Concordance for Fabiola.

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1.    been read for the last thirty years in many lands and many it tongues. At this late
2. the last thirty years in many lands and many it tongues. At this late day, to say th
3. Chris- where productive of inestimable good tian souls, would be the utterance of t
4. of disap- pointment and suffering. The good already accomplished by the early missi
5. the coming storm, and the work at that time in progress was meeting with fierce and
6. ing storm, and the work at that time in progress was meeting with fierce and even it cru
7. s meeting with fierce and even it cruel opposition. Then it was that men asked themselves,
8. Catholics America thirty years ago had cause to fear the torch or the axe of the exe
9. by the Cardinal' s graceful pen in the history of Fabiola, the Catholics in America pr
10. the great majority of the as that self-same faith had been misrepresented, in the e
11. y needed the help of bright examples of courage, zeal and perseverance, to beckon them
12. s, producing such beautifully fruits of virtue, and showing forth so and so powerfully
13. faith all itself finally triumphed over opposition ; and verifying the words of : the Apos
14. ia, became a victory that conquered the world " Haec est quae vincit mundum, fides no
15. his is the victory which overcometh the world, our faith." By the study of these mode
16. in their poor despised Church, at that time remarkable for its to poverty and obscu
17. and obscurity, there dwelt the eternal truth brought earth from heaven down by the S
18. om heaven down by the Son of the living God, the truth which He had ; confirmed by
19. down by the Son of the living God, the truth which He had ; confirmed by miracles an
20. racles and sealed with His precious and life' s blood the truth in whose defence mil
21. with His precious and life' s blood the truth in whose defence millions of the holies
22. ery lives ; greatest men sacrificed the truth in whose possession the noblest and mos
23. n whose possession the noblest and most life enlightened aniong the children of cons
24. d aniong the children of consolation in death. Adam had found peace in die. and For t
25. of consolation in death. Adam had found peace in die. and For tkis truth, they were w
26. am had found peace in die. and For tkis truth, they were willing to How opportune, at
27. were willing to How opportune, at that time, was the appearance in our midst of a t
28. brighten and cheer the arduous path of many a despised if not persecuted Catholic,
29. d in fi'om her hiding-places, so, thank God, has that same Chiu'ch our own country
30. hiding-places, so, thank God, has that same Chiu'ch our own country bounded forth f
31. , where she stands confessed in all her truth and beauty, at once the envy and admii-
32. e stands confessed in all her truth and beauty, at once the envy and admii-ation of he
33. ape of materialism. The contest between truth and error is as fierce as ever, though
34. otestantism. laurels in a We can win no war against protestantism, in the ranks. fo
35. the martyrs Pancratius, Sebastian, and other heroes of primitive Christianity. Yet a
36. Catholics. There remains to us a great duty of defence and preservation, and there
37. he lives of men and women who have done honor to principle, glorified God and benefit
38. of men and women who have done honor to principle, glorified God and benefited their fell
39. have done honor to principle, glorified God and benefited their fellow-beings by th
40. t structure beneath whose hallowed roof peace and prosperity. Therefore it is our hap
41. el of that period. beautiful engravings will bring Its many bright fortify more vivi
42. od. beautiful engravings will bring Its many bright fortify more vividly before the
43. the Church in different periods of her One, for instance, might past existence. be
44. f the Schools." indiscreetly,—that he will find In proposing this sketch, he added
45. comhas been carried on entirely on that principle. of places been written at all sorts of
46. sorts of times and in all sorts when no duty urged, in scraps and fragments worn for
47. ed, in scraps and fragments worn for of time, when the body was too fatigued or the
48. , when the body was too fatigued or the mind too It has, therefore, ; early and ; la
49. 'i : in its parts. If so, this account will explain the cause. Secondly, he will th
50. s. If so, this account will explain the cause. Secondly, he will thus be led not to e
51. nt will explain the cause. Secondly, he will thus be led not to expect a treatise or
52. is little book, of each page with notes idea. and references. But and till half was
53. ts, condition, ideas, feeling, ity. His desire was rather to make his reader familiar
54. l than learned, with the records of the time. For instance, such writings as the Act
55. to leave impressions on the author"' s mind, rather than have been examined and cri
56. instruction has been freely iised. Any one acRoman Breviary must have observed, th
57. orated in a distinct and characteristic form. This is not the result so much of any
58. es she betrothed ; is tunately pressed, death," angel slie rejects the love of perish
59. etrothed ; is tunately pressed, death," angel slie rejects the love of perishable man
60. pressed, death," angel slie rejects the love of perishable man, "the food of and tri
61. gel slie rejects the love of perishable man, "the food of and triumphantly proclaim
62. rself under the protection of an who is will shield her. is This history as plainly
63. n of an who is will shield her. is This history as plainly written by the fragments of
64. a and joined together. But throughout, one discerns another peculiarity, and a tru
65. ther peculiarity, and a truly beautiful one in her character. It is clearly represe
66. ver before her the unseen Object of her love, saw Him, heard Him, felt Him, and ente
67. ction, such as hearts on earth have for one another. She seems to walk in perpetual
68. ng gaze, and returned looks of gracious love. would venture to alter the would presu
69. e to alter the would presume to attempt one at variance with it? Or who would hope
70. who would hope to draw a portrait more life-like and more exquisite than the Church
71. lace before us a cer- tain type of high virtue embodied in the character of that saint
72. tion to be expected from a work in this form, and one intended for general reading,
73. expected from a work in this form, and one intended for general reading, judge. a
74. which embraces several centuries more, will show that as much is positive early pei
75. positive early peiiod here imparted, as knowledge on the practices and belief of that it
76. usual to communicate in a more didactic form. At the same time, the reader It must r
77. unicate in a more didactic form. At the same time, the reader It must remember that
78. te in a more didactic form. At the same time, the reader It must remember that this
79. ntries have been condensed into a small space. : year; the period of St. Sebastian, t
80. e view of the morals and opinions Pagan world, as a contrast to those of Christians.
81. from graver pursuits but that, ; at the same time, the reader may rise from its peru
82. graver pursuits but that, ; at the same time, the reader may rise from its perusal w
83. rom its perusal with a feeling that his time Rather let it has not been lost, nor hi
84. ather let it has not been lost, nor his mind occupied vdth frivolous ideas. be hoped
85. eas. be hoped, that some admiration and love may be inspired by it of those primitiv
86. 4 '72 82 88 106 119 129 IX. Meetings X. Other Meetings XI. XII. XIII. A Talk with the
87. bove Ground VI. Deliberations VII. Dark Death VIII. Darker Still . 265 . . 275 280 28
88. e Critical Day its First Part XXIX. The same Day its Second Part XXX. The same Day i
89. . The same Day its Second Part XXX. The same Day its Third Part XXXI. DioNYSius, Pri
90. 3 533 .... .... .... . XXXIII. Miriam's History XXXIV. Bright Death PART I. III II. The
91. XXXIII. Miriam's History XXXIV. Bright Death PART I. III II. The Stranger from the E
92. R AND LOVELY ? ' " 409 ' . . PAOK "Each one, approaching devoutly, received from hi
93. " "PaNCRATIUS was STILL STANDING IN THE SAME TO heed the movements of his 415 PLACE,
94. tioner tion, and bid him at once do his duty " "Fabiola went down herself, with a fe
95. Catacomb of St. Peteoxilla A Dove, as a Symbol of the Soul, fouxd ix the Catacombs 67
96. . Peteoxilla A Dove, as a Symbol of the Soul, fouxd ix the Catacombs 67 . . 71 . . 8
97. esurrection A Dote, as an Emblem of the Soul Domitilla .189 203 Diogenes, the Excata
98. ith a Representation combes" 247 of the Good Shepherd, found at Ostium, prior to the
99. e in the 253 Cemetery of Domitilius The Good Shepherd, a Woman Pra:ying, from the Ar
100. he Arcosolium of the Our Lord Under the Symbol . . . , Cemetery of SS. Nereus and Achi
101. Praxedes Our Saviour Represented as the Good Shepherd, with a Milk Can AT His Side,
102. 48 353 in the Cemetery of of the Sixtus Man Born Blind, from a Picture in the Cata3
103. of domitilla 36^ Jesus Cures the Blind Man, from a Picture in the Cemetery of St.
104. n the Catacombs 447 Moses Receiving the Law, from a Picture in the Cemetery of "Int
105. CHRISTIAN EmPEROR, AFTER A MeDAL OF THE Time Dioclesian, after a 549 Medal in the Ca
106. f Constantine 552 NoE AND the Ark, as a Symbol of the Church, from a Picture in THE Ca
107. houses, and making Caasar's gardens on one side, way towards or Sallust's on the,
108. side, way towards or Sallust's on the, other, to enjoy their evening walk, and learn
109. ld, once left bare for the athletic and war- ^y^ Street of tlip Thp-ms. § Plan of
110. the Emperor Dioclesian was covering the space sufficient for many lordly dwellings, f
111. n was covering the space sufficient for many lordly dwellings, far by the erection o
112. Sallust's garden, just alluded to. The particular spot will direct our steps, is Campus M
113. n, just alluded to. The particular spot will direct our steps, is Campus Martins is
114. steps, is Campus Martins is to which we one whose situation so definite, that accur
115. ite, that accurately describe it to any one acquainted with the topography of ancie
116. n times there we can was a large square space in the Campus Martius, sur- rounded by
117. n- Its ruins are clearly traceable; the space now covered by ning thus along the pres
118. n by windows. In the middle of that is, one side of this quadrangle relieved is a d
119. f fiction," of invisible ubiquity, " we will enter in with our called. friend, or sh
120. , on the pavement of which we read with pleasure, in mosaic, the greeting Salve, or Welc
121. l woods, bearing candelabra, lamps, and other household implements of bronze or silve
122. ts, vases, tripods, and objects of mere art. still, On the walls are paintings evid
123. stal Palace, The Pompeian Court London, will have familiarized many readers with the
124. an Court London, will have familiarized many readers with the forms of an ancient ho
125. ye which could offend the most delicate mind. Here and there an empty niche, or a co
126. eyond. Through an arch, opposite to the one inner and whereby we have entered, we c
127. artly withdrawn, and admits a the first time, bright but softened ray from the eveni
128. de the columns of Phrygian marble, sits life, whose feat- ures, noble yet mild, show
129. called the segmentwn, which denotes the state of widowhood and not a jewel or preciou
130. thin the upper hem of her dress. At the time that we discover her she is busily enga
131. lly she has recourse a gem set in gold, one or another of several elegant caskets u
132. ecious orna- ments of earlier days were being devoted to some higher purpose. w But a
133. evoted to some higher purpose. w But as time goes on, some little uneasiness may be
134. he inner-hall; and shall hardly find we time to sketch him it. before he reaches He
135. all for that age, with ing. elegance of form and manliness of bearHis bare neck and
136. y her feet. She gazes upon him for some time in silence, as if to discover in his co
137. s if to discover in his countenance the cause of his unusual delay, for he is an so h
138. rn. But he meets her glance with * This custom suggests to St. Augustine the beautiful
139. suggests to St. Augustine the beautiful idea, that the Jews were the pcedagogi of Ch
140. and cannot have failed to tell you the good of the day about myself." again, wonder
141. ) (The mother smiled "I was reading the other day that the Scythians each evening cas
142. have done. an But to-day, for the first time, I have a doubt, a fear of conscience,
143. son has done nothing that may give you pain. Only say, do you wish to hear all that
144. hat has befallen me to-day, or only the cause of my late return home?" all, "Tell me
145. ianus set us this led, as for which our good master our work during the morning hour
146. work during the morning hours and ; you will hear, to some singular discoveries. The
147. osopher should be ever ready to die for truth.' (I I never heard anything so cold or
148. nearly fatally betrayed me. companions. truth can they possess, and my word Christian
149. 'philosopher,' and 'faith' instead of 'truth.' mistake I saw Cassianus start; at the
150. But in these days of danger and I thank God that I did so. apprehension we are obli
151. displeased, and "He dullest fault. ill-will is the oldest and strongest, but, unfor
152. have had an and grudge against me, the cause to you, or which I cannot understand."
153. ught do?" For when we "Yes, and was the cause of my delay. the field by the river, he
154. me, Pancratius, understand, is the last time ; we I meet here' (he laid a particular
155. last time ; we I meet here' (he laid a particular emphasis on the word) have have a long
156. as the etc. exercise which combined all other personal contests, —wrestling, boxing
157. ents of writing in schools, the tablets being covered with wax, f The flat top, on wh
158. nsciously done anything that could give pain to of him I any my school-fellows ; nor
159. ou are anxious to begin them with those evil feelings which are usually their bad en
160. fully added, all 'And now, my comrades, good-bye, and may attend you. peace.' I happ
161. comrades, good-bye, and may attend you. peace.' I happiness in the face part from you
162. good-bye, and may attend you. peace.' I happiness in the face part from you, as so,' ' I
163. not tell the rest " ! entreat you, for God's sake, and for the love you bear your
164. ntreat you, for God's sake, and for the love you bear your father's memory," said th
165. and for the love you bear your father's memory," said the mother, placing her hand upo
166. * ! * Ton have till concealed us, but I will find you out; then bear One of the many
167. us, but I will find you out; then bear One of the many calumnies popular among the
168. will find you out; then bear One of the many calumnies popular among the heatheus. :
169. that I was strong enough surely was an evil spirit. heart seemed bursting within ;
170. hardest struggle of strong within my ! life; never were flesh and blood so God! may
171. y ! life; never were flesh and blood so God! may they never be again so tremendousl
172. on. He side. replied, " I thought of My good angel conquered my blessed Lord in the
173. e side. replied, " I thought of My good angel conquered my blessed Lord in the the de
174. rth my hand to Corvinus, fully do; 'May God forgive you, as I freely and and and ma
175. wing brow. It was not merely a maternal emotion that was agitating her bosom ; it was n
176. eeling of a having virtuous for her son one, in her estimation, for so heroically a
177. an mother have boasted to the Church of justice than the the son she had brought up. Bu
178. . moment prayed for with all the fervor Many a pious parent has devoted her infant s
179. m the cradle to the holiest and noblest state 4pillJi|lll1111ilIWI|](llll|PIII| lllll
180. of ancient Felicitas, of the Maccabees, one, —who ? Symphorosa, or the unnamed mo
181. or offered their children, not all, but many, yea priests, to to be victims whole-bu
182. be victims whole-burnt, rather than of God It was some such thought as this which
183. d be And what was passing in that boy's mind, as he too remained silent and abstract
184. hful No anticipation of a church in his honor to ages on the banks of the distant Tha
185. tasius, Biblioth, in vita Honorii. m No idea that his name would be crowned with enr
186. th enrolled in every niartyr- hung over many altars, He was only the simple-hearted
187. hristian youth, who looked upon it as a matter of course that he must always obey God'
188. tter of course that he must always obey God's law and His Gospel and only felt happ
189. f course that he must always obey God's law and His Gospel and only felt happy that
190. appy that he had that day performed his duty, when it came under circumstances of mo
191. her eyes what he would have imagined an angel's to be. Silently, and almost unknowing
192. sj^irit, who had shielded him ever from evil; or might he not well see in her the li
193. on ; silence, in a tone full of " grave emotion. The time is at length come, my dear ch
194. in a tone full of " grave emotion. The time is at length come, my dear child," she
195. arned for in the exuberance of maternal love. Eagerly have I watched in thee the ope
196. e opening germ of each I have Christian virtue, and thanked God as it appeared. noted
197. ch I have Christian virtue, and thanked God as it appeared. noted thy docility, thy
198. ness, thy diligence, thy piety, and thy love of God and man. I have seen with joy th
199. y diligence, thy piety, and thy love of God and man. I have seen with joy thy livel
200. nce, thy piety, and thy love of God and man. I have seen with joy thy lively faith,
201. the poor legacy of thy mother's weakly virtue, or art the true inheritor of thy marty
202. egacy of thy mother's weakly virtue, or art the true inheritor of thy martyred ; fa
203. father's nobler gifts. That hour, thank God, has come to- day!" " What have I done,
204. should thus have changed or raised thy opinion of " me ? " asked Pancratius. This day,
205. ld, and must be treated henceforth as a man; for thou canst think and last of thy s
206. thou canst think and last of thy school education, ; speak, yea, and act as one." " " How
207. ool education, ; speak, yea, and act as one." " " How dost thou mean, dear mother?
208. nd honest it and generous thoughts thou art too sinhave written, and fervently expr
209. tly expressed, that if was " a glorious duty to die for the faith, thou hadst not be
210. ," interrupted the boy. " "What greater happiness can a Christian desire on earth? thou s
211. "What greater happiness can a Christian desire on earth? thou sayest most truly," cont
212. d, " trepidly and patiently, not merely pain, but what I know it must have been hard
213. tain, with the cross upon thy shoulders one step more, and thou wilt plant it on it
214. semble him ? Though I never enjoyed the happiness of knowing him, has not his image been
215. , has not his image been ever before my mind ? not been the very pride of Has he my
216. mmemoration has been made of him, as of one of the white-robed army that surrounds
217. joy, but not fame, not distinction, not wealth, not what he valued more than all these
218. e held in his own, may be poured out in love of his Kedeemer, and in testimony of hi
219. r, to give thee." thrilling with a holy emotion; "take from thy neck the bulla. badge o
220. y worldly advantage. I But there it. is one treasure which ance, till have reserved
221. t I I valued it it gold and jewels. now time make over to thee." With trembling hand
222. which hung round it, and for the first time her son saw that it supported a small b
223. ing eyes. self gathered it my- from his death-wound, as, disguised, I stood by his si
224. ight be ready freely to flow. The whole family son, thus seemed to him once more unite
225. ers were taking place, a very different one presented ated in itself in another hou
226. ey between hills. was that of Fabius, a man of the equestrian order, whose family,
227. s, a man of the equestrian order, whose family, by farming the revenues of Asiatic pro
228. Asiatic provinces, had amassed immense wealth. His house was larger and more splendid
229. more splendid and Esquiline It than the one we have already visited. It contained a
230. ense apartments and 'besides possessing many treasures of European art, it abounded
231. s possessing many treasures of European art, it abounded with the rarest i^roductio
232. s beyond the Indian ocean, of monstrous form and fabulous descent. Fabius himself, t
233. was determined thoroughly to enjoy this life. In fact, he never dreamt of any other.
234. s life. In fact, he never dreamt of any other. Believing in nothing, yet worshipping,
235. ge peristyle, or court, surrounded as a matter of course, on all proper occasions, wha
236. ned to have ; its turn, he passed for a man as good as his neighbors and no one had
237. have ; its turn, he passed for a man as good as his neighbors and no one had a right
238. r a man as good as his neighbors and no one had a right to exact more. The greater
239. e greater part of his day was passed at one or other of the great baths, which, bes
240. er part of his day was passed at one or other of the great baths, which, besides the
241. n their name, comprised in their siums. many adjuncts the equivalents of clubs, tenn
242. hiled away his hours or sauntered for a time into the Forum to ; hear some orator sp
243. ing, or some advocate pleading, or into one of the many public gardens, whither the
244. e advocate pleading, or into one of the many public gardens, whither the fashionable
245. public gardens, whither the fashionable world of Rome repaired. He returned home to a
246. or picked up during the day, among the many parasites on the look-out for good fare
247. the many parasites on the look-out for good fare. At home he was a kind and indulge
248. did luxury, and the sole heiress of his wealth. This the is his daughter, who, accordi
249. e diminutive As we have done before, we will conduct the reader at once into her apa
250. , in native and foreign suite of rooms, art. A refined op])ortunities, taste direct
251. laid with silver, in a room of Cyzicene form that is, hav- ing glass windows to the
252. or features we wish more with minds. We will, therefore, content ourselves with sayi
253. ot considered inferior in appearance to other ladies of her rank, age, and fortune, a
254. of her rank, age, and fortune, and had many aspirants for her hand. But she was a c
255. from Herculaneum. surrounded her, with one or two exceptions, and exacted humble h
256. ought up in indulgence by her careless, good-natured father; she had been provided w
257. ver known what it was to deny herself a desire. Having been left so much to herself, s
258. d to furnish Poppaea, Nero's wife, with one cosmetic. understood it to be it, somet
259. y scorned though outwardly she followed life, In fact, she believed in nothing beyon
260. her very pride threw a shield over her virtue she loathed the wickedness of heathen s
261. indulge in long descripthat our reader will believe that they are If at the tions,
262. uisite, to put him in possession of the state of material at the period of our narrat
263. our narrative; and that social Kome and will make this the more intelligible. And sh
264. or an taste, age of decline in arts and good that the year we are supposed to visit
265. Antonines, as our age Donatello. Roman art, for example, that of the is from that
266. CelHni, Raffaele, or Italian Yet in how many So, palaces are still pre- served works
267. silver mirror with a handle, and in the other a It is strange instrument for so fair
268. they are sup- posed to possess. stock, One is a black ; not of the degraded negro
269. ck ; not of the degraded negro but from one of those races, such as the Abyssinians
270. e called bears, Syra, tells us that she other two are garrulous, light, and any littl
271. tery to their m promote the for suit of one or other of the profligate candidates b
272. their m promote the for suit of one or other of the profligate candidates best or la
273. stibium t on your guests It has cost me many trials A Slave. From a painting in Herc
274. e," interrupted the wily Greek, high an honor. I " I should not presume to look to as
275. gold from Asia. I Nothing can equal its beauty ; nor, may add, is its arrangement, the
276. interposed smile, of the mistress, with desire? you to praise "what would you your own
277. ur own doing?" and what have Nothing to desire, noble lady, but that you may be ever h
278. more my own doing, for I am not than my duty," was the modest who said, and sincere
279. that you are not over given to praise. One seldom hears a soft word from your mout
280. might serve me as / please ? I have as good price, that a right to the service of y
281. hall, whether you like it or not. A new idea, indeed, that a slave has to have any w
282. a, indeed, that a slave has to have any will but that of her mistress, when her very
283. but that of her mistress, when her very life belongs to her ! " "True," replied the
284. e handmaid, calmly but with dignity, my life belongs to you, and so does all else th
285. ou, and so does all else that ends with life,— time, health, vigor, body, have bou
286. o does all else that ends with life,— time, health, vigor, body, have bought with
287. OAvn become your what no emperor's " " wealth can purchase, no chains of slavery of l
288. s " " wealth can purchase, no chains of slavery of life contain." " " fetter, no limit
289. h can purchase, no chains of slavery of life contain." " " fetter, no limit And pray
290. in." " " fetter, no limit And pray what soul." is that? A "A never soul!" before " r
291. nd pray what soul." is that? A "A never soul!" before " re-echoed the slave let asto
292. ion, to it, and instinctively from what death. lie. is allied as disease is .to And W
293. annot, either is impossible to me." The other two could understand but little of all
294. For my part, I have studied again, for many of ; years, and have come existences I
295. now better than your mistress Or do you will selves, or really fancy, that when, aft
296. lves, or really fancy, that when, after death, your corpse be thrown on the heap of s
297. le, ignominious buried in a be burnt in one and when the mingled ashes have been to
298. and when the mingled ashes have been to death, to pit, common a life you will survive
299. es have been to death, to pit, common a life you will survive as a conscious being,
300. een to death, to pit, common a life you will survive as a conscious being, and have
301. a life you will survive as a conscious being, and have "' still of joy and freedom m
302. e to be lived?" Non omnis moriar,''* as one of your poets says," replied will die.
303. ''* as one of your poets says," replied will die. * N'ot all of ' Fabiola grasped th
304. scribed, there is a hand that And there will pick out each charred fragment of my fr
305. d fragment of my frame. is a power that will call to reckoning the four winds of hea
306. nce more in this my body, yours, or any one's, bondwoman, but free, and joyful, not
307. tern fancy are these, unfitting ? every duty You must be cured of them. ? In what it
308. of in any Greek or Latin author." " In one belonging to is my own land ; a school
309. , the haughty for "without waiting even death ; that future ideal existence to claim
310. ; that future ideal existence to claim equality already, even now, you presume with me?
311. nd in all that enriches and embellishes life and in every grace of form and lineamen
312. embellishes life and in every grace of form and lineament, and in every charm of ac
313. ved from envious But if I thought, from one so lowly and so insignificant as I. ; *
314. Job xix. 27. I® — must answer simple truth she paused, as faltering tress ; " to y
315. esture from her misI put it to your own judgment, whether a poor gence, who holds an unq
316. living whose measure is of existence is immortality, whose only rightful true place of dwel
317. ig- lower in greatness of thought, than one who, however owns that she claims no hi
318. ongsters that beat, without hope she of liberty, against the gilded bars of that cage."
319. with fury first ; felt herself, for the time in her life, rebuked, humbled by a slav
320. rst ; felt herself, for the time in her life, rebuked, humbled by a slave. She grasp
321. ound a valuable emerald ring, which the good Pastor, not far from her house, priest
322. f seen by her, would prob- qMj have the other. cut short the one and prevented The in
323. prob- qMj have the other. cut short the one and prevented The interior chambers in
324. revented The interior chambers in a Eo- man thus it house were more frequently divi
325. e, surrounding objects, and rested upon one, unseen by Her but to her really presen
326. eless earnestness, passing rapidly from one feel- ing to the other, as her warm and
327. ssing rapidly from one feel- ing to the other, as her warm and tender heart received
328. about her, and affection for her unseen love. When hand Syra saw this beautiful visi
329. this beautiful vision, like that of an angel, before her, she paused for a moment. i
330. few exceptions in its haughty exercise. One of these was her old nurse and freed- w
331. ut the fact is, my father has called in one or two new people to dine, and I was an
332. to dine, and I was anxious to have some one with whom own so I I could have the exc
333. m own so I I could have the excuse of a duty to converse. of our Yet I I have some c
334. f our Yet I I have some curiosity about one though nobody seems to new guests. It i
335. guests. It is Fulvius, of whose grace, wealth, and accomplishments hear is, much ; kn
336. nd you have come me as usual," said the other playfully, "in your own snow-white dres
337. s But, ? seem to me to ! be celebrating one eternal espousal. good heavens what is
338. ! be celebrating one eternal espousal. good heavens what is this ? Are you hurt Or
339. ress it looks like blood. If so, let me change at once." " ISTot for the world, Fabiol
340. let me change at once." " ISTot for the world, Fabiola ; it is the jewel, the only or
341. lood, in your veins or mine." The whole truth flashed upon Fabiola' s mind. Agnes had
342. The whole truth flashed upon Fabiola' s mind. Agnes had and humbled almost to sicken
343. h to exhibit proof to all the seen all; world of my hastiness of temper, in over-chas
344. esson of fortitude, and of elevation of mind, learnt from a slave, such as few patri
345. teach us." "What After " all, a strange idea! are they?" Indeed, Agnes, I have often
346. what Human beings as much as ourselves, same reason, the same feelings, the endowed
347. as much as ourselves, same reason, the same feelings, the endowed with the same org
348. the same feelings, the endowed with the same organization. Thus Saint Agnes. From an
349. reserved in the Vatican Museum. far you will admit, at any rate, to ; go no higher.
350. y rate, to ; go no higher. if Then they form part of the same family owr life, is an
351. o higher. if Then they form part of the same family owr life, is and God, from whom
352. her. if Then they form part of the same family owr life, is and God, from whom comes t
353. n they form part of the same family owr life, is and God, from whom comes thereby ou
354. art of the same family owr life, is and God, from whom comes thereby our Father, He
355. ter, Agnes? notion or to of their feel, being allowed to move, it to act, to think, e
356. l that you w " I g^ most admire, — in mind, in reasoning, in truthfulness, and in
357. u w " I g^ most admire, — in mind, in reasoning, in truthfulness, and in heroic fortitu
358. it in that tear. But, dearest cousin, I will save you from a repetition of your pain
359. will save you from a repetition of your pain. Will you grant in me my request? 'Any
360. ave you from a repetition of your pain. Will you grant in me my request? 'Any " my i
361. request? 'Any " my is power." that you will allow Then it is, me to purchase Syra
362. ra — think that you." " her name. You will not like to see her about You are mista
363. bout You are mistaken, Agnes. I shall I will master pride for once, and own, that he
364. most admire a new feeling in me towards one in her station." "But she is." I think,
365. carry out in practice that strange to, philosophy which Syra alluded in which there is no
366. discharge his And there seems to be no one who thinks of comduty. "I manding. Come
367. in that mysterious chamber, Avhich you will never open for me, you keep your charms
368. you. If make every body and every thing love amphitheatre, you were a Christian, and
369. as if she heard si)eaking to her, some one It passed away, and she gaily said, del
370. we have mentioned, ! would just be the one ; sort of person one would like to see
371. would just be the one ; sort of person one would like to see near you really must
372. e spoken in jest. I have too so high an opinion of your good sense to believe such a ca
373. . I have too so high an opinion of your good sense to believe such a calamity possib
374. ave too so high an opinion of your good sense to believe such a calamity possible. la
375. ontagious required the lash to make the other slaves approach me; while that poor thi
376. really my recovery." " And did you not love her for this "Love her! to Love a I sla
377. ." " And did you not love her for this "Love her! to Love a I slave, child! Of cours
378. you not love her for this "Love her! to Love a I slave, child! Of course, I took car
379. ost irresistible of petitioners. we see will not bargain together. But Send some one
380. ill not bargain together. But Send some one to-morrow, to be right. my father's ste
381. be right. my father's steward, and all will And now this great piece of business be
382. ll And now this great piece of business being settled between us, let us go down to o
383. orgotten to put on your jewels." "Never mind them; I will do without them for feel n
384. ut on your jewels." "Never mind them; I will do without them for feel no taste for t
385. assembled in a hall below. It was not a state banquet which they were going to share,
386. tableful of friends was always made. We will therefore content ourselves with saying
387. d exquisite in arrangement and material will confine ourselves entirely to such inci
388. e. Come, come, I dare say you have some one already in view." During most of this a
389. dress, which was meant to be thoroughly good-natured, as it was perfectly worldly, A
390. as perfectly worldly, Agnes appeared in one of her abstracted moods, her bewitched
391. wered Fabius: "Oh, yes, most certainly, one who has already pledged me to him by hi
392. trothal-ring, and has attending to some one discourse, nor saying adorned " " me wi
393. ? Come, Agnes, some day you Your first love, no doubt may it " last long and make y
394. e for marriage according to the f Roman law. "Annnlo of St. fidei sues subarrhavit
395. r father, and had been attending to the other guests. Roman purnius sophist, or deale
396. . Roman purnius sophist, or dealer in ; One was a heavy, thick-necked universal kno
397. aler in ; One was a heavy, thick-necked universal knowledge, named CalThe another, Procul
398. One was a heavy, thick-necked universal knowledge, named CalThe another, Proculus, a mere
399. lThe another, Proculus, a mere lover of good fare, often at the house. first Two mor
400. cimen of a noble-hearted youth, full of honor and generous thoughts; strong and brave
401. his courtesy of manners, but apparently good-natured and obliging, he had in a short
402. natured and obliging, he had in a short time quietly pushed his way into the highest
403. cle of pagan Rome, the obscurity of his history, and the suddenness of his apparition,
404. a feeling his of mistrust, and gave an idea that a character of feline exterior sof
405. ide, Fabiola and Agnes were together on one the t^wo younger guests last Banqnet Ta
406. n about three joarts of a round table ; one side being left unencumbered by the sig
407. hree joarts of a round table ; one side being left unencumbered by the sigma* or semi
408. nd we may observe, unknown in the times form of S. was now in ordinary use. resembla
409. Sallust's gardens, last year. works the other day, on my way to found them very littl
410. who can possibly be spared, to come and labor at the Thermae. A few thousand Christia
411. usand Christians, thus set to the work, will soon finish it." " And why Christians b
412. h it." " And why Christians better than other criminals? " asked, with some curiosity
413. nvicts," answered he, "naturally do not love their work, and they require the lash a
414. ; and most they never because it is the will of the divine emperors that their as ha
415. I cannot say that I admire this sort of justice," replied 1 am most Fabiola; " but what
416. rious to know what can be the motive or cause of this " stupidity, or unnatural insen
417. in Chaldea. His doctrines were brought many Rome at the time of Vespasian by two br
418. doctrines were brought many Rome at the time of Vespasian by two brothers Some maint
419. at these were the named Peter and Paul. same twin brothers as the skin of which he M
420. he second of these brothers, seeing the other's victims give better omens of birds th
421. ulum. Their followers, of whom they had many, * Gloves. made the cross their "M ^T®
422. trij^es, and they think it the greatest honor to and even ignominious death, as the b
423. greatest honor to and even ignominious death, as the best means it; of being like th
424. minious death, as the best means it; of being like their teachers, and, as they fancy
425. ," observed Proculus, "that the Thermte will be finished soon, and sport. we shall h
426. id. Fulvius, that the divine Dioclesian will himself come to the dedication? " "It i
427. certain and glorious games. for and so will there be splendid But we shall not have
428. wait ; festivals so long; already, for other purposes, have orders been sent to Numi
429. such are the spectacles which you call will draw my sword willingly against any ; e
430. st any ; enemy it of the princes or the state but I would as readily draw against the
431. but what delight can it be to a refined mind to see beast, or a noble either a feebl
432. oble either a feeble by a most powerful animal pierced through by a javelin? '* I torn
433. I torn of agreeing with the greatest of man am not ashamed Roman orators." "Then sh
434. he soldier replied, "depend upon it, it will be on the side of the defenceless, not
435. already won her heart ? He thought over many, but could find no answer. The gift of
436. der had been given. Suddenly the bright idea flashed through likely to possess no yo
437. to possess no young Roman nobleman his mind, that Fulvius, who daily exhibited new
438. s of the two, and astonish his daughter one day by the sagacity he had displayed. B
439. humble scenes, and follow Syra from the time that she left her young mistress's apar
440. presented herself to Eu- phrosyne, the good-natured nurse was shocked at the cruel
441. r nice veil that we could throw learned one! before of a slave arguing with a noble
442. t her had never communed with the outer world. down, dear Caacilia," said Syra, with
443. I have brought you a famous feast; you will fare sumptuously." sightless eyes " Sit
444. you and not for me." " Why, to tell the truth, it is a greater treat to me, to see yo
445. ." " No, dear Syra, no; it must not be. God has wished me I could no more to be poo
446. re to be poor, and I must try to do His will. think of eating the the rich, so food,
447. than I could of wearing the dress, of I love to long as can obtain that of the poor.
