toot of spectators came in, a
1841.t of spectators came in, and stood near one of the side-doors, can offer up no sacr
1842.s, can offer up no sacrifice but to the one living God and its from which they coul
1843.r up no sacrifice but to the one living God and its from which they could see alL r
1844.eed, was pondering whether, having lost one But the placid gentlespy, he should not
1845.ev,s this, from the preparation and the cause of it being inunseen, and from that add
1846.rom the preparation and the cause of it being inunseen, and from that additional suff
1847.d a sudden paleness, truly, a rack'n,;/ pain, through all " Let me loose, I say, or
1848.hrough all " Let me loose, I say, or he will be gone." " Who will be gone?" " answer
1849.oose, I say, or he will be gone." " Who will be gone?" " answered "who Pancratius,"
1850.rra. : that Thou ; ha=.t made me suffer pain ; the first time for Thy sake. I have l
1851.; ha=.t made me suffer pain ; the first time for Thy sake. I have loved Thee in peac
1852.time for Thy sake. I have loved Thee in peace I have loved Thee in corntort I have lo
1853.rt I have loved Thee in joy, and now in pain I love Thee How much sweeter it is to b
1854.ve loved Thee in joy, and now in pain I love Thee How much sweeter it is to be like
1855.beckoned to Catulus, who understood the sign, and stretched out his hand to receive
1856.poor girl die ?" asked a spectator poor man's table !" " Thou triflest with me," ex
1857.d the judge, thoroughly " and makest We will try somelight of my lenity. a. lighted
1858. the hall. that Csecilia, for the first time, learnt she was in the midst of CHAPTER
1859. ever true and and Spouse Let me suffer pain and torture for Thee faithful to Thee h
1860.ry your "Humbly waiting your divinity's pleasure outside, and with that what are you abo
1861.at what are you about, fumbling all day duty, sirrah anxious to propitiate your godl
1862.Dead !" cried out Tertullus " dead with one turn of the i he shall smart for it. Br
1863.t see, than thou or thy cruel masters?" life and death, " What a third time in twent
1864.an thou or thy cruel masters?" life and death, " What a third time in twenty-four hou
1865.asters?" life and death, " What a third time in twenty-four hours wilt thou dare Thi
1866.n twenty-four hours wilt thou dare This time thou shalt not escape." to cross my pat
1867.ther taken with the trick. This was ; a good symptom. " Well," he said at : ! '>. Th
1868.But as he ran of herculean build, ' " I will be merciful to you. Lietors, their axes
1869.ew himself down, and exclaimed Spare my life ; I have important information to furni
1870., if I live." "Who wants your worthless life 1" responded the gentle " Maximian. Lie
1871.ors, put aside your axes ; the rods are good enough for him." last, bind yoxir fasce
1872.m.ul, au:l to keep n >>s of of lire was one of being the and a shower of blows fell
1873.u:l to keep n >>s of of lire was one of being the and a shower of blows fell up:;:: s
1874., whose kuife I found under head of the family. in life, the restoring where the edict
1875.fe I found under head of the family. in life, the restoring where the edict had been
1876. and brought him to dour, from which my justice ?" "A youth lather's \< brought this i-
1877.rasp, for- I to him upon certain-terms; one of wliieli was your ^uanli have heard h
1878.d me." "Then let him not escape a third time, or you may have to and the exclusive f
1879.ve to and the exclusive forming of your mind. You know have trained you, to care not
1880.ring of both their hearts. The dark old man fixed his I suppose it was he who taugh
1881.ed in your hands the divided remnant of family you know where he is ?" " Yes, sire Tor
1882.quatus, who has abandoned the Christian wealth," superstition, has told me." Fulvius c
1883.h, spare me that, Eurotas for hi "He is one who has been staying some time with Chr
1884.hi "He is one who has been staying some time with Chromatiaa sake spare me !" " " I
1885. with Chromatiaa sake spare me !" " " I will and a party of Christians in the countr
1886. the country." Well, then," resumed the other, unmoved as ever, " Why, this is worse
1887. must not si} rink "Yes, and lives with many others of that sect in Campania." from
1888.at prepared it by crime. For the future will one " What I shall not know whom to day
1889.epared it by crime. For the future will one " What I shall not know whom to day be
1890.t next. for there is an honesty even in sin. Nature Prefect, send some one immediat
1891.t. for there is an honesty even in sin. Nature Prefect, send some one immediately to a
1892. even in sin. Nature Prefect, send some one immediately to arrest all ward and hone
1893.; applying them. Our lot is cast by the same throw, we be" arrest as " many as you c
1894.t by the same throw, we be" arrest as " many as you can, and spare no one, and make
1895.rest as " many as you can, and spare no one, and make them come rioh, or die, toget
1896. the day he cnme to Rome or Fulvius, in time for my supper." bound himself to his st
1897.tify his revenge, for a dark, impending fate never failed to weigh upon his soul, an
1898.ing fate never failed to weigh upon his soul, and escape the disgrace and sarcasm th
1899.ht. on him by Roman society. The reader will perhaps be curious to know, what has be
1900.ed and bewildered, he ran to 1< The old man listened with imperturbable sternness t
1901.us." "No immediate profit, indeed but a good prospect in view, The steps had been wo
1902.e the second alternative," said the old man, with a keen about, till, consciousness
1903.make out ho\v h glow in his eye, but no change of face shorter, and that he was in a c
1904.e way." alone, and in the dark " But my honor is engaged I cannot allow myself to be
1905.f which, indeed, he geance. You have no time to lose, remember, in foolery. Your rec
1906.s or his tapers, to feel serious alarm. wealth by honorable," (Eurotas smiled at the i
1907.h by honorable," (Eurotas smiled at the idea coming degrees he began One after anint
1908.led at the idea coming degrees he began One after aninto either of their minds) " r
1909.ir minds) " rather than by foul means." other of his lights were burnt out, and his v
1910.ad wan You know our compact. Either the family is himsi coming back to the same speedi
1911. the family is himsi coming back to the same speediest. restored to wealth and splen
1912.back to the same speediest. restored to wealth and splendor, or it ends in and with yo
1913.is hands, and these solemn monuments of death began to speak to hiy " Give me tune wr
1914.ithing in all his body. enough, and all will in a language that it could not refuse
1915.all his body. enough, and all will in a language that it could not refuse to hear, nor p
1916. be well." misunderstand. "Deposited in peace," was the inm. " " and even the thousan
1917.m. " " and even the thousand I give you time, till all in hopeless. Things do not lo
1918. in hopeless. Things do not look bright one resting in Christ was another at presen
1919.another at present. But, Fulvius, it is time that I tell you who I am," nameless one
1920.pon a heap :ild but would he bo laid in peace, by pious hands, us they > On the cold
1921.ns robed and holding lamps tween them a form wrapped up in a white linen cloth, with
1922. sons, with sorrowful countenances, nnd many others, among whom he could distinguish
1923.sh Sebastian, closed the procession. As many bore lamps or tapers, the figures seeme
1924. a picture of the charm which bound his life, and this must expire with it. And Good
1925.life, and this must expire with it. And Good Shepherd looked brightly down on him. B
1926. body had been laid upon the ground and other psalms He was cut off for and hymns wer
1927., his eyes behold has always treated of death. At length it was placed in the no ligh
1928.d for it, under an arch. While this was being only his grave was much larger than the
1929. all that, done, Torquatus drew nigh to one of the spectators, and whisit was as da
1930.What else is pered to him the que tion: death ? "Whose funeral is this?" ; ; mid exti
1931.arth's joys, so anxious was lie to have one more look at things without, lest he sh
1932.by something was beginning could not be death as yet. Death had to be followed But ev
1933.as beginning could not be death as yet. Death had to be followed But even this was co
1934.l'' diers, in this cerneteiy, and whose soul God took to Himself. " Then I am her mu
1935.iers, in this cerneteiy, and whose soul God took to Himself. " Then I am her murder
1936.he holy bishop's feet, fell It was some time before his feelings prostrate Dsfore hi
1937.som, saying, back, my son, whoever thou art, to Father's house. But thou art weak a
1938.r thou art, to Father's house. But thou art weak and faint, and needest thy could f
1939. himself, thought 1 may ; pit can ; the same day. All rejoiced at the prodigal's ret
1940.And <1 glimmer of light appeared at the same disas the sounds and the words of the s
1941.enitentiary syB'em of the earl.v Church will be better described in any volume that
1942.ol the second period of ecciehia-sticAl history that of The Church of the Goxil cax. It
1943. with Marcellinua about his safety. His life was too valuable to the Church to be sa
1944. qiii'.tns rest, they travelled, bv the same road us Tor- knew how eagerly it was so
1945.ast conceal himself. The "No," said the good man, " it must not be. I am already usu
1946.onceal himself. The "No," said the good man, " it must not be. I am already usual p
1947.residence was no longer safe and a bold idea had been adopted by the courageous sold
1948.ly It was to lodge the Pontiff where no one could sus- families have, indeed, sent
1949.w it would be kept as moral as paganism will permit pect him to be, and where no sea
1950.an and Quad- very strictness. Bishop Bx>man heathens. They are rude provincials; an
1951.r ones who would not scruple to take my life, if they could do so with impunity." in
1952.angerous books, full of and there is no time to be lost. "And why, Sebastian !" repl
1953.have done little by my words perhaps my death may do more face and tearful eye. ; ! V
1954.ad promised Sebastian not to expose his life during the journey. He howmore necessar
1955.town till he saw the end. "Tell me why, good Sebastian, I pray." Corvinus arrived wi
1956., "What, another secret ?" "Call it the same, to be revealed at the same time. But I
1957.Call it the same, to be revealed at the same time. But I and to the house. He found
1958.it the same, to be revealed at the same time. But I and to the house. He found it em
1959.what I want you to do, and that I think will satis- and through, but discovered neit
1960. got orders to seize on Chrennatius and symbol of Christianity. He was confounded a fy
1961.ld master Cassianus at Fundi to a cruel death. I want you to hasten before his messen
1962. 4 " And then ?" 'but I would go to the world's end, to save niy good Cassian"Look th
1963.ould go to the world's end, to save niy good Cassian"Look that way," answered the se
1964. the servant. "You see gate? us, or any other fellow-Christian." He was soon ready, t
1965.ay. "What two? Always two, it seems." " One Corvinus having resolved to keep the ho
1966.olved to keep the hostile expedition in good youth, very handsome, sing so sweet The
1967.youth, very handsome, sing so sweet The other his own hands, as honorable, lucrative,
1968.ues, he found he whom he considered his evil genius shoulii i, the little community
1969.vice was received lighted to find, that one at least was at l-'imdi, when ho with d
1970.ions were taken. that officer, a humane man, remarked that the r cellianus, with th
1971.referred power to ivot. lie offered the matter, and him the assistance of u.a C4 FABTO
1972.assistance of u.a C4 FABTOLA; OR r, and other requisites; lint they were declined. Co
1973.n of his own sweet school-boy days that time which most look back on from hearts tee
1974.ance to greet him, as a conspirator lie state and a A shout arose ed him, and he sat
1975. and by its tone, and by the look which time. At length he started on his journey, a
1976.oad Hi-omul, Oorvinus learnt there were many present like for an hour or two, pushed
1977.t,vo " ]>oys !" he shouted out, "do yon love yonr master, Cassia- rows of trees. Cor
1978.s ? He was once mine too, and I owe him many a grudge." A yell of execration broke o
1979.e, vexation, and remorse. " Then I have good news for you here" is permission from s
1980.A shower of books, writing-tablets, and other school missiles speed. The attendants w
1981.n him bunk was wet aud slimy, and every time he attempted to climb his foot slipped,
1982. his lacerated Loss of blood, and acute pain, at length exhausted him; by and he fel
1983.is ready instruments, left the expiring man where he lay, to die unnoticed. ; who h
1984. repaired slept. while the carriage was being and had a good carouse with his money w
1985. while the carriage was being and had a good carouse with his money while he Two act
1986.f revenge had thus been accomplished in one day the pagan and the Christian. CHAPTE
1987.vage who had of Christian prisoners, it will not appear surprising, that their numbe
1988.increased, with the growing of a by the labor and sweat Thermae of Diorlesian were be
1989.or and sweat Thermae of Diorlesian were being devised and witnessed, without intensit
1990.lprits, toil. accustomed to such menial many of whom were men little The only recomp
1991. willing pnr" veyor to wild beasts they will do charmingly. I ani sure ; And mind, k
1992.ey will do charmingly. I ani sure ; And mind, keep them up in good condition." " and
1993. I ani sure ; And mind, keep them up in good condition." " and task-masters, accepta
1994. with lash or stick in men of excellent family, but work like plebeians, and will go "
1995.nt family, but work like plebeians, and will go " nand, ever ready to add pain to to
1996., and will go " nand, ever ready to add pain to toil, whether it were to vent with y
1997.ated by them. a number of captives, for many of whom Rabirius made reTheir deacons v
1998.ldly venture among them, and distribute one of those chambers which flanked the eas
1999. them, or give long arm of the hall. In one of them they saw a number of them the m
2000. must use the term) resting after their labor. better treatment at their hands. They
2001.com- The centre of the group was an old man, most venerable in apmend themselves to
2002.were preserved for the sacrifice, work, one on each side, they bore up his bonds. I
2003.e the dens near the are told that their particular delight was, over and above amphitheatr
2004.erfoaai their work for them.* But their time was not serves, from which at any time
2005. time was not serves, from which at any time could be drawn the materials yet come f
2006. orBufferings ; they received for their labor, was that of the mules and oxen which s
2007. stable to sleep in, food sufficient in quantity to keep up their strength, clothing eno
2008.eacons in the next pontificate. Several other captives lay on the ground, about the o
2009.ptives lay on the ground, about the old man's feet, as he, seated on a block of mar
2010. Christians of right belonged to them." One afternoon, towards the end of December,
2011.toiling to raise, would be dedicated to God, under his invocation, become a title,
2012.ed and absorbed by a glorious temple in honor of the Queen of Angels, which should co
2013. the mightiest artistic genius that the world should What more consoling thought coul
2014. prodigality of a wicked emperor, as in truth building up one of the stateliest churc
2015.wicked emperor, as in truth building up one of the stateliest churches in which the
2016.e stateliest churches in which the true God is worshipped, and the Virgin Mother, w
2017.mbatants in the amphitheatre, such as a good dealer would have for cattle at a fair.
2018.d Christians under your charge, for the honor of fighting in the amphitheatre, on occ
2019.m obliged to finish the work in a given time, and I cannot do asked the superintende
2020.ort of hands." " I cannot take that old man, if you like for he is not worth his ke
2021.e is not worth his keep, so that others will be got to replace those that help far a
2022.ough your works, and let us choose what will suit us." cut in the amphitheatre. The
2023.above, like the Pantheon. This led into one of the shorter arms thaoe lialhs, was C
2024.f the hall, where the -arms intersected one anothor, a text. Tue floor was afterwan
2025.thus the pillars were shortened, uiA of one block had to be ereutud. Two were i.min
2026.of a bear's or blood ilmvThey like to > form his mother and Sebastian slipt his purs
2027.t wounds and blows, before But there is one whom you Conies to decide the contest.
2028.rius " but he is who spends much of his time among the cona fine ing, and plenty ; y
2029.brief -ig -better, still remain; geons, will give our of the one which we have 2030.ill remain; geons, will give our of the one which we have 2031.ch we have idea of what confessorship cost, independent
2032.at confessorship cost, independent of A man might ; ; ; i victs, " But it is mine,
2033.m in their He pays, of course, well for being allowed all this ; so round to look. ma
2034.ed of two square subterranean chambers, one below the other, with only one round ap
2035.re subterranean chambers, one below the other, with only one round aperture in the ce
2036.hambers, one below the other, with only one round aperture in the centre of each va
2037.e how much of the two first could reach other means of ventilation, drainage, or acce
2038.ecuring the prisoners ; but have, rings many used to be laid on the floor, with thei
2039.ion, thou shalt not him instantly. This time at least, Pancratius, escape." the lowe
2040.him do. and thus without any medical or other asrecovery appeared hopeless, learning
2041.ppeared hopeless, learning what sort of life they were compelled to lead but we sist
2042.e, there regained their health.* At the same time the would advise him to peruse tho
2043.ere regained their health.* At the same time the would advise him to peruse those im
2044.stians bought access to these abodes of pain, but not of Acts of the Martyrs, which
2045., but not of Acts of the Martyrs, which will show him how they were made sorrow, and
2046. in the jail, killed by its severities, many before their bodies had endured any tor
2047.f these most cherished and venerated of God's inspired words, as these venerable mo
2048.t leisure sufficient to read much Roman justice required at least the outward forms of
2049.ubject, we would limit him willingly to one speci- and hence the Christian captives
2050.subjected to an interrogatrue that they will be best read by the scholar in their pl
2051.recious examples but we trust that some one will soon give us a the African latinit
2052.ous examples but we trust that some one will soon give us a the African latinity pro
2053.rthy English version of these, and some other similar, early the secretary or registr
2054.inus, now hi his ninetieth " Who is the God of the Christians?" he rethe same as we
2055.is the God of the Christians?" he rethe same as were known to St. Augustine, and can
2056.ne, and cannot be read year, was asked, one without emotion. If the reader would co
2057.ot be read year, was asked, one without emotion. If the reader would compare the plied,
2058.y reitjournal of a culprit condemned to death, ate approach of execution, with the un
2059.ades the corresponding nar. the case of one Ptolomteus, beautifully recited by St.
2060.via Perpetua, a delicate lady of twenty-one years of and in that of St. Perpetua, h
2061.d not hesitate in concluding, question, Art thou a Christian ? and upon recitals of
2062.r to the of Vienne, or Lyons, or to the history of the noble marty .i nerve our courage
2063.history of the noble marty .i nerve our courage, by the Boany similar, still extant rec
2064.re to " fight with wild beasts." " What art thou?" he asked of one. ; catechumens a
2065. beasts." " What art thou?" he asked of one. ; catechumens and contemplation of wha
2066.stones : am a Christian, by the help of God," was the rejoinder. " And who art thou
2067.p of God," was the rejoinder. " And who art thou ?" said the prefect to Busticus. "
2068.rtaker self; and by His grace of the "I same hope as those whom you see. " Then turn
2069.f both into it, and found there already other victims, The youth had just thru awaiti
2070. The youth had just thru awaiting their time of sacrifice. be was being handcuffed,
2071.waiting their time of sacrifice. be was being handcuffed, to request " can Ire answer
2072., to request " can Ire answered the old man, reprehended or condemned who obeys the
2073.the precepts of Jesus Christ our Sa' No one," What viour. ' ' sort of learning and
2074.ue ?" I have endeavored to master every science, and have tried " cue of the captors to
2075.hich the cin-umbeing torn to pieces by, liberty. do not who follow iih," that is " Wret
2076.anciently foretold by the prophets, who will come to judge nankiud, and is the preac
2077.ants. But they could discern neither ho will learn well under Him. I indeed, as a me
2078.arn well under Him. I indeed, as a mere man, am the bravado and boisterousness, nor
2079.ce belongs to the prophets."* agape, or love-feast; for they supped with calm joyi r
2080.th calm joyi right doctrine, relieve in one God. the "The Christians boldly took fu
2081.alm joyi right doctrine, relieve in one God. the "The Christians boldly took full u
2082.hrist. At evening they were led : "Thou art, methinks, a master of error to others,
2083. with his feet stretched are your names cause you love to look upon the objects of yo
2084.feet stretched are your names cause you love to look upon the objects of your future
2085.in in the name is Secunda," replied the one. day of judgment." Many retired at this
2086.me is Secunda," replied the one. day of judgment." Many retired at this rebuke, and not
2087.da," replied the one. day of judgment." Many retired at this rebuke, and not a few "
2088.m a widow, named Rufina, professing the same were led by it to conversion." But whil
2089.the bodies saving faith,' continued the other. At length, after having put similar qu
2090.nswers from all the others, except from one wretched a much more dainty banquet for
2091. banquet for the souls of her children. man, who, to the grief of the rest, wavered
2092.youth, who hast the audacity to But his duty forbade this at present. After, therefo
2093.ds. Show thus at once thy piety and thy wisdom; for thou art yet but a tear shall And
2094.once thy piety and thy wisdom; for thou art yet but a tear shall And you two women,
2095.ng, sufficient portions of the Bread of life to feed, early in the morning of their
2096.ng." Pancratius signed himself with the sign of the saving cross, and calmly replied
2097.is youth which you behold in me has the wisdom of grey hairs, if it worship but one Go
2098.wisdom of grey hairs, if it worship but one God. But your gods, with those who ador
2099.om of grey hairs, if it worship but one God. But your gods, with those who adore th
2100. youth, "that thus I suffer some of the same punishment as was inflicted on my they
2101.h, "that thus I suffer some of the same punishment as was inflicted on my they were only d
2102.re than common danger to discharge this duty. For the revelations of Torquatus had m
2103.t then pronounced sentence in the usual form. could scarcely venture out by day, unl
2104.ced, to see who would be its Before any other could step forward, the young tians, an
2105.beautiful in its lovely innocence as an angel's, he the confessors back to their pris
2106.reference, and even to claim it. " Thou art too young, my child," said the kind pri
2107.or they could perMy youth, holy father, will be my best protection. Oh! do not refus
2108.ection. Oh! do not refuse me this great honor." The tears stood in the ceive a fragra
2109.es, and his cheeks glowed with a modest emotion, as he spoke these words. He stretched
2110. his entreaty was so full of fervor and courage, that the plea CHAPTER TXTT. was irresi
2111.thout, was the scene within the prison. Peace, serenity, cheerfulness, and joy reigne
2112.ered to dogs, nor Thou wilt keep safely God's sapearls be cast before swiue. cred g
2113. her eons. Acts of St. Perpctaa, ic. "I will die rather than betray them," answered
2114., of a large mansion, its mis- streets, other and another followed, till, covered wit
2115.saw him coming, and was struck with his beauty and sweetness, as, with arms fol his br
2116. his breast, he was hastening on. "Stay one moment, dear child," she said, putting
2117.d, looking up " and I have no home save one which it might be smilingly; " displeas
2118. 1, you much hurt, Tarcisius ?" " Never mind me, Quadratus," answered smile; he, mos
2119.wered smile; he, most solemn and sacred duty, and I must not tarry a moment eyes wit
2120.w; this is my house." "If I am alive, I will," answered the boy with a kindled ence,
2121., higher sphere. She watched him a long time, and after some and the divine Victim o
2122.on bet- ble burden which he carried. No one stopped him, till a lady ter things tha
2123. him. She drew nearer, and into an open space, where boys, just escaped from school,
2124.few mobeginning to play. " We jnst want one to make up the game; where shall we get
2125.med the first speaker, a strong and " I will have no sulking, bullying youth, laying
2126.ything done. So come, join us at once." good fellow." likewise. "I go-" entreat you,
2127.ly, "do let me such thing," replied the other. "What is that you seem to be carrying
2128. for half an hour out suppose; well, it will not addle by being Give it to me, and I
2129.out suppose; well, it will not addle by being Give it to me, and I will put it by saf
2130.not addle by being Give it to me, and I will put it by safe while we of its nest. at
2131.s composed for him an epitaph, which no one can read, without ; ; concluding that t
2132.Lord's Body in the B. Eucharist was the same then as now : " Tarcisium sanctum Chrie
2133.he Roman martyrology, on the 15th of "I will see it," insisted the other rudely; "I
2134.e 15th of "I will see it," insisted the other rudely; "I will know in the cemetery of
2135. see it," insisted the other rudely; "I will know in the cemetery of Callistus what
2136.hborhood whence his relics were, in due time translated to the church of him roughly
2137.und; and all asked eagerly what was the matter. St. Sylvester in Campo, News of this o
2138.y were to be deresisted every effort of one their feast supernatural strength, as h
2139. have no effect. strength, was the only one that could have overcast, even Cuffs, p
2140.y kept " What is it ? what can it be ?" one began to ask the other; had arrived, an
2141. what can it be ?" one began to ask the other; had arrived, and as quickly divined wh
2142. recognized Tarcisius, having a few and being asked, as a better-dressed not be depri
2143.us the deacon, who flew out immediately man, the same question, he replied contempt
2144.acon, who flew out immediately man, the same question, he replied contemptuously, ;
2145.he guards, had passed freely Sebastian, being known to "Christ's secret gifts, by goo
2146.sult them, was aroused, and "Never with life," was to Tarcisius to yield up his char
2147./tleria, LaO.n jjrovoro. Iqu ty, supply one oJ Lho oaroal, bat tbat result from ide
2148.ratiua, who had longed for They drew to one side, when the youth double promise to
2149.ar, from your window, and looked at the many piping arches of the ainpitheatre, as o
2150.at I await you to-morrow." " It did, in truth. first to I felt an inward assurance th
2151.ies of huniau cruelty. But now that the time is come, I con hardly believe myself wo
2152. believe myself worthy of so immense an honor. What c;m I have done, Sebastian, not i
2153.as the object of so great a grace ?" be one of the the secrets were?" Eight well, i
2154. in your apartments, you said there was one motive strong enough to check your arde
2155.tive strong enough to check your ardent desire to die for Christ and lately you refuse
2156.Campania, and joined this secret to the other how, I cannot conceive." " Yet they for
2157.her how, I cannot conceive." " Yet they form but one. I had promised to watch over y
2158.I cannot conceive." " Yet they form but one. I had promised to watch over your true
2159. your true welfare, Pancratius it was a duty of friendship and love that I had assum
2160.cratius it was a duty of friendship and love that I had assumed. I saw your eagernes
2161.is not he who willeth, nor runneth, but God who hath mercy, that inaketh the lion a
2162.rom the crystal waters of the stream of life ? Is it been pointed at by the very hea
2163.en pointed at by the very heathens with honor, aj a gallant and not too like what one
2164.nor, aj a gallant and not too like what one may read or hear about another, but dar
2165.ctive " Oh, yes, far more far more than one can name without merit and the special
2166. the special glory, of dying for simply being a presumption. That I, a boy just come
2167.d to a ibat it startles me to think, it will soon be that no a common culprit; when
2168.ng both his you pelted and hooted, like other believers tence pronounced on you in co
2169.bastian, more still, and more. To close one's eyes " How like God's love has yours
2170.nd more. To close one's eyes " How like God's love has yours been to me so wise, so
2171.e. To close one's eyes " How like God's love has yours been to me so wise, so upon t
2172.d open them in full gaze on the face of God to shut them upon tea thousand countena
2173.oi. tempt, and fury, from every step me one thing more: that this day you will keep
2174.ep me one thing more: that this day you will keep near me to the of the amphitheatre
2175.e, and unclose them instantly upon that one end, and will secure my last legacy to
2176.e them instantly upon that one end, and will secure my last legacy to my mother." su
2177.d dazzle or scorch, "Even if it cost my life, I will not fail. We shall not be did n
2178. or scorch, "Even if it cost my life, I will not fail. We shall not be did not its b
2179.o dart them at once into the furnace of God's parted long, Paucratius." heart, and
2180.ing into its burning ocean of mercy and love without fear of destruction up the holy
2181.looks to as if unconscious of the me so good interruption, and merciful in God, to g
2182.e so good interruption, and merciful in God, to grout me such a death. How much the
2183.and merciful in God, to grout me such a death. How much the accustomed prayers, and p
2184.blation and consecration. And then each one, more willingly must one at my age face
2185. And then each one, more willingly must one at my age face it, when it puts an end
2186.ow's glorious destiny ? " " To tell the truth, it seems to me so magnificent, so far
2187.nely-tempered steel, the purity of your desire, or tip with a I determined, passing bl
2188.tip with a I determined, passing blight one single leaf of your palm. therefore, to
2189.er look of a mother like mine, and shut one's ears to the sweet plaint of her patie
2190.hall see her and hear her, for the last time, as we have arranged, to-day before my
2191., to-day before my fight but I know she will not unnerve me. " ! : much more yells !
2192. instance of the power of adaptation in God's Church! Fixed as are her laws, her in
2193.h! Fixed as are her laws, her ingenious love finds means, through their very relaxat
2194. only a sublimer Here was a minister of God, and a disapplication of them. principl
2195.tli the f eet of the heart panted under God." The bosom stall headed, and the Divin
2196.lready dead, and the There sacrifice of life was, in all but act, completed in him.
2197.ct, completed in him. was only Christ's life within and without the sanctuary of tha
2198.ncratins, smiling, it lias been :ill on one side ; for / have liki> a<>ombat. none
2199.the gilded ornaments of the temples and other public buildAnd the in holiday splendor
2200., frightened mine, and nearly caused my death ?" " last tune we shall No, Corvinus, h
2201.ps to by the name of the Coliseum. Each one directs the arch indicated by the numbe
2202.his ticket, and thus the that stream of life, huge monster keeps sucking in by degre
2203.ow so?" "Because I reached thee just in time: when thy strength was nearly exhausted
2204.all have been gorged wards for the last time into the water. I saw thee I knew with
2205. with blood, and inflamed with fury, it will melt once more, and thee, as I took hol
2206. in a thick continuous flow through the many avenues the murderer of one most dear t
2207.hrough the many avenues the murderer of one most dear to me. Divine justice seemed
2208.murderer of one most dear to me. Divine justice seemed name of between him to have over
2209.o have overtaken him there was only niy will by which it entered, now bearing their
2210.ning thee to thy servants, rescued from death." with all the pomp and circumstance wh
2211.side of the amphitheatre, where a large space, ard skin purse, which I found on the g
2212.as lost in the Various sports succeeded one another and many a gladia- a leopard-sk
2213.arious sports succeeded one another and many a gladia- a leopard-skin purse, the gif
2214.e Christians and the wild beasts. It is time, I gave to thy slaves; my own knife I r
2215.they remained thus together encouraging one another, rabble, the roaring beasts, hi
2216.ody except onedrowned their voices from time to time. he could not, for his life, cu
2217.pt onedrowned their voices from time to time. he could not, for his life, curse Panc
2218.rom time to time. he could not, for his life, curse Pancratius. While they were thus
2219.me which I have long de- approaching to love. There is It has been a tiresome and to
2220. should fall uppermost. I have won it." One above who cannot forgive without repent
2221.ted thee ; devoted thee to the infernal evil ; genius. whatsoever death I die, thou
2222. the infernal evil ; genius. whatsoever death I die, thou too shalt one day perish."
2223. whatsoever death I die, thou too shalt one day perish." Corvinus slunk away, and a
2224. for lost the sight on which his coarse imagination which he had longed for during months.
2225.rs, entered the room, and BUI. forward, one, ano ly embraced entered the arena, or
2226.rewith ho iullicted each armed on every one, as ho went by him. They were then brou
2227.except the brave youth, who had another time he was tied up to posts to be more help
2228.nd resumed his attitude of prayer; when one of the crowd shouted favorite sport was
2229.choed the cry, till the emperor, having One encounter with a single out to him, "Ta
2230.re, he saw Sebastian in her standing on one side, with a lady closely enwrapped bem
2231.ade I I now humbly make; gloriously the same confession which and man, I Christian;
2232.loriously the same confession which and man, I Christian; and for love of Jesus Chr
2233.ion which and man, I Christian; and for love of Jesus Christ, God Do not take from m
2234.hristian; and for love of Jesus Christ, God Do not take from me this only legacy, l
2235.d Do not take from me this only legacy, life. gladly give my which I have bequeathed
2236.ints expecteth thee. Fight faithful the good fight, for thy soul's sake, and show th
2237. Fight faithful the good fight, for thy soul's sake, and show thyself Remember him t
2238. him too and steadfast in thy Saviour's love.t whose precious relic thou bearest rou
2239.led in thine eyes, my sweet mother, ere many hours are over." perhaps it will bestow
2240.r, ere many hours are over." perhaps it will bestow the same on me." For an instant
2241.s are over." perhaps it will bestow the same on me." For an instant there was dead s
2242.nce ; the multitude seemed The graceful form of the gallant youth, his softened, won
2243.etching forth his arms once more in the form of a cross, the lanista, adding a strok
2244.through every " dearest boy; may in his cause, ; ; and whispered bless you! i ear, Co
2245.se, ; ; and whispered bless you! i ear, Courage, heart : God a I shall be close behind
2246.ered bless you! i ear, Courage, heart : God a I shall be close behind the emperor ;
2247., with his hands stretched forth in the form of a cross, and praying to God most att
2248. in the form of a cross, and praying to God most attentively, with a fixed and uutr
2249. bears and leopards, breathing fury and death in least, their very snort, were just r
2250.freed the captive of the desert. { With one graceful bound the elegant savage gaine
2251.ful bound the elegant savage gained its liberty and, though enraged by darkness, confin
2252.he sleek tius was still standing in the same place, facing the emperor, so absorbed
2253.n the chest, and its fangs and fora saw one wild beast after claws on the throat o
2254.him except its breast, slowly advancing one paw before another, ing upon and there
2255.ce, - :beActsofii: i- '-I 1 - 15J ('hTe will b9 St. b. ibid. Sec also St. Ignattus'a
2256.villain ! young martyr was deposited in peace on the Aurelian way, in the cemetery wh
2257.d, to the neighboring gate. In times of peace, a basilica was raised over his tomb, a
2258.t, kneeling. shalt die such a piecemeal death as " or thon no Christian dog ever en-
2259.n dog ever en- stands to perpetuate hie honor. The persecution now increased daily vi
2260.cially the its fury, and multiplied its Many whose names have appeared in our pages,
2261.. Her husband, with three others of the same when he was in a passion his language w
2262.f the same when he was in a passion his language was composed of broken was taken, repea
2263.arcus and Marcellianus, jealous of this state he was now Zoe's crown, prayed openly a
2264.th every crime, and summarily stoned to death. His twin sons suffered also a and call
2265. his wellThe two crimes, however, cruel death. The treachery of Torquatus, by his des
2266.this slaughter, not like a scorpion, an evil demon ; aud he only wondered he was sti
2267. glory in the name." M ; counting every one as glorious who gave his life in its pu
2268.ting every one as glorious who gave his life in its purchase, and as ready to give h
2269.conversed with Pancratius, recalling to mind the buoyant cheerfulness, the graceful
2270. graceful thoughts, and the unconscious virtue of the amiable and comely youth. But he
2271.I am a Christian ; and iu this the last time. you have had the best pledge of your s
2272.ecurity." " How do you mean, ungrateful man ?" that if you want a body-guard Thus,
2273.us, noble emperor around you of men who will spill their last drop of life's blood f
2274.f men who will spill their last drop of life's blood for you, go to the prison and t
2275. this maimed and ill-favored host there will be more fidelity, more ; ; ; the reach
2276.l brute, he boldly advanced, dropped on one knee and thus addressed him ; loyalty,
2277.ood from them, nonian legions. and they will give you willingly the other half." " "
2278.s. and they will give you willingly the other half." " "I Folly and madness !" return
2279.And what would have prevented me at any time from actHave I not had access to ing th
2280.ccess to ing the traitor, if I had been one ? your royal person by night as by day
2281.ve another, and a higher Lord to serve; one who will judge us both; and His laws I
2282.er, and a higher Lord to serve; one who will judge us both; and His laws I must obey
2283.o, sire; To escape, perhaps, the bitter death you, like a coward, concealed your reli
2284.eath you, like a coward, concealed your religion? you have deserved !" : Tne martyr Satu
2285. VOL i. no more coward than traitor. No one better than So long as I could do any k
2286.o any knows that I am neither. yourself good to my brethren, I refused not to live a
2287.embarrassment of choice between seeking death or enduring life." " I will decide that
2288.hoice between seeking death or enduring life." " I will decide that Death is your aw
2289.en seeking death or enduring life." " I will decide that Death is your award point f
2290.or enduring life." " I will decide that Death is your award point for you. tion, : Ti
2291. you. tion, : Tin: and a slow lingering one it shall be. But," he added, in a lower
2292.t be done quietly at home, or treachery will njnvad. Here, Quadratus, take your Chri
2293.er burst of fury, another storm of vile language, which ended in the stout centurion's b
2294.e, which ended in the stout centurion's being ordered at once to execution. But Sebas
2295.,v. 73 Might them not be a more -riling one; ju sect, ; refined form of t! \V:IH ii
2296. a more -riling one; ju sect, ; refined form of t! \V:IH iii li< Epicureani m very m
2297.ous and vices of the Christians. Such a hypothesis might be tenable ; commoner but was har
2298.rd to reconcile to her intellect, how a man ! like that noble soldier could, any wa
2299.lied the dusky chief, with a grin which fate were going to fall on some one closely
2300.n which fate were going to fall on some one closely bound to her by showed another
2301. mistressV started more. The thought of being so near a Christian to ing repast, whic
2302.ity Maximian proceeded, and Hyphax kept time to every mem"What news?" ber of his sen
2303. with arrows toit was hardly an earthly one. morrow morning. What a pity he was suc
2304.ing. What a pity he was such a hau "You will take Sebastian to your quarters; and ea
2305. youth :" row morning not this evening, mind, for I know that by this "Be silent, Af
2306.nless you have some information to give time of day you are all drunk but to-morrow
2307.he subject." your hands are steady, you will tie him to a tree in the grove "Oh, of
2308.nformation is indeed of Adonis, and you will slowly shoot him to death. Do you know
2309.donis, and you will slowly shoot him to death. Do you know that he turns out to be on
2310.th. Do you know that he turns out to be one of Slowly, very astonishing. mind; none
2311. to be one of Slowly, very astonishing. mind; none of your fine shots straight throu
2312.nty of arrows, till he die exhausted by pain and your peace, I pray you and do not p
2313. till he die exhausted by pain and your peace, I pray you and do not prate any more l
2314. about what you do not understand." And mind, silence; or else " once. "Certainly no
2315.y not, if you so wish it; I suppose his fate is quite ;- " "What a pity, she thought
2316. suffer a loss, as if ! ; ; . I ; ; ; a matter of indifference to you, madam. It certa
2317.o be a Christian, and was to be shot to death on the morrow. But on none did the doub
2318. ? Was he a mean impostor, who affected virtue, but ! course that was all chance. Ther
2319.ected virtue, but ! course that was all chance. There was a significance in her words
2320. which did not escape the quick ear and mind of Fabiola. She looked up, for the firs
2321.f Fabiola. She looked up, for the first time, and fixed her eyes searchingly on her
2322.t officer that my countrymen have shot. Many they have killed, and some they have sa
2323.ed. But of " swarthy face. There was no emotion in it if flagon of wine upon the table,
2324.unt for this phenomenon, of a Christian being all that was good, virtuous, amiable ?
2325.enon, of a Christian being all that was good, virtuous, amiable ? One solution never
2326. all that was good, virtuous, amiable ? One solution never occurred to Fabiola's mi
2327.ne solution never occurred to Fabiola's mind, that he was all this because he was a
2328.an. She only saw the problem in another form; how could he be all that he was, in sp
2329.hen whispered, "Do you want Sebastian's life saved?" Fabiola almost leaped up, as sh
2330.aid, "It wiH cost dear." price." and my liberty." but what is my security for them ?" "
2331.sestertia,* accept your terms ; "I ; of being a Christian ? variously in her mind, in
2332.of being a Christian ? variously in her mind, in vain. Then it came Perhaps, after a
2333. vain. Then it came Perhaps, after all, good old Chromatius was right, and Christian
2334.artyr's prayer is not a preparation for death; for his is is no The soldier who sudde
2335.tead." " As thou and " not tyr going to death, is seized, and made to bear him willin
2336.here- fore, for the forgiveness of past sin; for there is a conscious- fulfilled fi
2337." That " secured." ondly, a dowry, a is good dowry, mind; wanted money more than now
2338.ured." ondly, a dowry, a is good dowry, mind; wanted money more than now." is ness o
2339.more than now." is ness of that perfect love, wliich sendeth out fear, an inward ass
2340.ghest grace, which is incompatible with sin. Nor in Sebastian was it a prayer for c
2341.n. Nor in Sebastian was it a prayer for courage or strength; for the opposite feeling,
2342.known to him. It never entered into his mind to doubt, that as he had faced death in
2343.his mind to doubt, that as he had faced death intrepidly for his earthly sovereign on
2344.rning, was a gladsome hymn of glory and honor to the King of kings, a joining with th
2345. rude harping upon the vibrating boughs form softer hymns, the only ones that earth
2346.y the strong fascination of her eye, as one of The ity. He seemed on " thou mightes
2347.is orders, thou wouldst have known he " will have no trilling with him here. "1'shaw
2348.trilling with him here. "1'shaw! pshaw! man; of course the prisoner will appear dea
2349.haw! pshaw! man; of course the prisoner will appear dead, and will IK! reported as d
2350.urse the prisoner will appear dead, and will IK! reported as dead." " And iH he fina
2351.nally recover?" " His fellow-Christians will take care to keep him out of the " Art
2352.will take care to keep him out of the " Art madV" he at last exclaimed; the serpent
2353.. He offered himself as an oblation for God's He offered himhonor, and for the appe
2354.e afflicted Church, and prayed that his death might mitigate her sufferings. And then
2355.of covetous"Let us see. Why, my fellows will >;t. ;;lf the money, in bribes and feas
2356.turn ; for they brought heaven into his soul; and what could he give back? It v. a f
2357.im, he could see the countenance now of one, and then of another \Vcll, happy frien
2358.y ]. ;y sorceress, my charming But that will be too much for my scoundrels. We to ou
2359.cross the court and my proposal." then. will h; "It is a and after that, we He shall
2360., who could split a flying arrow with a one, called them into his room, told them t
2361.he officer was stripped a exhibition of good archery. nary while the chosen five too
2362. best a desolate sort of del near ; not one fellow-Cl friend, not a sympathiser for
2363. into a loud laugh, as if itself in her mind with Ions recollection connected h. She
2364.e. The very shout a strain upon natural courage, as the insulting multitude put But thi
2365.ut up indifference tied up, like a this being, with most unfeeling aimed at, accordtr
2366.ffed figure, to be coolly orders ; this being alone in the midst ing to the tyrant's
2367. a horde of swarthy savages, whose very language but who were no doubt uttering uncouth,
2368.ubt, if he could speak very respectable man, few hours of besides his gibberish; bu
2369.ish; but these forest by banditti, open language n an d felt more like assassination tha
2370.h of Sebastian. Each chosen on the wise man's skirts is better than each hit, ever
2371.ainted with blood: ary step of absolute necessity." removed each sharp pang, the enduring
2372.easy thus to get rid of any the unsated love of suffering for his Lord. the listhe g
2373.sthe gaze of the eye on heaven, earnest one that is too much in the way." prayer, e
2374.arnest fear. strain of the heavenly por"Good night, good night," he replied, in grea
2375. strain of the heavenly por"Good night, good night," he replied, in great tening of
2376. your gold that It was indeed, a dreary death; yet this was vinus I gave you two piec
2377.ou two pieces of advice have After all, death came not; the golden gates remained unb
2378. golden gates remained unbarred; night! One you have acted against; the other you f
2379. night! One you have acted against; the other you for greater glory even upon the mar
2380.ill reserved followed." translated from death to " How?" earth, found himself, not su
2381.ot tell you not to hunt the Christians, life, but sunk into the second, and I tormen
2382.ge, confusion his altar, " Then 1 was a good counsellor in the one advice; follow me
2383., " Then 1 was a good counsellor in the one advice; follow me noble warrior, as he
2384.sicond." And not only that church do we love, but that anbeautiful. "What was it?" p
2385.rich enough by C has till now with your wealth, to 1'al.iola. She to mark the spot on
2386.n visiting the Crystal Palac-5. London, will flnd in the Roman rally. Not a single s
2387.w him nearer and whispered: " I feeling good hiiter. . "Li when he was improving, sh
2388.usly invited to enter and for the first time in her life, she found herself consciou
2389. to enter and for the first time in her life, she found herself consciously in the b
2390.consciously in the bosom of a Christian family. Irene, we are told, was the widow of C
2391.we are told, was the widow of Castulaa, one of the Chromatian band of converts. Her
2392.converts. Her husband had just suffered death know from illy. Kurotas, out of whom I
2393.as some splendid Christian prizes view, one Come this way into the shadow, and I wi
2394.ne Come this way into the shadow, and I will tell you how surely you may intercept h
2395.sure. Leave to him the cool murder that will be necessary, for it may be troublesome
2396.iola, as she became familiar with them. One evidently thought Sebastian's presence
2397.y, her ideas all belonged to the common world, she was ; selfish, light, and forward,
2398. was ; selfish, light, and forward, The other, who was the younger, was a so gentle,
2399. tables turned; or, rather, how has the world gone round in a brief space! The last t
2400.how has the world gone round in a brief space! The last time these two wicked beings
2401.d gone round in a brief space! The last time these two wicked beings were on the sam
2402.ime these two wicked beings were on the same spot, plotting bane to others, the wind
2403.rtuous youths, who, like two spirits of good, were intent on unravelling their web o
2404.k approaches. They are gone thence, the one sleeping in his tomb, the other slumber
2405.ence, the one sleeping in his tomb, the other slumbering on the eve of execution. Dea
2406.her slumbering on the eve of execution. Death looks to us like a holy power, how much
2407.ch he prefers taking to his society the good, than the evil. He snatches away the fl
2408.aking to his society the good, than the evil. He snatches away the flower, and leave
2409.ower, and leaves the weed its poisonous life, till it drops into mature decay. : But
2410.oked up, the window was occupied by two other persons. "That is Fulvius," said Corvin
2411.who just came to the window." " And the other is his evil demon, Eurotas," added the
2412. to the window." " And the other is his evil demon, Eurotas," added the They both wa
2413.hristian matron, in the middle class of life. Fabiola did not find her intelligent o
2414.itor was not a Christbut this caused no change in their treatment of her. ian Then she
2415.ened the hard crust of prejudice on her mind. For the present, however, her thoughts
2416.ld have leisure to confer ; with him on religion. An insuperable obstacle, howew, rose t
2417. obstacle, howew, rose to this project. will not attempt to lead Fulvius came aguin,
2418.otas. And yet this miserable lot me the life of one of the emperor's most favorite a
2419.d yet this miserable lot me the life of one of the emperor's most favorite all it c
2420.usness went, to have lost sight of this world, and now to awaken in it again, no mart
2421.d now to awaken in it again, no martyr, man on probation, who an but ordinary wayfa
2422.t martyrdom itself. It was to be like a man who, in the midst of a stormy night, sh
2423.et, should find himself relanded on the same side as he started St. Paul sent back t
2424.ter. Yet no murmur escaped him, no only one Intelligence He adored in silence the D
2425.ligence He adored in silence the Divine Will, hoping tl regret. him the merit of a d
2426. have now," he generously said, "earned one privilege This of a martyr, that of spe
2427.boldly to the persecutors. Nurse, me, I will use the first day that I can leave my b
2428.d every wound [y Dionysius But ije; not one arrow having touched a vital organ. tak
2429.hich the black slave betrayed to Corwas one to which allusion has already been made
2430.es. eeivintf intelligence at the of her wealth, by confiscation. f infr ill i/i i.llf.
2431. but the faintest hint at the end, that duty mi;?] it C him to take another course,
2432.hi.lh jndgi nl His wruth shall soon ov> will To this give EBB ''.v Church an emperor
2433.mperor Khali l>e after His . And thy of time. no perishable being expressions of per
2434.er His . And thy of time. no perishable being expressions of personal attachment. Thi
2435.personal attachment. This whom is whole world, tilltheend while iiiou hast time, impi
2436.hole world, tilltheend while iiiou hast time, impious man; and ess of (iod, in the n
2437.lltheend while iiiou hast time, impious man; and ess of (iod, in the name of Hun, t
2438.tian not to fly, conceived the romantic idea of saving him, Deep silence was held wh
2439.id not know the depths of wickedness in man's She thought that the tyrant might fum
2440.ment, but that he would never condemn a man twice to death. Some pity and mercy, sh
2441.t he would never condemn a man twice to death. Some pity and mercy, she thought, must
2442.nce and knowing the covetousness of the man, presumed, as she said, to offer him a
2443.nt. This was a ring with jewels of rare beauty, and immense value. The present was acc
2444.he Palatine on the 20th, in common with other petitioners, and wait for the emperor's
2445.th as a suppliant, and for her father's death, took her stand in a row of far more wr
2446.d put his men in order of defence. Only one entrance at the end of the court was le
2447. Fifty men stood along each side of the space, with Hyphax and Jnbala on the opposite
2448.rican, "that my men have sworn, that no man passes that thres- Hyphax," the sight o
2449.veness for every offence." secretary, a man scarcely less imperious than himself. I
2450.r dashed Only here and there, he handed one to his scornfully, it on the ground. ma
2451.ne to his scornfully, it on the ground. man, but from anxiety about Sebastian's fat
2452.man, but from anxiety about Sebastian's fate. She would have Maximum was prayed, had
2453.man rose, to fear that she had only exd one slavery for a worse. llvphax screened h
2454.rose, to fear that she had only exd one slavery for a worse. llvphax screened himself b
2455. responsible." " At any here. " rale, I will myself see time," said Maximiau. Two of
2456. At any here. " rale, I will myself see time," said Maximiau. Two of my work done pr
2457.you fellows with clubs come ; or strong emotion, stood there before them; his laeer. an
2458.ut, in a hollow bnt distinct voice, Who art thou, sirrah that makost so free with t
2459.fast approaching. Thou hast HP blood of God's Saints upon the !" "Maximian " ! < ;
2460. spilt on these stairs so you knock the life out of him make clean work of it. witii
2461.r throat ? S"hr could not for All ! her life is have snid she was off. anything: els
2462.s wife," (lately her own slave !). " It will look more brilliant on a black hand, th
2463.et still, an ignominious end before the world beaten to death without ceremony, while
2464.ominious end before the world beaten to death without ceremony, while the emperor con
2465.w and if her daughters but, some way or other, she could not like the :.ho loved her
2466.d to read; she took up volume ; ! ; ; I honor ! tyrant, seeing his work completed, or
2467.or on a The volume of favorite works on Death, on Fortune, on Friendon Virtue; and ev
2468.works on Death, on Fortune, on Friendon Virtue; and every one of them seemed insipid,
2469. Fortune, on Friendon Virtue; and every one of them seemed insipid, unsound, and in
2470.raja, who brought it in, retired to the other end of the room, alarmed and perplexed
2471. his summons, and they were buried with honor where now stands his basilica. ; "Put d
2472.him to come here." While her errand was being delivered, she composed herself, and ga
2473.RT. "The Lady Agnes herself." " On what cause is the poor child there ?" " On the acc
2474.child there ?" " On the accusation of a man named Fulvius, Christian." for being a
2475.of a man named Fulvius, Christian." for being a days in the life of man and of mankin
2476.us, Christian." for being a days in the life of man and of mankind. Not merely the d
2477.stian." for being a days in the life of man and of mankind. Not merely the days of
2478.have influenced the social or political fate of mankind. But it is probable that Col
2479. " Then we this for shall soon set that matter right. day, but the precise hour, the d
2480.r, the decision of which secured to the world all that he taught and gave it, and to
2481.ly the ness to the contrary. Tell her I will " come I can give witpresently; and tak
2482.rial. In whatever way it has been every soul, like Jerusalem, has had its day. And s
2483.mperor and slave, father and guest, the good and the wicked, Christian and heathen,
2484.istian and heathen, rich and poor; then life and death, joy and sorrow, learning and
2485.d heathen, rich and poor; then life and death, joy and sorrow, learning and simplicit
2486. not all come as agents, pulling at her mind in opposite ways, yet all directing her
2487.generous, though haughty and impetuous, soul one way, as the breeze and the rudder s
2488.ous, though haughty and impetuous, soul one way, as the breeze and the rudder strug
2489. breeze and the rudder struggle against one another, only to determine the ship's s
2490.That rests not with We have been enman; wisdom, not philosophy, can decide. gaged with
2491.ot with We have been enman; wisdom, not philosophy, can decide. gaged with events commemor
2492.e following day in his calendar, and he will agree it must be an important day in ou
2493.ciated with anything ; hip late through life position or his relation to others spir
2494.; hip late through life position or his relation to others spiritual little and insignif
2495.ne. When there was something to do, her mind was at once energetic though afterwards
2496.usation against you, which five minutes will confute ? I will go to Tertullus myself
2497.ou, which five minutes will confute ? I will go to Tertullus myself, and contradict
2498.charge. " "What Agnes, making on herthe sign of the cross. The announcement did not
2499.agger her, nor perplex her. Sebastian's death had taken all edge or heaviness from it
2500. are a Christian." " And so I am, thank God!" replied , lii.- lil.iw ti> wliifh cul
2501.l.iw ti> wliifh culpriiH \vi . -f their pain'" ..;; the legs of the crucified was co
2502.idered an ictus gratiosii*. every manly virtue; she was not surprised to find it in he
2503.two such peerless beings to be not mere chance-grown plants, but springing from the sa
2504.ce-grown plants, but springing from the same seed. She bowed her head in reverence f
2505., " How long have you been so?" "All my life, dear Fabiola; I sucked the faith, as w
2506. tlie, probability is, Hint the emperor will dwlaro be Fur hi; hates Fulvius. But yo
2507.ious giving the property to the nearest relation, who worships ceived how you contemned
2508.erous "Certainly, father." " I thiuk he will embrace it while I am sure there is no
2509. embrace it while I am sure there is no mind waa the Christian name." that chance of
2510.s no mind waa the Christian name." that chance of making a free gift to me. The propos
2511.hristian, I could not have " Then how " will you manage it, father ?" I could have l
2512. could have loved any thing in you. " I will have an " You think imperial n-seript p
2513.ut you know not the fortee so, . ! T of universal prejudice, the weight of falsehood dail
2514.ing hearts have How ready for signature many proceed iinme2515. the unpopularity which is sure ; and I will n- how they enslaved, and induced to be
2516.selfish in me to argue thus with you in will redound greatly to his credit and glory
2517.s as vain as your present position. You will of course compel Fulvius to he is cruel
2518.vius to he is cruel and rapacious ; and one vice must be made to fight " another. p
2519. to he is cruel and rapacious ; and one vice must be made to fight " another. prove
2520.all retire to Oh, no! rest with an easy mind. To-morrow will be the critical day of
2521., no! rest with an easy mind. To-morrow will be the critical day of tend to do so ag
2522.ng! what, to-morrow?" asked Fabiola, my life. All my future depends upon whether I a
2523.m accepted or rejected." shocked at the idea of anything so immediate. " I " that I
2524.osabout me (though I suspect few people will care much), I am to be interrogated ear
2525.rrogated early, and summary proceedings will be ophy, before your final bargain was
2526.s struck." " Fear she is well worthy of being your Is not that good news, dear ?" ask
2527.s well worthy of being your Is not that good news, dear ?" asked Agnes eagerly, take
2528. taken. not, father And then putting on one of her daughter-in-law. Yes, to-morrow
2529. then putting on one of her daughter-in-law. Yes, to-morrow is indeed the turning-p
2530.s free and independent as ever. " Never mind that steel makes short work of spirit.
2531.. return early for me to-morrow; early, mind, sharp Fabiola; but they Is her fate ce
2532.y, mind, sharp Fabiola; but they Is her fate certain ? and are its consequences sure
2533.emed something better than a mere human emotion. She feel pain and remorse at sacrifici
2534.ter than a mere human emotion. She feel pain and remorse at sacrificing so young a l
2535.n and remorse at sacrificing so young a life, and for an ; ; ' : : ' ; had not heard
2536.race. Agnes, however, saw the favorable change in her spirit, and inwardly thanked God
2537.nge in her spirit, and inwardly thanked God for it. She begged her cousin to return
2538.nal farewell. insecure result." At this same time a consultation was being held at t
2539.arewell. insecure result." At this same time a consultation was being held at the ho
2540.." At this same time a consultation was being held at the house Come Fulvius," said t
2541.t the house Come Fulvius," said the old man sternly, looking as cold "no softness,
2542.as a grey rock in the morning mist this matter. Do you remember what day is to-moi " "
2543.rt. " The " critical to g:iin another's wealth, day always for you. It was on " you co
2544.was on " you committed !" this day that Peace, peace interrupted Fulvius in agony. :
2545." you committed !" this day that Peace, peace interrupted Fulvius in agony. : you alw
2546.f this you wish to forget yon swer from experience, how powerful is wealth in conquering m
2547.n swer from experience, how powerful is wealth in conquering must not bo. I must take
2548.e you from every prei ed by conscience, virtue, or even honor. It is folly any resista
2549. prei ed by conscience, virtue, or even honor. It is folly any resistance." "And you
2550.. It is folly any resistance." "And you will allow, too," rejoined Corvinus, "from t
2551. Corvinus, "from the compassion for any one's life, who stands in the way enumerati
2552.nus, "from the compassion for any one's life, who stands in the way enumeration we h
2553.was "Certainly," said the magistrate, I will anright in one thing, she ought to be i
2554. said the magistrate, I will anright in one thing, she ought to be iu the other. be
2555.ht in one thing, she ought to be iu the other. be rather called an aspirant Fabiola's
2556.rant Fabiola's hand, there has not been one who could not justly after her fortune.
2557.ould not justly after her fortune." Why will to of your ; "Yourself included, my dea
2558. her, with myelf the lady Agnes's great wealth." " And in a manner too, methinks, that
2559." " And in a manner too, methinks, that will more easily gain npon what I hear of he
2560. and lofty disposition. Giving her that wealth independent of conditions, and then O'!