448. m* which charity know is given me in by one poor ; like myself. I procure for you t
449. onsolation of feeling that I am, before God, will love only a poor blind thing. if
450. ation of feeling that I am, before God, will love only a poor blind thing. if think
451. of feeling that I am, before God, will love only a poor blind thing. if think He I
452. with Dives and wiser you are than I, my good you wish. I will give the dish to my It
453. ser you are than I, my good you wish. I will give the dish to my It shall be as chil
454. are." " Thanks, thanks, dear sister ; I will await your return." Syra went to the ma
455. , replaced it as well as she could with one hand, on coming out. She was in she saw
456. ow, returning to her blind friend, when one of the noble guests of her mistress's t
457. e, ; unseen, catch a glimpse of him, as one nailed to the spot. than she stood its
458. about to cease her knees struck against one another, a shiver ran through her frame
459. he hand to her breast, made upon it the sign of life, and the spell was broken. She
460. to her breast, made upon it the sign of life, and the spell was broken. She fled in
461. --M There was no eye upon him —except One which it he did not heed, but which rea
462. it he did not heed, but which read his evil heart in that hour. He gazed drew back
463. the bandages, he reeled like a drunken man to the door, and rushed to his ; again
464. inted to the stains of blood. That dark man said nothing but his swarthy countenanc
465. advances of his slaves ; ; " It is the same, no doubt," at length spoke the attenda
466. n tongue " but she is certainly dead." "Art thou quite " sure, Eurotas?" asked the
467. keenest of his hawk's looks. As sure as man can be of what he has not seen himself.
468. itate, fierce as they could launch. " I will tell thee ; As to those stains, — bee
469. ose stains, — been shed now.''^ is no time for dreams or " any one see thee pick t
470. now.''^ is no time for dreams or " any one see thee pick the the thing up? "Tut, t
471. ? "Tut, tut! this " fancies. Did — No one, I am sure." "Then we are safe; better
472. better in our hands than in others'. A good night's rest will give us better counse
473. ds than in others'. A good night's rest will give us better counsel." "True, Eurotus
474. —at once his devoted guardian and his evil genius. Fulvius tossed about and moaned
475. rm, while on the summit of the mast the same scarf streams out, like a pennant, unru
476. dst the sea-birds that shriek around, a form with a torch in her hand, and black fla
477. ritten in fiery letters, JSTemesis.* is time to return to our other acquaintances in
478. s, JSTemesis.* is time to return to our other acquaintances in the house of Fabius. A
479. , her whole action so motherly, it that one would have thought was a parent ministe
480. d girl was and her voluntary servant on one side, The heart of Fabiola was touched;
481. interested as to charity, it was a word love on earth between strangers unknown to G
482. was amazed, when, a few me if I did not love a slave. I think, I now, I could almost
483. a slave. I think, I now, I could almost love Syra. half regret that I have agreed to
484. or slave can only do so by finding some one still poorer, and helpless, like me. Th
485. not sorry have you present, to hear the good news I bring to Syra. Fabiola has allow
486. round Syra's neck, exclaimed " Oh, how good happy you will now be, dear Syra " But
487. eck, exclaimed " Oh, how good happy you will now be, dear Syra " But Syra was deeply
488. ed, and replied with faltering voice, " good and gentle lady, you have been kind ind
489. een kind indeed, to think so much about one like me. But pardon me if I entreat : !
490. se," rejoined Syra, "it this is not the one in to most perfect I to abide I with Go
491. ne in to most perfect I to abide I with God, in the state wherein we have been call
492. t perfect I to abide I with God, in the state wherein we have been called.* own which
493. upted "But much clear is it to me, that God has willed me condition. How can I wish
494. y more eagerly, "we can be manage it. I will not free you, and you bondwoman. That w
495. l not free you, and you bondwoman. That will be just the same." "No, no," said Syra,
496. nd you bondwoman. That will be just the same." "No, no," said Syra, smiling, "that g
497. instructions to us are : ' shall my Our will never do. Servants be subject to your m
498. asters with all fear, f not only to the good and gentle, but far also to the froward
499. ; is but you, noble Lady Agnes, are too good and Where would be my cross, if I lived
500. t know how proud and headstrong I am by nature one of these ; gentle for me. and I sho
501. how proud and headstrong I am by nature one of these ; gentle for me. and I should
502. ould fear for myself, if I had not some pain and but she was more eager virtue, humi
503. ot some pain and but she was more eager virtue, humiliation." Agnes was almost overcom
504. xample. request." " Selfish," Come, you will not refuse such a " replied the slave,
505. he slave, you can never be. therefore I will appeal to yourself from your request. A
506. est. And You know ties Fabiola, and you love her. What ! a noble soul, and what a sp
507. biola, and you love her. What ! a noble soul, and what a splendid of truth intellect
508. ! a noble soul, and what a splendid of truth intellect she possesses if What great q
509. ught and aim it is the occupation of my life. I will try to win her by patience, by
510. aim it is the occupation of my life. I will try to win her by patience, by assiduit
511. usted, I have as we have held to-day. ; one resource more." " What is that? " both
512. ? " both asked. " To give slave like my life for her conversion. I know that a poor
513. said to be approaching, and perhaps it will not pleases, disdain such humble victim
514. ain such humble victims. But be that as God my life for her soul is placed in His h
515. h humble victims. But be that as God my life for her soul is placed in His hands. fa
516. ims. But be that as God my life for her soul is placed in His hands. falling And oh,
517. o lady)," said Agnes. hearted, generous virtue "Kemain at your post; such singlemust t
518. of arch gravity, say that she has said one very wicked thing, told a great story,
519. of an act of greediness offered to give happiness, the free exercise of your religion, an
520. ve happiness, the free exercise of your religion, and have up life itself, for the salva
521. exercise of your religion, and have up life itself, for the salvation of one fie !
522. ve up life itself, for the salvation of one fie ! who tell is your tyrant and torme
523. litter was waiting at the door and any one who could have seen the affectionate fa
524. done before, " See how these Christians love one another! " A Dove, as a Symbol of t
525. before, " See how these Christians love one another! " A Dove, as a Symbol of the S
526. stians love one another! " A Dove, as a Symbol of the Soul, found in the Catacombs. ;
527. e another! " A Dove, as a Symbol of the Soul, found in the Catacombs. ; CHAPTER THE
528. HE FIRST VIII, DAY'S CONCLUSION. little time about the door, and Agnes fairly off, a
529. allow herself to be accompanied home by one of her attendants, as it has grown dark
530. orgetfulness that day and night are the same '^'J to her, and that on this very acco
531. inquire tures, if thus we pass a little time before re-entering, to how the mistress
532. ery direction, looking for something or other that is lost, in every possible and imp
533. up in despair. must be found The reader will Syra probably have anticipated the solu
534. rted which she considered must be heavy liberty. to a poor slave-girl, as she probably
535. or reasons which she could not have the good housekeeper comprehend. all Euphrosyne
536. rdered the servants interrogated, and ; many even searched, to Syra's great pain and
537. d ; many even searched, to Syra's great pain and confusion house w^here Syra had bee
538. elieved the Moor to be a very Canidia,* being often obliged to let her go out alone a
539. for her cosmetics, as if plucked at any other time, ; they would not possess the same
540. r cosmetics, as if plucked at any other time, ; they would not possess the same virt
541. ther time, ; they would not possess the same virtues to procure deadly poisons Euphr
542. ws with such as consulted her imaginary art. It was not till all was given up, and
543. t she The conviction then Hashed on her mind, must have there dropped her kerchief,
544. Afi'ica. 83 ; determined to commit the matter entirely to God, and sought that repose
545. rmined to commit the matter entirely to God, and sought that repose which a good co
546. to God, and sought that repose which a good conscience was sure to render bahny and
547. usual services had been rendered to her other two servants and Euphrosyne, she dismis
548. as she thought betrayed some scheme or art, of Avhich Agnes might become the victi
549. her father's about him. She made up her mind for to prevent Fulvius having any acces
550. trange especially as and having brought one so young into company which often met a
551. tives for doing so It was nearly at the same had been decidedly selfish. moment that
552. ent " she said to herself. How from the other youths that come here. lips, ^N'ever a
553. ut his own strength and bold actions in war, which others speak so if much to do
554. n- choly seemed to steal over her whole soul. that had resulted from was painful to
555. elt as if that day were a crisis in her life. Her pride had been humbled by a Had he
556. een humbled by a Had her slave, and her mind softened, she knew not how. eyes been o
557. t it, Then and passed again through her mind ; ; look up above this world, she would
558. through her mind ; ; look up above this world, she would have seen a soft cloud like
559. ave (prayer and willing sacrifice it of life breathed upwards together), which, in w
560. owed golden fruit. In the midst of this space she saw the poor ; blind girl, with her
561. the poor ; blind girl, with her look of happiness on gi-ound ; her cheerful countenance,
562. ul countenance, seated on the Avhile on one side, Agnes, with her sweetest simple l
563. h her sweetest simple looks, and on the other, Syra, with her quiet patient felt smil
564. aressed her. Fabiola to an irresistible desire to some which she had never known or wi
565. lf and most stream, refreshing. Oh, for courage to plunge into this through which alone
566. d be crossed, in safety and land on the other side it. ! And still they beckoned, urg
567. himeras, most and interwoven with, each other; and this dark veil grew and grew, till
568. ring Esquiline; the taking in the whole space now occupied between the two hills by t
569. lt the amphitheatre just mentioned, and other edifices, with its materials. The entra
570. side, he entered into an immense square space, arranged and consecrated to Adonis by
571. rs, constructed by Alexander Severus in honor of his |,|]!l{j||]||i|||jj||||||lll|)|^
572. e bearing, and were accompanied by such prudence and considerateness, as gave confidence
573. or, and the innocence and candor of his mind. But he well saw the dangers to which h
574. arded, he said to his companion: "Every time that I enter here, it it strikes me how
575. ity, and the completion of the greatest prophecy of the Gospel, I power.* * by the Eoman
576. an cannot but believe that another arch will one day destruction of Jerusalem —the
577. nnot but believe that another arch will one day destruction of Jerusalem —the The
578. a victory, over the second enemy of our religion, the heathen Roman empire itself." "Wha
579. means of establishing Christianity? " " God forbid I would shed the last drop of my
580. st sanguine longings, forecast; but all will exclaim, 'This is the change of the rig
581. ast; but all will exclaim, 'This is the change of the right hand of the Most High '" i
582. e Most High '" is the empire converted, will not be ! " No ? doubt ; but your idea o
583. , will not be ! " No ? doubt ; but your idea of a Christian ; supposes an earthly in
584. s, my thoughts, I own, turn towards the family of one of the Augusti, as showing a sli
585. ghts, I own, turn towards the family of one of the Augusti, as showing a slight ger
586. stantius Chlorus." "But, Sebastian, how many do say, if of even our learned and good
587. many do say, if of even our learned and good men will say, nay, you speak thus to th
588. ay, if of even our learned and good men will say, nay, you speak thus to them, that
589. the Why, they ask, should we not expect same results now?" " I know it too well, my
590. errace that ran along principal By this time they room of which was that side of the
591. iseum, or Flavian amphitheatre, rose at one ; side, in all its completeness and the
592. ock, came soothingly on the ear. On the other side, the lofty building called the Sep
593. f that firmament up to which the eye of man, however wretched and bright, sinful, m
594. e, Sebastian," said the youth, with the same " church above, thin and easily to be p
595. h silence, I Both paused saying : for a time, when Pancratius again broke the me in
596. , when Pancratius again broke the me in mind of a matter on which want to take your
597. cratius again broke the me in mind of a matter on which want to take your advice, my f
598. ke your advice, my faithful counsellor; will your company be soon arriving?" " ISTot
599. arriving?" " ISTot immediately and they will drop in one by one till they assemble,
600. ISTot immediately and they will drop in one by one till they assemble, come into my
601. mmediately and they will drop in one by one till they assemble, come into my chambe
602. emble, come into my chamber, where none will " This puts ; interrupt us." of the sui
603. rifle, I have my said the officer, sage opinion? " Quite a dare say," replied the youth
604. ed the youth, bashfully, ; and generous man like you but an important one to an uns
605. generous man like you but an important one to an unskilful and weak boy like me."
606. an unskilful and weak boy like me." " A good and virtuous one, I doubt not do let me
607. eak boy like me." " A good and virtuous one, I doubt not do let me hear it and I pr
608. at every word. " You are aware I have a quantity of useless plate at home mere lumber, y
609. o use to any body. descend. I I have no one to am, and shall be, the last of whom a
610. ndigent. reversion should these wait my death, to have is what by And if a persecutio
611. what to do?" "Why, to tell know you the truth, I feared it might be highly presumptuo
612. highly presumptuous and impertinent in one of my age to offer to do what people wo
613. t miss these things a bit they But they will be to the poor, are of no value to me w
614. ally this. I should never be able to to being known that I presumed do any thing con-
615. u, to get the distribution made at some other house and as from a— say from one who
616. e other house and as from a— say from one who needs much the prayers of the faith
617. pecially the poor, and ; desires to " I will serve ! ! remain unknown." you with del
618. ! remain unknown." you with delight, my good and truly noble Hush did you not hear t
619. n, and with an epithet expressive of no good will." ; Pancratius approached the wind
620. d with an epithet expressive of no good will." ; Pancratius approached the window tw
621. g the speakers, evidently a woman and a man. light, After a few minutes they walked
622. Fabiola's black slave, Afra." "And the man," added Pancratius, "is my late school-
623. ow, Corvinus." They considered it their duty to catch, if possible, the thread of wh
624. make out a sentence here and there. We will not, however, confine ourselves to thes
625. tried to direct a cool interrogatory to one stretched upon the rack, and quiver; in
626. n the rack, and quiver; ing in agony on one side, wdiile the last sentence of beati
627. wdiile the last sentence of beating to death with bullet-laden scourges was being ex
628. to death with bullet-laden scourges was being executed on the other to sleep calmly a
629. aden scourges was being executed on the other to sleep calmly after such scenes, and
630. uel, but because he was a cold-hearted, man, not His tribunal, however, was suscept
631. up sottish, coarse, and angry when any one got off. He grew and brutal and not yet
632. grew and brutal and not yet arrived at man's ; ^ estate, his bloated and freckled
633. nance and blear Without taste for eyes, one of whicli was half closed, announced hi
634. e united in himself a certain amount of animal courage and strength, and a considerabl
635. d in himself a certain amount of animal courage and strength, and a considerable measur
636. experienced and he had never curbed an evil No one had ever offended him, whom he d
637. nced and he had never curbed an evil No one had ever offended him, whom he did not
638. who had passion. hate, — blessed him evil for his brutal contumely. to him, Justi
639. evil for his brutal contumely. to him, Justice and mercy, to him. to good and done wer
640. . to him, Justice and mercy, to him. to good and done were equally odious to give hi
641. ne and he seemed To become possessed of one, however, was all-important to his mind
642. one, however, was all-important to his mind; for wealth, as the means of gratifying
643. ver, was all-important to his mind; for wealth, as the means of gratifying his desires
644. rd, shy, and little have genius to make one. stupid to make himself a way in societ
645. ake himself a way in society, he sought other for the means, more kindred to his mind
646. ther for the means, more kindred to his mind, ambitious or avaricious desires. attai
647. , his conversation with the black slave will best explain. "I have come to meet you
648. ou at the Meta Sudans again, the fourth time, at this inconvenient hour. for What ne
649. fortune. What expense can these things cause?" "Yery great indeed. The most precious
650. ious ingredients are And do you think I will go requisite, and must be paid for. The
651. pian way, to gather my simples, without being properly rewarded to second ? But how d
652. fitted I ? You know I am not cut out by nature, by accomplishments, to make much impre
653. shments, to make much impression on any one's affections. I would rather trust to t
654. to the power of And how can your black art." "Then heart " let me give gift you on
655. rt." "Then heart " let me give gift you one piece of advice; if you have no grace o
656. ated; thing —depend upon it, there is one wMch you may "What is that?'' bring wit
657. p sufficiently for it in his heart. His language and mine are allied for us to be able t
658. oisons, and pretended he would purchase liberty, me many my I and take me back home as
659. pretended he would purchase liberty, me many my I and take me back home as his wife
660. oclesian and from the wink of the old ; man's awful understood he had hatched it fi
661. e employed in or to discover con- the " same But line." I have no I ability either t
662. , " though may have is to punish them." One way, however, is easy." "What " that?"
663. of them soon ? "Yes, and a most fierce one such as has never been before." " Then
664. keep your eyes open and look about for one or two good fat ones, half trying to co
665. eyes open and look about for one or two good fat ones, half trying to conceal themse
666. ceal themselves pounce upon them, get a good share of their confiscation, and come w
667. re of their confiscation, and come with one good handful to get two in return." "Th
668. f their confiscation, and come with one good handful to get two in return." "Thank y
669. ghastly smile as she proceeded suspect one of " my fellow-servants is one. Oh, how
670. suspect one of " my fellow-servants is one. Oh, how I detest her! " " What makes y
671. ness." " dreadful scrapes by her absurd truth- Good what next ? " Then she cares not
672. " dreadful scrapes by her absurd truth- Good what next ? " Then she cares not for mo
673. ltres begin to work. Christian money. I will not forget your hint about taste." It i
674. ound in the Catacombs. ; CHAPTER HEN X. OTHER MEETINGS. the two youths returned to th
675. before this period there had been a In virtue of for- wholesale one effected, the par
676. had been a In virtue of for- wholesale one effected, the particulars of which are
677. cts of this glorious soldier. mer laws, many Christians were seized and brought to t
678. brought to trial, which often ended in death. Two brothers, Marcus and Marcellianus,
679. ntered into their gloomy prison like an angel of light. It consisted of a strong room
680. f seeing the youths snatched from their fate. Sebastian hope, that of this crowd not
681. Sebastian hope, that of this crowd not one would be found, whom self a sense of of
682. owd not one would be found, whom self a sense of official duty, or a hope of pardon,
683. be found, whom self a sense of official duty, or a hope of pardon, or hatred to betr
684. know that such a betrayal involved his death He knew it well but Avhat cared he ? If
685. three victims would thus be offered to God instead of two, so much the better; all
686. ayed his noble features, softened by an emotion of tender looked upon the two vacillati
687. e : least of Christ's servants how then will you stand the angry to glance of the Lo
688. ), on that terrible day, He, in return, will deny you before His angels? when When,
689. d of standing manfully before Him, like good and faithful servants, as to to-morrow
690. he youths. not thus severely to ; young man, whoever thou art," " Speak mother's te
691. s severely to ; young man, whoever thou art," " Speak mother's tears and to yield,
692. retched parents and sorrow? does thy it religion command this, and dost thou call holy ?
693. hou call holy ? " "Wait in patience, my good old man," said Sebastian, " I with the
694. holy ? " "Wait in patience, my good old man," said Sebastian, " I with the kindest
695. ow what mean, which thou canst but with God's grace thou too shalt soon. father, in
696. se for these your aged parents, eternal life by your own loss of it. Will you make t
697. s, eternal life by your own loss of it. Will you make them Christians by abandoning
698. Christians by abandoning Christianity? will you make them soldiers of the Cross by
699. f the Cross by deserting its standard ? will you teach them that its doctrines are m
700. at its doctrines are more precious than life, by preferring life to them ? Do you wa
701. more precious than life, by preferring life to them ? Do you want to gain for them,
702. u want to gain for them, not the mortal life of prefer ' the perishable body, but th
703. ' the perishable body, but the eternal life of the soul? then hasten yourselves to
704. hable body, but the eternal life of the soul? then hasten yourselves to of your Savi
705. own at the receive, feet for crowns you will and entreat your parents' salvation." "
706. her both the brothers. "Claudius," said one, "put on me again the chains you have t
707. e taken " off." Nicostratus," added the other, " give orders for the sen- tence to be
708. from this moment a Christian with my I will die with them for I," a religion which
709. with my I will die with them for I," a religion which can make " will heroes thus of bo
710. hem for I," a religion which can make " will heroes thus of boys." "And continued th
711. bdued by its i^ower yet all was lost if one remained behind. He saw the danger, not
712. e souls fluttering upon the confines of life. Some hung upon his arms some clasped h
713. feet, as though he had been a spirit of peace, such as visited Peter in his dungeon a
714. such was Nicostratus's I office; "it is time for thee to depart. belief, cannot but
715. one, and which impel these young men to death my duty is imperative, and must overwei
716. which impel these young men to death my duty is imperative, and must overweigh my pr
717. e stronger said evidences than even thy virtue." "Oh, speak to Zoe; for I him then, th
718. speak." "For " six years," replied the other, with a faltering voice, her once eloqu
719. is needed intrust it for once to ; ; "0 God! the weakest and poorest of instruments
720. his right hand made over her mouth the sign of the cross, saying: "Zoe, speak; dost
721. ate steps were taken wished linus Every one was gained; and to prevent discovery. T
722. with Tranquiland his wife, to the full liberty of his house. Sebastian lost no time in
723. liberty of his house. Sebastian lost no time in j)utting them under the care of the
724. l from him what had haiDpened. indeed a matter of life or death to them all but, stren
725. what had haiDpened. indeed a matter of life or death to them all but, strengthened
726. d haiDpened. indeed a matter of life or death to them all but, strengthened now by fa
727. e prepared for either. Chromatins was a man of upright character, and not fond of p
728. ccurred. He was himself a victim to the same disease, greatly struck. and suffered a
729. greatly struck. and suffered agonies of pain. " If," he said, " what you relate be t
730. ate be true, and if I can have personal experience of this healing ; ; ; power, I certainl
731. f this healing ; ; ; power, I certainly will not resist its evidence." w Sebastian w
732. have been a superstition. course, which will pletely recovered. be later described,
733. been named his successor; so the reader will per- ceive that the events just related
734. bove enu- or about, the palace chamber. Many of them resided in, and besides them we
735. pleter instruction of the converts, and change withdrawing from observation so of life
736. ange withdrawing from observation so of life many persons, whose and retirement from
737. withdrawing from observation so of life many persons, whose and retirement from offi
738. tes should join him there, and, forming one household, should go on with religious
739. mewhat tedious arrangements, Torquatus, one of the former prisoners, converted by S
740. however, upon going his own way. : Only one more point remained to be decided it wa
741. , and direct its operations. contest of love between the holy priest Polywas renewed
742. an; each wishing to remain in Eome, and chance of martyrdom. But now the difference wa
743. pany and leave Sebastian to the arduous duty of encouraging confessors, and protecti
744. hat Torquatus. " Sebastian, I do not he will give us trouble." " I To tell the truth
745. will give us trouble." " I To tell the truth," answered the soldier, ; would rather
746. must remember that he a neo- phyte, and will improve in time, and by grace." As they
747. at he a neo- phyte, and will improve in time, and by grace." As they passed into the
748. d this horrid turmoil takes place every time she comes." ; " Indeed ! " said Pancrat
749. , " ? and can you " tell me what is the religion these Africans follow "I do not know, s
750. what might seem to be going on here." "Good night, comrade," said Sebastian; and th
751. efforts, are conscious that spirit and truth, selves undefiled we worship only the w
752. rship only the who know what care we by sin, and who would die yet, after we who On
753. in, and who would die yet, after we who One living God in take to keep ourrather th
754. would die yet, after we who One living God in take to keep ourrather than speak an
755. long as we shall continue to the Sun of Justice shall rise it and enrich walk in this p
756. ight, and until upon our country in His beauty, with His splendor. Sebastian, tell me,
757. then the shore with its and by degrees one white edifice after the till other spar
758. egrees one white edifice after the till other sparkled in the fresh beams, itself, at
759. have expected, Sebastian," observed it will Pancratius; "and so rises fully it be w
760. ighted country. retiring, How beautiful will then be to behold the shades and each m
761. hades and each moment the imperial city one and another of the charms, as yet conce
762. shines forth a holy type of the city of God. Will they who times see these beauties
763. s forth a holy type of the city of God. Will they who times see these beauties, and
764. e beauties, and worthily value them Or, will they look only at the narrow space arou
765. m Or, will they look only at the narrow space around them, and hold their hands befor
766. ar Sebastian, but I hope that you and I will look down upon that grand spectacle, fr
767. mb, from whose feet flow the streams of life." * They continued their walk in silenc
768. hed Lucina's and had affectionately bid one another good-night, Pancratius seemed t
769. and had affectionately bid one another good-night, Pancratius seemed to hesitate a
770. risks ; then you added, that there was one purpose in your mind which would effect
771. ded, that there was one purpose in your mind which would effectually restrain you bu
772. o check your longing ardor to give your life for it diffi- Christ." "And " why, Panc
773. Christ." "And " why, Pancratius, do you desire so much to know thought of mine I ? thi
774. Do you promise me ? Yes, most solemnly. God bless you A Lamb with a Milk-can, found
775. in. CHAPTER A TALK XI. WITH THE READER. will ^E take advantage of the holiday ^Yhich
776. y in which may and prepare him for what will follow. From the very compressed form o
777. t will follow. From the very compressed form of the which the early history Church i
778. compressed form of the which the early history Church is generally studied, and from t
779. cal arrangement we usually read of the state them, we may first easily be led to an
780. may first easily be led to an erroneous idea This of our Christian ancestors. may ha
781. ward organization, none for splendor, ; religion could enjoy that, in fine, it was all t
782. as all that was a period of conflict of peace or consolation. of tribulation, without
783. tribulation, without an interval On the other hand, w^e may suppose, that those three
784. by ten distinct persecutions, some from one another by breathing times of complete
785. ely separated rest. is erroneous and we desire to state more accurately the real condi
786. ted rest. is erroneous and we desire to state more accurately the real condition of t
787. es of that most pregnant portion of her history. it When may be once persecution had br
788. uordered by a their new decree, we find many martyrs, who owed crowns either to popu
789. ce also we read of a bitter persecution being carried on in one part of the empire, w
790. bitter persecution being carried on in one part of the empire, while other portion
791. ied on in one part of the empire, while other portions enjoyed complete peace. Perhap
792. , while other portions enjoyed complete peace. Perhaps a few examples of the various
793. of the various phases of persecu- tion will illustrate the real relations of the pr
794. ations of the primitive Church with the State, better than mere description patience
795. description patience to hear repeated, will ; and the more learned reader can pass
796. eem commonplace. Trajan was by no means one of the cruel emperors; on the contrary,
797. d no new edicts against the Christians, many their noble martyrs at — amongst St.
798. e which exhibits the lowest standard of justice: that they were not to be sought Adrian
799. s had published his persecuting edicts, many Christians had Such were the celebrated
800. the celebrated marsuffered torments and death. tyrs of Scillita in Africa, their comp
801. by touching, herself to the eve of her death, form one of the and exquisitely beauti
802. ching, herself to the eve of her death, form one of the and exquisitely beautiful, d
803. , herself to the eve of her death, form one of the and exquisitely beautiful, docum
804. From there these historical facts to it will be evident, that while was from time of
805. it will be evident, that while was from time of time a more active, severe, and gene
806. be evident, that while was from time of time a more active, severe, and general pers
807. e persecution of Severus had relaxed in other parts, happened that Scapula, pro-consu
808. epent of his crimes ; reminding hini of many judgments which had befallen cruel judg
809. en cruel judges in various parts of the world. of the Christians, those holy men, tha
810. hout practising cruelty, * by acting as other Eoma Subterr. 1. iii. c. 23. magistrate
811. would encourage tumults. Asper, seeing one ready to yield upon the application of
812. can also easily understand how, at any particular time, a savage persecution Asia, while
813. asily understand how, at any particular time, a savage persecution Asia, while the m
814. Gaul, or Africa, or Church was enjoying peace. But Eome was undoubtedly the place mos
815. t. To be elected Pope was equivalent to being promoted to martyrdom. At the period of
816. iod of our narrative, the Church was in one of those longer intervals of comparativ
817. f those longer intervals of comparative peace, w^hich gave opportunity for great deve
818. rtunity for great development. From the death of Vale- rian, in 268, there had been n
819. on, though the interval is glorified by many noble martyrdoms. During such periods,
820. r mansions contained. Thus we know that many of the titles in Rome were Tertullian m
821. ch were necessarily exposed to the air. custom of ancient Eoman life will remove an ob
822. sed to the air. custom of ancient Eoman life will remove an objection may arise, as
823. o the air. custom of ancient Eoman life will remove an objection may arise, as to ho
824. in the of the early Christians, social life which one would hardly know how to beli
825. the early Christians, social life which one would hardly know how to believe, were
826. s of the martyrs, and in ecclesiastical history. It is, the concealment which they cont
827. nt with Christian morality or Christian truth, was ever permitted to ensure such secr
828. ecution, consequences often The heathen world, the world of power, of influence, and
829. nsequences often The heathen world, the world of power, of influence, and of state, t
830. he world of power, of influence, and of state, the world which made laws as best suit
831. power, of influence, and of state, the world which made laws as best suited it, and
832. best suited it, and executed them, the world that loved earthly prosperity and hated
833. n communicating herself at home, wife's religion * No according to practice in those age
834. w what you taste secretly, before every other food and if he shall know of the Ad Uxo
835. husband and wife giving com; munion to one another. De Monogamia, c. 11. rounded,
836. y a mysterious system, which spread, no one could see how, and exercised an influen
837. , and exercised an influence derived no one knew whence. Families were startled at
838. ce. Families were startled at find- new law, with which they were not aware that th
839. at was enough. Hence their security and peace depended much upon the state of popular
840. curity and peace depended much upon the state of popular feeling when any demagogue o
841. e claims of civilized suffice to screen life, could them from such measure of persec
842. hem. After these digressive remarks, we will resume, and unite again the broken thre
843. een of Cor- thrown away upon the sordid mind vinus. Her own hatred of Christianity a
844. a Christian and had manuall mitted her other slaves; but, feeling it wrong to turn s
845. rn so dangerous a character as upon the world, had transferred her to another proprie
846. had often seen Fulvius at the baths and other places of public resort, had admired an
847. r moroseness, he could never have found courage to address him, had he not now discover
848. an effort, and enter into alliance with one who otherwise might Afra, or rather Jub
849. Pompey's gardens. These Mi covered the space round his theatre, in the neighborhood
850. ll as to the second." am a plain-spoken man, and have no preten; and elegance but w
851. preten; and elegance but we are both of one and both consequently of one mind." Ful
852. re both of one and both consequently of one mind." Fulvius started, and deeply colo
853. oth of one and both consequently of one mind." Fulvius started, and deeply colored t
854. . It is more graceful." " " : "Cut this matter short, sir. Again I ask, what do you me
855. the portico of the Baths of Novatus. We will talk more at leisure." Corvinus returne
856. ocured a garment shabbier than own from one of his father's slaves, and was at the
857. irst dawn of day. He had to wait a long time, and had almost lost patience, when he
858. ace. He thus saluted Corvinus I fear I "Good morning, comrade; in the cold " I I mor
859. ome more." At that moment a very feeble man, bent down by age, was approaching, sup
860. nk you, my child," replied the poor old man, "how kind of you to come for me so ear
861. ooking right " is," So she answered the other. of, " Surely this is not the place so
862. y appeared respectable and even and not one asked me for alms as he passed." very s
863. should like to discover the mystery. A good job might, perhaps, be got out of it. T
864. "It is ; ! "Humph "I have ! How I could one manage to get in ? " it! will take off
865. ow I could one manage to get in ? " it! will take off my shoes, screw of up one leg
866. it! will take off my shoes, screw of up one leg like a cripple, and join the next g
867. he next group in, queer ones that every one of come, and go boldly " doing as they
868. d go boldly " doing as they do." ; That will hardly succeed is depend upon it these
869. ents but she better known than they, as being a young heiress, nearly as rich as her
870. ed to his rude com- panion, through his mind. He said, therefore, to Corvinus "If yo
871. t familiar at the house, try your plan. will venture I have met the lady before, and
872. ont door. Thus we shall have a double ? chance." " " Do you know what I am thinking, F
873. ither with the wolf or with the fox, we will take a more spiritual mode of doing so,
874. ad for noble lines of ancestry, and her family was not one families of recent conversi
875. nes of ancestry, and her family was not one families of recent conversion, several
876. professed the faith. was cherished the memory offices in of As in heathen ancestors w
877. As in heathen ancestors who had won the state, so in this, and was preserved with pio
878. accompanying the waving branches of the family-tree, the stem had never been hewn down
879. pear surprising but when we reflect how many a soldier goes through a whole campaign
880. ns and does not receive a wound; or how many a family remains a triumph, or held hig
881. does not receive a wound; or how many a family remains a triumph, or held high other C
882. family remains a triumph, or held high other Christian houses, ; untainted through a
883. d if Provi- dence watched over the well-being of the Church, by preservit, through ol
884. f the Church, by preservit, through old family successions, long unbroken — : w chai
885. * All the honors and the hopes of this family centred in one, now whose name is alrea
886. and the hopes of this family centred in one, now whose name is already known to our
887. h a docility and ter, intelli- gence of mind, and such simplicity and innocence of c
888. t she had grown up the common object of love, and almost of reverence, to the entire
889. Yet nothing seemed to spoil, or but her good qualities expanded, with a well-balance
890. er, had ripened into combined grace and wisdom. She shared all her parents' virtuous t
891. thoughts, and cared as little for- the world as they. She lived with them in a small
892. n warp, the compact virtuousness of her nature ; received the few friends with relatio
893. ling. For, notwithstanding the Yoconian law "on the inheritance of women," t now qu
894. ources, large personal additions to the family property. * f Is. i. 9. " Ne quis hsere
895. em iieqne mulierem faeeret," that i. no one should leave a virgin or a woman his he
896. w In general, of course, the to heathen world, who visited, what immense accumulation
897. visited, what immense accumulations of wealth the miserly parents must be putting by;
898. was under ried on as a business of its life. the care and direction of the deacon R
899. re of the sick, poor, and strangers, in one of the seven regions into which Pope Ca
900. his ; purpose committing each region to one of the seven deacons of the Roman Churc
901. ho came from a distance, recommended by other churches; and a frugal table was provid
902. of martyrs, procured or compiled by the one of the seven notaries kept for that pur
903. sist and Agnes had been accustomed out, many times a day, and to pass hours there; a
904. ss hours there; always beaming, like an angel of light, consolation and joy on the su
905. ed the distribution had to take i^lace; other regions had sent their poor, accompanie
906. eacons while Sebastian, Pancratius, and other persons of higher rank had come in thro
907. ese had been seen to enter by Corvinus. being known to whom sight of the commission,
908. ronounced to "Deo gratias''' "Thanks be God." This was not merely a Christian, but
909. poor and intirm. The men were ranged on one side, the women on the other. Under the
910. re ranged on one side, the women on the other. Under the portico at the end were tabl
911. district, and conducting them But as no one recogto a peculiar spot within the port
912. orticoes. nized or claimed Corvinus for one of his poor, he was at length long or w
913. s situation into himself. Even his dull mind which he had thrust rights, Here he was
914. as, the son of the prefect of the city, duty it was to punish such violators of dome
915. scape; but he saw his guarded by an old man named Diogenes and showed lips. it two
916. ke battle-axes against him. He had only one consolation ; it was evident he was not
917. s Friend, you probably do not belong to one of the regions live? * invited here to-
918. dwelling-house. Reparatus looked in the same direction, and saw Pancratius, just ent
919. d with the youth (who asked much in the same position as they had last met in, only
920. e you can receive it unknown." " Then I will tell you the truth I came in here merel
921. it unknown." " Then I will tell you the truth I came in here merely for a freak and I
922. house " " inflict For the gods' sakes, good Pancratius, do not punishment." Corvinu
923. he gods' sakes, good Pancratius, do not punishment." Corvinus, such frightful " You know,
924. Brutus, or entreat you by all that you love, by all that you hold sacred, not to di
925. e so cruelly. My father and for ever. I will his house, not I, would be crushed and
926. beg your pardon my former injuries, you will only be merciful." "Hold, hold, Corvinu
927. en. I have told you that was long Every one but the blind But hear me now. is aroun
928. it, a witness to this outrage. to There will be a hundred evidences assembly, still
929. speak of more you attempt to molest any one we shall have it in our power to bring
930. Do you understand me, your own father's judgment-seat. Corvinus?" trd " I do, indeed," I
931. g tone. I I " I Never, as long as live, will breathe to mortal soul that came " into
932. as long as live, will breathe to mortal soul that came " into this dreadful place. !
933. joined in crying out, " Pancratius, you will not send him away fasting and unsuccore
934. , it, went to try his fortune to by the custom, He and, found according Roman unlocked
935. r entering at such of a porter, girl no one could have suspected the an hour. Inste
936. en years of age, clad in a peasant's No one else was near and he thought it an exce
937. picion which had garment. ; crossed his mind. portress " : Accordingly, he thus addr
938. from near behold them." Agnes looked as one entranced ; her eyes beheld a very ffi
939. s heaven, she exclaimed " Yes, He whose beauty sun and moon to in their lofty firma- m
940. dmire, Him is pledged my service and my love." * Fulvius was confounded look, the an
941. could ever expect his said, of opening mind " It (affection it could not is be call
942. bably entered here by some and no doubt will quietly retire." his Saying this, she w
943. " "I suppose," answered * he, regaining courage, luaa mirantur, " Ciijus pulchritudinem
944. ; ing met the lady of the house at the same place with you, her noble cousin's tabl
945. ight to wait upon her, in common with " other voluntary clients." " But not at so unr
946. footing in a familiarity, still less a one Yet not even the longest dinner's acqua
947. ake sure for yourself of the fortune of one or the is other of Rome's richest heire
948. ourself of the fortune of one or the is other of Rome's richest heiresses. There noth
949. re nothing like hav- ing two strings to one's bow." This coarse and bitter sarcasm
950. him fast, he added "Go now, Fulvius, in peace and remember that you have this day mad
951. de yourself amenable to the laws of the state by this unworthy con- not good for eith
952. of the state by this unworthy con- not good for either of longer here. : n-o-® duc
953. either of longer here. : n-o-® duct. I will spare you, it if you know how to keep y
954. over your head, as a security that you will follow peace." it discreetly. Now, agai
955. ead, as a security that you will follow peace." it discreetly. Now, again say, go in
956. for his cowardly assault," replied the other, as they re-entered the house. The two
957. ats of that morning. Each knew that the other had incurred only failure and shame; an
958. both to the conclusion, that there was one fold at least in Rome, which either fox
959. ire from Apostolic Indeed we should the world.* expect to find that the noble charity
960. istributed St. Paulinua of Nola did the same. vis dare sacerdoti, et " Dabis impio m
961. Aug. hoc tollit fiscus, quod : light of good filled works to shine' before men, whil
962. only He The plate and jewels of a noble family publicly valued, sold, and, in their pr
963. pared, Dionysius the priest, who at the same time was the physician to whom the care
964. , Dionysius the priest, who at the same time was the physician to whom the care of t
965. is appearance, and seated in a chair at one end of the court, thus addressed the as
966. e assembly "Dear brethren, our merciful God has touched the heart of some charitabl
967. uld I seek to Christ's sake. He is some one who loves not to have his treasures kno
968. treasury. " Accept then, as a gift from God, who has inspired this charity, the dis
969. ily recite for those who give, or do us good." During this brief address poor Pancra
970. rge as possible. making himself And his emotion did all but betray him, when the whole
971. , as ^^ eyes, and fervent tone, if with one voice tuum, vitam ceternam. distributed
972. Abundant food was was yet early indeed many partook not of food, as a still more de
973. into his hand, and giving him a hurried good day, away most lightly, and was soon lo
974. d turned the corner, laugh outright, as one a good trick, heavy about her, if she h
975. ed the corner, laugh outright, as one a good trick, heavy about her, if she had been
976. overed a solution of the problem of his wealth. * " Be pleased to render, Lord, eterna
977. * " Be pleased to render, Lord, eternal life to all who for Thy Name's sake do unto
978. all who for Thy Name's sake do unto us good things." CHAPTER '^^:)s^ XVI, THE MONTH
979. pearing, radiant mesis sengers from the world he visiting and cheering, to remind If
980. g and cheering, to remind If less us he will soon come back, and gladden us again. p
981. hill-side, and look ever and anon, from one's book, over the varied and varying lan
982. Then, mingle with these the innumerable other colors that tinge the picture, from the
983. ustic dwellings, with flowers innufaint idea merable, and patches of greensward of t
984. y and with sharp word, or sharper makes many suffer, that perhaps one only may enjoy
985. sharper makes many suffer, that perhaps one only may enjoy. At last the dusty roads
986. t roads were narrow, and the drivers of other days were not more smooth-tongued than
987. bine, Tusculan, and Alban hills favored one among these. were all studded over with
988. Baja3, Antium, and so on to Cajeta, and other fashionable limits sufficient to Avater
989. ants of the imperial capital. It was to one of these " tender eyes of Italy," as Pl
990. its villas,* because forming its truest beauty, that Fabiola had hastened, before the
991. a, and was remarkable, comfort. for the good taste which arranged the most though no
992. , from others the song or harp-notes of family parties, or the loud, sharp, and not ov
993. down murmuring and chattering, the most good-natured trellis, imaginable, along the
994. ness and from Fabius, for reasons which will be explained later, seldom paid more th
995. , a stock of books, some old favorites, other lighter productions of the season (of w
996. t every year from Rome, together with a quantity of smaller familiar works of art, such
997. a quantity of smaller familiar works of art, such as, distributed through new apart
998. her side, from which she selected first one volume, this year, and then another. fi
999. astonished was she at learning, that of liberty. She could feel no the reason was attac
1000.nk Syra a fool for her pains. do in her mind. It was true she had often read or hear
1001.ed ; as and what were a few dozen in as many centuries, of love, compared with the d
1002.re a few dozen in as many centuries, of love, compared with the daily cases, Yet her
1003.struck her forcibly. clear and palpable one at hand, exceptions to the general rule
1004.ptions to the general rule She waited a time, and watched her maid eagerly, to see i
1005.t. Syra pursued all her duties with the same simple diligence, and never betrayed an
1006.s, she had pronounced impossible — to love a slave. And she had for also discovere
1007.nce, that there was such a thing in the world as disinterested love, affection that a
1008.h a thing in the world as disinterested love, affection that asked no return. * Such
1009.versations with her received a superior education. tion her slave, after the memorable on
1010.on. tion her slave, after the memorable one to ques- which we have recounted, had o
1011.ich we have recounted, had on her early history satisfied her that she had She was too
1012.and reader. Still she could perceive no change in her conduct, no pride, no pretension
1013. turning it never seemed to over to any one but at once naturally and cheerfully se
1014. virtuous declamation, or suggest moral truth, or a more practical course of action,
1015.this done by any apparent shrewdness of judgment or pungency of wit; nor did it seem to
1016.ing, or deep thought, or superiority of education. of this in Syra's words, ideas, much F
1017.ng But there seemed to be in her maid's mind some latent but infallible standard of
1018. some latent but infallible standard of truth, some master-key, which opened equally
1019.d equally every closed deposit of moral knowledge, some well-attuned chord, which vibrate
1020.al light, of Heaven (and what spiritual wisdom, intel- and heavenly delicious privileg
1021.stupid book down. Here is something, It will I am new told, very amusing, and only j
1022.ars were confirmed. She saw that is was one of those trashy works, which were freel
1023.gh grossly immoral, making light of all virtue; while every Christian writing was supp
1024.m resolution, and and said " Do not, my good mistress, ask me to read to you from th
1025.te ; this. And what indelicate, rale of virtue could have made that reading seem which
1026.mmit them. read them of others." but it will not induce it And, in the meantime, is
1027.consideration, do them? " " Not for the world." "Yet, as you hear them read, their im
1028.them read, their image must occupy your mind as they amuse you, your thoughts must d
1029.your thoughts must dwell upon them with pleasure." ; " Certainly. " " What then ? " is T
1030.stress; and what is ? the action of the mind, the soul, but thought A passion which
1031.d what is ? the action of the mind, the soul, but thought A passion which tuishes it
1032.but thought A passion which tuishes it, death, is the action of this invisible power,
1033.use of some little mortification. " But one If difficulty remains. There is respons
1034. society, to the laws, to principles of justice, to self; for painful results will ensu
1035.f justice, to self; for painful results will ensue. exist, But if only the inward ac
1036.presume to judge it? Who to control it? God," answered Sjra, with simple earnestnes
1037.expected some new theory, some striking principle, to come out. Instead, they had sunk do
1038.ut the most respectable of the Olympian family? Do you think they have any thing to do
1039.spoke not of gods and goddesses, but of one Fabiola was disappointed. only God." An
1040.t of one Fabiola was disappointed. only God." And Avhat do you call Him, Syra, in y
1041.ra, in your system ? He has no name but God and that only men have given Him, that
1042.peak of Him. It describes not His " " ; nature. His origin, His attributes." "And what
1043.awak- curiosity. Simple as light is His nature, one and the same every where, indivisi
1044.riosity. Simple as light is His nature, one and the same every where, indivisible,
1045.ple as light is His nature, one and the same every where, indivisible, undefilable,
1046.was any Power, beginning belong to ; He will exist after all love, justice ending ha
1047.ing belong to ; He will exist after all love, justice ending has ceased. wisdom, goo
1048.long to ; He will exist after all love, justice ending has ceased. wisdom, goodness, st
1049.er all love, justice ending has ceased. wisdom, goodness, strained as too, and unerrin
1050.goodness, strained as too, and unerring judgment Him by His nature, and are as unlimited
1051.s too, and unerring judgment Him by His nature, and are as unlimited and unreit. He al
1052. the East should be thought the land of poetry and inspiration." When she saw Syra rel
1053.relaxed from the evident tension of her mind, she said, in as light a tone as she co
1054.ssume: "But, Syra, can you think that a Being such as you have described, far beyond
1055.hoice. I called Him Is it occupation or labor to the sun to send his rays through the
1056.beams at the surface of the transparent element, and hold it them back off, into light.
1057.ountain, as though she were testing the truth of Syra's words. "And they sound like t
1058.h of Syra's words. "And they sound like truth," she added; "for could ? false- hood b
1059.ld ? false- hood be more beautiful than truth that one has never been alone, self, Bu
1060. hood be more beautiful than truth that one has never been alone, self, But what an
1061.ver been alone, self, But what an awful idea, has never had a wish to onesecret, has
1062.childish brain, from the observation of One that knows no imperfection. Terrible th
1063.no imperfection. Terrible thought, that one is living, if you say is true, under th
1064.the sun but a shadow, he enters not the soul ! It is enough to make one any evening
1065.ers not the soul ! It is enough to make one any evening commit ness ! Yet self-dest
1066.s, a calm came She seemed for the first time to feel the presence of One greater tha
1067. the first time to feel the presence of One greater than herself, some one whom she
1068.sence of One greater than herself, some one whom she feared, yet over her. whom she
1069.d, yet over her. whom she would wish to love. She bowed down her mind, ; and her hea
1070. would wish to love. She bowed down her mind, ; and her heart too owned, had a Maste
1071. watched the workings of her mistress's mind. She knew how much depended on their is
1072.ep in her unconscious pupil's religious progress was involved in the recognifor the firs
1073.as involved in the recognifor the first time, that it she bent her intelligence to H
1074.er intelligence to His feet tion of the truth before her grace. ; and she fervently p
1075.been bowed down in accompaniment to her mind, and with graceful kindness said " Syra
1076.have not yet reached the depths of your knowledge; you must have " much more to teach me.
1077.lief.) But to-day you have opened a new world, and a new life, to my thoughts. A sphe
1078. you have opened a new world, and a new life, to my thoughts. A sphere of virtue bey
1079.a new life, to my thoughts. A sphere of virtue beyond the opinions and the judgments o
1080. approbation,) " standing by us when no other eye can see, or restrain, or encourage
1081.e us ; a feeling that, were we ever the same, shut up forever in solitude, we should
1082.which fall would place each individual. life, below " it, even with an outwardly vir
1083.But you have thrown a new Tell me, upon other it to-day obscure to me. now, was not t
1084.t equalwhich exists before your Supreme Being, and that possible moral superiority wh
1085.l superiority which He might see of the one over the " other, inversely of their vi
1086.hich He might see of the one over the " other, inversely of their visible rank? " It
1087. great measure so, my noble lady though idea, which there are other considerations i
1088.noble lady though idea, which there are other considerations involved in the ; would
1089. that day, Syra?" said the mis- with an emotion quite new to her. The poor maid was ove
1090.mistress, and tried to seize her ; hand life, but she prevented of tears her, and, f
1091. she : Avithdrew her embrace she said " One thing Being more, Syra : dare one addre
1092.thdrew her embrace she said " One thing Being more, Syra : dare one address, by worsh
1093.aid " One thing Being more, Syra : dare one address, by worship, to this whom ! you
1094.dor of His might. His kindness, and His wisdom, being. we live Hence, one may address
1095.is might. His kindness, and His wisdom, being. we live Hence, one may address Him, no
1096., and His wisdom, being. we live Hence, one may address Him, not as far and move an
1097. of homage? "I fear not, noble Fabiola; one must needs obtain a Vic- tim worthy of
1098.d Fabiola. sacrifice " "A ; bull may be good enough for Jupiter, or a goat for Bacch
1099. me to know ? in purity, must indeed be one every way worthy of Him, spotless match
1100.ing so clearly described to me the deep sense of responsibility under which you ually
1101. every thought of mine is seen, it is a truth which have spoken." have not sti'ength
1102.e subject further at presrest." ent; my mind has need of A Monogram of Christ, fonnd
1103.ired rest of the and during the day her mind and calm. alternately agitated When vie
1104.e looked steadily on the gTand of moral life which her mind had she of felt grasped,
1105.ly on the gTand of moral life which her mind had she of felt grasped, she found an i
1106. made discovery a great phenomenon, the knowledge of which guided her into a new and loft
1107.equired, the desolateness, almost, of a virtue without admiration or even sympathy, sh
1108.ven sympathy, she again shrunk from the life that was before her, as about to be pas
1109.e only sources of it scious of the real cause, she TThat was the use of so much waste
1110.r ? The next morning had been fixed for one of those visits which used to be annual
1111.lly paid in the country, —that to the will now ex-prefect of the city. Chromatins.
1112.e had freed all his country slaves, but many of them had preferred remaining with hi
1113.ion to her wish to discharge a pleasing duty of courtesy most kind friend of hers fr
1114.ment. In a light country carriage, with good horses, Fabiola and dashed gaily along
1115.not exactly define the on the summit. A change, she perceived, had taken place, which
1116. her that ; the villa had entirely lost one of its most characteristic orna- ments,
1117.the name, now become quite an The empty one, of Ad Statuas* Villa of Statues," or "
1118.report were true that he now a hale old man, courteously received her, and inquired
1119. take a stroll about the grounds. ; the same care as ever, full of beautiful plants
1120.is?" "My dear young lady," answered the good-humored old gentleman, "do not be so an
1121.Of what use were those " figures to any one ? thought so," replied she, "others mig
1122. had them brought "Why, to tell you the truth, I have under the hammer." "What! and n
1123.fast for assume with her how your young imagination runs away," far my poor old tongue to k
1124.r old But why not them as mere works of art? " " Because they had been set up here,
1125.ur ancesnor wise, have been long of the same opinion. retain tors, but belonging to
1126.cesnor wise, have been long of the same opinion. retain tors, but belonging to quite an
1127.in tors, but belonging to quite another family, so did I these it pretenders to a high
1128.und Neither could I run a risk of their being bought friend, for the continuance of t
1129.ught friend, for the continuance of the same imposture." "And pray, my most righteou
1130.atins, amused at her sharpness, and you will see that I have planted palm-trees all
1131.r heads above the evergreens, the villa will take the title of Ad Palmas* instead."
1132.Palmas* instead." little "That contain. will be a pretty name," said Fabiola, who it
1133.d Fabiola, who it thought of the higher sense of appropriateness which She, of course
1134.alms." TO : a training-school, in which many were being prepared, as wrestlers or gl
1135.: a training-school, in which many were being prepared, as wrestlers or gladiators us
1136.the great combat of faith, martyrdom to death. They who to had entered in, and they w
1137. conqueror's palm, borne by them before God's judgment-seat, in token of their vict
1138.eror's palm, borne by them before God's judgment-seat, in token of their victory over th
1139.eat, in token of their victory over the world. to Many were the palm-branches shortly
1140.ken of their victory over the world. to Many were the palm-branches shortly retreat.
1141.rly Christian But we must here give the history of the demolition of Chromatius's statu
1142.ns, after making every inquiry into the truth of the fact, sent for Sebastian, and pr
1143., as a means of obtaining a cure of the same complaint. This of course could not be
1144.zing furnace not perhaps so difficult a matter for the prefect's son. In one day two h
1145.cult a matter for the prefect's son. In one day two hundred pagan statues were brok
1146.ll objects had been treated as works of art rather than religious things, and, like
1147.rted, but his son Tiburtius became also one of the most fervent of Christians They
1148.s connection with the palace, his great courage cratius. After this little digression,
1149.ey ? Do tell me." "Why, that you have a quantity of people living with you whom nobody k
1150.ical sort of a most Platonic republic." life, forming " Highly flattered " interrupt
1151.ourselves." " But I hope they do us the justice to add, that we pay our way? " observed
1152." How " kind of them ! " rejoined the I good-humored old judge. They — the whole p
1153. is really your object and your mode of life ; ; ; here, my good friend ? " "We spen
1154.ct and your mode of life ; ; ; here, my good friend ? " "We spend our time in the cu
1155. here, my good friend ? " "We spend our time in the cultivation of our higher facult
1156.ety of ways some read, some write, some labor in the gardens and I assure you no hire
1157.beautiful songs together, all breathing virtue and purity, and read most improving boo
1158.entils, have already found out and that good cheer does not necessarily " mean good
1159. good cheer does not necessarily " mean good fare." Why, you are turned complete Pyt
1160. person within our reach this winter we will endeavor to clothe all all the naked, a
1161.ked, and feed the hungry, and attend to will go for this." the sick about. All our e
1162.ndeed a very generous, though very new, idea in and no doubt you will be well laughe
1163.ough very new, idea in and no doubt you will be well laughed at for your and abused
1164. for your and abused on all sides. They will even say worse of you than they do now,
1165.y called by that name." "Let me ask you one question. Have you taken the trouble of
1166., not I I indeed ; I would not waste my time over them I could not have patience to
1167.oo much, as enemies of all intellectual progress, as doubtful citizens, as credulous to
1168.abominable crime, ever to give myself a chance of a nearer acquaintance with them." "W
1169.biola, once, but I " I thought just the same about them have much altered indeed str
1170.ave much altered indeed strange to ; my opinion of late." This is since, as prefect of
1171. the city, you for must have had punish many of these wretched people, their constan
1172.ver the cheerful countenance of the old man, and a tear stood in his eye. He though
1173., who had once persecuted the Church of God. Fabiola saw the change, and was distre
1174.uted the Church of God. Fabiola saw the change, and was distressed. In the most affect
1175., and else. let us talk of to something One purpose of my visit to you was, ask you
1176. to you was, ask you if you knew of any one going immediately to Rome. I have heard
1177.what he did before, —go without is me pain." "Yes," replied Chromatins, "there ing
1178.rning. write your letter; the bearer is man start- Come into the library, and proba
1179.. At a table in the middle room a young man was seated, transcribing a large volume
1180.o send a letter to her father in Eome." pleasure," replied "It will always give me great
1181.father in Eome." pleasure," replied "It will always give me great the young man, "to
1182."It will always give me great the young man, "to serve the noble Fabiola, father."
1183. judge, rather before me, to be had the honor, when very young, as my father had had
1184. for some book, lay on the lines table. One of these the good old man placed before
1185.ay on the lines table. One of these the good old man placed before the lady, with in
1186. lines table. One of these the good old man placed before the lady, with ink and a
1187.l, which she drew from an Anxious, some time, to embroidered bag, upon the wax. rewa
1188. strong yet finest fibres, across which truth might weave the and yet a thousand moti
1189.ly afford to travel on ance, I shall by chance and cheap conveybe some days upon the r
1190.he road." or Fabiola, hesitating, said: liberty, if I "Would it be taking too great a e
1191.t have contracted by making him her the other side messenger. destroy it She therefor
1192.n writon that sheet. Then for the first time ten, and she proceeded to read them. sh
1193. book unknown to her "I say you to you, love your enemies; do good to them that in h
1194.I say you to you, love your enemies; do good to them that in hate you, and pray for
1195.r who who maketh his sun to rise on the good and the is bad, * and raineth upon the
1196. morality or base degradation. Does any one practise this doctrine, or ? is it a sp
1197., or ? is it a splendid paradox ject. I will trouble myself no more on the subit ; O
1198.self no more on the subit ; Or rather I will ask Syra about it sounds very like one
1199.will ask Syra about it sounds very like one of her beautiful, but impracticable, th
1200.rs me by her sublime views, so wants My mind The shortest way is to get rid of the c
1201.d The shortest way is to get rid of the cause of my perplexity, and forget such haras
1202.it goes to the winds, or to puzzle some one else, who may find it on the road-side.
1203., tus. and receive from him the kiss of peace to the door of Chromatins' s villa. ere
1204.nce, knelt down, kissed slight perhaps, good priest's hand, and obtained his blessin
1205. the last farewell was spoken, the last good wish expressed; and Torquatus, mounted
1206.which led to the gate. Long after every one else had re-entered the house, Chromati
1207.terfall by leaping down two stones at a time, and plunging into an abyss concealed b
1208.oughts amidst these shifting act in his life's new drama? did they amuse him ? did t
1209.c, its paintings, its magnificence, its beauty. He forgot that all these were but the
1210.an whose passions they enkindled, whose evil desires they inflamed, whose ambition t
1211. they fanned, whose resolutions beings, art ! ; they melted, and whose minds they e
1212. and have his wings unscathed It was in one of his abstracted defile, moods that he
1213. inlet of the sea before him, and in it one solitary and motionless The sight at on
1214.onless The sight at once brought to his memory a story of his childhood, true or false
1215.fore it mattered not ; him. Once upon a time there was a bold young fisherman living
1216. living on the coast of southern Italy. One night, stormy and dark, he found that h
1217.d heat, he fell asleep; but, after some time, was awakened by a loud shouting at a H
1218.outing at a He looked round and saw the family-boat, the crew distance. of which were
1219.e was commencing another and a narrower one. A horrible suspicion flashed upon his
1220.. A horrible suspicion flashed upon his mind he threw off his tunic and pulled But t
1221.t there, still round he went, and every time could they want? ; ; : nearer to the ce
1222.," Torquatus said to himself, " did any one ever perish in this way ? or is it a me
1223.circle, are my present thoughts, by any chance, an " which has caught me, and ! exclai
1224.uatus looked over his letters, and drew one out for the town. He was taken to a lit
1225.l, during which he learned the master's history. A native of Fundi, he had started the
1226.me acquainted at an early period of our history, and had proved eminently successful. B
1227.res and his future prospects. A strange idea dashed through the mind of Torquatus, t
1228.ects. A strange idea dashed through the mind of Torquatus, that some day that inform
1229.any fulfill Fabiola's commission quick, change his horses at night. him for, to was ne
1230.y, within whose walls there was more of good and more of empire. evil contained, tha
1231.re was more of good and more of empire. evil contained, than in any province of the
1232.pectable lodging, suited to the present state of his purse ; and easily found one. sa
1233.t state of his purse ; and easily found one. said, did Fabius, we have his daughter
1234.r there. The fact was, that ; he had no love green fields or running brooks society
1235.ghter's presence was a restraint on his liberty but when she was gone, with her establi
1236. with her. his table; Men of profligate life surrounded late hours, with and deep dr
1237.sed the fools to go and build a temple, one of the most conspicuous places of the m
1238.ition of them and destroy the a foreign religion must be to an "To be had any wit corner
1239. are so condescendingly tolerated for a time princes. But as they do not choose to b
1240.inces. But as they do not choose to but will build temples in public instead of skul
1241. in by-lanes, as they used to do, I for one am not sorry. One by the most humane so
1242.hey used to do, I for one am not sorry. One by the most humane so, do may gain some
1243. shall be a fair division. We w^ill aid one another. You propose bold and rough mea
1244.er. You propose bold and rough means; I will keep my counsel as to mine. But each sh
1245.alluded hope." " made an uncouth bow), "will accompany you, " but I fear I have an e
1246.ngagement already." " there " Nonsense, man," said the good-natured knight is nobod
1247.dy." " there " Nonsense, man," said the good-natured knight is nobody left in the ci
1248. pale, side, ? " and tell drew the away truth, Fabius to one while he said: "To somet
1249.and tell drew the away truth, Fabius to one while he said: "To something very " tha
1250.ks with you heartily she were out of in good I wish my house. But, come," he continu
1251.o, I saw that your daughter made up her mind, that no good should ever come out : of
1252.your daughter made up her mind, that no good should ever come out : of it." " Say yo
1253.hing of such matters. wish, indeed, she life, would give than that to her." uj^ her
1254.ss your suit boldly and I tell you, you will win it, whatever Fabiola may think. But
1255.yable part of the ; establishment." " I will wait on you without fail," replied Fulv
1256.u," added Fabius, as he turned away. We will not describe the banquet further than t
1257.nd excited. cool. Fulvius, however, for one, kept himself the church at destruction
1258.ns become their fiercest persereluctant mind of Dioclesian to Every one began to see
1259.sereluctant mind of Dioclesian to Every one began to see that, before many months c
1260. to Every one began to see that, before many months cutor. were over, the imperial e
1261.lamor hunts down, requires an amount of courage too heroic to be common. Even the most
1262.ll liberal found reasons for Christians being excepted from posed progress that kind
1263.or Christians being excepted from posed progress that kind consideration. One could not
1264.posed progress that kind consideration. One could not bear their mysteriousness, an
1265.s, another was vexed at their sup; this man thought them opposed to the real glory
1266. eliminated from debate, them a foreign element, it. One thought their During doctrine
1267.rom debate, them a foreign element, it. One thought their During doctrine detestabl
1268.called, where both sides came to the to same conclusion, Fulvius, after having glanc
1269.ion, Fulvius, after having glanced from one the other of the guests, had fixed his
1270.vius, after having glanced from one the other of the guests, had fixed his evil eye u
1271. the other of the guests, had fixed his evil eye upon Tor- quatus. The youth was sil
1272.by turns, was Wine had given him a rash courage, and flushed. ISTow he clenched which s
1273.ed. ISTow he clenched which some strong principle restrained. his hand, and pressed it to
1274.t to his breast; now he bit his lip. At one time he was crumbling the bread between
1275. his breast; now he bit his lip. At one time he was crumbling the bread between his
1276.l if ; pale they could," said his lips, one. Torquatus leaned forward, opened but r
1277.n Fulvius, with a cool cal- culation of time and words, added, in bitter sarcasm: "A
1278.nd look. am the "Because," answered the other, with great excitement, "I myself a Chr
1279. about Christians than himself. A young man opened his mouth as he stared at Torqua
1280.er he should not knock down somebody or other, no matter whom. Corvinus looked at the
1281.ld not knock down somebody or other, no matter whom. Corvinus looked at the poor Chris
1282.ds in his trap in a morning. Here was a man ready to hand, to put on the rack, or t
1283.is ? To get hold of a had long been his desire and was one, if he could only manage Be
1284.d of a had long been his desire and was one, if he could only manage Because he kne
1285.stians to be convinced, that no genuine one would have allowed himself either to dr
1286. from the discovered Christian, as from one pest-stricken. He felt alone and depres
1287.," replied Torquatus, again excited; "I will stand to my colors to the last." !" "Hu
1288.hem playfully down, talking in the mean time on indifferent subjects. "Dear me! " he
1289.s! It is well I am not playing with any one, or I should have been ruined. You try,
1290.e poising of his hand, the knowing cast vice. of the wrist, and the sharp eye first
1291.rently; "but, I dare say, Corvinus here will give you a chance, low." if you will st
1292.dare say, Corvinus here will give you a chance, low." if you will stake something very
1293.re will give you a chance, low." if you will stake something very I must be very low
1294.eed " It " — for recreation —but no matter." ; for Come on," said Corvinus, whom F
1295." Fulvius made him drink if still, from time to time, and he became very talkative.