2561.ns, and then O'!':Ting yourself to her, will put her under one of two obligations, e
2562.ing yourself to her, will put her under one of two obligations, either to accept yo
2563. Let us calmly weigh its prospects. You will go to for you. the 'emperor, and ask fo
2564.c Suppose it is granted ?" property. 'I will sei! it as quick as possible, pay my de
2565.ecuring it ! nied me. " ietly, my young many ?" :i friend : ; let us discuss the mat
2566.any ?" :i friend : ; let us discuss the matter < except through her ?" " None whatever
2567.?" " None whatever. Fulvh"*, of course, will npply for his * ' iber ov.r proverb 'Fr
2568.OLA ; OR you shall " Then I fim a mined man. I have no other prospect before me, of
2569.all " Then I fim a mined man. I have no other prospect before me, of retrieving my fo
2570.tunes here. Still I munt, ily hence." " Good and what do you owe at Janus'* arch ?"*
2571. what do you owe at Janus'* arch ?"* "A good couple of hundred sestertia.t between p
2572.f you are disappointed, do you think he will fly ?" security ?" let you " Not if he
2573. of to-day for morning by a child, this time with the sword hanging over her neck A
2574.hanging over her neck A is approaching. Life or death to you hangs upon it it is the
2575.over her neck A is approaching. Life or death to you hangs upon it it is the flame ir
2576.eat within great day of your existence. Courage then, or rather an inflex- him and, in
2577.ngled in his heart, were distilled into one destiny J" black, HATRED. With flashing
2578.awarded to you which you fear more than death, and which will drive this illusion for
2579.ich you fear more than death, and which will drive this illusion for ever from your
2580. drive this illusion for ever from your mind. " " I fear nothing for Christ. For kno
2581.ng for Christ. For know, that I have an angel ever guarding me, who will not suffer h
2582.t I have an angel ever guarding me, who will not suffer his Master's handmaid to suf
2583.ture, he broke forth: CHAPTER XXIX. THE SAME DAT: ITS "Wretched woman, I give thee o
2584.E DAT: ITS "Wretched woman, I give thee one more opportunity of rescuing thyself fr
2585.from destruction. Which wilt thou have, life with me, or death ?" " Death even I wil
2586. Which wilt thou have, life with me, or death ?" " Death even I will choose for her,
2587. thou have, life with me, or death ?" " Death even I will choose for her, rather than
2588.ife with me, or death ?" " Death even I will choose for her, rather than life with a
2589.even I will choose for her, rather than life with a monster like thee !" exclaimed a
2590.y, and with fraternal impartiality, the one from the heaven which he ascended in th
2591.n which he ascended in the morning, the other from the dungeon into which she descend
2592.y path." Fabiola was alone for the last time with Agnes. She had been for some minut
2593.ed to her, had she been a Christian, an angel of light and a spirit of darkness and t
2594. espousals to the Lamb, when she should sign her contract of everlasting love, as He
2595.should sign her contract of everlasting love, as He had done, in blood, she had thro
2596.s humbling shame ; there was a terrible sense of the approaching consum- pounded ; ;
2597.cessary for his rescue from beggary and death, so at least he ; yet he would'still ra
2598.nevitable. So he would give her another chance. He was now at the prison-gate, of whic
2599.. He pronounced it, entered and, at his desire, was conducted to his victim's cell. Sh
2600. few hours to live let them be spent in peace." "Madam," he replied, "I have come to
2601.them, if ; : nized on earth, t tions of virtue in poetical mythology, a being of a hig
2602.ions of virtue in poetical mythology, a being of a higher sphere was recogIt was not
2603. concep- and intellect, combined in the soul, might be supposed to stamp upon the ou
2604.t be supposed to stamp upon the outward form. Hence her feelings passed beyond love
2605. form. Hence her feelings passed beyond love into a higher range; they were more aki
2606.n to reverence. : you " and, instead of peace, I offer happiness. if I understand the
2607. : you " and, instead of peace, I offer happiness. if I understand the time is past for t
2608. I offer happiness. if I understand the time is past for this "Surely, sir, you, sad
2609., sir, you, sad vanity. Thus to address one whom you have delivered " over to death
2610.s one whom you have delivered " over to death, is at best a mockery. please, to years
2611. mockery. please, to years ; Agnes took one of her hands in each of her own, crosse
2612.est earnestness, said " Fabiola, I have one dying request to make you. You have nev
2613.ave never refused me any; I am sure you will not tins." "Speak not thus tome, deares
2614.st; : "It is not so, gentle lady ; your fate is in your own hands ; only your own ob
2615.our own hands ; only your own obstinacy will give you over to death. I have come to
2616.our own obstinacy will give you over to death. I have come to renew, once more, my of
2617.nce more, my offer, and with it that of life. It is you command me now." " Then prom
2618.nd me now." " Then promise me, that you will immediately apply your your \-e last ch
2619.ll immediately apply your your \-e last chance. " mind I would you that' I am a Christ
2620.tely apply your your \-e last chance. " mind I would you that' I am a Christian and
2621.e doctrines of Christianity. I know you will embrace them; and then you will no long
2622.now you will embrace them; and then you will no longer be to me what you forfeit a a
2623. a gen* tionate heart, a and a virtuous life. What o;!ii l)iii: win i:ui and y> ': I
2624.d, to my e; gloomy shadow, the shado of death. Drive it away, and all will all ion. A
2625. shado of death. Drive it away, and all will all ion. Already the almond-trees are h
2626.rost, but with blossoms; tin- e;irth is being loosened ) vines, und cpriiiK '.veiling
2627.t that sunders "I that temperature that one loves, of a sun, ul not heating, but so
2628.l of gladness shall embalm your and the soul shall be washed clean as the, driven sn
2629.tened as the babe's. From that bath you will come forth a new creature, born again t
2630.ature, born again to a new and immortal life." "And shall I lose all that you have b
2631.rowd formed a circle, round the charmed space, which few, save Christians, loved to e
2632.cted general attci! stood opposite each other, at the ends of the M-miciirV formed by
2633.he M-miciirV formed by 1 the multitude. One was a youth, enveloped in his toga, wit
2634.eatures could not be distinguished. The other was a lady of aristocratic mien, tall a
2635.and on it engrafts but a small shoot of one that is sweet and tender, and the flowe
2636.deprive it of no gracei casion. such as one does not expect to meet on such an ocWr
2637.eur, no strength that it had before, so will the new life you shall receive ennoble,
2638.gth that it had before, so will the new life you shall receive ennoble, elevate, and
2639.stand this word), the valuable gifts of nature and education -which mantle of Indian w
2640.word), the valuable gifts of nature and education -which mantle of Indian workmanship, wo
2641.led also, like her mistress. The lady's mind seemed intent on one only object, as sh
2642.tress. The lady's mind seemed intent on one only object, as she stood immovable, le
2643.ng you already possess. What a glorious being ! make you, Fabiola !" a new world yon
2644.ious being ! make you, Fabiola !" a new world yon are leading me to, dear Agnes Oh, t
2645. me. Oh, that I could make Christianity will " What ! with her elbow on a marble pos
2646.at once." The executioner turned over a quantity to Christian eyes really such pair as l
2647.s he could find, ments you as I do, the happiness of dying for Clirist And now I will spe
2648.appiness of dying for Clirist And now I will speak a word to you which I never addre
2649.you beGod bless you !" And she made the sign of the Cross on fore, feel, ! An embrac
2650.s, was their last earthly greeting. The one hastened home, filled with a new and ge
2651. with a new and generous pur- pose; the other resigned herself to the shame stricken
2652.her crown.* Suffice it to say, that her angel protected her from harm ;t and that the
2653.t we have, sir," said the softened exe" one so cutioner; young ought to wear other
2654.e" one so cutioner; young ought to wear other bracelets." "Silence, man!" rejoined th
2655.ght to wear other bracelets." "Silence, man!" rejoined the exasperated judge, who,
2656. youth, thy station, and the bad educaI desire, if possible, to save thee. tion thou h
2657. received. Think better while thou hast time. Renounce the false and pernicious maxi
2658.ocent heart. Only her unshorn hair, the symbol of virginity, which had been let loose,
2659.ise thy false divinities, and can, only love and serve the one living God. Eternal R
2660.ities, and can, only love and serve the one living God. Eternal Ruler, open wide th
2661.can, only love and serve the one living God. Eternal Ruler, open wide the heavenly
2662. heavenly gates, until lately closed to man. Blessed Christ, call to Thee the soul
2663.o man. Blessed Christ, call to Thee the soul that cleaveth unto Thee: victim first t
2664. Thy Father by "I was a lovely morning. Many will remember it to have been a beautif
2665.Father by "I was a lovely morning. Many will remember it to have been a beautiful da
2666., as they have walked It symptoms waste time, I see," said the impatient prefect, wh
2667.at mile-stone, shall the " contempt "On judgment commun- "Duplex corona eet prtostiia ma
2668.urch of St. Agnes In the Piazza Navona, one of the most beautiful lu Rome. "Cui pos
2669. once," was the reply. Agnes raised for one moment her hands and eyes to heaven, *
2670. heaven, * "Solvitur acris hyems, grata vice veris et Favoni." t Pudicitia. t St. Am
2671.one but it Is clear from Prudentius and other writers t&M Agnes suffered at the place
2672.at the place of trial, of which we have other ; A I l-'MUOl.A; then calmly knelt down
2673. for the executioner wus trembling with emotion, and could not wield his sword, t As th
2674.roved the executioner for his hesitaThe man passed the tion, and bid him at once do
2675.ed the tion, and bid him at once do his duty. back of his rough left hand across his
2676.on washed in the blood of the Lamb. The man on the judge's right hand had looked wi
2677.hy hand, not only wouldst thou save her life, but, despising the imperial commands,
2678.hat if ment who 'Fulvius stood, pale as death xtuod, as one does for a mois shot thro
2679.'Fulvius stood, pale as death xtuod, as one does for a mois shot through the heart,
2680.r struck by lightning. He looked like a man on whom sentence is going to be pro: :
2681.e is going to be pro: : nounced, not of death, but of eternal pillory, as the judge a
2682. Borne. If this lady please, even now I will take her deposition against thee. Pray,
2683.asked most respectfully, may I have the honor of " tion, Sir," she said in a tone cle
2684.and distinct, but full of emo- grant me one petition. Let not the rude hands of you
2685.athers ; for she was " noble as she was good." Tertullus was manifestly "Madam, irri
2686. earnestly insisted, claim which female virtue has upon you, by any tear which a mothe
2687. when you return home this evening, you will be met at the threshold by daughters, w
2688. met at the threshold by daughters, who will kiss your hand, though stained with the
2689. hand, though stained with the blood of one, whom you may feel proud if they resemb
2690. heard he hoped, his future daughter-in-law. of you, madam," he said, " and of your
2691. signal to Syra, who attended her. some one else and presently four slaves appeared
2692.peared bearing a Fabiola would allow no one but herself and Syra lady's litter. to
2693.timidly asked if she might " I am " Who art thou ?" asked Fabiola. poor join them.
2694. and even with sharper weapons, so that many mingled their own blood with When a sov
2695. too a Christian ?" " She hesitated for one instant, then replied, No, sir, I am no
2696.t I own that if any thing could make me one, it would be what I have seen this day.
2697.at do you mean ?" that, to preserve the religion of the empire such " (her tears interru
2698.isfor a moment) ; the shape and name of man should have to live and "Why, entering
2699.d. But all respected the prior claim of one and here it on first ; grace was presen
2700.s the deacon Beparatus, who, at risk of life, ; flourish. Oh, sir, you know not what
2701.died, that she would not endow with her wealth, and ennoble by her alliance, that Asia
2702.on into the imperial presence and, as a matter of business, reported the death of Agne
2703., as a matter of business, reported the death of Agnes, exaggerated of THE I rilL'lU'
2704.unpopular gracious net of clemency, ami one so feelings, to bestow it upon her rela
2705. travelling requisites on h; ha\.- only one tiling more to get for our for you ami
2706. then continued " :i little inheritance will conso Yes, yes, by alt means no doubt,
2707.t fellow. Let a rescript be made tian's life, just as I." And he laughed ; : 1 and I
2708.just as I." And he laughed ; : 1 and I -will sign it. Tertullus produced the one pre
2709.as I." And he laughed ; : 1 and I -will sign it. Tertullus produced the one prepared
2710.I -will sign it. Tertullus produced the one prepared, saying he had fully relied on
2711." " The I ordered it last night, but it will only be poison. ready at noon." " What
2712.. " "lam Surely you know," rejoined tha other, unmoved. but onr barwilling to make on
2713.er, unmoved. but onr barwilling to make one more trial any win TC else gain is clea
2714.y win TC else gain is clear my father's family must not end in beggary. It must be ext
2715. in beggary. It must be extinguished in honor." Fulvius bit his lip, and said, "Well,
2716. "Well, be it as you like, lam weary of life. Leave the house as soon as possible, f
2717.le on tha Latin gate soon after dusk. I will join you there. For I, too, have an imp
2718.ou there. For I, too, have an important matter to transact before I start." " And what
2719.eatures, by the bath and the perfumer's art, the traces of his morning's passion. H
2720.ultiplied disappointments that day, had One woman, indeed, strengthened his instinc
2721. girdle, but concealed under his cloak, one of those curved dag" ;t it is not in he
2722. gers, of highest temper and most fatal form, which were only d his only ground of h
2723. fixed upon him his cold dark eye, with one of those looks which ever read Fulvius
2724.e could deBut his look tect any lurking idea of escape from his gripe. was cool and
2725.as cool and unusually open, and the old man asked no more. While this dialogue was
2726.elf for ling suit. his journey, without necessity of returning home, that he even ; ; pro
2727.the rapacious emperor himself. risk his life over it, for if he failed, he was utter
2728.ing to give some ex; After waiting some time, he entered the audience-hall, and adU
2729.e greeting. humbly to pray your roy- al justice, to i being put into immediate possessi
2730.mbly to pray your roy- al justice, to i being put into immediate possession of are of
2731.dy Agnes's property. She has been conof being a Christian upon my accusation, and has
2732. was Been approaching. Eurotas had just time to conceal the flasks in his belt, and
2733.yrian ; had not the latter, his purpose being accomplished, acted with forbearance, a
2734. see him, and retired. The reader It is time, however, that we return to Fabiola. is
2735.es she had indeed willingly admired the virtue, unselfish, generous, and more than ear
2736.ibute to that faith. planations, : "I " will obey instantly every intimation of the
2737.ry intimation of the supreme destitute. will. But I am almost Command what of right
2738.wly retired. He looked a ruined, broken man. as he passed out of the ''!'h me a beg
2739.read his answer in his nephew's Xo more life, elevation of niiud, courage of conscie
2740.hew's Xo more life, elevation of niiud, courage of conscience, and determination of vir
2741.nscience, and determination of virtuous will, such as no other system of And even if
2742.ermination of virtuous will, such as no other system of And even if, as she now shrew
2743.of Syra, concerning an unseen sphere of virtue, and its all-seeing Ruler, came from th
2744.and its all-seeing Ruler, came from the same source, to what did it all amount more
2745. structure of faith, which the simplest soul may contain as a child's eye will take
2746.plest soul may contain as a child's eye will take ; his calm;i. ' J see," lie ' ' ui
2747.untain, though She had never heard of a God, One in the coequal Son lor man. She ha
2748.n, though She had never heard of a God, One in the coequal Son lor man. She had i F
2749.rd of a God, One in the coequal Son lor man. She had i FA 111 OLA ; OR " never been
2750. OR " never been told of the marvellous history, of Redcmpti'rn by God's sufferings and
2751.e marvellous history, of Redcmpti'rn by God's sufferings and death. She had not hea
2752. of Redcmpti'rn by God's sufferings and death. She had not heard of Nrt/.aivth, or Be
2753.uld she call herself u Christian, or be one, in ignorance of all this. How many nam
2754.r be one, in ignorance of all this. How many names had to become familiar and sweet
2755. in grace, in sacraments, iu prayer, in love, iu char- of recompense, for procurino;
2756.owful scenes she had witnessed, till it one to have access to her. There she sat in
2757.o excited to obtain rest from turned to one point, sometimes to another of the late
2758.t and, at last, she was dwelling on her being confronted with over a child suddenly c
2759.ulvius, that morning, in the Forum. Her memory vividly of light upon the cloud that ov
2760.ed the entire scene before her, and her mind gradually when it hung over her father'
2761.it not seem to her worked itself into a state of painful excitement, which she at an
2762.ch, had been allured by conscience, and justice, and purity, and and looked towards the
2763.s the door. Was it her overheated fancy truth, on, on, till with arms outstretched, t
2764.happy somehow, some- heard. where ; r-r justice was a senseless word. "Pray, madam, who
2765.enseless word. "Pray, madam, who is the man you honor by that gracious " How " that
2766. word. "Pray, madam, who is the man you honor by that gracious " How " that she furth
2767.the scorned race of Christians morrow I will interrogate her. " I One only remains,
2768.ians morrow I will interrogate her. " I One only remains, and to- When she turned f
2769.ese, and looked around upon the heathen world, Fulvius, Tertullus, the Emperor, Calpu
2770.he contrast of baseness with nobleness, vice with virtue, stupidity with wisdom, and
2771.t of baseness with nobleness, vice with virtue, stupidity with wisdom, and the sensual
2772.eness, vice with virtue, stupidity with wisdom, and the sensual with the spiritual. He
2773.and the sensual with the spiritual. Her mind was thus being shaped into a mould, whi
2774.l with the spiritual. Her mind was thus being shaped into a mould, which some form of
2775.s being shaped into a mould, which some form of practical excellence must be found t
2776.found to fill, or it must be broken her soul was craving as a parched soil, which he
2777.l deserved the glory of gaining, by her death, her kinswoman's conversion ; but was t
2778.swoman's conversion ; but was there not one, more humble, who had established a pri
2779.le, who had established a prior claim ? One who ; speech ?" jL further "You, Fulviu
2780.t is worse, into the house of sorrow of one whom you have bereaved. Begone at once,
2781.you have bereaved. Begone at once, or I will have you ignominiously expelled hence."
2782. have been too well obeyed. There is no one within call." Fulvius found the way pre
2783.not ; had given up freedom, and offered life, for this unselfish gain ? While Fabiol
2784.he emperor." The porter had at but upon being assured that he first denied him admitt
2785.what to do when he was informed that no one with such a claim could be refused entr
2786.p very floridly, and intrusted to a bad memory, laid at her feet an imperial rescript,
2787.d presents, and never imagined that the one was a bribe for the So she desired him
2788. him to return her humble thanks to the other. ; ; be admitted unless he came from th
2789. case and the porter, wondering that so many imperial messengers should come in one
2790.many imperial messengers should come in one day, let him pass. He begged that the d
2791.ot like to disturb the house, in such a state of grief! He added, that ho the way to
2792.om an earlier date. When, for the first time, I was invited by your worthy father to
2793. your worthy father to his table, I met one, whoso looks and words at once now ment
2794. forfeited and con- adding, " "Insolent man Say that I am too ill topic here; it is
2795.d concealed noth- hi:< ing" "Except her religion," irony. interrupted Fulvius, with bitt
2796.by pangs and rendings of the heart, and soul, by sleepless nights of struggles with
2797.fiends that have conquered ay, and with one at home that is sterner than they by da
2798.irit. Have I not a right to ; ; earned "Peace !" Fabiola went on "that word sounds li
2799. liepress your indignation, lady, for I will be heard out you undermined my characte
2800.oisoned her feelings, and you turned my love into necessary enmity. " enjoy it ? " A
2801.ty. " enjoy it ? " Ay, call it what you will, call it my blood-money; and the more i
2802.nd snatch it from me. It is like a rich man tearing the carrion from the hound's ja
2803.rent his skin in hunting it down. " " I will not seek for further epithets by which
2804.r epithets by which to call you ; "Your love !" now broke in the indignant lady: "ev
2805.u have said were not basely false, what love could you have for her f How could you
2806. the dove's gentleness ? No, it was her family connection, her nobility, that you gras
2807.lt she was in the presence of a madman, one in whom violent passion, carried off by
2808.g fully into his eyes, "I now enis your mind deluded by some treat you to go. If in
2809.I should have ever dreamt about Agnes's wealth " or property on such a day, or should
2810.d have taken any advantage of her cruel death. d&inestic, contented, and affectionate
2811.s worthy of possessing her as " "As any one can be," struck in Fabiola, "who, in of
2812.very atmosphere in which you move." " I will leave when I have accomplished and will
2813.will leave when I have accomplished and will my position, my so ; I have it from the
2814.m the emperor's mouth that over to you. Will you pretend to make me believe, that th
2815.troyed in me every honorable purpose of life, withered my only hope, cut me off litt
2816.ather believe, that in this city is any one so disinterested as, undesired, to have
2817.society, respectable ease, and domestic happiness. "That was not enough. After acting in
2818.yon cross its threshold, the average of virtue will be raised in this wicked city. Aga
2819.ss its threshold, the average of virtue will be raised in this wicked city. Again I
2820.om myhouse, at least ; or at any rate I will withdraw from this offen- could me the
2821.nted wolf, till I against or, , off all sense of female propriety, and stood forward
2822.o escape or to bring aid your first cry will be your last, cost me what it may. " Yo
2823. my rightfully, though painfully earned wealth peace, reputation, my means of subice,
2824.htfully, though painfully earned wealth peace, reputation, my means of subice, all yo
2825.uthful stranger," " Wicked and insolent man !" exclaimed the now ; ; No, no, Lady F
2826.subdued by his subtlety, as he had been reasoning to prove Fabiola guilty, flashed up ane
2827.me to say that it was prepared in fciie one hour that elapsed between your cousin's
2828.hour that elapsed between your cousin's death, and the emperor's telling me that he h
2829. a maniac's gripe, and He went on: this time did not let her go. Now listen to the l
2830.go. Now listen to the last words that I will speak, or last that they may THE great
2831.eart of Fabiola, were suppressed, for a time, by the exigencies of the moment. Her f
2832.her, and had, with great, docility, And one legacy I prize more than all her inheri
2833.erjoyed at finding the umph over me, as one whom you have outwitted you houored blo
2834.ou She would not have exchanged for any wealth the sweet smile wretched? No, never hav
2835.er have made me; but I can prevent your being what you have no which accompanied that
2836.iolently down offer, of seconding those good impressions of grace, which the upon th
2837.d suffocated, as if a menced. While the man was pushing her mistress backwards, gre
2838.spoken in a tongue unknown the dread of pain, nor the fear of death could for a mome
2839.nown the dread of pain, nor the fear of death could for a moment have to Fabiola; whe
2840. anguished her. But she had offered her life for rushed out of the room her mistress
2841. released herself. An- the house before one fatal blow was struck was hopeless and
2842. fatal blow was struck was hopeless and other body was lying in her place, apparently
2843.n of his crime, and in doher mistress's life and her brother's dagger. ing so manife
2844.ou picked up here," brought back to his memory so terrible a domestic tale, that had t
2845.and yon its reward. Transfer it by your sign manual to me as a free and loving gift,
2846. to me as a free and loving gift, and I will depart. If not, you have signed your ow
2847.ern and menacing glance accombp the you will hear, (rive ! ; ! : : : ! ; ; ; " Reven
2848.to to bury of whose garment sends forth virtue and shame. hardly having tended her in
2849.eed to forgive him to whom you allude I love him too much for that, and would willin
2850.h for that, and would willingly give my life to save him. And of what have I to be p
2851.f exclusively Blessed Eucharist, in the form of unleavened bread, which, attendants
2852.sed them upon it, and remained for some time absorbed feel grateful for whom a few m
2853.lowed Eurotas to get possession of that family relic, but should, ever 'since he regai
2854.s a sacred thing and, when ill else was being packed up, should have folded it up and
2855.ent which he prescribed until midnight. will call," he added, " very early in the mo
2856.in her ear, which seemed to do her more good than all his medicines for her countena
2857.s no anger or indignation exist in your soul against him who has injured you ? does
2858. does any pride or vanity arise in your mind at the thought of what you have done ?
2859.have done ? or are you conscious of any other fault requiring humble confession and a
2860.ur breast ?" " Full of imperfection and sin I know myself to be, venerable father b
2861.im light of a sick-room, she opened her mind and heart to them? They were simple and
2862.arnest. She saw at once the reality and truth of all that her servant CHAPTER XXXII.
2863.ad described wherein no ap. a sphere of virtue, objects, and conversing in a totally d
2864.ifferent sphere. probation or reward of man was to be expected, but only 8m 1 e P a
2865.er features, now a the approving eye of God, she had admired the idea, which , trem
2866.proving eye of God, she had admired the idea, which , trembled in f her eye, or ^eam
2867.eye, or ^eam down her cheeks someflowed mind ; but she had rebelled ^ar powerfully s
2868.ng rule of hourly conduct. considerable time, while a blissful look of perfect and c
2869.hen Miriam had discoursed of heroism in virtue as , t r ,. ., prescribed feeling it an
2870.as , t r ,. ., prescribed feeling it an honor, and thinking it did her c-ood , ...^ i
2871.d thinking it did her c-ood , ...^ i. , being its ordinary standard, how chimerical t
2872.s ordinary standard, how chimerical the principle had i_ i., in contact .._", such a rare
2873.act .._", such a rare i_. of to be with virtue. type il Yet here, without preparation,
2874.tement, without glory, nay, with marked desire some " I think nourishment, she said to
2875.<', heroic in every way. some wonderful medicine." from habitual heroism of virtue, read
2876.ful medicine." from habitual heroism of virtue, ready at any hour to do what given you
2877.h a tiUp softly taught. Could this be a philosophy ? Oh, no, it must be a T * MI i -t i ui
2878.it has to be used, it should be i_ / ut religion the religion of Agues and of Sebastian,
2879.used, it should be i_ / ut religion the religion of Agues and of Sebastian, to whom she
2880.d delight, Appeared as if her servant s mind were removed from Bur- t^ f*V ^dmg ; ;
2881.f the blind and ears of the deaf, whose will cleanses lepers, the hem Kuaebim, in hi
2882.ont the m h curTor ui Persons fred fron slavery retained the Qm (likrrtus, liberta) of
2883.that this very Lord a, fulfil the first duty, which my heart has been burning to dis
2884.wish I knew a stronger word not for the life which you have saved me, but for the ma
2885. had doomed, and pursued i him took the form of a servant, and in ;'* habit was foun
2886. took the form of a servant, and in ;'* habit was found like stripes, ' man that uneq
2887. in ;'* habit was found like stripes, ' man that unequalled example of heroic virtu
2888.' man that unequalled example of heroic virtue, which aloue inspired it." "After all,
2889.After all, what have I done, but simple duty ? You had a right to my life, for a muc
2890.but simple duty ? You had a right to my life, for a much less cause than to save you
2891.had a right to my life, for a much less cause than to save yours," answered Miriam. m
2892. shameful doaih, be;M:m> tlio Crucified One,, as men here call him, and thereby res
2893. men here call him, and thereby rescued man from his fate, and gave him part in His
2894.l him, and thereby rescued man from his fate, and gave him part in His own riches an
2895.have reached the right conclusion. Only God have been trained to the doctrine which
2896.annot but prize as an unrivalled not of virtue. I have been reflecting on it, night an
2897. night and day, since I witnessed alone being a victim worthy of God ?" but I further
2898.itnessed alone being a victim worthy of God ?" but I further alluded to the continu
2899.vellous dispensation of an all-powerful love. However, on this I must not yet spoke
2900., on this I must not yet spoke of " Yes God ; speak. it; and my heart has been year
2901.h of praise though I know you do not of one plant all springing one from another. I
2902.w you do not of one plant all springing one from another. I thought it bore want it
2903. act could have been enhanced, or human virtue rise one step me in your conduct how th
2904.ave been enhanced, or human virtue rise one step me in your conduct how these can r
2905. do for another, what is much less than God has done for him? But, Miriam, there is
2906.is a deep and unseen root whence her. " Good and Not springs all this, possibly dark
2907.nd contemplation, deep gentle lady, for one moment listen to me. to depreciate what
2908.isten to me. to depreciate what you are good enough to value, since it pains beyond
2909.e it pains beyond reach, complex beyond man's power to unravel yet you to hear it,
2910.from what perhaps simple to a confiding mind. If, in my present igmight have been do
2911.Let it be a slave pardon me, occupy all nature, rich enough to fill creation with all
2912.her pang- I see it in your face, but it good and perfect in it, strong enough to bea
2913. of an assassin, but of the minister of justice, impend mean, your idea of that God, wh
2914. minister of justice, impend mean, your idea of that God, whom you made me fear, ove
2915.justice, impend mean, your idea of that God, whom you made me fear, over his head.
2916.and taught me but whom characterize the virtue of that master, if out of pure love, an
2917.e virtue of that master, if out of pure love, and to know as the ever-present watchm
2918.dge that he might reclaim that wretched man, he should rush be- I am sure you will
2919.d man, he should rush be- I am sure you will make me love when, as a Christian, you
2920.uld rush be- I am sure you will make me love when, as a Christian, you exneath the a
2921.h boundless tenand leave written in his will, that he made that slave heir to his de
2922.nd mercy. " Without some titles and his wealth, and desired him to be considered as hi
2923.e considered as his deep mystery in His nature, as yet unknown brother ?" to me, I can
2924.m, you have drawn a picture too sublime man's purchase." to be believed of man. You
2925.lime man's purchase." to be believed of man. You have not eclipsed your own deed, "
2926.ed teachers, than for I spoke of human, virtue. To act as you have now described of on
2927.ue. To act as you have now described of one so gifted and so I, should undertake th
2928.n would require, if possible, that of a god !" But will you believe me, if I attemp
2929.uire, if possible, that of a god !" But will you believe me, if I attempt to give yo
2930.er bosom, fixed on Fab- explanation?" " ONE " iola's wondering eyes a look of heave
2931.HO DID WHO IS BEADY TO DIE FOB ANOTHEB, WILL CKKTAINLY NOT DEALL THIS I'OB MAN, WAS
2932.HEB, WILL CKKTAINLY NOT DEALL THIS I'OB MAN, WAS TKULY GOD." CEIVE HIM." " And Fabi
2933.INLY NOT DEALL THIS I'OB MAN, WAS TKULY GOD." CEIVE HIM." " And Fabiola covered her
2934.yed earnestly in her own seized a great principle that of FAITH. I will, therefore, be lo
2935.ized a great principle that of FAITH. I will, therefore, be long time was silent. di
2936.at of FAITH. I will, therefore, be long time was silent. died tranquil heart. only t
2937.who truly " Miriam, I thank you from my soul," at length Fabiola for us, has taught
2938.ngth Fabiola for us, has taught us. You will believe my word only as that For of a f
2939.as that For of a faithful witness ; you will accept His, as that of an unersaid; "yo
2940.filled your promise of guiding me. some time I have only been fearing that you might
2941.en fearing that you might not be a ring God." Christian; but it could not be. Fabio
2942.her head, and listened with reverential mind " Now tell me, are those awful, but swe
2943.h have sunk into my heart as deeply, as wisdom, which she drew from some unknown schoo
2944.he whom now she almost worshipped as au angel, who could open surface of the still oc
2945.or are they its essen- the unfathomable Wisdom, overflowing on earth. tial principle ?
2946.able Wisdom, overflowing on earth. tial principle ?" Miriam expounded, in the simple term
2947.mple allegory, dear lady, your powerful mind the sublime doctrine of the Trinity the
2948.Trinity then after relating the has, in one bound, reached and grasped the master-k
2949.d grasped the master-key of our fall of man, unfolded the mystery of the Incarnatio
2950.has in the very 'words of St. John, the history of the Eternal Word, Often sh. extracte
2951.Often sh. extracted, and condensed into one thought, the most vital and till He was
2952. pupil uttered never by cavil or doubt. Philosophy " That man, God's creature and bondsman
2953.er by cavil or doubt. Philosophy " That man, God's creature and bondsman, rebelled
2954. cavil or doubt. Philosophy " That man, God's creature and bondsman, rebelled again
2955.e days of our s', : 89 lived a place to religion, captiousness to docility, incredulity
2956.read it in her looks, and asked her its cause. " I "But all that yon hardly dare tell
2957. a noble name !), that is, the expr. of God's love, the exteruation of His wisdom,
2958.le name !), that is, the expr. of God's love, the exteruation of His wisdom, the evi
2959.. of God's love, the exteruation of His wisdom, the evidence of woman who he bore pull
2960. had sinned . as you, .-..mid abh-ir to sin. Sho r; us have related to ' ' me is ac
2961.ill own heart, gl J!i II :, .-, 'ine to love intensely, M, and to the fall< in;: til
2962.and ; Hia power, the very breath of His life-giving self, . life, which is Him- beco
2963. very breath of His life-giving self, . life, which is Him- beconieth flesh Who shal
2964.he poured out upyears before the Son of God came into the world a prophet spoke, re
2965.ars before the Son of God came into the world a prophet spoke, recorded his words, an
2966.gibes of Hia uel,'t which hi the Hebrew language signifies 'God with us," that is with m
2967.which hi the Hebrew language signifies 'God with us," that is with men. host; she w
2968.e was forgiven on account of her " This prophecy was of course fulfilled hi the concepti
2969. course fulfilled hi the conception and love, and was dismissed with kindest comfort
2970.ismissed with kindest comfort. birth of God's Son on earth," "And what became of he
2971.He was crucified, two women were privi" One whose very name is blessed by every one
2972.One whose very name is blessed by every one that truly leged to stand close to Him
2973. her Son. Mary is the name by which you will know her: penitent: to show how unsulli
2974.nt: to show how unsullied and repentant love may -w.dk Miriam, its original in her o
2975. its original in her owu tongue, is the one by which I hand in hand, beside Him who
2976.d, beside Him who said that He had come honor her. Well, you may suppose, was she pre
2977.tigued with her destiny by holiness and virtue not as cleansed, but as ever dean not a
2978.ola sat by her side, but exempted, from sin. The tide of which you spoke, found til
2979.d to her heart's brim with this tale of love. She pondered before her the dam of an
2980.and more how brook that the holiness of God should mingle with what every part of t
2981.s the blood of Adam, when the breath of God sent it sparkling Saviour's love, so ha
2982.eath of God sent it sparkling Saviour's love, so had she been as ready to forgive he
2983.ve of his Master side of the slumbering man, were the blood and the flesh, the one
2984. man, were the blood and the flesh, the one that slumbered so tranquilly beside her
2985.her was surely true which the Spirit of God formed into the glorious humanity, to h
2986.at Mary gave to Jesus. When, after some time, Miriam awoke, she found her mis" And a
2987.s not yet completed) you surprised that many, like your sweet Agnes, should have at
2988. merit of this self hufind in her, whom God so elected, the model of every virtue m
2989.whom God so elected, the model of every virtue miliation; she did not stir, but thanke
2990.iliation; she did not stir, but thanked God with a full heart and should, hi prefer
2991.ek to fly upwards on wings of undivided love like hers? thought, unobserved. A secre
2992.t; but she had thoroughly to detail the history of our Saviour's birth, Hia laborious y
2993.de of her heart. She felt for the first time His active but suffering public life, a
2994.st time His active but suffering public life, and then His ignominious that her hear
2995.listener and ready learner. At last the time for rest had come, when Fabiola humbly
2996.eerful reply. " What " can there be for one who canMIRIAM'S HISTOHY. hope," said Fa
2997. affected eagerness after every sort of knowledge but can only confess that patient and n
2998.t he congratulated she scorned the true wisdom, and blasphemed its Giver for them both
2999.its Giver for them both on having had a good night's rest. Both laughed one who has
3000.g had a good night's rest. Both laughed one who has scoffed at the very torments wh
3001.e very torments which proved the at the idea; but concurred in saying that it had be
3002.rised, till Mirlove, and sneered at the death which was the ransoming, of piest night
3003.topped her speech. "Venerable priest of God, I confide to your fatherly care Miriam
3004.e of corruption, and shall there be any one on earth daring and high enough to call
3005.self His father ?" " but there shall bo one "No," softly whispered Miriam; and humb
3006.ly enough, she only thought how she her love, so that it might bring honor, however
3007.ow she her love, so that it might bring honor, however slight, to Him, id shame, howe
3008.lf. "She, went int* the house of a rich man, wlK-ro the usual courtesies of hospita
3009. it: guest, into the house of a haughty man who spurned, Mimpherself, it i tion of
3010.Ml [OLA; OR ; "T am, my child," the old man replied "unworthily I hold likewise the
3011.kewise the higher office of a priest in God's Church." 'ugly knelt before him, ami
3012.ced Lis right : himd upon her head, and good courage, daughter; you are not the firs
3013.is right : himd upon her head, and good courage, daughter; you are not the first of you
3014.brought into His holy Church, It is now many years sineo I was culled ill here, unde
3015. was to baptize, a few hours before her death, the wife of Fuhouse, "Be whom God Hngl
3016.er death, the wife of Fuhouse, "Be whom God Hngly he permitted his daughter Miriam,
3017. name was Syrian, as the in d to a rich family from She ci ;o of her new faith. became
3018.er hi-li mental cultivation, a model of virtue, wimple and nin ;.i3019.er frpirit has been hovering about your life by the side of the angel who guards you
3020.ring about your life by the side of the angel who guards you, guiding you unseen to t
3021.sed hour. Ami, 1> -;'i.re the throne of God, she has been unceasing in her supplica
3022.is property, or allow it tomerge in the family resources, and be made available toward
3023.ieving their embarrassments. And on her death-bed, among other solemn parental injunc
3024.rrassments. And on her death-bed, among other solemn parental injunctions, she laid t
3025. she laid this on her daughter's filial sense of duty, that she never would allow, af
3026. this on her daughter's filial sense of duty, that she never would allow, after comi
3027.led Eurotas, made his appearance in the family. No one Greek slave, placed themselves,
3028., made his appearance in the family. No one Greek slave, placed themselves, as we n
3029.tion, to receive baptism on Easter-eve. one who was already enrolled in the list of
3030.ight to make is sufficient to add, that being the elder brother, but conscious ana, t
3031.ter-sister of Agnes. herself useful, by being the ready messenger between the sick- t
3032. sustaining the position of head of the family and adminisroom and the rest of the hou
3033.perty, and having a haughty a nbiparted many particulars of her previous life to Fab
3034.parted many particulars of her previous life to Fabiola; and tion to raise his house
3035. nobler rank, and increase even as they will throw some light on our preceding narra
3036.ed in the desperate traffic of interior will give her history in a continuous form.
3037.erate traffic of interior will give her history in a continuous form. Some years before
3038.r will give her history in a continuous form. Some years before our story commenced,
3039.a and India, and came back home tioch a man who, though not of ancient family, was
3040. tioch a man who, though not of ancient family, was rich, and with a large fortune, an
3041.ually become Eurotas, instead of a rich family, into which to pour superoppressed with
3042. married to a lady of great vir- fluous wealth, found only a bankrupt house to save fr
3043.nkrupt house to save from ruin. But his family pride prevailed and after many reproach
3044.ut his family pride prevailed and after many reproaches, tue, who became a, Christia
3045. his own capital, ceived their domestic education under her care. The for- and thus virtu
3046.ite stream which wat- and of the entire family. After a few years of weary life, the f
3047.tire family. After a few years of weary life, the father sickened and died. ered the
3048.arnt much from his mother of the On his death-bed, he told Orontius that he had nothi
3049. Orontius that he had nothing to wife's religion, doctrines of Christianity, and had bee
3050.e did-not further explain, whom he must knowledge, of which he afterwards made so fatal a
3051.tism. He was wilful and artful, with no love ness, in the hands of a cold-hearted, r
3052., or for any strict morality. ambitious man, who soon prescribed as the basis of mu
3053.Ho looked forward to distinction in the world, and to his full confidence, absolute s
3054. confidence, absolute submission to his will, while he should share in all its enjoy
3055.city of an inferior, and the understood principle, be, highly educated; and besides the G
3056. highly educated; and besides the Greek language, then that nothing was too great or too
3057.as too great or too little, nothing too good or too generally spoken at Antioch, he
3058.th Latin, wicked to be done, to restore family position and wealth. To stay at Antioch
3059.be done, to restore family position and wealth. To stay at Antioch was impossible afte
3060.gh with a slight foreign accent. In the family, the vernacular overtaken the house. Wi
3061. vernacular overtaken the house. With a good capital in hand, much idiom was used wi
3062.ntrol, and insisted that he should cou- death. There was still untouched the sister's
3063.s fortune and To follow the dominant an religion of the state. both agreed that this mus
3064. follow the dominant an religion of the state. both agreed that this must be got from
3065.t of -a house for conmuch trouble about religion; to especially, or abandon that of the
3066. that of the empire, was, he thought, a sign of weakness. secrated virgins, in which
3067.ntended to pass her days. She But women being more imaginative, and more under the sw
3068.: nn-ucii or upon In r posed that for a time they should all lii meaas. But this did
3069. not answer tlu'ir pui-poM- :mother course had failed, Euro(:i to hint, tha
3070.atagem and unseen violence, of which no law could take oo^iu/.am and which no one w
3071.o law could take oo^iu/.am and which no one would dare reveal, offered him the best
3072.would dare reveal, offered him the best chance of success. Among the privileges of Chr
3073.rime;! and that the name of "pearl," no other person saved. Those, therefore, that di
3074.s on returning to Autioch, reported her death, together with that so precious iu n Ch
3075.reated her with kindness. After a short time, Fabius instructed one of his agents in
3076.. After a short time, Fabius instructed one of his agents in daughter valued it bot
3077. slave of polished manners and virtuous One day, early iu the morning, she knelt be
3078.first glance she had overlooked. BKIGHT DEATH. It informed her that what she sought w
3079.st where he was closeted with .the dark man, in whose presence chapter but one, tha
3080.dark man, in whose presence chapter but one, that Fabiola was told, that an old man
3081.one, that Fabiola was told, that an old man in she always trembled; threw herself o
3082.m and asking him his name and business, wealth. He was on the point of yielding to her
3083.e you truly sincere in what you offer?" man !" " How is that "I will surrender any
3084.hat you offer?" man !" " How is that "I will surrender any thing, all I have, to res
3085. , : ' ' ; ; : ; Holy of Holies." "Then sign that paper," said Eurotas, with a sneer
3086.when he saw himself overreached, by the man to whom he had suggested the snare for
3087.h the formalities required by the Koman law. For a short time she was treated sooth
3088. required by the Koman law. For a short time she was treated soothingly then hints b
3089. upon Her first impulse was to turn the man out of the house but the thought of the
3090.t the thought of the sister came to her mind, and she civilly said ; ; ; " to him :
3091.Whatever debts Fulvius has contracted I will discharge but with only legal interest,
3092.ons, But she soon enwhich reduced it to one half the demand. gaged him in a more la
3093.su\vd from confiscation, though she it. One who hod looked down more carefully, sha
3094.ion as would ensure him comfort through life. These temporal matters being soon disp
3095.rt through life. These temporal matters being soon disposed of, she diution between t
3096.efore the house, where, with Fabiola on one side and Emerentiana on the other, and
3097.iola on one side and Emerentiana on the other, and poor Molossns, who had lost all hi
3098. r below. u They av. r supposed noxious animal beg it. others were, stirring she menti
3099.y some Pagan orgies near the river, and being invited to join in them, When she had n
3100.tance, when he had been treating of the virtue and meaning of the sign of the cross to
3101.eating of the virtue and meaning of the sign of the cross to be used in baptism, " w
3102.ed them to practise faithfully what all good Christians did, that is, to make this "
3103.ke this " in the course and at the holy sign upon themselves already, beginning of e
3104.be engaged.''! But it was observed with pain, by all but Fabiola, that the patient,
3105.d the modest peasant child received the honor of annual commemoration among the Saint
3106. the very entrance into a cemetery, and one fur- nished with such large churches, t
3107.; waste of illness, in child or sister. Love is so hopeful, and so There was a hecti
3108.weak, and a slight cough was heard from time to time. She lay long awake, and she de
3109.d a slight cough was heard from time to time. She lay long awake, and she desired to
3110.from early dawn she could look out upon one spot more fair to them all than the ric
3111.d collect and lesson, derived from this custom. Any one perusing the present rite of b
3112.d lesson, derived from this custom. Any one perusing the present rite of baptism in
3113.lly that of adults, Once condensed into one office what used to be anciently distri
3114.uted through a variety of functions. On one day the renunciation of Satan was made,
3115.ils, or the Ephpheta, as it was called. will see ; exorcisms, and genuflections, and
3116.ody, breathings upon the candidate, and other name of Agnes; for near its entrance ha
3117. approach she could make, in her infirm time of Lent passed quickly and solemnly, ti
3118. villa an entrance to the cemetery this time it health, to the sepulchre of one and
3119.his time it health, to the sepulchre of one and loved. whom she so much venerated e
3120.to describe the ceremonial of the Early one morning, beautiful and calm, for it wan
3121.espass. They passed by this opening and one of them, having looked down, called the
3122.oked down, called the others. " This is one of those Church in the administration o
3123.The liturgical great developments after peace had been gamed ; and much that belongs
3124.d lurking-places of thfl Christians." " One of their rabbit-holes into the burrow."
3125.into the burrow." " Let us go in," said one. '"Yes, and how shall we get up again?"
3126.ven ceremonies and accessories were the same in the three first centuries as now. If
3127.xample is thought worth following, some one will perhaps illus. trate a brighter pe
3128.le is thought worth following, some one will perhaps illus. trate a brighter period
3129., and Corona MiM. e. 3. is the { The* o will be found, particularly In the and compe
3130.aptistery. " Do not flatter and Sennen. God has spared me till I yourself, dearest
3131.lemn office, which was to be protracted death, as it has been hitherto for life and I
3132.cted death, as it has been hitherto for life and I hail it with joy. I know too well
3133.so soon !" sobbed out Fabiola. When the time for the administration of baptism arriv
3134.from four or but I would not rob yon of one hour of your mystic whiteness." five fe
3135.mid !>! Dionysius came, and saw a great change in his patient, we may use the expressi
3136.formed whom he had not visited for some time. It was as he had feared out of the tuf
3137.she prayed long and fervently, and with many tears, that over the water is now to be
3138.painting of St. John then returned. " " God's will be Sister," she said with firmne
3139.ng of St. John then returned. " " God's will be Sister," she said with firmness, don
3140.o struction, was admitted for the first time her, and for me until a stranger shall
3141.-day that Fabiola returned to bearer of good tidings. On the Sunday following, " Sun
3142.sacred mysfor all that they had been to one another for months, that no teries in M
3143.aticum. This private celebration, as we idea and absorbing pride, that day was, that
3144.to the level of her former slave not in virtue, not in beauty of Afterwards, he anoint
3145. her former slave not in virtue, not in beauty of Afterwards, he anointed her with oil
3146. prayer, character, not in greatness of mind, not in heavenly wisdom, the last Sacra
3147.t in greatness of mind, not in heavenly wisdom, the last Sacrament which the Church be
3148.tended these solemn not in merit before God oh no; in all this she felt herself inB
3149.is she felt herself inBut as a child of God, as heiress to an rites, with tears and
3150. so. give me, if I have been wanting in duty to you, and in good equal Never had she
3151.ave been wanting in duty to you, and in good equal Never had she been so proud of sp
3152.er knows how to blend our joys and sor- sign of salvation when I can speak no more a
3153.salvation when I can speak no more and, good rows, and sends us the latter when He h
3154.epared us for Dionysius, remember me at God's altar when I am departed." He prayed
3155.ved, and she pressed them for the first time noticed the shortened breath, and heavi
3156.t fell dead there, in making the saving sign. Fabiola felt happy to preside at Miria
3157. Fabiola mourned much over her but this time she mourned Agnes's household, all of w
3158.on 1 I cnn do for us by intercession, I will pray to Agnes* and Sebastian, to interp
3159.r, imdt!>. r.limate of Camby the pania, will "\SVwilIsi: m. spring, and talk over be
3160.; played, said to her dpiu: : left what will you do, when sister, "My * you ?" Poor
3161.aid "O, no, no, dearest sister. Pray to God, who will refuse you nothing, that I ma
3162.o, no, dearest sister. Pray to God, who will refuse you nothing, that I may not lose
3163.ady beyond the Tiber (Pnl1 Inus, In his Life, torn. ii. Oper. ed. Bened.) St. August
3164.in a house supposed to be infested with evil tpirits. De Civ. D. lib eaying maw too,
3165.de of the poor Christians on this great change. was lika PART THIRD VICTORY. CHAPTER I
3166.ly meet in the cemeteries nearest them, many did not solitude. by one those whose wo
3167.nearest them, many did not solitude. by one those whose words and actions and thoug
3168.en describing not an ordinary period of peace and every-day life, but one of warfare,
3169. ordinary period of peace and every-day life, but one of warfare, strife, and battle
3170.period of peace and every-day life, but one of warfare, strife, and battle. Is it u
3171.k around us ? We have been reviving the memory WE APPEAR to ourselves to be walking in
3172.WE APPEAR to ourselves to be walking in One had fallen victims, or who and then mor
3173.e Church-of Christ has still to sustain many years of sharper persecution than we ha
3174.ants and oppressors kept up the fearful war upon her, without intermission, in one
3175. war upon her, without intermission, in one part of the world or another for twenty
3176.ithout intermission, in one part of the world or another for twenty years, even after
3177.ans under their several dominions. Like one of those rolling storms which go over h
3178.e rolling storms which go over half the world, visiting And Let not the reader fear t
3179.e going to lead him forward into a long history. This will belong to some one better qu
3180.d him forward into a long history. This will belong to some one better qualified for
3181. long history. This will belong to some one better qualified for the task of unfold
3182.his persecution wreak its fury first on one country, then on another, destroying ev
3183.menia, while it left no place in actual peace, but entire empire. is necessary for it
3184., fifteen years after our last scene of death. Time :i'.id pen.>: laws have given sec
3185.en years after our last scene of death. Time :i'.id pen.>: laws have given security
3186.ws have given security to the Christian religion, and the Church is likewise more fully
3187.establishing her organization. book, We will barely what hung like a blighting storm
3188.g like a blighting storm-cloud over the Many who on the return of peace had hung dow
3189.loud over the Many who on the return of peace had hung down their having by some act
3190. some act of weak condescension escaped death, had by this time expiated their fall b
3191.ondescension escaped death, had by this time expiated their fall by penance; and now
3192. stepped after Pontiff at once upon the sin. councils footstool of the papal throne
3193.es, to consult the successor of St. And world of hand mutilated; or when his halting
3194.nd conflicts, that the foundations were being laid of a mighty system, The perdestine
3195.s effects in after ages. secution drove many from the cities, into the deserts of Eg
3196.he deserts of Egypt, where the monastic state grew up, so as to make "the wilderness
3197.e, and had died a peevish destitute old man, and Galerius had been eaten up alive b
3198.red amidst tortures inflicted by Divine justice, equal to any he had intlicted on Chris
3199.about to cuter into her great career of universal diffusion and ! If at this period our f
3200.! If at this period our friendly reader will follow us out of the 3201.o the valley with which hi quainted, he will find sad havoc among the beautiful tree
3202.ad been refreshed by a vision, and com- Being now baptized, she was repayiii pletely
3203.ilgrims that came from all parts of the world. city to her spending the day in attend
3204.r of great interest and no villa, after One afternoon when Fabiola returned from th
3205.e morning I noticed, among the crowd, a man not yet fifty, but worn by mortificatio
3206.o, having defeated Even if ancient full liberty to the Church. it, Xbe oeremouy employe
3207. it would surely be very natural," said one youth. Ami \eryjust," added another. "O
3208.. "Oh, nevermind," said Corvinus, "they will always let (inn off for turning Christi
3209.such sobs, ns all around to compassion. Many approached him, and whispered, 'Brother
3210.ched him, and whispered, 'Brother, thou art in great distress; weep not so, the sai
3211. is merciful." Others said to him, ' We will all pray for But he seemed to be 'beyon
3212.sconsolate or heart-broken, except only one man." " Go "what did he next ?" on, go
3213.solate or heart-broken, except only one man." " Go "what did he next ?" on, go on,"
3214. go on," broke in Fabiola "After a long time," continued the fossor, "he arose, and
3215. tomb. I thought I llud seen it before, many ; thing, rather thun stain! " "Where ci
3216.ia, called Miriam ?" ' a pause of great pain to himself, so agitated now that his vo
3217.hat faltered, he asked me again, 'Thank God!" he she died?' 'Of consumption," I rep
3218.than they would have done from the wild one of the d He cursed them, and threw ston
3219. the close of the Corvinus moved slower same scene, then went on. road, that which l
3220.es victims of some fatality, com with a particular object, approached the cage in which a
3221.d Fabiola ; why did his face, I had not will return again courage to meet his eye. f
3222.d his face, I had not will return again courage to meet his eye. for he went towards th
3223.la. Miriam, this consoling foresight in death 1" thou hadst then, not, lady ; " I dur
3224. I had once seen But I am sure he ; the animal, by gestures and words saying: "Very li
3225. likely, indeed, that you are to be the death of me! You ore very safe in your den."
3226.your den." In that instant, the enraged animal made a spring at him, and through the w
3227.d a frightful lae ; wound. The wretched man was picked up, and carried to his lodgT
3228.g through the of persons gathered round one they were evidently teazing. He would h
3229.ame familiar to it. In the centre was a man, younger than himself but if nigh. he l
3230.nigh. he looked older than he was, from being wan, and attenuated, the other did so m
3231.as, from being wan, and attenuated, the other did so much more from being the very co
3232.nuated, the other did so much more from being the very contrary. He was bald and bloa
3233. fixed hia eyes upon him with a look of one delirious, or demented. " Do you know m
3234.hristians. Where have you been all this time ? How many of them have ; you caught ?"
3235.Where have you been all this time ? How many of them have ; you caught ?" And he lau
3236.caught ?" And he laughed outrageously. "Peace, peace, Corvinus," replied the other. "
3237.?" And he laughed outrageously. "Peace, peace, Corvinus," replied the other. "You mus
3238.. "Peace, peace, Corvinus," replied the other. "You must be very quiet, or there is n
3239., and his gait and tone were those of a man habitually intoxi- " "You His clothes w
3240. neglected. " won't "Ay, ay, Corvinus," one youth was saying to him you get your de
3241.ome, and don't you think the Christians will have their turn about now ?" " Not they
3242. about now ?" " Not they," answered the man we have described, "they Lave not the p
3243.ne published his first edict, after the death of Maxentius, about liberty for the Chr
3244.ct, after the death of Maxentius, about liberty for the Christians, but next year he pu
3245. savagely. of their best blood than any man ? "You you been forgiven for all this?
3246. got rid of them all, that I may do the same. If not, will come, they will come Veng
3247.em all, that I may do the same. If not, will come, they will come Vengeance and fury
3248.ay do the same. If not, will come, they will come Vengeance and fury why should they
3249. have. But I have found the remedy, and will make it known to you, as soon ! ! as th
3250.talionis\ executed on them the mercy of God, and His readiness to forgive the worst
3251.lf was a living proof. ted."* ; beast?" man seemed so?" asked Corvinns, turning pal
3252.le. . " Who says Kusebius, ubi tup. The law of retaliation, such ax was prescribed
3253.ch ax was prescribed also in the Mosaic law, " an ye for au eye, a tooth for a toot
3254.nity in hope, rather than certainty, of being attended to, said 'And now, Corvinus, y
3255.tended to, said 'And now, Corvinus, you will ask me how is forgiveness to i : ' 96 F
3256. i : ' 96 FABIOLA; to Oil be applied to one who believes all tins? It is by baptism
3257.Holy Ghost." "What?" exclaimed the sick man, loathiugly. "By being washed in the la
3258.exclaimed the sick man, loathiugly. "By being washed in the laver of re^em-niting wat
3259. me! Take it away! " I thought, as much good morning, air. I shall be happy accommod
3260.I shall be happy accommodate you at any time, at as reasonable rates as my A great f
3261.and to be plunged into water" (the sick man shuddered had never been parted fever,
3262. this pitcher. Certainly," answered the other At the sight of it, the patient writhed
3263.n by a violent convulsion. intermediate history of either. There seemed to be an underw
3264.rom the bite of the the servant enraged animal. It was with difficulty that he and cou
3265.ally he broke out into violence against God and frightful paroxysms of blasphemous
3266. and frightful paroxysms of blasphemous man. And then, when this subsided, he would
3267.before men, as they hoped it was before God. had remained at home that and the prec
3268. visitor approach, and an indescribable emotion thrilled through her, when she found he
3269.y, before you, had not an obligation of justice, as well as many of She rose, as she sa
3270.ot an obligation of justice, as well as many of She rose, as she saw the long-expect
3271.ur great Apostle charges on us, that we love one another." " I know you feel so. And
3272.eat Apostle charges on us, that we love one another." " I know you feel so. And the
3273.rude upon you for any lower motive than one of strict duty. I know what gratitude I
3274.for any lower motive than one of strict duty. I know what gratitude I owe you for th
3275.he kindness and affection lavished upon one now dearer to me than any sister can be
3276.eyes charged towards her the offices of love which I had neglected." " to be with bi
3277. begone! Thou hast glared on me long my angel of Life. Remember, Orontius, that Josep
3278.Thou hast glared on me long my angel of Life. Remember, Orontius, that Joseph was so
3279.omes! Oh! at my throat. fly You are too good, indeed, towards one so worthless," ref
3280.. fly You are too good, indeed, towards one so worthless," refrom off his throat, h
3281.g the beast sumed the pilgrim ; " but I will not thank you for your kindthe bandage
3282.o claim ing I have learnt your mercy to one who could have His friend saw how unrep
3283.rstand you," observed Fabiola. " Then I will tell you all plainly," rejoined Orontiu
3284. CHAPTEB AT LAST. JH. have now been for many years a member of one of those communit
3285.ave now been for many years a member of one of those communities in Palestine, of m
3286.ine, of men who live separated from the world in desert places, dividing their day, a
3287. Divine praises, contemplation, and the labor of their hands. Severe penance for past
3288.ressions, fasting, mourning, and prayer form the great duty of our penitential Have
3289.ng, mourning, and prayer form the great duty of our penitential Have you heard of su
3290.tial Have you heard of such men here ?" state. " The fame of holy Paul and Anthony is
3291.en busily employed inquiring after some one, about the Januses in the Forum. At len
3292.xirnian Herculeus Augustus, the seventh time."t time, Here they found sundry entries
3293.Herculeus Augustus, the seventh time."t time, Here they found sundry entries with re
3294.tion seemed perfectly first " It is the time in my life," said satisfactory to both
3295. perfectly first " It is the time in my life," said satisfactory to both parties. th
3296.the owner of the den, has given me. But one thought troubled me, and prevented my f
3297." that A my obligations ? Certainly, by God's mercy." was administered tho water on
3298. to their bods, creditor as a slave, to labor for him and endure his blows and scornf
3299.e had value, for I am yet strong. "Only one means remained. I could give myself up
3300.gious who lived in community, or common life, were so called. THE CHURCH OF THE CATA
3301. in the "T'u I of fill piety, ( saw the religion I my de; so that yielding to grace, I b
3302.ccount of h>.w you were brought to that life, which you have BO generously ", : i'U,
3303.bly brethren, for I was born to eternal life, ud to do now ?" i also, on that day. B
3304.hat day. But embraced." my return. T "I will obey yon as briefly as possible. I fled
3305., ns you know, -.-is. of my journey. Th one sorrowful night from Borne, accompanied
3306.lay an offer! his voice choked him. You will reiii.'.jibe:-," he added, smiling, "th
3307.er unintentionally deceived mo into the idea, that she covBuFool that I was Fabiola.
3308.BuFool that I was Fabiola. 'iaycd. "The same, the curse of our house, the author of
3309.wo f ;*! Our mear.s ik. lisbop of but I will accept from >me other country. We cross
3310.k. lisbop of but I will accept from >me other country. We crossed over to Pahviine, a
3311.e shrubs, Orontins paused and wept fora time, then went on " "At length, when all wa
3312. and dishevelled, and her For the first time in my life I whole aspect bespoke abjec
3313.elled, and her For the first time in my life I whole aspect bespoke abject misery. S
3314. She asked whom she a was breaking ont. One day meant. rebelled against his command
3315.med uninhabited. Not a sound could long time." be heard but the bubbling of the wate
3316.why did I ever leave you and your h The time wa's come, he told me, wheu we must T f
3317.n, that we mast learnt to be Graja, and good old departed Enphrosyne, have not survi
3318.osyne, have not survive the ruiu of our family. Here we must both die; and have embrac
3319.we must both die; and have embraced Ch: good myself, " the wild beasts would consume
3320.beasts would consume our bodies, and no one would Tubala?" What, have you know the
3321.f its last representatives, "For a long time, lady, in my sorrows and remor "So sayi
3322.ven those who have handed me the larger one, and swallowed the contents of the as w
3323.reproached him for the difT rHut, thank God, I have been making myself ence of our
3324. for drink. A venerable Why, when he w. one for any old man, with a white beard, pu
3325.nerable Why, when he w. one for any old man, with a white beard, put a wooden bowl
3326.oing to explain t happened; but I bless God with ; ! , 1 ; ( : 1' . < ; ; : : ! i.'
3327.a, who, having in Egypt, had that spent many years with the holy Anthony returned to
3328. establish the cenobitie and eremitical life in 'year* his own country, and had alre
3329.cted several disciples. A.B. " That old man was him, that, contrary to up; fatally
3330.cii. vi-.i. i U. priviiUi and the largo one a husband came ill at a ! t' room. bptu
3331. been committed, and that unintentional death may have ensned. " Fabiola and Orontius
3332.nsned. " Fabiola and Orontius looked at one another in silence, wondering at the ju
3333.ween Orontius his own, and his sister's history. Upon it were lying two sharp weapons,
3334.f both which were rusted with blood. In one he recognized his own dagger the other
3335.In one he recognized his own dagger the other appeared to him like one of those instr
3336.n dagger the other appeared to him like one of those instruments of female vengeanc
3337. and shed the blood of her, whom now we honor as a she replied. wound, earnestly," "
3338.und, earnestly," " Dost thou believe in One God in Three Persons ?" sister in heave
3339. earnestly," " Dost thou believe in One God in Three Persons ?" sister in heaven. B
3340."I and gave her occasion to display her virtue, I date the dawn of firmly believe in a
3341. and died for our sins ?" grace upon my soul. " That I, likewise, from the instant t
3342.tian heroism, began to feel the hand of God upon me, that has led me to repentance
3343. Fabi- stows it. Church, in her days of peace and of victories, never forget what she
3344.bted to it for our spiritual lives. May many, who will only read of it, draw from it
3345. for our spiritual lives. May many, who will only read of it, draw from it the same
3346. will only read of it, draw from it the same mercy silently before the shrine. They
3347.d holiness, Fabiola withdrew to rest in peace, in company with Agnes and Miriam, " Ma
3348.y which was all I could snatch from the law. I was about I. a somewhat hasty conclu
3349.whore my father the post of steward and man of business to the noble family who own
3350.teward and man of business to the noble family who owned the Oakhani domain. Oakham Pa
3351.id " so, that they seemed to have got a good working majority," and the words at onc
3352. England without enjoying the hos" They will have it all their own way for the prese
3353. had ranked foremost among take his own time at demolishing the Pope." my home pleas
3354. pleasures and the support of the great family's par" " how Yes," said the first speak
3355.ow Yes," said the first speaker long it will last remains liamentary interest was ab
3356.liamentary interest was about the first idea which had been to be seen, but for a ti
3357.ea which had been to be seen, but for a time we shall have a strong Tory Governto me
3358.have a strong Tory Governto me in later life, among the duties of presented ; ; ; Sh
3359.scenes. graver years. Ten years of busy life in London law-courts had, indeed, somew
3360.years. Ten years of busy life in London law-courts had, indeed, somewhat dwarfed th
3361. considerably diminished. The old ducal family had become extinct, and the property ha
3362.ally contrived that ; ment," " And what will they do f" asked the Yankee (if such he
3363.year or two ; and I suppose the farmers will get some sort of a sop, and promise of
3364. over the Budget and there's talk about Law Keforrn ; I suppose that is about our p
3365.to exert their former influence over my mind. My companions in the carriage were thr
3366.nced towards me for confirmation of the other's accuracy; "changes in government don'
3367.on of the other's accuracy; "changes in government don't come to much in England ; and no
3368. don't come to much in England ; and no man when he is in power can really do what
3369.er can really do what he talks about in opposition. The new men will find it so, and they
3370. talks about in opposition. The new men will find it so, and they know it as well as
3371.we." "It is incomprehensible," said the man in grey, speaking rather to himself tha
3372. politicians stared at him, and then at one another was clear that he and they revo
3373.kets, and the Having painfully done his duty with the morning paper, the scrambling
3374.ative which seemed to indicate that the animal " in question had not greatly consulted
3375.atly consulted his interests by her un- principle. " expected success. He did not seem of
3376. did not seem of a conversational turn, Principle !" he repeated, for the first time bend
3377.Principle !" he repeated, for the first time bending on me a and the young man's nex
3378.irst time bending on me a and the young man's next attempt was on the stranger in g
3379.hing menting on the attention which the other was bestowing on the exists ? And then
3380.looks "Well, I don't know," I replied; "law is power with ns. BO green." Then, as b
3381.on "When you are We don't cling to this man or that, and we are uot always raisused
3382. inquired. " The "May-be," returned the other,pointing to a well-timbered bit people,
3383.there is no power in that. The laws The chance words fell on my ear, and I proceeded t
3384.esn c;tu is beautiful, but this By this time he Tru id, "Perl to the bl;i with a " h
3385.r the Oak- ham Station?" " The next but one," I replied. And I began to worder what
3386.fader, that the Oakham Station was what one might call a private one. The parliamen
3387.ation was what one might call a private one. The parliamentary influence of the Duk
3388. rleil to, save liy guests of the great family, and occasional fanners journeying to a
3389.ormer ; an illustrious some- never give life, human life, souls." And hivd towards t
3390.llustrious some- never give life, human life, souls." And hivd towards the tapering
3391.the toll of the bell. "'And this Oakham family, has it much hold on the neighborhood ?
3392.f Bradford, a younger branch of the 1 ; same family, don't reside here much, though,
3393.dford, a younger branch of the 1 ; same family, don't reside here much, though, of cou
3394. hand." " Oh, then, I can walk but what will happen to my port- park did its best to
3395.eave it in the cloak-room, sir, and bus will call for it at in the best position for
3396. sort?" " Oh, sure, sir, White Lion bus will take it there, sir, all replied but the
3397., is my father at home ?" " No, sir, no one at home it's court day at Bradford, and
3398.day at Bradford, and dered me helpless. One steady step forward, a keen gl; master
3399.had lifted me from my position of peril will walk part of the way with the gentleman
3400.ul," he began yet you are not altogeth- pleasure. " it isn't " er the loser by the trans
3401.iful ; " My father !" I exclaimed ;'" I will give it to him myself on his return, an
3402. their own magnificent scale of natural beauty, that plied, smiling " call on Mr. Aubr
3403. never visited America. Bet you on that idea," he continued, smiling, "it was that w
3404.f bourse; I believe they are considered good landlords, but you see now-a-days class
3405. ; ; ; ; : ; passed the best part of my life in Australia, never visiting my TlIK CH
3406.ther had filled his present post in the time of buildings. My the old family, whose
3407.st in the time of buildings. My the old family, whose memory ho venerated with somethi
3408. of buildings. My the old family, whose memory ho venerated with something of an old m
3409.y ho venerated with something of an old man's regret. My motlrer and only sister, t
3410. by several years, completed the little family party, whose members were now for a bri
3411.rty, whose members were now for a brief space reunited, and whom I will introduce to
3412. for a brief space reunited, and whom I will introduce to the reader as briefly as m
3413.new friend rather than myself. It was a family of the commonplace English middle-class
3414.rt could push into the romantic. "Is no one really at homey" he inquired: (hen gl;r
3415.: (hen gl;r around him, "Whata waste of labor Well, let us get tli the business ;" an
3416.ch ! My hung mothvr was just what every man's mother is, or ought to be, nt least t
3417.ndividual heart, the best mother in the world. She father's posihad many practical in
3418.ther in the world. She father's posihad many practical interests associated with por
3419.ssociated with portraits of the present family, mingled with those of the elder ducal
3420.y considered her husband to be the best man in the county, and her sou the cleveres
3421.he cleverest, ble, my reader As girl of will have sufficient data to estimate her me
3422. Mary, she was a sensiBesides the usual good-natured two-and-tweuty. methods of gett
3423.nd pointed out the first founder of the family, a Lord Treasurer of the Caroline perio
3424.d Treasurer of the Caroline period, and other worthies of civil and military renown,
3425.han he never rode to cover. And a great man, too, he was in Parliament for in his f
3426.s he spoke he sat down on a fauteuil in one of the windows, and motioned us to do t
3427. the windows, and motioned us to do the same. "Ho had a SOD, told That evening, as I
3428.am. I shall esteem it a kindness if you will enable him to do so, and will show him
3429.ss if you will enable him to do so, and will show him any " JOHN attention. Faithful
3430.d not fail to satisfy himself as to the state of color, black or bay horse, or whatev
3431.now it was reckless extravagance, first time I had seen him uncovered, and I could n
3432.aved splendidly consented to the entail being cut means of cunning contrivances for r
3433.rms from Mexico branch of the Carstairs family, had raked together a lot of and Brazil
3434.ins to be seen out of doors and my wife will be expecting you at dinner." " Much obl
3435." said my father. " Look here, Hir John will never forgive me if I leave a friend of
3436.e me if I leave a friend of hia to sir, will Grant and I listened with interest the
3437. silence I thought it was to conceal an emotion which few men care to exhibit to one an
3438.motion which few men care to exhibit to one another but when at hist he spoke, his
3439.while you stay at Oakham and, Jack, you will see about his things being brought down
3440.nd, Jack, you will see about his things being brought down to the Grange." Jack was m
3441.he view you but the break-up of a great family can never be anything but a calamity in
3442.ll its modem finery, has never been the same "Ah, well, take of it, ; motion that ou
3443.fter the atmosphere of London clubs and law-courts the contact with a roiud so fres
3444.essibly agreeable. "Yon are exceedingly good," he replied, "but my outfit is much mo
3445.wing-room. " Stuff and " Mrs. nonsense, man," said my father Aubrey is used to ever
3446.stume it is a settled thing, then. Jack will bring you home to dinner, and if Mr. Ed
3447. gallery in dened that of us, since the change." to silence, for and I was glad for so
3448.or and I was glad for some of the Leven family but Grant detained him. "Just sec here,
3449.Our I knew him well ; as it did with so many an evidence that the speaker was not an
3450.dwards." ducing him as he was a reading man, of whom people liked to say that he wa
3451.eople liked to say that he was ordinary man, had a singular charm about it, and my
3452.rting bows, and we left the library. My change great library, rich in its collection f
3453.clusive of the manuscripts, and half as many more again in the Bradford collection,"
3454.PTER HL apartment. " " but it Plenty of other men's thoughts here," said Grant ; woul
3455.other me to have to use them." "To each one his proper gift," replied the vicar, wi
3456.re of conscious superiority. "You are a man of action, no doubt, but human thought
3457.ive refresh! "Well, give me a book that will make me think," responded Grant " but w
3458.reviews, think for you. As to books, no man that I have yet met in England reads th
3459.eplied; "but I am sure of this, that no one who had five thousand volumes within re
3460.f his arm-chair could ever guess what a man i'eels in the bush, who has nothing but
3461.Virgil and his ; ; ment." sister, "Mary will feel flattered," I replied, as we appro
3462.sted that he was in earnest; "My mother will be in raptures at the news," said Mary,
3463.. ll.h.lf nf Tim AUSTRALIAN DUKE OR THE pleasure ground and the paddock beyond it, a man
3464.ure ground and the paddock beyond it, a man can take in and make his own I daresay
3465.inies ?" these " evergreens, or pruning one of his vines " I don't the Earl of Brad
3466.es " I don't the Earl of Bradford would desire to accomsuppose plish either of those f
3467. "Your plan is an original Conceive our good bishop evangelizing the publics, and br
3468.ans are stanch supporters of Church and State, and you couldn't expect Really, Grant,
3469.n't expect Really, Grant," I exclaimed, one. their lordships to extirpate their nat
3470.ry for Unsectarian Schools,' whilst the other party went in for Sound Scriptural Educ
3471.ther party went in for Sound Scriptural Education. So what did they do at Bradford." but
3472.le; our National Drink and our National Religion.'"* " if By this time, Mr. Edwards had
3473. our National Religion.'"* " if By this time, Mr. Edwards had recovered his presence
3474.ely bad taste, Well, really, I wouldn't mind the ash-pits, if it were not for mind.
3475.t mind the ash-pits, if it were not for mind. " but to say the least," he said the w
3476.," he said the women and children." you will remember the whole of the social state
3477.u will remember the whole of the social state of Bradford thing was disowned by the C
3478.ree days in the week, and get drunk the other four where that to lead a crusade again
3479.and highly-cultivated land, along which death, and daughters as well as sons work in
3480.re were " Too white puffs of smoke from time to time revealed the presence of five k
3481." Too white puffs of smoke from time to time revealed the presence of five kicking c
3482.t is a famous "And you tell me this new government of ours is going to view," I observed;
3483." chimed in the vicar, with that dis- " one always wants, both sides of a question.
3484.e moor, which makes you long for a free life in the wilderness, safe out of reach of
3485.to pull you back to ; ; Then, my common sense and duty." "Duty!" said Grant "it's tin
3486.u back to ; ; Then, my common sense and duty." "Duty!" said Grant "it's tinct, Oxoni
3487.o ; ; Then, my common sense and duty." "Duty!" said Grant "it's tinct, Oxonian, lige
3488. ever thought, Miss Aubrey, what an odd time we should have of it, if every one took
3489.odd time we should have of it, if every one took to doing their duty ?" odd?" said
3490.of it, if every one took to doing their duty ?" odd?" said Mary. " I wish with all m
3491.." did this question. " doubt, effect a change ; but we cannot make men moral by Act M
3492.ue. " What "I fancy," I remarked, "that one can help them to be im- would come of i
3493.be im- would come of it ?" I asked. " A universal social moral, and our legislation on th
3494.tion on this question undoubtedly tends revolution," was the reply. " I've a horror of the
3495.ious fact was stated in the debates the other night," word." " that in five dioceses
3496. said Mr. Edwards " a totally different state of from any- houses." things "I beg to
3497.say," he exclaimed, "personal influence will effect and quite of another kind. It wo
3498.be squalid, or degradwhat your favorite law will never bring about. if the Now, or
3499.qualid, or degradwhat your favorite law will never bring about. if the Now, or abjec
3500.or abject poverty if the rich did their duty." Irish bishops and parish clergy can c
3501.ouses in ing, " And what is " doing our duty ?" said Mary, because hadn't Ireland on
3502.o come offence, Mr. : among Increase of education, a spread of general intelour laborers
3503.l intelour laborers and artisan classes will, in time, no " Well, but follow it up,
3504.r laborers and artisan classes will, in time, no " Well, but follow it up, and see w
3505.iluty." Mi-. awards looked as nish this definition. he was naturally expected to fur"1 pre
3506. to fur"1 presume, "he said, "that each man's if an effort, "one must hear mass, an
3507.e said, "that each man's if an effort, "one must hear mass, and I believe Bradford
3508.nscience must prescribe its own line of duty." " that's a safe Fidelity to conscienc
3509.e," said my father ; "yea, and it has a good English ring about it." rule, Grant kep
3510.ther," I said, "I don't think Mr. Grant will smile if I go it fully meets the requir
3511. to my old ground ; but we want a fixed law to direct our Still there; you see we d
3512.eren't aware hem! I suppose there are a good many Catholics iu Australia ?" By this
3513.t aware hem! I suppose there are a good many Catholics iu Australia ?" By this tune
3514.rassment, and the simple dignity of the man made itself felt in his answer " I am a
3515." " It is conscience which supplies the law," said Edwards. " What if my conscience
3516.nce, of course," he replied, " which no man would be justified in following. " "But
3517.g or somebody that gives me the rule of duty." Edwards found himself in a difficulty
3518. my my father ; "on these matters every one suits himself, and Mr. Edwards will not
3519.very one suits himself, and Mr. Edwards will not mind showing you his church on Mond
3520.suits himself, and Mr. Edwards will not mind showing you his church on Monday." " I
3521.st Oxonian tone " and I trust Mr. Grant will not suppose that our difference of sent
3522.scussion," he said, politely perhaps he will give us his solution of the question ?"
3523.I suppose there's the " your church for many reasons. This was a happy way of escapi
3524. ! Not that there is anyof myself or my history. thing worth telling, "he continued, sm
3525.. But in admitting a stranger to I your family circle, you show me a confidence of whi
3526. ample ? I can't at this moment call to mind any instance trayed it. " No, my dear s
3527.myself, and if you " " still wish it, I will do so. those who have taken away their
3528. cried Grant if everyone simply did his duty, or, if you like it better, if everyone
3529." down to listen, and Grant began hia a universal this, for instance, If every owner of a
3530.f every owner of a demesne like did his duty according to this view, I take it we sh
3531., I take it we should not have quite so many Bradfords." My father laid his hand on
3532.on his shoulder. " My dear young social revolution. CHAPTER IV. GKANT'S STOBT father belon
3533.ged to what yon in England would call a good family ; we don't know much of those di
3534.o what yon in England would call a good family ; we don't know much of those distincti
3535. was a gentleman by birth, a University man, and He married hi his own rank of life
3536. man, and He married hi his own rank of life, and of good connections. friend," he s
3537.married hi his own rank of life, and of good connections. friend," he said, "you ous
3538. "you ous feelings, I am longer in this world of ours, you will find what a differenc
3539. I am longer in this world of ours, you will find what a difference there " is betwe
3540.hat Grant had not ; are young, and have many very genersure ; but when you have live
3541.ved a little " Mr had his answer. " You will see our parish church to-morrow, Mr. Gr
3542.who presided at the tea-table ; " it is one of the sights of Oakham. " soon after t
3543. the sights of Oakham. " soon after the time of his marriage, family troubles oblige
3544. " soon after the time of his marriage, family troubles obliged him I don't need to sa
3545.nd valleys, no trees, open downs, and a good broad stream or asked composedly. There
3546.at half-past ten," said Mary, in a only one thing to do, and that was to make wool
3547.more wool that was his business. When a man has a good " Has my description of Brad
3548.that was his business. When a man has a good " Has my description of Bradford proved
3549.n of Bradford proved so attractive that many thousand sheep to feed, he wants shephe
3550., but he was incapable degrees he got a good many fellows into his employment, foi o
3551. he was incapable degrees he got a good many fellows into his employment, foi of an
3552.nto his employment, foi of an evasion. "Being Sunday," he said, with something of he
3553.ttlers felt him to bo .us from iliuii a good neighbor or a good, master they gathere
3554.bo .us from iliuii a good neighbor or a good, master they gathered , Till-: \i:\V UT
3555.ng ns that what we had got to do iu the world was to serve (!od and save our soul not
3556.he world was to serve (!od and save our soul not to Selves or (iod, .'iinl make gel
3557.a lot of I" ; money, but to keep out of sin, unii round him as a protector. " I hav
3558.ve said that my father was a University man, and He had brought with him a fair of
3559.ine scholar. something of books, and as time allowed him, he did his best to I had c
3560.m, he did his best to I had carry on my education, At twelve years old, I fancy red about
3561.nd Greek as I should have learnt in the same time at Hanow and, besides that, I had
3562.eek as I should have learnt in the same time at Hanow and, besides that, I had gaine
3563.Hanow and, besides that, I had gained a good many morsels of useful knowledge, bette
3564. and, besides that, I had gained a good many morsels of useful knowledge, better acq
3565.ad gained a good many morsels of useful knowledge, better acquired in the bush. But my fa
3566.'s genteel voice, that sonn and all the world like a flute-stop of an organ 1o fed yo
3567.hat Father Daly was a short, tliieK-set man, with a But that is what lie told face
3568. that is what lie told face for all tie world like a potato. and us. and, my word, bu
3569.my mother, anything that would give you pain, or seem, as it were, bumptious, and fo
3570.ays piety and that sort of thing that a man gets at the my dear lady," like to say
3571.y," like to say University. he became a good hand father never got into any awkward
3572.as much money as became his rank, and a good deal more than suited his father's pock
3573. suited his father's pocket ; but as to religion, I My ; fancy he shared it with Socrate
3574.ared it with Socrates. His standard was honor to speak the truth, because it was the
3575.es. His standard was honor to speak the truth, because it was the truth ; to be brave
3576. to speak the truth, because it was the truth ; to be brave, and courteous, and just,
3577.ks of sheep it seemed just like our own life in the bush, and I fancied every bushin
3578.every bushinan was an ; Edouiite. Well, one day, as we were sitting down to supper,
3579.us he was a Catholic. " We soon saw the change, though it did not come all at As brave
3580. place was called. He took charge of my education, and rode about looking up the settlers
3581.ong the settlers. Gradually they got to love him and trust him, and he did what he l
3582.they felt his power, and it ruled them. Many of them till then hod lived Like dogs,
3583.he could see him ? ' " A priest, ; what good would he to the More purpose if sir," s
3584.iugly fixedly at me, "and there is only one way of doing it. It was not law that ma
3585.is only one way of doing it. It was not law that made the change at Glenleven, but
3586. doing it. It was not law that made the change at Glenleven, but two men with loving h
3587.loving hearts, who Lived in the fear of God, and spent themselves for their brethre
3588..' " ' What is "When I was nineteen, my good it, was obliged to revisit Europe. Ther
3589. There the Irish estates well, it don't matter ; dear mother died, and my father was s
3590.father's kind heart, that he sent off a man and horse to Ballarat to fetch a priest
3591. fetch a priest, and the priest came in time to give poor Mike all he wanted, so tha
3592.o that he died Like a Christian. " as a matter of course father entertained the rope a
3593.here which I shall carry in My priest ; memory to my grave. Father Daly said he would
3594. see if there were any others who might chance to want him. Well, it was wonderful the
3595.arryin' and buryin" people for the bore Life,' and at Mr. Grant,' the end of the thi
3596.ts, For it was seldom enough they got a good were present at it. word In )in priest
3597.as I had never seen i ; such as in this world I shall never see again. How shall I de
3598.gain. How shall I describe him ? An old man, stooping and bent, in extreme old age,
3599.; the flesh, the body, and the pride of Life destroyed, obliterated. Nothing left bu
3600.ed THE AUSTRALIAN DUKE OH THE us, those soul. NEW UTOPIA. at ease about that. It sha
3601.penetrated me to the paid ; so set your mind eighty years vegetables, slept on a sof
3602.d with The look and the words of such a man inconceivable labor. were not easily fo
3603.d the words of such a man inconceivable labor. were not easily forgotten ; and so you
3604.ame a water-drinker, and why, come what will, I must go to Bradford to-morrow." " An
3605.eyes are not precisely like the eyes of other men." But I said nothing. "Is that all?
3606. resisted him if it had been to save my life, so I er, I brought it to England. The
3607.nelt and waited till he should speak. " God, and they leave me about 4,000 to start
3608.ild,' he said, do you want to save your soul ?' laughing, way to stand much in need
3609.'s last warning." " "'Well then, you'll mind my words, will you?' I bowed Really, Mr
3610.." " "'Well then, you'll mind my words, will you?' I bowed Really, Mr. Grant, it's a
3611.ngs: that you'll never miss bade us all good night. hearing Mass on Sundays, if you'
3612., I'm so awfully sleepy." "I don't care one turn under the verandah." Do you promis
3613.s.' "Jack," she said, half choking with emotion, " you see who indeed," I said " 'Well
3614.ng' and he spoke slow and distinct, And one thing more I have to say to "Yes, Grant
3615. so ; /should call him you'll gave your soul. the Duke of Leven." you, and don't for
3616.u dreaming of, your heart on them ; and mind this word, too We must lay down our liv
3617.irs head and blessed me, and somehow or other I got back to my in India." "Did you ev
3618.my in India." "Did you ever hear of his death ?" she asked. place. Harry took my arm,
3619.int,' was his reply, 'if there ever was one on this "And was his father," she said.
3620.ever before heard of that extraordinary man, but shouldn't see it, and you a lawyer
3621.reland, and the name they Harry told me many marvellous things about him; how at of
3622.ydney to do business for my father, and many's the time I thanked Father Young for h
3623. business for my father, and many's the time I thanked Father Young for his three wa
3624.er, meanwhile, was growing a prosperous man, and people said he was saving money. B
3625.he first left England, there had been a good deal had been debts, not his own, but h
3626.ition with But the dream of my father's life had been to their creditors. pay them a
3627.ed to say, could he feel himself a free man. " How much is there at Sydney ?' I ask
3628.in your summing up you'd beat the Chief Justice But what shall we do ? Must we tell my
3629.reakfast next morning came the letters, one for Grant, sent on from London to the W
3630. straight aim, the righteous thing of a soul that knew the worth of souls, purpose,
3631.r " He'll have to go back to Australia. life afresh. right, that ; ; ; papa?" said M
3632.?" said Mary. "Why, my dear, what can a man do in England with "Why so, ?"' 4,000 "
3633.h "Why so, ?"' 4,000 " ' Well, it don't matter, father,' I said. ' the debts shall be
3634.thut hideous rubbish, and leuvu By this time we were approaching home, nml could see
3635.re approaching home, nml could see Homo one standing at the garden gate, as it seem
3636.and, and that his " they are beyond our judgment." manner indicated something was the ma
3637.nt." manner indicated something was the matter. "True," he said, and he lifted his hat
3638. addressing my father; you think ; must wealth always bring such blindness witli it ?"
3639. before. " Read that," he said, and you will eyes on." most remarkable specimen Fve
3640.ved from drowning? Wother day, and told me ho had something he wo
3641. 2,106 ounces, value 8,376 Lyndsay, the Government surveyor, has been here, and examined t
3642.Gienleven is pronounced auriferous from one end to the other. Now, what will you do
3643.onounced auriferous from one end to the other. Now, what will you do? sell, let, or d
3644.us from one end to the other. Now, what will you do? sell, let, or dig? Either way I
3645.; or si* months hence I wont answer for being an honest man in spite of Father Young
3646.hence I wont answer for being an honest man in spite of Father Young and hia warnin
3647.II QBANT, 'You'll think and haven't had time to me 1 ! ' ' "H. GIBSON." said Grant,
3648. do not do, and heart, Jack, a terrible sense of what they might find ought to do ; a
3649.o do ; and I ask myself shall I do it ? Will gold be a curse to me, as to them ? Wil
3650.ill gold be a curse to me, as to them ? Will its touch poison, betray, deceive do wi
3651.erdition. closing heavily on the Oakham family. what else could we do ? And when Grant
3652.r. In deed. Money is a means a means of good as well as of evil." less than eight-an
3653.s a means a means of good as well as of evil." less than eight-and-forty hours, the
3654.o sons had "Just so," he said; "but how many men use it for good ? been swept from l
3655." he said; "but how many men use it for good ? been swept from life, and the younger
3656.y men use it for good ? been swept from life, and the younger, as well as the elder
3657.at I shall do better than of the Oakham family, as my father said, was now extinct. th
3658.hat I had better and said a word of the happiness he had felt in our little homenothing.
3659.nk, Mr. Aubrey," he said, be going. You will be having plenty of business here of on
3660.ll be having plenty of business here of one circle it had been but three days since
3661.met him in the sort or another, and the family coming, and I shall be an train, and we
3662.e Earls of Bradford. the opening of the will, Lord Duffield, a maternal uncl. Sir Jo
3663.field, a maternal uncl. Sir John Bipley being the two executors. There were so many t
3664. being the two executors. There were so many thousands to Lady Mary, and legacies an
3665.ldren (and some funerals were over. Mr. other family connections ; ' THE : 10 nil TJT
3666.(and some funerals were over. Mr. other family connections ; ' THE : 10 nil TJTE AUSTR
3667.ase for the lawwas disappointed but the will editors know their business. . ; I cons
3668.ept the offer. There did not seein much chance of making my fortune by English law, an
3669. chance of making my fortune by English law, and so, to make a long story short, be
3670.ist- . mas le heir!" i Mr. Edwards. "It will pedigree !" '' it is Not quite so long
3671.oof that Mr. Grant, at millions. If any one will bear in mind the 'fact (which of G
3672.that Mr. Grant, at millions. If any one will bear in mind the 'fact (which of Gleule
3673.t, at millions. If any one will bear in mind the 'fact (which of Gleuleven, was real
3674.act (which of Gleuleven, was really the man indeed it was well known in is a fact)
3675.e ten years the produce of gold in this one the colony, when I was governor. Carsta
3676. year colony exceeded 104,000,000, they will easily understand what Mid his son, thi
3677. the whole estate had his real name and history. " Then Mary was right," I muttered to
3678.urn to England a John continued wealthy man. One commission, entrusted to me by the
3679.o England a John continued wealthy man. One commission, entrusted to me by the duke
3680.y father ; "no, not possible " personal history during that eventful period. It was a b
3681.entful period. It was a busy part of my life, and the duke was right in saying that
3682.d in a fortnight," said my father. " He will do no such "It will be a which gave me
3683.aid my father. " He will do no such "It will be a which gave me a secret anxiety. Mu
3684.id Sir John. case for the lords, and he will, no doubt, have a subpoena to the new d
3685.there had never been any concealment of being eccentric. I was sorry for this, though
3686. though not much surthe fact, and every one in Queensland knew well enough who pris
3687.iginality looked in that direction. the family name and ducal title. Then as to the he
3688.g money, he seemed to care for it a the family, of both of which Grant was now the sol
3689. which Grant was now the sole surviving good deal. He took his millions from Austral
3690.en all this had been sifted and proved, good grace, and made no objection to the pro
3691.osals I submitentative. and every legal form gone through which could be demanded te
3692.o does everybody. I had my share of the law my meditations showed me that my imagin
3693.he law my meditations showed me that my imagination had painted to give him a worthy recept
3694. school children, and the Exborough but many thought much of these subjects in early
3695. and the impresI remembered how at that same station he had stood alone a sions firs
3696.. year before, looking in vain for some one to carry his bag to There, for the firs
3697.o carry his bag to There, for the first time, I saw the Catholic religion at full wo
3698. for the first time, I saw the Catholic religion at full work; the White Lion I remember
3699.. What a bright gala day it was The old family and Protestant, sent out to me pretty r
3700.n all this further. When the interests, education questions, workhouse questions, churchf
3701.ness ? Hariy keeps on pressing for some one out. Can you find me anywhere an honest
3702.out. Can you find me anywhere an honest man with a head, and I tli In my perhaps ro
3703.ht he would acqn it lu\l name, hesihi " Will " Mind, I don't you go yourself? he sai
3704.ould acqn it lu\l name, hesihi " Will " Mind, I don't you go yourself? he said, at l
3705.decide on accepting the post, 1 " e you will not regret it. " 1 . things for the poo
3706.t it. " 1 . things for the poor and the labor!" but if he did so, the papers, at any
3707.rew used to regard the whole subject as one Till-: Al'XTHAUAX DL'KK Oil Till-: XT.
3708.ns and who is there who to look back ut one thing or other as having been the slave
3709. there who to look back ut one thing or other as having been the slave of ; lately. Y
3710.e of ; lately. You know if the mines in one of the his imagination ? duke's hobbies
3711.You know if the mines in one of the his imagination ? duke's hobbies." "And not merely /;//
3712.bbies." "And not merely /;//;/, heard a good deal of I is it?" snid the secretary; "
3713.the neighbourhood, and was able to be a good deal of comfort to her father and mothe
3714. of course, going to Australia. Curious history his has been, certn " He is really an e
3715.aid Sir Clinton, "but not long for this world, I fear I never saw a man so alt " Well
3716.ng for this world, I fear I never saw a man so alt " Well, he is a very good fellow
3717.r saw a man so alt " Well, he is a very good fellow, of course," said member " but h
3718. " but he carries things too far, to my mind." " How so?" I ventured to ask. " Oh, I
3719.. " Oh, I dont know exactly ; lives the life of a hermit, T\ in his position, is a m
3720.e's always sporting some social view or other; setting 1 : ; i ; ; 1 a little against
3721.i ; ; 1 a little against the current. " One thing, you know, he's u Catholic. world
3722." One thing, you know, he's u Catholic. world of politics and of letters. The many ph
3723.. world of politics and of letters. The many phases, some more, and some less pleasa
3724.le of polite society but mark well this truth, dear reader, it is still the world, an
3725.his truth, dear reader, it is still the world, and anything higher and bettor than wh
3726.gher and bettor than what savors of the world, you must not look to extract from its
3727.y, so on the present occasion I had the good fortune to meet a Solicitor-General, an
3728. of a popular philosophic review (whose theology, by the way, was not predominantly Chri
3729.ot predominantly Christian), two men of science, and a county member. Including our hos
3730.he gayest and less distinguished in the world has " Yes," observed the second man of
3731.e world has " Yes," observed the second man of science, who till now had " it's a C
3732. has " Yes," observed the second man of science, who till now had " it's a Cuts a man o
3733.ience, who till now had " it's a Cuts a man of his spoken but little, great pity th
3734. their gaiety, that any person who, for one half hour, can stimulate a new curiosit
3735.or. if " may calculate for exactly that space of time . fair amount of popularity. Th
3736.may calculate for exactly that space of time . fair amount of popularity. The conver
3737.s the forms in a kaleidoscope. Home the state of the Then the conversation, by an eas
3738.f the Then the conversation, by an easy change, flowed into forwhich aimed, I will not
3739.y change, flowed into forwhich aimed, I will not say at proving men to be well-devel
3740.was left to digest all I had heard, and form found that writers of this particular c
3741.rd, and form found that writers of this particular class ever aim at own conclusions. Was
3742.rs of the possible probability of their being nothing better. The boundless means pro
3743.en, on the moors, you know." Well, it's one of his crochets, and, perhaps, not the
3744.said, "and the sooner the better, in my opinion." stepped in to you what, Ford," he sai
3745.ty nor for savages either, nor for that matter for heathens you'll find the whole stoc
3746.tock-in-trade ready for inspection in a good many of our manufacturing towns, only n
3747.in-trade ready for inspection in a good many of our manufacturing towns, only nobody
3748.My first week at Oakham was given to my family. I had to be introduced to my new broth
3749.d to be introduced to my new brother-in-law, Oswald, who had brought Mary over from
3750.ll members of Parland, and, to tell the truth, I was not sorry to have tins liament t
3751.not sorry to have tins liament to spend one calendar month in a colliery district,
3752.licity of liis loyalty to tl "Ah," said one of the men of science, " I've been down
3753.alty to tl "Ah," said one of the men of science, " I've been down there uresentativfl o
3754.said nothing, but I thought he looked a good deal, and on inquiry, I found that the
3755.by thousands. It's a grand thing is our education movement it ; enables each man now-a-da
3756.ur education movement it ; enables each man now-a-days to read his Degg." of making
3757.s true-born Britons. of themselves, and many resent it like of their laborer's wages
3758.arted, and that his place was filled by one of a younger generation. "I half expect
3759.h this," I said grapes in June had been one of the deadly sins." "Ah!" said Oswald,
3760. for his own table, he would be doing a good work to grow them for other people, and
3761.d be doing a good work to grow them for other people, and that they would be like gif
3762.d the County Hospital, and half a dozen other institutions, not to speak of his own a
3763.d. And leaving his flowers in charge of one of the men in attendance, he led the wa
3764. a gentleman's sideboard." " And at the same time that he removed it," whispered Os"
3765.ntleman's sideboard." " And at the same time that he removed it," whispered Os" he b
3766.e where a young and intelligent-looking man was superintending the packing of vario
3767.tered destination. asked, amazed at the quantity which were being delicately packed in c
3768.sked, amazed at the quantity which were being delicately packed in cool moss, about t
3769.plied Verney, the hi ail gardener " and one or two other missions. Thursday will be
3770.y, the hi ail gardener " and one or two other missions. Thursday will be Corpus Chris
3771.and one or two other missions. Thursday will be Corpus Christi, and they use a wonde
3772.orpus Christi, and they use a wonderful quantity of flowers." " : ; ands." The paintings
3773.us parts of the ducal mansion all, with one exception, a singular picture, painted,
3774.s a single figure, representing a young man in poor and squalid attire, lying on a
3775. few or no pictorial adjuncts ; only in one corner of the picture appeared somethin
3776.e head of the principal figure. All the beauty of the painting was in that head wasted
3777. said Oswald. saint ?" Who is it ? a of pleasure. I soon found that Verney was a Catholi
3778.s meaning. The noble youth who fled the world, who despised pleasure, and held riches
3779. youth who fled the world, who despised pleasure, and held riches as a curse, the prince
3780.and to die as a beggar, was, doubtless, one whose story might have a deep attractio
3781.tory might have a deep attraction for a man made rich against his will, and ever fi
3782.raction for a man made rich against his will, and ever fighting with wealth and its
3783.gainst his will, and ever fighting with wealth and its temptations. church had replace
3784.use at Hradford," said Oswald, spends a good deal of time there how he can endure it
3785.rd," said Oswald, spends a good deal of time there how he can endure it, know, but h
3786., " what injiistico I have done you The world talks and judges, and comprehends nothi
3787.omprehends nothing you are not " of its form and fashion Aud as we turned to leave t
3788.. and, for him, thoughtful. your duke a man of business this morning," he " but sai
3789. a dead failure. On that subject, as on many others, Leven is peculiar and I believe
3790. Everyone talks of it, and Oakham. " no one tells me what or where it is. " (No won
3791.e I was here, I said. it Oswald " but I will tell beyond it struck me. At Exborough
3792.am, and the gentry hereabouts called it one of his peculiarities but I suspect they
3793.undoubtedly, Faitk always has an innate sense of beauty." ON the following Monday the
3794.ly, Faitk always has an innate sense of beauty." ON the following Monday the Duke retu
3795.ined, the hour preceding dinner was the one hour in the day he claimed for privacy,
3796. the day he claimed for privacy, and no one then ever ventured to disturb him. At l
3797.is hand, and looked into that face, the same, and yet so altered. Aged not by ten bu
3798.," said Oswald, "and immensely proud of being of the old stock, and all that sort of
3799.reached me in Australia," I said, "that one of they looked at that altar." ; ; ; ;
3800.that altar." ; ; ; ; ; ; what she has a mind for." "And, then, the chapel?" "Ah, yes
3801.on to Leven's colony of orphan boys and other select "Yes, and St. Alexis." character
3802.sign of creating a New a true painter a man with a soul at the end of his low, Jack
3803.ating a New a true painter a man with a soul at the end of his low, Jack Utopia." pa
3804.land, and have all manner of schools of art, carving and metal work ; then there ar
3805.dertaking unless you take conceived the idea of a Christian colony, not beyond the R
3806.re; elected from for a mouth, with hard labor, for selling prints in a shop window th
3807.y, for he would certainly have dono the same. Look here, Jack yon send a fellow to p
3808.s he dead, then," I asked, gently, "I'. world, Jack he has ; himself went into the st
3809.d arrested a beggar. The others did the same, and they took the rogues to the govern
3810.e same, and they took the rogues to the government workshops, and offered them food and wa
3811." left it; passed, as into tin:, silent life.' He ate would say, and his pencil to U
3812.fice must be dicity acts, and spread of education." " And to remain in the world, and not
3813.d of education." " And to remain in the world, and not to leave it." yet, Leven, you
3814. it." yet, Leven, you might advance the good cause a preof course," I said. "Could y
3815. yet, Leven, you might advance the good cause a preof course," I said. "Could you dou
3816.s deal in parliament ?" "Why, " " every one who has such means at his command. Migh
3817.d "yes, indeed, I do look at it such an good that way do it, and I give them my bles
3818., of course, I don't regret it, nor the time, only go one way to work, and that is s
3819. don't regret it, nor the time, only go one way to work, and that is straight ahead
3820.ur paradise some day, "I said. " That I will we'll have a week there when all the hi
3821., and otters them." expression of great pain was on his brow when he once more in th
3822.r, if you have a taste that way, and it will be very raised it. But it passed in a m
3823." calm look returned. "All right, Jack; one must do one's Our conversation was inte
3824.returned. "All right, Jack; one must do one's Our conversation was interrupted by t
3825.nterrupted by the sudden appearance but one must do it, and then the scene of a thi
3826.pe of a merry fair-haired leave it with God." " Cousin boy, who came running down t
3827.," I said; "and I think, also, that the government workshops were abolished by the next El
3828.ctually prohibited? My dear Grant, that will answered my look of inquiry. "Little Ed
3829.igram," he ! never pay; the Anglo-Saxon animal cannot live without " I believe he can'
3830.d a Catholic curious, wasn't and on her death-bed got her husband to promise that thi
3831.obby. way, Jack they all have during my life, and leave it to nobody. The last is wh
3832.e last is what I artheir rations. Every man at work on the place has his proper den
3833.work on the place has his proper dently desire to do, if I have but time. Still, I sup
3834.oper dently desire to do, if I have but time. Still, I suppose, OakBut the ham, at a
3835.of it is, I have adopted Edward, and he will have whatlicense to sell beer or spirit
3836.else should I train him to feel his but time alone can test it." Well, on the whole,
3837.d twenty sea-kings in him. I suppose it will have to be thrashed Most men think me a
3838.d at the humble, apologetic tone of the man -who is this you can't do half the good
3839. man -who is this you can't do half the good you might without that sort was speakin
3840.hout that sort was speaking of what the world styled his crotchet. " My dear of influ
3841.uence at Oakham to help you. And, then, family life All I was thinking was, you know i
3842.t Oakham to help you. And, then, family life All I was thinking was, you know its be
3843.fe All I was thinking was, you know its beauty, you feel its charm." ." I said, "who c
3844.vate efforts can ever take the place of law and "Yes," he answered rather huskily,
3845.n't but somehow its not my line. public opinion." " " Yimr old but you are sure you are
3846.old !" he said, smiling. I mean is this family life is not the world, it can be ways t
3847.he said, smiling. I mean is this family life is not the world, it can be ways the ma
3848.. I mean is this family life is not the world, it can be ways the man for law and ord
3849.fe is not the world, it can be ways the man for law and order. Just see here. Did y
3850.t the world, it can be ways the man for law and order. Just see here. Did you ever
3851.ord?" : ; ' : : ; ; i : ; : " The stove-man," I replied; "of course. What of him?"
3852.d everything. B full of beggars, and no one knew how to get rid > Alexis." old fami
3853. one knew how to get rid > Alexis." old family he replied, "and a lovely thing it was,
3854.ack, where should I find a "I know it," life tn. Kumford (he was an American, you kn
3855.re Elzear, and your little niece, Mary, will be just quities, dug up in the camp har
3856.ch had first set in motion the brain of good old Edwards and there were all manthe r
3857.nderstand more of my friend's habits of life, and ually He was literally worn and ma
3858.ey are not Darwins. Well, now, not very life, and. it pressed heavily. but a few of
3859.few of those lads have been thinking to good purpose, revenue, and its administratio
3860.and its administration for the glory of God princely and the good of his fellow-men
3861.n for the glory of God princely and the good of his fellow-men, was his daily care a
3862.n, was his daily care and his daily and form a class of instruction under Father Hub
3863.trange follow, Jack, Besides, there are other things. but I can't help it. I don't th
3864. think I'm hiirder about the heart than other men yourself, Oswald, Werner, and a lot
3865. Oswald, Werner, and a lot of others, I love you all, and I love you tenderly; but i
3866. a lot of others, I love you all, and I love you tenderly; but it's quite a differen
3867., Jack, you must taka rue as you find ; Family life not the world, yoti say V \Vcll no
3868. you must taka rue as you find ; Family life not the world, yoti say V \Vcll now, I'
3869.a rue as you find ; Family life not the world, yoti say V \Vcll now, I'll just tell n
3870.ust tell nnd you thia it would br. the, world to me. As to your dinners assure you, 1
3871.led the a i week tlic ilivini.: down to form our new approach and in a limi ' ' ' '
3872.mmediate circle, did Leven pour out his labor and his substance. The great floods of
3873. which others take to be known and done justice to, he spent to remain hidden. But I wa
3874.made it his single thought "to give his life for his brethren." At Oakham it was one
3875.ife for his brethren." At Oakham it was one of his favorite objects to draw the " W
3876.e of his favorite objects to draw the " Will he ever come to his senses ? " I said "
3877. his case." " Possibly but it must have time to germinate. Yon will '. ; him probabl
3878.but it must have time to germinate. Yon will '. ; him probably at Exdale, where, Osw
3879. a previous chapter that mv dinner, and family on those occasions the dinner was alway
3880. " It is no bad tiling the ter Mary, in particular, had not the least pretension to rifle
3881.tesy." His house, with its galleries of art and library, his anything of a hero but
3882. certain days, and marriage was a happy one. Mary supplied the plain 1 '. whom duri
3883. formed alittle soei-tv. " It cost me a good deal of thought, what we should make ou
3884.to me, " but at last I hit on natural " history. "What a fellow you are, Grant," I said
3885.m together?" "The simplest thing in the world," he replied "I started kham museum. Yo
3886.You remember the statuury hall of the ; sense which served as ballast to her husband'
3887. as ballast to her husband's anil Their family consisted of three children, of whom th
3888.nd heir, A\ in his cradle. I's The only other sister, first unmarried no more on a f<
3889.ne, el;. i' illection?" "i do, indeed a good deal in the Adonis line." stamped, howe
3890., as mistress of a house, and head of a family. the true genius of that particular cal
3891.ad of a family. the true genius of that particular calling she understood her Christian, a
3892.the village school, and trained and his sense of wrong and injustice is just like a f
3893.tice is just like a fiery pasthem to bo good servants but no one was ever plagued wi
3894.iery pasthem to bo good servants but no one was ever plagued with sion but he cares
3895.g. control himself when he pleads their cause. " The house looked as if somebody was
3896.elf for the working-classes just hi the same way as I care for the rights, was never
3897.ultry -yard, which I care for ex" but I will maintain against all comers that she wa
3898.antage. of wives and mothers. "And what particular advantage do you think poor Degg will A
3899.icular advantage do you think poor Degg will After the deserted suites of state apar
3900. Degg will After the deserted suites of state apartments, and long, silent get from t
3901.ence. galleries of Oakham, the sound of family talk and " In the first comprattle was
3902. In the first comprattle was a pleasant change, though the scene, by place," said Oswa
3903.tting down his betparison, was a homely one, for what they called at Exdale, was li
3904.t only half a dozen ing of our glorious constitution, I suspect Mr. Degg calculates cows and
3905.floating into parliament on the tide of universal suffrage." Master Edward, his claims be
3906.al suffrage." Master Edward, his claims being stoutly contested by Alexia, "Well, so
3907.ary. "It's a miniature picture of human life," I observed, as Oswald and I stood at
3908.nd Alexia standing up for the rights of man or rather of woman." "In the present in
3909. woman." "In the present instance, Mary will be the winning horse," " I never said O
3910.infidel ?" " I don't see what right any one has to say so and, after all, as the wo
3911.st Oxford "But, strance, " my if ; by a war of independence." divines as hopeless i
3912.t the window ; "I think I have heard of one Judith." " Under I venture to remark, "
3913.by address." " if she had not known the art of " Just so," said Oswald making herse
3914.tal lesson for you, Florry." If there's justice in England, he'll soon be in limbo. "A
3915.en half round the park visit ?" by this time." "Yes," I replied, "ever since I've be
3916.ad at last to the key to her character, one that little dialogue had given me satis
3917.." We were summoned to dinner, the only other addition to our "Really, Mr. Knowles? W
3918.r a schismatical piece " at least party being Wilfrid Knowles, who liked to be called
3919.d to scious antagonism he, stiff in his sense of sacerdotal superihave an unfailing c
3920. an unfailing command of temper "I, for one, deeply dein her audacious of : The blo
3921. "If Mr. Aubrey were to express such an opinion " The Oxit would not be far from the tr
3922.on " The Oxit would not be far from the truth," he observed. ford of the present day
3923.aid, "you are prob" it would prolong my life if I thought I should badgering. ing co
3924.o be considering telling yon of him the other day the editor of the /, and the greate
3925.y the editor of the /, and the greatest good-for-naught in Exshire. : . as he calls
3926.aid Oswald 'I believe women think every man with a black beard is a genius." "How !
3927.beard is a genius." "How !" moors ; ' ; one, Charley," said his incorrigible " so I
3928. incorrigible " so I sister suppose you being fair accounts for it." " " Indeed, I ho
3929.y call him) would have condemned us for life to the use of stable-lanterns. " " " if
3930.to the use of stable-lanterns. " " " if one had to find one's Possibly," I said, wa
3931.able-lanterns. " " " if one had to find one's Possibly," I said, way on a dark ' le
3932.the look-out for first principles which one would have thought they had learned cen
3933.ons. " " she might possibly some day or other find it worth her while to No, but my c
3934.and how else is," said Oswald, "that so many of your say," geniuses are just nothing
3935.all, and go out can they hope to get at truth?" whilst you are staring at them." "Tho
3936.es, and cannot put them together again. beauty is always of use I appeal to Mr. Aubrey
3937.uff I was made of. "Your simile has the vice of all similes," she replied; "it "To a
3938. regulate, but not my independent conby beauty ?" victions." "Well, what do you mean b
3939.y it?" " "But, my dear Miss Oswald, how many persons now-a-days Suppose I were to ca
3940. it the splendor of goodnesat" "Ah that will do famously," she replied " if goodness
3941.dity ? All the people I know take their beauty, then beauty is goodness so we conclude
3942.e people I know take their beauty, then beauty is goodness so we conclude in favor of
3943.lfrid Knowles, as he really hardly know one man who thinks for himself, unless it r
3944.d Knowles, as he really hardly know one man who thinks for himself, unless it rose
3945.ink old Mary's a peaceable mem- his own opinion, no doubt, but not in mine. I like the
3946.ere to give us 'gooseberry with a plain truth or two, as she did just now on the matt
3947.ruth or two, as she did just now on the matter of genius. champagne ticket, I should c
3948.I wish she could put some of her common sense into presently poor joined her, and soo
3949.h of the erratic gift herself, I should war. " That's the way she treats the impost
3950.'t settle down to has read a prodigious quantity of rubbish. She would have no humdrum.
3951. hopes and defiant. If ever she becomes one, it will be the result of if she is eve
3952.nd defiant. If ever she becomes one, it will be the result of if she is ever saved f
3953.f she is ever saved from hell do Florry good but I think it's a mistake ; he becomin
3954.ut I think it's a mistake ; he becoming one, it will only rouses over-preaching not
3955.nk it's a mistake ; he becoming one, it will only rouses over-preaching not be by th
3956.by the ministry of Father Wilfrid." her love of contradiction. " the correctnes s of
3957. conclusion, I was next We talked about other things for a while, and then adjourned
3958.ossessed a church of its own, served by one of affairs, and Florence at the further
3959.Oswald; "how d'ye Florry ?" " There's a good deal of truth in the remark," said Wilf
3960.d'ye Florry ?" " There's a good deal of truth in the remark," said Wilfrid ; "a geniu
3961.hing at best much like a comet, as it, "One might have a trifling advantage over sk
3962.g advantage over sky-rockets." Yes, but one isn't always groping one's way in the d
3963.ets." Yes, but one isn't always groping one's way in the dark." " Well, really, whe
3964.tility of the last-named article iu a - will help to restore temper. Suppose you tel
3965.e to sit in, I presume," she said, "and will save the expense of chairs; but what wi
3966.ll save the expense of chairs; but what will you do with the holy water stoups ?" me
3967.an at the beginning, and r< my friend's history and experiences as well as my memory se
3968.s history and experiences as well as my memory served me. She listened, at first with
3969.oly water in them ?" inquired Florence, one innocently desirous of information. "Pr
3970."Probably not," said Knowles, "but they will bear their will there " But beauty her
3971.said Knowles, "but they will bear their will there " But beauty her haughty features
3972.t they will bear their will there " But beauty her haughty features. "Yes, that is rea
3973. midst, and speaking out to them like a man and the others, astounded, cut to ; wit
3974.But what made it real ? " I asked. "The man was in earnest," she replied, "and so w
3975.s. Oswald," said fact, then he spoke as one having authority, who had the truth " "
3976.ke as one having authority, who had the truth " " but a to give ? Knowles, sepulchre,
3977.hre, such as was required for the " The truth " she repeated in a tone, as though and
3978.ssary of the words conveyed no definite sense to her understanding. " Gothic art the
3979.te sense to her understanding. " Gothic art the description of an elaborate rite, "
3980.te catch your meaning; I cannot see how one man has any more authority to talk than
3981.atch your meaning; I cannot see how one man has any more authority to talk than ano
3982. bravely what he thinks strongly, it is truth to him and listened attentively. "I hav
3983. they don't know my newspaper), " it is one among many examples of the way what the
3984.t know my newspaper), " it is one among many examples of the way what they are talki
3985.s, or when he lived. But what does that matter ? It is the last new slang which they h
3986.tor. " If she has not preserved it, she will very probably revive finds favor in pro
3987.rtion as it is manly, j; " That view of truth is rather " If we continue at our I obs
3988. have witnessed it ! " ! What a scene 1 One longs to ! ; ; ; " a dozen or two of th
3989.gs to ! ; ; ; " a dozen or two of those same strong truths would soon reduce English
3990.e English branch of the Church Catholic will ere long have the each other to negatio
3991.ch Catholic will ere long have the each other to negations. " most magnificent ritual
3992. said Florence, "and I tell yon what it will then remind me of; a grand display of g
3993.ing to eat upon the table." oft-jective truth, as he calls it " Would you like the di
3994. never do for me you " must leave me at liberty to seek for truth wherever it blossoms,
3995. " must leave me at liberty to seek for truth wherever it blossoms, "if the dishes we
3996.ious me, "I I could not help calling to mind her own earnestness. respect your love
3997. mind her own earnestness. respect your love of what is real and honest ; argument t
3998.rds the evening before, on the peculiar vice of similes. At monies only, it would be
3999.f the monial is not an empty shell ; in time it will bring back the Archfeological C
4000.nial is not an empty shell ; in time it will bring back the Archfeological Committee
4001. beside her, and informed her sister-in-law, that I had been realities." "Never " s
4002. felt a against everybody's garden walL Time has softened his rough ; ; ; ; ! it," p
4003.corn of shams which was manifestly "And other things besides time," said Mary; "he ha
4004.as manifestly "And other things besides time," said Mary; "he has had genuine in her
4005. "I have heard nothing about them ; but life, and how for the first tune it had open
4006. first tune it had opened my heart to a sense of the realities of faith. I suspect hi
4007.f the realities of faith. I suspect his wealth, after all, has been his chief trouble.
4008.rhaps it would resign themselves if the chance were given them." TIII: ACXTUA 1.1 A. \
4009.o do the greatest posi'oility, aouut of good, the actual results are always falling
4010.ccentricity of his friend, or a fervent desire of impaling the unhappy culprit. CHAPTE
4011.d patiently to Father Wilfrid for " the space of two hours. " Oswald will never forgi
4012. for " the space of two hours. " Oswald will never forgive him the first achievement
4013.," I replied : stand his motives in the matter of Degg." " If Mr. Knowles would but be
4014.s." "I daresay he would have run a fair chance of burning in that fourteenth century M
4015.ll, I'm not very fond of revenge, or of law courts either. I don't believe they're
4016. believe they're the best places in the world for fos; tering charity." 'And was that
4017. shocking if Degg were to be held up to judgment for libelling me, when for these many y
4018.dgment for libelling me, when for these many years past law court after law court ha
4019.ling me, when for these many years past law court after law court has declared it i
4020.r these many years past law court after law court has declared it impossible to cal
4021.y, my dear Miss Oswald, it's what every one knows; this poor creature has found it
4022.acinstincts of faith : would go against one's at least that my feeling." There was
4023.ou believe nothing. And if there is any one ; Plans for the day were brought under
4024.sion, includ Exdale Church, Mr. Knowles being desirous that questions in debate about
4025.ration should be settled the spot. Maiy good-naturedly consented to accompany h but
4026.o thing you do believe, obey it, and it will lead you further." "I don't understand,
4027.baskets and fishing-re Florence herself being the driver. Oswald had challenged the d
4028.nd rebuilding tion, yourself. " Well, I will take the first element of faith ; you b
4029.yourself. " Well, I will take the first element of faith ; you believe in God ?" " Of c
4030.first element of faith ; you believe in God ?" " Of course," she replied. " And tha
4031.displayed his accustomed clear head and knowledge of busini It was late in the afternoon
4032. yon believe that He made you, body and soul for I suppose you believe that you have
4033.r I suppose you believe that you have a soul you don't think you are nothing but a b
4034.ieve that I have a : : ; : "Well, never mind that be quick or you'll be late for tea
4035.it,'' she answered. '"Dust thou " " Waa art, to dust returnest,' not spoken of the
4036., to dust returnest,' not spoken of the soul." "Well, that is, perhaps, not the very
4037.the very safest ground of faith, but it will do for the present. Now, listen to me.
4038.ld her I had said a 'Hail Mary' and an 'Angel of Ck they are facts, living real> that
4039.In this way," he replied "If there is a God, he must be He is your Master yes, you
4040.don't get posts or something pui have a soul, an immortal soul, as you say you belie
4041. something pui have a soul, an immortal soul, as you say you believe, you by, Charle
4042.does," said Oswald. care of an immortal soul is a very serious business." baker's ca
4043.ing him," said Florence ; and there the matter dropped. kindly to her, and she went aw
4044.e abstained alike from provoking he was one who never forgot, and he watched his op
4045. was careful to inform me, rejoicing in good ventilation and drainage. The houses an
4046. said the duke. " I have known such the sign of "the Leven Arm.}," the tavern, that
4047.body was licensed to be drunk on the ay life; they condense into a second the sensat
4048.ix rooms, to which to retire it was his custom finds himself at gave her time to gathe
4049.as his custom finds himself at gave her time to gather up her courage and at last sh
4050.mself at gave her time to gather up her courage and at last she nd her voice, but it wa
4051.e nd her voice, but it was a very husky one. "I remembered r words; I shall never f
4052.get them. It is all confusion now, they will lead me somewhere, I don't yet know whe
4053., astonished at his own success; but in truth, my had been rather in my ears than my
4054.home. solid, entered with the glee of a man who sitting-rooms, and a couple of bedr
4055.g-rooms, and a couple of bedrooms, with one for his attendant. This was all. The fu
4056.ness and poverty. Of the sitting-rooms, one was a dining parlor, the other his priv
4057.ing-rooms, one was a dining parlor, the other his private study ; it looked into a li
4058.he duke's parting words, give said, ; ; will let me you your revenge," he ell, that'
4059. go down to the monastery. I shared his happiness to have him here in this corner of the
4060. to have him here in this corner of the world, .away from his letters and his cares,
4061.indow. I looked around on the wall were one 01 two prints of devotion, in plain bla
4062.l ; and no French cookery was ever done justice to as was that first homely little dinn
4063. that people have no hearts, eryone has one, only they can't always find it." "I su
4064.ned, and two blackrobed figures entered one, to whom Leven knelt for a blessing, an
4065.ssed to be the abbot, and another young man, whose expressive countenance beamed wi
4066.hose expressive countenance beamed with pleasure, as he greeted his friend I did not nee
4067.te and girded by its forests, more than one river took its found its way through pl
4068.e and after a minute or two of silence, one clear voice filled, NEW UTOPIA. I meant
4069.unds those were to which, for the first time I listenwhole ed, awaking in me a new s
4070.e I listenwhole ed, awaking in me a new sense, yet one to which my It was the voice o
4071.hole ed, awaking in me a new sense, yet one to which my It was the voice of the nat
4072.one to which my It was the voice of the nature seemed responsive. the voice of the anc
4073.y it is nomany cares, and too little recreation." your
4074. for the otters." river, ; 1 nothing in particular. Church, CHAPTER XIEL UTOPIA. It yielde
4075.me their interpreter, translating their sense from the ear to the heart, and from the
4076. flesh and blood, to any of those tones world, to which I listened It only lasted too
4077.h I listened It only lasted too short a time, and when it ceased I found I had been
4078. burnt before and St. Ethelwold and the good Odo, St. Dunstan, and the the Duke, as
4079.and the the Duke, as "the Arch-enemy of Progress," . kings, some bishops, and monks, in
4080.a leven that the postbag brought, among other contents, from Exdale, and a newspaper
4081.whose remains It of the county. lay for many centuries in a ruined abbey was to be h
4082.d not speak, for went up to the tombs ; one clad in ducal robes, with his feet rest
4083.cal robes, with his feet resting on his good dog, his grave, manly features carved w
4084.ving beyond the quatrefoiled panend the family arms ; but a brass fillet ran els, and
4085.ms ; but a brass fillet ran els, and at one round the upper surface, engraved with
4086.ters came out, they had, doubtless, the time toreturn; try whence they Therebut now
4087.turn; try whence they Therebut now they desire a better, that is, a heavenly one. God
4088.ey desire a better, that is, a heavenly one. God is not ashamed to be called their
4089.sire a better, that is, a heavenly one. God is not ashamed to be called their God,
4090.. God is not ashamed to be called their God, for He hath To whom is this the street
4091.nstration against me in But what is the truth of the matter ? Degg ford. . and 1 furn
4092.inst me in But what is the truth of the matter ? Degg ford. . and 1 furnish* Free Thou
4093.oresee," said Grant. nor at our b: wolf will not lie down with the lamb in our day,
4094.d for them city." (Heb. I passed to the other tomb, and thought I recognized in the f
4095. inscription which bade me pray for the soul of John William, Marquis of Caretairs,
4096.but, bless your heart, Jack, of makes a man take a very different view of the meani
4097.ugh considering, chnir, andlooking into space, at it; sn I love like a definition whe
4098.nir, andlooking into space, at it; sn I love like a definition when one can get - /
4099.ing into space, at it; sn I love like a definition when one can get - / - THE A USTRALIAN
4100.at it; sn I love like a definition when one can get - / - THE A USTRALIAN DUKE OR T
4101.tyrdom that might not be success in the world's estimation, but it would certainly be
4102. flight, my dear Grant," I said " and I will admit all its but now to desiucontrover
4103., strddird to n fori the happiest of my life. Oswald's description of the place had
4104.to make it very unlike any phase of the world with which I hod hitherto boon familiar
4105. self ; : no results in the commonplace sense of the word ?" "I do not say so," he re
4106.to say that the impression left on your mind after laying down one of those villaino
4107.ion left on your mind after laying down one of those villainous newspapers is that
4108.villainous newspapers is that the whole world is going the way of the Gospelof the be
4109.titudes ? All I can say is it is not my idea of the Gospel. "I wish," I said, "you w
4110.wish," I said, "you would clear up your idea a little at present I can catch only ha
4111.," he replied, "the case seems a simple one enough. There is a sense in which the s
4112.e seems a simple one enough. There is a sense in which the success of the Gospel alwa
4113.is, when we expect it to regenerate the world meaning by the world that evil thing wh
4114. to regenerate the world meaning by the world that evil thing which is the enemy of G
4115.ate the world meaning by the world that evil thing which is the enemy of God, and ne
4116.d that evil thing which is the enemy of God, and never will be regenerated. The wor
4117.ng which is the enemy of God, and never will be regenerated. The world reigns ; ; Ut
4118.God, and never will be regenerated. The world reigns ; ; Utopian dream with which Osw
4119.e influences the moral atmosphere of so many an English His success, partial as it w
4120.er. The early weekday mass was heard by many on their way to work; the streets were
4121.y defeat. But take into account, on the other of the church and monastery, according
4122.oyment of artistic genius. "All this is education," said Leven, "and it gives the oppormi
4123.n every quarter of the globe; and, as a matter of course its victories far outweigh it
4124.ies far outweigh its defeats, tunity of education. Werner, here, holds that a man must on
4125.f education. Werner, here, holds that a man must only for the report of them, I bel
4126.ave to wait un- know something about an angel before he can carve one, and before he
4127.hing about an angel before he can carve one, and before he can paint the legend of.