1296.s made him drink if still, from time to time, and he became very talkative. Corvinus
1297. it recollecting " Who? "Yes, asked the other, surprised. was," continued Torquatus t
1298.e for my faith ; but I won't betray any one, —that I won't." "Let me take your pl
1299.d up and started. He thought he saw the good Polycarp behind his adversary's chair.
1300.mself, to that cleansed but ill-guarded soul; and as they entered departed. that was
1301.d departed. that was holy, all that was good, At length, wine, into a frenzy, after
1302.ce; "you have it too." dis- graced your religion, and you have betrayed No, no," groaned
1303.xclaimed piteously the tortured sinner. will forgive ; They me " Silence utter " God
1304.ill forgive ; They me " Silence utter " God not His name you are degraded, still. :
1305.outcast, a ruined prodigal and gameyou? will your Christian ; Who will look at frien
1306. and gameyou? will your Christian ; Who will look at friends? And nevertheless you a
1307.nd nevertheless you are a Christian you will be torn to are a hypo- pieces by some c
1308.orn to are a hypo- pieces by some cruel death for it ; yet you will not be wor- shipp
1309.es by some cruel death for it ; yet you will not be wor- shipped by them as one of t
1310.you will not be wor- shipped by them as one of their martyrs. crite, You Torquatus,
1311.ed your" self into my power completely. life. — (and he showed him of your peace,
1312.y. life. — (and he showed him of your peace, of your Fabiola's purse) — "of your
1313.of the prefect of the upon you, (and no one else can now restrain him after such pr
1314.ter such provocation) and to-morrow you will be standing before his father's tribu-
1315.his father's tribu- nal to die for that religion which you have betrayed and dis- " ; ;
1316. represent your Christianity before the judgment-seat in the Forum ? The for fallen man
1317.ment-seat in the Forum ? The for fallen man had not courage to follow the prodigal
1318. the Forum ? The for fallen man had not courage to follow the prodigal in sin. repentan
1319.d not courage to follow the prodigal in sin. repentance, as he had done in Hope was
1320.ntance, as he had done in Hope was dead sin, in him felt he had relapsed into his c
1321.d, "Neither." and "Come, ing then, what will you do?" asked Fulvius, masterTorquatus
1322.quatus, "only neither of those him with one of his falcon glances. "What you things
1323.el, ay, and money that ? play with, you will only do my bidding." " And what is " "R
1324.roaned, it "A traitor at last! what you will; that or death! ? Ay, death by hear Cor
1325.traitor at last! what you will; that or death! ? Ay, death by hear Corvinus pacing im
1326.st! what you will; that or death! ? Ay, death by hear Corvinus pacing impatiently up
1327. it to down the Quick! which ! be " Not death Oh, no, any thing but that Fulvius went
1328.e, rolled like dark billows through his soul, each comUnable to sustain himself long
1329.ng ; sounded in his to rouse him. ears. state, Fulvius found him in this exclaimed: a
1330.Charybdis?" A Bove, as an Emblem of the Soul. crt trb Diogenes the excavator from a
1331.inting in the Cemetery of Domitilla " |)art Seronir.— (Conflict. CHAPTER DIOGENES
1332.therto led our reader have been laid in one of those slippery truces, rather than p
1333.e of those slippery truces, rather than peace, which often intervened between persecu
1334.tion and persecution. Already rumors of war have crossed our path, and October." it
1335. "Diogenes, the excavator, deposited in peace, eight days before the of — From St.
1336.hreats of Corvinus, have brought us the same news, that before long the horrors of p
1337. before long the horrors of persecution will re-appear, and Christian blood will hav
1338.ion will re-appear, and Christian blood will have to flow, in a fuller and nobler st
1339.itherto watered the Paradise of the New Law. The Church, ever calmly distinctly hea
1340.ly heard. provident, cannot neglect the many signs for of a threatened combat, nor t
1341.sely muffled up in his cloak, for young man, not it was dark and rather might be se
1342.mediate vicinity of the Forum. erty, As vice is unfortunately too often linked with
1343. the neatest dwelling in the street and being particularly struck with the cleanlines
1344.cularly struck with the cleanliness and good order of one beyond the rest, he boldly
1345. with the cleanliness and good order of one beyond the rest, he boldly knocked at i
1346.ed at its door. It was opened by an old man, whose name has already appeared in our
1347.two it was solemnly sad. He looked like one who had lived much among sons, the dead
1348.ANOBA^ distinguished Jonas devoured The other son was making a rough design, in which
1349. pick- axe. These varied occupations in one family might have surprised a modern, b
1350.k- axe. These varied occupations in one family might have surprised a modern, but they
1351.the honorable * ; he well knew that the family belonged craft of the Fossores, or exca
1352.ike the is or reader. But although this opinion untenable, it is extremely probable tha
1353. leave positive signs of improvement or change as time went on, gives us reason to con
1354.itive signs of improvement or change as time went on, gives us reason to conclude th
1355.d venerable works were carried on under one direcand probably by some body associat
1356.s that this occupation was continued in particular families ried it ; grandfather, father,
1357.father, and sons, having car- on in the same place.* We can thus easily understand t
1358. office, or Though the that underground world. for the burial of all Church provided
1359.. for the burial of all Church provided space place of sepulture, if her children, it
1360.nean Christian Rome, a work on which we will freely draw. ; EMPTV LOCVM AB ARTEMISIV
1361.'s rude attempts in yourself? " glyptic art his next step was to address him. Do yo
1362.e This was a who cannot afford to pay a good woman who kept a small shop may suppose
1363.hat the superb mausoleums of sovereigns will fall to utter decay, market-wife descen
1364.escend to distant ages. for and yet the memory of a But what is your reason thinking t
1365. " ? " I Simply because * posterity the memory of would sooner commit to the keeping o
1366.umber, unfortunately, not intelligible, being in cipher. rich. And my rude record may
1367. St. Agnee, on the Nomentan Way. "Never mind that; ing. its simplicity is worth much
1368.tiful inscription brought us to put up; will see the writer and engraver were it dif
1369. s I on the Nomentan way. believe is in memory of a most sweet : child, whose death is
1370.n memory of a most sweet : child, whose death is deeply it, Pancratius took a light t
1371.ly jDrayers." Amen," answered the pious family. But Pancratius, attracted by a certain
1372. s voice, turned round, and saw the old man vigorously trying to cut off the end of
1373.awny hand across his eyes. "What is the matter, my good old ? friend " said the youth
1374.cross his eyes. "What is the matter, my good old ? friend " said the youth kindly. "
1375.t is all simple enough " " to take into one's arms a good child like Dionysius, spi
1376.le enough " " to take into one's arms a good child like Dionysius, spices, wrapped i
1377., tyr's their tomb.* " How dififerently one would wish to treat a marthe plain body
1378.me more for their dead than the heathen world did for its gods." L " Yes, noble Pancr
1379.mrade younger than himself lying in the same bed. of Kestitutus, the As we were clos
1380.should I pity him ? we were pressed for time, no second phial of blood to put outsid
1381., don't you to you may have perform the same office for me one of these days? " " Oh
1382.may have perform the same office for me one of these days? " " Oh, no, I hope not,"
1383.de to such a possibility. Surely my own time must come sooner. How the old trees are
1384.ng plants cut down " " ! Come, come, my good friend, I Avon't afflict you. But I hav
1385.this tomb was discovered unviolated. On being opened the bones, white, bright, and po
1386. ing troubles. Our holy Pope filled up, will be there, with the priests of .the titl
1387.ossor, that all may act in concert." "I will not " fail, Pancratius," replied Diogen
1388.you." A favor from me ? " asked the old man, surprised. "Tes; you will have to begi
1389.asked the old man, surprised. "Tes; you will have to begin your work immediately, I
1390." well." "Nothing would give me greater pleasure," answered still Diogenes, somewhat fla
1391.he compliment, but more pleased by this love for what he so much loved. " After I ha
1392.na, half an hour before mid-day, and we will go on together." " But I shall not be a
1393.atius. " Two youths, recently baptized, desire much to become acquainted with our ceme
1394.ked me to initiate them there." ; " Any One friends of yours will be always welcome
1395.em there." ; " Any One friends of yours will be always welcome. What are their names
1396.son of Chromatins, the late prefect the other a young man named little, ? Torquatus."
1397.ins, the late prefect the other a young man named little, ? Torquatus." Severus sta
1398.rus, "I was little surprised to find in one corner, at that early hour, Torquatus i
1399.ave large alms to the I unknown person (God poor there. hour, for a Christian." Not
1400.poor there. hour, for a Christian." Not good company thought, and at such an known a
1401.n the faith, friends do not know of his change. We and probably will hope his old for
1402.not know of his change. We and probably will hope his old for the I'ose The two youn
1403.as- and bade the old excavator a hearty good night. Our Saviour blessiug tliu Bread,
1404.ems to us as whose character and little history, though we had neglected one, thoughts
1405.little history, though we had neglected one, thoughts opened this the pious Lucina.
1406. were indeed of that quiet, unobtrusive nature, which aftbrds little scope for appeari
1407.part in general Her ing, house, besides being, or rather contain- a title or parochia
1408.or parochial church, was now honored by being the residence of the supreme Pontiff. t
1409.found in the cemetery of SS. Nereus and family, that trust in the Lord." It is singula
1410.syllable should be omitted in the name, one easily slurred in pronouncing it. the C
1411.might feed them at home. This loathsome punishment soon caused his death. Lucina admitted,
1412.is loathsome punishment soon caused his death. Lucina admitted, at forty,* into the o
1413.ect seemed to Lucina quietly passed her life. Its main be attained. Her son had offe
1414.ttained. Her son had offered himself to God; and lived ready to shed his blood for
1415.ned in our last chajDter took place. It will be sufficient the to say, that in it fu
1416.ion * Sixty ; and to each was intrusted one cemetery or was the fall age, but admis
1417.ld excavator but innocently, proud. The good seemed rather more cheery than otherwis
1418.ent tombs that lined the road) into the same villa on the rightHere they found all t
1419.nswered questions put to him, but, from time to time, gave intelligent little lectur
1420.questions put to him, but, from time to time, gave intelligent little lectures, on s
1421.rm oitr friends, if we digest the whole matter of these into a more connected narrativ
1422. connected narrative. And besides, they will wish to know something of the subsequen
1423.ish to know something of the subsequent history of those wonderful excavations, pilgrim
1424.hich we have conducted our youthful The history portions of the early Christian cemeter
1425.er from this term to the eighth century time, then down to our a own when we have re
1426.ave reason to hope that new epoch it is being commenced. "We have generally avoided u
1427.cause might mislead our readers into an idea that this It is was either the original
1428. was called sometimes Ccemeterium ad by other names, had among them The meaning of th
1429.of SS. Peter and Paul having been for a time buried there, in a crypt This term beca
1430.ery. was generalized, till name of that particular cemetery, then we familiarly call the w
1431.onverted into Christian cemeteries. for will The man who wishes to get the sand out
1432.into Christian cemeteries. for will The man who wishes to get the sand out of the g
1433.vation as near as may be to the surface will have it of easiest possible access, for
1434.ossible access, for drawing out mateand will make it as ample as is consistent with
1435.ond and third below, constructed on the same principle. catacomb may be divided into
1436.nd third below, constructed on the same principle. catacomb may be divided into three par
1437.e crossed by others, and these again by form a complete labyrinth, or net-work, of T
1438., from a child to a full-grown that is, man, as laid with its side to the gallery.
1439.ide to the gallery. Sometimes there are many as fourteen, sometimes as few as three
1440.as few as three or four, of these rows, one above the other. to measure, that it is
1441.e or four, of these rows, one above the other. to measure, that it is probable the Th
1442.the side of the grave, while this * was being dug. much prized for That is, the red v
1443.nd may be seen in museums and churches; many of the latter have been either by a mar
1444.are its limits determined. possible. We will try to content him, as briefly as There
1445.e model of our resur- and speaks of our being buried with Him in baptism, was natural
1446.epos"the deposition of left ,"' ited in peace," : are the expressions till that is, t
1447.l that is, the dead are but there for a time, called for again, as a pledge, or prec
1448. a place where for ; mitory, slumbering many lie, as in a till dawn come, and is * d
1449.. They inspired abhorrence of the pagan custom of burning the dead nor have we a hint
1450.ve we a hint that this mode was, at any time, system, but ; adopted by Christians. B
1451. the symbolical taste still flourishing art. Their itself, are characteristic of a
1452.haracteristic of a very ancient period. time went on. For this peculiar taste declin
1453., 350). Another curious and interesting custom furnisiies us with dates on tombs. At t
1454. plaster, mark would press into ; left. Many of these objects continue to be found,
1455. of these objects continue to be found, many have A loculus^ open. been long or, col
1456.ment, This is sometimes of Domitian, or other early emperors. may be asked, wherefore
1457.Besides motives of natural piety, there one constantly recorded on sepulchral inscr
1458.al inscriptions. if In England, want of space prevented the full date of a person's d
1459.e prevented the full date of a person's death being given, we should prefer chronicli
1460.ented the full date of a person's death being given, we should prefer chronicling the
1461.It is more historical. c "tj® : : m No one caves about remembering the day on whic
1462.parture and Therefore it alone accurate knowledge of this was necessary. had was recorded
1463.corded. left In a cemetery close to the one in which we have our three youths, with
1464., belonging to both orders of the dead. One in Greek, after mentioning the "Deposit
1465.PRO NOBIS . . . " Nones of Jnne Live in peace, and pray for us." This is a third VICT
1466.ONO . may thy spirit be in enjoyment " (good). That of SS. Nereus and Achilleus. Thi
1467.ve in the cemetery of Pr^etextatus, not many for yards from that of Callistus. It is
1468.stus. It is remarkable, letters; first, being in Latin written with Greek then, for c
1469.h day before the calends of Nov. Christ God Almighty refresh thy spirit in Christ."
1470.rayers inscribed over tombs, the reader will not, we trust, have forgotten, that we
1471. earliest ages. to We used. have now to state After peace down them lie what period t
1472.es. to We used. have now to state After peace down them lie what period they were res
1473.e Church, the devotion of Christians to desire burial near the martyrs, was prompted o
1474.ese cemeteries, the sand extracted from one gallfery was removed into another alrea
1475.d into another already excavated. Hence many are now found completely filled up. A L
1476. during the first period in the lOGENES history close. of the cemeteries, though near i
1477. gladdened his heart, to be followed by one that would Could future fate, have deep
1478.followed by one that would Could future fate, have deeply fore, tlie afflicted him.
1479. afflicted him. Although, therewith the matter it of this chapter have no direct beari
1480.o direct bearing upon it our narrative, will serve essentially to connect present to
1481.t present topography of its scene. When peace and liberty were restored to the Church
1482.topography of its scene. When peace and liberty were restored to the Church, these beca
1483.of them was associated with the name of one, or the names of several, of the more e
1484.out, by the additions of later ages.* * One or two entries from the old Kalendarium
1485.ntries from the old Kalendarium Romanum will illustrate this: V6 : An several ordina
1486. our aid but before mentioning them, we will glance at the changes which this devoti
1487.ries. First, commodious entrances, from time to time, with easy staircases were made
1488.rst, commodious entrances, from time to time, with easy staircases were made; suppor
1489.city, visited each of these churches, a custom yet practised ; descended below, and wi
1490.ombs and lapidary inscriptions of every one of these Popes, together with those of
1491.together with those of St. Antherus, in one chapel of the newly-ascertained cemeter
1492.hat St. Ambrose, it St. Gaudentius, and other bishops, should have found martyrs of s
1493.fore them. The place was unknown at the peace of the Church, till discovered by Divin
1494.by Divine manifestation. But instead of being permitted to enter again into this hall
1495.had taken place while preparations were being * Acta Martyr, torn. 341 iii. : made fo
1496. of sepulture of in the fourth century; one, of the Eoman pontiffs, the other of ma
1497.entury; one, of the Eoman pontiffs, the other of martyrs. t ; After these come three
1498.ount. To show the value period of their history, of these documents, and describe the o
1499.y, of these documents, and describe the one disparty. changes which took place in t
1500.e in the catacombs during the second we will give a brief account of left covery, in
1501.art. lib. i. c. 28, ap. Marclii, p. 81. One would xxviii. apply t St. Damasus's epi
1502.. lius; that probably his distinguished form; tomb would be found below, in a and th
1503. the cemetery of Callistus, and not the one at St. Sebastian's, a few of that hundr
1504.ndred yards further, St. must claim the honor foretold that as these name. He went an
1505.ch would account was verified. for that idea, for it It was known * that his body re
1506.ed was found to lead at once to a wider space, carefully secured by brick- work of th
1507.carefully secured by brick- work of the time of peace, air from above. On ; the left
1508.y secured by brick- work of the time of peace, air from above. On ; the left and prov
1509.e It was, however, and ample and except one, very high above it, there were no othe
1510. one, very high above it, there were no other graves below, or over, or at the sides.
1511.nly the left-hand end remains, the rest being broken and lost. Above the tomb was ano
1512.this holy pope, already mentioned, took pleasure in putting verses, which he loved to wr
1513.ant exhibit a particu- and very elegant form of letters, known among antiquari- Sain
1514.this character. To proceed on the wall, same plane, were painted two * These right o
1515.easily memorates the two martyrs on the same day, might be led to suppose that they
1516.Cornelius Pope, of St. Cyprian." On the other side, on a narrow wall projecting at a
1517.are two more similar portraits but only one name can be deciphered, that of St. Six
1518.eriod of these holy cemeteries, the sad one of their desolation. later the Saracens
1519.ian, whom we have frequently named with honor, should have re-discov- ered two of the
1520.metery of Callistus, almost entire; the one being a stable and bake- One is, most p
1521.ry of Callistus, almost entire; the one being a stable and bake- One is, most probabl
1522.ntire; the one being a stable and bake- One is, most probably, that by Pope Damasus
1523.d entrances, the mere wasting action of time and Aveather, have left us but a wreck
1524.ars for these sacred places, house, the other a wine-store. built * Pope Pius IX.—
1525.ossible, to all found ; but every thing state. is restored, its original Accurate tra
1526.of every part explored. To secure these good results, the Pope has, from his own res
1527., ; a truly imperial undertaking. It is time, however, for us to rejoin our party be
1528. our readers of the first period of the history of subterranean Rome, as antiquarians l
1529.y of subterranean Rome, as antiquarians love to call the catacombs, has no doubt bee
1530.g straight gallery, crossed, indeed, by many others, but adhered to faithfully; lect
1531.m anxiously. " I wonder," he said, "how many turns we have passed by, " before leavi
1532.s main gallery ? looked around "A great many," answered Severus, drily. " How many d
1533.t many," answered Severus, drily. " How many do you think, ten or twenty?" " Full th
1534. way they turn. is to hold a lamp ; you will find one at each angle. As to ourselves
1535.turn. is to hold a lamp ; you will find one at each angle. As to ourselves, we know
1536.ose A Lamp with a representation of the Good Shepherd, fonnd at Ostiom From Boiler's
1537.century. for the catacombs, of which so many are there found. But not content, he ke
1538.here found. But not content, he kept as good count as he could of the turns, as they
1539.of the turns, as they went and now with one excuse, and now with another, ; he cons
1540. he constantly stopped, and scrutinized particular spots and But Severus had a lynx's eye
1541.u call this? " asked Tiburtius. " It is one of the many crypts, or cuMcula* which a
1542.? " asked Tiburtius. " It is one of the many crypts, or cuMcula* which abound in our
1543.ed Diogenes; "sometimes they are merely family sepultures, but generally they contain
1544.ebrated. You are of course aware of the custom of so performing them." " Perhaps my tw
1545.not have heard but know it well. surely one of the glorious privileges of martyrdom
1546.y and precious Blood * Chambers. upon ; one's ashes, and to repose thus under the v
1547.d to repose thus under the very feet of God.* But let us see well the paintings all
1548. into this chamber, in preference to so many others in the cemetery. The Last Supper
1549.n tlie Cemetery of St. Callistus. It is one of the most ancient, and contains a mos
1550.r o'er them placed revere. She ie7ieafh God's feet reposes, Nor to us her soft eye
1551. eye closes, Nor her gracious ear." The idea that the martyr lies "beneath the feet
1552.t of Presence in the Blessed Eucharist. God" is an allusion to theEeal cfrr® frien
1553.ribe "I am no scholar," replied the old man, modestly, "but when one has lived sixt
1554.eplied the old man, modestly, "but when one has lived sixty years, man and boy, amo
1555.y, "but when one has lived sixty years, man and boy, among things, one gets to know
1556.sixty years, man and boy, among things, one gets to know them better than others, b
1557.o know them better than others, because one loves them more. All here have been ful
1558.ied Pancratius, gently, "and a favorite one. The use of Gentile images, when in the
1559.tted. You see masks. Our Lord under the Symbol of Orpheus. Prom a picture in tlie Ceme
1560.metery of DomitiliuB. for instance, and other pagan ornaments in this ceiling, and th
1561.d so our Lord was represented under the symbol lege. of Orpheus, to conceal sacri- His
1562. repre- sentation of the " I see," said same subject." Torquatus, " a shepherd with
1563.with a sheep over ; his shoulders I the Good Shepherd remember the parable." — tha
1564. " If I is this subject such a favorite one it ? " asked have observed in other cem
1565.orite one it ? " asked have observed in other cemeteries." you will look over the arc
1566.have observed in other cemeteries." you will look over the arcosolium,'^ * answered
1567. arcosolium,'^ * answered Severus, "you will see a fuller representation of the scen
1568.You see that figure on the right? " The Good Shepherd. A woman prajang. From the arc
1569.," replied Tiburtius ; "it is that of a man apparently in a chest, with a dove flyi
1570.Holy Spirit and of the salvation of the world. Such in is our beginning ; and here ou
1571.in observed Pancratius, pointing to the other side ; " and here we have another type
1572. " and here we have another type of the same "Where?" asked Torquatus, but a figure
1573.ee the multiplication is, you know, the symbol familiarly called the of Christ." * f%f
1574.ons about its origin," said the youth, "one finds the meaning in the word itself; i
1575. to mean Jesus ' Christ, itself; Son of God, Saviour.'* Another puts it in the symb
1576. God, Saviour.'* Another puts it in the symbol that as fish are born and live in the w
1577.n the union all.t bread and the fish in one multi23li- cation shows us how, in the
1578.e Baptismo, is lib. ii. c. 3). \ In the same cemetery fish ; another interesting pai
1579. figure in adoration. The priest is the same as, in a picture close by, is repreIn a
1580.st," said Torquatus, we are come to the Good Shepherd." Yes," continued Severus, " y
1581.too, left ; the penitent in the post of honor. On each side you see a person evidentl
1582.oth are leaning forward, and Addressing One on either side is apparently giving she
1583.r words, but browsing quietly on, while one is turning up its eyes and head, lookin
1584. the attention. Him to preach. grace of God. " It is not difficult to interpret thi
1585.ure." But what makes this emblem such a particular favorite " ? again pressed Tiburtius. "
1586.nd similar paintings, to belong chiefly time when the Novatian heresy so much plague
1587.uatus, care- " he thought he was losing time. "It was, and indeed is, the heresy," a
1588.s not for power which are too great for God to pardon." Pancratius was not aware of
1589. traitor, confused. " Surely a dreadful one," replied Pancratius, " to limit the Hi
1590.s always so much loved this type of the Good Shepherd, ready to run into the wildern
1591.Torquatus, evidently moved, "that Gift, one who had become a Christian, and receive
1592.ay, and plunge into voice faltered) — vice, and —and" — (his " almost betray h
1593.ren, would not the Church reject such a one from hope?" The Blessed Virgin and the
1594. some despairing thought had quenched a man's heart. a new flash of hope, in that D
1595. late for to-day; "I think, you know we will excuse us, have got our work to do. The
1596. These young friends especially as they will see the church in good time, and in bet
1597.pecially as they will see the church in good time, and in better order also, as the
1598.lly as they will see the church in good time, and in better order also, as the holy
1599.oor Severus at chagrined seeing how his good father remarkable a picture. * if There
1600.titions of right, in the this painting. One has been It is lately found, we remembe
1601.was departed, he told " all that he had will give us observed to his brother, remark
1602.uble yet: I strongly suspect him." That man In a short time they had removed every
1603.ongly suspect him." That man In a short time they had removed every mark which Tor-
1604.at the road, by blocking up the present one, and turnFor this purpose they had the
1605.ful could be instructed of the intended change. Moses striking the rock, from the Ceme
1606.ve to of blest," as called it. There we world left Fabiola perplexed by some sentence
1607.rdly durst inquire. visitors called the Many and next day, and for several she often
1608.often thought of putting before some or other of them the mysterious sentences, but s
1609.g herself to do it. A rect, lady, whose life was like her own, philosophically coran
1610.he shrank from submitting so. A learned man, well read and literature, paid her a l
1611.d. It was strange that, after all, when wisdom or consolation was to be sought, the no
1612.t felt profane to do in all branches of science ; lady should turn instinctively to her
1613.a. There passed over her countenance an emotion not observable to her mistress; but she
1614.y by mistake. it cannot drive out of my mind, Avhich it is quite perplexed by it." "
1615." "Why should be so, my noble lady? Its sense seems plain enough." "Yes; and that ver
1616.despise a : trouble. My ought I fancy I man who To does not resent an injury, and r
1617. most would be much to ; but to con- do good in return from for evil, seems me an I
1618. but to con- do good in return from for evil, seems me an I unnatural exaction human
1619.ms me an I unnatural exaction human the nature. Now, while of feel all this, I am scio
1620.n others, too. ; but look at the simple principle you honor Do you despise, or do you res
1621. ; but look at the simple principle you honor Do you despise, or do you respect, Aris
1622.s the shell that voted lady, contemn or honor the name of Coriolanus, your city ? gen
1623.a, live in, if "Bless me, child! what a world we should were. It is we very pleasant
1624.he feats of such ; wonderful people but one would be very sorry every day." to see
1625.. " And Fabiola laughed heartily In the same good humoi- Syra continued But suppose
1626.nd Fabiola laughed heartily In the same good humoi- Syra continued But suppose we ha
1627. that we should have to send off to the other side of the world for a Theseus, or a H
1628.ve to send off to the other side of the world for a Theseus, or a Hercules, to destro
1629.stroy case, a them? if In fact, in that man would is in be no more a hero country."
1630.ut I do not see the application of your idea." "It to is this: anger, hatred, reveng
1631.d, revenge, ambition, avarice, are ; my mind I as complete monsters as serpents or d
1632.l when I princi- ple? If so, I fear you will soar too high." "No, dear lady. You wer
1633.ured to maintain that inward and unseen virtue was as necessary as the outward and vis
1634.o not fear to tell me " Well, then, the principle of that is system which I profess this
1635.t and practise, as every-day and common virtue, nay, as simple duty, whatever any othe
1636.y-day and common virtue, nay, as simple duty, whatever any other code, the purest an
1637.rtue, nay, as simple duty, whatever any other code, the purest and sublimest that pro
1638.nd sublimest that proof of transcendent virtue." " may be, considers heroic, and That
1639.hero is is indeed a sublime standard to form, of moral elebut mark the difference be
1640. act is supported by the praises of the world : when he checks his But who sees, care
1641.en, who maketh His sun : to rise on the good and the bad, and raineth on the just an
1642.t and the unjust." Fabiola paused for a time, overawed then said affection- and resp
1643.fully " Again, Syra, you have conquered philosophy. Your wisdom is consistent as it is sub
1644.ra, you have conquered philosophy. Your wisdom is consistent as it is sublime. ately :
1645.nsistent as it is sublime. ately : my A virtue heroic, even when unseen, you propose a
1646.seen, you propose as the ordinary daily virtue of every one. Men must indeed become mo
1647.e as the ordinary daily virtue of every one. Men must indeed become more than what
1648.an what gods have been thought the very idea is to be, to attempt it ; but worth a w
1649.o be, to attempt it ; but worth a whole philosophy. ? Can you lead me higher than this " "
1650.h would you leave me ? " it "Where your peace." heart should tell you that had found
1651. had VI. DELIBERATIONS. I now been some time for rag- ing in the East under Dioclesi
1652.extermination, It had been deter- mined religion to spare no one; to descend It but cutt
1653. been deter- mined religion to spare no one; to descend It but cutting the chiefs o
1654.tient work of blood, had yielded to the opinion of his counseltill lors, that the edict
1655.taneously in every province, of the and government, The thundercloud, fraught with vengean
1656.t with vengeance, would thus hang for a time, in painful mystery, over its intended
1657. the leading ofiicers of his and of the state. The principal one, the prefect of the
1658. of his and of the state. The principal one, the prefect of the had brought with hi
1659.ntance Calpurnius, had been invited and many priests, who had come from different i^
1660.ed by them, which Maximian Herculeus in particular preferred. During the reign of Nero, th
1661.conspiracy, and of course punished with death. His immense property was seized by the
1662.as his house, described by Juvenal, and other writers, as of unusual size and magnifi
1663.ape. would be attributing to Maximian a quality which he did not possess, were we to gi
1664. a mere soldier of fortune, without any education, endowed with little moi-e than a brute
1665. to recklessvices ness, addicted to the same coarse and foul crimes, which a Christi
1666.thout restraint of any passion, without sense of justice, or feeling of humanity, thi
1667.traint of any passion, without sense of justice, or feeling of humanity, this monster h
1668. was or palace. w ensured by penalty of death. In the semicircular apse at the upper
1669.e transferred by him to the head of the religion he its all was planning to extirpate, a
1670.me, the churches of the city and of the world the mother and Little did chief."* he i
1671.oleration irritated the gods, and whose evil Nay, some had afflicted their by openly
1672.ance. i-epeated, for the ten-thousandth time, to an applauding the stories of murder
1673.ss's head, and inconsistently enough of being These tales were all most unbelievers,
1674.re all most unbelievers, and serving no God. probably their reciters knew perfectly
1675.gh tii-mly believed well, they were but good sound heathen lies, very useful in duty
1676.good sound heathen lies, very useful in duty to sit ; : keeping up a horror of Chris
1677.ristianity. But, at length, up rose the man, who was considered to have most deeply
1678. asserted Christians held any monstrous principle, had their supreme pontiff in person co
1679.ontiff in person contradicted it, every one would have laughed at the very idea of
1680.very one would have laughed at the very idea of taking his word for his own that bel
1681.s, Then Demetrius city. them of a great many curious histories shut up Moses and Aar
1682.in their if people, that came this made war upon every king and way and destroyed t
1683. and destroyed them all. It ; was their principle, ; they took a city, to put every one t
1684.ciple, ; they took a city, to put every one to the sword and was all because they w
1685.f the "these Christians are still under same priesthood, and are quite as ready to-d
1686.equently bear but a independent of tlie government of the State, divided loyalty. I hate,
1687.a independent of tlie government of the State, divided loyalty. I hate, therefore, as
1688.up my * throne, than of the election of one of these priests in * St. Rome." These
1689. the emperor said you said you had some one to propose, for superinfor merciless de
1690. think he'll do. Why, prefect, I had no idea you had such an ugly son. I : should th
1691.ink he paced, is just the thing ; every quality of a thoroughis unconscientious scape-g
1692.of ; have clean work I pay up well if I Mind you, sirrah, I must it no hacking and h
1693.for now go and remember, that your head will if your back a greater. can answer a sm
1694.ss, but with real reluctance ; much the same as if he had been invited to go very Se
1695. Maximian, though he knew not fully the cause. was not mei'ely that the tyrant own to
1696.to set you up in busi; These Christians will afford you plenty of game so make yours
1697.fore you. The property of the convicted will be divided between the accusers and the
1698. accusers and the treasury unless I see particular reasons for ; taking the w^hole to myse
1699.ow you may go." Most thought that these particular reasons would turn out be very general.