4128.int he must have studied til the day of judgment." "That is a very solemn view of the ma
4129.nt." "That is a very solemn view of the matter," I replied ; and it, and prayed over i
4130.course of lectures to his pupils on the nature of angels before he let them touch it s
4131.t them touch it seems to require in any one who labors for the good of his kind, an
4132.o require in any one who labors for the good of his kind, an almost sublime degree o
4133.ssion and purity so much as the robe of one of those you saw iu the church." " " an
4134." Quite true," said Werner, only common sense a "Just so, Jack and as very few of suc
4135.about us, you perceive how it is less a man possesses the thought, he cannot expres
4136.cceed in becoming artists but can it be other than a benefit guessed, as I glanced at
4137.ward. It ran as follows that there is a world of spirit as well as a world of matter
4138.there is a world of spirit as well as a world of matter ?" ; ; so tempted to talk of
4139.a world of spirit as well as a world of matter ?" ; ; so tempted to talk of discourage
4140. talk of discouragement, if the naughty world does not at once turn its swords into p
4141.comfort for you, which should atone for many an effigy-burning read that :" and he h
4142.sm. Two of the puppies are drowned. The other has got his eyes open we mean to call h
4143.said Leven, "and consists of two ports, one positive and the other negative the pos
4144.ists of two ports, one positive and the other negative the positive is supplying in f
4145., accordwill be full of it, and a great many excellent persons will con- ingly, I gr
4146. it, and a great many excellent persons will con- ingly, I grant that to effect anyt
4147.h me 011 the disappointment. But a poor soul is rescued numt of your clodhoppers, it
4148.ar worse abyss than Baker's Bit, and no one wiU offer of tidy wives. I assure you t
4149.e you the subject has greatly exercised will know of it congratulations, though me I
4150.xpected," I said. Degg "Be ery." "It so good, then," I retorted, "as to explain your
4151.the Bum total of social degradation. No man made "ikyou," 1 s;i;d, "I feel very muc
4152.ze in a pigstye, and if no provision is will spiritualin the building of THE AUSTRAL
4153.ttagp resiliences for giving a laboring man any corner to live in which is not eith
4154. interior instincts which go beyond the knowledge we acquire by the senses, I seemed to u
4155.stand that these three men knew more of one another than appeared on the surface, a
4156., who Werner was, and what had been the history of that strong tie which had linked him
4157. no little ; "I do not admit all to my "Peace, man," said Leven. secrets I have corre
4158.tle ; "I do not admit all to my "Peace, man," said Leven. secrets I have correspond
4159.seen the Glenleven schools. How long it will last it is hard to say but as yet neith
4160.e a set of men and women who know their religion and their duties. I simply great friend
4161.nal kindness, and assistance ing." " in time of difficulty, and leave it to the grac
4162.ifficulty, and leave it to the grace of God to do the Well, I suppose a fellow must
4163.est to approach the subject. My readers will probably ere this have discovered that
4164.plomatist. I have acted on mathematical principle that the shortest line between two give
4165.here the abbot joined us. For the first time I was able to take in a general view of
4166.letion, which extended before me." this time left we had things in earnest." " Yes,
4167.n I say? the to be the rule of monastic life. What one age creates, another overthro
4168.e to be the rule of monastic life. What one age creates, another overthrows, and so
4169.gain. It is a perpetual exercise of the virtue of Hope." more fruitful. " "Yes," said
4170.mpossible for Grant to conceal the deep emotion which my words called forth, and I felt
4171.and perhaps, in your heart have thought many thoughts." thoughts ?" Well, that I exa
4172.ou to conceive the possibility of there being a something to explain it all. Well, th
4173., there is, or was in short, Wer" ner's history is a chapter in my own. " What " you ha
4174.lieve it possible that we shall make as many converts by singing as by preaching," h
4175." he said. "Your friend Mr. Knowles for one." " What ? does he come here to gather
4176.ome here to gather ideas ?" " The first time " I don't know about that," said Werner
4177.ell what I thought about things at that time. I had thought a good deal about money
4178.ut things at that time. I had thought a good deal about money and society, and one's
4179. good deal about money and society, and one's duty about such things, and how one c
4180.deal about money and society, and one's duty about such things, and how one could ob
4181.d one's duty about such things, and how one could obey the Gospel, obey it to the l
4182.I had thought of these things as a poor man, and not as a rich man. When the wealth
4183.things as a poor man, and not as a rich man. When the wealth came, it was enormous.
4184.or man, and not as a rich man. When the wealth came, it was enormous. I felt the weigh
4185. description, but he said the mediaeval idea suffered by their omission." seats, as
4186.n be real. At present he plays with the truth as children do with pretty pebbles, whi
4187. they shine and please the eye. The day will come when he will need a rock to stand
4188.ease the eye. The day will come when he will need a rock to stand on." " he must suf
4189.w tone, which struck to my heart, "some one else must sufit is the only way :" and
4190.on Werner. of the young monk evinced no particular response to his words: classes, foundin
4191.asked myself what it might indicate. By one of those Pictures even ef that family l
4192.. By one of those Pictures even ef that family life we once talked of, sometimes ; ; ;
4193.e of those Pictures even ef that family life we once talked of, sometimes ; ; ; THE
4194.to have weight, influence, character, a man must be at the head of a grand Christia
4195.cal greatness, too came in, and a dozen other fancies you couldn't believe how many.
4196. other fancies you couldn't believe how many. Occasionally, whilst all these things
4197. Henry's words about riches, and giving one's life for the brethren I can't describ
4198.'s words about riches, and giving one's life for the brethren I can't describe it ex
4199.pose of seeing for myself what Catholic life in Catholic countries was, to study the
4200.hich would for evpr destroy his selfand sense of honor, and which wouldildivcr liini
4201.d for evpr destroy his selfand sense of honor, and which wouldildivcr liini up bound
4202.f those political Beelzebubs." " Strong language, Grant." " Not a bit too strong why, I'
4203.I first made acquaintance with Werner's family. His father holds a half a dozen forest
4204.he is her She loved him as only mothers love their idol, he is her cross. sons, and
4205.ur's idleness, and with a voice like an angel singing his own songs to his own improv
4206.ised music, and a poet (I'm a practical man myself, but I know what a charm it is t
4207., nor any body it was impossible not to love him. " He was the idol of his mother, a
4208.privilege of shedding his blood for the good cause aye, and he meant it, too but you
4209.lege of shedding his blood for the good cause aye, and he meant it, too but you know
4210.uld have been a happier ; ; ; ! stop to love ' passing the love of woman.' I did not
4211.pier ; ; ; ! stop to love ' passing the love of woman.' I did not stop to think what
4212.t day I started for Florence. " It is a good thing to finds one's self a duke someti
4213.Florence. " It is a good thing to finds one's self a duke sometimes, ; Did I not lo
4214.ne's self a duke sometimes, ; Did I not love him I did not Yes, indeed ask why he wa
4215.nderfully easy to get into places where one has a mind to go. As Duke of Leven, I h
4216.easy to get into places where one has a mind to go. As Duke of Leven, I had no diffi
4217.w his face was changed! What a stamp of evil was there ? Not evil perfected, consumm
4218.d! What a stamp of evil was there ? Not evil perfected, consummated past the hope of
4219.the enemy on him loss of grace, loss of peace, of innoYet I loved him as I ever did o
4220.e, of innoYet I loved him as I ever did one cannot, somehow, cence. change. Of cour
4221. I ever did one cannot, somehow, cence. change. Of course he welcomed me but he was al
4222.but he was always too ; ! ; ; ; to find time to give me a morning to myself. When we
4223.others, the most charming people in the world, no doubt but what did I care for busy
4224. what I wanted was his xoul ? "At last, one evening it was in the gallery of the Pi
4225. just now, men fish for crafty snare. ; one another's souls to give them to the ene
4226.archese Zingari was just then a leading man among the Italian Liberals. It was a gr
4227.erous. It was also safe, what could the world find to say against it ? There was art
4228.orld find to say against it ? There was art and music, and flattery and beauty. An
4229.ere was art and music, and flattery and beauty. An atmosphere too, such as even to us,
4230.ey took him on his weak side, fired his imagination, and quietly sapped his moral strength,
4231.tle more, would be wanted to plunge Say one word more, and you will repent it,' he
4232.ed to plunge Say one word more, and you will repent it,' he answered. 1 can forgive
4233.you your folly as regards myself, but I will hear nothing that can touch the honor o
4234. I will hear nothing that can touch the honor of a lady. "I cannot repeat it all my p
4235.the Church of Sta. Maria Novella such a change from the busy streets to find on< in th
4236.ustrade, I shed bitter tears. Why did I love him so, and what was it I loved? His so
4237.ve him so, and what was it I loved? His soul! that soul, the innate beauty of which
4238.and what was it I loved? His soul! that soul, the innate beauty of which had ; been
4239. loved? His soul! that soul, the innate beauty of which had ; been revealed to me at o
4240.eting. Clouded over, and bospotted with many a stain, there it still was, a beautifu
4241.e it still was, a beautiful, n glorious soul, most dear to God, most dear to my hear
4242.eautiful, n glorious soul, most dear to God, most dear to my heart, and, as I felt
4243. the Enemy. "What could I do? With that one thought in my mind I raised my eyes, an
4244.could I do? With that one thought in my mind I raised my eyes, and they fell on a fi
4245.tifully on the worshipper. Such was the one to fix on speaking now as if in prayer
4246.at was the answer tc my prayer. Perhaps death would save him. How was it with him ? I
4247.e straight "It was all true. to But his soul t ; suspense but getting free as soon a
4248.orse than typhus, a deadly thing; every one had fled the house in terror, except hi
4249.them, it was all such yourself. between God and the world to satisfy your conscienc
4250. all such yourself. between God and the world to satisfy your conscience and wild tal
4251.hat were your high aspirations by doing good works, and to please your- ill at ease.
4252.age, possible. Hypocrite choose between God and mammon. Let and he would never rous
4253.in. But he did. On the fourth it be all God, or all mammon. You want to make a grea
4254.to pieces, but all re, prestige of your family, to be the Great Duke as well as the pa
4255. you are not indifferent. You think the world has no hold could guess. ' ' ' : ! ; on
4256.ld could guess. ' ' ' : ! ; on you, and one remedy its hold is tightening day Sacri
4257.t save it. give to the poor,' give ALL. Wealth, reputation, ease, time, pleasure, free
4258.r,' give ALL. Wealth, reputation, ease, time, pleasure, freedom, lay them all down,
4259.ve ALL. Wealth, reputation, ease, time, pleasure, freedom, lay them all down, renounce t
4260.em, abjure them, and forever !' by this soul, ' Sell all all for all, Gradually he g
4261.h I could see my mother I' Then At last one day he said I knew it was all right wit
4262.g to which I could cling on the side of nature if by such an act I could win the soul
4263.ature if by such an act I could win the soul that was hanging in such a terrible per
4264.ch never my left father had held on his death-bed, and which has all me, I promised,
4265. I promised, with the earnestness of my soul, "I saw what he was thinking of some tr
4266.h he was hastening, when that blow from God struck him down and saved him. And in h
4267.began to discover the true worth of the soul I had saved a soul, Jack, as far above
4268.he true worth of the soul I had saved a soul, Jack, as far above my own in worth and
4269. Jack, as far above my own in worth and beauty as those heavens are above the tree-top
4270.o And now that it had waked to its true life, God no wonder 'Haven't you heard ?' He
4271.now that it had waked to its true life, God no wonder 'Haven't you heard ?' He's de
4272.ds of tenderness, what flights of lofty beauty what H It sudden, too.' 'JDead /' 'Yes;
4273.visitor of distinction was there, and a good many foreigners. There was a great crow
4274.or of distinction was there, and a good many foreigners. There was a great crowd and
4275.orms and ladies' trains, thinking in my soul what disgusting trash it all was, I saw
4276.of the Nile, there they are, as sure as life, and to this There she was, 'Lady Ex, '
4277.escort of Mr. Eustace de Something " or other, a young diplomat of rising expectation
4278.pirit ; something had gone out of him a good deal of the animal, I think but it had
4279. had gone out of him a good deal of the animal, I think but it had left behind all his
4280. left behind all his gifts of heart and mind, and imagination, deepened and vivified
4281.nd all his gifts of heart and mind, and imagination, deepened and vivified with a new life
4282.ation, deepened and vivified with a new life and sense. I knew not (and only imperfe
4283.epened and vivified with a new life and sense. I knew not (and only imperfectly, and
4284.let me know) all that had passed in his soul during those seemingly unconscious hour
4285.ad promised : how was I to soemyway The idea that oftenest came it fulfil? I did not
4286. a dash, retaining 5,000, and and begin life over again as William Grant. The Austra
4287. lay benc.tth and though he was a noble soul, unsoiled by the touch and breath of th
4288.unsoiled by the touch and breath of th( world, I had accustomed myself to regard what
4289. unda I ; gun terest in it all, and his art was always at their service ; and a fin
4290.the whole case before him. He asked for time; nine days, put had a novena of masses
4291. prepared to hear his decision as to my fate. 'No what I had thought of would not do
4292.ad thought of would not do ; there were other and better ways than that of 'selling a
4293.ers ; giving not my money alone, but my life. 'You vowed away not merely possessions
4294.ly possessions,' he said, 'but freedom, time, ease, reputation. In Australia you den
4295.ease, reputation. In Australia you den, life, will from simply have shifted the heav
4296.reputation. In Australia you den, life, will from simply have shifted the heavy weig
4297.ted the heavy weight once for all. What God designs for you is a will never sacrifi
4298. for all. What God designs for you is a will never sacrifice, and one which the worl
4299. for you is a will never sacrifice, and one which the world yon externally as you a
4300.will never sacrifice, and one which the world yon externally as you are, bat demandin
4301.moment and every faculty of your entire being !' "There is no ;need, my dear Aubrey,
4302.cause, you see, cost me nothing. such a life grinds a fellow to powder. But it was n
4303.to hii simple garden, that great loving soul revealed itself to me ii truth ; always
4304.at loving soul revealed itself to me ii truth ; always true to its one idea of servin
4305.elf to me ii truth ; always true to its one idea of serving God and man ii the spir
4306.to me ii truth ; always true to its one idea of serving God and man ii the spirit of
4307. always true to its one idea of serving God and man ii the spirit of self-sacrifice
4308.true to its one idea of serving God and man ii the spirit of self-sacrifice, yet al
4309.s, dear reader, they are s g gven on my memory), and the Sunday Gospel was that wine r
4310.d, of hope, or of aspiration within his soul ? When it was time to leave the church,
4311.spiration within his soul ? When it was time to leave the church, Grant still linger
4312.d, ai Anyhow, thoughts, you shall spend one day with me there." " To Bradford I" I
4313. they've forgotten all about it by this time ai You can guess what it was. His call
4314. to leave ti What right had I to say to God, 'not this,' 'everything but field to D
4315. I have business there whi< and I thank God I did presses. I am to meet one of your
4316.I thank God I did presses. I am to meet one of your London scientific friend this !
4317. and I have to see if our plans on that matter can be pc The simplicity of the words t
4318.crifice ; it was not but the outcome of one act, an act by which he had theory, vol
4319.ry, voluntarily given all all to save a soul ; and God had accepted the gift. What m
4320.rily given all all to save a soul ; and God had accepted the gift. What more was ye
4321. as if hills ; had been out of the busy world for a twelvemonth. An ho or two brought
4322., and my reluctance to return to common life, a DUO IN AiTUM. took me to the house o
4323.leven, nd I cellent school for curing a man of day-dreame. He was o beheld its appr
4324.ctions, and I could not but marvel at t beauty, material and spiritual, which hung abo
4325.ung about the place, versatility of his mind, which could so easily turn from subje<
4326.je< increased to my heart by the deeper knowledge and appreciation of profoundest interio
4327.hinery and ventilation. He spoke like a man who und t THE A USTRALIAN DUKE OR THE N
4328. like a Shibboleth. " at last; Drybones will be here to-morrow," said Grant, and bef
4329.hickens myself." " Where are the men on duty ?" "I doant know." " The Hen and Chicke
4330. "Now, my lad, see here," "The overseer will be here in an hour, and if he finds no
4331. be here in an hour, and if he finds no one here but you, and you refuse to answer
4332. you refuse to answer his questions, it will be the worse for you. strong grasp ; "y
4333. of it, and tell me where Jones and the other two." " How far is it from here ?" " Ab
4334.d about in sore disburning to civilized life come and take your first lesson in " "
4335. come and take your first lesson in " " one engineering. tress for a minute or so,
4336.ion which had been introduced into " ds particular mine, of which I retain only the genera
4337.ait. ction that the air was admitted by one shaft and forced I be Tim Jones." shaft
4338.hese two ere at a considerable distance one from the other, and that Bradford, rejo
4339.at a considerable distance one from the other, and that Bradford, rejoicing in the si
4340.er, and that Bradford, rejoicing in the sign of the Prince of Wales' Feathers, ie wo
4341.her by certain strong doors, the object being, in tory. See here, he said, you'll jus
4342.athers, ,se of an accident occurring in one of them, to prevent its exand tell your
4343.and disappeared in the road. iiich, for one cause or another, " Isn't it It was the
4344.disappeared in the road. iiich, for one cause or another, " Isn't it It was the busin
4345.her, " Isn't it It was the business for one gang of men to open these enough to bre
4346. of men to open these enough to break a man's heart ?" said Grant. "Turn at certain
4347.them at others, according to -where you will, do what you will, always confronted wi
4348.cording to -where you will, do what you will, always confronted with the >ors he pac
4349.h the workings happened to be country's evil genius, the curse of drink." And to the
4350.iderable returned in company with a big man, who, judging by his apfor his sojourn
4351. of stupid amazement, and in the little one is a mile and a half away on reply to h
4352.at the visit to the ale house had not e other side of the hill " Is Grant turned to t
4353. anxious to as- been a brief or passing one. rtaiu if the whole thing is in order b
4354.hen a mine is ventilated by two shafts, one shaft so the responsible guardian and d
4355. necessarily longer and deeper than the other, and the weight his companion little be
4356.t the long shaft and out at responsible man in charge and entering pure and wholeso
4357.ave been trusted to do the necese short one to-morrow." We reached what Grant had c
4358.dery, received a number of details that one hundred and eighty men were .ce, and wa
4359.aft but a certain number of men were on duty >rk on that side ere attending to the d
4360.erent in its aspect from the heathy the other side to a spot where a few yen), and de
4361.d a signal house, with the works at the other side, indicated the .mmunicaticg cality
4362.n quest of; But where were the men? Not one was visible. "In the Is th we at last g
4363. the Is th we at last gathered the sary duty. After painful questioning not been ent
4364.. I only imperfectly apprehended the in one of the sheds, ght of a shock of hair an
4365.ket arrangements for descending it . no one, drunk doors unopened. Signal all the m
4366. half-a-crown, and bade him ran for his life with " If you are quick and faithful, y
4367. you it to the Great Shaft, now lose no time, shall have the same sum when you retur
4368.Shaft, now lose no time, shall have the same sum when you return but be off." The bo
4369.at sight of the silver, and set off ; 1 state of things, but J Tim AUSTRALIAN DUKE OR
4370.ook-out on the road to detect di'l flio truth, the wlioln truth, break on mo and dplu
4371.d to detect di'l flio truth, the wlioln truth, break on mo and dpluge me \ first appe
4372.party. But half au hour anguish and I u life l,;u[ In mated by a death of sacrifice,
4373.nguish and I u life l,;u[ In mated by a death of sacrifice, and that in passed, and n
4374.f sacrifice, and that in passed, and no one yet appeared. very deed and ti " The "
4375.tened," he said, Well, he had given his life for his brethren. there is only one oth
4376.is life for his brethren. there is only one other chanoe. Here, you fellow," addres
4377.ife for his brethren. there is only one other chanoe. Here, you fellow," addressing t
4378.anoe. Here, you fellow," addressing the man, who by this time was partially sobered
4379.ellow," addressing the man, who by this time was partially sobered, " can you trust
4380.letely the signal to lower away. of his family that we should have been " Grant !" I "
4381. not been for his se what can you do ?" will be here in a moment " Leave tary, Mr. D
4382." To the hundred and myself, men on the other side of the eighty " opened it, and fou
4383.f the eighty " opened it, and found his will, drawn up and signed with pit there is,
4384.l in vain ; he gave the signal, and the man Werner, Werner and the other brethren g
4385.nal, and the man Werner, Werner and the other brethren gently and reverently lowered
4386.ut of sight. he, who had sacrificed his life to charity, had also been use I tried t
4387.t ? After all, I knew offer his body to God by the longer and more lingering sacri
4388. we watched beside him whilst tl " Then God rest his soul I" he " that was an crowd
4389.eside him whilst tl " Then God rest his soul I" he " that was an crowded in from all
4390.ilst some telegraphed for But there was one who came and would not go away more aid
4391.ft and descend without knelt there like one who had been smitten to the heart v los
4392.had been smitten to the heart v loss of time. something more than sorrow. It was Wil
4393.had the closing scene of that beautiful life, received the light faith in his soul,
4394.l life, received the light faith in his soul, and awoke to reality. The abbot's wo c
4395.o regarding him had been an unconscious prophecy he nobly been won by the suffering, not
4396.not of himself, but of another. saved ; many of whom a short week before had been bu
4397.essing their benefacl it with Leven ? I will say nothing of all that, and of the bit
4398.t the feet of his father, and felt that one 1 working party who had out from among
4399. was men of a common mould. We read his will and all were startled and amazed to f k
4400. to Edward Wigra smile of inexpressible peace, but life had been extinct at least cer
4401.Wigra smile of inexpressible peace, but life had been extinct at least certain other
4402. life had been extinct at least certain other lands and properties were left to be ad
4403. were left to be administe an hour. The cause of his death was not the actual combus-
4404. be administe an hour. The cause of his death was not the actual combus- in trust for
4405., but what miners call the but the vast wealth after-damp," that is, the mixture of ba
4406.mained not a farthing. They laid him in one of the sheds, and we telegraphed to The
4407.he news spread about, and gradually the truth came to Glenleven and Oakham, understoo
4408.teadily carrying out the purpose of his life to obey the prec their very intensity.
4409., and give to the poor, and fol for the time, stunned me. I could act, and speak, an
4410.ct, and speak, and move, Christ." The ~ truth, when known, produced a powerful and gi
4411.have been not ft little by the ardor of one whose story I have as yet left incomple
4412.have as yet left incomplete. The Duke's death hastened the work which the influence o
4413.was received into the Church within the same year, and my readers will not probably
4414.ch within the same year, and my readers will not probably be greatly astonished to h
4415.ng given opportunity me of carrying out one of Leven's dearost wishes, I resolved,
4416.olved, to "dedicate a portion of my own wealth to the erection of a church. I chose a
4417.d my whom the faith. suiiicient for the life. -cated to St. Alexis, and designed by
4418. the gift of And I think, if there be a desire in both our hearts, it is BO to train h
4419.t's ideal of I number among the unhappy life. " the Christian family." THE END. THE
4420.among the unhappy life. " the Christian family." THE END. THE VISION OP OLD ANDREW THE
4421.ny beggar that strayed to his door, and many a one had gone away blessing him for hi
4422.ar that strayed to his door, and many a one had gone away blessing him for his char
4423.he tops of which the taper spire of its good old the law forces men to dole out, bri
4424.ich the taper spire of its good old the law forces men to dole out, brings with it
4425. its children there below. The size and beauty of this relic of times gone by, seems t
4426.ropy, or their worldly indicate that at one period a much more numerous and wealthy
4427.period a much more numerous and wealthy wisdom, the rulers of the hind had just change
4428.aused in every district those unand the same is evident from the extent of the churc
4429. now so conspicuous in the vicinity the many grass-grown mounds scattered through th
4430.e recognized as the "Union Workhouses." One of these had, a short time well known t
4431. Workhouses." One of these had, a short time well known to be composed of the debris
4432.neighcloth had furnished employment and happiness to its cottagers. borhood was full of s
4433.ports about the misery of And there was one yet remaining amongst them who could th
4434.exaggeration in these rumors; still, in truth, ing with the new-made cloth, spread fo
4435.ere was much to startle a tottering old man in the prospect whiteness, to bleach in
4436.e before him; and the addition, in this particular case, of a strict shock of the loom and
4437.llect those days and heavily on the old man's mind. Andrew was a Catholic; and, sce
4438.those days and heavily on the old man's mind. Andrew was a Catholic; and, scenes; fo
4439.neration, he as far as conviction and a love for his religion went, he was a had bee
4440.as far as conviction and a love for his religion went, he was a had been the blithest. B
4441.he blithest. But he had seen the looms, one by one, sincere one. We cannot say that
4442.hest. But he had seen the looms, one by one, sincere one. We cannot say that, in hi
4443.had seen the looms, one by one, sincere one. We cannot say that, in his earlier yea
4444., he had grow idle; und his companions, one by one, go forth to seek shown himself
4445.d grow idle; und his companions, one by one, go forth to seek shown himself a very
4446.orth to seek shown himself a very pious one. The gaiety of youth, and his their for
4447., and his their fortunes elsewhere; or, one by one, carried up the hill to own vill
4448.is their fortunes elsewhere; or, one by one, carried up the hill to own village acc
4449. trees, and now he was the sole tion of mind, and into many negligences which now he
4450. he was the sole tion of mind, and into many negligences which now he reBut he had a
4451.rd or a libertine. There were, however, many things that he looked back to sge aye,
4452.on the summer evenings; but back to his mind in a new light, and told him of the nec
4453.ind in a new light, and told him of the necessity then, sometimes, the tear would steal d
4454. cheeks whilst of preparing for another change, and of doing it by making he was speak
4455.ist at the Holy Mass, And the villagers one and all knew old Andrew, and they conso
4456. heaven, to conduct old men such as him good old times would come back again, but si
4457. and he fnlt that if once he entered in truth now the only one of the craft, where er
4458.f once he entered in truth now the only one of the craft, where erst all had been i
4459.joyously. it grew upon him each day the necessity of taking the fatal in one of the Midla
4460.ay the necessity of taking the fatal in one of the Midland , unassuming little vill
4461.ngland, seldom visited by travelers, as being out of the line of the greater thorough
4462.o feature of interest beyond the simple beauty of its fields and orchards. At present
4463.d not been sufficiently schooled in the science <>f the cross to Ivar up against it lik
4464.ay from worth preserving. all that mude life At length his empty cupboard and empty
4465.utely starve, or go into the workhouse. One hope alone remained; yet it was scarcel
4466. to the house of his old pastor. He had good reason to go, for he had had no breakfa
4467.finished their dinner, hoping that some chance might furnish him with n meal. But he h
4468.neath the lime trees, he paused to take one last and lingering look around. The sun
4469.t, no; he would not spoil their sports; time and care would soon enough do that: so
4470.d from stone to stone, and pursued each other round the trees, and dodged about the i
4471.-palisaded monuments; and he thought of many hours which he had spent like them, and
4472. from his eye, he tottered onwards. The good priests's house was reached. His first
4473.e grave. He was standing at the foot of one which had long been undisturbed, and ov
4474. bed far softer than he had pressed for many a year. It seemed far more inviting to
4475.atience, sitting by a nice fire, with a good quartern loaf and a lump of cheese besi
4476.artern loaf and a lump of cheese beside one, but it's not so easj to practise it, w
4477.here's no hope of ! "What could the old man's situation as deeply as himself could
4478.dant upon very precarious means: he had many to weep for as destitute as Andrew; and
4479.fficient for the entire support of only one. What, then, could he do ? Why, only gi
4480.uld he do ? Why, only give the poor old man such consolation as lay in his power. H
4481.ded something about the consolations of religion, and the blessings of poverty, and the
4482.iation of the past, and directed by the love of Him, who "suffered for us, leaving u
4483.for us, leaving us an example." The old man could not gainsay anything of this; sti
4484. pauper's grave, presented thempauper's death -bed, and selves to him, without the mo
4485.selves to him, without the most distant chance of escaping them, the desolation that c
4486.l very well to preach about patience to other people. O, Father Peter, I dara say you
4487.at you say and I dare say it's all very good and true but, change your snug little p
4488.re say it's all very good and true but, change your snug little parlour for my cottage
4489.ther, and you've well made up for it by many a good meal to poor old Andrew. May God
4490.nd you've well made up for it by many a good meal to poor old Andrew. May God bless-
4491.any a good meal to poor old Andrew. May God bless-- you for it, and keep you from s
4492.ames of my old cronies, who lie here at peace. Ah you were happy to be taken off befo
4493.more comfortable and happier place than one of the coarse beds in the big house ove
4494.il it burst open, nnd disclosed a human form, endeavoring, as it were with difficult
4495.come up and speak to them at your Is it will ?" "Why one no! not always, at least,"
4496.peak to them at your Is it will ?" "Why one no! not always, at least," replied the
4497. no! not always, at least," replied the other. in "But the year a little liberty is p
4498.ed the other. in "But the year a little liberty is permitted us to stretch night you kn
4499.gure before The him was that of a young man, somewhat the corner of that big fellow
4500.ses turned round in their coffins? Poor man, he was terrified to think they must ha
4501.but have at length returned to my first one, though it does so grievously incommode
4502.ewel and a long jaunty feather stuck on one side of it. There he stood surveying hi
4503.ew, by degrees, had been recovering his courage, and the lively voice of his extraordin
4504.y be the bed I should choose to lie in. One 'ud think there were many resting-place
4505.ose to lie in. One 'ud think there were many resting-places here bettor worth having
4506.he said, when he had completed his this one night in the year, we don't feel much o
4507. straightened But as if doubtful on the matter, he proceeded to insert, elegant on thi
4508.he proceeded to insert, elegant on this one night ? There's no one here, is there,
4509. elegant on this one night ? There's no one here, is there, to see first one, and t
4510.e's no one here, is there, to see first one, and then the other, between two grave-
4511.s there, to see first one, and then the other, between two grave-stones that and admi
4512.t some were very near neighbors to each other, and essayed to imtheir symmetry, much
4513.you I was in hopes that you prove would change places with me, and, of course, I shoul
4514.n impression on my re-appearance in the world. "I faith, and you would make an impres
4515.wn into the But that ain't it," he each other, as if the concentrated violence of a t
4516.is extraor- pursued, taking a malicious pleasure in pressing a topic which, " You have g
4517.ce tried to calm it. he clearly saw the other wished to avoid. "Don't be afraid, Andr
4518., Andrew," he said, "I'm very harmless; other reason for wishing to be so spruce. You
4519.ybody but myself else, perhaps, I might other company to-cight, very different from o
4520.elp it," he went on. " "To tell you the truth, Andrew," he went on, "I laid my True,
4521. quite suited my own inclina- meet some other company. The church-yard is full of the
4522.ncy to already. Every grave has by this time sent forth its inmate, breathe a little
4523.at perhaps you wouldn't be unwilling to change places with to some of them before rene
4524.w wilder and madder, tfll In outdo each other in their freaks and gambols, A 'ulrew t
4525.ishes in that respect were undergoing a change, but he said nothing about it at presen
4526.too, counselled a different mode of his courage, he resumed his tactics. So roofs of th
4527.he could not help remarking in them the same expression of eager anxiety which had s
4528.ome object. He too looked up ; ar.d the cause of their ap- opportunity of asking a fe
4529. back from his his hand towards the old man. touch, but after repeated assurance th
4530. the sky above was In an instant what a change came over the scene. Although murky bla
4531.r and more melancholy as he watched the progress of the glowing index over the fiery dia
4532.. did so, stating the wishes of the old man, aa he understood them, to exchange pla
4533.nderstood them, to exchange places with one or other of them, it he could suit hims
4534.od them, to exchange places with one or other of them, it he could suit himself. He w
4535.lf. He was immediately overwhelmed with One would have him to go here, to see what
4536. what a lovely offers. He had seemed so time-eaten, was restored in all its sharpnes
4537., was restored in all its sharpness and beauty ; the sculptured monsters in the string
4538.y hideous, in fact, almost endowed with life; the niches were filled with saintly st
4539.intly bishops, and priests, and the old man could scarcely riors, and queens and vi
4540., were engaged in the wildest tumult of pleasure. The churchyard seemed instill its defi
4541.politerichly embroidered coat, have the honor of offering him ness, requesting that h
4542.or he well recollected the tomb. In had many a time followed parties of sight-seers
4543.ell recollected the tomb. In had many a time followed parties of sight-seers into th
4544.ical tomb, which covered the remains of one of the possessors of the manor house, w
4545.s. Nine-pins, and bowls, and a thousand other games that he had skittles, and hockey,
4546.d the old gentleman, as the original of one of the portraits, though, more stiff if
4547.y, he must have been much and formal in life than now. But Andrew recollected, also,
4548.marble, the flesh and blood in her real constitution, that almost before of the tomb was dry
4549. dry, aye, in less than six months from death of her first, she hnd cast herself into
4550. of all their property. the ruin of the family. For law and extravagance soon pulled t
4551.r property. the ruin of the family. For law and extravagance soon pulled the estate
4552.use. merely signified to the polite old man, that he well knew the tomb, but expres
4553.rtable a resting place, in exchange for one of But all this Andrew kept to himself.
4554.n," reply. speak, since you have asked. life, "Again, All these bodies that yon see,
4555.in the village below. " Why, as for the matter of that," he replied, were, endowed wit
4556.?" exclaimed Andrew, gasping for in the particular reason to be dissatisfied with my posit
4557.sfied with my position south aisle. The family pew is by the side of it, and the fire-
4558., then, " kind to her spouse before his death, as she was faithful after. so joyous a
4559.d full of mirth," replied the miserable form before him, "whilst we were in this lif
4560.orm before him, "whilst we were in this life ? And yet, did we not know even then, w
4561. having heard his grandfather say, that one of the very disinterested lords of the
4562.ns of friendship, to gain possession of many of their broad fields, and, among other
4563. is upon us. But those who are still in life, are they not truly insane, as once wer
4564.there not thousands now, (Andrew's) own family. And he had a shrewd suspicion, too, th
4565. obsequious bow, and disappeared behind one of the buttresses of the church. And no
4566.r more loud and boisterous. But, at the same time, it seemed to Andrew's ears to sou
4567.e loud and boisterous. But, at the same time, it seemed to Andrew's ears to sound ho
4568.enced before, came creep- You have they will, but they will not, and yet seem joyous
4569.ame creep- You have they will, but they will not, and yet seem joyous. wondered, too
4570.h Andrew Andrew ! if we could have only one of those days only one of those hours,
4571. could have only one of those days only one of those hours, that you are so anxious
4572.fear for himself, Andrew stood for some time rivetted to the spot ; and a confusion
4573. By degrees, however, his senses seemed one by one to awaken, and when at length hi
4574.rees, however, his senses seemed one by one to awaken, and when at length his eye-s
4575.avel pathway before the door, that some one was standing just within the threshold,
4576.r. It was an old and apparently wayworn man, who was thus acting the part of verger
4577. himself. ing over the limbs of the old man, and seemed to be curdling his blood. H
4578.that told of intense and long-continued pain. His His ruffles and frills, and his lo
4579.rooped mourn- to his measure; for while one article of dress hung loose and ! how c
4580.n his back ; now you have made up your 'mind, Andrew," he said, despondingly. "I bod
4581. he said, despondingly. "I boded little good from introducing you to see, "I ghastly
4582. the first part of the night. MI it was one of that wretched crew he bed, to await
4583.or three years ago, a totterYou ing old man coming to your door to beg a bit of bre
4584. Catholic, nor did I know that you were one of my faith; but you gave me charity fo
4585. faith; but you gave me charity for the love of God, and 1 blessed you in my heart;
4586.but you gave me charity for the love of God, and 1 blessed you in my heart; and He,
4587.ssed you in my heart; and He, for whose love you shared That was the last your meal
4588.was discovered by some countrymen, only time enough to be carried to some cottage ne
4589.ear, and to hare the assistance of your good Father Peter before I died. Now I can g
4590. rule the verger. charity. Come in, you will see what will do you good." Andrew foll
4591.er. charity. Come in, you will see what will do you good." Andrew followed him, and
4592. Come in, you will see what will do you good." Andrew followed him, and he closed th
4593.oming his ! of real flesh fastly and in love that the was heaving in agony, the limb
4594.hem. Banged along the screen were seven other figures. At hrst Andrew took them for g
4595.ed to be a dilapidated bier standing in one corner, and a gaily painted fire-engine
4596.ebs, which seemed not to have been dis- other, with its turned to look around the chu
4597.splendent wounds. Here, too, he the old man row on the wall above turbed for centur
4598.to carry the tall tower and but, at the same time elegant, from the wellepire above
4599.rry the tall tower and but, at the same time elegant, from the wellepire above marke
4600.he bare wood was visible, for it seemed one blaze of burnished gold, relieved, and
4601.ainted. But these emblems of a national religion had given place to the more universal o
4602.al religion had given place to the more universal one of Christianity. Xhe screen was [no
4603.n had given place to the more universal one of Christianity. Xhe screen was [now su
4604.ecious stones. He had never before seen one so large, except in pictures, and it at
4605.ntion. Yet not the cross for there hung One upon it with his arms outstretched, dis
4606.d his eyes to the spot. It was not like one of those brass or ivory representations
4607. Jesus, which he had often seen, and by many of which he had been greatly affected.
4608.e impression which they conveyed to the mind was feeble, as compared witl> what he f
4609.redemption. Numerous coronas of antique form were suspended from the roof they, too,
4610.nog cam of mercy and of and purity, the love, the name of Jesus, and that of hope na
4611.y concealed by the boarded floor of the family pew adjoining, were two full length ; ;
4612.rass, beneath elaborate canopies of the same metal, the interstices and lines On the
4613. lines On the tinted in various colors. being all filled up with wax, beneath the for
4614.n altar the fire-place mentioned before being transformed ; purtenances which was stu
4615. M THE VISION OF OLD ANDRUW THE WEAVER. change had taken place. There had formerly bor
4616. to cut off a portion of the aisle, and form the vestry by the side of the chancel.
4617.e and fairy-like tracery than the great one beneath the rood and now this desolate
4618.wed with a more lavish hand than in any other part Nor was it diffiof the church whic
4619.the mystic ark, the star, the lily, and many other emblems of her whom all generatio
4620.ystic ark, the star, the lily, and many other emblems of her whom all generations wer
4621.he centre of the aisle, was a figure of one who seemed to have chosen this spot for
4622.evoseemed to become contagious, for the desire to join in it came strongly upon him, a
4623.ndrew," his companion replied, "to know many things that go on in the world we have
4624. "to know many things that go on in the world we have left, especially if they concer
4625.; and this is permitted to us both as a punishment and a consolation. You have wished to d
4626.ave been condemned, but cannot find any one among them with whom you would change p
4627. any one among them with whom you would change places. Another trial is now permitted
4628.ther trial is now permitted to you. any one here with whom you would make an exchan
4629.pe to give up his charge so soon. Well, God's will be done." And h cast a look of u
4630.give up his charge so soon. Well, God's will be done." And h cast a look of unbounde
4631.Andrew, "you don't mean to say that any one here, aye, even yourself, would be will
4632.aye, even yourself, would be willing to change places with me. Would you leave this gl
4633. glorious church to return to the rough world to live in such a cottage as mine is ?
4634.et," his guide proceeded, "there is not one here who would not joyfully change plac
4635. is not one here who would not joyfully change places with you. Aye, if your cottage a
4636. can I have "who ; done to deserve your love ?" The round when, for the first time,
4637.r love ?" The round when, for the first time, he perceived that the bewilderment cau
4638.ed, with the exception of a narrow ple. space down the middle of the nave, which serv
4639.ed on the epistle side, the women, with one exception, that of the mailclad knight,
4640.on, that of the mailclad knight, on the other. Like him all were on their knees like
4641.ey, prayed, May the souls of the on the mind of Andrew. beheld kneeling before the i
4642.en the period faithful departed rest in peace? In an instant the truth flashed ' 1: T
4643.parted rest in peace? In an instant the truth flashed ' 1: These whom he : ; of impri
4644.They were of all ages and conditions in life, and dressed after a strange variety of
4645.miliar to him, yet he could not cull to mind who had been the wearers of tham. and t
4646.earers of tham. and that, at the day of judgment, every one of these bodies, even that o
4647.and that, at the day of judgment, every one of these bodies, even that of the ragge
4648.he congregation. For he himself had fol many to their last home, under the north wal
4649.s had been buried but. :IK yj\rd, where Many a drees of very rh before, kis curiosit
4650.ld not recognize the lineaments of even one. But as he looked his countenance gradu
4651.hought -was taking possession of his ml mind. dered yard, that, like the churchthe c
4652.rved that those who wore a more ancient form of dress were nearest to the chancel ;
4653. could hold it, had it not 'seemed to a time some of them must have been here, for h
4654.have been here, for he was close beside one who must have lived when noble knights
4655.. Do people then remain in purgatory so many hun- thing of what he did to they help
4656.bts which he dreds of years ? " owed to God. " He made But as he looked lower down
4657.er up a mass every very day for his own soul and all who wore anything approaching t
4658.t and so He could no longer repress his desire to know the meaning you may guess that
4659. For Of this, so at length referred the matter to his guide for ex- his sudden convers
4660.ad, the more so as before planation. so many had suffered from his " In the main cru
4661.perhaps we of most to long pray for his soul for they knew that he would 'hava moder
4662. back part at least of what he had that God's mercies are above all His works; is H
4663.se they " No, not so," rejoined the old man, " God is truly merciful, had been taug
4664. " No, not so," rejoined the old man, " God is truly merciful, had been taught that
4665.y merciful, had been taught that it was good to pray for the dead. and His mercy doe
4666.ay for the dead. and His mercy does not change with times and " Seldom even in those d
4667.ng heard about the prison from which ao one u let yonder, where stood his There was
4668. were the bareheaded monks of more than one monastery of those. farthing "Yes, I se
4669.s, and mourners tlwt followed, were too many to ple have been pretty much the same f
4670.o many to ple have been pretty much the same for wickedness in every be reckoned. An
4671. line, seemed to float up to the clouds one of the ancient times, and his sins were
4672. for him and some relief and if all his time, and made what amends he could for his
4673.and designs had been carried out in the same spirit, and with the his burnings, and
4674.bberies, he would be this night outside same fidelity, he would long since have pass
4675. have drew was too much absorbed in the history of the black knight made him a heavy de
4676.poor like you and me." " He left in his will," the old man went on, " directions for
4677.nd me." " He left in his will," the old man went on, " directions for "Listen," con
4678.support could to repair his faults when God gave him grace to repent. of twelve poo
4679.ur of the twelve poor fishermen But his time, you see, was short. He couldn't find o
4680.y the houses himself before he died, if time had been allowed and frauds upon his ne
4681.was no oppressions easy him. He ordered one of his memoirs to be given to a commatt
4682. split it up again, and to give to each one his own; munity of Cistercian monks, an
4683.ery to be built You not to mention that many had gone away never to return, and know
4684.in those punctually days th poor and to God's Church? I have always learned that we
4685.ot especially if they gave any thing to God's poor or His Church. b found." And man
4686.God's poor or His Church. b found." And many a fervent prayer went up to heaven from
4687. he had much to pay. For he had wronged God as well aa man. He had robbed Him of hi
4688. pay. For he had wronged God as well aa man. He had robbed Him of his honor himself
4689.s well aa man. He had robbed Him of his honor himself, he had given scandal to others
4690. a guide to goodness; so when the short time allowed to him was over, and after to h
4691.remained much for him to " pay, both to God and man. "Yes, yes," cried Andrew, more
4692. much for him to " pay, both to God and man. "Yes, yes," cried Andrew, more sorrowf
4693.ed Andrew, more sorrowfully than ever, "God is truly merciful and It was merciful i
4694.o just. accept the repentance of such a man at all; but then He has been just too,
4695. He has required three hundred years of punishment." " his "After all," resumed the old ve
4696.drew; "who is to blame then? surely not God, for you told me how just He is." "Wait
4697."U THE VISION OF OLD ANDREW THE WEAVER. good of bis poor soul. And if they had conti
4698.OLD ANDREW THE WEAVER. good of bis poor soul. And if they had continued till now, su
4699.hter, and even riot and debauchery. the many footsteps of a procession of old, slowl
4700.them that written, preach the gospel of peace, of them that bring glad tidings of goo
4701.ace, of them that bring glad tidings of good things ;" (Rom. x. 15.) Their sound was
4702.and was, as are it In the days of were, one great rosary but would have which they
4703.; its villages and hamlets were like so many little beads, its cities with their cat
4704.poor knight was dead that it began. was one of the first to be seized on by king as
4705.ce to pray for himself, as you see him, one night in the year and to suffer every o
4706.e night in the year and to suffer every other day and night, till he had paid the lon
4707. his a solitary case there is more than one here, and many elsewhere, who would lon
4708.y case there is more than one here, and many elsewhere, who would long since have go
4709.the reply, "that we are allowed to know many things whilst we are here, whether they
4710.t ; Pater Noster for the welfare of his soul ?" " I understand it " This is now," sa
4711.ld and why so few why, I do believe not one of ment consists in having these motive
4712.atory is cold, and so they do little in life to escape it themthe trouble and vexati
4713.till I am not really vexed at them, you will understand I ing there. How often do yo
4714.in times gone by, that " How ?" the old man somewhat " sharply asked; by the Masses
4715. through poor, for them to pray for the same pic-us end. Formerly no which th proces
4716.passed. The prayers that were said, the one ever thought of passing through a churc
4717.s to say a prayer for those who who was being carried to the tomb, but for all who re
4718.but for all who rested lay around it no one ever entered a church and went out unbe
4719.? mindful of the dead but now, though a man's own father, or or what good is a mode
4720., though a man's own father, or or what good is a modern funeral to any one but the
4721.or what good is a modern funeral to any one but the under- mother, or brother, or s
4722.ild, lie beneath the inquired. I was in life I was rather given to grumbling, a faul
4723.er given to grumbling, a fault which in truth is too common with us poor Most of the
4724.al ground, or because in the Protestant one there is some other mouldering carcass
4725.use in the Protestant one there is some other mouldering carcass to which we were onc
4726.y signifying a wish that we may rest in peace. stop, and we may rest in peace for the
4727.rest in peace. stop, and we may rest in peace for them, for they will trouble themsel
4728.we may rest in peace for them, for they will trouble themselves no farther about us.
4729.rhymes that have taken the place of.the good old charitable inscriptions and if they
4730.old charitable inscriptions and if they chance to light upon one where they see a cros
4731.ptions and if they chance to light upon one where they see a cross, they say 'O, he
4732.y see the words at the foot begging for peace for the weary soul, but even in repeati
4733.he foot begging for peace for the weary soul, but even in repeating them they mean n
4734.out to them by the only emblem which at one time a persecuting age permitted to the
4735.to them by the only emblem which at one time a persecuting age permitted to them, 'h
4736.sed to the bo n fuse for the lawbut the will course, was disappointed ; father, and
4737.urged me to accept the offer. seem much chance of making my fortm English law, and so,
4738. much chance of making my fortm English law, and so, to make a long story short, be
4739. male " hi-ir ! I Mr. Edwards. I" ; "It will .,.,,,, "1l MI think," said Sir John qu
4740.ader, of troubling yon with my personal history during that eventful period. It was a b
4741.oof that Mr. Grant, at millions. If any one will bear in mind the 'fact (which of G
4742.that Mr. Grant, at millions. If any one will bear in mind the 'fact (which of Glonle
4743.t, at millions. If any one will bear in mind the 'fact (which of Glonleven, WHS real
4744.act (which of Glonleven, WHS really the man; indeed it was well known in is a fact)
4745.e ten years the produce of gold in this one the colony, when I was governor. Carsta
4746. year colony exceeded 104,000,000, they will easily understand what ud his son, this
4747. the whole estate had his real name and history." "Then Mary was right," I muttered to
4748.urn to England a John continued wealthy man. One commission, entrusted to me by the
4749.o England a John continued wealthy man. One commission, entrusted to me by the duke
4750.n. His father never took the part of my life, and the duke was right in saying that
4751.d in a fortnight," said my father. " He will do no such "It will be a which gave me
4752.aid my father. " He will do no such "It will be a which gave me a secret anxiety. Mu
4753.id Sir John. case for the lords, and he will, no doubt, have a subpoena to the new d
4754.there had never been any concealment of being eccentric. I was sorry for this, though
4755. though not much surthe fact, and every one in Queensland knew well enough who pris
4756.iginality looked in that direction. the family name and ducal title. Then as to the he
4757.wliich Grant was now the sole surviving good deal. He took his millions from Austral
4758.en all this had been sifted and proved, good grace, and made no objection to the pro
4759.posals I submitutative. and (very legal form gone through which could be demanded te
4760.th which I closed I had my share of the law my meditations showed me that my imagin
4761.he law my meditations showed me that my imagination had painted to give him a worthy recept
4762. school children, and the Exborough but many thought much of these subjects in early
4763. and the impresI remembered how at that same station he had stood alone a sions firs
4764.ralia. .ofore, looking in vaiu for some one to carry his bag to There, for the firs
4765.o carry his bag to There, for the first time, I saw the Catholic religion at full wo
4766. for the first time, I saw the Catholic religion at full work; the \Vhite Lion I remembe
4767.c What a bright gala day it was The old family and Protestant, sent out to me pretty r
4768.rry keeps on pressing for some ouo nest man with a ' i, tind I'll :1 1 e liis fortu
4769.1 e liis fortune." I tlr hesit;' " \V a will not regret it." at last. "Mind, I on ac
4770.' " \V a will not regret it." at last. "Mind, I on accepting the post, J took in par
4771.rew used to regard the whole subject as one in i ; I THE which the fancy of youth h
4772.You know improvement of the mines is is one nnil who is there wlm to look buck at o
4773. there wlm to look buck at oue thing or other as having been the slave of ' duke's ho
4774.n, it?" said the secretary; "I've / his imagination ? I returned, then, to England, spendin
4775.the neighbourhood, and was able to be a good deal of comfort to her father and mothe
4776. yes, you would have known him, Curious history his has ; of course, bfforo I going to
4777.ton, "but profession, not long for this world, I fear I never saw a man so alt " Well
4778.ng for this world, I fear I never saw a man so alt " Well, he is a very good fellow
4779.r saw a man so alt " Well, he is a very good fellow, of course," said the county mem
4780. " but he carries things too far, to my mind." " How so?" I ventured to ask. " Oh, I
4781.sk. " Oh, I dont know exactly lives the life of a hermit, which, ; ; fought their wa
4782.nd a certain share of reputation. now " world of politics and of letters. Yes," obser
4783.d of letters. Yes," observed the second man of science, who till now had The " it's
4784.tters. Yes," observed the second man of science, who till now had The " it's a world ha
4785. science, who till now had The " it's a world has many phases, some Cuts a man of his
4786.who till now had The " it's a world has many phases, some Cuts a man of his great pi
4787.'s a world has many phases, some Cuts a man of his great pity that. more, and some
4788.clare polite society but mark well this truth, dear reader, it is still can be guilty
4789. I should say that was the primest. the world, and anything higher and better than wh
4790.ld justify a commission of lunacy." the world, you must not look to extract from its
4791.y, so on the present occasion I had the good fortune to meet a forehead "there certa
4792. of a popular philosophic review (whose theology, by the way, was not ders at Bradford.
4793.th predominantly Christian), two men of science, and a county member. Including our hos
4794. since he's had the any person who, for one half hour, can stimulate a new curiosi-
4795.r. " ty, may calculate for exactly that space of time on "And if I am rightly informe
4796.may calculate for exactly that space of time on "And if I am rightly informed (you'l
4797.and varied as the forms in a on the the state of "Ah, yes," said Sir Clinton, "that's
4798.e's always sporting some social view or other; setting h a little against the current
4799.setting h a little against the current. One thing, you know, he's a ; Catholic. " ;
4800.which Then the conversation, by an easy change, flowed into foraimed, I will not say a
4801.an easy change, flowed into foraimed, I will not say at proving num. to be well-deve
4802.was left to digest all I had heard, and form found that writers of this particular c
4803.rd, and form found that writers of this particular class ever aim at own conclusions. Was
4804.rs of the possible probability of their being nothing better. The boundless means pro
4805.Glenleven, moors, you know." Well, it's one of his crochets, and, perhaps, not the
4806.said, "and the sooner the better, in my opinion." my relief. you what, Ford," he said,
4807.I. nor for savages either, nor for that matter for heathens you'll find the whole stoc
4808.tock-in-trade ready for inspection in a good many of our manufacturing towns, only n
4809.in-trade ready for inspection in a good many of our manufacturing towns, only nobody
4810.ging all members of Parliament to spend one calendar month in a colliery district e
4811.My first week at Oakham was given to my family. I had be introduced to my new brother-
4812. had be introduced to my new brother-in-law, Oswald, wh brought Mary over from Exda
4813.he duke had been land, and, to tell the truth, I opportunity for rectifying called aw
4814.things before meeting him. " All," said one of the men of science. " I'vn heon do,
4815.ing him. " All," said one of the men of science. " I'vn heon do, ,. was he not a Leven
4816.12 THE VISION OF OLD ANDREW THE WEAVER. same time they pointed towards the high alta
4817.E VISION OF OLD ANDREW THE WEAVER. same time they pointed towards the high altar. He
4818.ld, and richly brocaded curtains of the same Behind it, covering the reredos terial
4819.out it, font with tenfold vividness and beauty. Life Even the material oruaI'.'rn l>mi
4820.font with tenfold vividness and beauty. Life Even the material oruaI'.'rn l>mituod i
4821.el roof, showed like eyes of cebore the form of the " De froit inscribed in golden l
4822.ith verses from the looked fundia," and other prayers for the dead. But if Andrew les
4823.mbre ornaments was more intently on any one of them, it was still a star. So the gl
4824.o be transparent, fixed his eyes on any one amongst them, it them the sculptured an
4825.the radiance of the golden ill, all was life. But Andrew had not the time, even had
4826.l, all was life. But Andrew had not the time, even had he been able, to unthither in
4827.mystery ; for a door, now for the first time observed in the dark of a quiet evening
4828. contaminations, ? put on such majestic beauty They then sub-deacon and deacon, and on
4829.ty They then sub-deacon and deacon, and one the ground, each in his appointed place
4830.is earth, such, wearing and his worn in life, yet stately old man, with looks of unc
4831.g and his worn in life, yet stately old man, with looks of unconquered meekness, in
4832.about to commence, and to assign in his mind to some superto look upon, unless prese
4833. He looked on ( rank. around their each one of the ministers his proper natural pow
4834.ight heads. Their bodies seemed to have idea of being allowed to assist at this most
4835.ds. Their bodies seemed to have idea of being allowed to assist at this most august a
4836.ssist at this most august attributes of matter, for though delight at the stance, and
4837. the beauties folded round the wearer's form were perfectly visible. Yet ger and mor
4838.fully than the stiffened chasubles each other, was there no confusion, no mingling of
4839.e the representation of Jesus crucified one his place and attribute. Above them, po
4840.d majestically over their heads what at one moment appeared amid a fragrant cloud o
4841.sight the nave and its congregation. no one of his voice, when a flood of harmony,
4842. be called by he now also for the first time perceived two angelic figures, that had
4843.c figures, that had hitherto reigned of other name, broke the deep silence with sword
4844.their hands, as if to guard as if every one of the cherub faces that he had that wi
4845.at onoe upheld and and at the and every one of those angel forms there upon the thr
4846.d and and at the and every one of those angel forms there upon the threshold, further
4847.roof, the stalls and canopios, aye, and one of those beaming stars above, BI.-UL fo
4848.sk," the voice resumed, "ortho ceremony will proceed." " " I had a but I think it is
4849., and at a motion pf the Seraph's hand, one of the occupants of the stalls gently g
4850.is night been permitted to behold ; the one suffering, assembled there behind him i
4851.mbled there behind him in the nave, the other triumphing, yet full of sympathy for th
4852.de for them. Now it was as the Toice of one pleading his cause with tears, and bowi
4853.it was as the Toice of one pleading his cause with tears, and bowing bown to the very
4854.rest and clamorous before the throne of God, be given to the souls in prison, and p
4855.d anon the full chorus would classes of God's saints, ; burst forth joyously, s if
4856.ted their petition.! Andrew listened as one in a trance. to Every faculty seemed be
4857.Every faculty seemed be absorbed in the sense of hearing and when at length the harmo
4858.e absorbed in that wondrous hymn, aland love, ternately terrified, and consoled, and
4859. stirring words were infused into his ; man somewhat past the prime of and might ha
4860.k upon. He wa dressed in a coarse brown habit reaching to his feet, with a hood of th
4861.eaching to his feet, with a hood of the same material thrown back behind. A rough co
4862.His neck and feet were bare, the latter being protected only by leather sandals. His
4863.rely shaven round the crown. his coarse habit and girdle, and rough. formed sandals,
4864.dle, and rough. formed sandals, everyan idea of the thing in fact that he wore, thou
4865.is pure benevolence that old throat for love of him as he gazed upon him. " What wou
4866.d winning Toice quite reassured the old man, and he venture*} to mention " that he
4867.f which he had already repented, adding life, bling weaver. He had the appearance of
4868. of it here, only for the of course, no one would be willing to exchange For, angel
4869.o one would be willing to exchange For, angel. " " Not so heaven for earth, when once
4870.ed, much a would not have thought thing soul can be saved thereby." was the Gospel o
4871.ldering in the grave and to look at the same time at the shining bodies of so many w
4872.ng in the grave and to look at the same time at the shining bodies of so many who ha
4873.e same time at the shining bodies of so many who had believed in Jesus just risen ;
4874.ew, "that as yours to come again to any one would give up such bliss of a earth, ev
4875. "It has been done," was the reply, "by one whose bliss which the highest of the sa
4876.hich He set us the example, be the only one left unpractised?" really in earnest. f
4877.eed give a force to the narative of the mind Evangelist, that might well strike a fa
4878. had been told that this was the proper time for the sermon, but he could not imagin
4879.his thoughts: "Yes, willingly; if Jesus will want so he stood wondering what new sce
4880. But is it possible 1" faltered the old man " would you no I cannot believe it I da
4881.." "Would I, you mean to say," the holy man proceeded, " consent to exchange my lot
4882.eges of his glorithe angels at his fied state for the sake of charity, and it seemed
4883.a ft voice, that came, he fancied, from one of nor did it enter through his own if
4884.as still incredulous. Now is the proper time for it. " to make ? "if I make bold to
4885."if I make bold to say, that either the world's mightily quest He was bewildered by t
4886.or else you don't know what poverty his memory to find out what he stood most in need
4887.nor how poor and miserable I am." " The world is and always has been much the same,"
4888.e world is and always has been much the same," was gradually the wish that he had ut
4889.anging places And as for poverwith some one in the church-yard, came back to his mi
4890.ne in the church-yard, came back to his mind. the reply, " as far as trials and cros
4891.dress. Suppose it to be divested of the beauty itated whether to dare even to whisper
4892.It was my dress on " that was about mo, good sample of everything it too coarse eart
4893. talking to himself than to the sainted man before him, "this beats all I have ever
4894.I can't understand it. It may be that a man who has been poor once, and has got ric
4895.nt I have always born laid what a happy life, after all, is the monk's. And so I thi
4896.t from the cares and temptations of the world to have nothing to do all day long, but
4897.othing to do all day long, but to serve God and say one's prayers for any one who h
4898. all day long, but to serve God and say one's prayers for any one who has a lilting
4899.serve God and say one's prayers for any one who has a lilting that way, I am sure t
4900. ! I mistake, greatly brother," did the good monk reply, you fancy that the walls of
4901. most serious sacrifice, to give up his liberty for the confinement and strict obedienc
4902.e the sacrifice cost much. Besides, the world often broke still with some embarrass"
4903.tone, he answered, but for your sake, I will confess, that I was pedient, not always
4904.y. softly much gold and wide lands, and many men to wait upon me. But I heard the wo
4905.aces, I tried to do the like found more happiness in poverty and humiliation, than I had
4906., than I had ever done in riches and in honor. What I did then, if such be : ; thee s
4907.le and wretched as they were. in on the other hand, had often to mingle with the worl
4908.ther hand, had often to mingle with the world, and strive against its wickedness. " "
4909. ?" said you were " that would make the matter still Andrew, interrupting him, For pri
4910.For priests are always honored and have many a easier. consolation in their ministry
4911.their ministry. How do not their people love and reverence them How grateful to them
4912. whom they have converted. I know how I love Father Peter, and he to preach against
4913.to follow Jesus, and so, at some future time when He should appoint, to possess real
4914.when He should appoint, to possess real happiness. And now, if i were permitted to return
4915.or than I am at present ; but it is the love of Him whom now I know even as I am kno
4916.g again to take upon myself that humble state which He so loved, that I may bo thus m
4917.im in His abjection. For now I know the experience of centuries has taught it to me that t
4918.; and every privation we endure for the love of His will, I am has often said to me
4919.privation we endure for the love of His will, I am has often said to me that my grat
4920.e so loved. All believe me, Sir, such a life as this is very different from that of
4921.s is very different from that of a poor man like me ; again I say, it's very differ
4922. There were no Union Workhouses in your time, so you are if you did if you had tried
4923. so you are if you did if you had tried one, you would'nt be so ready to give up yo
4924.ne caatle, much less heaven, to go into one. No, no, you little know what a Union h
4925. it may," answered the saint, " for the love of " Jesus, and of the souls He died to
4926.e locked up, and not allowed to see any one of your friends, but once a week ?" " Y
4927.ross," year, or day, or hour we pass in pain or poverfor the love of Him, is requite
4928.or hour we pass in pain or poverfor the love of Him, is requited by our overwhelming
4929. ^ "But to seem to be deserted by every one," said Andrew, as ?" nity Andrew oould
4930.of these a last resourse, "aye, even by God. No friends to console or laet words, s
4931.illing to give up his argument and help one, no good priest to comfort one, no Mass
4932.o give up his argument and help one, no good priest to comfort one, no Mass, even on
4933.and help one, no good priest to comfort one, no Mass, even on no time for prayer, u
4934.est to comfort one, no Mass, even on no time for prayer, unless you would be scoffed
4935. give Sundays, having i let mo count BO many. If then He offer to me now these preci
4936.ecious years, shall I not, both for the love of wiiat He has loved, and that I may a
4937.I begin to understand something of your history now. I ft having road about great and r
4938.ry. And m your coll, I suppose you were one of thcae. I don't ; him courage to proc
4939.se you were one of thcae. I don't ; him courage to proceed. by a lot of ignorant bigots
4940.ed. by a lot of ignorant bigots, little chance of having the sacraments even at the ho
4941.ving the sacraments even at the hour of death. Ah! iu yournion,' you had Liud brother
4942.sole you how would you boax with such a change ?" for ever !, ; THE VISION OF OLD ANDR
4943.S * I would "What say yon now, brother? Will yon exchange with try to recollect," re
4944.ollect," replied the saint with more of Will yuii give me the op] I now in your powe
4945.e of adding to this luippineBS which 01 will you keep all, even His most cherished f
4946. you was hanging in the very agonies of death, that He was left to from your place of
4947. the consolations of His Father and His God." throne, and made more glorious than a
4948.is cheeks, for a moment blinded the old man, upon as such evils, are, in reality bl
4949. " If know how to profit of them, shall one day shine like diamonds your eyes were
4950.s you see the very threads of my coarse habit hereabouts as they are now, I trow ther
4951.ining now. Jesus has told you, that not one hair of your people to be found in our
4952. me when I'm in Father; much less shall one care, or one pang, or one privation, th
4953.in Father; much less shall one care, or one pang, or one privation, the workhouse,
4954.ch less shall one care, or one pang, or one privation, the workhouse, and that's li
4955.on't make me patient, I don't know what love of Jesus, fail of its reward." I The cl
4956.more to say, so his lovely monitor went will." "I'll try then to think of both," sai
4957.said Andrew. " Then you've made up your mind not to change." " Yes," replied, Andrew
4958. " Then you've made up your mind not to change." " Yes," replied, Andrew, "I think I h
4959.to pray often for me,that I may make as good a use of poverty and afflictions " The
4960.stretching forth his hands over the old man he said It was at length plain that And
4961. became more thoughtful, whilst the his love of poverty, was born in a stable and di
4962.nd make yofc "You just now spoke of the happiness of preaching to and every day more and
4963.erien- you the secrets of that heavenly wisdom, which He so often cing them again, has
4964.blessing I wish you now and lowly. thus will I pray for you every day and hour, unti
4965.w could no longer keep silence. " Small chance of trust I shall not have many prayers
4966. Small chance of trust I shall not have many prayers to offer np before the tune you
4967.ded The Mass at once They won't let any one but the church parson preach there." qu
4968.lace amid the golden stalls. " There is one mode of preaching," replied the saint,
4969.none can hinder and few resist, that of good example. For- choir of saints and angel
4970.gy, ii possible, patient resignation in pain and suffering, would make converts than
4971.sus Christ, King hearted master. And no one could hinder that. " of Glory, deliver
4972. more prayer accept them in behalf than many others, and I laughed that I did when h
4973.o told this day, and let them pass from death to life, which Thou me many a one would
4974.is day, and let them pass from death to life, which Thou me many a one would be glad
4975. pass from death to life, which Thou me many a one would be glad to change with me.
4976.rom death to life, which Thou me many a one would be glad to change with me. Little
4977.ich Thou me many a one would be glad to change with me. Little then proinisedst of old
4978. there Andrew listened overwhelmed with emotion, but ere it was are millions who would
4979.change the lost concluded, the voice of one of the angels seemed to speak ir, "Thou
4980.is ended. hi hell, that they might have time for penance; the souls in his interior.
4981.and Until thou hast passed the gates of death, thou canst not be purgatory, easier an
4982.ght." of all that they might show their love of God more, and earn Obedient to the i
4983. all that they might show their love of God more, and earn Obedient to the intimati
4984.arn Obedient to the intimation, the old man rose from his knees, more merit and a h
4985.stinct, like some beautiful and glowing man's reverie, resumed. object seen in the
4986.asure on treasure in heaven, so that by one month spent patiently in a workhouse, s
4987. would be nothing there to disturb your peace. Yea, even the loss of spiritual consol
4988.e with patience and in obedience to the will of God, will have more merit in heaven,
4989.atience and in obedience to the will of God, will have more merit in heaven, than a
4990.ce and in obedience to the will of God, will have more merit in heaven, than any mas
4991.leave the place, when the music ceased, same moment it appeared to him that a number
4992.him that a number of rough voice at the same time called out, " What do you mean per
4993.hat a number of rough voice at the same time called out, " What do you mean persons
4994.e mist, and almost as instantaneously a form up in terror. It was broad daylight, an
4995. standing with his spade and mattock on other than Lady Esther. No sooner, therefore,
4996.Andrew, you I" he exclaimed, as the old man turned and true enough, she was no long
4997.his face towards him ; " I had a better opinion of you than this, knelt, taken her plac
4998.ad just now against the grave-stone see God could mo longer refuse their prayer." t
4999.their prayer." there. Why you look daft man I Ain't you sober yet ?" But he did not
5000. did not stop to look if there were any other changes Andrew felt nettled, and was go
5001. for he felt that the admonition of the angel applied the recollection of the lessons
5002.hurch, equally with the chancel. He had mind, and he checked himself, and simply tha
5003.siness here, now that he had refused to change places for having waked him. His meekne
5004.eeping on the head for a moment to take one more look at the great crucifix grass.
5005.oft and thoughts ; but it took him some time, for his head was aching soothing radia
5006.ter his walk the preceding pression the same as that of the saintly monk, but ten-fo
5007.rew's impulse was to oast precisely the same as they had ever done ; the grave benea
5008.ded that the lesson he had learnt was a good one, come how it might, and he resolved
5009.hat the lesson he had learnt was a good one, come how it might, and he resolved mor
5010., and he resolved moregood? Try to make good use of it then." As he spoke these word
5011.ere's to the Workhouse, since it is the will of God," threshold, and he closed the d
5012. the Workhouse, since it is the will of God," threshold, and he closed the door. It
5013., had a bewildering effect upon the old man; Yet he did not forget the parting admo
5014., he had offered up to heaven more than one fervent recollection. prayer for the so
5015.nce if you wish so to stylo it, of real life. We have no incidents to narrate but su
5016. We if we expected to find in it either truth or probaAgain, when we invest half-a-cr
5017. writer displaying a much more intimate knowledge than we ourselves possess of the manner
5018.fy the cravings of their them, are in a state of the most profound ignorance? No, gna
5019.d. ' it ought to be. We do not look for truth. We do not even mean-looking house, in
5020.looking house, in a street leading from one of the great look for probability. We m
5021.-storm rolling along the Alpine elderly man of grave, yet gentle and attractive app
5022. are equally ready to be transported in imagination to the the wanderer. His dress, and the
5023.he various articles that were abodes of wealth and luxury, and to be treated to an ela
5024.circumstances may vary, we shall in due time be chapel which he served. He had grown
5025.r the deadly cramps of cholera provided one of his flock that, after the usual amou
5026.ling was to be succored or prepared for death prepared as the incidents, und dramatic
5027.d dramatic situations, the whole affair will con- Catholic priest alone knows how to
5028.lone knows how to prepare the trembling soul clude in the legitimate and recognized
5029.ognized manner. The three for its awful change: elevating their poverty as far as his
5030.ather and money, uiid is treated to the history of a certain number of mother, and brot
5031.er, and brother and sister, and all the world bi events vhich could never by any poss
5032. that, as the storm and thus, everybody being satisfied, there is an end of the howle
5033.r and anon rose from the chair where he matter, .j^J the author sets to work again at
5034.de less wonder still that the murmured "God help another work, at once as clever, a
5035.y its stains. The city was enveloped in one vast cloud of damp and mist, through wh
5036.oad on such a night. And yet there were many wanderers many who were abroad on this
5037.ight. And yet there were many wanderers many who were abroad on this bitter night be
5038.tliem, although they were surrounded by wealth and luxury on every side many who glare
5039.nded by wealth and luxury on every side many who glared with the eye of hunger and t
5040. the mud which its wheels whirled aloft many who knew not where to as the last one.
5041. many who knew not where to as the last one. And so, dear reader, if in this little
5042.ips, as he thought of the the lot of so many of his suffering and the poverty which
5043.book bad and neglect, and the victim of love be no longer the huso ingratitude of th
5044.hurrying on as fast as the viothe storm will permit him, we will take tho opportunit
5045.as the viothe storm will permit him, we will take tho opportunity of introducing our
5046. introducing our readers to some of the other personages who will figure in this stor
5047.ers to some of the other personages who will figure in this story of real life. f 1
5048.s who will figure in this story of real life. f 1 But whilst Father Eustace -Ted cou
5049.ODUCES MB. STANHOPE, A LONDON MERCHANT. LOVE 'AND day of hard and laborious work, to
5050.STANHOPE was a London merchant of great wealth nnd circumstances the most general answ
5051.e influence. When comparatively a young man he had been left messenger would receiv
5052.f the named Maria. He was a stern, hard man; possessing to all He was their servant
5053.at once laid aside, and before his aged nature. servant knocked at the door of his roo
5054.ret, another call to-night. What is the matter cold, self-possession was never for a m
5055.ns which are so dear to most of us. Hia will was iutlexi"Poor, poor fellow," involun
5056.of the presence of sphere, and the self-will which naturally formed so prominent hia
5057.n turning to her, he said, " Say that I will a part in his nature, had become so str
5058.e said, " Say that I will a part in his nature, had become so strongly developed by th
5059.rget to say your beads for him, for his death-bed scarcely aware of the fearful stren
5060.strained though blessed in the sight of God, is but lonely and desolate passion had
5061.haughty, passionless, as as far as this world is concerned." he seemed to be, there w
5062.." he seemed to be, there was, however, one tender feeling within "Oh many, many is
5063. however, one tender feeling within "Oh many, many is the Rosary I have said for him
5064.er, one tender feeling within "Oh many, many is the Rosary I have said for him, poor
5065.poor his breast, and that was an nrdent love for his children. The suffering child,"
5066.hood. At such times he would smi!> this world of trouble, to receive his reward for a
5067.kissing them, try to speak to them with love and tenderness Buffered here." but it w
5068.felt it so. The words fell stra By this time the priest had completed his hasty prep
5069.arations, from his lips the cold, stern man was too much frozen to and passing for
5070.would door of the tabernacle, where the love of the "Adorable" keeps amuse themselve
5071. conviction all the while burytne dying man, and carefully placing It in his bosom,
5072. them They were the only objects in the world for which he cared. Men said blustering
5073.assengers, as they brush of the immense wealth it laid at his feet, as because it w: i
5074.g amongst men. The mere gold mystery of love and sacrifice. Oh for the days gone by
5075.s gone by the he despised, and he would sign the papers transferring thousgood old t
5076. thousgood old times when the priest of God would not have had ands of pounds with
5077.forget that it \vas have told the dying man that the pledge of his redemption was f
5078. tit hand to the unbending power of hia will; in a word, he waft his trembling soul
5079. will; in a word, he waft his trembling soul to tho home of its eternity when from m
5080.t his trembling soul to tho home of its eternity when from much as he could see that he
5081. Such v, as Mr. Stanhope, a cold, stern man, with b; mitted to accompany Him on His
5082.tted to accompany Him on His journey of love. Oh for at all strorg within him, the g
5083.e. Oh for at all strorg within him, the good old times, when, when will yo return wi
5084.hin him, the good old times, when, when will yo return win: almost crushed by the 1:
5085.when he could turn his 8l Yet, when the time came, and he was nt liberty, as he appr
5086. Yet, when the time came, and he was nt liberty, as he approached his home his pace wou
5087.ought was feeding on his heart. And, in truth, it was so; for, he felt and knew his p
5088.ll, that he knew not how to make others love him that there was no heart in the worl
5089.love him that there was no heart in the world that beat furnished a library large eno
5090. as he entirely in unison with his own. Many, perchance, will think this picture ove
5091.n unison with his own. Many, perchance, will think this picture overdrawn but, in sa
5092.author, his brow seeming to expand very truth, there are too many such men as the one
5093.ing to expand very truth, there are too many such men as the one whom we with though
5094.uth, there are too many such men as the one whom we with thought, and intelligence,
5095.ing beaming out from his dark full self-will to extinguish all the better feelings o
5096.nguish all the better feelings of their nature At such moments the face of the father
5097.would flush, too, eye. and who, made to love and be loved, are tyrants, even where w
5098.low the standard which his enthusiastic nature had pictured, that he had made no frien
5099.is father, but it was with a hi kind of love too. It was, if we may so speak, a love
5100.love too. It was, if we may so speak, a love of the intellect more than of the heart
5101.ect, and awe in it for it to be a heart-love. Edwin, and no wonder that his father a
5102. the boy seemed to care much, he had as many as would have nature, at seventeen 1 an
5103.care much, he had as many as would have nature, at seventeen 1 and ; should be love an
5104. nature, at seventeen 1 and ; should be love and gentleness, at the domestic hearth.
5105. still more, if you have met him in the family circle, and in all social intercourse,
5106.cle, and in all social intercourse, you will recognize the character, and will be ab
5107., you will recognize the character, and will be able to join your testimony to ours,
5108.e manly fellow of seventeen, his sister being two Mr. Stanhope had never been able to
5109.oof by the most eminent professors whom wealth could procure. This peculiar training h
5110.ly to be expected from such a method of education. They were retiring and bashful, almost
5111.ght its influence, almost living on the will of their father. Fearing their father a
5112.n, it is not surprising that they loved one another most deeply and tenThey were ch
5113.elicately-moulded lips, which" reminded one of Mr. Stanhope and it was but too evid
5114.ent that there was much of the father's nature reflected in that of the son. Intellect
5115. the gentle feeling, and the cold stern man would be himself again. and could he ha
5116.erceiving that so much of his own proud nature was reflected in him. He felt that the
5117. even he scarcely knew how much his own life was wound up in that of his son. Oh cou
5118.een easier to kill him in his youth and beauty, than it was afterwards to tear his ima
5119.aria was a gentle trusting girl, with a love for her brother that was almost childis
5120. consequently to her brother's stronger nature all the more closely on this account; a
5121.carcely inferior to his. within CHAPTER NATURE. IV. FIRST ASPIRINGS. RESPECTABLE RELIG
5122.ATURE. IV. FIRST ASPIRINGS. RESPECTABLE RELIGION. ; brought into i cause of disagreement
5123. RESPECTABLE RELIGION. ; brought into i cause of disagreement spring up Such natures
5124.d up in the embryo and on the slightest cause the blood would rush into his .5125. countenance won burning ".d proDeluded life lie had lid H collision, or 'U them. i
5126.d which changed the whole course of his life. Up to this time one could scarcely say
5127.he whole course of his life. Up to this time one could scarcely say of him that he h
5128.ole course of his life. Up to this time one could scarcely say of him that he had b
5129.nd romantic thought ever to be gross or animal, but he had " natural" life. He had nev
5130. gross or animal, but he had " natural" life. He had never led an essentially pierce
5131. an essentially pierced the cloud which nature, unenlightened by grace, interposes bet
5132.nlightened by grace, interposes between man and the mysteries of the unseen world.
5133.een man and the mysteries of the unseen world. He had m ver learnt how to commune wit
5134.th his Creator, and to walk through the world united to his God by that wonderful and
5135.to walk through the world united to his God by that wonderful and constant union, w
5136.nt union, which constitutes at once the happiness and the perfection of those who have be
5137.ave begun to wnlk in the ways of Divine love. He had never learnt how to refer his a
5138.ow to refer his actions to the Almighty God, and, consequently, he had naturally ei
5139.onciouslv. u pride, of the most reiiuud nature. incident ' WHEN Edwin ; THE TWO : VIC
5140.ep? Oh, I am so much afraid. I wish the good come and take me on I mptings of his he
5141. his heart, and the inclinations of his nature and. re and carrv me had indulged them
5142.was a stranger was I don't think that I love Him at all. O dear papa, do tell me re
5143.and. foramomc:. that he was a religions man. He and religion, in its tame the range
5144.c:. that he was a religions man. He and religion, in its tame the range of his experienc
5145. religion, in its tame the range of his experience. He had gone to church for years, stran
5146.ss, attended and he had heard this very same sermon, but it had never oc;reh most re
5147.ng in his, the pew all tended to remind one. most nnpleae- and drew his boy closer
5148.ct, you could see ing him. This strange language of Edtrin's filled him with an hen? Mr.
5149.orness of heart, a great deal more than God. It was was between himself and the chi
5150.ndfathers, had all points as these. His emotion was scarcely lees than that of been goo
5151.ion was scarcely lees than that of been good Protestants ever since the time of the
5152.of been good Protestants ever since the time of the "blessed reild, as he answered M
5153.neas.iiad, every Sunday, for at least a will not in. ; .' . ; : : . : : : ; .<-. I -
5154. i . . ; : ; . liope the he :-.r:< _... same parish church, and, there: y had at sta
5155. a to read .rays i~. 1. and in this his religion consisted, accompanied his father to ch
5156. perhaps, you would tell me whether the good Jesus was seeking me, and whether He wo
5157. do not want to leave you, I 1 like the good Jesus to find "v, and teach me to be a
5158. Jesus to find "v, and teach me to be a good child, and take me home to Hunyon would
5159.e yon, my An-ifng darling And the cold, man softened more than he had ever done .he
5160.softened more than he had ever done .he same time, awoke :: the officiating clergyma
5161.ned more than he had ever done .he same time, awoke :: the officiating clergyman was
5162.nd ng dreary aisl- forms and figures of other days. Then t. nto his mind, and he woul
5163. figures of other days. Then t. nto his mind, and he would wonder dead mother WOT. w
5164.e would wonder dead mother WOT. were an angel in heaven, thin":. a, and .m, and wheth
5165.uch he had loved her. and cherished her memory still His large black he laughed, and,
5166.ns with feeling as he thus communed lie world ^* imagination fr**3 created around hi*
5167.eeling as he thus communed lie world ^* imagination fr**3 created around hi**^ and down fro
5168.ow aad I felt ; and I do wish, papa, he time, a: On one iiartiflBlar Sunday the prea
5169.t ; and I do wish, papa, he time, a: On one iiartiflBlar Sunday the preacher had ta
5170.ay the preacher had taken as tl 7 to be good. I would have been very attenhistor 'iv
5171.d to learn ; but Laad awe to the loving history, but there was son:-. laughed at me, pa
5172.d not ask him again. But I do wish some one would teach jae how to be sad and melan
5173. sat preBsibly Edwin started OB several other tie hands tightly clasped in an attitud
5174.had bat his father al As soon as; ' " I will invite Mr. Grant to dine with before. u
5175.hed a very nio mon in the morning about sin, and what a shocking thing it was to be
5176.Dear pap.. . TWO aspirings of the lofty mind to something higher find more noble ami
5177.hood, with no Ami childhood to boyhood, one to teach him what 1 to know, with the n
5178.e evening, have wished to jvtir i and a honor of the event. moment mi large number of
5179.is own little room to relieve ? with no one to tell him that the aspirings of liin
5180. aspirings of liin heart were after its God, with no one to teach him that the prou
5181. liin heart were after its God, with no one to teach him that the proud passions Un
5182.at the proud passions Unit w. iv in his nature were to be rendered subservient to thos
5183.nt to those higher aspirations, with no one to teach him how to be, good. But let h
5184.ns, with no one to teach him how to be, good. But let him take courage. The good Jes
5185.h him how to be, good. But let him take courage. The good Jesus is already seeking him
5186.be, good. But let him take courage. The good Jesus is already seeking him to take hi
5187. fifteen years of age, it was announced one Sunday that in a few weeks the bishop o
5188. chapter, that he could not make up his mind to speak to him. He listened eagerly ev
5189., and with the s ions of his 1>; strong nature so little disciplined and brought i und
5190.ite, for such he thought it. His active mind began to work, and he used to wonder wh
5191.tion had been always looked upon in the same light in which Mr. Grant seemed to rega
5192. forefathers had always had such a mean opinion of it, and if so, how it was that they
5193.endered complete, when Mr. Grant called.one day, and after asking him a single ques
5194.t to receive it, and, moreover, that no one had taken pains to teach him how to pre
5195. longed and. wished and prayed for some one to teach him how to be good for the goo
5196.yed for some one to teach him how to be good for the good Jesus to take him on His s
5197.one to teach him how to be good for the good Jesus to take him on His shoulders to c
5198. as if this latest act of his religious life, so to call ten it, had but to render t
5199. to render the gulf between himself and God wider and more apparent than ever and,
5200.because most respectable people did the same but he had no fixed and clear notion of
5201.he had no fixed and clear notion of the nature and character of the action he performe
5202.e solemn word came flitting through his mind: "This is My Body," and also, " This is
5203. New Testament, which shall be shed for many unto remission of sins," (ver. 28), and
5204.g what was false, Edwin kuew nothing of religion but what he had learnt from his father
5205.approach the Lord's table for the first time, he sat for hours with his Bible before
5206.ecoming more and more perWith an ardent desire to plexed, and more and more uneasy. do
5207. body and blood of the Lord. But, let a man prove himself and so let him eat of tha
5208.crament ? or how he could eat and drink judgment to himself for not discerning the body
5209.ful denunciation of the apostle the ; ; judgment Lord" (1 to himself, not discerning the
5210.irst doubt which prepared the way let a man prove himself For, for all thai followe
5211.llowed \va.-i implanted in his youthful mind. drinketh unworthily, etiteth and drink
5212.inketh unworthily, etiteth and drinketh judgment to himself, Ou the appointed day, howev
5213.he Lord." : THE TWO or instruct liim of truth with VICTORIES. In this stato of perple
5214.s stato of perplexity and doubt with no one to counsel wreaths of the graceful ivy,
5215. every statue or figure, with a with no one to whisper in his ear the words hand to
5216.o all the instincts and feelings of his nature of the happy time. In the evening as th
5217.and feelings of his nature of the happy time. In the evening as they sat, a merry ba
5218.n their round the ample hearth, with no other light than the sparkling plain and lite
5219.ht than the sparkling plain and literal sense, and with these instincts crushed and f
5220.ghtly and cheerfully in the listener at one moment trembling as he thought again an
5221.of the inspired Words: Therefore, let a man prove him- round, with young hearts lau
5222.the sorrow-stricken were beand drinketh judgment to himself, not discerning the body of
5223. had heard from Mr. Grant with no fixed one of Mr. Seymour's sons, a fine open-hear
5224.ons, a fine open-hearted fellow, during idea or belief, but with his mind one vast c
5225.ow, during idea or belief, but with his mind one vast chaos of uncertainty the eveni
5226.uring idea or belief, but with his mind one vast chaos of uncertainty the evening s
5227.ections, and sympathies which Christmas time, and there was such a feeling of misery
5228.l to awaken. such a want of reality and truth about this action, which There were few
5229.still, and out of whose bright eyes the happiness lation that Edwin could never bring him
5230. saying, "Papa, I think I bered hearth, one of a happy band now scattered far and w
5231.hat his father did not press him on the matter, attaching, as he himself did, so littl
5232. shall not approach " ; and what wonder nature developing itself more and more every d
5233.dmiring him ; but his uneasiness on the matter of religion, and the state he was in, h
5234.m ; but his uneasiness on the matter of religion, and the state he was in, had grown upo
5235.ness on the matter of religion, and the state he was in, had grown upon him every day
5236.ntioned, and the workings of his active mind had left a languor and paleness on his
5237.did, of a young and loving heart not at peace speaking, too, through the hectic flush
5238.ich now so often came upon him, of such pain, and care, and grief, as youthful trust
5239. know or feel. But, again, let him take courage. Light and comfort are at hand brightne
5240.ort are at hand brightness is near. The good Jesus is looking for His lamb, that wit
5241.oed in their souls ; and, at the moment memory had beguiled them, and in thought they
5242. frosty breeze, to carry its message of love to young and old, ringing so softly and
5243.ins are all employed to greet in humble love and praise the God-made Man, as once ag
5244. to greet in humble love and praise the God-made Man, as once again He descends upo
5245. in humble love and praise the God-made Man, as once again He descends upon the alt
5246.again He descends upon the altar of His love speaking to the schoolboy's heart of hi
5247.o the schoolboy's heart of his mother's love telling the weary of rest to come, fill
5248.to come, filling the hearts of all with love, and joy, and hope, and "I bliss. CHAPT
5249.. have already mentioned that about the time Edwin reached his seventeenth birthday
5250.n event occurred which It was Christmas time, altered the whole course of his life.
5251.s time, altered the whole course of his life. and an invitation had been sent to Edw
5252.t determined to decline the invitation, family. as he felt every day less and less fit
5253.p.ng persons, and every preparation was being made to " enable them to spend a merry
5254.spend a merry Christmas" in the fullest sense of the word. WE love thee right well, w
5255.s" in the fullest sense of the word. WE love thee right well, with the merry swell O
5256.in, And biddest thy children rejoice. I love the soft sheen of thy holly green, And
5257.he soft sheen of thy holly green, And I love on its leaves to gaze ; I Jove tho glad
5258. they glewoi in the yule-log's blaze. I love thee, I love thee, I love thy brave chi
5259.in the yule-log's blaze. I love thee, I love thee, I love thy brave chime, I love th
5260.og's blaze. I love thee, I love thee, I love thy brave chime, I love thee right dear
5261. I love thee, I love thy brave chime, I love thee right dearly, thou old Christmas t
5262.e thee right dearly, thou old Christmas time. "I love thee right well, thou old Chri
5263.ght dearly, thou old Christmas time. "I love thee right well, thou old Christmas bel
5264. bell As thou swellest adown the vale I love thy sweet song, as It flitteth along, A
5265.eth no part In the joy of the Christmas time That growoth not light, with glac* visi
5266.t At the song of the Christmas chime. I love thee, I love thee, I love the brave chi
5267. of the Christmas chime. I love thee, I love thee, I love the brave chime. That gree
5268.tmas chime. I love thee, I love thee, I love the brave chime. That greeteth thee lou
5269.reeteth thee loudly, thou old Christmas time. ; ; ' When I love thee right well for
5270., thou old Christmas time. ; ; ' When I love thee right well for the tale thou dost
5271.nd looks in thy presence grew bright. I love thee, I love thee, and long for the chi
5272.hy presence grew bright. I love thee, I love thee, and long for the chime. That gree
5273.reeted thoe bravely, thou old Christmas time. ; When Edwin of Mr. Seymour decorated
5274.e gorgeous mirrors were framed with " I love thee, old bell, though a tale thou mays
5275. the friends of to-day. Oh 1 still do I love thee, and love thy brave chime, And e'e
5276. to-day. Oh 1 still do I love thee, and love thy brave chime, And e'er will I love t
5277.hee, and love thy brave chime, And e'er will I love thee thou old Christmas time." ;
5278.d love thy brave chime, And e'er will I love thee thou old Christmas time." ; night,
5279.'er will I love thee thou old Christmas time." ; night, The evening was far spent, i
5280.pent, in fact it was close upon midwhen one of the party proposed that they should
5281.ared never iv.-nl u Catholic book in my life, and I am now air enter a Catholic Chur
5282.r enter a Catholic Church for the first time but if i thor It appeared to most of th
5283.evening's enter- would make me a better man, or bring me nearer to Most of them had
5284.h- worldly, tepid creature that I am it will kill me, it is killing need hardly say,
5285.hardly say, had been of no very correct nature, me already, for I have read, and praye
5286. uncertainty on every side. Oh would to God I empty form intended to delude weak pe
5287. on every side. Oh would to God I empty form intended to delude weak people, and cal
5288. besides, their music is generally very good, and it would be a a good pity to miss
5289.enerally very good, and it would be a a good pity to miss the sight ; so do come wit
5290.(HIS Mass, or whatever they call it, is one of the most amusing ing their way to th
5291.ituated a little distance things in the world; so many genuflections, and crossings,
5292.little distance things in the world; so many genuflections, and crossings, from B sq
5293. and crossings, from B square, no doubt many of our readers are grumwith us? bling,
5294.ession of these Catholics; and would to God I understood more clearly even my own b
5295. would never be guilty of such a deadly sin. My French master was a Catholic and al
5296.ic and although he never spoke to me on religion, I know he was a good man, so gentle, s
5297.poke to me on religion, I know he was a good man, so gentle, so humble, and BO meek,
5298.to me on religion, I know he was a good man, so gentle, so humble, and BO meek, whe
5299. their professions as we are in ours to one of their churches (where they are asacc
5300. repeat I but I am ; sembled to worship God according to the best of their power an
5301.ccording to the best of their power and knowledge), just as you would ask me to accompany
5302.to accompany you to the theatre, or any other place of amusement. No, Frank, I will n
5303. other place of amusement. No, Frank, I will never do it I will not make the house o
5304.sement. No, Frank, I will never do it I will not make the house of God for even thei
5305.ever do it I will not make the house of God for even their churches are the houses
5306.r even their churches are the houses of God a mere place of vain amusement and idle
5307.of vain amusement and idle curiosity. I will never insult the religious belief of an
5308.o join you in perpetrating. No Frank, I will not go with such motives ; as these ; a
5309.ear fellow, how warmly you do take this matter. I am sure I didn't ask you to join us
5310.r to think about; and, moreover, that a good hone-whipping would have been the great
5311.erred upon him and the rosy face of the good old man becomes quite purple with indig
5312.n him and the rosy face of the good old man becomes quite purple with indignation a
5313. with indignation as he conjures up the idea of his son, Tom Brown, taking any such
5314. ridiculous notions, and thinking about religion and that sort of thing "and I should li
5315.ly own virtues and perfections. " Be as good as your father, sir, and you will do. B
5316.Be as good as your father, sir, and you will do. Be as clever and longheaded as your
5317.longheaded as your grandfather, and you will be But as to getting any of Master Edwi
5318.f Tom for Tom, " a fine specimen of the animal," with a decided taste for showy and pi
5319. and manliness Tom meaning drinkand the other fashionable and more ing, smoking, swea
5320. and his class objectionable find their pleasure and perfection. Then there is Miss Simp
5321.t with a jaunty and abstracted air, how many sheep's heads there are planted on huma
5322.ht theatrieal but In ain, and his uobl< mind bent itself in humble reverence to the.
5323. and the closec eye, and the gentle and angel-like look of the innocent child, and he
5324.. He sa-w what he had never seen in his life before he saw warm gush " ing piety ; h
5325.nd crowded congregation worshiping like one man I . Simper cannot help thinking tha
5326.rowded congregation worshiping like one man I . Simper cannot help thinking that wo
5327.l to suppose him thinking so much about religion and such abstract things. We have a gre
5328.here were question of dogs, tobacco, or other such matters, we should be equally glad
5329.at our story is true, and that if their experience refuse to recognize any such person as
5330.cept to repeat that our story is a true one, and that we have merely sketched Edwin
5331.ld remind them, too (although old Brown will probably say that it is all trash and n
5332. those aspirings to practice that it is one thing to see and desire to do what is b
5333.ractice that it is one thing to see and desire to do what is better, and another thing
5334.lect is often converted long before the will, and that many a one who desires someth
5335.onverted long before the will, and that many a one who desires something better, who
5336.d long before the will, and that many a one who desires something better, who is di
5337.ng better, who is dissatisfied with his state, and who to a certain extent despises h
5338.lic chapel, or rather church for, thank God, the day is gone by when we were compel
5339.e taste recognized and drank in all the beauty of the cer emonial which was going on h
5340. the unreality of his own dealings with God and despite the genuflections, &c., whi
5341.st, he felt that he was in the house of God, and that he was amongst those who were
5342.e was amongst those who were worshiping God as h< " hymn, Adest* his ear, he hid hi
5343. still h< bent his head as he felt that God was working in his heart, anc strains o
5344.lling song, and dares to utter with its sin-stained lips the glorious strain which
5345.-stained lips the glorious strain which angel tongues were its first to sing which da
5346.re such as to strike the beholders with pleasure and admiration, despite the disadvantag
5347. labors on ac- misery, ay, even its own sin, in th all-sufficient mercy of the Infa
5348.e Infant's smile. Oh again do we say, " God speed thee," thou dear old hymn, for th
5349. thou dear old hymn, for thy message is one of love, and joy, and hope have heard s
5350.ear old hymn, for thy message is one of love, and joy, and hope have heard some say
5351.wn weakness, own We hackneyed, but thou art as dear to us, thou comest to ut laden
5352.s of error, we heard thee for the first time on one never-to-be-forgotten Christmas
5353.or, we heard thee for the first time on one never-to-be-forgotten Christmas night,
5354.h oi tears which greeted the message of love and rest which thou didst bring to our
5355.thou didst bring to our weary, fainting soul. It was, however, at the time of the Ho
5356. fainting soul. It was, however, at the time of the Holy Communion that the greatest
5357.ed to the altar to receive the bread of life and even he suddenly entered the church
5358.ommenced, and the altar, which of every one who approached the altar, and he marked
5359. and evergreens intermingled with them, God within his breast. He felt that faith s
5360.ness, and soft now beheld for the first time was worth any price that could be beaut
5361. time was worth any price that could be beauty which were perfectly enchanting. The sa
5362.nctuary was paid for it that it was, in truth, the hidden pearl of the Gosfull of pri
5363.t too proud to minister at the altar of God. Clouds of fra- mighty God to enlighten
5364.the altar of God. Clouds of fra- mighty God to enlighten him and make known to him
5365.ng slowly to the roof of the sanctuary, will, that seeing what was right he might em
5366.rever it may fall, the tout ensemble is one, which, to use the hackneyed phrase, it
5367. is easier to imagine than its count of art ; ; bled to find himself already so muc
5368.ene. He looked around, and he saw every one wrapt in silent prayer, from the poor w
5369.o find a voice to tell him that hi left peace, and faith, and rest, Lu the bright and
5370.IES. eration ; ;ir . and so -with every other Lord had said tli;.. doctrine, and j- o
5371. own pomBOW heart fitting the care, the pain, aud the retiiniiug flttiiig grief whic
5372.mpelled to do. But, again, let him take courage; the emblems emblems of of that to whic
5373.octrines. point to a single miracle, or other supernatural gift whilst, on ifts of th
5374.upernatural gift whilst, on ifts of the other hand, the miracles and nih'T ; Infant h
5375.d well. upon him from His cr.b, and all will yet be the Catholic Church were too pal
5376.iY DOCTOR she openly repudiated the wry idea, ai Edwin asked himself, " how can I sa
5377.me astray, or which, The Chuall events, will not admit that she cannot. be infallibl
5378.ines of the Catholic Church. At length, one day, when walking out alone, he remarke
5379.tholic Christian Instructed," and a few other simple works of the same kind, and Edwi
5380.d," and a few other simple works of the same kind, and Edwin hastened home, that he
5381. works, would give but a very imperfect idea of the eagerness and avidity with which
5382.h. which I am a member rejects the very idea of infallibility; how, then, can she be
5383.ow, then, can she be the true church ?" Time after time, and day after day, poor Edw
5384.an she be the true church ?" Time after time, and day after day, poor Edwin read and
5385.more firm conviction that there must be one true church, and that the Church of (Lu
5386.e alone could claim the title. finished one set of books ; he procured another, but
5387. the dreadful thou: ever present to his mind what would his father say when he and t
5388.s fine intellect at once recognized the justice of those He recognized at claims, and t
5389. those He recognized at claims, and the truth of her pretensions. once that for which
5390.lead him astray ; and he longed for the time when he lay his poor, weary, aching hea
5391.nd full light and rest for his fainting soul. of her doctrine with regard to her sac
5392.on and communion, and he longed for the time when he might imbibe from those channel
5393.h he felt so much to want. admitted the truth and beauty of the Church's teaching in
5394.so much to want. admitted the truth and beauty of the Church's teaching in regard to M
5395.perations. He saw that " she was to be "One," "Holy," "Catholic," and " Apostolical
5396. teachings, since men were bound, under pain of damnation, to listen to her ; and al
5397.nation, to listen to her ; and all this being proved, then came the all-important que
5398. which were to point out to all men the one true fold. Having seen that unity of fa
5399.hat sanctity proclaimed by miracles and other supernatural gifts that Catholicity emb
5400.ctrine, and that there was not a single one of her doctrines which had not been den
5401. maintaining, and others rejecting, the necessity of baptismal regen1 young protection, b
5402.wn heavier and more painful to bear. no one had learnt his secret. His sister, with
5403.ister, with all the quick perception of love, had long seen that there was som< weig
5404.n that there was som< weighing upon his mind, and more than once had beg; him to tel
5405.reboding upon his son, and trembled The family physician was lest anything should befa
5406.quently called in, but he was unable to state what ailed Edwin except that he was ver
5407.and feeble, and that his He recommended change of mind seemed to be uneasy. and so Edw
5408., and that his He recommended change of mind seemed to be uneasy. and so Edwin was h
5409. for everywhere he carried with him his mind, BO ill at ease for the He read with pr
5410. in the before him, and the rage of the will which he had never yet easy chair in th
5411.ir in the priest's little room, and had time to look upon dared to contradict, would
5412.o a great extent, his hands, and beg of God to give him strength to be faithful had
5413. never entered a Catholic church him in one word, that he was rather too matter-of-
5414.him in one word, that he was rather too matter-of-fact but since the memorable Christm
5415.instant the illusion the sacred emblem, courage returned to his heart, the moment of he
5416.ks and was virtually convinced ; of the truth of that religion that he was anxious to
5417.tually convinced ; of the truth of that religion that he was anxious to know more and to
5418. anxious to know more and to fulfil the will of God, but that he was entirely depend
5419. to know more and to fulfil the will of God, but that he was entirely dependent upo
5420.om mention thee but there is, at least, one heart which misses the pleasant twinkle
5421.odness of thy own great heart. There is one who never will and who never can forget
5422.own great heart. There is one who never will and who never can forget that when he c
5423.own of a to his father, as that gentle- man, being a member church which is always
5424.f a to his father, as that gentle- man, being a member church which is always so loud
5425.is always so loud in its professions of liberty of conscience, could not complain of hi
5426., with men of Mr. ! ; Stanhope's class, liberty of conscience is all very well when it
5427.onal interview, and when they knew each other better concluding by again pressing upo
5428. to follow Father Eustace's advice, and time after time in imagination he went throu
5429.Father Eustace's advice, and time after time in imagination he went through the inte
5430.ustace's advice, and time after time in imagination he went through the interview, in which
5431.g of him not to spurn him. On more than one evening, on which Mr. Stanhope had been
5432.as right, found in thy dear and gushing love that which repaid him to the full, and
5433.he had left behind. There is, at least, one who will never forget the pride with wh
5434.eft behind. There is, at least, one who will never forget the pride with which thou
5435.st watch his onward steps in the way of God one who will never forget that thy symp
5436.atch his onward steps in the way of God one who will never forget that thy sympathy
5437. onward steps in the way of God one who will never forget that thy sympathy was ever
5438.ever deepest when his need was greatest one who, so long as it shall be given him t
5439.all be given him to ascend the altar of God, will never forget thee, nor allow thy
5440.e given him to ascend the altar of God, will never forget thee, nor allow thy honore
5441.nce to pass from out his heart, but who will ; ; cherish to the last the memory of h
5442.ut who will ; ; cherish to the last the memory of his best and dearest friend. e, dear
5443.ed his for they had much to say to each other. Peace be with th heart most freely to
5444.for they had much to say to each other. Peace be with th heart most freely to his new
5445.but very little more instruction before being in a fit state to be received into the
5446. more instruction before being in a fit state to be received into the him, Edwin actu
5447.but again the cold, stern face rose " O God O God I canup before him, and, groaning
5448.ain the cold, stern face rose " O God O God I canup before him, and, groaning aloud
5449.ncipally directed to inspiring him with courage and confidence to take the desired, but
5450.fidence to take the desired, but at the same time, dreaded step. To say that Father
5451.ce to take the desired, but at the same time, dreaded step. To say that Father Eusta
5452.erfluous. CHAPTEE NEW FRIEND AND A TKUE ONE Sunday evening Edwin set off to IX. ONE
5453.ONE Sunday evening Edwin set off to IX. ONE. STOLEN INTERVIEWS. A CRISIS APPROACHES
5454.aid as ever of his father acquiring any knowledge of that in which he was engaged. out, s
5455.ngaged. out, saw how the mighty hand of God had brought the work about in its own m
5456. not prevail upon Edwin to mention this matter to his father at present, he selected f
5457.intimately acquainted with the Catholic religion, and placing himself in the hands of Go
5458.on, and placing himself in the hands of God without reserve, to trust to the loving
5459. him to to a favorable issue in its own good time. useful to his Edwin's heart beat
5460.to to a favorable issue in its own good time. useful to his Edwin's heart beat very
5461. and hailing be fervent in prayer, that God might dispose his father to receive the
5462.trembled, and held in the full light of God ', but weighed down ami oppressed with
5463.is father wished to see him before he i one which gentlemen of Mr. Stanhope's alway
5464.l, all rushed upon him, and what wonder time, in order to try to compose himself a l
5465.ived as he was of the special graces of God's holy beatings of his anxious and flut
5466. before Put your- his father's room aud God be with him now to ntn sacraments, the
5467. the brave young heart against the iron will that is deself in his place, my good, c
5468.on will that is deself in his place, my good, cozy, but somewhat censorious termined
5469.elf degraded by his son's forsaking his religion, and embracing FATHER AND SON. THE CONF
5470.nd how much, in spite of his cold, stem nature, he was bound up in his hoy, he tremble
5471.teaded explanation. Edwin inadvertently one day left exposed his table a book on th
5472.forward in his room, which adjoined the one in which they sat. Poor Edwin listened
5473.to him to announce that the stern, cold man within was steeling himself for the com
5474.nst his own flesh and blood feeding the evil passions of his own stern, undiscipline
5475.ng boy in the adjoining room place your will in opposition to mine, or I will crush
5476.n the adjoining room place your will in opposition to mine, or I will crush you crush you
5477.e your will in opposition to mine, or I will crush you crush you even to the dust, w
5478.- varying tale of pride, and power, and will. Maria vain to soothe him. He kissed he
5479.what was wrong between rpa, within him, soul, this, because I know you too well to s
5480.you could have been so foolish as to of being led astray and per. yourself to the sli
5481.ed that it seemed more like the face of one who was dead and who had passed away fr
5482.passed away from worldly cares, than of one whose heart was at that very moment a v
5483.oment father and son sat gazing on each other Ther without the power or the will to u
5484.ach other Ther without the power or the will to utter a word. however, a twitching a
5485.trembling boy before him. looked like a man who, under the mastery of some strong a
5486. the centre of so much pride, and of so many hopes, about perchance, to be withered
5487.of the greatest impo, and with which my happiness certainly, and I would fain beSome two
5488.s, you had accompanied his son and some other young people to the Popish chapel on Ch
5489.on these reports to you, Edwin, besion. cause I felt sure that no member of my family
5490. cause I felt sure that no member of my family, much less my own son, could so far for
5491. church of his baptism hi order to join one so fallen, so degrading in its doctrine
5492.church on. every Sunday and yet be a my love nn3 when, for the at least the first ti
5493.ve nn3 when, for the at least the first time I entered a Catholic Church, ami au apo
5494.t conour worn and anxious look for some time past, and I was often alarmed lest it m
5495.ccident, and, to my astonishment, and I will say horror, I found upon your desk this
5496.ice faltered more and more," I hope you will not press me to do so at present." As E
5497. and nothing shall move me. Dearly as I love you, and God alone knows how dearly tha
5498.hall move me. Dearly as I love you, and God alone knows how dearly that is, althoug
5499.ps, I have never been able to show that love as much as I could desire, I would not
5500.le to show that love as much as I could desire, I would not allow even you to question
5501.fess in my own heart that there must be one true Church on earth, and that the Cath
5502. turn away from me as you do. In all my life before, you know, papa, that I have nev
5503. not stifle my ; ! : had not made up my mind, and I was not sure that I should ever
5504.a, say that you forgive me say that you will not cast me off. I will try to love you
5505.me say that you will not cast me off. I will try to love you more and more, and to b
5506.you will not cast me off. I will try to love you more and more, and to be more obedi
5507.to be more obedient than I have been. I will never cross you again, and it shall be
5508., and it shall be the sole object of my life to render you happy. O ; ; papa, that m
5509. sternly, but say you forgive me, or it will kill me." For the dark stern face was a
5510.me iu prosecuting my inquiries into the nature of the ser- doctrines held by the Catho
5511.nder tho members of this hitherto happy family ?" demanded Mr. Stanhope, in his sterne
5512.sing that I have been influenced in the change which has come over me by the grandeur
5513.," he continued, "but it has but little change of feeling, for I have witnessed it onl
5514.dhood I have been dissatisfied with the state I was in. I have been chilled and beate
5515.wn by the coldness and emptiness of the religion I professed. I have been perplexed and
5516.t was bent upon him a gaze that told of pain and bitter grief of blasted hopes and b
5517. expect to find you so far lost to your duty, sir. Of voice that ; When approached t
5518.these mad and foolish notions from your mind. "Papa," answered Edwin, weeping, but s
5519.he fault is all my own. as I cannot nuy good result to be attained i VICTORIES. to 1
5520.seventeen years of study, utto know the religion I have so long professed; and h Mr. Gra
5521. are intolerable, sir. You dare to pass judgment upon me, and upon your ancestors. We ha
5522.u, and you alone, How dare you use such language to me, sir? how are right. dare you spe
5523.aint, and I ing upon the floor. A short time, and there was a great hurrying to and
5524., I do not forget what is due to yon. I love and " as it ever did. I honor you above
5525. to yon. I love and " as it ever did. I honor you above all the world. There is nothi
5526. it ever did. I honor you above all the world. There is nothing that I And once again
5527.e is nothing that I And once again, may God be with the brave young heart would not
5528.ave young heart would not do to show my love and reverence for you, and when that ha
5529.et. wrong your own heart too. I pass no judgment upon you, between yourYour belief is a
5530. upon you, between yourYour belief is a matter pupa, or upon any one. self and God, ev
5531.ur belief is a matter pupa, or upon any one. self and God, even as mine is. No, I p
5532. matter pupa, or upon any one. self and God, even as mine is. No, I pass no judgmen
5533.and God, even as mine is. No, I pass no judgment upon mid a dear and well-known voice wh
5534. whatever may happen, there is at least one heart will remain faithful to you, and
5535.may happen, there is at least one heart will remain faithful to you, and love you de
5536. heart will remain faithful to you, and love you dearly "Edwin, know nnd feel oh how
5537.atholic or lose my own mately, immortal soul ; and I know oh I am sure, dear, dear p
5538.TEB XI. COMFOET IN GBIEF. A MTNlSTERINa ANGEL. PAIN. It was a month before Edwin was
5539. COMFOET IN GBIEF. A MTNlSTERINa ANGEL. PAIN. It was a month before Edwin was suffic
5540.as his father cast him from ! THE PROUD MAN'S to do that?" soul ought to be as dear
5541.him from ! THE PROUD MAN'S to do that?" soul ought to be as dear to me as yours is t
5542.yours is to you, and I have no doubt of being able to save it, even in the church whi
5543., even in the church which you, in your wisdom, "Enough, sir, enough of this. My and h
5544.take ? well pondered the strength of my will ? And do you supyou are about pose that
5545.And do you supyou are about pose that I will ever submit to the degradation you to h
5546. my position, and do you suppose that I will ever put it in the power of a jibing mo
5547.e you considered how in you, hopes, how many expectations are concentrated so much "
5548.e from his bed. Duringthe whole of this time there was a soft and genial face for ev
5549.for ever hovering round his bed like an angel of comfort and consolation, smoothing s
5550.nded forehead holding such cool and ; ; many and are you prepared to blast them a me
5551.ssing him with such deep .and heartfelt love, and ever and anon, when he groaned the
5552. away, as a thing not worth having, the love that I have ever lavished upon you ? Ha
5553.d upon you ? Have you considered that I will die rather than yield to your "tell me,
5554.am willing to die. I cancast me off, it will kill me, oh indeed it will. If " on tha
5555.t me off, it will kill me, oh indeed it will. If " on that dreadful night, "Edwin, m
5556. are now." And, oh how often during the time he the stern dark face rose up before l
5557.face rose up before lay upon his bed of pain, as him as he had seen it last when it
5558. not live without your Ipve, and in the knowledge that you and, after dreaming of angels
5559.continued, sobbing till his voice those same mild eyes looking into his, with such a
5560. looking into his, with such a depth of love " was hardly audible, I must become a C
5561. to feel those pure and I must; and may God support me in the to his, with love so
5562. may God support me in the to his, with love so holy and so innocent, I must I must
5563.pon the -'Enough brother's and sister's love. chair, and stamping passionately upon
5564. from Edwin a full acgo your way, and I will go mine. You have cast me off You count
5565.u have cast me off You count of his own change, and of the interview with his father.
5566.m you. Henceforward we are strangers. I will She listened calmly and quietly to his
5567.en, who has forsaken and betrayed me. I will trample upon every with all the quickne
5568.something painful and distiv feeling of love that may linger I will cast it from me
5569.istiv feeling of love that may linger I will cast it from me as a base and loathsome
5570.nterview with his father, and their the God that is above us, I will never look upo
5571., and their the God that is above us, I will never look upon your face dreadful part
5572.hen his papa saw him again, and saw his mind was made up, he would relent and forgiv
5573.I know you too well to suppose that you will do. I am sorry, of course, that you sho
5574. because I necessarily think it a false one, and one which is not required. Why can
5575.I necessarily think it a false one, and one which is not required. Why cannot we be
5576. my own dear, darling boy, my pride, my love, my joy." And again the pitying angels
5577.ou know, dear, that he had a fit on the same night, but he soon recovered; but I kno
5578.g my arms around his neck, I have taken courage to whisper your name, but, oh Edwin, he
5579. almost broken as I listened. I hope he will relent, but, dearest, we must be prepar
5580.e, to see whether, perehauee, Christmas time might not have left some mark of soften
5581.iation. seemed to fall like a pall When mind ; at once with a fearful distinctness,
5582. ; at once with a fearful distinctness, one figure, however, always being foremost
5583.stinctness, one figure, however, always being foremost in the picture a cold, stern f
5584.ittle hands with such a look of pitying love, and as he gazed he felt his heart grow
5585.s heart grow light and He felt that the good Jesus had, indeed, sought out strong. H
5586.he could leave all beside to follow the Good Shepherd, whom he had sought for so lon
5587.ob afresh, ourselves at his feet, and I will plead for you severe. meet him as he en
5588.Edwin be- cheerful and unconcerned. The happiness of two young " do be comforted. We will
5589.ness of two young " do be comforted. We will throw at this on a father's and hearts
5590.ngels shall gladly write the words that will He was bring comfort and joy to those t
5591.nt over him to kiss his wounded brow to God on high, and on earth peace to men of g
5592.unded brow to God on high, and on earth peace to men of good will ;" and her golden h
5593.d on high, and on earth peace to men of good will ;" and her golden hair, as it fell
5594.high, and on earth peace to men of good will ;" and her golden hair, as it fell abou
5595.f suffering already, and on this day of universal love and ing angels who were gazing on
5596.g already, and on this day of universal love and ing angels who were gazing on the s
5597.ng angels who were gazing on the scene. happiness, he, too, will relent, and give the kis
5598.azing on the scene. happiness, he, too, will relent, and give the kiss of peace, and
5599. too, will relent, and give the kiss of peace, and there shall be merry Christmas at
5600. for his conquered pride and vanquished will. A step is heard approaching; it must b
5601. Edwin CHEISTMAS DAY, AND NOT A " MEBKY ONE." turns deadly pale, and rises, as the
5602.eet him as he and -nore composed, after many trembling and anxious consul- enters, w
5603.to re- word, surely depending Christmas time the icy heart will melt, the iron will
5604. depending Christmas time the icy heart will melt, the iron will unbend, yet. She sp
5605. time the icy heart will melt, the iron will unbend, yet. She speak in a gay and che
5606.dear to him than )m and never-unbending will. Lot thorn not record the pride and hau
5607.let them leave him in the room which he will not forsake. not VICTORIES. and harshly
5608.r their ruined hopes as if their hearts other's them ; arms, wept would break, and we
5609.t, "Edwin, my own darling, I, at least, will never forsake you never love you less,
5610. at least, will never forsake you never love you less, my poor, poor boy." And now t
5611. clearing weather to hurry to the house God now, while many a hearth is bright and
5612.er to hurry to the house God now, while many a hearth is bright and gay, and love is
5613.le many a hearth is bright and gay, and love is the speaking in many an eye, let the
5614.ht and gay, and love is the speaking in many an eye, let the cold, stern man think o
5615.ing in many an eye, let the cold, stern man think of " Let him Merry Christmas" tha
5616.the work of his hands, and exult in his will but, for God's sake, lot him forget tha
5617.s hands, and exult in his will but, for God's sake, lot him forget that it is the M
5618.at it is the Merthe solemn ry Christmas time. Above all, let him forget " words he h
5619.ll, let him forget " words he heard not many hours ago Glory bo to God in the highes
5620.he heard not many hours ago Glory bo to God in the highest, and on earth peace to m
5621. bo to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men of good will." ; : He would have
5622.e highest, and on earth peace to men of good will." ; : He would have given worlds t
5623.hest, and on earth peace to men of good will." ; : He would have given worlds to rec
5624.ng to announce his subm to his father's will and, oh how his proud heart sicken the
5625.ng of his boy and of all that was past. One, two, tin eo hours, and now he knew tha
5626.master's face to discover how the proud man bore his trouble, he could find no mark
5627.osure ; CHAPTER A VICTOKY AND A NOTABLE ONE, we may IF IT BE WORTH THE PBICE. After
5628.may IF IT BE WORTH THE PBICE. After the death-blow to his hopes which he had now rece
5629.l appearance perfectly calm. He gave no sign of recognition as his sou entered the r
5630.iness of the very least importance, and one which was scarcely worthy of even so mu
5631.e ?" sent for you, " " Dear papa, if "I desire no explanation, " - " "Johnson," he sai
5632.g him. Stanhope, and infrom him when it will suit his convenience to depart quire he
5633. the servant was leaving the room, "you will remember that Mr. Edwin Stanhope is hen
5634. stranger here and, should he call, you will nut admit him without my express orders
5635.r he had marked the pitying look of the man's face; and with all his pride and haug
5636.and with all his pride and haughty self-will he felt himself humbled and abased he f
5637.by a pen so weak and feeble as ours. We will rather drav. over the sorrowful scene,
5638. over the sorrowful scene, and leave to angel hands to record the parting vows of fai
5639.which they uttered, clinging round each other's necks leave to angel hands to record
5640.nging round each other's necks leave to angel hands to record the love and watchful c
5641.ecks leave to angel hands to record the love and watchful care with which she packed
5642.im as often as she could. Above all, we will draw a veil over that parting moment, w
5643.t that the worthy old gentleman is in a state of great satisfaction, and that he is l
5644.ittle Papa, I am determined, because no other course opsn to our me." " Then, sir, ti
5645. taken his father's hand, but the proud man turned haughtily and sternly away, and
5646.ord, without another look, with all the love of so many years cast away and trampled
5647.t another look, with all the love of so many years cast away and trampled undutif ul
5648. notable victory. Kather than sacrifice one iota of his pride ; and haughty will, h
5649.ice one iota of his pride ; and haughty will, he has sacrificed and ruthlessly cat;;
5650. the dearest object he possessed iu the world and for what? That he might not appear
5651. surely a less jewel of a young heart's love and tenderness salvation was at stake.