1700.n the Catacombs, m ^ * CHAPTER VIL DARK DEATH. FEW days after Fabiola's return from t
1701.ry, Sebastian considered to wait it his duty so upon her, to communicate much of the
1702.ave already observed, that of the ,,„ many noble Fabiola had met in her father's ^
1703.ul of others, blending so completely in one character nobleness and simplicity, hig
1704.haracter nobleness and simplicity, high wisdom and practical sense, he seemed to her t
1705.d simplicity, high wisdom and practical sense, he seemed to her the most finished typ
1706. to her the most finished type of manly virtue, one which would not easily suffer by t
1707.the most finished type of manly virtue, one which would not easily suffer by time,
1708.e, one which would not easily suffer by time, nor weary by familiarity. When, theref
1709.astian wished to speak to her alone, in one of the halls below, her heart beat at t
1710.iciently she was already annoyed by the many candidates for her hand, he felt regret
1711.tes for her hand, he felt regret at the idea that he was going to add another, yet u
1712. perhaps was soon depressed again, upon being told it was the vulgar and stupid Corvi
1713.t between the two dabblers in the black art, the principal ef&cacy of which, howeve
1714.ich you have unfolded so disagreeable a matter, and the tenderness with which you have
1715.ess with which you have treated every ; one concerned." " I "what if have only done
1716.e him, I should have done for any human being, — possible, from pain or danger." "T
1717.for any human being, — possible, from pain or danger." "Tour " friends, I I otherw
1718.you mean," said Fabiola, smiling; whole life would go, in works of unrecould not be
1719.in earnest, Sebastian. you saw c::^ — one who had ever hated you, and sought your
1720.uccor, him ? " Certainly I would. While God sends His sunshine and His rain equally
1721.nemies, as upon His friends, shall weak man frame another rule of justice? At these
1722.s, shall weak man frame another rule of justice? At these words Fabiola wondered; theor
1723.tly; "was it there that you learnt have one near me, who is yet, by her own choice,
1724.rceptions, who has propounded to me the same ideas; and she is an For I Asiatic." "
1725.n the abstract," remarked Fabiola; "but death would overtake us before we could half
1726.lly, conduct." " And how " better could death find us, though not surprise if us, tha
1727. surprise if us, than in thus doing our duty, even ? not to its comple- tion " For m
1728.- tion " For my part," resumed the This world I lady, is "I am of the old Epicurean p
1729.y, is "I am of the old Epicurean poet's mind. I shall a banquet, from which be ready
1730.tur* —and not it then. I wish to read life's book through, its and close calmly, o
1731.ad, smiling, and "The last page of this world's book comes but * " in the middle of t
1732.iddle of the As a sated guest." — ; ; death may happen to be written. on the next p
1733. book of a new volume, wherever ' ' But life without a last page." " I understand yo
1734." " I understand you," replied Fabiola, good-humoredly you are a brave soldier, and
1735.s such. You must be always prepared for death from a thousand casualties we seldom se
1736.y, " ; ; and stealthily, upon the weak. fate, You no doubt are full musing on sheave
1737.rom the enemy, and falling covered with honor. You it. look to the soldier's funeral
1738.trophies erected over To " I you, after death, opens its bright page the book of glor
1739. anticipating fancy. as speak of vulgar death, may come to me in common with the poor
1740.lcers nay, if you please, by the In any form let it still ; crueller inflictions of
1741.ueller inflictions of it men's I wrath. love." come comes from a hand that "And do y
1742. hand that "And do you really mean that death, so contemplated, would be welcomed by
1743. with rich conduct her to her new home, will my exulting heart be, Avhen death, unde
1744. home, will my exulting heart be, Avhen death, under whatever gates, iron on this sid
1745.nder whatever gates, iron on this side, form, throws back the but golden on the othe
1746.form, throws back the but golden on the other, which lead to a new and perennial be,
1747., which lead to a new and perennial be, life. And I care the not how grim the messen
1748.een, save through the fleshless ribs of death " "No," replied Sebastian; "for us, it
1749.her hand- who had rushed in at the cry. One glance had told her all. Her * father w
1750.tening to the details of their master's death. The desired letter of which Torquatus
1751.f obliged to stay, while his galley was being fitted up and stored with the best wine
1752.spirits at Baias, ; more. He a party of good livers anxiously awaited him his luxuri
1753.was a corpse. He had left his undivided wealth to his only child. In fine, the body wa
1754.o his only child. In fine, the body was being em- balmed when the courier his galley
1755.at left he had spoken as he had done of death, and with mournful thoughts. the house
1756. Then the buoyancy and her of youth and mind bore her up again to the surface Fabiol
1757.ain she was thus tossed up and down, of mind. view of life, to the horizon, between
1758.us tossed up and down, of mind. view of life, to the horizon, between transient deat
1759.life, to the horizon, between transient death and life, while her attendants applied
1760.he horizon, between transient death and life, while her attendants applied remedies
1761.e the hand that tried to adminisIn this state she remained long a restoratives to her
1762.turn of tears, in nursing her shattered mind and frame. Euphrosyne and Syra alone wa
1763.ne watched by her. The former had, from time to time, put in the commonplaces of hea
1764.ed by her. The former had, from time to time, put in the commonplaces of heathen rel
1765.er too, how kind a master, how honest a man, how loving a father he had been. But t
1766.ower, in this tribulation that a bright angel was riding in the dark cloud that over-
1767.as to Fabiola in a gloomy and searching form. become of her father? Whither was he g
1768.r had he been crushed into annihiHad Ms life been searched through by that unseen la
1769.t, and put away the reflection from her mind. Oh, for a ray from some unknown light,
1770.rom some unknown light, that would dart Poetry had preinto the grave, and show her wha
1771.nd even glorify it but had only, in ! ; truth, remained at the door, as a genius with
1772. drooping head, in, and torch reversed. Science had stepped and come out scared, with t
1773.overed a charnel-house. and recoil, And philosophy had barely ventured to wander round and
1774.t unsolved, the mystery or veiled. some one, better than all these, to remove the d
1775. the vision of light, clothed in mortal form, translucid and radiant, rising from th
1776. have remained the grosser qualities of matter, without impairing the essence of lovel
1777.out impairing the essence of lovely its nature. Spiritualized and free, and glorious,
1778. ancient battle done by Israel air, for God ; like crystal fountains spring- ing in
1779.ns, side by repeoples crea- and undying life. And how knows she this? Because One, g
1780.g life. And how knows she this? Because One, greater and better than poet, sage, or
1781. descended first into the dark couch of death, had blessed it, as He had done the cra
1782.joyous ; infancy sacred; rendering also death a holy thing, and place a sanctuary. it
1783. be an object of dread to the Christian soul, for it continued what he had made it,
1784.e it, the furrow into which the seed of immortality must needs be cast. The time was not co
1785. of immortality must needs be cast. The time was not come for speaking of these thin
1786. And from that day the grave ; — till other cares mercifully roused her. The and su
1787.re borne, and a huge funeral mystery of death, corpse arrived, pile, built up of arom
1788.aster urn, and placed in a niche of the family sepulchre, with the inscribed of their
1789.hospitable ity of those and industrious citizen with the false moral- men called Christ
1790.r dangerous principles into every noble family, and spi-eading disloyalty and immo- !
1791.who would ! have been sorry to exchange one goblet of Falernian for an amphora* of
1792.ther. Fabiola had to apply her vigorous mind to examine, and close her father's comp
1793. and oppression, in the transactions of one whom the world had applauded as the mos
1794.on, in the transactions of one whom the world had applauded as the most honest and li
1795. must in take our reader back a few the history after steps of Torquatus. his fall, On
1796.he of falconei', who, having got hold a good hawk, was to strike come dove all ^' to
1797.train him him, in return for a well-fed slavery. down the With the coolness of a practi
1798. practised hand, he brought back to his memory every circumstance precision of the pre
1799.every thread of last evening's web, and many more meshes : The position of Torquatus
1800.sition of Torquatus was this if he made one step towards Christianity, which Fulviu
1801.d faithful to his cruelly punished with death. compact he should want for nothing. an
1802.Fulvius; "an early walk, and fresh air, will do you good." The poor wretch consented
1803. early walk, and fresh air, will do you good." The poor wretch consented and they ha
1804.nd it, with engines of torture of every form. Torquatus shrunk back. "Come tioner. "
1805.is There no fire put on yet, and nobody will hurt It's for you, unless you happen to
1806.etty toys you have here." Catulus, with good heart, showed them round his museum of
1807.explaining every thing with such hearty good-will, and no end of jokes not quite fit
1808.ining every thing with such hearty good-will, and no end of jokes not quite fit for
1809.in a pair of sharp pincers, and another time brought down a mallet within an inch of
1810.ia, who had seen him at church. After a good refection, he was led to a gambling-hal
1811.s left free, lest he should his through being suspected by Christians. to Corvinus ha
1812. Callistus ment. When that place in his soul, of Catulus was in fulfilment of his en
1813.lfilment of his engagebetween grace and sin took which Severus noticed, it was the
1814.nd leading Rome. Once possessed of this knowledge, he was sure no disguise would conceal
1815.yes; and he would easily pick them uj), one by Christians, of one. He therefore ins
1816.ly pick them uj), one by Christians, of one. He therefore insisted upon Torquatus's
1817. an excellent opportunity at the coming many priests every remonstrance, dispelled e
1818. IN DECEMBER. HOEVER fact, has read the history of the early the Popes, will have becom
1819.ead the history of the early the Popes, will have become familiar with recorded almo
1820.onth of December, wherein he created so many priests, for and deacons, and places. t
1821.sts, for and deacons, and places. to so many clergy bishops different The supply fir
1822.evidently times, to furnish pastors for other in dioceses. In later the ember-days De
1823. and preconized, as it all parts of the world. And, though this function is not tion,
1824.f ordina- continued essentially for the same purpose. Marcellinus, under whose ponti
1825.f course, in different years. It was to one of these we have alluded, as about to t
1826.And we cannot but think that the answer will be interesting to the Christian antiqua
1827. not only bishops but martyrs to govern other churches, and gave to a St. Laurence hi
1828. national or personal prepossession, we will be no ignoble spot. follow a learned li
1829.iorum, because in lived the illustrious family The centurion whom St. Peter converted
1830. St. Peter converted t belonged to this family; and possibly to him the apostle owed h
1831.te, and die for, the faith of After the death of Pudens, the house became the Christ.
1832.oken of. ! \ most ancient church in the world," * that marks at once the Vicus Patric
1833.s, and the house of Pudens. As in every other city, so in Rome, the eucharistic sacri
1834. communion was brought to them from the one It was altar by the deacons, and distri
1835.ts. fice was offered originally in only one place, after And even Pope Evaristus, t
1836.e of "title." The connection two acts ; will be apparent to any one looking at Genes
1837.tion two acts ; will be apparent to any one looking at Genesis xxviii. where, after
1838.e How terrible is this place This is no other than the house of God, and the gate of
1839.lace This is no other than the house of God, and the gate of heaven. And Jacob set
1840.s truly, to the Christian, the house of God and the stone altar, set up in it, was
1841., as is done to this day (for the whole law of Evaristus remains in full force) and
1842.s became a title, or monument.! ; ; Two One is, interesting facts are elicited from
1843.rrative. raised, that this that to that time there was only one church with an altar
1844.t this that to that time there was only one church with an altar in * . Rome ; and
1845.me till of Pudentiana. Another that the one altar then altar existing Avas not of s
1846.forms the We further conclude, that the law was not and that the wooden altar of th
1847. it had been first erected, though from time to time it might be carried, and used e
1848.been first erected, though from time to time it might be carried, and used elsehigh
1849.The pontificate of St. Pius L, from its history, for forms an interesting period in 142
1850.s Pastoris, the designation, for a long time, of the cardi- nalate attached to the c
1851.esting conclusions respecting Christian time, Secondly, in this pontificate worship
1852.es, "that is It not so." we all meet in one But when interrogated where he and wher
1853.e come answered, to Home for the second time, nor do I place but the one have mentio
1854.the second time, nor do I place but the one have mentioned." Ave have said that Ful
1855.aid that Fulvius and Corvinus met early one morning. ISTovatus and Timotheus were t
1856.n and the Timotine, as they passed from one brother to family, Timothean baths were
1857.ine, as they passed from one brother to family, Timothean baths were part of and are t
1858.part of and are those at which know any other The Timotine or the house of the Pudens
1859., lived on this spot, and, as in lie no other Borne, attended divine worship there. i
1860.e to as for guests, all who, want." "in one word, undertakes provide in This could
1861. undertakes provide in This could be no other than the bishop or pope himself. We mus
1862. HiKTup, 34. The Greek word used is the same as in St. Justin. arm Stephen family, (
1863. the same as in St. Justin. arm Stephen family, (a.d. 257) baptized the tribune Nemesi
1864.tized the tribune Nemesius and his with many others, in the title of Pastor.* And he
1865.h vessels of the Church to the poor. In time this place of St. is name has ; given w
1866. exist, that the But the church the the same and no doubt can for Pudentiana was, th
1867.e ologies, find either in in sepulchral history, inscriptions, in martyrof all or eccle
1868.interesting reader, and of Exorcist. We will one example of each. Of a Lector: CINNA
1869.esting reader, and of Exorcist. We will one example of each. Of a Lector: CINNAMIVS
1870.dral), nor at St. Peter's, where the at one of which it would naturally be expected
1871.'s. (now SS. Nereus and and Interred in peace the tenth day before the calends of Mar
1872. A sarily difference was, however, that one order was not neces- a passage, or step
1873.step, to another; but persons remained, life, often for in one of these lesser order
1874.ut persons remained, life, often for in one of these lesser orders. There was not,
1875. Of these Fulvius impressed well in his mind the features and figure and still more
1876.t of Rome, there assembled. eye, But on one, more than the rest, he fixed his pierc
1877.required, and which he exhibited in his death for Christ. In those days every outward
1878.tirs abroad, disguised may choose, that man is my prize. And I know his worth." * I
1879.%i£^K^, Our Saviour represented as the Good Shepherd, with a Milk-can at his side,
1880. u ® CHAPTER THE PRIE IVN XI. VIRGINS. law, was the one at which such dedication v
1881. THE PRIE IVN XI. VIRGINS. law, was the one at which such dedication veil to God wa
1882.he one at which such dedication veil to God was virginity per- mitted by the Church
1883.e Church permitted the anticipation, by many years, of that period, and fortified th
1884.thed themselves to the spouses forever, death. was no wonder that they, who in their
1885.who in their Lamb, as His chaste should desire to come to His nuptials before it lily,
1886.the palm, should this be their portion. state. Agnes had from her infancy chosen for
1887.for herself this holiest The superhuman wisdom which had ever exhibited itself in her
1888.ming more than usual relaxation of that law of more than ten years in the Another p
1889.in ful- which prescribed a delay of her desire. petition. this We may easily imagine t
1890. must be It entirely left in her hands. prudence and grace wdth which was evidently pros
1891.em. Syra as a dependant, and Agnes as a relation, had put on mourning upon Fabius's deat
1892.tion, had put on mourning upon Fabius's death and hence no change of habit would rais
1893.urning upon Fabius's death and hence no change of habit would raise suspicion in his d
1894.n Fabius's death and hence no change of habit would raise suspicion in his daughter's
1895.would raise suspicion in his daughter's mind, of their having taken some secret, or
1896. was only a day or two before the happy one of their spiritual nuptials, that Syra
1897.nding to be displeased, to keep all the good things to yourself. ? Do you that chari
1898.eplied Syra, laughing. be dressed Never mind about the seeing. But tell me, how wall
1899.ra gave her an exact description of the habit and veil, and form. very interesting "
1900. description of the habit and veil, and form. very interesting " she said. ! their c
1901. you curiosity, described to do?" The " other, amused at her unwonted minutely the sh
1902.nutely the short ceremonial. Well now^, one question more," resumed the blind girl.
1903. title said I might come, must know the time and Syra told her it place." of Pastor,
1904.e choose to should not have I Never you mind," replied of have secrets from me, do n
1905. of Agnes, in the hospital of which the good priest Dyonisius lived. She found him a
1906.ve in community before this period, yet many continued to reside at home; and persed
1907. place in and they often met apart, for particular instruction and devotions. The bishop t
1908.Incarnate Word chose host, that follows same chaste path to heaven for His own Mothe
1909.n the superiority of virginity to every other state and he feelingly described the ha
1910.superiority of virginity to every other state and he feelingly described the happines
1911.er state and he feelingly described the happiness of having no love on earth but one, whi
1912.ly described the happiness of having no love on earth but one, which instead of fadi
1913.appiness of having no love on earth but one, which instead of fading, opens out int
1914.which instead of fading, opens out into immortality, For bliss, he observed, is but the exp
1915.expanded flower in heaven. which Divine love bears on earth. * "Jesus the virgin's c
1916.tion of the candi- dates for this great honor, the holy Pontiff proceeded to bless th
1917.ng at the foot of the was motionless in one of her radiant raptures, gazing fixedly
1918.f consecration to Jesus Christ, my only love on earth, under ; the care of these two
1919.or blind Cecilia. When she heard of the happiness that awaited Syra, she had flown, as we
1920.ret. The blessings were spoken, and the habit and veil put on when they asked her if
1921.t a poor girl, and do you think my Lord will be offended, if I ask Him to crown me,
1922.reaths from their heads, to put on hers sign from the Pontiff checked eyes, she but
1923.ways taught, that the very queenship of virtue is innocence crowned by penance. The An
1924. everything in breathed contentment and happiness. one of those genial days which a Roman
1925. in breathed contentment and happiness. one of those genial days which a Roman wint
1926.was December. living seemed to know and love the gentle mistress of the place. The d
1927.s which she brought theai, with evident pleasure; but none owned her kindly sway so niuc
1928.e three spoke together of the morning's happiness, and of the happier morning of which it
1929.med to hold all its splendor within her soul, she saw at once, in the scene, the ver
1930. parents, or villa, that, for the first time, she had gone withany male attendants,
1931.hany male attendants, to her suburban a good opportunity for pressing his suit. he c
1932.espectful, but freer air than usual, as one already assured of his request. "I have
1933.eed, and bright it Agnes, borne back in mind to the morning's scene has been to me,"
1934. me," replied " and no ; sun in 07ie my life has ever given me fairer, — it can on
1935. doubt you mean, of your espousals with one who may have won your heart." "That is
1936.nticipation of this is happy hour?" the sign I my beloved has placed upon my counten
1937. but himself."* And who I is this happy being ? I was not without hopes, have a place
1938. not without hopes, have a place in nor will renounce them yet, that I your thoughts
1939., She feared no danger, for she knew no sin." Her less ; childlike countenance rema
1940.am," he said, " you are trifling I with one who sincerely authority, admires and lo
1941. intrust myself with undivided devotion one whose love is chaste, whose caress is p
1942.yself with undivided devotion one whose love is chaste, whose caress is pure, whose
1943.d that dare to utter with is name is of one whose honor untarnished, and whose virt
1944.e to utter with is name is of one whose honor untarnished, and whose virtue as unchal
1945. one whose honor untarnished, and whose virtue as unchal- lenged as his courage?" He t
1946.d whose virtue as unchal- lenged as his courage?" He turned round, and stood confronted
1947.alked for would now probably self. some time about the garden, thought she find her
1948.imperious mistress in another's house?" One," replied the lady, first " who, by all
1949.ur in child, feels herself bound W6 : ; honor and duty to thwart them, and to shield
1950.d, feels herself bound W6 : ; honor and duty to thwart them, and to shield her from
1951.III. EDICT. for its publica- HE ,-^ day being at length arrived tion in of the Rome,
1952. down a simi- and had manfully suffered death for his boldness. Corvinus was determin
1953.rmly supported by a pillar, of much the same cunning precaution as was taken by the
1954.ers to pierce through, or hew down, any one who should attempt to pass without the
1955.king use of it that night, if he should chance to discover it, the cunning Corvinus ha
1956.o discover it, the cunning Corvinus had one chosen which he felt sure no Christian
1957.ctions; and most edict. minutely to the one This whom chosen he had placed close to
1958.osen he had placed close to the for his man had been character. post on account of
1959.y, tions, how he was but to prevent any one's interference with the sacred edict. H
1960.pid with sahaia or beer,* in the merest animal consciousness, that * " Est autem sabai
1961. it was his business, not an unpleasant one, to spear, or sabre, some one or other
1962.npleasant one, to spear, or sabre, some one or other before morning. The night was
1963.nt one, to spear, or sabre, some one or other before morning. The night was raw and a
1964. were at play, but how soon it would be time to cut the present emperor's throat, an
1965.. " Come in, my noble young masters how good of you thus sons were in their poor hou
1966.reparations for their frugal meal. ; to honor ; my if poor dwelling ! I hardly dare o
1967.re oifer you our plain it, fare but you will partake of you will indeed give us a Ch
1968.in it, fare but you will partake of you will indeed give us a Christian love-feast."
1969. of you will indeed give us a Christian love-feast." " Thank you most I kindly, fath
1970.ad to eat something. In the meanfor us. time one of your youths can go out and cater
1971. eat something. In the meanfor us. time one of your youths can go out and cater Com
1972. and cater Come, we must have something good self ; and I want you to cheer your- wi
1973.wine." Saying this he gave his purse to one of the sons, with instructions to bring
1974.sions than he knew ed. Lips. the simple family usually enjoyed. Ammian. They lib. sat
1975. way of saying something, addressed the man. " Good Diogenes, I have heard Sebastia
1976. saying something, addressed the man. " Good Diogenes, I have heard Sebastian say th
1977.ng about him." happened,* and as I With pleasure," answered the old man. " It is I forty
1978.d as I With pleasure," answered the old man. " It is I forty-five years since it th
1979.e venerable Pontiff Sixtus was going to death, and Laurentius met him, and so tenderl
1980.lices, and patens, t besides an immense quantity of silver melted down, and distributed
1981. spectacle I have ever beheld in all my life. But to look into his countenance was t
1982.not think that I could stand what he as God pleases ! did ; for he was indeed a nob
1983. boy," exclaimed the centurion, full of emotion, glistening eyes, having risen from his
1984.as shouldei-s. He has already given you courage. must not is forget our night's work. y
1985.rk. you But we Wrap yourself well up in will " God give your cloak, and bring your t
1986. But we Wrap yourself well up in will " God give your cloak, and bring your toga qu
1987. and bitter night. fire, ; so ! It Now, good Diogenes, put more and just leave the d
1988.put more and just leave the door ajar." man, " and God speed I wood on the and let
1989.d just leave the door ajar." man, " and God speed I wood on the and let us find sup
1990.the well-known salutation of "thanks if God;" and Sebastian entered, of inquired an
1991. fire. a faggot over There it frizzled, one letter praise, to keep it down, and dro
1992.proclaiming that there no true Lord but one stronger than Caesars, the Lord of lord
1993.nd that neither counsel nor strength of man shall prevail against Him. he gazed abs
1994.ecause it contained blasphemies against God and His holiest truths. They knew that
1995. dom, made no calculation on that head. Death for for martyrChrist, whether quick and
1996.or a sword might strike them, whether a death-blow would at once stun them out of exi
1997.ators of this deed. lidiculous side, In truth, it had its and he was inclined to laug
1998.i'ised, a kindness, in reason for their being there might be apparent, partly to keep
1999.y to their meal for it the hour for the good old fervent times, calling them. as Pan
2000. Forum in seeking his own abode. If any one had seen Pancratius that night, when al
2001.ian went to his side, and for the first time conand after looking at it for some mom
2002.te right." sir, Come, this is no joking matter. Tell me, at once, who came here last n
2003.at Well, tell and what they did." "Why, one of them was but a stripling, a boy, tal
2004.hat you miss, while I was busy with the other." " And what of him ? What was he like
2005.emembered that I had to run through any one that came if it near me " "Exactly," in
2006.uld have performed that It is not every one feat. But pray, sirrah, why did you not
2007.d you not give the alarm, and rouse the other guards to pursuit?" " First, Master Kor
2008.weiner, because, in my country, to I we will fight any living men, but we do not cho
2009.Corvinus, but well within This business will go hard with you his teeth then added i
2010. offence." w "What " is?" to let a Why, man come up and speak ; to you, without giv
2011.ged Roman. Nomen or Numen, it's all the same, I suppose. A letter make any differenc
2012. call myself Hermann, and they mean the same. How should / know your nice points of
2013.. How should / know your nice points of language? " Corvinus was enraged at himself; for
2014.gained his ends, intelligent foreigner. will by putting a sharp, sottish, prsetorian
2015.putting a sharp, sottish, prsetorian on duty, instead of a said, for all this savage
2016.s turned pale, for he knew this was the same boat." "And you must contrive something
2017.fe, which he was sure he had seen at of one of his companions. He treasured up, as
2018.there uproar. But when they found was a universal the spirit of the Some admired so Chris
2019.ic fashionable resort occupied with the same theme. In the great Antoit nian Thermag
2020. affair this is, about the edict " said one. ! Say emperors " rather, " what a trea
2021.h would have sufficed each bv itself to cause death ? " : ^:l "No, that is quite a fa
2022.d have sufficed each bv itself to cause death ? " : ^:l "No, that is quite a false re
2023.women came up it who drove his lance at one, and passed clean through her, and stuc
2024.ugh her, and stuck in the ground on the other side, without making any wound in her.
2025.any wound in her. He then hacked at the other with his sword, but he might as well ha
2026.he had been brought down." "Wonderful!" many exclaimed. " ! "What extraordinary peop
2027. answer these questions. I learnt more, one day after dinner, it," "I don't believe
2028.c about these Christians from you, than life I had heard in all my before. What so a
2029.d in all my before. What so a wonderful memory you must have, to remember or accuratel
2030. Is barbarous people! the genealogy and history of that what Scaurus has just told us p
2031.. To prepare a powder that would make a man fly in the air, it would be only necess
2032.edominates more than "There for the the other three elements. lentils, Such for insta
2033., or according to Pythagoras. is These, being gathered when even with the sun in Libr
2034.ed when even with the sun in Libra, the nature of in which is to balance heavy things
2035.deed, that the Thessalian witches go at pleasure through the clouds, from place to place
2036.h charm. Then, as to the Christians you will remember, excellent Proculus, that in t
2037.e account to which you have done me the honor to allude, which was at the deified Fab
2038.aring on this of ; uiatter, recorded in history. It is quite certain, that here in Rome
2039.as sometimes called Simon Peter, and at other times Simon Magus, actually in public f
2040.have most extraordinary They power over nature. Thus, for example, they think they can
2041.red lives, that they have only to go to one of those priests, own the crime, and as
2042."is incompatible with the safety of the state. A man who thinks he can be pardoned by
2043.patible with the safety of the state. A man who thinks he can be pardoned by anothe
2044.ho thinks he can be pardoned by another man of every ciime, is capable of conniiitt
2045.t, no doubt," observed Fulvius, "is the cause of them. After new and terrible edict a
2046.But even " so, I would gladly give them one chance of escape." is "And what who tha
2047.even " so, I would gladly give them one chance of escape." is "And what who that? " sn
2048. Fulvius. to join in destroying That no one should be allowed them, I could not pro
2049.eer from crime than they. would have no one raise his hand against them, who cannot
2050.ld, a profligate, or a thief. Foi- with being any of these, no one charges the poor C
2051.thief. Foi- with being any of these, no one charges the poor Christians."* Fulvius
2052.conversion of this great how long? What many to the truth, empire, so long as we fin
2053.f this great how long? What many to the truth, empire, so long as we find even honest
2054. sweet voice answered him at his side: "Good youth, whoever thou art that speakest t
2055. at his side: "Good youth, whoever thou art that speakest thus, and methinks I know
2056.hy voice, remem- He ber that the Son of God gave light to the dark eye of the body,
2057.if by spreading thereon clay; which, in man's hands, would have Let us be as dust b
2058.thely. But Sebastian begged her to stay one moment. gram of Christ, found in the Ca
2059.s of the night, our youths had not much time for rest. Long before daybreak the Chri
2060.rivately in the morning, "before taking other food," as TertuUian expresses it.t The
2061.pons, their food, their strength, their courage, were all to be found in their Lord's t
2062. the lukewarm and the timid gathered of life. fresh spirit from the bread In churche
2063. seen in the cemeteries, is * There was one cemetery city. lib. ii. ad sextum Phili
2064.n preparing their flocks earth. for, to many, their last public communion on office
2065.hen per- formed was essentially, and in many details, the same as they daily witness
2066.s essentially, and in many details, the same as they daily witness at the Catholic a
2067.onsecration, the com- munion alike, but many of the prayers that the Catholic hearin
2068.st reciting them, in the still more the same language as the Koman Church of the Cat
2069.citing them, in the still more the same language as the Koman Church of the Catacombs sp
2070. came it the occasion which we when the time for giving the kiss of peace brotherly
2071.we when the time for giving the kiss of peace brotherly love —sobs till —a genuin
2072. for giving the kiss of peace brotherly love —sobs till —a genuine embrace of ;
2073.be heard and bursts of tears for was to many a parting salutation. Many a youth clun
2074.s for was to many a parting salutation. Many a youth clung to his father's neck, sca
2075.ld mothers press their daughters to new love which fear of long Then came the commun
2076.m the sacred food. as Then of faith and love. receiver, with thrilling accents ovari
2077.eived in it a provision of the Bread of Life, sufficient to last him till some futur
2078.locket.* It was now that, for the first time, poor Syra regretted the loss of her ri
2079.r some years' disuse, had been put into good repair and order by the fossores, had b
2080. torn. i. fig. 11) cia confirms this by many arguments {ChristiaiKB Eccl. Politia, t
2081. he said to himself, " act the warren I will be the sportsman outside." In the meant
2082.e, had pro- ceeded, according to almost universal custom, to the baths, to invigorate his
2083.- ceeded, according to almost universal custom, to the baths, to invigorate his limbs
2084.ll where the events of the morning were being discussed, and where Fulvius was waitin
2085. girl, attention, fleeter who would not same he stopped it, her, gave her the note,
2086.mation that Corvinus and his troop were time hastening across the fields, so as to a
2087.astor. to all be betrayed to Torquatus. principle comcall In this the Christian congi-ega
2088. which we have before described, placed one on each side of a gallery or passage, s
2089. or rather wide entrances, are opposite one another. At the end of one will be foun
2090.are opposite one another. At the end of one will be found an rfcHb w arcosolmm or a
2091.opposite one another. At the end of one will be found an rfcHb w arcosolmm or altar-
2092. men, under charge of the ostiarii* the other the women, under the care of and in the
2093.the sexes at divine worship was these a matter of jealous discipline in the early Chur
2094.t parts or ornamented the entrances. In one instance, indeed in the chief basilica
2095.ebastian sent his message, was like the one discovered in the cemetery of St. Agnes
2096.e women, with a pilasters in the men's, one of these sur- faces having in a small n
2097.tery. is is about the size of half each other division, from which lesser height, aft
2098.e found in the churches built after the peace, and yet to be seen in ancient basilica
2099. made their arrangements. Fulvius, with one body of ten or twelve men, lurked to gu
2100.a soldier, and not a rat-catcher. me my man to hand, into the light of day, foot to
2101. the light of day, foot to foot ; and I will fight him hand and but I have no love s
2102.I will fight him hand and but I have no love soldiers. for being stifled or poisoned
2103.nd and but I have no love soldiers. for being stifled or poisoned, like vermin in a d
2104.in." the This speech found favor with " One said, There may be hundreds little is o
2105.ng into the gloomy length Hush ! " said one, " listen to that voice ! An Altar with
2106.oices, singing, like the sound " ; * of many waters "Dum meas; appropriant super me
2107.it out of a thousand. It is that It the cause of all last night's curse and this day'
2108.for him, dead or alive But, stop," said one, " let us light our torches." " Hark !
2109.at a distance? I have heard it for some time." "And, look!" added a third; "the dist
2110. fear ? The Lord ?" the protector of my life of whom shall I he afraid " While the w
2111.ad ; near which his brother and several other stout workmen were stationed, in In a m
2112.nd the threats of violence which " Stay one were showered upon him, for a fool or a
2113.markable tomb a few^ yards within it; I will just step into one or two of the last c
2114. yards within it; I will just step into one or two of the last corridors, and see."
2115.o have vanished at ; once. " either "We will have no more of this work," they said;
2116.lazing torches into the side galleries, one here and one there, as they passed by,
2117.s into the side galleries, one here and one there, as they passed by, to get rid of
2118.erved to shed bright- monuments of that virtue which had never save the Church. But la
2119.thed in a dark dress, so as to resemble one of those bronze statues, which have the
2120.xtremities of white marble, and startle one, when first seen so like are they to ;
2121.e ? What is it ? " the men whispered to one another. " A sorceress," replied one. ^
2122.to one another. " A sorceress," replied one. ^ " " The genius loci,''^ * observed a
2123." Bring her along," he commanded ; some one at least shall pay for our disappointme
2124.an genius of the place. The Cure of the Man born Blind, from a picture in the Catac
2125. worthier seize you." "No may save much matter," she answered, laughing; lives. "my be
2126.er," she answered, laughing; lives. "my being taken Give me a lamp, Pancratius." "Why
2127.t annoyed no doubt whatever, in his own mind, that he had been duped by his supposed
2128.duped by his supposed victim, who had : many ways as the Dacian guard's adventure hi
2129. sternly, Look at me, woman, and me the truth." " I must tell you the truth without l
2130.nd me the truth." " I must tell you the truth without looking at you, sir," answered
2131.ius there passed the slightest possible emotion, just as much as the wave that runs, pu
2132.playful breeze, over the ripe meadow. A knowledge had flashed into his mind, a clue had f
2133.eadow. A knowledge had flashed into his mind, a clue had fallen into his hand. "It w
2134.d, a clue had fallen into his hand. "It will be ridiculous," he said, "for twenty so
2135.nd girl. Keturn to your quarters, and I will see you are well rewarded. You, Corvinu
2136.ore to your father, and tell him all, I will follow in a carriage with the captive."
2137.vius," he said, vexed and mortified. ^ "Mind you sacrifice." bring her. The day must
2138.eed, was pondering whether, having lost one But the placid he should not try to mak
2139." how long have you been blind?" " " my life," she replied. ? What is your history h
2140." my life," she replied. ? What is your history history. I Whence do you come ? " My pa
2141.e," she replied. ? What is your history history. I Whence do you come ? " My parents we
2142.pray, in discharge of a vow made for my life in early sickness, to They left me in t
2143.to their devotions. memorable day, when many Christians were buried at their tomb, b
2144.nts " I have no me to Rome when had the happiness to be of the number." " And how have yo
2145.r." " And how have you lived since ? " "God became my only Father then, and His Cat
2146. and His Catholic Church my mother. The one feeds the birds of the air, the I have
2147.rds of the air, the I have never wanted other nurses the weaklings of the flock. for
2148.ve seen vou. Do you remember very early one morning in the autumn, leading a poor l
2149.leading a poor laine Vieus Patricius? " man along the She blushed and remained alms
2150. he have seen her put into the poor old man's purse her own " share of the Tou have
2151.fore the judge of earth, I suppose, who will send me to my Spouse in heaven." "And s
2152.ise; for he could see no token from the soul to the countenance, but a smile. "So jo
2153.e ^milian basilica, and left her to her fate. It had been a cold and drizzling day l
2154.t of spectators came in, and stood near one of the side-doors, from which they of a
2155. wdth him ; ened heavy penalties on any one who should presume the silence. It and
2156.s calculated. pi'efect " ? Cecilia knew one else was there, as the " thus kindly ad
2157. noble I name ; hast thou ; it from thy family ? " No ; am not noble except because I
2158.who have kept thee only poor and blind. Honor the decrees of the divine emperors, and
2159.halt have riches, and fine clothes, and good fare; and the best physicians shall try
2160. ; better motives to propose to me than God and for the very things for which I mos
2161.dost thou mean? " not daintily "I thank God that I because by ; am all poor and mea
2162.eady? at least thou canst not thank thy God that He has made thee sightless." * Bli
2163.ever to have ? seen the face of a human being, or the sun, or the earth ? strange fan
2164.n me as with a countenance of intensest beauty, and smiles upon me ever. And I know it
2165. And I know it to be that of Him whom I love with undivided affection. I would not b
2166.n, nor the diversities of aside see the world have its splendor dimmed wondrous lovel
2167. it drawn for its by earthly visions. I love Him too much not to wish to Him always
2168.rs at once, or I must try what a little pain That will soon tame thee." will do. " P
2169., or I must try what a little pain That will soon tame thee." will do. " Pain? " she
2170. little pain That will soon tame thee." will do. " Pain? " she echoed innocently. Ha
2171.n That will soon tame thee." will do. " Pain? " she echoed innocently. Hast thou nev
2172.ou never felt it? hast thou never "Yes, pain. " been hurt by any one in thy life? "
2173.ou never "Yes, pain. " been hurt by any one in thy life? " Oh, no Christians never
2174.es, pain. " been hurt by any one in thy life? " Oh, no Christians never hurt one ano
2175.hy life? " Oh, no Christians never hurt one another." The rack was standing, as usu
2176.ing, as usual, before him and he made a sign to Catulus to place her upon it. The ex
2177.all this; she knew not but might be the same person who had been conversing with her
2178. sterner voice. "ISTeither torments nor death," firmly replied the victim tied to the
2179.e altar, " shall separate I me from the love of Christ. : can offer up no is sacrifi
2180.can offer up no is sacrifice but to the one living God and its ready oblation mysel
2181.p no is sacrifice but to the one living God and its ready oblation myself." signal
2182.he prefect made a lasses of and he gave one I'apid whirl to the two wheels of the r
2183.ruly, sufficed to inflict all a racking pain, through this, her frame. an excruciati
2184. inflicts. from the preparation and the cause of suffering being and from that additi
2185. preparation and the cause of suffering being and from that additional A which darkne
2186.ice; tliat Thou hast made me I I suffer pain the ; first time for Thy sake. fort sti
2187.ast made me I I suffer pain the ; first time for Thy sake. fort still ; have loved T
2188.y sake. fort still ; have loved Thee in peace in joy, I have loved Thee in comin pain
2189.eace in joy, I have loved Thee in comin pain I love have loved Thee — and now it i
2190. joy, I have loved Thee in comin pain I love have loved Thee — and now it is Thee
2191.resting upon the hard couch at the poor man's table " "Thou triflest with me," excl
2192.ed, " and makest light of my lenity. We will try some- thing stronger. sides." * Her
2193. body distended for the apf)lication of other tortures. This of fire was one of the m
2194.ion of other tortures. This of fire was one of the most common. ; UXr % : : A thril
2195.e out from all sides of the hall. first time, Cgecilia, for learnt that she was in t
2196. ever true and and torture for Thee but pain Let me faithful to Thee Let me come to
2197.e you about, fumbling all day with that duty, sirrah ! torch ? " The executioner adv
2198.ead ! " cried out Tertullus " dead with one turn of the wheel? impossible!" Catulus
2199.e's welcoming embrace. Had she breathed soul, as a sweet perfume, in the incense of
2200.-uit first virginal blush * ? There are many instances in the lives of martyrs of th
2201.in the lives of martyrs of their deaths being the of prayer, as in St. Praxedes, St.
2202. "Impious or tyrant, dost thou not see, life that a poor blind Christian hath more p
2203.tian hath more power over masters?" and death, than thou thy cruel "What! dare to a t
2204.n thou thy cruel "What! dare to a third time in twenty -four hours wilt thou not cro
2205.ours wilt thou not cross my path ? This time thou shalt escape." These were Corvinus
2206., be gone holding him fast. "Let me Who will loose, I say, or " ? he will be gone."
2207.Let me Who will loose, I say, or " ? he will be gone." Pancratius," answered Corvinu
2208.er, oned to Catulus, who understood the sign, and stretched out his hand to receive
2209. prefect Humbly waiting your divinity's pleasure outside, and for anxious to propitiate
2210. he was rather taken with the last, " I will This was a good symptom. be merciful to
2211.aken with the last, " I will This was a good symptom. be merciful to you. Lictors, b
2212.xclaimed edges. he said at : " Spare my life ; I have important information to furni
2213.ximian. enough for wants your worthless life?" responded the gentle "Lictors, put as
2214.tors, put aside your axes; the rods are good him." his In a moment hands were seized
2215.zed him and brought him to " "Who was A justice ? " I " Twice this day he has been almo
2216. me." " Then let him not escape a third time, or you may have ; to take his place. B
2217.Christian superstition, " has told me." time with Chro- And pray who is this Torquat
2218.d pray who is this Torquatus ? " "He is one who has been staying some " matins and
2219.me a Christian ? " "Tes, and lives with many others of that sect in Cam" pania." Wha
2220.at treachery I shall not know whom some one immediately to arrest ! these men, and
2221.care?" replied the emperor peevishly as many well ; as you can, and spare no one, an
2222.as many well ; as you can, and spare no one, and make all them smart it is do you u
2223.ou understand supper." me ? Now begone, time for my Corvinus went tions, home ; and,
2224.Campania, that so he might retrieve his honor, gratify his revenge, and escape the di
2225., to to the barren recital, " " The old man listened with imperturbable sternness a
2226.ius." No immediate profit, indeed but a good prospect in ; view, at least." "How "Wh
2227.he second alternative," said tlie old ; man, with a " it is the keen glow in his ey
2228. it is the keen glow in his eye, but no change of face shorter, and less troublesome,
2229.er, and less troublesome, way." "But my honor is engaged; I cannot allow myself to be
2230.ance. and that is calls for You have no time to lose, remember, in foolery. in. Your
2231. you would prefer my trying to get this wealth by honorable," (Eurotas smiled at the i
2232.h by honorable," (Eurotas smiled at the idea coming into either of their minds) " ra
2233.nd the You know our compact. Either the family is speediest. restored to wealth and sp
2234.er the family is speediest. restored to wealth and splendor, or it ends in and with yo
2235.and writhing in all his body. " Give me time enough, and all will " I be well." give
2236.is body. " Give me time enough, and all will " I be well." give you time, till all i
2237.gh, and all will " I be well." give you time, till all is hopeless. it Things do not
2238. all is hopeless. it Things do not look time that I tell bright at present. But, Ful
2239.rother, Fulvius, and am the head of the family. I have had but one thought, but one ai
2240. the head of the family. I have had but one thought, but one aim the i-estoring of
2241.family. I have had but one thought, but one aim the i-estoring of our house to that
2242. father's negligence and prodigality in life, brought it down. Thinking that your fa
2243.m and gains to him upon certain terms ; one of which was your guardianship, and the
2244.ship, and the exclusive forming of your mind. You know how Fulvius, I have trained y
2245.ring of both their hearts. The dark old man eyes more intently than ever, and went
2246.ed in your hands the divided remnant of family wealth." Fulvius covered his face with
2247.our hands the divided remnant of family wealth." Fulvius covered his face with his han
2248. ; for me " ! "Well, then," resumed the other, unmoved as ever, " I will Eemember, ne
2249.resumed the other, unmoved as ever, " I will Eemember, nephew, that he who does not
2250.at prepared it by crime. For the future will one day be the past. Let our compact, t
2251.epared it by crime. For the future will one day be the past. Let our compact, there
2252.honest, for there is an honesty even in sin. JSTature has given you abundance of se
2253.d applying them. Our lot is cast by the same throw, we become rich, or die, together
2254. heart than ever; for a dark, impending fate never failed to weigh upon his soul eve
2255.ing fate never failed to weigh upon his soul every returning night. The reader will
2256. soul every returning night. The reader will peihaps be curious to know what has bec
2257. after his companions had retired. some time was so confused that he knew not where
2258. degrees he to feel serious alarm. out, One after the other his lights and his vigo
2259. feel serious alarm. out, One after the other his lights and his vigor began to fail,
2260.and he found himself coming back to the same spot, after he had wandered about appar
2261.elief weaker, these solemn monuments of death began to speak to his soul, in a langua
2262.onuments of death began to speak to his soul, in a language that it could not refuse
2263. death began to speak to his soul, in a language that it could not refuse to hear, nor p
2264.pretend to misunderstand. "Deposited in peace," was the inmate of one; "resting in Ch
2265."Deposited in peace," was the inmate of one; "resting in Christ" was another; and e
2266.; they? pieces; but would he be laid in peace, by pious hands, as On the cold ground,
2267.earth's joys, so anxious was he to have one more look at things without, lest he sh
2268.this were the charm which bound his it. life, and must expire with And soon the last
2269.nely, and closed for ever. What else is death Death had to be folwas coming. The worm
2270.and closed for ever. What else is death Death had to be folwas coming. The worm was b
2271.itself round his heart. it could not be death as yet. else. lowed by something But ev
2272. faint glimmer of light appeared at the same : ; distance as the sounds; clearly hea
2273. four who cloth, carried between them a form wrapped up in a white linen with a crow
2274. sorrowful countenances, and Reparatus, many figures others, closed the procession.
2275.whom he could distinguish Sebastian, As many bore lamps or tapers, the seemed to mov
2276.that a pictPs. Ps. iv. 9. v. 10. * " In peace, in the selfsame, I will sleep f will r
2277.v. 10. * " In peace, in the selfsame, I will sleep f will rest." in hope. For Thou,
2278. peace, in the selfsame, I will sleep f will rest." in hope. For Thou, Lord, singula
2279.ingularly hast placed me : : ure of the Good Shepherd looked brightly breast and pra
2280.body had been laid upon the ground, and other psalms and hymns were sung, and prayers
2281. which the Church has always treated of death. At length it was placed While this was
2282.he tomb prepared for it, under an arch. being done, Torquatus drew nigh to one of the
2283.rch. being done, Torquatus drew nigh to one of the spectators, and whisi^ered to hi
2284.fell into the hands cemetery, and whose soul God took to who Himself." Then I am her
2285.into the hands cemetery, and whose soul God took to who Himself." Then I am her mur
2286.he holy bishop's feet, fell It was some time before his feelings prostrate before hi
2287.ng, "Welcome back, my son, whoever thou art, to But thou art weak and faint, and th
2288., my son, whoever thou art, to But thou art weak and faint, and thy Father's house.
2289.'s crimes for it was the evening of the same day. return, All rejoiced at the prodig
2290.penitentiary system of the early Church will be better described in any of the secon
2291. of the second period of ecclesiastical history, It is well volume that embodies the an
2292.prisoned for the faith. cures the Blind Man, from a picture m the Cemetery of St. D
2293. with Marcellinus about his safety. His life was too val- uable to the Church to be
2294.ontiff where no authoritatively called. one could suspect him to be, and where no s
2295.dratus with sorrowful and there " is no time to be ? And why, Sebastian tearful eye.
2296. ence more necessary than now." me why, good Sebastian, I pray." must be a What, tel
2297.et." " another secret ? " Call it I the same, to be revealed at the same time. I But
2298.ll it I the same, to be revealed at the same time. I But can you what want you to do
2299. I the same, to be revealed at the same time. I But can you what want you to do, and
2300.t you to do, and that faith, as I think will satisfy you. Corvinus has got orders to
2301. master Cassianus, at Fundi, to a cruel death. I want you to hasten before his messen
2302." said he, smiling; "but I would go the world's end to save my ; good Cassianus, or a
2303.I would go the world's end to save my ; good Cassianus, or any other fellow-Christia
2304.end to save my ; good Cassianus, or any other fellow-Christians." He was Quadratus, s
2305.illa, for found shelter reason little a time in Fabiola's its mistress, which letter
2306.ven themselves and their rest, horses a good they travelled, by the same road as Tor
2307.t, horses a good they travelled, by the same road as Torqua- tus had lately trodden,
2308. conceal himself. "JS'o," said the old, good man, "it must not be. of am I already a
2309.eal himself. "JS'o," said the old, good man, "it must not be. of am I already and I
2310.hildren to my school, because they knew will permit ; but I would be kept as moral a
2311.eve there are some among the elder ones life, if who would not impunity." " scruple
2312.in? No, I little by my words perhaps my death may do ; more for them." all Pancratius
2313.ed Sebastian not to expose his the end. life during the journey. till He, however, d
2314.slave where he go," was the reply, in a symbol of Christianity. annoyed. He looked abo
2315." ; "What two? " Always two, it seems." One good youth, very handsome, sing so swee
2316."What two? " Always two, it seems." One good youth, very handsome, sing so sweet. Th
2317.outh, very handsome, sing so sweet. The other very big, very strong, oh, very. pulled
2318.less, indeed, he whom he considered his evil genius should have ; As soon as he was
2319.dent and he was delighted to find, that one at least was at Fundi, when he arrived.
2320.ce ; ; but that vinus officer, a humane man, remarked that the connnission supersed
2321.superseded ordinary jurisdiction in the matter, and gave Corfull power to act. He offe
2322.m the assistance of an executioner, and other requisites; but they were declined. too
2323.om the boyish to greet him, against the state and a perfidious Christian. A shout aro
2324.nd, Corvinus learnt there were liimself many jDresent like —young ! bears' cubs, w
2325.em. " Boys ? " he shouted out, " do you love your master Cas- sianus He was once min
2326.nus He was once mine too, and I owe him many a grudge." broke out from the benches.
2327.s. A veil of execration ! " Then I have good news for you ; here to is permission fr
2328.an for you do what you like to Mm." and other school miswho stood unmoved, with his a
2329. of his own sweet school-boy days; that time which most look back on from hearts tee
2330.acerated body. Loss of blood, and acute pain, at length rise. exhausted him, and he
2331., and had urged on the first efforts at man where cruelty of his ready ins-truments
2332.wn to drink, and so drown care and pass time. At length he started on his journey, t
2333.. The bank was wet and slimy, and every time he attempted climb it was not deep, but
2334.hboring cottage, while the carriage was being repaired, and had a good carouse with h
2335. carriage was being repaired, and had a good carouse with his money begun to revive
2336.ad been thus accomplished Christian. in one — the pagan and the The Anchor and Fi
2337.t, the !#/ Thermae of Dio- clesian were being erected by the labor and sweat ' of Chr
2338. Dio- clesian were being erected by the labor and sweat ' of Christian prisoners, it
2339. and sweat ' of Christian prisoners, it will not appear surprising, that their numbe
2340.or mines; materials, to and were put to labor in the harder and to To transport saw a
2341.tted to the departments of the building art. religious culprits, to such many of wh
2342.ilding art. religious culprits, to such many of whom were men little accustomed meni
2343. men little accustomed menial for their labor, The only recompense which they receive
2344.an a stable to sleep food sufficient in quantity to keep up their strength, clothing eno
2345.as they were unreasonable, ready to add pain to crueller masters. watched every gang
2346.orks the ; preserves, from which at any time could be drawn the cruel spectacles, ma
2347.longed to them." that the Christians of One ulus, afternoon, towards the end of Dec
2348. Cat- who had an for theatre, such as a good dealer would have for cattle at a fair.
2349.er the the wicked Christians under your honor of fighting in the amphitheatre, on off
2350. to finish the so, if I work in a given time, and cannot aui left short of hands." w
2351.e, and cannot aui left short of hands." will "I cannot help that; others that are be
2352.and that myself through your works, and will suit us." us choose Rabirius, grumbling
2353. Pantheon. of the shorter This led into one arms of a cruciform hall of noble dimen
2354.ch angle the where the arms intersected one another, a huge granite pillar of one b
2355.d one another, a huge granite pillar of one block had was to be erected. Two were a
2356.cted. Two were already in their places, one capstans, ready to be of girt with rope
2357.ng pur- veyor to wild beasts " I " they will do charmingly. I am sure they are Chris
2358.work is over, and then they are at your vice." What are their names, that I may take
2359. that I may take a note of them ? And " mind, keep them up in good condition." They
2360.e of them ? And " mind, keep them up in good condition." They are called men of exce
2361.tion." They are called men of excellent family, Largus and Smaragdus; they are young b
2362. are young but work like plebeians, and will go with you nothing loth." "They glee.
2363.ce, the works, however, they picked for many but generally in vain. made came near A
2364.me near At length they of whom Kabirius one of those chambers which flanked the eas
2365.hich flanked the eastern side of the In one of them they saw a number of longer arm
2366. must use the term) resting after their labor. group was an old num, most venerable i
2367.at, in addition to their own task-work, one on each side, they bore up his bonds. I
2368.s bonds. Indeed, we are told that their particular delight was, over and above their own a
2369.perform their work for them.* But their time was not yet come ; for both of them, be
2370.eacons in the next pontificate. Several other captives lay on the ground, about the o
2371.ptives lay on the ground, about the old man's feet, as he, seated on a block of mar
2372.toiling to raise, would be dedicated to God, under his invocation, become a title,
2373.ed and absorbed by a glorious temple in honor of the Queen of Angels, hall, which sho
2374. mightiest artistic genius that ? t the world should ever see What more consoling tho
2375. prodigality of a wicked emperor, as in truth building up one of the stateliest churc
2376.wicked emperor, as in truth building up one of the stateliest churches in which the
2377.e stateliest churches in which the true God is worshipped, and the Virgin Mother, ?
2378.minished by several feet. take that old man, as far as if you like ; for he is not
2379.y like to see young blood and plenty of life struggling against wounds and blows, be
2380.ggling against wounds and blows, before death comes to decide the contest. But there
2381.ontest. But there is His face is turned one there whom you have not named. from us;
2382.he a fine youth, who spends much of his time among all the con- victs, relieves them
2383.ork. it is He pays, of course, well for being allowed so not our business to ask ques
2384.ltation, ter " Fet- him instantly. This time at least, Pancratius, thou shalt not es
2385., and thus learning what lead ; sort of life they were compelled to to peruse but we
2386.records, the Acts of the Martyrs, which will show him how they were made We know of
2387.of strength to faith and to hope, after God's inspired words, as these venerable mo
2388.ubject, we would limit him willingly to one specimen, the genuine Acts true that th
2389.ecimen, the genuine Acts true that they will be ; Perpetua and Felicitas. best read
2390.heir plain African latinity but we some one will soon give us a worthy English vers
2391. plain African latinity but we some one will soon give us a worthy English version o
2392.rthy English version of these, and some other similar, early Christian documents. The
2393. ones which we have singled out are the same as were known to St. Augustine, and can
2394.. Augustine, and cannot be i-ead by any one without emotion. If the reader would co
2395. and cannot be i-ead by any one without emotion. If the reader would compare the morbid
2396.inary journal of a culprit condemned to death, down to the immediate approach of exec
2397.via Perpetua, a delicate lady of twenty-one years of age, he would not hesitate in
2398.den, because truthful legend, or to the history of the noble martyrs of Vienne, or Lyon
2399. martyrs of Vienne, or Lyons, or to the many similar, still extant records, to nerve
2400.lar, still extant records, to nerve our courage, by the contemplation of what children
2401.t down into it, and found there already other victims, of both cifully struck and stu
2402.o conducted them The youth had just was being handcuffed, to request one of the capto
2403.d just was being handcuffed, to request one of the captors to inform his mother and
2404. place to which a sexes, awaiting their time of sacrifice. time, while he poor fare
2405.exes, awaiting their time of sacrifice. time, while he poor fare man might court com
2406. of sacrifice. time, while he poor fare man might court committal, hoping there to
2407. are nothing better, description of the one which * See the account of St. still re
2408.we have mentioned Pothinus, Ruinart, i. will give our p. 145. readers some idea of w
2409., i. will give our p. 145. readers some idea of what confessorship cost, independent
2410.ed of two square subterranean chambers, one below the other, with only one round ap
2411.re subterranean chambers, one below the other, with only one round aperture in the ce
2412.hambers, one below the other, with only one round aperture in the centre of each va
2413., we may imagine how much of the two No other means of ventilation, first could reach
2414.for securfloor, ing the prisoners ; but many used ; be laid on the with of their fee
2415.of the ; Lyonese martyrs inform us that many new-comers expired in the jail, killed
2416.peared hopeless, without any medical or other assistance, there regained their health
2417.e, there regained their health.* At the same time the Christians bought access to th
2418.ere regained their health.* At the same time the Christians bought access to these a
2419.stians bought access to these abodes of pain, but not of sorrow, and furnished whate
2420.ost precious examples have been ; Roman justice preserved in the proconsular Acts of Ma
2421.d, now in his ninetieth was "Who is the God of the Christians?" he replied, with si
2422.was content to ask the simple question. Art thou a Christian? and upon an Often, as
2423.n? and upon an Often, as in the case of one Ptolomaeus, beautifully recited St. Jus
2424. with wild beasts." the rejoinder. What art thou ? " he asked of one. " I am a Chri
2425.ejoinder. What art thou ? " he asked of one. " I am a Christian, by the help of God
2426.one. " I am a Christian, by the help of God," was * Ruinart, p. 145. f " Si dignus
2427.ignus fueris, cognosces." lb. " And who art thou ? " said the prefect to Rusticus.
2428.ace and mercy I have been made partaker same hope as those whom you see." Then turni
2429.imperial self; of the : edicts." or "No one," answered the old man, "can be reprehe
2430. edicts." or "No one," answered the old man, "can be reprehended condemned who obey
2431.rsue? " have endeavored to master every science, and have sort of learning tried every
2432.ristians piously hold, is to believe in one God, the Maker and Creator to confess t
2433.ians piously hold, is to believe in one God, the Maker and Creator to confess the o
2434. Lord Jesus Christ by the prophets, who will come to judge mankind, and is the preac
2435.er of I indeed, salvation, to those who will learn well under Him. and insignificant
2436.d insignificant to be able to as a mere man, am too weak utter any thing great of H
2437.te Deity this ofiice belongs the Son of God, anciently foretold : to the prophets."
2438.retold : to the prophets." * "Thou this art, methinks, a master of error to others,
2439.pouse but My name Secunda," replied the one. I "And At am a widow, named Eufina, pr
2440.m a widow, named Eufina, professing the same savdng faith," continued the other. len
2441.g the same savdng faith," continued the other. length, after having put similar quest
2442.nswers from all the others, except from one wretched man, who, sacrifice, to the gr
2443.ll the others, except from one wretched man, who, sacrifice, to the grief of the re
2444.ds. Show thus at once thy piety and thy wisdom, for thou art yet but a stripling." Pan
2445.once thy piety and thy wisdom, for thou art yet but a stripling." Pancratius signed
2446.ng." Pancratius signed himself with the sign of the saving cross, I and calmly repli
2447.th which you behold in if it me has the wisdom gods, grey hairs worship but one God. B
2448.the wisdom gods, grey hairs worship but one God. But your with those who adore them
2449.wisdom gods, grey hairs worship but one God. But your with those who adore them, ar
2450. youth, "that thus I suffer some of the same punishment as was inflicted him on the
2451.h, "that thus I suffer some of the same punishment as was inflicted him on the mouth on my
2452.t then pronounced sentence in the usual form. The "Lucianus, Pancratius, Rusticus, a
2453.thout, was the scene within the prison. Peace, serenity, cheerMness, and joy reigned
2454.d. The eve of " fighting with," that is being torn to pieces by, wild beasts, was alw
2455.ild beasts, was always a day of greater liberty. to see friends of the intended victims
2456.nd bitterness it was truly an agape, or love-feast; for they supped with Pancratius,
2457., "To-morrow cient for you, because you love to look is not suffi- upon the ; object
2458.t you may know them again in the day of judgment." Many retired at this rebuke, and not
2459.now them again in the day of judgment." Many retired at this rebuke, and not a few w
2460.e, who would gladly have joined But his duty forbade this at present. After, who ing
2461.en- sufficient portions of the Bread of Life, to feed, early in the morning of their
2462.y excited by the coming slaughter of so many Christian victims, it was a work of mor
2463.re than common danger to discharge this duty. quatus had made all it For the revelat
2464. would be its safest bearer. Before any other could step forto his them scarcely vent
2465.beautiful in its lovely innocence as an angel's, he seemed to entreat for preference,
2466.claim it. and even priest, "Thou filled art too young, my child," said the kind wit
2467.re before him. " My youth, holy father, will be my best protection. Oh ! do not refu
2468.ction. Oh ! do not refuse me this great honor." The tears stood in the boy's eyes, an
2469.es, and his cheeks glowed with a modest emotion as he spoke these words. He The stretch
2470.reaty was so full of fervor j)riest and courage that the plea was irresistible. took th
2471.ast before swine. Thou wilt keep safely God's sacred gifts? " " I will die rather t
2472.t keep safely God's sacred gifts? " " I will die rather than betray them," answered
2473.saw him coming, and was struck with his beauty and sweetness, as, with arms " Stay, on
2474.ty and sweetness, as, with arms " Stay, one folded on his breast, he was hastening
2475. smilingly ; " and I have no home, save one which it might be displeasing to thee t
2476. tarry a to me a most solemn and sacred duty, and in its performance." " must not mo
2477.r to her as a messenger from a alive, I will," am higher sphere. She watched him a l
2478.m higher sphere. She watched him a long time, and cries, after some deliberation det
2479.tance, hastened on, and shortly an open space, where boys, just escaped from school,
2480.ng to play. came into "We just get want one " to make up the game ; where shall we
2481.ast ? take a part in our game, that's a good fellow." "I can't, Petilius, now; I rea
2482.bullying youth, laying hold of him. " I will have no sulking, want any thing done. S
2483. "No seem to ; such thing," replied the other. "What ? is that you be carrying so car
2484.ing so carefully in your bosom well, it will A letter, I suppose not addle by being
2485.t will A letter, I suppose not addle by being for half an hour out ; of its nest. Giv
2486.out ; of its nest. Give it to me, and I will put it by safe while we play." And lie
2487.e child, looking up towards heaven. " I will see it," insisted the other rudely ; "I
2488. heaven. " I will see it," insisted the other rudely ; "I will know what is this wond
2489.see it," insisted the other rudely ; "I will know what is this wonderful secret." hi
2490.neighborhood asked eagerly what was the matter. They saw a boy, who, with folded arms,
2491.trength, as he resisted every effort of one much bigger and stronger, to make him r
2492.his purpose. "What it? what can it be?" one began to ask the other; wlien Fulvius c
2493.? what can it be?" one began to ask the other; wlien Fulvius chanced to pass by, and
2494.hav; ing seen him at the Ordination and being asked, as a better- dressed man, the sa
2495.n and being asked, as a better- dressed man, the same question, he replied contempt
2496.ng asked, as a better- dressed man, the same question, he replied contemptuously, as
2497.neral demand was made to Tar"Never with life," was his cisius, to yield up his charg
2498. "Are you much hurt, Tarcisius ? "Never mind me, Quadratus," answei'ed eyes with a s
2499. burden wdiich he carried. him, till No one stopped a lady met him and stared amaze
2500.vely?" -whom itrH'r'^fnffW^ifil ; 'M an angel now, sleeping the martyr's slumber, tha
2501. believers for him an epitaph, which no one can Damasus composed ; read, without co
2502.w: Cum in the Blessed Eucharist was the same " Tarcisiiim sanctum Christi sacramenta
2503.stus his relics were, in whence St. due time, translated to the church of Sylvester
2504.oked forward for strength, was the only one that could have overcast, even slightly
2505.n whispered " Christ's secret gifts, by good Tarcisius borne, ; The mob profanely ba
2506.pplied to the Blessed Eucharist, supply one of those casual, but most striking, arg
2507.look of bright intelligence. Sebastian, being in, known and out of, the prison daily;
2508.ncratius, for this interview. They drew one side, who had longed when the youth beg
2509.ar, from your window, and looked at the many gaping arches of the amphitheatre, as o
2510.that await you to-morrow." " It did, in truth. I felt an inward assurance that is I s
2511.an inward assurance that is I should be one of the of first to appease the roaring
2512.uties human I cruelty. But now that the time come, I can hardly believe myself worth
2513. believe myself worthy of so immense an honor. What can have done, Sebastian, not ind
2514. who willeth, nor he that i-unneth, but God who hath mercy, that maketh the electio
2515.eel about To tell the bey6nd my right " truth, it seems me so magnificent, so far it
2516. the crystal waters of the stream of it life? Is not too like what one may read or h
2517.stream of it life? Is not too like what one may read or hear about another. w but h
2518.tius ? "Oh, yes, far more far more than one can name without presumption. That I, a
2519.hrist as yet, should I shall be able to time to-morrow, see Him face to face, say, S
2520.t that I feel is so like me to think it will soon be " no longer. both And his yet,
2521.Yes, Sebastian, more and more. To close one's eyes upon the of faces of men, to and
2522. and open them in full gaze on the face God ; shut them upon ten thousand countenan
2523.e, and unclose them instantly upon that one to sunlike intelligence, whose splendor
2524. welcome us at once into the furnace of God's heart, ; them its and plunge destruct
2525. destruction burning ocean of mercy and love without fear of surely, Sebastian, it s
2526.f the interruption, " it looks to me so good and merciful in God, to grant me such a
2527. it looks to me so good and merciful in God, to grant me such a death. more willing
2528.and merciful in God, to grant me such a death. more willingly must one at my age face
2529.nt me such a death. more willingly must one at my age face it, when it puts an end
2530.ast tender a mother like mine, and shut one's ears to the sweet ! plaint of her pat
2531. of her patient voice her, for the last time, as True, I shall see her and hear we h
2532.y before my fight : but tear A know she will not unnerve me." had made its way into
2533.the meeting in your apartments, you was one motive strong enough to check your arde
2534.despatching me hastily to Campania, and desire to die for Christ ; joined this secret
2535. for Christ ; joined this secret to the other " : how, I I cannot conceive." had prom
2536.your true welfare, Pancratius: it was a duty of friendship and love that I had assum
2537.ratius: it was a duty of friendship and love that I had assumed. I saw your eagernes
2538. tarnish, even as lightly as a Yet they form but one. ; ; breath does finely-tempere
2539. even as lightly as a Yet they form but one. ; ; breath does finely-tempered steel,
2540.nely-tempered steel, the purity of your desire, or I tip with a passing blight one sin
2541. desire, or I tip with a passing blight one single leaf of your palm. determined, t
2542.have been certainly condemned, and Each one, approaching devoutly, and with tears o
2543.en pointed at by the veiy heathens with honor, as a gallant and daring youth you migh
2544.ing for simeven in your conflict, ; ply being a Christian." " Quite true, Sebastian,"
2545.lprit ; saw you pelted and hooted, like other believers when when I ; heard sentence
2546.ours been to me, to save you." How like God's love — so wise, so generous, and so
2547.een to me, to save you." How like God's love — so wise, so generous, and so unspar
2548.dier's neck then continued " Promise me one thing more that this day you will keep
2549.ise me one thing more that this day you will keep near me to the end, and will secur
2550.y you will keep near me to the end, and will secure my last legacy to my mother." ;
2551. my mother." ; : : " Even if it cost my life, I will not fail. We shall not be parte
2552.er." ; : : " Even if it cost my life, I will not fail. We shall not be parted long,
2553.f the oblation and conse- And then each one, approaching devoutly, and with consecr
2554. instance of the power of adaptation in God's Church ! Fixed as are her laws, her i
2555. ! Fixed as are her laws, her ingenious love finds means, through their very relaxat
2556.ication of them. Here was a minister of God, and a dispenser of His mysteries, who
2557.Yet living, he "lay beneath the feet of God." The bosom still heaved, and the — ;
2558.he minister while was com- sacrifice of life was, in all life but There was only Chr
2559. was com- sacrifice of life was, in all life but There was only Christ's within and
2560.dings, on the gilded of the temples and other public too, seemed to array them in hol
2561.known by the name of the Coliseum. Each one directs his steps to the arch indicated
2562.ps sucking in by degrees that stream of life, which soon animates and enlivens of st
2563.ng mass. And, after this shall fury, it will and fro, have melt been gorged with blo
2564. out in a thick continuous flow through many avenues by which it entered, now bearin
2565.e was on the eastern side where a large space, called the imlmnar, was reserved, and
2566.r the imperial court. The Coliseum. and many a gladihad sprinkled the bright sand wi
2567.r fiercer combats, began to call, It is time, or roar for the Christians and the wil
2568.e wild beasts. Various sports succeeded one another ; ator killed, or wounded, ther
2569.they remained thus together encouraging one Before the citizens were the prison to
2570. shouts which drowned their voices from time to time. While they were thus engaged,
2571.which drowned their voices from time to time. While they were thus engaged, Corvinus
2572. tried in vain to grasp the.e. ; my day evil genius. I have hated thee come." ; devo
2573. It look like a combat. has been all on one side ; for / have lain done none of the
2574., frightened mine, and nearly caused my death ? No, Corvinus, hear I me calmly. It is
2575.vinus, hear I me calmly. It is the last time we shall speak together. Cassianus " I
2576. so?" I Because in reached thee just in time : when thy strength already was nearly
2577. had let backwards for the go last last time into knew thee, as I took hold of thee,
2578.le. I had in my : grasp the murderer of one most dear to me. Divine justice seemed
2579.murderer of one most dear to me. Divine justice seemed to have overtaken him; there was
2580.o have overtaken him; there was only my will between him and his doom. It was my day
2581.ning thee to thy servants, rescued from death." "Thouliest!" screamed Corvinus; that
2582.s put his hand on almost approaching to love. "Corvinus, / have freely forgiven thee
2583.cannot Seek pardon from Him. If not, is One above, forgive without repentance. I fo
2584.ll to thee this day, that by whatsoever death I die, thou too shalt one day perish."