5652.at ? He has it 'ml the supremacy of his will has been vindicnt 1ms not given way, hi
5653. character is unblemished in the >f the world and what is his own happiness, or that
5654.in the >f the world and what is his own happiness, or that of ; >vu child, in comparison
5655.ose arms fold him again and again to as war heart as ever beat in human breast, and
5656. himself harder than ever, and so at no time as yet to think of the future. He felt
5657.ch, BI dearest to him. He felt that the world the dark, dreary world usual with that
5658.He felt that the world the dark, dreary world usual with that unruly member, had beco
5659. weary feet. Bashful and retiring as he will not be restrained from speaking too muc
5660.o little fitted to fight his way in the world which was now absolutely refused to spe
5661. always waiting to carry to the face of God such tears wonder if he were anxious an
5662.ered been taken, and had been taken for eternity ; the rest was ter land " before we can
5663.d how merely temporal, and he felt that God would carry him through holy they are i
5664.g of them is treasured up in the Divine mind. harshness of his father but it was a s
5665.had received, but the thought that past love more composed, they had a long chat abo
5666.re could be so easily put away that the memory of the happy prospects. Edwin told his
5667.ng a Catholic he had felt a very strong desire to self cast upon the world so sternly
5668.ery strong desire to self cast upon the world so sternly and so proudly, for daring d
5669. he found himself bound to do under the pain immediate prospect of carrying his desi
5670.pain immediate prospect of carrying his desire into effect but that of his own damnati
5671.s object. days towards the proud, stern man and if he wept as he with gratitude and
5672.l. It has happened before, and probably will happen again ; and therefore old Brown
5673.his commendations, could the worthy old man transport himself in imagination to Mr.
5674.the worthy old man transport himself in imagination to Mr. Stanhope's lonely room, and see
5675. and, as he listened to i 1 you Eustace will never forsake you " and as he felt the
5676.and, after trying several times to kiss one of the hands that clasped his, but tryi
5677.k him, for he knew that it would do him good his desk, and groans and weeps through
5678.. ; ; ; ; ; ; iit of him, they were, in truth, tears of forgiving sorrow that in the
5679.f forgiving sorrow that in the sight of God heaped burning coals on the un- forgivi
5680. have throughout this affair with noble courage and resolution. having thrown yourself
5681.ould yon become a Cniholio. and that no man might dence that reacheth from end to e
5682.hat ordereth your triumph should be for God alone, be able to say that you had one
5683. God alone, be able to say that you had one single earthly object to gain in all th
5684. Edwin, took few wonderful way in which God both his hands in his own, and embraced
5685.nd feeling that after the had shown His love towards you, that He would most probabl
5686.eived, providentially but I am sure you will pardon me for, having heard of what I m
5687. and inflamed, as if he had What is the matter, Johnson?' said papa, are dwelling can
5688.ive you, and for the next few weeks you will live been crying. ' Oh! no, sir, / am q
5689.d Johnson, with me not a word now, or I will not say another you ill?' virtually I s
5690.y another you ill?' virtually I say yon will laying a strong emphasis upon the I ;'
5691.dwin,' cried papa, in great alarm, 'for God's gether, I have thought it better to t
5692.n the house of sake what has happened a good old widow, one of the most fervent memb
5693.ake what has happened a good old widow, one of the most fervent members of my sir,'
5694.at he could scarcely speak, but after a time he been hero three times already this m
5695.wn, and tell him what had happened, you will be going to her, and what day she is to
5696.rning away his thing ready for you. You will come here to mass every day; face from
5697.uch, for he continued and of course you will stay and breakfast with me. can take a
5698.ubbing it incessantly, he managed, with many interruptions, and if you don't stay to
5699.if you don't stay to tea with me, why I will go with you, to tell papa the whole sto
5700.concluded Johnson, I have lived in this family nearly thirty years now, and I and give
5701.udge Mr. always together, whilst at the same time you will be living in Stanhope, si
5702.Mr. always together, whilst at the same time you will be living in Stanhope, sir, he
5703.s together, whilst at the same time you will be living in Stanhope, sir, he continue
5704.dead in the house, see her for the last time, I can't forget, perfectly quiet, and n
5705.ing out so intently. He seemed, too, to experience a sir, how he put his poor little arms
5706.and kissed me, and said that I was very good, and that his dear slight return of the
5707.very noisy use of his handkerchief, and angel in heaven, and that he would always lov
5708.gel in heaven, and that he would always love me very much; when he did return at las
5709.lub' moist but we all know that this is one of the effects of a bad bering as if hi
5710.umthe angels could tell us no doubt our good friend, bluff old Mr. Brown, might blam
5711.a, dear mamma, poor old Johnson is very good to me, and I " and here Johnson went be
5712.nd I " and here Johnson went behind the love him very much, him for it, we scarcely
5713.. Papa declares that he was almost this time you can prepare yourself to be formally
5714.ersation. the Church, and for the great happiness of your first commun- 'Yes, sir,' conti
5715.on't vocation is not for the Church, it will have done you no harm to want to forget
5716. done you no harm to want to forget how good and loving he has always been to me, ha
5717. has always been to me, have spent some time in the seclusion and retirement of coll
5718.tanhope knows what is best; but you see life. If, on the contrary, you are called to
5719. the serbeen watching over you all this time, and lias provided you ; ' ' did so adv
5720., but with another home in placo of the one you have so courageousoli !" continued
5721. have so courageousoli !" continued the good old man, ly forsakenfor Hi;, love, "the
5722.courageousoli !" continued the good old man, ly forsakenfor Hi;, love, "the wonderf
5723.d the good old man, ly forsakenfor Hi;, love, "the wonderful, wonderful ways of Prov
5724.18 THE TWO ; VICTORIES. the inestimable happiness of making his first communion. in some
5725.ing dinner, and instead of staying some time in the dining-room, as he usually does,
5726.ilent and gloomy, even at the Christmas time, he suddenly said, Frank, my boy, come
5727.ar to those under which Edwin made his, will understand the emotions of his warm you
5728.e them. Those who may not have had this happiness would not understand us, did we take up
5729. feelings of a heart in which faith and love are bright and warm, when, for the firs
5730.re bright and warm, when, for the first time, its Lord and its God comes to take up
5731.n, for the first time, its Lord and its God comes to take up His abode within it, c
5732.over and gone, I have found Him whom my soul loveth, I he was firm in hia resolution
5733.ing where he was for have held Him, and will not let Him go, my heart is breakthe pr
5734. best position for him in ing with very love and joy, O leave me with my God. O my e
5735.h very love and joy, O leave me with my God. O my every way and when Frank had seen
5736. seen more of the kindness of Jesus, my God, my all," he murmured, again burying hi
5737. had a long talk, on poor lamb with the Good Shepherd, who had sought it out in vari
5738.ner, and brought it home to Himself, to other in their efforts to amuse Edwin, and to
5739.st and gone. and dine with them, as the good old priest pressed him to do. Edwin was
5740.im to set out. " either as regarded the quantity it contained, or the variety of No, my
5741.l, by dint of groping and searching, he man- before I can allow you to depart," was
5742. on the very greatest occasions College life is very severe, and only strong men mus
5743.nd only strong men must underand by the time it had gone round once or twice, poor E
5744., and composed than he had done for tin will nurse you, and make you strong; and the
5745.se you, and make you strong; and then I will go many months and when, next morning,
5746.and make you strong; and then I will go many months and when, next morning, he sat d
5747.ch threatened to ensue between body and soul for the eonsomehow, this did happen ver
5748. whether the trials and lodger, and his many virtues, and not a little indignant whe
5749.have altogether down the naturally weak constitution of his young friend. ness and pride of
5750.her about three months, and, with the " God forbid that it should be so," would he
5751.ng, and his separ- himself, " yet, O my God, he is in Thy hands, and Thou art a ati
5752. O my God, he is in Thy hands, and Thou art a ation from his sister, he began to fe
5753.xample of his father. I couldn't do it; God knows I corldn't, and I'm very glad tha
5754.as ever he likes, and that mother and I will make him as welcome and happy as though
5755.g to Father " Eustace, you h?.ve a true history of the reason of my intrusion on you th
5756.ion on you this morning, and I hope you will use all your influence with my friend,
5757.ed graces. forgot, his hands, which the good old priest never a look in which faith,
5758.priest never a look in which faith, and love, and angel-like innocence seemed strivi
5759.er a look in which faith, and love, and angel-like innocence seemed striving for the
5760. pleasant and :< the bright examples of virtue which I see around me. I shall your goo
5761.s, my own dear, dear father, and I pray God to give me an opportunity of showing ho
5762.all, nor expose myself to the danger of being converted against my will by Father Eus
5763.he danger of being converted against my will by Father Eustace there, who is smiling
5764.stace there, who is smiling at the very idea of making a convert of such a stanch Pr
5765.that when you know more of your adopted religion you will soon be disgusted with it, and
5766. know more of your adopted religion you will soon be disgusted with it, and that you
5767.soon be disgusted with it, and that you will be at his feet in less than six months,
5768.ls it. I confess that I don't share his opinion on this point, and that only goes to pr
5769. are only half as happy in your adopted religion as I pray you may be, you will be happy
5770.pted religion as I pray you may be, you will be happy indeed. Meanwhile, I give Fath
5771.are yourself any unnecessary trouble. " God knows, my dear young friend," Father Eu
5772.brave-hearted boy, were it in my power. God Almighty have you in His holy keeping,
5773.our health, and write to me every week. God is ; have shown you bless you, my child
5774. ; have shown you bless you, my child ! God bless you " ! succeeded week, and month
5775.he had been at college four months. The change of air seemed to have had a beneficial
5776.ought that he was decidedly better. his happiness was the continued harshness of his fath
5777.mself with all the ; Week fervor of his soul to the acquiring of the perfection of h
5778. the acquiring of the perfection of his state, he left his troubles about his father
5779.fidently and lov- ingly in the hands of God, knowing that He would bring everything
5780.out as should seem best to His infinite wisdom. Whilst Edwin's days are thus gliding a
5781.t Edwin's days are thus gliding away in peace and tranquil happiness at his college,
5782.thus gliding away in peace and tranquil happiness at his college, what of the proud man w
5783.iness at his college, what of the proud man who has spurned him from his heart ? A
5784.bent, his hair a little grayer, and his form a little thinner, but prouder, sterner,
5785.more unforgiving than ever, nursing his evil feelings as he broods over his imaginar
5786. you had better take care too, for I am one of those old-fashioned folks who have g
5787.he may still the raging passions heart, evil CHAPTEB XVL HOPES BEAUZED. TTNBELENTINa
5788.EAUZED. TTNBELENTINa STILIj. THE PEOTJD MAN PAY8 ANOTHEB INSTALMENT OF THE PBICE OF
5789. he did not emerge until the routine of life. He entered at once with all the enthus
5790.red. How he spent those days he and his God know but that they were days of fierce
5791.of fierce and awful coneagerness of his nature into the spirit of the state to which h
5792.ss of his nature into the spirit of the state to which he alone his face bore testimo
5793.on the morning of fondly hoped Almighty God had called him. It was the reali- flict
5794.ith a step more stately and prouder mer life, and now that he had found it, it is no
5795. strange of all, when he learnt of each other, Edwin, in answer to a question from Fa
5796.no bounds, and he gave full vent to his evil passions. Eustace, my more than father,
5797.o have loved him as scarcely father any chance I could have come here before I was con
5798.ayer, I have to ask of you, dear Father world. My curse upon him for a vile apostate
5799.for a vile apostate as he is I that you will often implore for me grace not to dis-
5800. often implore for me grace not to dis- will never forgive him, by the God that made
5801. to dis- will never forgive him, by the God that made me; never, ce, the holy state
5802.e God that made me; never, ce, the holy state I have chosen, grace not to be blind to
5803. For three days after Edwin left him no one saw him, as he remained locked up in hi
5804.CTORIES. to be giving way, that in very truth And thus he fed the sense of the wrong
5805. that in very truth And thus he fed the sense of the wrong he fancied he had sustaine
5806.pt in union with that submission to his will and that rejection lu 'art that moments
5807.sion to his will and that rejection lu 'art that moments when he looked so worn and
5808.hat old look rent the heart to see him, many, many came over him, telling in an in-
5809.d look rent the heart to see him, many, many came over him, telling in an in- stant
5810.g in an in- stant its tale of grief and pain, telling, although he flattered of his
5811.g, although he flattered of his adopted religion which he knew in his himself that lie h
5812.T HELP rr. IT, AND DOESN'T WANT TO HELP One morning, towards the middle of Septembe
5813.ure. hour, and whether it were that his good angel was at work try- very unwell, and
5814.hour, and whether it were that his good angel was at work try- very unwell, and beggi
5815.n as soon as possible Eustace, the city one day more irritated and passionate than
5816.ards and forwards with hasty steps, " I will never forgive him never never never." A
5817.gain, looking for awhile upon the blank space where the picture had been, till he tur
5818.y heart wept in the stillness and dark- mind ness of the night, even for his lost, l
5819.r the days gone by and all their former love, telling him how happy he was, and that
5820. to Maria, breaking the sad news to his happiness complete was his father's forgiveness,
5821.ch he might soon could never forget his duty and love toward his dear father and rec
5822.ht soon could never forget his duty and love toward his dear father and recover. Fat
5823.sed, reto Edwin with a formal note from one of the clerks, intimating his worst fea
5824. to inform him that Mr. Stanhope had no desire to enter he stretched out both his hand
5825. stretched out both his hands, with the same gentle, innocent into any correspondenc
5826.re, and putting his arms around the old man's neck, kissed And so he went his way,
5827.ns his son. Whilst the warm-hearted old man was in the middle in all their painful
5828.nt of my domestic affor it. Till then I will trouble you, fairs, sir, I will ask you
5829. then I will trouble you, fairs, sir, I will ask you to yourself." And, turning on h
5830.nted the church as usual; he was in the world almost as much as usual, and casual obs
5831.nd casual observers remarked but little change in him, and wondered to Bee him bear hi
5832.of his business, at ehii'rli, or in the world, there were moments when, although a sh
5833. his face with his hands, remained some time buried in sorrowful and foreboding thou
5834. who was in a very weak and debilitated state. Edwin's courage at the time of his con
5835.ery weak and debilitated state. Edwin's courage at the time of his conversion, and his
5836.bilitated state. Edwin's courage at the time of his conversion, and his gentle and a
5837.. tercourse, had so endeared him to the good old priest, that he felt this illness o
5838. liked to admit. He was resigned to the will of God. but he felt that it would be a
5839.o admit. He was resigned to the will of God. but he felt that it would be a very he
5840.be a very heavy blow to him, should the Good Shepherd take the innocent boy for ever
5841.to Himself. He felt that there would be one tie more, and that, perhaps, the strong
5842.rongest, loosed between himself and the world and although he felt, and felt most sur
5843.d, still it would be a loss to him, and nature shrunk and trembled as she contemplat;
5844.d with all the quickened perceptions of love to the slow, heavy breathing, and he sa
5845.l is over, but a poor, wasted, shrunken form, as fuir, but as fleeting and as ; ; TH
5846.tion's hand wont to strew around it. At one glance Father Eustace took in all that
5847. to be. He knew it ; he had watched its progress often before, and he felt that though c
5848.tchfulness might keep him to them for a time, it would be only for a time, and that
5849.them for a time, it would be only for a time, and that ere long poor Edwin would mos
5850.aking. VICTORIES. must confess that our mind can neither 21 conceive, nor our JK-U d
5851.e when the brother ami looked into each other's eyes once again, and when without utt
5852.t spoke to licart, witli.au eloq in its language which our feeble pen shrinks from endea
5853.here, lay me down, for I am very weary. God bless you, dear Father Eustace, God ble
5854.ry. God bless you, dear Father Eustace, God bless you ;" and with a pleasant smile
5855.l asleep in the arms of the weeping old man ; and as he slept so peacfully and calm
5856.oo freely about my betters. been a very good master to me, and of course he knows wh
5857.to me, and of course he knows what soon being better. "No, dear Father Eustace," answ
5858.ce, my own best friend, why do you weep time he will surely be an angel in heaven, a
5859.wn best friend, why do you weep time he will surely be an angel in heaven, and when
5860.y do you weep time he will surely be an angel in heaven, and when I think of If I had
5861.itterly ? I am happy, very, very happy. God help me, I can't help it and," it, but
5862. why do you weep ? Am I not going to my God, and was he added more emphatically tha
5863.r, who first told me of His help it !" "God help him" answered Mrs. Martin, rather
5864.artin, rather sharply, goodness and His love ? and now you weep to trust me to Him.
5865., "I hope I know my " Father Eustace, I love you very much, but not half as much pla
5866.o me. I shall be very "I can't help it; God help me, I can't help it." sorry to lea
5867. leave you, but I can leave you all for God. I am but," he added, drawing the old p
5868.ls and "the better land," if the gentle happiness that smiled upon his fair young face we
5869. must very soon close his eyes upon the world. He had wasted away under the influence
5870. painful to look upon his poor shrunken form and be obliged to think that his brave
5871.d seized upon him, and that no power of man, no force But upon his of love, no ardo
5872. power of man, no force But upon his of love, no ardor of devotion could save him. a
5873.dor of devotion could save him. and his pain face, even when his sufferings were the
5874.the most intense, there ever rested the same gentle smile, sadder, perhaps, and more
5875.n expression, but loving, There was the same quick appreciation patient, sweet as ev
5876.of those around him, that there was not one of them who would not willingly have ,
5877.him, especially as the physician was of opinion that his native air would be of seryice
5878.at the happy home where he had spent so many pleasant months, and where his example
5879.months, and where his example had drawn many a thoughtless heart nearer to its to Go
5880.ny a thoughtless heart nearer to its to God. "I can bear the rest now," he whispere
5881.o never uttered a hasty word in all his pain. From the first moment of his conversio
5882.t of his conversion, ; feel back left I will go in coming to see me at your house. p
5883.t your house. poor old Mrs. Martin, who will nurse me very tenderly. Besides I am qu
5884., as it were, so spiritualized his mere animal part by its wasting influence, he was s
5885.art by its wasting influence, he was so angel-like, so immaterial, that they about hi
5886.he had already put on some part of that immortality which was so soon to enshroud him hi it
5887.houghtfully sent me after we parted. It will be better for us all ," and as he seeme
5888.weep certain scene, and we must beg the same indiilgence now. for me." One day he sa
5889. beg the same indiilgence now. for me." One day he saw poor old Johnson sitting wee
5890.WO of bis bed, find ho beckoned the old man to corao nearer to him. When the fnithf
5891.Edwin put ont his poor wasted arms, and man's taking him round the neck, laid his h
5892. confession was over the innocent young soul once more absolved, and left in solemn
5893., and left in solemn communion with the God who hod come to be Himself the pledge f
5894.e feebly whispered, "you have been very good I recollect the night you to me, and I
5895. I recollect the night you to me, and I love you very much. took me up to see my dea
5896. very much. Poor, poor papa; I know you will be very sorry when lam gone." Poor old
5897.aid the sick boy down as tenderly as an angel might have done, and, withdrawing into
5898.ll the day with Edwin, returned home in time to meet her father at the usual dinner
5899.ened the door, a hurried account of the state of Edwin, Father Eustace followed him t
5900.tace heeded him not. sir," said the old man, with the tears trickling down his face
5901.eathbed of your son, and that, I trust, will be a apology for my intrusion upon your
5902.r boy uttered was your name. Surely you will now forget all that is post, and not al
5903. Surely you and if you would do so, you will come and see him ere he die " must inde
5904.performing a thousand little offices of love, and a happy smile always passed across
5905.the last few to him, and, nights of his life, he always drew her quite close in addi
5906.r quite close in addition to his usual "Good bye, dear, goodbye," softly " Poor, poo
5907.dbye," softly " Poor, poor papa give my love to poor papa." When added, she had left
5908.how his He would fain gratitude for her love towards his lost boy. have gone himself
5909.mit? What would men say? What would the world think? It could not be. Maria often ess
5910.d left, a very serious and unmistakable change in well that his son had returned to !
5911.ou have made me a laughing-stock to the world you have made my home desolate and now
5912.rdon your harsh expressions. This is no time for bandying words. I call to witness t
5913.r bandying words. I call to witness the God who is to judge us both," he continued,
5914.son is dying, perhaps even now is dead. Will come with me or not, for I cannot delay
5915.d hoarsely, "no, he has gone his way, I will go mine." Father Eustace turned away to
5916.tching them, with a face like that of a man in fearful His brow grew knotted, and t
5917.of the pressure, sat wrestling with the evil passions that were killing him. He knew
5918.Father Eustace saw at a glance that the time was come, and that the fatal change was
5919.t the time was come, and that the fatal change was near at hand. The flush had departe
5920."My dear child, would you Lord and your God the Good Shepherd who is about to take
5921. child, would you Lord and your God the Good Shepherd who is about to take you to Hi
5922. the work of his own and blasted hopes. One hour two hours and still she ere he thr
5923.lf with frantic grief upon the lifeless form. Leave them alone, the father and sou.
5924. moaning, sighing wind with its tale of death, and thicken round them, each tune that
5925.ried beating of his own withered heart. Death death death sighs the wind without, as
5926.eating of his own withered heart. Death death death sighs the wind without, as he sta
5927. of his own withered heart. Death death death sighs the wind without, as he starts th
5928.ind without, as he starts think of that other fearful night when he swore by his Make
5929.kept his oath. And, for thee, poor boy, peace be with thee Though our hearts were hea
5930.er have the ANOTHEB VICTORY, AND A KEAL ONE. PEACE. heart to bring thee back again
5931.ve the ANOTHEB VICTORY, AND A KEAL ONE. PEACE. heart to bring thee back again into th
5932.ee back again into this cold and dreary world THEY hurried back with all speed, and h
5933. sleepest so calmly and so free from We will tend with a loving hand the flowers tha
5934.nd when our own hearts grow weak and we will steal in the softening twilight to the
5935.anxiously that we may gain strength and courage from the hallowed memories that flit ar
5936. do of a past them as if expecting some one else, and for a moment a shadow flitted
5937.t it was to do all and dare all for its God. Peace, passed away, however, in an ins
5938.was to do all and dare all for its God. Peace, passed away, however, in an instant, a
5939.ant, as he made an effort to He was too peace be with thee 1 raise his hand, which he
5940.et but Father Eustace, interpreting his desire, raised it to his lips, crucili i He ha
5941. his bed, for they felt that the solemn change was at hand. They watched the awful and
5942., more heavy, and more painful than the one before. The storm outside is hushed, an
5943.r object was to bring under your notice one phase of that which, more or less modif
5944.eart that arc dead, is passing to ! its God wails for the hopes that ! for the stri
5945.rth to earth ! Slower and slower still. God be with him now Another smile as he see
5946.o Church's parting ! forth, O Christian soul; in the name of God the created thee ;
5947.forth, O Christian soul; in the name of God the created thee ; in the name of God t
5948.f God the created thee ; in the name of God the Son who suffered for thee in the na
5949.on who suffered for thee in the name of God the Holy Ghost who sanctified thee in t
5950.us forget the darkness of the Past. For many a long year the English Catholic was a
5951.nd of his birth. Yet he never ceased to love her. love of country is woven round our
5952.birth. Yet he never ceased to love her. love of country is woven round our hearts li
5953.ntry is woven round our hearts like the love of our mother, and is mixed up with the
5954.may place us in foreign feelings of our nature. cherubim and seraphim in the name of t
5955. our minds let thy place be this day in peace, and thy abode in holy wander with fond
5956.e may visit sunT look full of faith and love, and peace ineffable, nier lands, and w
5957.t sunT look full of faith and love, and peace ineffable, nier lands, and walk amid ri
5958.han those which deck gazes for the last time on the crucifix which the old priest ou
5959.d priest our own, but somehow we cannot love them half so well, and lief ore )his gl
5960. ore )his glazing eye another effort to form with his the grandest dwelling that we
5961.th to earth Dust to dust Ashes to ashes SOUL and, oh let us thank God as we say it,
5962.shes to ashes SOUL and, oh let us thank God as we say it, the free, the yard which
5963. we say it, the free, the yard which wo love so well, where we have so often strayed
5964. where we have so often strayed in rtal soul, into the loving hand that gave it, to
5965.here we saw them lay the parents of our love! laid so gently on that mercy-breathing
5966.e exiles from our home, how intense our desire i f rei.l ; ; who The ; ; ; ; ! ! ! ; !
5967.ome to his assistance all you saints of God, meet him all you angels, reliis soul,
5968.of God, meet him all you angels, reliis soul, and present it now before its Lord ;"
5969. arms, meekly and 1 their hist upon tho world ; turning thither, how enduring the hop
5970.ow buoyant the confidence, how fond the love, made fonder still by absence. It was w
5971.st forth into * hand that inflicted tin punishment was the baud of his country, world that
5972.punishment was the baud of his country, world that she had solemnly foresworn. They t
5973.t had been built for the worship of the one true was, nevertheless, the kiss of lov
5974.one true was, nevertheless, the kiss of love. from his heart the image that his love
5975.love. from his heart the image that his love had enshrined there, and God, and the m
5976. that his love had enshrined there, and God, and the mighty piles which had so ofte
5977. mere material fabrics bodies without a soul. land he loved so well, and that he mig
5978.her's halls. He loved her much with the love of re- a church about them but the name
5979.to them, he inquires in astonishlove of desire for the days to come. In the heart of t
5980.light of the looking down from the very same spot hundreds of years before brave old
5981.s and her minsters had their altars his religion was invented, and that, therefore, the
5982.e presumption and the presence of their God and her rich lands were richer of right
5983.ields were still more fertile, when the many a year the rack, the knife, and the gib
5984.easts of the appeared to depend on some one individual, some sainted and as the gen
5985. hearts, upon his ear, it was raised to sign himself with the sign of that the blood
5986. it was raised to sign himself with the sign of that the blood of the martyrs has ev
5987.ever been the fruitful seed of In those good old times, if old age found the poor ol
5988.nd gentle nun flitting round his bed of pain like some sweet spirit from a better la
5989.f his rest and though he was but a poor man, they remembered his soul for many a da
5990.was but a poor man, they remembered his soul for many a day as that of a brother who
5991. poor man, they remembered his soul for many a day as that of a brother who had gone
5992.y, and England had saints for her ; ; ! man feeble flickering flame of the faith, b
5993.nd joyous anticipations for the future. Many of the best, purest, and most learned o
5994., we think no more about them. Did each one come before us in its own individual be
5995.d a romance, that is, a romance of real life, attached saints in every bishops, grad
5996.nd has given to heaven. of Beverley the good old times when England was in truth "me
5997. the good old times when England was in truth "merrie England," and he weeps for the
5998.use without tearing in twain those whom God had made one. He weeps for " Westminste
5999.earing in twain those whom God had made one. He weeps for " Westminster the days wh
6000. things, blessed by the presence of its God. and he cannot but- weep that they shou
6001.should have passed away ; and did. alas Tyranny they away pass for, Edward the throne o
6002.ith of ages. onation ;" for the worship God in York Minster ; ' ! ; They scattered
6003.rove the monk from the monastery, and : one of them. The story of Edwin Stanhope, w
6004.ou yourself, dear reader, perhaps, know many whose sufferings have been scarcely inf
6005.Edwin. If you do not, we could tell you many such a tale. We could teU you of young
6006., and exposed to all the dangers of the world, for daring to do as poor Edwin did. We
6007.on, prospects, and everything which the world could offer them, and are obliged to ea
6008.little conceive. Yes, we could tell you many such tides, and in our own simple way w
6009.have endeavored Yet simple, unromantic, matter-of-fact you one of them. though it be,
6010. simple, unromantic, matter-of-fact you one of them. though it be, we would fain pe
6011.of the Faith which has been given to so many of you gratuitously, and for which, per
6012. when yet that you turned away from the death-bed of instead of keeping him alive, an
6013. We liopn poor w it ; the old gentleman will not be very angry, but, in fact, conten
6014.the contempt and scorn which wo know he will hurl at us for candor and sincerity com
6015.ppreciation of the glorious gift of she will forgive us; for, although we might have
6016.en obliged to conclude it by distorting will tell you how to prove it. We have, too,
6017.tially a true tale. of those and, thank God, they are not rare to meet with now- co
6018.are to meet with now- confidence in her good nature, as to be persuaded that she wil
6019.o meet with now- confidence in her good nature, as to be persuaded that she will a-day
6020.ood nature, as to be persuaded that she will a-days who are converts to our holy Fai
6021.ossoms or white least substantially the same as ours, we are content to let you favo
6022., are rank on the side of old Brown, as one of the most implacable called to follow
6023.ur critics. But if you meet with such a one, greet him a song which none else can s
6024.scant, and his lot we believe her heart will soften, and that she will become be har
6025.eve her heart will soften, and that she will become be hard, help him if you are abl
6026.hard, help him if you are able, and you will do a good reconciled to the unromantic
6027. him if you are able, and you will do a good reconciled to the unromantic ending of
6028.to make a Catholic of Mr. Stanwork, and one which God will bless for, the same God
6029.Catholic of Mr. Stanwork, and one which God will bless for, the same God knows Fait
6030.olic of Mr. Stanwork, and one which God will bless for, the same God knows Faith is
6031., and one which God will bless for, the same God knows Faith is in question ! It is
6032. one which God will bless for, the same God knows Faith is in question ! It is the
6033.such generous souls, are hope. Would to God we could; but twelve years have .rolled
6034.he cold, dead manner, in away since the death of Edwin, and he is not a Catholic yet.
6035.and he is not a Catholic yet. which too many of us, good, comfortable souls, take, a
6036.t a Catholic yet. which too many of us, good, comfortable souls, take, as a mat- He
6037.a mat- He is a white-headed, feeble old man now; but although still ter of course,
6038.ice if for the pride and unbending self-will of other days. He buried well but ordin
6039.or the pride and unbending self-will of other days. He buried well but ordinarily fai
6040.that, if he has had to turn hia back on many an old friend, that he has found many a
6041.n many an old friend, that he has found many a new one and, thauk your God, that his
6042.ld friend, that he has found many a new one and, thauk your God, that his trial has
6043.as found many a new one and, thauk your God, that his trial has never been yours, f
6044. is nearest and dearest to the heart of man. And for you, dear brother, long a wand
6045.grave of his son. the morning after the death of his boy, when they timidly entered t
6046.ound him still kneeling by the lifeless form, and with one of the cold hands pressed
6047.kneeling by the lifeless form, and with one of the cold hands pressed tightly to hi
6048.f how his boy had sickened and died the death of the just. He did not speak, even whe
6049.orpse was laid, and " My own bright boy form, repeating ever and anon, Where was the
6050.killed him I have murdered him I have O God, forgive me Would that I had died destr
6051.hildren whom circumstances prevent from being interred in her own consecrated ground.
6052.USTACE IS CHARGED WITH A MESSAGE TO THE OTHER WORLD. WHO SHALL TELL A LITTLE PRATTLER
6053. IS CHARGED WITH A MESSAGE TO THE OTHER WORLD. WHO SHALL TELL A LITTLE PRATTLER " WHS
6054. from London. there still, a feeble old man, but bent much more by the secret sorro
6055.written itself upon hia face and in hia form, than by weight of years. On the first
6056. years. On the first anniversary of the death of his boy, he and his daughter were si
6057.arms about his neck, and told him, with many tears and kisses, that she must follow
6058.nd the wily old priest and Brown thanks God that there ia no dunhis son Tom's playi
6059.upon him; and, although we cannot thank God for it, we are very much afraid rest of
6060.l, my friend my is ; in heaven, W/l.t i duty and if still, I shall not, on that acco
6061. bo filled up in his withered i ; id of one who is to me to think of " Catholic Tru
6062.one who is to me to think of " Catholic Truth, I shall indeed be most grateful. Ho an
6063.t Mr. StanIf they speak to him on hope. religion he listens patiently, but heart. seemin
6064.k place about eighteen months after the death of Edwin. He was much with Edwin during
6065.present with Edwin had not produced the same effect upon him as upon his friend, sti
6066.much with his friend on the blessing of religion. His own appreciation of the blessing h
6067., that he found it hard to speak on any other with those whom he loved. When the end
6068.e lesson conveyed in his calm and happy death was almost the only thing required to c
6069. the litconnected with the sickness and death of his boy. It was a subject on which F
6070.eak as Mr. Stanhope was to listen ; and many and many a time, when Father Eustace ha
6071.. Stanhope was to listen ; and many and many a time, when Father Eustace had told hi
6072.ope was to listen ; and many and many a time, when Father Eustace had told him how f
6073.the last words of his boy were words of love and duty, he would lay his head upon th
6074.words of his boy were words of love and duty, he would lay his head upon the old man
6075.uty, he would lay his head upon the old man's shoulder, and gently murmur, "Tell me
6076.Father Eustace, however, with his usual prudence, would hear of no hasty steps. He insis
6077. had been, still a severe ; had pleased God to have left him to me, I should have b
6078.ery grateful but I know that he was too good for me, and that God took him from me t
6079.w that he was too good for me, and that God took him from me to punish my pride and
6080.me to punish my pride and break my self-will ; but I am not sorry he became a Cathol
6081.ot help feelit ; ing my loss," "and you will which came upon Mr. Stanhope after his
6082. came upon Mr. Stanhope after his son's death, and which lasted several months, with
6083.ich lasted several months, with several other reasons, combined to delay her formal r
6084. to delay her formal reception for some time. She chose the anniversary of Edwin's d
6085.e. She chose the anniversary of Edwin's death, as we have seen, to make the announcem
6086.at she had any fear of meeting with any opposition from him, but because she thought he wo
6087.uld feel it less on such a day, when so many chastening thoughts would be working in
6088.friend, he sobbed aloud. fit of illness God, and I am satisfied, only my heart is v
6089.imes endeavored to lead him to speak of religion, and he would add, as the tears streame
6090.My boy is with ; Edwin had found in the one he had embraced, and how cheap he had h
6091.ould be gained by annoying him. He, the happiness which therefore, deemed it better, and
6092. deemed it better, and his plan was the one adopted by Frank and Maria after his de
6093.ne adopted by Frank and Maria after his death, to surround him as much as possible wi
6094.f Catholicity, and to leave the rest to God. What an inscrutable thing is .the huma
6095. home of Frank and Maria and as the old man often insists upon their reciting their
6096.ow happy I am you would nqt cry, Frank; sign of the cross properly they begin to hop
6097.ss properly they begin to hope that his mind is and if you would only promise me to
6098.sometimes speak to him about relig- his death, they may have the happiness of seeing
6099.out relig- his death, they may have the happiness of seeing him a memOh promise me this,
6100.mOh promise me this, ber of the Church. God grant that it may be so. ion, my happin
6101.h. God grant that it may be so. ion, my happiness would be complete. The union of Frank S
6102.he union of Frank Seymour and Maria was one of the last my dear friend, and I shall
6103.of our dear old friend, Father Eustace. many conversations with Father Eustace, and
6104.d whieh ho attributes to the prayers of one whom of Ids congregation. He recovered
6105.om the immediate effects Soon after the death of Edwin, of the fever, but he never th
6106.of Mr. Stanhope, at the years after the death of poor Edwin, Father Eustace died, in
6107.ho seemed to find his chief the fullest sense of the word, the death of the just, L .
6108.hief the fullest sense of the word, the death of the just, L .ess i" heaping his favo
6109.L .ess i" heaping his favors upon every one whom his son behind him a name to be he
6110.a name to be held in benediction, and a memory With such an influence at his back, it
6111.fluence at his back, it is very dear to many, besides him who pens these lines. Ther
6112. grateful heart, and of a it half-dozen memory that could never forget all that the o.
6113.sponsible upon him and his, and been to one who had been dearer to her than all the
6114.who had been dearer to her than all the world the use to whieh they turn it makes us
6115. i ! incoinpanied witli t! <>f you, "he nature, and it required and pacify the r< " i-
6116.n I in my pride cast him forth upon the world, he might have tiled in the streets hai
6117.u a second and a lander father than the one who disowned him. I can never thank you
6118.m. I can never thank you as I ought. I -will not even endeavor to do so, but I beg y
6119.l desolation him of the heartbroken old man who is upon the earth, and who, were it
6120. curse which has cast a blight upon his life. Tell him, Shall wholly do away, I wv n
6121.t, nor frost, nor ihmnlrr, Cor.ElilDor. One little prattler, the oldest and bold th
6122.sometimes says to him, " Dear Since the death of Father Eusgrandpapa, do tell me why
6123.seldom speaks of There is a sor- bright angel in heaven, now, and I know that old Joh
6124.never pass away. row graven on it which time and loving care may perhaps would not s
6125. not true and if dear uncle Edwin be an angel, I cannot tell, grandpapa, why you cry
6126.hich is all the more bitter because the cause of it can never and are so sorry for hi
6127.o sorry for him. I should like to be au angel too, if " and as Jo! be remedied. Oh, h
6128.meeting him " again, if the goodness of God may pardon me my grievous ski. The desi
6129. He did his best to soothe the poor old man, and lead him to think of dear Father E
6130.oung voices are prattling round the old man's kn a venerable white-headed servant i
6131.sacrifice. often be prevented The proud will may not bend until the evil is done, an
6132.d The proud will may not bend until the evil is done, and then the remorse of a whol
6133., and then the remorse of a whole after life cannot repair the mischief, cannot reca
6134.papa, poor whispers to the faithful old man oh do tell me, Johnson, why poor grandp
6135. weather, a reprieve from their arduous duty. The sun's rays to them was what the br
6136.renadii rs and Voltigeurs rivalled each other in skill and precision. Not far from th
6137.m the spot, walking slowly along, was a man clothed in black. His eyes were fixed o
6138.nce reflected the pious thoughts of his soul he was a man of peace, and holy life, w
6139.the pious thoughts of his soul he was a man of peace, and holy life, whom God had c
6140.us thoughts of his soul he was a man of peace, and holy life, whom God had chosen as
6141.is soul he was a man of peace, and holy life, whom God had chosen as His earthly rep
6142.was a man of peace, and holy life, whom God had chosen as His earthly representativ
6143.box. Thus it was soon at his side. This good man was not only the physician of souls
6144.Thus it was soon at his side. This good man was not only the physician of souls, bu
6145.urs of his priesthtx id to tho study of medicine, and was able to apply the secrets of t
6146.ble to apply the secrets of the learned science to tho ordinary ailments of the country
6147.nd receivei care and attention from the good man. As the wound was too severe to all
6148.ceivei care and attention from the good man. As the wound was too severe to allow o
6149.leave from the colonel t> keep the sick man, and nurse him at the presbytery. " 1 w
6150.n, and nurse him at the presbytery. " 1 will soon return him to you qiiite cured," s
6151.s, has not resolved ti At all events, I will prepare his soul for a call him hence.
6152.ed ti At all events, I will prepare his soul for a call him hence. ; > better world.
6153.s soul for a call him hence. ; > better world." ; An instant after, the to Briangon.
6154.tended him with that skill and devotion science, sanctified by religion, alone can give
6155.ill and devotion science, sanctified by religion, alone can give; for more than a month
6156.ttend to tho exercises than a month the good cure" : It was a touching sight to see
6157.n charity, bending by day over the sick man's couch, and at night extended at his f
6158.days after reThus, us he hail said, the good cure accomjoined hi- corps. panied him
6159.telligence. " In a few days," men, "the good God and His minister will cliureh mid h
6160.gence. " In a few days," men, "the good God and His minister will cliureh mid house
6161.s," men, "the good God and His minister will cliureh mid house free from the storms
6162., BO scarcely arrived at his house when one of those common in mountainous district
6163.his question by saving, that for a long time he had entreated the assistance of gove
6164.time he had entreated the assistance of government, lor the resources of the church were n
6165.d the church destined to the worship of God, and the white house for the curd. Some
6166.ed too narrow to contain his joy. Great happiness sometimes produces the same effect as g
6167. Great happiness sometimes produces the same effect as greaf grief. The good priest
6168.ces the same effect as greaf grief. The good priest fell seriously ill one Saturday
6169.ief. The good priest fell seriously ill one Saturday evening the evening of the day
6170.he new church at Chauvet. For the first time, pereach other In the meanwhile the sto
6171.at Chauvet. For the first time, pereach other In the meanwhile the storm had ceased a
6172.hile the storm had ceased and the haps, God had become, according to the naive expr
6173. much did his grateful visitors. as the good curd of Chauvet was reciting his brevia
6174.den he saw in the distance, marching in good order, but without drums, as it The nex
6175.make the necessary purchases for the De courage A 1'ouvrage, la ! Les amis sout toujonr
6176.'ouvrage, la ! Les amis sout toujonrs " Good morning, monsieur le curd," said the el
6177.mbellishment of the church. During this time the curd, admirably tended in his turn
6178.ok advantage of this delay to ornament "Good morning my book of devotions ; friends,
6179. on the altar steps, ; : "I only did my duty." are doing ours in coming to build a c
6180.s in coming to build a church for " the good God, and a house for His minister. " Ca
6181.coming to build a church for " the good God, and a house for His minister. " Can it
6182. effect of this work of piety-, and did honor to the taste of the valiant sacristans.
6183.p of the tower replaced the old cracked one, which had become hoarse, the troopers
6184. ]>l . At length the great day arrived. One Sunday morning the 49th Regiment ranged
6185.parts of. the holy building; sill was ; happiness and joy the faces of the soldiers w< yo
6186.see by their looks they had performed a good action. n 10 o'clock the good curC of C
6187.rformed a good action. n 10 o'clock the good curC of Clmuvet At still , ; ; 1 1 1 be
6188.IENADIER, "You are a worthy minister of God," said he. "I will complete the sum you
6189. a worthy minister of God," said he. "I will complete the sum you desire to realize,
6190." said he. "I will complete the sum you desire to realize, if this is not sufficient t
6191.ficient to curry out your project." The same day the city, eight hours. that the van
6192.ns, wan to arrive on the fifth day. The good cur.' had not an instant to lose, if he
6193.eiving circumstance "by what happy "You will soon know, commander; in the meantime,'
6194.favor to ask you." " let it sooner than one I can refuse Two, be, " You will attend
6195.er than one I can refuse Two, be, " You will attend ; you nothing." at 1 Willingly w
6196.ttend ; you nothing." at 1 Willingly we will accept your invitation, monsieur le cur
6197. towards the officers of his battalion. will be there also, commander." " my mass to
6198. to Lyons to sell these ure. two covers will you buy them ? "You have taken along jo
6199.a hidden value, monsieur. " Now, answer will you buy my dishes? " "Their ostensible
6200.' : "Well, then, messieurs, to-morrow I will meet you at the Church of St. Ireneeus.
6201.of the column, made his entree into the good old town of Lyons. On the morrow, the b
6202.word," said the commander, pressing the good man's hand. "Thank you, commander. Now,
6203." said the commander, pressing the good man's hand. "Thank you, commander. Now, bef
6204.e whole regiment the benediction of the God of Armies, I have to ask you the second
6205.ay." " It is granted, monsieur how much will you give for this ?" "But very little,
6206.l your household on the invalid list ?" vice. " That does not How much is this watch
6207.ive and the watch and two covers are 1 "Will you permit me to offer you a medal that
6208. bearing this inscription on thi side : Religion, Honor, and Our Country, and on the rev
6209.his inscription on thi side : Religion, Honor, and Our Country, and on the reverse Fr
6210.rms, saying, this medal, so that it The good commander, Peyre, threw himself into th
6211.ommander, Peyre, threw himself into the good "Come, monsieur le cure come and bless
6212.us treasure of the priest, relating the history of the building of his church, informed
6213.fter we are gone," remembrance of added one of the officers, a tear standing in his
6214.ng in his eye. " Let us who possessed a good heart, " and pray for each other," said
6215.essed a good heart, " and pray for each other," said the worthy curfi a slight ; regi
6216. a slight ; regiment. if it last be the will of Providence that we see each other fo
6217.the will of Providence that we see each other for the time, may we meet in a better w
6218.ovidence that we see each other for the time, may we meet in a better world." The ev
6219.r for the time, may we meet in a better world." The evening I aaw, by the advertiseme
6220.pen to the public. I was tempted by the beauty of the morning, and suddenly decided to
6221.ed the crowd hurrying on in the fear of being late. Kuilroads, besides many other adv
6222. fear of being late. Kuilroads, besides many other advantages, will have that of to
6223. of being late. Kuilroads, besides many other advantages, will have that of to chin g
6224.ilroads, besides many other advantages, will have that of to chin g the Sisters. ONE
6225.ill have that of to chin g the Sisters. ONE was day Avarice was depolitical necessi
6226.rs. ONE was day Avarice was depolitical necessity and by institutions! stroyed for a time
6227.sity and by institutions! stroyed for a time among the Lacedemonians by yie creation
6228. convinced that it is their master they will learn to wait, when they find they will
6229.will learn to wait, when they find they will not be waited for. Social virtues How m
6230.l not be waited for. Social virtues How many great qualities are, in a great degree,
6231.great qualities are, in a great degree, good habits. Preach punctuality, They will i
6232., good habits. Preach punctuality, They will in a few minutes I tory. was nearly acq
6233. or thirty 30 THE ; SfSTEL'3. in it the sign of a long i years they had worked iu je
6234.ars they had worked iu jewellry for the same house i'Q masters succut-d one another,
6235.for the same house i'Q masters succut-d one another, and mak. they and monotonous s
6236.nous seclusion work, who ha\ they nrn d liberty ;.ud fresh air for : a in it, without a
6237.ud fresh air for : a in it, without any change in their own lot. They a lew luKirs. At
6238.H lived in the game room, at the end of one of the pa sages iu the Rue St. Denis, w
6239. go on before, while I inquire abo t he time of returning. light; weut on with it ti
6240.in at their next :r without their lives being marked by any other events halt, where
6241.without their lives being marked by any other events halt, where they have than Sunda
6242. a mother's informs them that it is the time fi.r hoeing out weeds, for maktendernes
6243.ss. At first it was amusing; afterwards one could not ing grafts and layers, for so
6244.. Madeleine has ou the sill of her dren one unable to leave off the habit of obeyin
6245.of her dren one unable to leave off the habit of obeying, the other window two wooden
6246. to leave off the habit of obeying, the other window two wooden boxes, in which, for
6247.w so little that their won- mation, all other plants may henceforth thrive in them. A
6248.t, and the game, they did not think the world was so great! It was old maid goes off
6249. begins to act over again the the first time they had trusted themselves on a railro
6250.sudden shocks, their alarms, and of her imagination. On reaching the grove of acacias, wher
6251.less and most of those who go there are life ? Ah how wrong was he who first had the
6252. how wrong was he who first had the bad courage to brought together by habit or the obl
6253. the bad courage to brought together by habit or the obligations of society. In the a
6254.that name of old maid, which recalls so many country assemblies, on the contrary, yo
6255.verything, is the height of fashion and good taste The two sisters were called Franc
6256. Madeleine. day's journey was a feat of courage without example in their Doubtless thei
6257.ay, Madeleine had suddenly proposed the idea of the ness. Oh, that the hearty enjoym
6258.been better," she said, "if she had not religion stamped its holy character on the celeb
6259.ster smiled at this Epicurian maxim. In truth, it would have been a great pity if any
6260.a low tone, as if interfered with their happiness, it was so frank and genial they were i
6261.ready disappeared They look round, take courage again, and express themselves full of a
6262.s would have agreed with her if she had man, and seem more particularly meant for h
6263.in their budget. The three francs spent life therefore there must be a more intimate
6264.e principal instruments of the isolated being who But the motion and the succession o
6265. left, Meudon the savage, admit me to a knowledge of some of his habits these with its vi
6266.e- Indian, tell me of rkwomen look from one window to the other with excla:iing int
6267. of rkwomen look from one window to the other with excla:iing intelligence, in which
6268.! ! ; ; ! : ! : ; ! ! ; : ; - <1 light. One fellow-]' vHulf it i: be at liiiifc, th
6269.beautiful country and I listen to these good <>M maids 6 am interested; and time pas
6270.ese good <>M maids 6 am interested; and time passes wii, At last the sun sets, and w
6271.re I reached them I heard voices on the other side forth she would have a specimen of
6272.ere burnt, her hands blackened, i:d her world, and that her saucer before it was crac
6273.r saucer before it was cracked, was the same face tied up with blood-stained bandage
6274.shops for sixpence which are Why should one of the girls employed at the gunpowder
6275.ty, is to be like these learned men who will see nothing in a "lant but the chemical
6276.th the resigned and unhopeful manner of one who has always been accustomed to suffe
6277.ch affected. I saw them consulting with one another in a low tone then built higher
6278.ched it, but they insisted with so much good nature, that I I met the two old sister
6279.it, but they insisted with so much good nature, that I I met the two old sisters, who
6280.o me that they would at first feared to pain them, and with some awkwardness I gave
6281.e journey had been giyen to the beggar. Good, like evil, is contagious; I run to the
6282.ad been giyen to the beggar. Good, like evil, is contagious; I run to the poor hill,
6283.ld not contain herself for joy. All her life she place, and return to Frances and Ma
6284.ner out on the grass! While helping her will walk with them. sister to take the prov
6285.th their day, the recollection of which will off. Frances, on the other hand, was br
6286.tion of which will off. Frances, on the other hand, was brought up at Mont- long make
6287.rac- and joyless now, I understand that God has provided a tion of novelty for her
6288.ensation with every trial. The smallest pleasure derives lection. She told of the vintag
6289.t we feel to be such, and the luxurious man feels no longer. could not make go to t
6290.e sails on the lake in the innkeep- the other that first of earthly blessings the bei
6291.her that first of earthly blessings the being easily made ; ; ; leaving the manufacto
6292. we sit down under a tree. Se'vres, its many-storied houses abutting upon the garden
6293.dens and the slopes of the hill; on the other side spreads out the park of St. Cloud,
6294.e ocean, Oh that I could persuade every one of this that so the rich might not abus
6295.d that the pocr might have patience. If happiness is the rarest of blessings, it is becau
6296.ne and Frances ! Worthy sisters ! whose courage, ; resignation, and generous hearts are
6297. wretched who give themselves your only wealth, pray up to despair for the unhappy \di
6298.e furrow, ance we have made, was a very good specimen of a Breton billowy mass. He h
6299.s own straight as an arrow the first of God's creatures to sing its farmer. Both fa
6300.well Maker's praises; the hum of insect-life begins; and all the choice as well as t
6301. dogs, the lowing of mier and both were good, simcattle, the shrill crow of the cock
6302. grazed in briskly to work. Must have a good lot of corn got in before pasture land
6303.onest eyes, and horses Bobert, the head man, gave out the sharp sickles and his mot
6304.p sickles and his mother's calm, gentle nature. Sincerely religious, he had the reaper
6305.ecked handkerchiefs under their a great love for the poor, and, when quite a little
6306.eat hunches of bread for them, which he One day he met a little barefooted boy, Mar
6307.s own feet. everything with the help of one lame servant, who had grown On his retu
6308.bots old in her service, and whom every one called Limping she kissed him tenderly
6309.kthorn hedge, and running up to her for one more kiss. lose one's sabots." And next
6310.nning up to her for one more kiss. lose one's sabots." And next he came in barefoot
6311.urly black face covered with blood. " " Good heavens' what has happened? said Marthe
6312.keep them quiet; and as he chose not to mind me, I sent one of my sabots at dear." h
6313. and as he chose not to mind me, I sent one of my sabots at dear." his head." "Very
6314.ttle fellow like that "And, mother, you will come to the field when the Angelus " "
6315.us " " He's an impudent monkey, all the same and next time I rings ? She nodded a pr
6316. impudent monkey, all the same and next time I rings ? She nodded a promise and Aubi
6317.st by the side of his favorite I got as many pecks as I had given him thumps." " " b
6318.aps that nearly O, Yves, my poor child, will you never mend your ways ? " touched th
6319.was doing you no harm and he's " such a good boy. with an oak branch, which he flapp
6320.. " Not a bit of it it all comes to the same is noon And now it there is no shadow c
6321.in the midday heat. A bell rings, every man stops just have to buy the shoes." " Th
6322. the Angecertainly not do." " " there's one law lus with all his men, after which a
6323. Angecertainly not do." " " there's one law lus with all his men, after which all s
6324.?" " and refreshment. For the hundredth time some laborer Yes, there is a different
6325. some laborer Yes, there is a different law for a cruel, disobedient boy, bids his
6326.comrades beware of falling asleep under one of the and for a good and charitable on
6327.lling asleep under one of the and for a good and charitable one. I reward the one an
6328.ne of the and for a good and charitable one. I reward the one and I Walnut-trees fo
6329.a good and charitable one. I reward the one and I Walnut-trees for there, three fee
6330.et underground, according to punish the other. But, mind, you are not to suppose that
6331.nd, according to punish the other. But, mind, you are not to suppose that I CHAPTEB
6332.ld, the first who called me mother, and God knows how I thanked Him for you. Let me
6333. So "O you have said before; once more, will you buy me a pair my God," wailed the p
6334.e; once more, will you buy me a pair my God," wailed the poor child, " how shall I
6335. would have fetched a couple of " No, I will not. When you deserve favors, you shall
6336.her for Twelfth-day. I am sure Marcotte will kill me. I had " Very well; I shall wri
6337.hall wring that bird's neck, and Maclou will rather run away at once than face him.
6338.error stricken. Marcotte was a dreadful man, get a flogging." " You will never be s
6339. a dreadful man, get a flogging." " You will never be so wicked." to be sure, but th
6340.here were things as bad or worse; it "I will, as sure as " would soon be dark, and b
6341.ts and take a sinful oath. If you don't mind your mother's displeas- " loups-garous.