2585. whatsoever death I die, thou too shalt one day perish." imagination had Corvinus s
2586. I die, thou too shalt one day perish." imagination had Corvinus slunk away, and appeared n
2587.moned them to the They hastily embraced one another, and took leave on earth. They
2588. wherewith he inflicted a blow on every one as he went by him. They were then broug
2589.ort be more conspicuous to ; at another time he was tied up to posts be more helples
2590.to be rolled, or gored by wild cattle.* One encounter with a single wild beast ofte
2591.tyrs of Lyons, Ruinart, vol. 153 (where will be of St. Per- found the account of the
2592.hitheatre, he saw Sebastian standing on one side, with a lady closely enwrapped in
2593.th His saints expecteth thee. Fight the good fight for thy soul's sake, and show thy
2594.teth thee. Fight the good fight for thy soul's sake, and show thyself faithful and s
2595.faithful and steadfast in thy Saviour's love.* Remember him too whose precious relic
2596.d in thine eyes, my sweet mother, ere " many hours are over." let On, on, and us hav
2597.n pressed the hand of her in his ear, " Courage, dearest and whispered bless you ! boy
2598.nd whispered bless you ! boy ; may give God I shall be close behind the emperor ; m
2599.eth year, standing without forth in the form of a cross, with his God most tlie leas
2600. forth in the form of a cross, with his God most tlie least, attentively, with a fi
2601. bears and leopards, breathing fury and death in their very snort, pieces. were just
2602.outh. The mob were frantic, as they saw one wild beast after another careering madl
2603. had resumed shouted out cerer!" : when one ; crowd a sorthe has a charm round his
2604.this very place bly made gloriously the same confession which I now hummake I am a C
2605. I now hummake I am a Christian and for love of Jesus Chiist, God and man, I gladly
2606.Christian and for love of Jesus Chiist, God and man, I gladly give my life. Do not
2607.n and for love of Jesus Chiist, God and man, I gladly give my life. Do not take fro
2608.s Chiist, God and man, I gladly give my life. Do not take from me ; ; this only lega
2609.e ; it Avhich gave him crown perhaps it will was a panther bestow the same on me." s
2610.erhaps it will was a panther bestow the same on me." seemed For an instant there was
2611.e multitude softened, won. The graceful form of the gallant youth, his now inspired
2612.of and his generous selfdevotion to his cause, had wrought upon that cowardly herd. P
2613.etching forth his arms once more in the form of a ; his voice, the intrepidity of hi
2614. Paneratius -was still standing in tlie same place, facing the emperor, apparently s
2615.ul bound the elegant savage gained With one desert, t and, though enraged by darkne
2616.h enraged by darkness, confinement, its liberty; and hunger, it seemed almost playful,
2617.m. Pancratius was still standing in the same place, facing the emframe. been a hermi
2618.ont. Crouching upon it slowly advancing one paw before it had gained of some moment
2619.artyr was depos- HE body of the ited in peace on the Aurelian way, in the cemetery wh
2620.d, to the neighboring gate. In times of peace a basilica was raised over his tomb, an
2621. tomb, and yet stands to perpetuate his honor. The persecution now increased its fury
2622.fury, and multiplied its daily victims. Many whose names have appeared in our pages,
2623.. Her husband, with three others of the same party, was taken, repeatedly Tranquilli
2624.mb he was taken and summarily stoned to death. His twin sons suffered also a cruel de
2625.th. His twin sons suffered also a cruel death. The treachery of Torquatus, by his des
2626.ho looked only to the viccounting every one as glorious who gave his life in its to
2627.ting every one as glorious who gave his life in its tory purchase, and as ready to g
2628.ratius, recalling to graceful thoughts, mind the buoyant cheerfulness, the and the u
2629.t cheerfulness, the and the unconscious virtue of the amiable and comely youth. But he
2630.l brute, he boldly advanced, dropped on one knee, and thus addressed him : " Sire,
2631.rds, or thou shalt die such a piecemeal death, as no Christian dog ever ! endured." "
2632.ent Latin, when he was in a passion his language was composed of broken sentences, epith
2633.ed with every vulgar and coarse In this state he was Sebastian a torrent of every cri
2634.e, He had nui-sed, he said, a vij)er an evil demon; and he only won- dered he was st
2635.assault, on the "Listen to me, the last time. I my royal master," he replied, "perha
2636.ecurity." How do you mean, ungrateful : man ? " Thus, noble emperor that if you wan
2637.r that if you want a body-guard drop of life's around you of for you, men who floor,
2638.s around you of for you, men who floor, will spill their last blood go to the prison
2639.en half their blood from them, and they will give you willingly the other and in mai
2640.m, and they will give you willingly the other and in maimed and loyalty, fidelity, mo
2641.f I for me." acting the traitor, at any time from had been one ? Have I not had acce
2642. the traitor, at any time from had been one ? Have I not had access to your royal p
2643.ave another, and a higher Lord to serve one who will judge us both and His laws I m
2644.her, and a higher Lord to serve one who will judge us both and His laws I must obey
2645.me ; ; than yours." C " " "And why have religion? you, like a coward, bitter concealed y
2646.oncealed your To escape, perhaps, the ! death you have deserved " No, su-e ; no more
2647.u-e ; no more coward than I traitor. No one better I than yourself knows that do an
2648.etter I than yourself knows that do any good to am neither. So long as could my bret
2649. me the embarrassment of choice between life." seeking death or enduring "I will dec
2650.ssment of choice between life." seeking death or enduring "I will decide that point f
2651.een life." seeking death or enduring "I will decide that point for you. it Death is
2652.g "I will decide that point for you. it Death is your award; and a slow lingering one
2653.ath is your award; and a slow lingering one lower tone, as All if shall be. But," h
2654.lt? I too quietly at home, or treachery will spread. Here, Quadratus, take your Chri
2655.er burst of fury, another storm of vile language, to which ended in the stout centurion'
2656.to which ended in the stout centurion's being ordered at once But Sebastian was to be
2657.d not have started more. The thought of being so near a Christian, to him who worship
2658.r ; Maximian proceeded, and Hyphax kept time to every of his sentences by a nod, and
2659. to be a smile it was hardly an earthly one. "You will take Sebastian to your quart
2660.mile it was hardly an earthly one. "You will take Sebastian to your quarters; and ea
2661.to-morrow morning, —not this evening, mind, for I all know that by this time of da
2662.ning, mind, for I all know that by this time of day you are drunk, —but to-morrow
2663.ut to-morrow morn- ing, when your hands mind; none are steady, you will tie him to a
2664.n your hands mind; none are steady, you will tie him to a tree in the grove of Adoni
2665. a tree in the grove of Adonis, and you will slowly shoot him to death. Slowly, of y
2666.donis, and you will slowly shoot him to death. Slowly, of your fine shots straight ti
2667.t plenty of arrows, he die exhausted by pain and take him loss of blood. Do you unde
2668.nd me ? silence ; Then off at once. And mind, or else " A Monogram of Christ, found
2669.o be a Christian, and was to be shot to death on the morrow. But on none did the doub
2670. Was he a mean imposliber- who affected virtue, but was secretly a tine? Impossible, t
2671. she was sure not gilded, but — gold. being Then how account for this phenomenon, o
2672.phenomenon, of a Christian all that was good, virtuous, amiable ? One solution never
2673. all that was good, virtuous, amiable ? One solution never occurred to Fabiola' s m
2674.e solution never occurred to Fabiola' s mind, that he ffi was all this because lie w
2675.She only saw the all problem in another form spite of how ? could he be that he was
2676.f how ? could he be that he was Then in being a Christian it She turned variously in
2677.hristian it She turned variously in her mind, in vain. it came to her thought thus.
2678.ught thus. right, I Perhaps, after all, good old Chro- matins was fancied ; and Chri
2679.. and Might there not be a more refined form of this religion, and a more grovelling
2680.here not be a more refined form of this religion, and a more grovelling one just as she
2681.of this religion, and a more grovelling one just as she knew there was in her own s
2682.here was in her own sect, Epicureanism? one coarse, material, wallowing in the very
2683.wing in the very mire of sensualism the other refined, sceptical and Sebastian would
2684. of the com; ; moner Christians. Such a hypothesis might be tenable but it was hard to rec
2685.rd to reconcile to her intellect, how a man like that noble soldier could, any way,
2686.ere about to fall sufl"er a Sebastian's fate were going to to her, on some one tie.
2687.an's fate were going to to her, on some one tie. closely bound by some secret and m
2688.. " Do you know that he turns out to be one of those wretched Christians? Hold your
2689.of those wretched Christians? Hold your peace, if I pray you, and do not prate any mo
2690., and do not prate any more suppose his fate about what you do not understand." "Cer
2691. so wish first officer it; I is quite a matter of indifference to you, to me. shot. ma
2692. madam. It certainly is He won't be the Many they have was that my countrymen have k
2693.aved. and tones, But of course that all chance." There was a significance in her Avord
2694.ape the quick ear and up, for the first time, mind of Fabiola. She looked it; and fi
2695.e quick ear and up, for the first time, mind of Fabiola. She looked it; and fixed he
2696.er eyes searchingly on her There was no emotion in if maid's swarthy face. she was plac
2697.en whispered, " Do you want Sebastian's life preStill served ? " " Certainly." Fabio
2698.her lip, to enforce silence, said, " It will cost dear." "Name your j)rice." "A hund
2699.r j)rice." "A hundred sestertia* and my liberty." is "I accept your terms; but what my
2700.About 800?. mr ; " Secondly, a dowry, a good dowry, mind ; for I never wanted money
2701.mr ; " Secondly, a dowry, a good dowry, mind ; for I never wanted money more than no
2702.y the strong fascination of her eye, as one of the serpents of their native land mi
2703.ve land might do a stupidity. vulture. "Art mad?" he at well at last exclaimed; If
2704.st seen the orders, emperor's " when he will ! his have known he have no trifling wi
2705. trifling with him here." Pshaw ! pshaw man ; of course the prisoner will appear de
2706.aw ! pshaw man ; of course the prisoner will appear dead, and will be reported as de
2707.urse the prisoner will appear dead, and will be reported as dead." " " And if he fin
2708.nally recover ? " His fellow-Christians will take care to keep him out of wish thou
2709.y fellows ousness coming uppermost. ! ; will consume half the money, in bribes and f
2710. sorceress, my charming "Well, But that will be too much for my scoundrels. We to ou
2711.arriagewill give them half, and add the other half " settlements, shan't we ? demon?
2712.ve twenty-four hours and after that, we will have a glorious wedding." meantime, was
2713.to rest and the marble pave; ment was a good enough soldier's bed. But, after a few
2714.yr's prayer is is not a preparation for death ; for his a death that needs no prepara
2715.not a preparation for death ; for his a death that needs no preparation. The soldier
2716.r the friend, of is the martyr going to death, unknown name, who salutes seized, and
2717.fore, for the forgiveness of not a past sin; for there is fear, consciousness of th
2718. is fear, consciousness of that perfect love, which sendeth out an inward assurance
2719.ch sendeth out an inward assurance with sin. JSTor of that highest grace, which is
2720.atible in Sebastian was it a prayer for courage or strength it, for the opposite feelin
2721. unknown to him. never entered into his mind to doubt, that as he his earthly sovere
2722.reign on the it battle-field, had faced death intrepidly for so he should meet His pr
2723.rning, was a gladsome hymn of glory and honor to the King of kings, a joining with th
2724. rude harping upon the vibrating boughs form softer only ones that earth could utter
2725.. He offered himself as an oblation for God's honor, and for the appeasing of his w
2726.ffered himself as an oblation for God's honor, and for the appeasing of his wrath. se
2727.ffered him- Church, and prayed that his death might mitigate her sufferings. * Called
2728.return for they brought heaven into his soul and what could he give back ? It was as
2729.im, he could see the countenance now of one, and then of another of the happy frien
2730.uld split a flying arrow with a fleeter one, called them into his room, told them t
2731. have been of an ordinary exhibition of good archery. The officer was stripped and b
2732.d opposite, cool and collected. sort of death. It was at best a desolate ; Not a frie
2733.ot a friend, not a sympathizer near not one fellow-Christian to bear his farewell t
2734.stancy, to see the encouraging looks of many, and hear the whispered blessings of a
2735.ing multitude put a strain upon natural courage, as the hunter's cry only nerves the st
2736.y, shut up in the court of a house this being, with most unfeeling indifference tied
2737.according to the tyrant's orders ; this being alone in the midst of a horde of swarth
2738.ng the unruffled jiatience, the unsated love of suffering for his Lord. Earnest was
2739.et this was not the was indeed a dreary death After all, death came not; the golden g
2740.he was indeed a dreary death After all, death came not; the golden gates remained unb
2741.d himself, not suddenly translated from death to of angels. life, but sunk into uncon
2742.nly translated from death to of angels. life, but sunk into unconsciousness in the l
2743.autiful. And not only that church do we love, but that ancient chapel which stands i
2744.ader, when visiting the Crystal Palace, will find in the Eoman Court an excellent mo
2745.the arches of Titus and Constantine, he will see a chapel of fair dimensions standin
2746.ir dimensions standing alone. It is the one to which we allude. It has been lately
2747.s been lately repaired by the Barberini family. Ellas earned up to Htaven, fu>m a pimn
2748.lection conShe was nected itself in her mind with that beautiful object. night, so s
2749.nian archers." . ; " A very respectable man, no doubt, ; if he could speak any inte
2750.o doubt, ; if he could speak any inter- language besides his gibberish val but these few
2751.doubt; for so says a proverb in is my ; language : dust on a wise man's skirts fool's gi
2752.rb in is my ; language : dust on a wise man's skirts fool's girdle.' better than th
2753.at was a pre- liminary step of absolute necessity." "What! do you mean father?" It that y
2754.she pushed her advantage, saying "To be one that " is sure too ; what else ? It is
2755.hus to get rid of any much in the way." Good night, good night," he replied in great
2756.id of any much in the way." Good night, good night," he replied in great fear. "Stay
2757. advice worth all your gold that night. One you have acted against ; the other you
2758.night. One you have acted against ; the other you have not followed." 1^ crtr® ! ; ^
2759.confusion, and stripes." " Then I was a good counsellor in the one advice ; follow m
2760." " Then I was a good counsellor in the one advice ; follow me in the second." "Wha
2761.d become offer yourself, rich wdth your wealth, to Fabiola. enough by Christian She ha
2762.ery offer; carefully. but have observed one thing riches. Not a single suit has bee
2763.rize must come on the Do you understand principle that two and two make fom". me ? " " To
2764.s our last interview; and and unfeeling good hater." She drew him nearer and whisper
2765.e this way into the shadow, and I view, one especially. I rather like you, as a hea
2766.s a hearty, unscrupulous, relentless, : will tell you how surely you may intercept h
2767.sure. Leave to him the cool murder that will be necessary, for it may be troublesome
2768.e tables turned or, rather, how has the world gone round in a brief space ! The last
2769.how has the world gone round in a brief space ! The last time these two wicked beings
2770. gone round in a brief space ! The last time these two wicked beings were on the sam
2771.ime these two wicked beings were on the same spot, plotting bane to others, the wind
2772.occupied by two virtuous two spirits of good, youths, who, like were intent on unrav
2773.k approaches. They are gone thence, the one sleeping in his tomb, the other slum- b
2774.ence, the one sleeping in his tomb, the other slum- bering on the eve of execution. p
2775. on the eve of execution. power, seeing Death looks to us like a holy how much he pre
2776.wer, and leaves the w^eed its poisonous life, till it drops into mature decay. But a
2777.oked up, the window was occupied by two other persons. "That is Fulvius," said Corvin
2778.orvinus, "who just came to the window." good, rather than the evil. "And slave. the
2779.e to the window." good, rather than the evil. "And slave. the other is his evil demo
2780., rather than the evil. "And slave. the other is his evil demon, Eurotas," added the
2781. the evil. "And slave. the other is his evil demon, Eurotas," added the They both wa
2782.ain has cost favorite officers." me the life of one of the emperor's most it." "And
2783.cost favorite officers." me the life of one of the emperor's most it." "And no than
2784.ronounced every wound But curable ; not one arrow having touched a vital organ. los
2785.oving, she was courteand, for the first time in her life, ously invited to enter she
2786.as courteand, for the first time in her life, ously invited to enter she found herse
2787.consciously in the bosom of a Christian family. we are told, was the widow of Castulus
2788.we are told, was the widow of Castulus, one of the Chromatian band of converts. Her
2789.s. Her husband had just suffered Irene, death; but she remained still, unnoticed, in
2790.younger, was a perfect contrast to her, world, docile — other, who so — so gentle
2791.fect contrast to her, world, docile — other, who so — so gentle, and affectionate
2792.gentle, and affectionate; Irene herself life. so considerate about othei's; devoted
2793.n ; it was was not a but this caused no change in their treatment of her. Then she in
2794.ened the hard crust of prejudice on her mind. For the present, however, her thoughts
2795.he would have leisure to conwith him on religion. An insuperable obstacle, however, slow
2796.usness went, to have lost sight of this world, and now to awaken in it again, no mart
2797.o awaken in it again, no martyr, but an will not We of Sebastian. ordinary wayfaring
2798.ordinary wayfaring salvation, It —was man man on j)robation, who might yet lose i
2799.nary wayfaring salvation, It —was man man on j)robation, who might yet lose itsel
2800., should find him- self relanded on the same side as he started from. like St. Or, i
2801.g heard the mysterious words which only one Intelligence can utter. regret. Yet no
2802. no its He adored in silence the Divine Will, hoping that purpose was only to give h
2803. have now," he generously said, "earned one privilege This of a martyr, that of spe
2804.f speaking boldly to the persecutors. I will use the first day that I can leave my b
2805.may be the sooner." Moses receiving the Law, from a picture in the Cemetery of '* I
2806.e black slave betrayed to Corvinus, was one to which allusion has already been made
2807., or he could destroy her, and obtain a good share He was nerved for this second of
2808.re He was nerved for this second of her wealth by confiscation. alternative by the tau
2809. but the faintest hint at the end, that duty might compel him to take another course
2810.amb, and could admit from no perishable being expressions of personal attachment. Thi
2811.tian not to fly, conceived the romantic idea of saving him, in spite of himself, by
2812.did not know the depth of wickedness in man's for She thought the tyrant might fume
2813.rant might fume a moment, but condemn a man twice pity and mercy, she thought, must
2814., must linger in that he would never to death. Some ; his breast and her earnest plea
2815.ight token and knowing the covetousness man, presumed, as she said, to offer him a
2816.nt. This was a ring with jewels of rare beauty, and immense value. present was accepte
2817.he Palatine on the 20th, in common with other petitioners, and wait for the emperor's
2818.th as a suppliant, and for her father's death, took her stand in a row of far more wr
2819. ground. Only here and there, he handed one to his secretary, a man scarcely imperi
2820.here, he handed one to his secretary, a man scarcely imperious than was now nearly
2821. her, and her heart beat violently, not fate. from man, but from anxiety about Sebas
2822.er heart beat violently, not fate. from man, but from anxiety about Sebastian's to
2823. seen. It was Sebastian, wan and strong emotion, who, with features almost etherealized
2824.nd crept thus to greet him.* " Maximian art ! " he cried out, in a hollow but disti
2825.at the day Thou hast spilt the blood of God's Saints upon the pavement of this city
2826.lls at the gates. Thou hast pulled down God's temples, and profaned His altars, and
2827.e St. Sebastian. ousness and thy pride, God hath judged ; thee, and His wrath of th
2828.on overtake thee and thou shalt die the death His Church an emperor shall violent; an
2829.is Church an emperor shall violent; and God will give after His own heart. And till
2830.hurch an emperor shall violent; and God will give after His own heart. And till thy
2831. give after His own heart. And till thy memory ; be accursed through the whole world,
2832. memory ; be accursed through the whole world, the end of time. hast time, impious ma
2833.sed through the whole world, the end of time. hast time, impious man Repent thee, wh
2834. the whole world, the end of time. hast time, impious man Repent thee, while thou an
2835.ld, the end of time. hast time, impious man Repent thee, while thou and ask forgive
2836.thee, while thou and ask forgiveness of God, in the name till of Him, the silence C
2837.d put his men in order of defence. Only one entrance at the end of the court was le
2838. Fifty men stood along each side of the space, with Hyphax and Jubala at the opposite
2839.y men have sworn, that no or going out, man passes that threshold, coming in, witho
2840.el; and the that she had only exchanged one slavery a worse. Hyphax "If," screened
2841.and the that she had only exchanged one slavery a worse. Hyphax "If," screened himself
2842.gh would have been straight. As it was, will myself see " we are not responsible." A
2843.re." rate, I my work done properly this time," said Maximian. Two of you fellows wit
2844.ot have any blood spilt on these stairs life so you knock the him with your cudgels;
2845.id she far off. She could not else. her life have is was any thing Fabiola, thy day
2846.ax's wife" (lately her own slave!). "It will smile, as look more brilliant on a blac
2847.et still, an ignominious end before the world beaten to How death without ceremony, w
2848.ious end before the world beaten to How death without ceremony, while the emperor con
2849.He was know that our sufferings earn us honor tyrant, The seeing his work completed,
2850. his summons, and they were buried with honor, where now stands his basilica. Christ
2851.E CRITICAL DAY: XXVIII. ITS FIRST PART. life ^JIJ^HERE ^W)!^ are critical days in th
2852.^HERE ^W)!^ are critical days in the of man and of nianmight kind. Not merely the d
2853. a different result social or political fate of ^£^ kind. or of Lepanto, in have in
2854.. or of Lepanto, in have influenced the man- But it is probable that Columbus could
2855.r, the decision of which secured to the world all that he taught and gave it, and to
2856.ay of Providence, which altered his his fate through life position or his relations
2857.nce, which altered his his fate through life position or his relations to others his
2858.ial. In whatever way it has been, every soul, like Jerusalem,* has had its day. has
2859.mperor and slave, father and guest, the good and the wicked. Christian and heathen,
2860.ristian and heathen, rich and poor then life and death, joy and sorrow, learning and
2861.nd heathen, rich and poor then life and death, joy and sorrow, learning and simplicit
2862. not all come as agents, pulling at her mind in oi^posite ways, yet all directing he
2863.generous, though haughty and impetuous, soul one way, as the breeze and the rudder s
2864.ous, though haughty and impetuous, soul one way, as the breeze and the rudder strug
2865. breeze and the rudder struggle against one another, only to determine the ship's s
2866. thy day," etc. Luke, xix. 42. not with wisdom, not pMlosopliy, can decide. We have 20
2867.t be an ing day in his calendar, and he will agree it man ; ; important day in our l
2868.y in his calendar, and he will agree it man ; ; important day in our little narrati
2869.acher, or informant, ; she loved her or other, she could not like the heathen one as
2870.r other, she could not like the heathen one as sister. She sat alone at home, and t
2871.olume after volume of favorite works on Death, on Fortitude, seemed on Friendship, on
2872. on Fortitude, seemed on Friendship, on Virtue; and every one of them plunged into a d
2873.med on Friendship, on Virtue; and every one of them plunged into a deeper She insip
2874.g, ; when she was disturbed by a letter being put into her hand. The Greek slave, Gra
2875. brought it in, retired to the what she other end of the room, alarmed and perplexed
2876. maid. come here." While her errand was being delivered, she composed herself, and ga
2877.ter? " The Lady Agnes herself." On what cause is the poor prison." " " " child there
2878.hild there ? " On the accusation of a " man named Fulvius, for being a Christian."
2879.ccusation of a " man named Fulvius, for being a Christian." " For nothing else I ? "
2880.am sure." I Then we shall soon set that matter right. Tell her I will can give ; witne
2881. soon set that matter right. Tell her I will can give ; witness to the contrary. com
2882.eft alone. When was something to do her mind was at once energetic and concentrated,
2883.n accusation against which five minutes will confute? " I will go to TertuUus myself
2884.st which five minutes will confute? " I will go to TertuUus myself, and contradict h
2885.ou are a Christian." so I And am, thank God ! " replied Agnes, making on herself th
2886. " replied Agnes, making on herself the sign of the cross. The announcement did not
2887.or stagger her, nor perplex her. tian's death had taken all edge or heaviness from Se
2888. had considered the type of every manly virtue she was not surprised to find it in her
2889.two such peerless beings to be not mere chance-grown plants, but She bowed her head in
2890.d her head in a kind springing from the same seed. of reverence for the child, " and
2891., " How long have you been so? " All my life, dear Fabiola ; sucked the from faith,
2892. only object of hatred to your generous mind was the Christian name." "True, dearest
2893.a ; but you know not the force " — of universal prejudice, the weight of falsehood dail
2894.weight of falsehood daily repeated. How many that noble minds, fine intellects, and
2895.resent position. to 2irove that " You ; will of course compel Fulvius you are a Chri
2896.-morrow?" asked Fabiola, shocked at the idea of any thing so immediate. Yes, to-morr
2897.bout to me (though I suspect few people will care much), early, am be be interrogate
2898.d Is not that and summary proceedings " will taken. good news, dear? asked Agnes eag
2899.t and summary proceedings " will taken. good news, dear? asked Agnes eagerly, seizin
2900.s hands. ecstatic And I then putting on one of her I looks, she exclaimed, "Behold,
2901.ey return early for me to-morrow early, mind, and we part no more." Fabiola felt her
2902. own heart swell and heave, as if a new element were entering in. She knew not what it
2903.emed something better than a mere human emotion. She * "Ecce quod concupivi jam video,
2904.ad not yet heard the name the favorable change in her for it. of Grace. spirit, Agnes,
2905.gnes, however, saw and inwardly thanked God She begged her cousin this to return be
2906.wn to her, for their final farewell. At same time a consultation was being held The
2907. her, for their final farewell. At same time a consultation was being held The reade
2908.rewell. At same time a consultation was being held The reader had better listen to it
2909.if the old sorceress I was any right in one thing, she ought to be in the other. wi
2910.ht in one thing, she ought to be in the other. will answer, from experience, resistan
2911.ne thing, she ought to be in the other. will answer, from experience, resistance." h
2912.t to be in the other. will answer, from experience, resistance." how powerful is wealth in
2913.xperience, resistance." how powerful is wealth in conquering will allow, too," rejoine
2914.." how powerful is wealth in conquering will allow, too," rejoined Corvinus, "from t
2915. for Fabiola's hand, there has not been one who could not justly be rather called a
2916.r, with myself, the lady Agnes' s great wealth." "And in a manner I too, methinks, tha
2917. "And in a manner I too, methinks, that will more easily gain upon what hear of her
2918. and lofty disposition. Giving her that wealth independent of conditions, and then off
2919.ons, and then offering yourself to her, will tions, either to accept put her under o
2920.l tions, either to accept put her under one of two obligayou as her husband, or thr
2921.e "None whatever. ; Fulvius, of course, will apply for his is, and the probability i
2922.and the probability it that the emperor will declare he intends to take But if I pi-
2923.. of giving the property to the nearest relation, " the gods— this Fabiola does, ? who
2924.she w " Certainly, father." "I think he will embrace it: while I am sure there is no
2925.embrace it: while I am sure there is no chance of his making a free gift to me. The pr
2926.nrage him." you manage it, father? " "I will have an imperial rescript prepared duri
2927.g the night, ready for signature; and I will proceed immediately after the execution
2928.ace, magnify the unpopularity "Then how will which is sure to follow it, lay it all
2929.erty tlement of is it, next in the set- will redound greatly to his credit and glory
2930.as vain as he cruel and rapacious ; and one vice must be made " to fight another."
2931.ain as he cruel and rapacious ; and one vice must be made " to fight another." Nothi
2932. my dear father; I shall retire an easy mind. To-morrow will be the critical day of
2933. I shall retire an easy mind. To-morrow will be the critical day of my life. All my
2934.o-morrow will be the critical day of my life. All my future depends upon whether I a
2935.ess lady, and sounded the depths of her philosophy, before your final bargain was struck."
2936.f not, father: she is well is worthy of being your daughter-in-law. Yes, to-morrow in
2937.ell is worthy of being your daughter-in-law. Yes, to-morrow indeed the turning-poin
2938.pirit. and independent as evei'." Never mind that sharp steel makes short work spiri
2939.akes short work spirit is free : Is her fate certain? and are its consequences sure?