6342.ther's displeas- " loups-garous. " " It will be " there's no moon." ure, fear God's
6343.t will be " there's no moon." ure, fear God's anger." very dark," she said, " Let m
6344.ther's arms, and rushed out anybody you will be sorry to leave?" "O of the house. an
6345.. and then yes, Armelle, you you are so good and kind Meanwhile, poor little Maclou
6346.is Aubin, that bad boy's brother, he is good too and so He had pulled a handful of i
6347.d bathed his bruised head and milk, and good advice too and his wife knitted me a pa
6348.kings at Christmas. There are plenty of good people at daughter she had torn up her
6349. St. Aubin du Cormier and besides, when one has always lived head, and was doing he
6350.omfort him. Maelou had told in a place, one is sorry to leave the trees, and the co
6351.ve the trees, and the cows, and her his history, and was extolling the prowess of his b
6352.abots Ah, he is a bad boy ; but you are good, and then you "Yes, I know, there in Ma
6353.And the children sat down opposite each other silently, with " What makes their elbow
6354.hy, because your father drinks so." " I love cry and looking up saw Aubin standing b
6355.elieve she the chickens won't beats the one you lost." like a duck hatched by a hen
6356.y when they were interrupted up for the one my brother killed don't you see ?" " Bu
6357. to them as goose is your father's what will he say ?" by a tremendous noise. ! : "
6358.stragglers got together and counted but one was missing the great white goose, the
6359.sts as he ; ! " Why, ; it geese so when one happens very luckily that I keep our fl
6360.hiuk I have lost it." " But your father will scold you." "Nevermind that." spoke. be
6361.; it's not worth thinking of." " O, how good you are !" and the little orphan clung
6362.And what do you suppose Maclou's master will do to him ? If your father had even to
6363.ody to take his H\vitch. and his master will lay a greas thick stick across his part
6364. know it " wicked afraid of telling the truth to Yves," as they call you, "Very well,
6365. Yves," as they call you, "Very well, I will say it again, for ; used to live. ; ; !
6366. and yet he knew that he had incurred a punishment. No matter better so than that poor lit
6367.w that he had incurred a punishment. No matter better so than that poor little Maclou
6368.t a child, and brave as he was he liked being punished as little as any other child s
6369.e liked being punished as little as any other child so he turned a little out of the
6370., in her little niche, smiling OB every one, and holding " What out her Child to th
6371. No trained voices Bangaatiphons in her honor, but many angels, and the crown-piece."
6372. voices Bangaatiphons in her honor, but many angels, and the crown-piece." a " Hail
6373.-piece." a " Hail Mary " was whispered, many a simple hymn sung beYou know quite wel
6374.cross, and word. " This little incident will show the character of the brothers. gre
6375.ers. greeted her with their carols. Ah, many were the confidences breathed into her
6376.the confidences breathed into her ear ; many the good resolutions formed at As Yves
6377.dences breathed into her ear ; many the good resolutions formed at As Yves grew olde
6378.anxieties increased. She was her feet ; many a mother came there to pray for her chi
6379.m sure she showed the road to heaven to many a sup- mother's patient hopefulness she
6380.spot in his heart; but all in vain. The good Abbe" pliant. Aubin knelt down on the e
6381.Marthe and little Armelle. There came a time when there seemed to be a hope of Yves
6382.ears. ond and better birthday. When the family returned from tha mass, at which the ch
6383.r the first "Are all the cattle right?" time, the parents led them into the inner ro
6384.p told the boys that it had been in the family for two hundred and goats ?" It was the
6385.flyyears. leaves were written important family events births, marriages, "Ay, master t
6386.?" etc. " should " After this "There is one short." And the old servant cast a pity
6387." said the farmer, you comserious fault God forbid it should be a crime I mit any g
6388.our godfather made you a names; and may God give you grace and strength to live and
6389.uite right." " Now, children, it is bed-time come and say good-night." of the occasi
6390., children, it is bed-time come and say good-night." of the occasion, and of his fat
6391.voice, " Take warning, Yves ; From this time the servants called them "our young mas
6392.his mother for her blessing was a small matter; and the boy seemed so altered for the
6393.nd of that " He went seldoiner derness, time, however, the old anxieties returned. M
6394.owever, the old anxieties returned. May God bless thee, as I do." Aubin was not lon
6395.s of the plaints of him were constantly being brought to his father. dead goose. As s
6396.id so, they grew larger and larger. She One day he had turned some cows into a clov
6397.he began flying about like a bird or an angel. A rough Jean's remonstrances were met
6398.e asked the carter where they were. The man pointed silently to the door of tho inn
6399.ed at his feet. For this inner room was one which was only used on solemn and impor
6400. full of consternation, exclaiming that one goose was missing and at the same momen
6401.g that one goose was missing and at the same moment Jean and Marthe came in. Both lo
6402.the meal, much joking with Louison, and many compliments to the mistress on her cook
6403.e like children than inferiors. On this particular evening, however, his words were few an
6404. right in thinking that Marthe knew the truth, though not from his brother. The straw
6405. as hiojpelf ; and now there was alwnys one empty seat in the family bench at churc
6406. there was alwnys one empty seat in the family bench at church, one absent at the even
6407.pty seat in the family bench at church, one absent at the evening meal on SunThe un
6408.g meal on SunThe unhappy boy hud become one of the habitues of the day. ing Pitcher
6409.y. ing Pitcher, a low tavern, kept by a good-for-nothing old fellow named Miichecoul
6410.ore unless he. paid a part of his Never mind the score now we'll settle accounts whe
6411.o frequented Machecoul's tavern but the truth was that he was a sort of king among th
6412.bitter envy of Aubin always stifled the good impulse, and he would turn away mutter"
6413.he would turn away mutter" She does not love me; he is all she cares for." Ah, no, i
6414." " Say a prayer, Daniel she is gone to God, and she forgave Bupper ready, and it i
6415.and it is growing late. " There is only one sheaf left now, but what a grand one it
6416.ly one sheaf left now, but what a grand one it is you. It is always made with extra
6417.er ness it is to pour on it a bottle of good old wine as he receives was: gave me an
6418.ds tom, but it is a pretty and graceful one nevertheless. The farm servants and day
6419.u- goat whose milk had fed her, went to one of the women who his wife, and agreed t
6420. now and then her father talked but the good woman put him off, and grains which she
6421. enough to cook liis Holy Mary !" cried one of the men, sleep. dinner and mind the
6422.cried one of the men, sleep. dinner and mind the house. He saw that the child was te
6423.ears old he took her home. It was a sad change for the poor child but the thing that s
6424.hearing Chantefleur talk of her mother. One day she had put a rosary round the chil
6425.nd pitied ? Alas for poor to lay there. One day a little boy gave orphan. Her mothe
6426. very wet or cold often she had to beg. One evening, when she was about ten years o
6427.tanding in the great wagon, caught them one by one as Yves threw them up with a str
6428. in the great wagon, caught them one by one as Yves threw them up with a strong, st
6429.ress has and suffered silently. was the state of things at Cadiorne when we infamily
6430.Providence, my child," " is a answered, good mother to the orphan." Two neighbors st
6431.'s corpse and when her husband came in, one of them said "Take off your hat, Daniel
6432.niel ; you must pay her some respect in death, though you made her life wretched. " :
6433.e respect in death, though you made her life wretched. " : : This he could not do; h
6434.d through you* misconduct Annette is my god-cli; lighter, and if she comes to me, I
6435.temple was a deep red mark he gave only one look, and fled from the place. Soon aft
6436.ecovered consciousness. Recognizing the man, she said " I had a fall, Catherinet, b
6437. a fall, Catherinet, but it is nothing. Many thanks I am sorry to have troubled you
6438.m sorry to have troubled you my husband will be " She just managed to drag herself t
6439.therinet, go and send the priest to me: God will repay you for your trouble." The m
6440.inet, go and send the priest to me: God will repay you for your trouble." The man we
6441.d will repay you for your trouble." The man went, with tears in his eyes, to do her
6442.She confessed and received ab" Bread of life " to solution, and received the support
6443.ed very quietly, forgiving her hus" Who will take care band, but troubled about her
6444.are band, but troubled about her little one. " of her ?" she said to the he : ; ; :
6445.r little Father, now that you have some one else to look melle's feet. The good far
6446.some one else to look melle's feet. The good farmer's eyes were wet. gently: after y
6447.n't turn gleaning, "answered the little one, "and I fell asleep, you out, mind. " B
6448.ittle one, "and I fell asleep, you out, mind. " But I am and it was Pierrot she answ
6449.she answered. going," " Pierrot is a "A good riddance;" cried La Gervaise, for that
6450.ther and asked him to give her her When God gives abundantly, our hands must be ope
6451. opened like mother's wedding-ring. The man turned pale he had placed His. But your
6452.d noticed what again to La Gervaise." " Good heavens seemed to her a sacrilege. And
6453. it to her mother's What a shame What a sin " and then said slowly and sorrowfully:
6454. and then said slowly and sorrowfully: "Good-bye, Patriache broke off abruptly rosar
6455.e broke off abruptly rosary, then, at a sign from him, " father. Armelle was lifted
6456.he high wagon, the two lads led the The man's heart smote him. horses, and he himse
6457.e took his us." Then Armelle repeated, "Good-bye, father;" opened the wife's hand, a
6458.want to speak to you," led her into the family sanctuary, the inner room. door, knelt
6459.id not feel lonely it seemed as if some one I do not even ask you to do what I wish
6460.er taking care of her her mother or her angel- want to say this we have a wound deep
6461.straight to the church- let us move the good God to cure it by a good action. The Th
6462.ght to the church- let us move the good God to cure it by a good action. The The ho
6463.et us move the good God to cure it by a good action. The The house where La yard. Wh
6464. all Jeanne's things here, and now that God has given me another harvest-home sheaf
6465.r harvest-home sheaf, with the names of God and her mother on daughter, they will d
6466.of God and her mother on daughter, they will do for her." her lips. So Armelle was w
6467.e he threw the door wide open, and made sign for his said: "I may keep my bundle, so
6468., "how hard she must have said " Before God and before our own conscience, we promi
6469.lows, I've got to bring up Armelle as a good Christian girl. Love her, all " an idea
6470.ng up Armelle as a good Christian girl. Love her, all " an idea; stippose the straw-
6471.good Christian girl. Love her, all " an idea; stippose the straw-cutter's daughter g
6472.ghter gives the sheaf to of you, as you love us, for His sake who has loved us. the
6473. this was placed on Armelle's head. The one brother. But troubles are soon over at
6474.f!" Patience," said Marthe ; "the child will save him yet" " His wife Pere Patriarch
6475.y on the waittried, and it cost her her life." wagon-pole, Martha answered, " What i
6476.wered, " What is that as the price of a soul?" ing for the sheaf; his sons were besi
6477.w days. But, to be sure, it was harvest time ; she would soon glean a little bundle
6478.a little bundle ; the miller was a kind man, and would give her in exchange for it
6479.ord have mercy on Yves !" Then ! ! ; m. good grain," said old Pierrot, "which the go
6480.od grain," said old Pierrot, "which the good God hasripennl. Hoe what He has hidden
6481.ain," said old Pierrot, "which the good God hasripennl. Hoe what He has hidden in t
6482.chestnuts in the ashes, sang songs, and One winter's evening it was snowing fast, a
6483.k flakes. Presently Labrie Armelle. His love for them -was a passion, a worship, as
6484. her irreAraelle. She conceived a great idea of the dignity of her oc- sistibly towa
6485.pherdess, and a king of France restored one of the creatures, the other sprung upon
6486.ance restored one of the creatures, the other sprung upon Armelle. She felt to his th
6487.een to your house to ask your blessing. God is giving me a great grace, and I want
6488.m. There sat Aubeside h in bin, pale as death, leaning his head on the table ; ; She
6489.t ?" Daniel asked. " I want to say just one word to you." " Well what is it ?" "Fat
6490.t me come back and take care of you and love you. Oh fools but to sacrifice one's li
6491.and love you. Oh fools but to sacrifice one's life, one's whole life, day by day, f
6492.ve you. Oh fools but to sacrifice one's life, one's whole life, day by day, father y
6493.. Oh fools but to sacrifice one's life, one's whole life, day by day, father you do
6494.ut to sacrifice one's life, one's whole life, day by day, father you don't know how
6495.to you ?" sweeter," said Armelle. " The man burst into a loud laugh. Now, look here
6496.on could save Daniel " You want to from sin or damnation by throwing yourself into
6497.cry as your mother did." "Oh, yes." " I will not "But would you consent to live with
6498.e him jealous of your services, of your love ? Would He went away, and Armelle clung
6499.uld have broken my there was a peaceful life ready for you elsewhere ?" ; stood Yves
6500.shortly. " You were all but devoured by one," added his mother. " And Yves saved my
6501." added his mother. " And Yves saved my life?" "I only killed the wolf." " The wolf
6502.kill me?" "Well, and if I did save your life, what would that prove ?" She went up t
6503.im, and said, in a voice trembling with emotion : "It would prove that you have a tiny
6504.would prove that you have a tiny bit of love for your little sister. No one can give
6505. bit of love for your little sister. No one can give more than his life for any one
6506.e sister. No one can give more than his life for any one." " I think " I don't know,
6507.one can give more than his life for any one." " I think " I don't know," answered Y
6508.eaths, if you like, easily enough, from love, or hatred, or whim, or because they ar
6509.y two roads, you see a wrong and aright one and when you took the right ; "Yes, Yve
6510.ld." " Why, it would be a hell ; !" "No one, I wasn't going to stop you. Why, Armel
6511.to stop you. Why, Armelle, I couldn't " love you so muoh unless you did your duty. S
6512. " love you so muoh unless you did your duty. So there was a heavy cloud overshadowi
6513.sed day a martyrdom." " But without any one to force you to " There is duty, Yves."
6514.hout any one to force you to " There is duty, Yves." ; it ?" the brightest and faire
6515. the brightest and fairest in a child's life. She was never again the same merry lau
6516.a child's life. She was never again the same merry laughing creature as before she g
6517.otherly wing, ; sacrifice everything to duty?" " Everything. But," she said, after a
6518. the gapiug wound, with a light ten"You will not hate me any more?" she asked der ha
6519.ld you " wiuuingly. BO sheltered by her love. The conduct of Yves was another This i
6520. pails to fill the trough. She " Do you love me, then ?" "Certainly I do." " I know
6521.re you slowly stealing away what little love my mother has left for nu: ! ; ; you ar
6522.plained. This cruel Yves was the son of one who was both her master and her father,
6523.ather, and she obeyed him in silence. I will neither have you ask her "Be silent." s
6524.er feeling came I can itive hatred. the love he was bescarcely say to replace the ot
6525.ve he was bescarcely say to replace the other, for even to cherish for Armelle was so
6526.rate from Rennes, a little, sharp, thin man, with like a peacock. He wanted a vote
6527. from Patriarrhc, junl fore did him the honor of drinking his wine and eating his Pat
6528. Patriarche had no fancy for men of the law. As a chickens. rule, country people co
6529.s of ghosta and loups-garoux" that made one's hair stand on an end. He delighted in
6530. close the girls kept together when the time came to separate. Brittany is such a pl
6531.the spade and the plough. Yves was in a state of suppressed fury with the dry little
6532. of suppressed fury with the dry little man, who kept looking at Armelle through hi
6533.eeling for Marthe's blessing. then the "death chariot," which passes noiselessly alon
6534.rd for it," he said, " and give up that idea the hawk does not mate with the dove, n
6535.ese words set him thinking. " She shall love me," he said, and he set about trying t
6536.is might. Marthe was full of joy at the change in his manners and conduct, and Armelle
6537.voice to Marthe, who led the way to the family sanctuary, and the lovers went for a st
6538.ildish days, of how they had loved each other all their lives, of the happiness which
6539.oved each other all their lives, of the happiness which awaited them. Then Marthe and the
6540. daughter's trousteau, that's all there will be no house to find for you the old fol
6541.aniel in the road, and invited him to " God bless you, I. M. 1'AbbC and We ; my chi
6542.e and Aubin, came out of church full of peace and joy. Aubin gathered some "Alleluia
6543.pluck them at Easter." "Thanks, Aubin I will put them on my mother's grave." "And ma
6544.way, it ; "And my brother." They knelt, one on each side of Annette's grave, and Th
6545.ed the ground, and said tell you that I love Armelle." : man was very much prayed ti
6546.d said tell you that I love Armelle." : man was very much prayed till strangest com
6547.have been jealous. His hands trembled a good deal ; still, he was as good as ever wi
6548.trembled a good deal ; still, he was as good as ever with the scythe and the sickle,
6549.ldren ran away in a like the picture of death. fright, and said he looked "In the nam
6550.I know Capital wine this," he said. the mind of Jean and Marthe Patriarche, I betrot
6551. betroth you here to "A barrel of it in one's cellar wouldn't be a bad thing in the
6552.lar wouldn't be a bad thing in the each other, in the sight of God and of the holy de
6553.hing in the each other, in the sight of God and of the holy dead. " winter," sugges
6554.bade them rememing Well, Pcre Daniel, I will send you a couple." " And what will the
6555., I will send you a couple." " And what will there be to ber that life is a pilgrima
6556.." " And what will there be to ber that life is a pilgrimage, and that their happine
6557.at life is a pilgrimage, and that their happiness depended pay ?" on their love for each
6558.heir happiness depended pay ?" on their love for each other and for God. Then he sai
6559. depended pay ?" on their love for each other and for God. Then he said that "Not a f
6560.?" on their love for each other and for God. Then he said that "Not a farthing." "
6561.ot marry till after Nothing at all ?" " One harvest. word, just one, that's all." "
6562.ing at all ?" " One harvest. word, just one, that's all." " I could wait Jacob's "
6563.ife at last. "Very well, my children; I will settle it all You will do well, I am su
6564., my children; I will settle it all You will do well, I am sure, " ii other. and it
6565.t all You will do well, I am sure, " ii other. and it will with your father. be a ple
6566. do well, I am sure, " ii other. and it will with your father. be a pleasure to me t
6567.her. and it will with your father. be a pleasure to me to " " And a pretty one, too. "We
6568.be a pleasure to me to " " And a pretty one, too. "Well, will you have me for a son
6569.me to " " And a pretty one, too. "Well, will you have me for a son-in-law ?" " Patri
6570.o. "Well, will you have me for a son-in-law ?" " Patriarche would not allow it." "
6571.ee hundred francs on the wedding-day. I will thatch and -whitewash your cottage, and
6572.hy you turned her out of doors." "Never mind that; I can take her back whenever I li
6573. much?" " It must be all properly done, mind drawn up by a notary; and on the whole
6574.u " shall be married at the end of that time. "Done 1" cried the young man. "When Ma
6575. of that time. "Done 1" cried the young man. "When Machecoul came in, he gave Yves
6576. rash promise, Daniel. Aubin is a young man of unblemished character, and sincerely
6577., and returned to the farm short of the matter is this Armelle is not of age, and I am
6578.amelessly forget iel, beware of braving God's anger !" priest indignantly. home? !
6579.L AMMKTTE'S GRAVE. fair." " You " "Very will find that it is that of others, too." w
6580. too." well but in any case I refuse to sign that paper." Daniel, be merciful. Yves
6581.g, the Abbe Kerdrec went to the Armelle love one another. Have you never loved any o
6582.e Abbe Kerdrec went to the Armelle love one another. Have you never loved any one "
6583.e one another. Have you never loved any one " It was a wretched place. The walls we
6584., nor Annette " thundered the miserable man "my mother cursed No," damp, black, and
6585. lay about the place; "Forgave you." in one corner fowls were pecking on a heap of
6586.ything was so bright and beautiful when Nature had donned her green robe, gemmed with
6587.of the flowers and the blasphemy of the man who ignores or insults the God of whose
6588.y of the man who ignores or insults the God of whose Uncreated Beauty all this fair
6589.s or insults the God of whose Uncreated Beauty all this fair world of. nature is a fai
6590.of whose Uncreated Beauty all this fair world of. nature is a faint image. The good p
6591.ncreated Beauty all this fair world of. nature is a faint image. The good priest walke
6592. world of. nature is a faint image. The good priest walked along slowly and thoughtf
6593.ghtfully, blessing all the creatures of God. A book was passed through his girdle,
6594.his girdle, but it was the open book of Nature that he was studyHe drew ing, and his e
6595.yHe drew ing, and his eyes were full of love and gratitude. near to the straw-cutter
6596.ticed the Abbe Kerdrec till he spoke. " Good morning, my friend. I come from Jean Pa
6597.s He told the whole story to the worthy man, who readvice. flected for a minute, an
6598.ce. flected for a minute, and then said will : Daniel's bad life is notohad been inq
6599.nute, and then said will : Daniel's bad life is notohad been inquired into too close
6600.. "Don't despair M. rious. If Annette's death ; marriage with his son." " My consent
6601. glad you see no objection the marriage will be after ! be thought of here we step i
6602.nt child shall not with La Gervaise the law will not help Daniel there. We deprive
6603.hild shall not with La Gervaise the law will not help Daniel there. We deprive him o
6604.e lives at the farm until she is twenty-one, and then marries Aubin." " but it is a
6605.thers have asked her in marriage on the same live ; ; day. harvest." " " It O, indee
6606.ive ; ; day. harvest." " " It O, indeed will written consent. is it put off till the
6607.onsent. is it put off till then.?" be a time of leisure then; I want you to give a "
6608.ou to give a " ; Well, we must trust in God !" And rely on me," said the mayor. On
6609.y word ?" " No but I am afraid that you will pay too many visits to this trouble. Pe
6610.o but I am afraid that you will pay too many visits to this trouble. Pere Machecoul.
6611.sented with two jacket, me read you the form, and then you will oiily have to sign.'
6612.ket, me read you the form, and then you will oiily have to sign.'' cloth, and every
6613.e form, and then you will oiily have to sign.'' cloth, and every beggar who come to
6614. DA I'd "Your " I have no reasons " the law on my side. reasons ?" asked the farmer
6615.Gorju, the mayor, who told him that the life he was leading deprived him of his natu
6616.atural Christian, and suffer with O how good you aro my father ; It is a " : heavy c
6617.took her in his arms daughter, we shall will you remember that now dry your eyes. go
6618. Yves remained lost in thought for some time; then he said " You must marry La Gerva
6619.not; she would kill me." " Look here; I will give you four thousand francs instead o
6620. her; and you can take away Armelle the same day." We will not linger over the hatef
6621.can take away Armelle the same day." We will not linger over the hateful compact; it
6622.ith him. The was perfectly justified in man was then to your mother's tomb to ask h
6623.' : ' trouble harder to me ; it is like death to me to leave the farm but I have trie
6624.misfortune. The straw-cutter married We will be true to each other, and wait. And O,
6625.-cutter married We will be true to each other, and wait. And O, Aubin, you will have
6626.each other, and wait. And O, Aubin, you will have Marthe but I shall have no one. Do
6627.ou will have Marthe but I shall have no one. Don't make mo weaker than I am remembe
6628.other sorrow in store for you. Remember one, thing whatever happens, however hard,
6629.ard, however terrible, you must forgive God commands you to do so, and I entreat yo
6630.r my words when you Wounds. ; ; : ; i " God will Ou his way judge you ?" answered G
6631. words when you Wounds. ; ; : ; i " God will Ou his way judge you ?" answered Gorju.
6632.d the Cur6, and told him his ! errand. "God forgive you " said the priest. Marthe h
6633.hey reached Daniel's gate in while gave one long embrace to him and his wife, and w
6634. her little bundle on a stool, and said good evening to her " In father. Presently s
6635. go into that room is it not there that family affairs are ar- They were heath that la
6636. Jean signed to Armelle to follow. "The matter is this," said the straw-cutter, ' both
6637.er lips, and forgiveness in her eyes. I will take her myself to your house; but you
6638.lf to your house; but you must give her time for her tears and farewells; and now go
6639.ything to do ; her stepmother spent her time and gossiping in the village, whilst Ar
6640.ce and care. Only, when Sunday came, no matter what orders were given to her, Her plac
6641.old that another week had gone. After a time, Armelle was forbidden by her father to
6642.en by her father to join the Patriarche family at Mass she saw them at the church, and
6643.became more gloomy and irritable as the time of ; Armelle's majority approached some
6644.bly. When the rain sun raises it again. God and his angels will be with you. There
6645.sun raises it again. God and his angels will be with you. There is an end to everyth
6646.e is an end to everything on earth. You will be eighteen in August, then there will
6647. will be eighteen in August, then there will be three years to wait. Take courage th
6648.there will be three years to wait. Take courage they will soon pass. And there will be
6649. three years to wait. Take courage they will soon pass. And there will be heart's ch
6650. courage they will soon pass. And there will be heart's child, own "my Never once ha
6651.cter, his parent's affection, Arme! ath love while he himself had nothing but her un
6652.0 TIII: w-ci . CHAPTER V. TEX LIVES FOB ONE. One evening ing village It ; the two b
6653.I: w-ci . CHAPTER V. TEX LIVES FOB ONE. One evening ing village It ; the two brothe
6654.e, she returned with a bowl of water in one hand and a looking-glass in the other.
6655. in one hand and a looking-glass in the other. drop of blood was on his fore- A ; "st
6656.Rennes. At length Aubin showed signs of life. Patritheirs, of another neighbor who h
6657.rs, of another neighbor who had taken a form, of the fair arche was Marthe sitting w
6658. du Cormier is in no hurry to marry, No one "The rose spoke. Suddenly a sound of wh
6659. said the Abbe Kerdrec as he entered. " Time " What do enough," said Aubin. you want
6660. sufficiently to I tell you there was a time in my life when a girl's hand be able t
6661.ly to I tell you there was a time in my life when a girl's hand be able to speak. hi
6662.in which ho could have led me anywhere. One look of hers was enough. If lay, but qu
6663.no cue who had been beforehand with me, one who knew how to opposite to him, he sai
6664.t on tied to his mother's apron string. courage, always told that Armelle loved Aubin f
6665.ed Aubin for I mean you the very day my life." " on which I asked her hand. The magi
6666.you thing our mother's caresses and the love of the straw-cutter's her father will n
6667.e love of the straw-cutter's her father will not consent to our marriage." He broke
6668., "I ask pardon of you all." up, that I will marry her ?" " Yves do not let us The A
6669.ubin's forehead. speak of it it does no good to either of ua and Armelle is my betro
6670.e bed-clothes. The magistrate rose, " I will not hear of it Once saying you shall ne
6671.e, except indeed, this: there are more, will you give her up ?" "No." crimes which e
6672.her up ?" "No." crimes which escape the justice of men, but God will judge Yves seized
6673.es which escape the justice of men, but God will judge Yves seized Aubin's arm, and
6674.hich escape the justice of men, but God will judge Yves seized Aubin's arm, and shoo
6675.e, cold, clear and keen as steel, young man tried in vain to get free. In the strug
6676.o the moon, and the pale light showed a man rushing madly from say mass. Then the m
6677. the evening Yves went home. There were many some minutes; then Jean Patriarche addr
6678.perhaps, that I Labrie lay, whining, in one corner Lou- Deny nothing do not speak i
6679.but still the shedder of blood deserves death. I allow Marthe entered tian ju-ople we
6680.lying in the road it was Aubin. The old man managed to carry him to the farm, and P
6681.s spread like wild fire, and in a short time the gendarmes, the garde champetre and
6682.the shop." Yves remained silent the old man's head was bowed lower " And where have
6683.id. Yves obeyed and then that room, the family sanctuBewildered with terror, she caugh
6684.oom. solemnities of four generations of good and upright men, wit" Jean nessed the t
6685.e dies " Then we must not grudge him to God." In the course of the day the Abb6 Ker
6686.thing heroic in his own The doctor gave good hopes of his recovery he had conduct. d
6687. examining the wound, whether the young man could have inflicted it on himself, but
6688.hen Yves left the house, he did so like one in a dream. but a dull, heavy weight wa
6689. the distance a withered tree stretched one bare arm, ing. He hurried like a gallow
6690. the road, were large brown on. ; ; ; " God's hand is heavy upon ns," he said; "but
6691. upon ns," he said; "but it is the hand One word from Aubin, and we must have left
6692. to Aubin. Ah, Marthe, Aubin ourselves. will make up for everything to us." of u Fat
6693.red, here at your "lam, lam! feet." Ask God to strike me dead is Yves, you shall li
6694.l live ; but you are not your own, your life not your own. It belongs henceforth to
6695.our own. It belongs henceforth to every one in trouble, " to every creature in dang
6696.ouble, " to every creature in danger of death. For the life which you wickedly tried
6697.ry creature in danger of death. For the life which you wickedly tried to take you ow
6698.hich you wickedly tried to take you owe God ten lives. Wherever there is peril, by
6699. rise, and go ; you are reconciled with God. Complete the work of penance obey your
6700.ey your father, do as he bade you." " I will but you know father, in time of war a b
6701. you." " I will but you know father, in time of war a ball may strike me, and if I h
6702. I will but you know father, in time of war a ball may strike me, and if I had not
6703.me tion.'' to me before you start and I will answer that ques- "And Armelle?" " You
6704.fed her with with your papers signed. I will go to the farm." The young man did not
6705.gned. I will go to the farm." The young man did not speak or move for a few minutes
6706.and out "Aubin!" suicide. despair, only one thing seems possible "You shall see him
6707.ust be and was gone in a moment. of the law It had been a wonderful inspiration of
6708. It had been a wonderful inspiration of God that the Abbe He managed to climb the t
6709.nfastened his necktie, and hid his face one moment. He felt that the same energy an
6710.d his face one moment. He felt that the same energy and force of character and passi
6711.ery, A hand was laid on his shoulder. A man must not die before he has made his pea
6712.man must not die before he has made his peace with might, properly directed, make him
6713.h might, properly directed, make him by God's grace a Christian It was a stroke of
6714.nius; nay, shall we rather say a. hero. God." It was the voice of the Abbe" Kerdrec
6715.ees. supernatural illumination ? It was one of those sublime ideas " It was The her
6716.nd you are right only it is not for you world passes such a one by, with a careless a
6717.y it is not for you world passes such a one by, with a careless and supercilious ti
6718.ands, the frayed cassock; son, and say, God be merciful to me, the most miserable o
6719.rciful to me, the most miserable of but God and all great souls know what is in him
6720. what is in him. " The Abb6 Kerdrec diJ justice to the grand old Breton farmsinners. er
6721. thinking him dead. My parents know the truth, and you, father, you know it too. Ther
6722.o. There are straw-cutter. We must wait God's time. There was a marvoices in the ai
6723.re are straw-cutter. We must wait God's time. There was a marvoices in the air calli
6724.emplation to which his consent had been pain?d The blood by a promise of four thousa
6725.d by a promise of four thousand francs. Will you buy Aubin's tongue and it said it w
6726.the road cries aloud like that of Abel. God's brand happiness at that price ? And P
6727.es aloud like that of Abel. God's brand happiness at that price ? And Patriarche said to
6728.riarche said to Marthe a stain is on my soul which it will never be effaced is on me
6729.o Marthe a stain is on my soul which it will never be effaced is on me, " You have t
6730.n cleanse. I hated Aubin because he was good and So the matter was settled. beloved.
6731.ed Aubin because he was good and So the matter was settled. beloved. And Armelle, how
6732.nusual their way to the farm. I deserve death a thousand deaths !" I condemn you to s
6733.t, but no bitterness ; ed where a fresh one had been on the point of accomplish- wh
6734.d been on the point of accomplish- when God was smoothing the way before her, was i
6735.ervants repent. He was wearied with his sin, without having the strength to What he
6736.ving the strength to What he felt was a desire to be hidden, to be anni; ; : ; ; ; ; 1
6737.raight to Eennes. Six months later, his good conduct obtained for him the permission
6738.permission he applied for to join the " Peace be to this house !" said the Cur6. Mart
6739.ake her away again ?" 1 "No." " And you will give her to me?" "Yes." " God is Thank
6740. And you will give her to me?" "Yes." " God is Thank yon, Daniel. very good ! My Go
6741."Yes." " God is Thank yon, Daniel. very good ! My God, I thank wants thee !" so I "A
6742.od is Thank yon, Daniel. very good ! My God, I thank wants thee !" so I "And now,"
6743.d the straw-cutter, "nobody am off. You will let me know when the me here, time coni
6744. You will let me know when the me here, time conies for signing," and he left the ro
6745.It almost seemed like a secret terrible necessity. Yves came in, laid some papers on the
6746.ast date to be written the ." wheii the time came. He was no longer one of the famil
6747." wheii the time came. He was no longer one of the family. He distinguished himeelf
6748. time came. He was no longer one of the family. He distinguished himeelf greatly he wa
6749.ldier, he was a hero. He was a model of good conduct too and in action, wherever the
6750.an attacked. generosity about them. His one object was to save the wounded, to shel
6751.the fallen from insult, to maintain the honor of the French flag. On one occasion, a
6752.intain the honor of the French flag. On one occasion, a French officer, whose coura
6753.n one occasion, a French officer, whose courage bordered on rashYves dashed in, ness, w
6754.ad broken his shoulder-blade. The first time he was allowed to use his hand, he mote
6755. his hand, he moted. " wrote the word " one on a sheet of paper, and sent it to the
6756.and sent it to the Abbe Kerdec. Another time he saved two children from He shunned a
6757.tice after drowning, at the risk of his life. and his superior these actions, as tho
6758. There was a fearful struggle in Jean's soul. He saw that there was a great change i
6759.n's soul. He saw that there was a great change in Yves but he did not say a word. He f
6760.t wonderful in; should conquer half the world." At the end of the campaign Yves was s
6761. There too his bravery was the theme on many tongues, and his name was more than onc
6762.eserved soldier, whose silent ways he " God has man who fought like a forgiven you,
6763.soldier, whose silent ways he " God has man who fought like a forgiven you," he sai
6764., English, hand. Chinese it was all the same to Yves one life was as good as by name
6765.nd. Chinese it was all the same to Yves one life was as good as by name. ; punishme
6766.Chinese it was all the same to Yves one life was as good as by name. ; punishment by
6767.as all the same to Yves one life was as good as by name. ; punishment by no hand but
6768.Yves one life was as good as by name. ; punishment by no hand but God's. ; ' ' You We will
6769.as by name. ; punishment by no hand but God's. ; ' ' You We will pray for you !" br
6770.ment by no hand but God's. ; ' ' You We will pray for you !" bring you back safe Yve
6771.is arms, and clasped him in a he said, "Good-bye, long embrace. Then, turning to Ann
6772.ngs in a handkerchief refused, and with one last look of money which his father off
6773.ather offered him The last scene of the family at his mother, he left his home. traged
6774.n straw-cutter hung about the farm from time to tune, to learn It was a regular day
6775.e .re when Aubin appeared for the first time Loic had undertaken to keep Annette's g
6776.t been forgotten tle garden. Patriarche family had laid fresh bouquets on the steps. N
6777.er At last the wedding-day came. ! "I " God are going away ?" am a soldier" ; ; ano
6778.is victims. He fought hand to hand with Death bore a charmed life; often he escaped a
6779. hand to hand with Death bore a charmed life; often he escaped all hurt by a miracle
6780.self-devotion was so Yves Alas, poor of memory. absolute; it was his only relief from
6781.s only relief from the anguish When the time of action was over, the ghost of the mi
6782.bin on the road in the filled his tent. man was ! past ; 1 ; lovmoonlight rose up b
6783.ore the scene changed ; destroyed their happiness. Once this time it was the wretched hov
6784. ; destroyed their happiness. Once this time it was the wretched hovel of the straw-
6785.e JH- Imd seen Annette he went to drown memory and remorse in wine. oi ; ; despair, a
6786.s fragrance and its blooming Oaths, bad language, ill-usage nothing could really purity.
6787.hing could really purity. harm her. Her duty remained, and she bent meekly beneath B
6788.sured him of forgiveness in the name of God ? Were not his crimes past all pardon ?
6789.as the gibbet-bike tree rose before his imagination, he seemed to himself bike Judas, when
6790.nd And that in inv work. he promised me God's for: But I begin to think my burden i
6791. I," he cried, in the bitterness of his soul, "but an assassin and a thief ? If they
6792.assassin and a thief ? If they knew the truth, they would my brother !" he said. "You
6793.scorn and hate me they would shun me as one stricken with the plague they would poi
6794.cross from my button-hole. your imrnost soul now. I can heal all its wounds." ness.
6795. respect, affection it is all stolen. I will wear this " " " You think that is hideo
6796.onger. impossible ? " I am sure*it is." One day the chaplain, the AbbS Florent, fou
6797.Yves, what do you want? what is in your mind?" " It is not the his lips moved as tho
6798.ish to do in the future?" " " To lead a life of To live silence, solitude, and praye
6799.ntly. " I do not deserve to have a with good and holy men, who would know my history
6800.th good and holy men, who would know my history, and yet friend," answered Yves. let me
6801. me be with them. "Yet you greatly need one." To be the lowest of all, the servant
6802.o, and I do not." all, and to feel that God has forgiven me. " of humiliation to th
6803.n to the very dregs, and to satisfy the justice, the Explain yourself, Yves." mailing i
6804.ot possible," al\*wys, Yves. implacable justice of God." " A merciful justice, Yves ; d
6805.," al\*wys, Yves. implacable justice of God." " A merciful justice, Yves ; do not f
6806.mplacable justice of God." " A merciful justice, Yves ; do not forget that." so "Yester
6807. is When the wound scarred " a shameful one? " if God has healed it." "Afriend!" Yv
6808.he wound scarred " a shameful one? " if God has healed it." "Afriend!" Yves burst o
6809.ately. "I have none; I never shall have one it is impossible. My comrades like me,
6810.possible. My comrades like me, they are good fellows ; but do I make friends with th
6811., I keep aloof. Alone always alone. You will "And if it is " No matter, the Sisters
6812.ways alone. You will "And if it is " No matter, the Sisters of Charity have received.
6813.ht lives saved in five years the number will soon be made up, please God, and then w
6814.the number will soon be made up, please God, and then what shall I do ?" "First go
6815." "For a tune. First of all, go to your good curC, and tell him that your penance is
6816., father, because it must be so. I have one thing to do a task which is laid upon m
6817.ut that is not enough for me. There are many sorts of expiation; I must go through t
6818. I must go through them "Yes, all. that good Your parents, to get their forgiveness;
6819.nd ask to be received as a brother. You will be able to make a confession of your wh
6820.able to make a confession of your whole life before them all, and to realize the lon
6821. with holy men acquainted with your sad history." to him, What hast thoti done ? The vo
6822.. " I have shown you a safe harbor, but one which is not without its labors and sto
6823.ot without its labors and storms. There will be every kind of hard penance everythin
6824.tear the heart from earth and fix There will be it on heaven ; tory to the priest, a
6825. know why I cannot die. I attempted the life of everything to confound human wisdom,
6826.he life of everything to confound human wisdom, to exalt the soul by humbling it, and
6827. to confound human wisdom, to exalt the soul by humbling it, and to purchase eternal
6828.by humbling it, and to purchase eternal happiness at the jn-irc c>i That will be your lif
6829.ternal happiness at the jn-irc c>i That will be your life, and it is a hard daily ma
6830.ess at the jn-irc c>i That will be your life, and it is a hard daily martyrdom. one.
6831.life, and it is a hard daily martyrdom. one." " The innocent and good accept it. Sh
6832.ily martyrdom. one." " The innocent and good accept it. Shall I complain ?" From tha
6833.n ?" From that day Yves was a different man. The future, which had been so terrible
6834.hape. His thoughts dwelt on that severe life of labor and penance with love and long
6835.s thoughts dwelt on that severe life of labor and penance with love and longing. To l
6836.t severe life of labor and penance with love and longing. To live by daily dying tha
6837.ng. To live by daily dying that was the life for him. The army returned to France, a
6838.th him, who belonged to my brother, and God has set a mark upon me, and Death will
6839.er, and God has set a mark upon me, and Death will not strike mo. You thought Now you
6840.d God has set a mark upon me, and Death will not strike mo. You thought Now you see
6841.he sky, then lurid "It is a fire," said one of the men. They set off i the directio
6842. who the tenth is, my son ?" was an old man, and a strong young one, linlf suffocat
6843.n ?" was an old man, and a strong young one, linlf suffocated, I think. No, I don't
6844.'t even know where I am; but that is no matter. Ten, at last, and "No there i the burn
6845.es, and ill of the masses of wood. fire God is satisfied !" The had begun on, in th
6846.e pledge of pardon. My son, here is the man you have just saved." Then Yves knew he
6847.en Yves knew he had saved his brother's life. It was a moment not to be described. T
6848.to the burning house,, people were each other in a long embrace, weeping, trembling,
6849.ng, murmuring talking of a helpless old man, who slept in a shed adjoining a broken
6850.t in a shed adjoining a broken words of love and tenderness which cannot be written
6851.Then Aubin merous openings, and of some one who had climbed on the took his brother
6852.cure followed with the two soldiers. No one You may imagine how he drank in then: a
6853.ccounts of the heroof to get to the old man, and been eeen no more. knew who he was
6854.actions of their comrade. Never had the good Abbe Kerthat no doubt he would lose his
6855.Abbe Kerthat no doubt he would lose his life in his generous attempt. drec thanked G
6856.e in his generous attempt. drec thanked God as he did that day. It was a strange an
6857.bout the poor people whose property was being destroyed, the wail- their work. Armell
6858.case, which the flames had all saved my life." Then there were the children to be lo
6859.ather drew near. The old Yves lifted up one the eldest seized the other by the hand
6860.ves lifted up one the eldest seized the other by the hand, man came forward. Without
6861.he eldest seized the other by the hand, man came forward. Without hesitating, Armel
6862.laden with this double burden, carrying one, dragging him, saying, as she put her a
6863.arms round his neck : " It is Yves, the other, he struggled, panting up the quivering
6864. the top, he sank his repentant son. We will not attempt to describe that mo" down w
6865.in the village may be imagined. ' Every one was pressed dead were carried, senseles
6866.nd blackened, to a place to eat, but no one was hungry, except the two soldiers, wh
6867.faces, and tried to re- had certainly a good appetite. Poor old Louison limped about
6868.mped about, vive them. waiting on every one. Old Loic hastened up to see the hero T
6869.6 Kerdrec approached the group. The old man of the village, and one after another f
6870. group. The old man of the village, and one after another followed him, full of rem
6871.d him, full of remained insensible; the man who had been the first to hasten pride
6872.to hasten pride and delight, till every one had had a good look at him ; to his res
6873.e and delight, till every one had had a good look at him ; to his rescue was slowly
6874.ring. and I should be afraid to say how many times the soldiers had " " cried the pr
6875.ied the priest. to tell their comrade's history. Aubin, my son The young man tried to r
6876.rade's history. Aubin, my son The young man tried to rise. It was all positive tort
6877. Armelle Tell Armelle and the children. God had father's sake ; and besides, it wou
6878.We have sent for her ; and the poor old man is beginning been very good, and the go
6879.the poor old man is beginning been very good, and the goal was very nearly reached.
6880.ers, he asked for a private " Oh, thank God My head swam," and I made sure of inter
6881. interview with his father, and the old man went with him into How was it? Who save
6882.ith him into How was it? Who saved me ? death. the inner room. He opened the Book of
6883.the soldiers a thought flashed into his mind. shoulders ; more than once the younp;
6884.. shoulders ; more than once the younp; man's voice was broken Can it be possible ?
6885.he said; and he put back the tangled by emotion. Then the peace of God sank into their
6886.t back the tangled by emotion. Then the peace of God sank into their hearts, hair fro
6887.e tangled by emotion. Then the peace of God sank into their hearts, hair from his f
6888. you know who it is that has saved your life ? It is waiting, surrounded by his fami
6889.life ? It is waiting, surrounded by his family, while Yvea received his 1 : ! ! ! ! ;
6890.beats. ! And look, father, the cross of honor Yves dear Yves my own brother don't you
6891.e Curfi ? O, " to think of our mother's happiness Yves could not take it all in yet; but
6892.bey of La Trappe !" Then Aubin made the sign of the cross, and said no more. place y
6893.g if it was all a dream the danger, the pain, and the gladness. Presently he regaine
6894.reaking, and he looked around, first at one, and then at another, he saw the cure,
6895.aiming, "Ten, father, ten!" there was a sense of lost embrac s were given in silence
6896. of lost embrac s were given in silence God's presence in the house .and Patriarche
6897.to of December, 1849, a and honest miea one BO It appears, sir, that the ancient Ro
6898.st five franc piece for an order of the same value. a " Praise for doing what you al
6899.ters. me is right! oh no; but now, sir, will to take leave of you, for duty calls me
6900.ow, sir, will to take leave of you, for duty calls me to my you wish to send this li
6901.order?" asked M. Lambelin, an excellent man, who then filled the office of post-mas
6902. " To my old mother," replied the young man. "For her new year's gift, I suppose?"
6903.ight, comrade, a new year's gift from a good son, brings happiness to him who gives,
6904.new year's gift from a good son, brings happiness to him who gives, as well as to her who
6905., kept by M. Save, the best host in the world, remarked the prolonged absence of the
6906. well call them, sir, for it takes some time is coin," answered Robin, since dead at
6907. dip our fingers in when we like." From one end of the table to the other there was
6908.like." From one end of the table to the other there was kept up a running fire of bon
6909.r, nevertheless. I have already had the happiness to send my poor mother a sum of seventy
6910.y francs." " " Seventy francs ? In what time ? " In two which I have had the honor o
6911.at time ? " In two which I have had the honor of servyears, during ing my country. "
6912. Lambelin entered the room, his arrival being greeted by a burst of applause. "What n
6913.ws do you bring ? " was shouted out. "I will tell you at dessert, it will make you r
6914.ed out. "I will tell you at dessert, it will make you relish your coffee better," an
6915.officer, the president of the party; "I will make enquiry as to Bois' behavior since
6916.n in the army, and if it answers to the good opinion we already have will come to hi
6917.the army, and if it answers to the good opinion we already have will come to his aid an
6918.ers to the good opinion we already have will come to his aid and do something for hi
6919. gets abroad sometimes pretty soon. The history of the soldier Buis had already arrived
6920.asting at the hotel Minerva, it was the custom to take a cup of mocha. About twenty of
6921. you my readers who are ignorant of the cause taire. of this transformation will no d
6922.the cause taire. of this transformation will no doubt like to know it. In the early
6923.nted themselves at the CaftS Neuf, then one of the greatest resorts of the Italian
6924.i .t of him, Nothing is easier, sir; we time an opportunity offers. mother." the pro
6925. which I c&refully hoard up until I can change them into a " round piece like this." "
6926.ssary now and then ' ' in the laborious life of a soldier." it." " And I am far from
6927.now living is it " That you as happens. One who had inaugurated his reign, by the n
6928.ns. act of peneral amnesty. tinued from custom to frequent this establishment, no-v be
6929.tho two visitors in silence, but at the same tiaie witli nuequivo'al in. good religi
6930.at the same tiaie witli nuequivo'al in. good religious make us sing hymns, which rem
6931.hop, Monseignenr Lucquet, who calls you desire ? us his children, relates to us curiou
6932.'' if you please," -was the "You sert." will not say so is by the time we have come
6933.e "You sert." will not say so is by the time we have come " to the des- comrade; mea
6934.nanimous welcome " Bring it then," said one of the officers, beginning to com- of t
6935.e canteen, when a servant brought "Some one is reading it," he answered. " Have me
6936.s as follows, morning." "A " Well then! good action ought to be recompensed you have
6937.a glass of water; you surely have that! good son and good soldier; this is for the s
6938.ter; you surely have that! good son and good soldier; this is for the soldier." We p
6939.ttes of a carabinier. " You have been a good all, the French have broken the aqueduc
6940.ers, with difficulty restraining sum of one hundred francs, quite a fortune for him
6941. the master of the establishment on his courage, when bye-and-bye a confused noise of f
6942. bayonets, etc., expressed. The name of God and his mother trembled on his was hear
6943. on his was heard on the stairs. At the same moment a company of lips, and his heart
6944. and his heart overflowed'with grateful emotion. "How " art Thou, my God said he, " Tho
6945.verflowed'with grateful emotion. "How " art Thou, my God said he, " Thou hast had p
6946.h grateful emotion. "How " art Thou, my God said he, " Thou hast had pity on grenad
6947.d ranged themselves in order of battle. good Placed above want, this dear parent, wi
6948.od Placed above want, this dear parent, will One of the officers who commanded the t
6949.aced above want, this dear parent, will One of the officers who commanded the troop
6950., bread not too hard or too black O my "God." And then turning his eyes to chocolat
6951. then is not fit for a coffee-house, it will us, he said, "Oh! how good you are also
6952.ee-house, it will us, he said, "Oh! how good you are also, my dear benefactors, do b
6953.nto a barrack." for I see that the Lord God "lias chosen you to enrich my " The Caf
6954.s liis establishment on his agreeing to change the name as above true model of filial
6955.flattering speeches, of which he On the same day, as he had promised, the colonel ma
6956.ips the sparkling draught. hud a single punishment, arid he was remarked during the "What
6957.ou despise that liquid there? " said As good a son the surgeon of the army, the exce
6958.he excellent and wise Lacauchie, or his courage and coolness in danger. was a brave sol
6959.f his pipe, since dead, a victim to his love of science. [isolation of a trooper, in
6960.pe, since dead, a victim to his love of science. [isolation of a trooper, in order to m
6961.make any." " Dessert what ! that ? "You will see, ' , 1 ! ' , ! ! ; ; ! ! ; ! ! ! !
6962. ' ' me." was determined to invite this good son and brave soldier "A good reason wh
6963.vite this good son and brave soldier "A good reason why you should drink then. Now,
6964. reason why you should drink then. Now, one, to dinner, aud it fell to me to perfor
6965.ur mother. I did, without betraying the quality or the number of persons Drink; bravo o
6966.y or the number of persons Drink; bravo one more cup." s to meet. I have already me
6967.is is the best stuff I ever drank in my life, but Minerva received at its table the
6968.g acquaintance with the police. " " but will not niasnient of this poor soldier, on
6969.poor soldier, on finding himself seated Happiness cheers," answered the colonel, served t
6970.after, Bois experiencing in himself the truth of the axiom enounced by Lacauchie, reg
6971.lone, aud to think of his mother. " The other personages in this cene, adjourned to t
6972. the Cafe main, my friend," said I, you will dine like a prince." " " I should like
6973.to end a day, of \rhich they could with truth say * Vv'e have gained one more." with
6974.could with truth say * Vv'e have gained one more." with Titus, Glace*, the French b
6975.days with an uncle ago, I of my college life, AND HIS COUNTRY HOUSE. or rather more
6976.eneraily agreed that he would have been one of the glories of the celebrated Congre
6977.brated Congregation of St. Maur, if the Revolution had not driven him from his monastery j
6978. Gdrusac, as he was still called in his family, was only twenty-five years old when th
6979.g was faintly heard in the distance. My good old uncle always met me with open arms,
6980.ge of this circumstance to mix with the world again, nor did he, on the other hand, e
6981.ith the world again, nor did he, on the other hand, endeavor to return to the religio
6982.nd, endeavor to return to the religious life by retaining, like most of the members
6983.e most of the members of his Order, the habit of St. Benedict in a Spanish or Italian
6984.ish or Italian monWhen the storm of tne Revolution had in some measastery. ure subsided, h
6985.set me down on the high-road at about a good league's distance from my uncle's home,
6986.here he habitually sat was furnished in particular with an unpretending elegance which did
6987.et, peaceful, studious mode of castors, life. Comfortable armchairs, of their noisel
6988.strious writers, who have devoted their time to t'.c The study of our n 1 village of
6989.study of our n 1 village of Mnl] on the other side of . f from St. a. hi; . huge 1'ol
6990. a drawing in colored pencils, faded by time, and set in a frame, once a handsome on
6991.me, and set in a frame, once a handsome one, but now damaged in several ] This pict
6992.ull bloom of the most radiant youth and beauty, and dressed in the style of one of Wat
6993.and beauty, and dressed in the style of one of Watteau's shepherdesses a trimming o
6994.ehind Dom Gerusac's arm chair, ready to change our plates and wait upon us, I could no
6995.he pathway ran between the bare rock on one side and these masses of verdure on the
6996.side and these masses of verdure on the other. Beneath the green surface roared the r
6997. not had so often before eyes the ideal beauty of that incomparable face. As to my my
6998.ian's appearance. I ventured to ask him one day if he ever remembered her loss wrin
6999.ounger. surprised old long before their time. It strikes me that for the last ten ha
7000.e foot of the road where she was in the habit of waiting for us, and came forward to
7001. say, as he followed her w.th his "that good woman has the legs of an ostrich, which
7002. Ge"rusac lived quite secluded from the world, and kept up little correspondence, exc
7003. at his house only a few members of his family who from time to time came to see him.
7004.ly a few members of his family who from time to time came to see him. A good old pri
7005. members of his family who from time to time came to see him. A good old priest, the
7006.ho from time to time came to see him. A good old priest, the Abbfi Lambert, was the
7007.perty was situated, and I would venture man was the poorest priest in France. His p
7008.etter," I mentally exclaimed, for to my mind Marian disfigured the prospect. I hated
7009. little winding path, enjoying the wild beauty of that Each time I came there I felt m
7010., enjoying the wild beauty of that Each time I came there I felt more struck nificen
7011.around it. In the midst of a large open space in front of the sacred edifice were two
7012.d their interweaving branches, so as to form in apa single tree with two large trunk
7013.oted the places where works hancel, any particular details. It would ah i, if, in art had
7014.rticular details. It would ah i, if, in art had once existed. strange convulsion of
7015.had once existed. strange convulsion of nature, the haul had been thrown Till-: roUTHM
7016.rmed au Yes, sir, christened ; for that one is called Monsieur le of buildings, dis
7017.property of imparting with was that the history of these great families was a perfect a
7018.ass, and the cups had all come from the same wns one of the sixteen Proveugal lords
7019.the cups had all come from the same wns one of the sixteen Proveugal lords who acco
7020.sixteen Proveugal lords who accompanied God- house, and that the person represented
7021.hilst the chronicle of the crusader was progress- possession of my mind, I was seized wi
7022.crusader was progress- possession of my mind, I was seized with ardent curiosity on
7023.s, worthy of late to me the more recent history of the country. One day as figuring in
7024.the more recent history of the country. One day as figuring in the pages of a novel
7025. her way, as I usually I really fell in love with it, and experienced the agitations
7026.d her head away in her usual ungracious man- GeYusac imagine when he saw me buried
7027.ise daunted, I began again: was all the time lost in dreams about this beauty, who o
7028. all the time lost in dreams about this beauty, who only ex- in wild li I n HIM lit' "
7029.o only ex- in wild li I n HIM lit' "How many years ? dear Marion have you trudged al
7030.to ill-tempered old women. " Before the Revolution there was a I still persevered. fine "
7031.age, and had just finished my course of rhetoric. In the midst of my intense internal ag
7032.c fancy. The isted feel dreadfully mere idea that anybody would suspect its existenc
7033.rdinary suppositions as to the name and history of very young then." " So young that I
7034.she went to meet my uncle. plague of my life. This reply seemed to me a funny bit of
7035.d have been easy enough to clear up the matter by ian's part, who must have evidently
7036.my uncle but I could not bear to at the time when the old regime came to an end. Wit
7037. was countable interest in the subject. One day, however, when wo only since the Re
7038.n appointed curfi of were at dinner, my courage suddenly rose, and pretending to in tho
7039.d said, with evident complacency of the family, with supporters and crest, used to be
7040.n branches which termed overhead au the time of the Revolution?" "Most likely," my u
7041.hich termed overhead au the time of the Revolution?" "Most likely," my uncle replied "but
7042.ll O, as to that," the lad replied, how many wiiich we can guess who may have been t
7043.easants, they knew nothing of the local history of their districts, and troubled themse
7044.t of my romantic worship. I made tip my mind to see it pass into Marian's hands, wit
7045.rew his arms about my uncle's neck. The good old man fairly wept for joy, and falter
7046.rms about my uncle's neck. The good old man fairly wept for joy, and faltered out a
7047.never hoped for this. It is too great a happiness, he called Marian and communicated to h
7048.er the news he had received. "Let every one set to work," he enjoined. " Desire Bab
7049. every one set to work," he enjoined. " Desire Babelou to get the blue bedroom ready,
7050.rself to the kitchen. M. de Champaubert will be here to-morrow. Everything must be r
7051. to-morrow. Everything must be ready in good timeYou will, I am sure, take particula
7052.verything must be ready in good timeYou will, I am sure, take particular pains about
7053.y in good timeYou will, I am sure, take particular pains about the dinner. There are some
7054.-pie, for instance. Try and let us have one to-morrow and give us some ceufa & In s
7055.rquis with a smile, since think of that will be nicest. " I will do Marian " fallen
7056.since think of that will be nicest. " I will do Marian " fallen here we last parted.
7057.ed to the kitchen. my best," "That dear good Maximin," my uncle " how I shall be to
7058.?" He had no vocation for the religious life, but he was a good my uncle asked. His
7059.on for the religious life, but he was a good my uncle asked. His family scholar and
7060., but he was a good my uncle asked. His family scholar and had a decided taste for the
7061. finished his studies, he reentered the world ley and the mountains. "After you had l
7062.t St. Pierre de his voice, answered, BO good-looking." Corbie, just " Was that a tun
7063.ke your vows. There were things at that time I very long " " It was in 1787 did not
7064.ept through the newspapers. days of the Revolution, and did not return to France till the
7065.uade myself that I had before my eyes a man who representof France, and was in the
7066. who representof France, and was in the habit of speaking t peace. Since then, his ta
7067.nce, and was in the habit of speaking t peace. Since then, his talents and fidelity h
7068.d not afford a glimpse of the least how many titles and dignities. May God prosper h
7069.east how many titles and dignities. May God prosper him His dress was as unpretendi
7070.ssible bit of red ribbon. worthy of his good fortune." The idea of finding myself in
7071.ibbon. worthy of his good fortune." The idea of finding myself in the presence of th
7072.ng myself in the presence of this great man, his manners easy and natural, and his
7073.nance expressed Not but there was at of being presented to him, kept me awake all the
7074.ept me awake all the night, and at once good-nature and shrewdness. the first thing
7075.e awake all the night, and at once good-nature and shrewdness. the first thing I did i
7076.he morning was to stand on the ter- the same time something commanding in his appear
7077.rning was to stand on the ter- the same time something commanding in his appearance,
7078. reception which was in course of whose life had been spent iu quiet scientific labo
7079.te ontof keepingwith the gait of an old-man whereas his friend, who had been prepar
7080.e through the agitations of un eventful life, still walked with with a ; ; ! " If yo
7081. ! " If your letter had only reached me one day sooner," my I should have gone to m
7082.k, talking all tho " " your library, my time, whereas my uncle went through his dinn
7083.nner with his usual l>y all means," the other gaily replied dear Thomas, is, I know,
7084.y replied dear Thomas, is, I know, your world, your kingdom, your fam- calm manner an
7085.dy appetite, only heightened by the You will introduce mo to all the ancient and mod
7086.ce mo to all the ancient and modern au- pleasure of having opposite to him so welcome a
7087.thful. Nothing could But, first of all, will you let me have exceed my internal agit
7088.M. de Champaubert exclaimed, as he him- mind, when all at once, in the midst of a co
7089.fond of these yellow grossed your whole life. You have never, I suppose, thought pea
7090. mountains that this wild production of nature is have married the beautiful girl whos
7091.ainly did not expect to have ; ' ' ! so many things to talk about." I asked my uncle
7092.etion, withdrew. A little before dinner-time Babelou came to me in the dining- room,
7093.Tell Marian to remain quietly in bed; I will let my uncle know about it." The two fr
7094.ed delighted with all he saw, went into good-natured raptures about the fine carnati
7095.h of a school-boy. I whispered The dear good man to my uncle the news of Marian's il
7096.a school-boy. I whispered The dear good man to my uncle the news of Marian's illnes
7097.lone with M. de Champaubert, who, after one more turn in the " Perhaps we had bette
7098. Marquis smiled now speak of it without emotion and since you wish it, I will give yon
7099.ithout emotion and since you wish it, I will give yon the history of that time of my
7100. since you wish it, I will give yon the history of that time of my life. Not so much fo
7101.it, I will give yon the history of that time of my life. Not so much for tell " You
7102.give yon the history of that time of my life. Not so much for tell " You must my fir
7103.ot so much for tell " You must my first love." us all ; your edification, my dear ol
7104.y beautiful eyes had instilled into his soul " of their poison. said in jest or in e
7105.. My uncle, after emptying his glass at one gulp, laid both his hands on the table-
7106. been taken suddenly ill?" " Never " we will wait mind," M. de Champaubert replied o
7107.n suddenly ill?" " Never " we will wait mind," M. de Champaubert replied on ourselve
7108.through the glass that covered it, like one of Greuze's lovely heads behind the hal
7109.s written, if I mistake not, before the Revolution in the mouth of August, 1789." \\~hat a
7110.th of August, 1789." \\~hat a wonderful memory you have for dates !" M. de " You are q
7111.panbert exclaimed. in this country some time after the famous night of the 4th of Au
7112.ed between the Champauberts, an ancient family in Normandy, and the Malpeires of Prove
7113.. More than a hundred years ago, at the time of the war with Piedmont, the division
7114.a hundred years ago, at the time of the war with Piedmont, the division of our army
7115. ancient coin or a manuscript in a dead language. " I arrived here, as I said before, to
7116.se mountains and green valleys, and the pleasure it was to hear the sound of well chal d
7117.ades in arms. Both were in the prime of life, and married to young wives, who had ac
7118. the low the Marquis de Chamcountry. In one of these engagements paubert was wounde
7119.o the Castle of Malpeire, where A short time afterwards, the Baron de Malfollowing d
7120. for six months out of the year. On the same day they both gave birth to sons, who w
7121.rth to sons, who were christened at the same time in the church of In commemoration
7122.o sons, who were christened at the same time in the church of In commemoration of th
7123. named after the new-born children. Are time the shade of these trees covered the wh
7124.le Marquis and Monsieur le Baron but no one here knows why." " The two widows spent
7125.ged to part but the similarity of their fate had given rise to a friendship, which l
7126.hey lived. They took care to instil the same feelings in the hearts of their sons, w
7127.tters of congratulation were duly sent. desire fora matrimonial alliance between the l
7128.a mule-driver followed with my luggage. man had travelled a little, and though a na
7129.ughter of the Baron de Malpeire came to life again.' 'What daughter,' I asked. 'Oh,
7130.in.' 'What daughter,' I asked. 'Oh, the one who is now full of health and spirits.
7131.was Jiad done, who have now been a long time in heaven. so really and truly dead tha
7132.santly during my journey on thoughts of love and marriage. I trembled to think how n
7133.of the surrounding country worked on my imagination I was enraptured with the aromatic peri
7134.ed with the aromatic perit ' ; solitary beauty of the mounthe confused but harmonious
7135. breathing. The It was in this frame of mind that I arrived in Malpeire. fume of the
7136. left La Chaise Dieu, my father told me one day that he had arranged my marriage wi
7137.s words. Mile, de Malpeire. that we can desire. I I think that this marriage combines
7138.wenty-five married to Mile. d'Herbelay, one of the most years ago, to be of the old
7139.o be of the old charming persona in the world. He is a nobleman full of Kc.hool a lit
7140.-minded and ignorant, but ' was at that time an old fortress to which some modem had
7141.tress to which some modem had been from time to time joined on. It was surrounded by
7142. which some modem had been from time to time joined on. It was surrounded by formida
7143.nt, and as to I have not made any it is one of the oldest in Provence. with regard
7144. oldest in Provence. with regard to the beauty of your fuparticular inquiries ture bri
7145. fuparticular inquiries ture bride, you will soon be able to judge of it yourself ;
7146.alconets. The drawbridge existed in the same state as at the time of the wars of Pro
7147.ets. The drawbridge existed in the same state as at the time of the wars of Provence,
7148.dge existed in the same state as at the time of the wars of Provence, but for many y
7149.e time of the wars of Provence, but for many years it had not been i. and its solid
7150.1^,1 to attend much to anything bnt the one predominating thought i or hand-rail. i
7151.ide, I walked ou looking about for some one to After going through a vaulted passag
7152.s of which were all closely shut up. No one appeared, and HO profound was the silen
7153.g my way as I rounded with bouquets. my mind. Every sound made me start, and I kept
7154.peiro appear, though I could not summon courage to inquire The Baron in after her, or e
7155.adame de Malpeire said In the meantime, will not be long now before he comes home. i
7156.ng now before he comes home. in ' ' ; I will order here. some refreshments will ' to
7157. ; I will order here. some refreshments will ' to be little brought up for you wine,
7158.ee. which seemed to me to date from the time of the League. A little table here, and
7159.poured it ance; but without allowing me time to give an account of out into two cups
7160.n account of out into two cups, gave me one, and she took the other herknow myself,
7161.two cups, gave me one, and she took the other herknow myself, she ran towards the doo
7162.myself, she ran towards the door at the other end, calling out, self, she said, Mile.
7163.ling out, self, she said, Mile. Boinet, will you let my daughter Not one word more,
7164.e. Boinet, will you let my daughter Not one word more, if you please.' "Mile. Boine
7165.ou deserve.' my most humble respects. I will hasten to inform Madame la yet,' I crie
7166. express that you did not posite to the one which opened on the large room. I heard
7167.tstep but when she saw me, she find any one below to show you up. Her I apologized
7168.ing: something marvel- seen more of the world I have no doubt she will soon learn to
7169.n more of the world I have no doubt she will soon learn to Madame la Baronne You hav
7170.red a few words of complilous, Kalon of one of the most charming hotels of the Faub
7171.self the charm about thia But, alas any desire to please. But so great was when I look
7172. on every side rocks, woods and a faint idea of her beauty. Who could ever have pain
7173.de rocks, woods and a faint idea of her beauty. Who could ever have painted mountains.
7174.Forbin Jauson wrote from here seemed at one moment to flash fire, and an instant af
7175.an instant afterwards to late mother-in-law to her uncle the Cardinal, just after s
7176.looked at fool For the first tune in my life, I had fallen desperately in Her dress
7177.llen desperately in Her dress was some- love." first sight much younger than she was
7178. managed to wear brilliancy of a pretty family portrait. A STTITOB TJNDEB THE OI.D REG
7179.v MY UNCLE'S DINIXQ-ROOM. sir," My dear love,' she said, glancing over her daughter'
7180. Boinet my part, I never could apply my mind to it, and as to serious has hnd nothin
7181. whom I lived, and the details of rural life. I would dressed for supper. often go i
7182.t church I have a distant view of these good It must be very difficult, Madame la Ba
7183.that it is quite enough to take to say. one's balance in shoes like yours.' 'Oh! no
7184.Malpeire'a eyes, I assure you it is all habit, I should not quickly replied. think of
7185.e shoes I can walk very well out at the same time her tiny foot, encased in a shoe o
7186.es I can walk very well out at the same time her tiny foot, encased in a shoe of tha
7187.d as a shepherdess. But that was a long time the blue heartsease and the purple-head
7188.transition to graver thoughts, kinds of other plants, one more lovely than the other.
7189.graver thoughts, kinds of other plants, one more lovely than the other. But I ago.
7190. other plants, one more lovely than the other. But I ago. bhe exclaimed: It is a terr
7191.?" No, sir, never,' she coldly replied. world. I have never been able to reconcile my
7192.turning towards the half open window BO many years of life before me and felt as if
7193.s the half open window BO many years of life before me and felt as if there would be
7194.was speedily corroborated by a confused time enough later for amusement, and so I al
7195.o slip by. M. le Baron is. kindness and good nature itself Although we have not the
7196.p by. M. le Baron is. kindness and good nature itself Although we have not the same ta
7197. nature itself Although we have not the same tastes, and though the life he most imm
7198.ave not the same tastes, and though the life he most immediately afterwards the soun
7199. him exactly, he would always have been will- heard in the adjoining room, and then
7200.ey was talked of but I have had a great many children, fowling piece in his hand. Ha
7201.et him anywhere else I and whenever the time to set out approached, I was not able t
7202.ts mercy, Madame la Baronne, spared you one of your chiland whilst you devoted your
7203.plied; Both,' cried the your daughter's education, the isolation you complain of must Mal
7204.No, asked. was not very successful. Her education has been left a little I brought from P
7205. little I brought from Paris, with some other furniture, just happened to be there wi
7206.mbing down inall the learned men of his time. My daughter has taken pos- to a precip
7207. not particularly amusing, her greatest pleasure is to read went in quest of it with his
7208.dolls, roughly carved The Philosophical History of the East and of the West with a knif
7209.swered. 'It is a the Abbe" ?' Madame to chance. ; ' ' ' ' tall fellow who won the pewt
7210.de it that figure lu.s passed? cards.' 'Will you tell me mine? Haul. in Home dirty s
7211.I think it is the image of some saint,' will consult the cards to see how soon a cer
7212.eper slipped it, I have no doubt, young man will marry a fair young lady.' Mile, de
7213. slipped it, I have no doubt, young man will marry a fair young lady.' Mile, de Malj
7214.quickly replied, 'they do not speak the truth.' And out of a box of burnished gold. Y
7215.'Cut, if yon pie He with my dear son-in-law. We played six games at pirqiiet. Maa s
7216.ecstasies; 'it seemed,' she said ' like being in Paris again. above his knees, his su
7217.eire's fault. We have got into this bad habit of sitting ing to the style still in us
7218.g ing to the style still in use at that time, and the conversation up.' "According t
7219.hand affectionately, and said with some Good nant contempt. Sir,' he said to me emph
7220.,' he said to me emphatically, 'we have emotion, 'Your coming here has made me very hap
7221.o apprehend. The King is master, and he will show night, my dear Count. To-morrow we
7222.to be so as soon as he chooses it. With one look, one 'Who knows?' that night. Mile
7223.s soon as he chooses it. With one look, one 'Who knows?' that night. Mile, de Malpe
7224.'s image kept pursuing me, and word, he will crush the factious multitude. If I Mile
7225.verish excitement subsided towards ical History of the East and West Indies has, I see,
7226.s and anticipations which had filled my mind during the night, was not at all anxiou
7227.ssion. I was in By Madame de Malpeire's desire I led her daughter in, and sat this sta
7228.ire I led her daughter in, and sat this state when, at an early hour, the Baron walke
7229.umerous society had been expected. felt love to you at once because of your great li
7230.e opposite to the father, the worthiest man I know. Now it is for you to sav if chi
7231.ling, and her head moving to and fro in time with her performance. Meanwhile the Bar
7232.hall consider myself the most fortunate man in the world.' 'In that case,' the Baro
7233.er myself the most fortunate man in the world.' 'In that case,' the Baron answered, w
7234.and Madame de Malpeire's what would you desire more?' I clasped the hand he held out t
7235.d then asked him as a favor to delay my happiness for a litfor ' you ?' 'O, ! loveliest,
7236.veliest, the ! ; to rest. tle while. 'I Will you play cards with me?' Madame de Malp
7237.w,' he mi come to breakfast, and then I will take you over tli; We have plenty of ti
7238.ll take you over tli; We have plenty of time to spare my wife only gets up for din;
7239., I suppose a heap of ruins but at that time not one st^nci of its ramparts was miss
7240.se a heap of ruins but at that time not one st^nci of its ramparts was missing, ami
7241.'ui mere worthless rags. Anil it is the same with us. As long as our race exists, it
7242.with us. As long as our race exists, it will be noble by right, and noble in fact, i
7243.e old nobleman's BUfle they give you an idea of his principles, and ant for the ster
7244.ified later on. "A little before dinner time Madame de Malpeire sent Mile. Boinct to
7245.t disappointment, I found her alone. "' Good morning, my dear Count,' she said. 'The
7246.I shall carry it off,' I exclaimed. You will do no such thing," she said again, smil
7247.ch thing," she said again, smiling, you will not even try to do so.' What can preven
7248. fete of the village. All the young men will tako In the afternoon they wrestle on t
7249.he strongest and most active of the lot will receive this day scarf. So you see that
7250. to do so,' I answered with a sigh. You will not be at ' . ' a loss for opportunitie
7251. to say that this is doing too great an honor in my opinion to that publichouse troph
7252. this is doing too great an honor in my opinion to that publichouse trophy.' She seemed
7253.e industrious, simjip-hearted men whose labor you ' not even wish to compete for it.
7254.ence, patience " It was hardly then the time to make my profession of faith on philo
7255.thies and repugnances which result from education. 'From your prejudices," she subjoined
7256.ched to the society in which I lower on one side of the parterre, ending with an ar
7257.ways lived, and I am convinced that you will share that sort of trellis painted ligh
7258. word Never. I saw her go not the least desire to become acquainted with that refini l
7259.elf on the bench where she intellectual world which your education must have given yo
7260.where she intellectual world which your education must have given you had left her work-b
7261.ew minutes she remained in already some idea of ? Would you not like to leave for a
7262.idery and on the contrary, the greatest pain to leave our poor mom D diligently to p
7263. displeased with this reply, for it was Will you allow evident that if Mile, de Malp
7264.e she had been born, I had room?' every chance of becoming her husband, if only from t
7265. did not imply either consent or of any other possible suitor. I also saw storms in t
7266.k up and held in my remote comer of the world was by no means distasteful to me. hand
7267.was by no means distasteful to me. hand one end of the long strip of blue silk whic
7268.perThe taste and execution of haps true wisdom to prefer the peace and tranquillity yo
7269.ution of haps true wisdom to prefer the peace and tranquillity yon enniiYiting with s
7270. very questionable, but joy here to any other mode of existence Everywhere else your
7271.s if it had been a chef d'ceuvrc worthy life might be disturbed by events against wh
7272.arefully sight could secure you. If the Revolution does not stop, who details, I replaced
7273. a very respectful manner on knows what will be the fate of that brilliant, refined,
7274.ectful manner on knows what will be the fate of that brilliant, refined, fashionthe
7275.sure yo.; should probably find in Paris many xali.inx raiic houses deserted. Under t
7276.houses deserted. Under these irke up my mind to give up the 1 could world, and lead
7277. irke up my mind to give up the 1 could world, and lead tho life of a simple country
7278.give up the 1 could world, and lead tho life of a simple country gentleman.' f THE P
7279.ss as a ball-room. all was over by that time. The peasants had dispersed, after burn
7280.ve desolated France, ' is not the first time and our fathers lis, Her muslin cap had
7281.her shoulder and trying to make out the cause of that extraordinary emoBut hi vain I
7282. in every direction. There tion. was no one passing under the castle walls. Everyth
7283.ew peasants at work here and there, and one or two goat-herds following in the wake
7284.d We shall do as they did; we shall our religion, our King, and our rights! These old wa
7285. is not at all tender-hearted. She, so. will not appear at first to like you, but it
7286. appreciate your merits. It may be some time before you succeed in touching the hear
7287.ouching the heart of this obdurate fair one, but, in the mean time, I can see no ob
7288.his obdurate fair one, but, in the mean time, I can see no objection to your marryin
7289.ble circumstance which had disturbed my mind in the morning recurred, to me, and I s
7290.si manner, But suppose a more fortunate man than myself has ' ' already succeeded i
7291.d, there is not for ten leagues round a man to whom a girl like my daughter could h
7292.daughter could have given a thought. No one visits here except a few old friends of
7293.of the Baron's, who sometimes do us the honor of dining with us after noticed anythin
7294.cy had deceived me. Twelve de Verdache, one of our glass manufacturing nobles; M. d
7295.o lead Cadarasse, too, who was formerly one of the rangers of the Mile de Malpeire
7296.e during the last neither as to size or beauty fitted the magnificent specimen of The
7297.borhood. you think it is doing too much honor to that stupid engraving spirit, and Ea
7298.ut it in that frame. I am quite of your opinion, but it is, ' The political news 1' I e
7299.how does however, my own doing, and you will understand my reasons ment.' ' it reach
7300.tand my reasons ment.' ' it reach these good people, I wonder ?' By a number of when
7301. news these make my picture, and at the same time he sent to Paris for a prizes at t
7302. these make my picture, and at the same time he sent to Paris for a prizes at the ru
7303.. persons circulate is transmitted from one neighborhood to an- handsome frame and
7304.and a box of colored crayons, for portr other with considerable rapidity. They are th
7305.great deal of have had mine done in any other manner. The Italian harm. Lately they s
7306.an painter did not re- able but for tho art Boinei of improving their flavor with s
7307..-eason for it. That woman is a perfect art, s more than once in order to set to wo
7308., and besides that ho had the beautiful idea of dressing me up like a Koman or a Tur
7309. little but she could never make up her mind to marry one of tnose clownish fellows.
7310.e could never make up her mind to marry one of tnose clownish fellows.' Miiron I co
7311.e box of crayons, in the hope that some other painter might ] haps come this way, but
7312.ith a would have only been too great an honor for her. Those clownish fellows, as you
7313.s her position is that of a menial. 'O, good Heavens !' Madame de Malpeire exclaimed
7314.rtrait taken ; it is her picture If she will sit to me,' I I should like to see in t
7315.e invited me by a Mile, de Malpeire was sign to follow her into the boudoir. standin
7316.re conand while she dresses your hair I will get everything tinued, I remained alone
7317.; said,' 'to try and take by marrying a man inferior to her in mind and education o
7318.ke by marrying a man inferior to her in mind and education one of those boorish, stu
7319.rying a man inferior to her in mind and education one of those boorish, stupid peasants w
7320.n inferior to her in mind and education one of those boorish, stupid peasants whom
7321.her. I ought to have understood by that time that the education she had secretly giv
7322.o have understood by that time that the education she had secretly given herself had crea
7323.it might have saved her from a terrible fate. But I remained, and her doom was seale
7324.in the preface of that work d across my mind : 'The woman who will venture to read r
7325. work d across my mind : 'The woman who will venture to read resist the M. de Champa
7326.k Heaven,' I thought to this book is as good as lost.' 'we have no St. Preuxhere.' I
7327.g, too myself, thoughtless, too much in love, to make any more serious reI put back
7328.on this discovery. only regretting that chance had happened to throw it in Mile, de Ma
7329. that I 'You are right, should not have time to sketch her portrait. my dear,' her m
7330.r mother replied; 'and, moreover, it is time for our /. King the bell, that Boinet m
7331. much relish. Mile. Boinet took them up one after another on :,int of a fork, a''li
7332.ent likeness," the Marquis subjoined, I will not therefore, of course reckoned perfe
7333.sitting generally lasted several hours, state of restless impatience to see my work f
7334.ession of her countenance the ball with one of tho village lads. My wife did away w
7335. last year, and my uilh the ; derwent a change. A sort of dreamy reverie seemed to ove
7336. to over her, which I would not for the world have interrupted, for then her features
7337.ble to her. But I was so desperately in love, and in consequence so obstinately sang
7338. did not dewould stroy the hope that my love and my devoted attentions end by soften
7339.tn of frieze, and short breeches of the same material; and, over, with worsted stock
7340.erself that my coronet. What a charming idea Christian name was Maximin. Madame de M
7341.rf, and turning to the Baron, I asked, 'Will the conqueror, then, not receive the pr
7342.om the hands of Mile, de Malpeire ? 'He will ccnie here for it after the sports are
7343.over, he replied. ' ' Madame la Baronne will receive him and his companions in the h
7344.Mile, de Malpeire, and trembling with ' emotion, I whispered to her, To-morrow your mot
7345.whispered to her, To-morrow your mother will tell ' you what has been a iswer. settl
7346. you what has been a iswer. settled. My happiness if I cannot be happy I depends upon von
7347.at so soon Forgive me, The excess of my love forgive me,' I cried, terribly agitated
7348. justifies ! ' ' ' marry me agai .st my will ? ' Marie de Malpeire.' despair and pas
7349.e she exclaimed indignantly. Very well. Time will show went to meet him, and brought
7350. exclaimed indignantly. Very well. Time will show went to meet him, and brought him
7351. came to let me know How like it it was time to go to church. I found Madame de Malp
7352.so in greater toilette than usual. Sli< love; I am sure I owe him a great many thank
7353. Sli< love; I am sure I owe him a great many thanks," he good- on a deshabille of st
7354.sure I owe him a great many thanks," he good- on a deshabille of striped silk, and a
7355.prevents him coming forward." luind The good old man embraced me most affectionately
7356.him coming forward." luind The good old man embraced me most affectionately, and sa
7357. a gay, light manner, but with a little emotion, r Well, we me by surprise. I expected
7358. leave me mother made me a confidential sign, and then whispered in the copy.' At th
7359.and then whispered in the copy.' At the same time, he turned towards his daughter, m
7360.hen whispered in the copy.' At the same time, he turned towards his daughter, my ear
7361.ere was a crowd in front of the A great many people are she answered, in a careless
7362.ety of tramps that pitch their the open space, where the fair was held, on a kind of
7363.s, a bit of ribbon of the national col. will be an immense number of people gathered
7364.aron and his f am;! It used to be !l:e, custom,' In- added, tinning to me, her. peared
7365.n the body of the church, provoked this time by the sound of those titles and high-s
7366.press it. ' Do not agitate yourself, my love, her mother affectionately whispered ;
7367.t up the nave I observed against except one. one of the pillars a picture worked in
7368.the nave I observed against except one. one of the pillars a picture worked in tape
7369.actually going to bury her alive !' And God restored her to you in a miraculous man
7370.e you plied, touched by her involuntary emotion. ri'/n. ' Xo one ' ' nize the scene " I
7371.by her involuntary emotion. ri'/n. ' Xo one ' ' nize the scene " I saw nothing, I r
7372.t and addressed the Baron in Proveneal. one side of him and his daughter on the oth
7373.one side of him and his daughter on the other. Pointing to a What does he say ?' whis
7374.coldly replied. At a distance, well and good, the Baroime I have ordered seats to be
7375.face had been turned towards her with a matter to them, my darling.' 'It is already do
7376.veniently ' ' Mile, de Malpeire pray to God without distinction of rank,' answered
7377.'They have a right to stand there. From time inrnaenion;;l the Abbat, that is, the p
7378.pressions. ' I leave you to take care I will go on first,' the Baron said I took Mil
7379.r features reminded me of the head This man's dress was somewhat an ancient gladiat
7380. Instead of worsted ut from that of the other peasants. ngs he wore yellow leather ga
7381.g does not provide a remedy, his nobles will be exposed to a conflict with the peasa
7382.llage. I own security. am quite of your opinion,' cried the Baronne, putting her head W
7383.e, and our out of the sedan-chair. this will Who knows how far W ' ' ' daughter shal
7384.em saying behind her that in all the My other parishes the seats of the lords of the
7385. of the manor had been pulled down. You will be obliged, perhaps, to remove yours.'
7386.of what was about She looked at me from time to time with a .1: place. which I Madam
7387.was about She looked at me from time to time with a .1: place. which I Madame . !, A
7388.At last the if to congratulate me on my happiness. with a paper in his hand, read in a lo
7389. and illustrious lord as long as I live will I renounce my honorary rights. Of these
7390.garden, and said steps as we with great emotion. '(!, mademoiselle, cannot you forgive
7391. mademoiselle, cannot you forgive me my happiness ? What can I do to soiten your feelings
7392.? If yon nld not IK' did but know how I love you, perlm so slow to return my :iH\>ct
7393.u care for somebody else. ' to me?' You will soon know,' she boldly replied, and wit
7394.lanoe with these recent alterations. At one <>f the angles of this portion of the b
7395.s of the parterre, I did not make up my mind to give her up. On the contrary, my lov
7396.ind to give her up. On the contrary, my love became selfish and tyrannical, and I fe
7397. passion blind and mislead me, that the idea of a forced marriage no longer appeared
7398.ugnant and odious as it used to do. The time for delay and hesitation was gone by, a
7399.rossing the square with his train. They will be coming up here. Let us go in. It soo
7400.awingand stakes run into the ground. At one end of these lists, so room we saw part
7401.me to take M. le Baron's orders.' " You will admit no one but the Abbat himself and
7402.le Baron's orders.' " You will admit no one but the Abbat himself and his I kept wa
7403.e others try to force their way in, you will do as I told her countenance and the fe
7404.our hand, M. le Baron. Come with us, my love,' she added, turning to her games are g
7405. them, holding in her lists, and seized one an. hand the blue scarf unfolded. She l
7406.f unfolded. She looked very pale, and I other by the body. One of them was soon throw
7407.ked very pale, and I other by the body. One of them was soon thrown down, and The o
7408.e of them was soon thrown down, and The other man stood bolt saw her hands tremble. s
7409.hem was soon thrown down, and The other man stood bolt saw her hands tremble. silen
7410.cupied the centre of the ring, and were one after an- fore, alone in the drawing-ro
7411.awing-room, standing near a window, and other rolled in the dust, amidst the shouts o
7412. il perfectly well known beforehand who will be ,he conqueror. The Abbat is to make
7413.iresome. Let UK take a turn in the par. love, always be devoted to her, without I th
7414.dulging in parterre was if such was her will her whim pluU'^nn, supported by the rum
7415. window, keeping oloso to the like some one feeling his way in the 7416. I followed with my eyes the indistinct form for some time, but the obscurity was so
7417.th my eyes the indistinct form for some time, but the obscurity was so great that it
7418.ginning of a conflagration somewhere or other, because in each cottage they light gre
7419.he case these summer evenings. No open. one was to be seen, but I fancied I heard t
7420.usted. I have been obliged to rest some time 011 my way up in Boinet's room. I do no
7421. know that I ever laughed so much in my life. I think it is that which has tired me
7422.shall hear all about it,' exclaimed the good lady, seized with a fresh fit of laught
7423.ed to me a little speech, which gave me time to look at him. Upon my word that man i
7424. time to look at him. Upon my word that man is a giant. I do not think my feathers
7425.o make my acknowledgments to that young man. Not knowing the language of the countr
7426.ents to that young man. Not knowing the language of the country, I have not been able to
7427.s delighted with his sentiments." 'Why, good gracious, madame,' the Baron exclaimed,
7428.y drank our tifully served out to these good people. healths, I don't know how many
7429. good people. healths, I don't know how many times, and are gone away qnite satisfie
7430.ept a multitude of lights moving in the same These were the pine-wood torches carrie
7431.d into the room with a gun in his hand, one of those heavy muskets formerly used in
7432.dred of them yelling and hooting on the other side of the moat in front of the gate.'
7433.taking us by storm. I am only afraid of one thing, which is that it should occur to
7434.take to defend that entrance. The first man that appears I shoot down as a dog, and
7435.ot down as a dog, and in like manner as many as shall follow, one by one. O my God,
7436.in like manner as many as shall follow, one by one. O my God, my God cried his and
7437. manner as many as shall follow, one by one. O my God, my God cried his and my daug
7438. many as shall follow, one by one. O my God, my God cried his and my daughter ?' Yo
7439. shall follow, one by one. O my God, my God cried his and my daughter ?' You must w
7440. ' I asked. ' Come with me,' he briefly time. For my part, I feel sufficiently refre
7441.m to be coming here, but they certainly will not come in. We can sleep in perfect 'O
7442.the Baron was somewhat anxious abMt the state of things. He fell, however, asleep as
7443.air, and Mademe de Malpeire and I began one of those interminable games at cards wh
7444.ard, but tumult outside. if M. le Baron will go down into the court, perhaps he can
7445.Baron had found in his game-bag. At the same time I perceived that She is not here !
7446. had found in his game-bag. At the same time I perceived that She is not here !' Mil
7447.I had heard in the boudoir, the strange emotion I had felt, the threat implied in the w
7448.a flash of lightning, passed through my mind the thought of what the Baron had said
7449.ver the castle for Mile, de Malpeire, I sin, nl rooted to the spot, feeling a horri
7450.The Baron came back, looking as palo as death. 'Sh: ,'iins * ' .' As soon as she saw
7451. You must take pity on that I cannot, I will not abandon her. fell on a letter, wlii
7452.exclaimed, 'Head, Monsieur, read. It is duty, it is my right. I must s vo her from t
7453.from then I shall hide her in some Slie will soon repent of her fault directed to yo
7454. The Baron and shut myself up with her. Religion bids us be opened the letter, and an ap
7455. be opened the letter, and an appalling change convent, exHe read it to the end, gave
7456. the 'Repentance can win forgiveness at God's hands,* by him and called wildly for
7457.ame I had read these Baron replied, the time he recovered his senses been carried of
7458.y heart must be revealed. have given my love, I have pledged my hand to a man who, a
7459.en my love, I have pledged my hand to a man who, ac- I love equal. cording to the i
7460.ave pledged my hand to a man who, ac- I love equal. cording to the ideas of the worl
7461.love equal. cording to the ideas of the world, is not him because he possesses all th
7462.with him ; his hardy frame is inured to labor. am and our house cannot brook disgrace
7463.irl h:.s option, no possible course but one. chosen her lot and she must abide by i
7464. lot and she must abide by it. She must man-- the man she has eloped with, and be t
7465.he must abide by it. She must man-- the man she has eloped with, and be to us as if
7466.n odious tyran- sitting together in the same place, pale, heart-broken, utterly wrot
7467. his this extremity. It wretched. nical despotism has driven me to Early in the morning t
7468.of age to escape the horrible misery of being forced in- consent to his daughter's ma
7469. think that share with If I fly with He will me him m you Thousands ot.n drag' me fr
7470.hosen. of t-trong arms and brave hearts will encircle tlie peasant's bri ie, and sav
7471.nnny which would constrain her to wed a man she does not love. If you would save my
7472.constrain her to wed a man she does not love. If you would save my honor, if you wou
7473.she does not love. If you would save my honor, if you would secure for the child you
7474.l, that I may become in the eyes of the world the lawful wife of the man with whom I
7475.yes of the world the lawful wife of the man with whom I have no'; feared to fly in
7476.the presence of a multitude, and whom I will never forsake in life or in death. CHAP
7477.itude, and whom I will never forsake in life or in death. CHAPTEE VEIL THE BMIGEES.
7478.whom I will never forsake in life or in death. CHAPTEE VEIL THE BMIGEES. I cannot exp
7479.t expect that you, ' and my poor mother will forgive me now, but the day will come w
7480.mother will forgive me now, but the day will come when you will do so." The Baron tu
7481. me now, but the day will come when you will do so." The Baron turned towards me wit
7482.t of passion, and said, must marry that man. I shall send my written consent, and w
7483. a, tone which even at this distance of time I cannot Cursed be the day when call *o
7484.I cannot Cursed be the day when call *o mind without shuddering, she '^as born. Curs
7485., she '^as born. Cursed be the day when God in His auger Accursed be her life in rr
7486.y when God in His auger Accursed be her life in rrised her from amongst the dead ' t
7487.rrised her from amongst the dead ' this world and in the O, do not say in the next,'
7488.le, de Malpeire's parents, brought on ? state e* physical which occasioned great suff
7489.g day the doctor pronounced me to be at death's door. I have preserved only a confuse
7490.er and often light-headed. recollect is being haunted by the same continued haltinctl
7491.aded. recollect is being haunted by the same continued haltinctly I kept fancying my
7492. gazed on the blue sky. Tlrs feeling of being dead and coming to life again was const
7493.lrs feeling of being dead and coming to life again was constantly re-occurring in my
7494. re-occurring in my excited of physical imagination, and I passed alternately from a state
7495.nation, and I passed alternately from a state prostration to one of violent excitemen
7496.alternately from a state prostration to one of violent excitement. At last, however
7497.f violent excitement. At last, however, nature triumphed. I sat up one day, looked abo
7498.st, however, nature triumphed. I sat up one day, looked about me, and ! ' ' peating
7499.s mad my poor ; girl is gone out of her mind." "What a terrible night we went throug
7500.ng before the entrance rne to pieces it one saw a woman sitting by my bed-side. It
7501.tches or rouge. and certainly I owed my life, under God, to the devoted care of her
7502.ge. and certainly I owed my life, under God, to the devoted care of her husband and
7503.e doctor was a sharp, clever little old man. He had not been deceived as to the cau
7504.man. He had not been deceived as to the cause of my illness, aud as soon as he percei
7505. beginning to recover consciousness and memory, he said , to tains is too keen for " B
7506.ns is too keen for " Be ween twelve and one o'clock Choiset came into the ' room, a
7507. of these mounMoreover, wo must benr in mind that the whiter here lasts for eight mo
7508.utively, and that it is likely the snow will soon begin to fall and to make the road
7509.ll and to make the roads impassable. My opinion is, that M. de Champaubert ought at onc
7510.If he cannot ride, nothI moved in a ing will be easier than to carry him in a litter
7511.e to sit and my thoughts murmured, 'you will I 18 Till: I'ORTUMT ' /.V MY UNCLE'S DI
7512.go light and the exhilarating r way You will go to your father. room, the doors and
7513.ld, and leaning on the arm of this kind man I tried to has received." 'A few lines
7514.so weak I could not get as far as Never mind," he said, encouragingly, as he led me
7515.s quite well the door. I have ordered a good litter to be got and in a place of safe
7516. me ready, with thick curtains, and you will be very comfortable. an account of the
7517.with me. ire, We shall rest . and you ; will lc ; ' ' i: ! ' ' ' ' ' ; ' ' accompany
7518. ' ' ' ' ' ; ' ' accompanying the royal family of Paris, subsequently to their unhappy
7519.ert the current of my thoughts from the one besetting And it did BO happen that the
7520.besetting And it did BO happen that the idea which was destroying me. de Malpeire,'
7521.He answered, ' They have spared you the pain of that throat. It would have been an a
7522. trial, which you parting. are not in a state to bear. For several days everything ha
7523.ey have left the castle." 'For any long time?' I asked, quite startled at this infor
7524.rs, which the Baron had received at the same time as my father's letter, and which h
7525.hich the Baron had received at the same time as my father's letter, and which he rea
7526.nfortunate passion had made in my whole being. I forgot Mile, de Malpeire. But before
7527.aves of which showed themselves against one of the window-panes. It was a sprig of
7528.le, de Malpeire had stuck into her sash one afternoon, and which I had taken posses
7529.th The old doctor perceived this sudden change, and said tears. in a decided manner, W
7530. sir, we must be off to-njorrow." "That same evening, Madame de Malpeire was sitting
7531.ession I looked at her, as I thought of one whose name I could not utter, but the p
7532.burst into tears, and said, in a low No other exvoice, I mourn over her as if she wer
7533. expression, not at all usual to her. ' Good-night," I said, 'du revoir tomorrow.' S
7534.not that night. choosing to rely on any one but himself for the minute watchThe sto
7535. himself for the minute watchThe stout, good-natured ing my dangerous illness requir
7536.hey The doctor acgoing, without casting one look behind me. companied me on horseba
7537.hich had taken hold of mine, and made a sign to him to close the curtains. The sif^h
7538.ad reeled, and I was seized with a wild desire to throw myself into the abyss and end
7539. throw myself into the abyss and end my life beneath the old waves of that foaming s
7540.we began to descend the mountain on the other side, when I felt the softer air blowin
7541. departed from a spot where, in a short space of time, I had enjoyed the most transpo
7542. from a spot where, in a short space of time, I had enjoyed the most transporting dr
7543. enjoyed the most transporting dream of happiness and suffered the most severe pangs that
7544.tration had been the means of saving my life. Another absurd, strange feeling, which
7545.en rise ' ' ' ' ' Who knows what is the fate of that unhappy tering voice I implore
7546.irl ? ' : haps she may have changed her mind at the last moment, and left that man.
7547. mind at the last moment, and left that man. What, in that case, would become of he
7548.ned and cast her off. There would be no one to lend her a helping hand, should she
7549.ght makes me miserable. I would give my life to save her to take her away from that
7550. to save her to take her away from that man. The ' My tat' first weary, burning eye
7551.eyes at last closed themselves, and for time I slept soundly for several consecutive
7552.nce, and said briefly happy she has the fate she chose for herself. " My father did
7553.ie to the Castle de Malpeire and to the time I spent there. Once, doctor looked at '
7554. " " My d< ar Marquis," he added, " you will let me introduce to you the AbbiS Lambe
7555. This made me feel anxious, for at that time life was made up of incessant fears, an
7556. made me feel anxious, for at that time life was made up of incessant fears, and the
7557.id ' Yo.i know I have just heard of the death of an old friend. him, Maximin, and alt
7558.must, I think, know something as to the fate of the family of Malpeire. He must have
7559.k, know something as to the fate of the family of Malpeire. He must have heard people
7560.that your intimacy ended, I am sure you will feel his death very much.' You mean tha
7561.macy ended, I am sure you will feel his death very much.' You mean that the Baron de
7562. forget Mile, de Malpeire's disgraceful history." 'He had been living the last few days
7563.ew days,' my father answered. here some time in a state bordering on destitution.' '
7564.my father answered. here some time in a state bordering on destitution.' 'And Madame
7565. heart, I think, my 'What, is she, too, good while ago of a broken 'The Baron father
7566.that the poor worn-out cassock 1 had no one with him in his last moments except a p
7567.ackio France.' is gone " We sat on some time in silence. At last I said to my father
7568.a moment, and then replied in a way the family tli at seemed intended to stop any fart
7569.rusac with a We should not have had the pleasure of seeing you tosmile. ii you had not s
7570. add, even in a more advanced period of life, stood in the way of my marrying. And n
7571.w I cannot look at that picture without emotion. The sight of it makes my poor old hear
7572.pressing sick call, and I was afraid of being too late. It is a long walk from Malpei
7573.began discreetly to sound him as to the time of his arrival in those parts, and the
7574. these inquiries, and he spared him the necessity of more direct questioning by 1 CHAPTER
7575.came here, about sixteen years ago, the family of : TEE HOME OF THE PINATKL8. M. de Ch
7576.ou were really very unfortunate in your physics.ejaculated, fiist love." As to me, my h
7577.unate in your physics.ejaculated, fiist love." As to me, my heart was bursting with
7578. an earnest and impressive manner, "May God have And you must also on the soul of t
7579. "May God have And you must also on the soul of that poor woman ! ; forgive her she
7580. her guilt by severe suffer- rage. this time a horrid wrinkled old peasant, bent hal
7581.ampaubert had been speaking Babelou had life." " "It is a shocking history, murmured
7582. Babelou had life." " "It is a shocking history, murmured the Abbfi Lambert, looked in
7583., and asked for a bed, as he was in the habit denial, and he then said, "I little tho
7584.w and then. companv I should relate the history of that poor sinner. God, have been you
7585.relate the history of that poor sinner. God, have been yourself acquainted with Mil
7586.en drying his cassock." Babelou "At the time of Mile, do Malpeire's elopement, I was
7587.heap of wheat. The crnins mildew, which one by one for the purpose of removing the
7588. wheat. The crnins mildew, which one by one for the purpose of removing the This oc
7589.all applied themselves, to the ant-like labor with extraordina; When I appeared, Mada
7590. comfortable terms with her daughter-in-law. She came one day to tell me the news o
7591.erms with her daughter-in-law. She came one day to tell me the news of her second s
7592.t a marriage portion and as the parents will not see or speak to the girl, it is mos
7593.It is not in any way a marriage ly they will disinherit her. that suits us. What sha
7594.her humble servants ? I can tell her it will be no such thing. And what a figure she
7595.be no such thing. And what a figure she will look amongst us in her smart gowns ? Th
7596.ok amongst us in her smart gowns ? They will laugh at us in the village, and I shall
7597.llage, and I shall be almost ashamed of being seen with her. For my part, I have no o
7598.g seen with her. For my part, I have no opinion of those handsome r, ' ; le Curd. We '
7599. ? 'I think it was your new daughter-in-law looking out for her The widow shrugged
7600.fair at Apt.' I sat down in the post of honor, under the proTwo small logs were slowl
7601.my They eldest son, when he comes home, will be out of forts about this Francois bro
7602.s brought her marriage. But it is of no good talking. to the farm, and there was not
7603.age in a different light, and peasants' idea of politeness is to take upon themselve
7604.n St. (lie subject, his young sister-in-law silently slipped into the room and seat
7605.ivering with cold. ' not leave, another time, the door open when you go out in the e
7606. you go out in the evening, daughter-in-law, the widow Pinatel said to her in a How
7607.of her. The eldest son went on with Tue other brothers had also his account of the sa
7608.t of the sale of pigs. their say in the matter, and an animate! discussion arose In th
7609. up the fire a ittle, shivering all the time in her wet clothes, and holding her hea
7610.stranger who had become a member of her family. But though a good woman as the world g
7611.me a member of her family. But though a good woman as the world goes, Madame Pinatel
7612. family. But though a good woman as the world goes, Madame Pinatel had none of the re
7613. my efforts were useless. "Just at that time I was summoned to Aix by the Bishop for
7614.t was a ble, entered the room where the family usually sat. Jiiy long apartment, but s
7615.g in it. The widow Pinatel's bed was iu one corner, screened from sight by curtains
7616.tigued. in the evening. During all that time the young woman moved, or opened her ye
7617.g a glance at the place her daughter-in-law had just left, muttered, I only hope sh
7618., the fr.mily was sitting round a table Good evening to you all. M. le Cure, how do
7619.t with you ?' 'Well, I supand you, pose one must always say yes to that, she ans we
7620.21 ' 'than- I sit down here.' She. made will sit und turning to his wife, said, 'Gom
7621.g to his wife, said, 'Gome, daughter-in-law, get your husliand's eo The, young woma
7622.i;der-t of the country, as I did to the other members of that 1 down and rest a littl
7623.person of ? It really is enough to make one laugh to But she soon recovered her sel
7624.e had in her mother's drawing she said, Will you do me the honor to walk into the In
7625.'s drawing she said, Will you do me the honor to walk into the In see I thanked her,
7626.of year. to be wonderfully mild for the time she added, glancing approvingly at her
7627.est son comes home, he always finds his law. wife hard at work, and something hot a
7628.ire for his supper. If you want to be a good housewife you had bet' The birds hopped
7629. ter learn a lesson from your sister-in-law. ' "'As long as Fraueois does not compl
7630. this bright sunshine is like a look of love the love of a The most deeply merciful
7631.ght sunshine is like a look of love the love of a The most deeply merciful God on th
7632. the love of a The most deeply merciful God on the works of His hand. afflicted sou
7633.God on the works of His hand. afflicted soul ought to be cheered by those benignant
7634.d meddled with the saucepan. ' Francois will excuse it,' I added; I shall not be so
7635.added; I shall not be so stupid another time.' ' There is nothing to be angry about,
7636. travel. W..B ankle deep in mud all the time, and my feet are like iciMake haste the
7637. support and strengthen her a uidst the many trials which must necessarily await her
7638. went awaypraying and trusting that her soul would turn to God, and seek peace in Hi
7639.nd trusting that her soul would turn to God, and seek peace in His love and service
7640.at her soul would turn to God, and seek peace in His love and service. which seem to
7641.ould turn to God, and seek peace in His love and service. which seem to give new lif
7642.ove and service. which seem to give new life to all creation. We feel that God is ou
7643. new life to all creation. We feel that God is our Father, and that he watches over
7644.offensive way which persons who have no religion always put on with priests when they en
7645.often met with this sort of contemptand love of God. uous treatment at the hands of
7646.t with this sort of contemptand love of God. uous treatment at the hands of men imb
7647.ous boasters who gloried in abusing the habit I wear, but the hostile, unfriendly man
7648.rt of impassioned scepticism. She had a mind at once arrogant and disputatious, whic
7649.here was not an atom in her of what the world calls touch. tenderness and sensibility
7650.u impetuous ' i > As I sat listening to imagination, full of false enthusiasm. her, I could
7651. unbridled passions had misled her from one folly arid one fault to another, into I
7652.ions had misled her from one folly arid one fault to another, into I was young myse
7653.at that her present miserable position. time, and had not yet learnt to fathom the f
7654.man conscience. I was so shocked at the state of that nuhappy soul that I began silen
7655.so shocked at the state of that nuhappy soul that I began silently to pray for her w
7656.ea a fervent Christians,* but still the family were tolerably regular in their attenda
7657.. I asked the widow why her daughter-in-law did not come with her, and what she was
7658.her hand to put it out.' " I was in the habit of vis. ting the different families ia
7659.e interrupted. These people and nothing will ever alter their feelings towards detes
7660. We must, the till however, put up with one another on both widow Piuatel can pay h
7661. property belonging to an emigre, so it will be long before the ow. er comes back. T
7662.ext Michaelmas, almost a whole But ever mind; I must have p;itien e.' This plan apj.
7663.property as that. I have already eiig:i man to drive the oxen, a shepherd aud a plo
7664.ast us till the next harvest.' All that will cost you a good round sum,' I said. He
7665.next harvest.' All that will cost you a good round sum,' I said. He tapped his leath
7666.were very high; but it never entered my mind that Frangois 1 inatel would adventure
7667.a ruinous game of hazard. He was in the habit of keeping with the younger men, and I
7668.e ust.ru yourself to a 1 f e of so much labor and fatigue. Moreover, your husband wil
7669.bor and fatigue. Moreover, your husband will not be perhaps as much of a he p to you
7670. must know, M. ness justnow. of land in one 1 will ' also addicted to drinking and
7671.know, M. ness justnow. of land in one 1 will ' also addicted to drinking and gamblin
7672.m me. When we have a farm of our own he will not be able to wander about the country
7673.all manage to keep him at home then. He will leave off loitering in the public-house
7674. off loitering in the public-houses; he will lead a quiet, industrious life, the app
7675.uses; he will lead a quiet, industrious life, the appointed lot of man on earth, and
7676. industrious life, the appointed lot of man on earth, and fulfil all the duties ' o
7677.earth, and fulfil all the duties ' of a good citizen and th head of a family. " Chri
7678., and fulfil all the duties ' of a good citizen and th head of a family. " Christian ch
7679.es ' of a good citizen and th head of a family. " Christian charity compelled me to ho
7680.compelled me to hold my tongue; but any one the least acquainted with Frangois Pina
7681.olive groves t:> say my by agricultural labor, and that he was only capable of exerti
7682. the town I met he A -'but without h is sign of the greatest perseverance, shrewdnes
7683.of a peasant is He was a thick-skulled, good-hearted, agitation of mind. He was walk
7684.ick-skulled, good-hearted, agitation of mind. He was walking to and fro, heedless of
7685.said, M. le Cure", can you 'I have only one of th ee mother's favorite child, and s
7686.end me a piece of six francs With great prudence she had taken care not to make over to
7687.f the paternal inheritance; but, on the other the first place you mus tell me what ha
7688.t at play every penny he possesse I. It law's advice, and withdrew with the sad con
7689.he sad consciousness that I was not the time for reproaches, or for trying to move h
7690.ry and softea his despair. her immortal soul, or even as to the questions relating t
7691.he questions relating to her But he had one of those excitable, unreasoning natures
7692. and over again, having appointed me to other functions. My flock thus passed will my
7693.o other functions. My flock thus passed will my mother say ? I had rather die than g
7694.urfe. The most disastrous not afraid of death. It is so easy to throw one's se!f into
7695.afraid of death. It is so easy to throw one's se!f into a and; t.ie Church was well
7696. that if left to himself he days of the revolution were th.n at threatened with an impendi
7697.ommit such a crime and that neither the sense of God's refused to adhere to the civil
7698.h a crime and that neither the sense of God's refused to adhere to the civil consti
7699.of God's refused to adhere to the civil constitution of the clergy with justica nor the fear
7700.gy with justica nor the fear of eternal punishment would be sufficient During several mont
7701.weakness, when he would place ening the courage of the weak. Towards the end of my circ
7702. from St C a woman. I took advantage of one of those int rvals to say to I came to
7703.arrived on the eve of the fair, is only one thing to do. since I had left my parish
7704. mother's kindness, own to her which is one of the principal ones in that part of t
7705.ast three days a festival. Oppor- never will show my face at home. I \v ill go away,
7706.g he had hitherto been in his duties to God and to his family, and numbers. " The n
7707.to been in his duties to God and to his family, and numbers. " The next morning as I w
7708. had the consolation of hearing at that time a bustling consequential air and manner
7709.nner. I went up to him to from his lips one word of real repentance. He soon calmed
7710.when I came away. My moth r is just the same as ever some measure the better of his
7711. brother was coming with fallen him. 'I will tell you the real truth,' he said with
7712.h fallen him. 'I will tell you the real truth,' he said with a I wanted to buy a gold
7713.rs flock there in ' ; , ' ' ' Til K the cause of francs. it all. PORTRAIT IN MY UNCLE
7714. end would be a marriage in the br ther God forbid that I should say such an untrut
7715.y sister-in- haps her father and mother will think better of it, and may forlaw is j
7716.e they call her in the village give her one of these days.' the fair peasant and on
7717.hese days.' the fair peasant and on the other hand, my wife is vexed because my broth
7718.ed Unit I had not been able to make the same A When my eldest brother married We loc
7719.ldest brother married We locked at each other, ui.d THE NIGHT AFTEB THE FAIB. " When
7720.go in,' he exclaimed I shall never have courage to It suddently came into my head to tr
7721. of six francs in my hand, but 'Well, I will go in first,' I said, 'and break to qui
7722.im. I threw in my greatly relieved, you will tell it to her before everybody. six fr
7723.e answered, I am not self that the next time luck was certain to and I staked afraid
7724. was certain to and I staked afraid she will forgive me fast enough.' turn, and lost
7725. card was drawn, and that I won. Sonie- family were seated round the table at supper.
7726.h his Knatel saw me she exclaimed, O my good Lord Has sonic thumb, which is a certai
7727.ord Has sonic thumb, which is a certain sign of bad luck. This put me into spirits,
7728.that way. I could still have bought the will of God, for that 1 had indeed a painful
7729.. I could still have bought the will of God, for that 1 had indeed a painful bit sh
7730. the little corn, but I had engaged the man to take care of the new8 to P ve ner mu
7731.let claimed in a voice of despair. 'You will see him in a moment,' francs, which I n
7732.ld not give in about heaven, murmured: 'God be praised; I thought a worse misIt was
7733.d; I thought a worse misIt was just the same two years I was afraid my poor boy was
7734.llen us. went to Maipeire for the first time. I should have done well Let him come i
7735.ransport of gratitude. Don't be afraid, mind saying it >o you the peasant who marrie
7736.ternal affection and generosity; 'there will always be say anything so shocking ?' I
7737.he subjoined, Ho d your tongue, unhappy man,' I said. It is shameful of table, but
7738. down. up to As sure as that I must die one day, I never made up to her. spoke in a
7739.appease her, but she listened The first time that I went to Maipeire for the St. L z
7740.fury broke out. It was no doubt a great honor, but I declare I should ner. she exc ai
7741.e the smiling sort of a way, and, us in duty bound, I answered in the bread whioii,
7742.d in the bread whioii, as a beggar, you will receive from your family? best way I co
7743.as a beggar, you will receive from your family? best way I could. Before we parted she
7744. at all expect. I stayed at Maipeire bt cause she asked I shall go away alone, and le
7745.l Timi];* woman, who was standing iij ' One of her where all the family were pathen
7746.standing iij ' One of her where all the family were pathen-d round the Abbat, wh. was
7747.he o 'He has lying in the p sitiun of n man asleep. A whits sh< "n. struck me,' she
7748.g ov. r him wone, she walked out of the room, and we hea
7749.'Yesterday you brought him back full of life and health, and your tongue,' cried the
7750. that beating, he leaned over the dying man to listen to his linost go back to S sa
7751.an to listen to his linost go back to S same evening. The eldest Pinntel offered to
7752.d to the Abbat, and said, in an anxious man- ' The poor fellow hns only a few minut
7753.ak to her to-night, something worse may constitution. Life does not easily withdraw from tha
7754.ight, something worse may constitution. Life does not easily withdraw from that youn
7755.. My son, she sha'n't insult me another time as she did my dear son," I said to him,
7756.y dear son," I said to him, if you wish God to forgive you what, mother, at you. '
7757.est prayer for the proud and rebellious soul I had left behind me. Alas, I ought to
7758.ought to have been pleading for another soul then about to up your heart to Him now.
7759.sins. raise ; my eyes appear before the judgment-seat of 1 God. " The Abbe Lambert sighe
7760.es appear before the judgment-seat of 1 God. " The Abbe Lambert sighed deeply, and
7761.d, as I was going to church, I saw some one on the ing day, tant to proceed with hi
7762. forgive your wife in the hope that Gud will forgive you ? " He made an effort to I
7763.natel gave up his penitent and ransomed soul into the hands of his Maker." walking v
7764. in the direction of St. C my way. This man, as he passed me, called out, ' The fai
7765.he executioner, and to imprisonment for life. 1 was not in France at that moment, th
7766.iu the States of the Church, and by the time I heard of her sentence she had already
7767.s supposed, bonauso the her daughter-in-law to death." judges had not sentenced " A
7768.sed, bonauso the her daughter-in-law to death." judges had not sentenced " And siuce
7769.g of that with all my heart t j give me time to prepare that unhappy unhappy man to
7770.me time to prepare that unhappy unhappy man to appear befcre Him. As I approached t
7771. C Before I arrived there I met another man, who confirmed the terrible account I I
7772. village is after I hurried on, begging God her, bent on avenging the Abbat.' ' ' ;
7773.e for me to visit her here, for at that time none but the priests who had taken the
7774. who had taken the oath could enter the State prisThe only thing I could do was to wr
7775.ommotion and political disturbances the law deals silently, as it were, with great
7776.s head out of the window nunl^us a last sign of farewell. We soon lost sight of the
7777. said M. de Champaubert, in an agitated man- watching the white speck vanishing in
7778.et me know the result. It is my anxious desire to secure her send for Babelou, and to
7779. to secure her send for Babelou, and to desire her to carry up to the lumbersufficient
7780.e Abb6 Lambert bowed low, and said, " I will try, M. le dreadful woman would have di
7781.but really the arm is without the least idea of it, the heroine of such a dreadful q
7782.ly burnt out, off with me. There was no time to lose, for my holidays were bu: a fre
7783.s to go back to ollege the next day but one. up the room. It had left off raining,
7784.t apprehend any great difficulty in the matter. I had amongst the trees and shook the
7785. M. de Champaubert got up and wished us good> corner of the attic, to bring away the
7786.ure" ; I intend every year to renew the same heavy picture up-stnirs? It must have b
7787. nothing lo look to but destitution and universal reprobation. Somebody, however, who kne
7788.d, I " And yet we have had a melancholy time of it," murmured my poor de.ir uncle, ;
7789.but guilty woman who had been his first love, room for it in the attic?" "O, I just
7790.hen of a strange interest about her. My mind kept dwelling on her I shuddered at her
7791.t her crime, but thought, nevertragical fate. theless, that the Ab at had deserved a
7792.spent the night in a feverish, restless state. The same image eleven and twelve o'clo
7793.ight in a feverish, restless state. The same image eleven and twelve o'clock at nigh
7794.ext morning. M. de Champaubert was soon form my part in the plot. and we started. Th
7795.shrug ; are always going in and out for one thing or another, the key generally rem
7796.shed cheeks and a beating heart, like a man engaged in a desperat. The lumber-room
7797.o my room. Soon afterwards I heard some one under my windows, calling to me in a su
7798.s all was over. Marian's all but sudden death was one of those events which throw a b
7799.over. Marian's all but sudden death was one of those events which throw a bachelor'
7800.o find the slightest fault with her. It will be no easy matter to replace so good a
7801.test fault with her. It will be no easy matter to replace so good a servant. " 1 was o
7802.It will be no easy matter to replace so good a servant. " 1 was o cupied meanwhile i
7803.u." Fifteen years afterwards, alter the death of Dom Gerusac, who made me his executo
7804.gatee, I found Mile. de Melpeire in the same place where Babelou had put her. go to
7805.has written some remarkable papers. His mind inspired by holy and bold convie; ions,
7806.three thousand officers, is true to the cause they had sworn to uphold, broke their s
7807.g in silence the fall of an illustrious monarchy, threw themselves into exile. Among the
7808.card. His heart free, and his purse his duty, he took the light, but satisfied with
7809. jovial party exchanged looks with each other, as Seven or eight young men, the of At
7810.now by heart the verses of BCranger and other worse than flippant productions of that
7811.s of absinthe, to prepare, according to custom, his diges"Absinthe!" said one of the c
7812.ng to custom, his diges"Absinthe!" said one of the clerks tive organs for dinner. m
7813. I ; petuous character, but still, when necessity required, sufficient master of himself
7814.b. Surprised 1 on, as a gentle by ; the revolution of July, his regiment was in garrison,
7815.r or see anything that would recall the evil days of revolution. He was obliged, how
7816.hing that would recall the evil days of revolution. He was obliged, howThis town, though p
7817. cv. r, to pass through Avignon. by tho good sense of the populace, was in a state o
7818.r, to pass through Avignon. by tho good sense of the populace, was in a state of grea
7819.ho good sense of the populace, was in a state of great ex- down with the Carlists !"
7820. with auger, but calm and resolved as a man who knows his own strength and right, r
7821.rom the table and slowly approached the one who seemed to be the chief of the party
7822.pose you have for you are eight against one " Monsieur," he said, laying his righth
7823.nsulting me, ; > I believe you to be to good do so cowardly a thing. Be that as it m
7824.owardly a thing. Be that as it may, you will permit me to remark that gentlemen of g
7825.l permit me to remark that gentlemen of good breeding ought to respect those whom ch
7826.od breeding ought to respect those whom chance unites under tho same roof. Now, as you
7827.pect those whom chance unites under tho same roof. Now, as your songs annoy me, and
7828. in the theatre, nor in the street, you will greatly oblige Frenchmen to We are robb
7829.ngly give three francs ten sous," added one of his companions, whose red nose testi
7830.ose testified to his propensities ; " I will give a hundred sous to the waiter; to s
7831.ed sous to the waiter; to see that fowl change into a carp." Wounded to the quick by t
7832.ning to his seat, he finished self, and God his glass of absinthe, rang for the wai
7833. day of abstinence. I am certain," said one of the young men, loud enough to heard,
7834.g to make a ; ; ' maigre dinner." "That will be a droll thing to see," added his nei
7835." added his neighbor. " We shall have a good laugh," said the chief and giving a new
7836.eplace this fowl by a carp." " Monsieur will then be served en f" maigre ' "Yes, my
7837.rved en f" maigre ' "Yes, my friend." " Good. Now we shall have our laugh," said the
7838.gine, received, on its entry, the honWe will pass over the sarcasms and jokes ors of
7839.him, opposing a digni- " rectly. have a good laugh," returned the facetious travthin
7840.dinner he was about to ridicule. At the same moment the organ boy, his face sparklin
7841.nvented out of hatred to the clergy and religion ; the more direct the insults, the less
7842.irect the insults, the less they seemed one. to affect him. "Decidedly the holy man
7843.one. to affect him. "Decidedly the holy man has made a vow of patience," said Blanc
7844.ade a vow of patience," said Blanche. " Will you please take yourself off as quickly
7845.al music without accompaniment ; at the same time I admire harmony. Let : "I think,"
7846.sic without accompaniment ; at the same time I admire harmony. Let : "I think," said
7847.y had to suffer the consequences of the law they had themselves laid down. They beg
7848.onsieur ?" * this gives consent ; so we will treat you with a piece this, "Ohameron,
7849.is, "Ohameron, Frangois- Joseph." which will set your hair on end." At these words,
7850.es, Ricard had obtained such charivari. religion have you been brought up ?" " In the Ca
7851.therefore But you, monsieur, let me ask religion. dismissed the organ boy and his instru
7852.." Gargon," said the captain, cried the one who was the leader of the party, "Gargo
7853.who, for the past hour, have insulted a man who has done nothing to provoke you, yo
7854.ongst you all, insulting bullies, there will not be found one whose heart is manly e
7855.ulting bullies, there will not be found one whose heart is manly enough to offer me
7856. " which is due to me. monsieur!" cried one of the insulters, unable to "Enough, st
7857.this taunt. "What are your arms ?" " no will be yours." Your hour?" " That which is
7858.r hour?" " That which is next to strike will be the best." nature of his business of
7859.ch is next to strike will be the best." nature of his business often called him to tha
7860.nt mnny weeks of every year nt Avignon. One day, when he was proceeding to this tow
7861.vel in these days ; we are removed from one place to another we can go quicker now
7862.ct of the railroads established at this time in the department of the Loire, when (l
7863.ve no repugnance to sit at table with a man who differs from you in I am a Protesta
7864.hose born in error, are the sons of the same God. By this title, I love and esteem y
7865.born in error, are the sons of the same God. By this title, I love and esteem you.
7866. sons of the same God. By this title, I love and esteem you. I love you more, perhap
7867.By this title, I love and esteem you. I love you more, perhaps, since I see you livi
7868.ore, perhaps, since I see you living so will diiw together, monsieur far from the tr
7869.ll diiw together, monsieur far from the truth. religious belief. the hotel Sain'-Yves
7870.eligious belief. the hotel Sain'-Yves." will allow me, I will join you at the same h
7871.the hotel Sain'-Yves." will allow me, I will join you at the same hotel." can do sti
7872." will allow me, I will join you at the same hotel." can do still better we can dine
7873. Bartolasse. officer, " I am not in the habit of at the first pass, fighting duels; b
7874.o use a sword, that I Jike to show they will do well to learn off!" II. Monsieur," s
7875.ant; "and I have even made an excellent one at the hotel we are about to enter. It
7876. the hotel we are about to enter. It is many years ago now, but I will tell you the
7877. enter. It is many years ago now, but I will tell you the story, between the fruit a
7878.een the fruit and the cheese perhaps it will please you, as much as your company in
7879.rederic Kicard, the principal personage history, passed through them with the stoicism
7880. of his companion. characstrong-hearted man. Leaving Du Vigan where he had gone imm
7881.tie banner of Don Miguel. Vain hope The courage of heroism does not always suffice to f
7882.though a Protestant, to a bad Catholic, will not have been lost. Be that as it may,
7883. have been lost. Be that as it may, the man you so wisely corrected ought to bless
7884.ended his days with your sword. May the life you have preserved be nobly and usefull
7885., monsieur: you have a noble heart. You will und.rcturned to France to seek a new po
7886.to France to seek a new position. Then, one see him one day, be assured; but, till
7887. seek a new position. Then, one see him one day, be assured; but, till that time ar
7888.him one day, be assured; but, till that time arrives, you " after the other, he beca
7889.till that time arrives, you " after the other, he became a lawyer without clients, a
7890.came a lawyer without clients, a physi- will always have a share of my prayers, that
7891. traveller, laughing, "that, as at this same none indeed he would have died of miser
7892.would have died of misery and hunger if one table a fowl was transformed into a car
7893.at Grenoble, had not of- dear AbbC ? It will be more difficult, I forewarn you. " fe
7894.hing .omain. Nothing is impossible with God," added the priest Strange inconsistenc
7895.e priest amorphosis in thinking, like a good royalist, that Bordeaux was to preach d
7896. as we are now in a similar position in