2940. feel still encounter imperial caprice. pain and remorse at sacrificing so young a r
2941.orse at sacrificing so young a result." life, But I own and for looking as an insecu
2942. " Come, Fulvius," said the old as in ? man sternly, ; cold I a grey rock in the mo
2943.rey rock in the morning mist this hope, matter. "no softness, Do you remember what day
2944.lends of The critical to gain another's wealth, day always for you. It was on " you co
2945.ou. It was on " you committed day that "Peace, peace!" will interrupted Fulvius in ag
2946.was on " you committed day that "Peace, peace!" will interrupted Fulvius in agony. "W
2947. you committed day that "Peace, peace!" will interrupted Fulvius in agony. "Why to y
2948.ry pretence to be guided by conscience, virtue, or even honor. It is folly to : affect
2949.e guided by conscience, virtue, or even honor. It is folly to : affect compassion for
2950.is folly to : affect compassion for any one's life, who stands /?er." in the way of
2951.ly to : affect compassion for any one's life, who stands /?er." in the way of your f
2952. Let us calmly weigh its prospects. You will go to the emperor, and ask for your rig
2953.d." Suppose your claims are rejected? " will sell it as "Impossible, impossible!" ex
2954." exclaimed Fulvius, racked by the very idea; "it is my right, hardly earned. It can
2955.y, my young friend ; let us discuss the matter stirrup to the coolly. Kemember our pro
2956.ere has been rights are refused you." " many a fall.' Suppose only that your Then I
2957.ppose only that your Then I am a ruined man. I have no other prospect before me, of
2958. your Then I am a ruined man. I have no other prospect before me, of retrieving " : S
2959. fly hence." owe at Janus' s arch ? " * Good and what do you "A good couple of hundr
2960.s' s arch ? " * Good and what do you "A good couple of hundred sestertia,t between p
2961.w is may be to you, or rather of to-day Life or death to for it approaching. you han
2962. be to you, or rather of to-day Life or death to for it approaching. you hang upon it
2963.on its the great day of your existence. Courage then, or rather to an inflexible determ
2964. in the Catacombs. mi CHAPTER XXIX. THE SAME DAY: ITS SECOND PART. HE day is less we
2965.artiality, jealousy, and with fraternal one from the heaven which he asthe from cen
2966.e asthe from cended in the morning, the other she descended in the evening? the dunge
2967.ride there approachthere was a terrible sense of the ; ; humbling shame ing consummat
2968.ild, while her fortune from beggary and death, so at — least he reasoned yet he wou
2969.nevitable. So he would give her another chance. watchword. He was now at the prison He
2970.h he possessed the entered, and, at his desire, was conducted found entrance " to his
2971.," he if 3^ou replied, them be spent in peace." "I have come to lengthen them, let pl
2972., let please, to years; and, instead of peace, I offer hap- piness." " Surely, sir, i
2973." Surely, sir, if I understand you, the time is past for this sad vanity. " It is Th
2974. vanity. " It is Thus is so, to address one whom you have delivered your over to de
2975.ne whom you have delivered your over to death, at best a mockery." not gentle lady ;
2976.best a mockery." not gentle lady ; your fate is in own hands I only your own obstina
2977. in own hands I only your own obstinacy will give you over to death. it have life. c
2978.our own obstinacy will give you over to death. it have life. come It is " to renew, o
2979.cy will give you over to death. it have life. come It is " to renew, once more, my o
2980. my offer, and with I that of your last chance." Have I I not before told you that for
2981.awarded to you which you fear more than death, will drive this illusion forever and w
2982. to you which you fear more than death, will drive this illusion forever and which "
2983.llusion forever and which " I from your mind." I fear nothing for Christ. For know,
2984.hing for Christ. For know, that have an angel ever guarding me, who will not suffer h
2985.hat have an angel ever guarding me, who will not suffer his Master's But now, cease
2986.ain, baffled once more by a child, this time Avith the sword hanging over her neck f
2987. his heart, were distilled hatred. into one black, solitary drop, With flashing loo
2988.oke forth " Wretched woman, I give thee one more opportunity rescuing thyself from
2989.m destruction. of Which wilt thou have, life with me, or death " ? " Death even I wi
2990. Which wilt thou have, life with me, or death " ? " Death even I will ! choose for he
2991.thou have, life with me, or death " ? " Death even I will ! choose for her, rather th
2992.fe with me, or death " ? " Death even I will ! choose for her, rather than life with
2993.en I will ! choose for her, rather than life with a monster like thee door. " " excl
2994.ath." my Fabiola was alone for the last time with Agnes. She had some minutes unobse
2995.ed to her, had she been a Christian, an angel of light and a spirit of darkness; and
2996. espousals to the Lamb, when she should sign her contract of everlasting love, been
2997.should sign her contract of everlasting love, been for * viary. 475 " Mecum enim hab
2998.sphere by which, in poetical mythology, being of a higher sphere was recognized on ea
2999.d manner, as her highest conceptions of virtue and intellect, combined in the soul, mi
3000.f virtue and intellect, combined in the soul, might be supposed to stamp upon the ou
3001.t be supposed to stamp upon the outward form. Hence her feelings passed beyond love
3002. form. Hence her feelings passed beyond love into a higher range; they were more aki
3003.were more akin to reverence. Agnes took one of her hands in each of' her own, cross
3004.st earnestness, said : "Fabiola, I have one dying request to make you. You have nev
3005. never refused " me any : I am sure you will not this." Speak not thus to me, deares
3006.not request; you " command me now." you will Then to pi'omise me, that immediately a
3007.omise me, that immediately apply your I mind master the doctrines of Christianity. k
3008.anity. know you * " Incessu patuit Dea, will embrace them; and then you are now." is
3009.embrace them; and then you are now." is will no longer be to me what you "And what t
3010.on, an affectionate heart, a cultivated mind, a tine moral feeling, and a virtuous y
3011.eling, and a virtuous yet over eyes, of life. What can be desired more in woman ? an
3012.loud, to my gloomy shadow, the shade of death. Drive it away, and all will be lightso
3013. shade of death. Drive it away, and all will be lightsome and bright." it, " I feel
3014.dy, "Waters gladness and oil of and the soul shall be washed clean as driven snow, a
3015.tened as the babe's. From that bath you will come forth a new creature, born again t
3016.ature, born again to a new and immortal life." " And shall I lose all that you have
3017.and on it engrafts but a small shoot of one that is sweet and tender, and the flowe
3018.eur, no strength that it had before, so will the new life you shall receive ennoble,
3019.gth that it had before, so will the new life you shall receive ennoble, elevate, and
3020.stand this word), the valuable of gifts nature and education which you already possess
3021.word), the valuable of gifts nature and education which you already possess. What a glori
3022.ch you already possess. What a glorious being Christianity will make you, Fabiola! "
3023.ess. What a glorious being Christianity will make you, Fabiola! " "What a new world
3024.y will make you, Fabiola! " "What a new world you are leading me to, dear Agnes! " Oh
3025.could ! Christ make you And now to as I happiness of dying I I will speak a word to you w
3026. And now to as I happiness of dying I I will speak a word to you which never she hav
3027.ever she have addressed you before, — God bless you ! " And embrace, convulsive o
3028.s, was their last earthly greeting. The one hastened home, filled with a new and ge
3029.ed with a new and generous purpose; the other the sign of the Cross on Fabiola's fore
3030.new and generous purpose; the other the sign of the Cross on Fabiola's forehead. mad
3031.early in the morning when she stood her angel protected her from ; harm t again befor
3032.ocent heart. Only her unshorn hair, the symbol of virginity, which had been let * " f
3033.urch of St. Agnes in the Piazza Narona, one of the most beautiful in Rome. "Cui pos
3034.te dress.* It was a lovely morning. its Many now will remember it to have been a bea
3035.* It was a lovely morning. its Many now will remember it to have been a beautiful da
3036. the earth is frost, but with blossoms; being loosened round the and spring seems lat
3037.oves, of has just that temperature that one a sun, already air. not heating, but so
3038.d a sufficient circle round the charmed space, which few, save Christians, loved to e
3039.eral attention they stood opposite each other, at the ends of the semicircle formed b
3040.the semicircle formed by the multitude. One was a youth, enveloped in his toga, wit
3041.es could not be distinguished. tall The other was a lady close about her, of aristocr
3042. aristocratic uiien, and erect, such as one does not expect to meet on such an occa
3043.hymn. 31. f Solvitur acris hyems, grata vice veris et Pavoni." I Pudicitia. crimson,
3044.lly veiled also, like her mistress. The mind seemed intent on one only object, as sh
3045.her mistress. The mind seemed intent on one only object, as she stood immovable, le
3046. introduced by her guards into the open space, and stood intrepid, facing the tribuna
3047. who, she appeared, had been objects of universal observation. " " Why ; she unfettered i
3048.at once." The executioner turned over a quantity of such ornaments, and at to Christian
3049. executioner for his him at once do his duty. hesitation, and bid : : shook her hand
3050., sir," said the softened executioner: "one so young ought to wear other bracelets.
3051.xecutioner: "one so young ought to wear other bracelets." "Silence, man!" I pity rejo
3052.ght to wear other bracelets." "Silence, man!" I pity rejoined tlie exasperated judg
3053. youth, thy station, and the bad educaI desire, if possible, tion thou hast received.
3054.hee. false Think better while thou hast time. pernicious Renounce the and maxims of
3055.pise thy false divinities, and can only love and serve the one living God. Eternal R
3056.nities, and can only love and serve the one living God. Eternal Ruler, open wide th
3057. can only love and serve the one living God. Eternal Ruler, open wide the heavenly
3058. heavenly gates, until lately closed to man. Blessed Christ, call to Thee the soul
3059.o man. Blessed Christ, call to Thee the soul that cleaveth unto Thee victim first to
3060.r by martyrdom's immolation." " I waste time, of I see," said the impatient prefect,
3061.road, and at what mile-stone, shall the judgment be executed? " I asked the headsman. "
3062. once," was the reply. Agnes raised for one moment her hands and eyes to heaven, th
3063.one but it is clear from Prudentius and other writers that St. Agnes suffered at the
3064.at the place of trial, of which we have other instances. ; crtt- drew forward her sil
3065. for the executioner was trembling with emotion, and could not wield his sword. t As in
3066.or his hesitaand bid him at once do his duty. The man passed the back of his rough l
3067.itaand bid him at once do his duty. The man passed the back of his rough left hand
3068.on washed in the blood of the Lamb. The man on the judge's right hand had looked wi
3069. a tone clear and distinct, but full of emotion, " grant me one petition. Let not the r
3070.stinct, but full of emotion, " grant me one petition. Let not the rude hands of * P
3071.er fathers for she was noble as she was good." Tertullus was manifestly be, irritate
3072. insisted, "by every claim which female virtue has upon you, by any tear which a mothe
3073.And if, when you home this evening, you will be met at the threshold by daughters, w
3074. met at the threshold by daughters, who will kiss your hand, though stained with the
3075. hand, though stained with the blood of one, whom you may feel proud if they resemb
3076.hristian?" replied, " She hesitated for one instant, then that " if No, sir, I am n
3077. " ; but I I own anything could make me one, it would be what have seen this day."
3078. do you mean "Why, that to preserve the religion of the empire such beings as she whom y
3079.he shape and flourish. Oh, sir, name of man should have you know not what you have
3080.retreat of her dungeon. endow^ with her wealth, and ennoble by her alliance, that into
3081. you) that if she wouldst thou save her life, but, despising the imperial comgentle
3082.g a Christian? : Fulvius stood, pale as death stood, as one does for a mo- ment who i
3083. Fulvius stood, pale as death stood, as one does for a mo- ment who is shot through
3084.r struck by lightning. He looked like a man on whom sentence is going to be pro- no
3085. is going to be pro- nounced, —not of death, but of eternal pilloiy, as the judge a
3086. Rome. If this lady pleases, even now I will take her deposition against thee. Pray,
3087.d most respectfully, " may I have the " honor of knowing your name ? " Fabiola," she
3088.e him, he hoped, his future daughter-in-law. madam," he said, " and of have often h
3089. signal to Syra, who attended her. some one else ; and presently four slaves appear
3090.peared bearing a Fabiola would allow no one but herself and lady's litter. A Blood
3091.dly asked if she might join them. " Who art thou ? " asked Fabiola. "I am poor Emer
3092. so that with that of the martyr. tion, many mingled their own blood When a sovereig
3093. on first entering his capital, ancient custom, handfuls of gold and silver coins amon
3094.d. But all respected the prior claim of one and here it was the deacon Eeparatus, w
3095.s the deacon Eeparatus, who, at risk of life, was scattered treasures, than there Ch
3096.ery of St. Domitilla. ^ CHAPTER XXX THE SAME DAY: f( ITS THIRD PART. ERTULLFS ace: h
3097.he imperial presence reported ; and, as matter Agnes, to of business, the death of fee
3098.d, as matter Agnes, to of business, the death of feeling exaggerated the public likel
3099.ould be a gracious act of clemency, and one sure to counteract unpopular feelings,
3100.d ring, and yesterday asked Sebastian's life, me for that wretched to just as they h
3101.ad finished cudgelling him M^ ®trb ; r death." And by for he laughed immoderately, l
3102.ed: "Yes, yes, all means; a inheritance will console her, no doubt, out, the loss of
3103.at fellow. Let a rescript be made and I will sign it." Tertullus produced the one pr
3104.llow. Let a rescript be made and I will sign it." Tertullus produced the one prepare
3105.I will sign it." Tertullus produced the one prepared, saying he relied had fully on
3106.eatures, by the bath and the perfumer's art, the traces of his morning's passion. H
3107.rengthened this instinctive conviction. One woman, indeed, seemed born to meet and
3108.eror himself. He might as well risk his life over it, for if he failed, he was utter
3109.terly ruined. to the After waiting some time, he entered the audience-hall, and adva
3110.ome humbly property. to pray your royal justice, to order of my being put into immediat
3111.pray your royal justice, to order of my being put into immediate possession my share
3112.Agnes' s She has been d-t^ convicted of being a Christian upon my accusation, all and
3113. usually give such warnings twice." " I will. right will obey instantly everj^ intim
3114.e such warnings twice." " I will. right will obey instantly everj^ intimation of the
3115.r's hand and slowly i-etired. He broken man. the gate : He was only heard to say, a
3116. of our servants elling requisites ; he will carry our small trav- on his horse. Two
3117.ney, I and then I " Pray what have only one thing more to get am ready to start." i
3118.son. is I ordered it last night, but it will only be ready at noon." "What willing t
3119. alarm. "Surely jou know," rejoined the other, unmoved. "I am It make one more ; tria
3120.oined the other, unmoved. "I am It make one more ; trial any where else ; but our b
3121. but our bar- gain is clear my father's family must not end in beggary. must be exting
3122.be extinguished Fulvius bit his lip, in honor." be it as you like, I am weary of life
3123.onor." be it as you like, I am weary of life. Leave the house as soon as possible, f
3124., " Well, Latin gate soon after dusk. I will join you there. For I, too, have an imp
3125.ou there. For I, too, have an important matter to transact before I start." "And what
3126. fixed upon him his cold dark eye, with one of those looks which ever read Fulvius
3127.as cool and unusually open, and the old man asked no more. While this dialogue was
3128.iring his look could detect any lurking idea of escape from his gripe. himself in a
3129. So completely did he evidently without necessity of returning ; prepare himself for his
3130. girdle, but concealed under his cloak, one of those curved daggers, of highest tem
3131.ggers, of highest temper and most fatal form, which were only known in the East. Eur
3132. was seen approaching. Eurotas had just time to conceal the flasks ; in his belt, an
3133.ealousy that amounted to hatred. ; pose being accomplished, acted with forbearance, a
3134.archer-chief that he should never It is time, is more see him, however, that we retu
3135.es she had indeed willingly admired the virtue, unselfish, generous, and more than ear
3136. gave motives of actions, principles of science, life,- elevation of mind, courage of c
3137.ives of actions, principles of science, life,- elevation of mind, courage of conof v
3138.nciples of science, life,- elevation of mind, courage of conof virtuous will, such a
3139.s of science, life,- elevation of mind, courage of conof virtuous will, such as and det
3140.tion of mind, courage of conof virtuous will, such as and determination and no other
3141. will, such as and determination and no other system of belief ever bestowed. shrewdl
3142.ing an the sublime revelations of Syra, virtue, unseen sphere of the same source, to a
3143.s of Syra, virtue, unseen sphere of the same source, to and its what did it all-seei
3144. structure of faith, which the simplest soul may contain as a child's eye will take
3145.plest soul may contain as a child's eye will take in the perfect reflection part of
3146.e had never been told of the marvellous history, of Kedemption by God's sufferings and
3147.he marvellous history, of Kedemption by God's sufferings and death. She had not hea
3148., of Kedemption by God's sufferings and death. She had not heard of Nazareth, or Beth
3149.Bethlehem, or Calvary. never heard of a God, One in Trinity; incarnate for man. irr
3150.ehem, or Calvary. never heard of a God, One in Trinity; incarnate for man. irrn ! H
3151.of a God, One in Trinity; incarnate for man. irrn ! How could she call herself a Ch
3152.uld she call herself a Christian, or be one, in ignorance ? of all this had to beco
3153. broken honeycomb. And how much had How many names — she yet to learn about the pr
3154. in grace, in sacraments, in prayer, in love, in charity to others ! What unexplored
3155. the smallest noise and she forbade any one to have access to her. There she sat in
3156.she had been allured by conscience, and justice, and purity, and truth, on, on, till wi
3157.onscience, and justice, and purity, and truth, on, on, till with arms outstretched to
3158.ure, was happy somehow, somewhere; " or justice " was a senseless word. How I strange,"
3159.range," she further thought, that every one whom have known endowed with superior e
3160.ence, men — ; like Sebastian, women I will like Agnes, should turn out ! to have b
3161.onged to the scorned race of Christians One only remains, and to-morrow interrogate
3162.hese, and looked round upon the heathen world, Fulvius, Tertullus, the Emperor, Calpu
3163.he contrast of baseness with nobleness, vice with virtue, stupidity with wisdom, and
3164.t of baseness with nobleness, vice with virtue, stupidity with wisdom, and the sensual
3165.eness, vice with virtue, stupidity with wisdom, and the sensual with the spiritual. He
3166.and the sensual with the spiritual. Her mind was thus being shaped into a mould, whi
3167.l with the spiritual. Her mind was thus being shaped into a mould, which some form of
3168.s being shaped into a mould, which some form of practical excellence must be found t
3169.found to fill, or it must be broken her soul was craving as a parched soil, which he
3170.l deserved the glory of gaining, by her death, her kinswoman's conversion but was the
3171.inswoman's conversion but was there not one, more humble, who had established a pri
3172.le, who had established a prior claim ? One who had given up freedom, and offered l
3173.e who had given up freedom, and offered life, for this unselfish ; gain ? While Fabi
3174. first denied him admittance ; but upon being assured that he felt bore an important
3175.at to do ; when he was informed that no one with such a claim could be refused entr
3176.p very floridly, and intrusted to a bad memory, laid at her feet an imperial rescript,
3177.d presents, and never imagined that the one was a bribe for the other. So she desir
3178.agined that the one was a bribe for the other. So she desired him to return her humbl
3179.unset. Sometimes her reveries turned to one point, sometimes to another of the late
3180. of the late events was dwelling on her being confronted with Her memory vividly repl
3181.elling on her being confronted with Her memory vividly replaced the entire scene befor
3182.ed the entire scene before her, and her mind gradually worked itself into a state of
3183.her mind gradually worked itself into a state of painful excitement, which she at len
3184.ch they heard Pray, madam, who ? is the man whom you honor by that " gracious speec
3185. Pray, madam, who ? is the man whom you honor by that " gracious speech " " said, ris
3186.t is worse, into the house of sorrow of one you have bereaved. Begone at once, or I
3187.you have bereaved. Begone at once, or I will have you ignominiously expelled hence."
3188.ve been too well obeyed. There It is no one within call." was true. Fulvius found t
3189. case and the porter, wondering that so many imperial mesHe begged sengers should co
3190.ial mesHe begged sengers should come in one day, let him pass. that the door might
3191.not like to disturb the house in such a state ; ; of grief. He added that he required
3192.om an earlier date. When, for the first time, I was invited by your worthy father to
3193. your worthy father to his table, I met one whose looks and words at once gained my
3194.hy, such a returned them." " Insolent ; man ! " Fabiola exclaimed, " to allude to t
3195.ied was too true, him her reciprocating love." now remembered that this from the hin
3196. con- cealed nothing "Except her irony. religion," interrupted Fulvius, with bitter " Pe
3197.on," interrupted Fulvius, with bitter " Peace " Fabiola went on " that word sounds li
3198.om you had destined for the place for I will courted. out, Repress your indignation,
3199.ter, you poisoned her and you turned my love into necessary enmity." " all Your love
3200.love into necessary enmity." " all Your love ! " now broke in the indignant lady fal
3201.ave said were not basely for her ? what love could you have plicity, How could you a
3202.ure the dove's mildness? it No, was her wealth, her family at, connection, her nobilit
3203.'s mildness? it No, was her wealth, her family at, connection, her nobility, that ; yo
3204. as worthy of possessing her as "As any one can be," struck in Fabiola, "who, in of
3205.very atmosphere in which you move." " I will leave when I have accomplished my task,
3206.en I have accomplished my task, and you will have little reason to rejoice when I do
3207.do. purposely, and unprovoked, blighted life, Ton have then and destroyed in me ever
3208.society, respectable ease, and domestic happiness. " That was not enough. After acting in
3209.rsation, you this morning threw off all sense of female propriety, and stood forward
3210.you cross its threshold, the average of virtue will be raised in this wicked city. Aga
3211.ss its threshold, the average of virtue will be raised in this wicked city. Again I
3212.m my house, at least ; or at any rate I will withdraw from this oifen- sive intrusio
3213. escajDC or to bring aid your first cry will be your last, cost me what it may. "Ton
3214.y ; rightfully, though painfully earned wealth of subsistence, all ; peace, reputation
3215.lly earned wealth of subsistence, all ; peace, reputation, my means " yo\i have stole
3216.youthful stranger." Wicked and insolent man ! " nant Roman " ; lady, reckless of co
3217.property. it my by ; full I have earned soul, hardly, by pangs and rendings is of th
3218.ends that ay, have con- quered and with one at home that but degraded sterner than
3219.f a proud, Have not a Ay, call what you will, call it my blood-money ; the more infa
3220. step in and from me. It is like a rich man tearing the carrion feet from the hound
3221.n in hunting it and rent you; down." "I will not seek for further epithets by which
3222.ther epithets by which She to call your mind is deluded by some vain dream," said Fa
3223.of a ried off itself she was in madman, one in whom violent passion, carfancy, by a
3224.t should have ever dreamt about Agnes's wealth or property on such a day, or should ha
3225.d have taken any advantage of her cruel death." "And me yet it is so; I have it from
3226. so; I have it from the emperor's mouth Will you pretend to that he has made it over
3227.ere is rather believe, that in this any one so disinterested as, undesired, to have
3228.by his ment. " subtlety, as he had been reasoning to prove Fabiola guilty, flashed up ane
3229.nd presume say that was prepared in the one hour that elapsed between your cousin's
3230.hour that elapsed between your cousin's death and the emperor's that he had signed it
3231.zed her with a maniac's gripe, and this time did not let her go. " He went I on Now
3232.ten to the last * words that Red paint. will speak, or they : ; may be the the last
3233.r they : ; may be the the last that you will it heai'. Give back fair to me that unj
3234. you its reward. Transfer gift, by your sign depart. If manual not, to me as a free
3235.l not, to me as a free and loving and I will you have signed your own doom." A stern
3236.m me no treasures can ransom. ance. And one You have you did legacy I prize more th
3237. mine? leave you to triumph over me, as one whom you have outwitted and I disgraced
3238.you have made me but I can prevent your being what you have no right to be. For this
3239.d with blood. It was the faithful Syra, life her mistress's who had thrown and her b
3240.ment. care suggested to the noble for a time, first Her • was to stanch the flowin
3241.ch accompanied that look. fully for any wealth the sweet smile In a few minutes the ki
3242.ty which might While of seconding those good impressions of grace, scfenes could not
3243.ong when the last struggle comWhile the man was pushing her mistress backmenced. wa
3244. cost her to make this Not the dread of pain, noi' the fear of death could ; was the
3245.Not the dread of pain, noi' the fear of death could ; was the horror of imprintof Cai
3246. anguished her. But she had offered her life for her mistress. To have fought with t
3247.eless; to try to alarm the house before one ; fatal blow was struck was hopeless in
3248.mber my scarf which brought back to his memory so terrible said, " that had the earth
3249.ould, Eurotas to get possession of that family relic, ever since he regained ; but it,
3250.ept it apart as a and when all else was being packed up, should up and put it in his
3251.which he prescribed until midnight. " I will call," he added, " very early in the mo
3252. ear, ; for which seemed to do her more good than all his mediher countenance bright
3253.im light of a sick room, she opened her mind and heart to them ? They were simple pa
3254.arnest. She saw at once the reality and truth of all that her servant had ever spoken
3255.n. . s4rb : ! had described a sphere of virtue, wherein no approbation or of man was t
3256.of virtue, wherein no approbation or of man was to be expected, but only the approv
3257.expected, but only the approving eye of God, she had admired the idea, wliich power
3258.proving eye of God, she had admired the idea, wliich powerfully seized her generous
3259., wliich powerfully seized her generous mind but she had rebelled against its becomi
3260.unseen power ? discoursed of heroism in virtue as And when Miriam had being its ! ordi
3261.eroism in virtue as And when Miriam had being its ! ordinary standard, how chimerical
3262.! ordinary standard, how chimerical the principle had seemed Yet here, without preparatio
3263., without forethought, nay, with marked desire had performed a deed of self-sacriFrom
3264. in every way. from habitual heroism of virtue, ready at any hour to do what would enn
3265.that she taught. all it Could this be a philosophy? ! Oh, no, must be a to religion the re
3266.be a philosophy? ! Oh, no, must be a to religion the religion of Agnes and of Sebastian,
3267.hy? ! Oh, no, must be a to religion the religion of Agnes and of Sebastian, Ho^^^ she wh
3268.. blind and the ears of the deaf, whose will cleanses lepers, the hem of whose garme
3269.s, the hem of whose garment sends forth virtue to cure all. Are you Him?" "With all my
3270.s no anger or indignation exist in your soul against \^^o has injured you ? does any
3271. does any pride or vanity arise in your mind at the thought of what you have done ?
3272.have done ? or are you conscious of any other fault requiring humble confession and a
3273.r breast? " ". Full of imperfection and sin I ; know myself to be, venerI able fath
3274.d to forgive him to whom you allude ; I love much for that, and would willingly give
3275.h for that, and would willingly give my life to save him. And of what have I to be p
3276.rticle of the Blessed Eucharist, in the form of unleavened bread, which, being dry,
3277.in the form of unleavened bread, which, being dry, he moistened in water, and placed
3278.ontemplation. it, and remained for some time absorbed And office of thus did the hol
3279.munion to the sick, without the cup, or one kind. CHAPTER XXXII THE SACRIFICE ACCEP
3280.of if awe and appeared as her servant's mind were removed from surrounding objects,
3281.kept fixed on heaven for a considerable time, while a blissful look of perfect and c
3282.ich was as yet prescribed feeling it an honor, and thinking it did her good, to be in
3283.ng it an honor, and thinking it did her good, to be in contact with such a rare type
3284. be in contact with such a rare type of virtue. At length, in the course some nourishm
3285.cian must have given you some wonderful medicine." " Indeed he has, " my I it dearest mi
3286.s they were alone, must now," the first duty, which my heart has been burning to I d
3287. wish I knew a stronger for let for the life which you have saved me, but which you
3288.—and, me unequalled example of heroic virtue, which alone it." all, inspired " After
3289.ne it." all, inspired " After what have life, I done, but simple duty? Tou had a rig
3290.fter what have life, I done, but simple duty? Tou had a right to my for a much less
3291.? Tou had a right to my for a much less cause than to save yours," answered Miriam. "
3292.eed {liberties, liberta) ; "do not from slavery retained the title of freedman or freed
3293. as an unrivalled reflecting it, act of virtue. since I have been it; night and day, w
3294. act could have been enhanced, or human virtue was grand, it rise one step higher." Mi
3295.ced, or human virtue was grand, it rise one step higher." Miriam, Fabiola's her, in
3296.most earnest tone, thus addressed ; her Good and gentle lady, for one moment listen
3297.dressed ; her Good and gentle lady, for one moment listen to me. ISTot what you are
3298.moment listen to me. ISTot what you are good enough to value, since it pains you to
3299. of an assassin, but of the minister of justice, impend over his head. What would you c
3300. act, if how would you characterize the virtue, of that master, out of pure love, and
3301.the virtue, of that master, out of pure love, and that he might reclaim that wretche
3302.and that he might reclaim that wretched man, he should rush beneath the axe's blow,
3303.ng ignominious and leave written in his will, that he made that slave his titles and
3304.t he made that slave his titles and his wealth, and desired him to be con- sidered as
3305.a picture too sublime to be believed of man. You have not eclipsed your own deed, f
3306.sed your own deed, for I spoke of human virtue. To act as you have now described would
3307.d would require, if possible, that of a God " ! Miriam pressed the folded hand she
3308.y and solemnly replied DID ALL THIS FOR MAN, " to her bosom, fixed on Fabiola's won
3309.s : And Jesus Christ, who for WAS TRULY GOD." a Fabiola covered her face with both
3310. her face with both her hands, and long time was tranquil heart. silent. Miriam pray
3311.m, said ; I thank you from fulfilled my soul," at length Fabiola " you have I some t
3312.l," at length Fabiola " you have I some time Christian " ; For have only been fearin
3313.stian system, or are they its essential principle " " From a simple allegory, dear lady,
3314.mple allegory, dear lady, your powerful mind has, in one bound, reached and grasped
3315., dear lady, your powerful mind has, in one bound, reached and grasped the master-k
3316.nding has extracted, and condensed into one thought, the most vital and prominent d
3317.ed them into their very essence. " That man, God's creature and bondsman, rebelled
3318.em into their very essence. " That man, God's creature and bondsman, rebelled again
3319.ursued him that this very Lord took the form of a servant, and in habit was found li
3320.Lord took the form of a servant, and in habit was found like a man * that in this for
3321. servant, and in habit was found like a man * that in this form he suffered stripes
3322.bit was found like a man * that in this form he suffered stripes, buffets, mockery,
3323.stripes, buffets, mockery, and shameful death, became the ; ' ; ; ' 'Crucified One,'
3324. death, became the ; ' ; ; ' 'Crucified One,' as man from his : fate, kingdom spoke
3325.ecame the ; ' ; ; ' 'Crucified One,' as man from his : fate, kingdom spoken. " all
3326. ; ' 'Crucified One,' as man from his : fate, kingdom spoken. " all men here call Hi
3327.onclusion. ii. And you had reached Only God * Phil. 7. CTtt- : could have performed
3328. in Campania, when you spoke sacrifice, God alone being a victim worthy of God ? "
3329.ia, when you spoke sacrifice, God alone being a victim worthy of God ? " "Yes; but of
3330.ice, God alone being a victim worthy of God ? " "Yes; but of I further alluded to t
3331. own days, by a marvellous dispensation love. an all-powerful However, on this I mus
3332. how that you have ever spoken parts of one plant it ; to all me coheres and togeth
3333.es and together, like the I ; springing one from another. thought bore only the lov
3334.e to do for another, for what much than God has done him? But, Miriam, there is a d
3335.tion, deep beyond reach, complex beyond man's power to unravel; yet perhaps simple
3336.avel; yet perhaps simple to a confiding mind. If, in my present ignorance, I can ven
3337.to creation with all that is occupy all nature, rich it, enough to good and perfect in
3338.s occupy all nature, rich it, enough to good and perfect in your noble " I strong en
3339.anches to the ends of earth. mean, your idea of that God, whom you made me fear, whe
3340. ends of earth. mean, your idea of that God, whom you made me fear, when you spoke
3341.chman and judge; but whom I am sure you will make me love when, as a Christian, you
3342.ge; but whom I am sure you will make me love when, as a Christian, you exhibit Him t
3343.cy. ; "Without some deep mystery in His nature, as yet unknown trine of " to me, I can
3344.not fully apprehend that wonderful doc" man's purchase." responded Miriam, Fabiola,
3345.han should undertake the instruction of one so gifted and if I so acute. But will y
3346.of one so gifted and if I so acute. But will you believe me some explanation? " "Mir
3347.replied Fabiola, with strong emphasis, "one WHO HIM.'' IS READY TO DIE FOR ANOTHER,
3348.WHO HIM.'' IS READY TO DIE FOR ANOTHER, WILL CERTAINLY NOT DECEIVE "And fore, now,"
3349.oined the patient, smiling, "you have I will, there- again seized a great principle
3350.ave I will, there- again seized a great principle —that of faith. be only the simple na
3351.o truly died for us, has taught us. You will believe my word only as that of a faith
3352.only as that of a faithful witness; you will accept His, as that of an unerring God.
3353.will accept His, as that of an unerring God." Fabiola bowed her head, and listened
3354.her head, and listened with reverential mind but to her, in whom she had long honore
3355. long honored a teacher of mar- vellous wisdom, which she drew from some unknown schoo
3356.ol whom now she almost worshipped as an angel, who could open to her the flood-gates
3357.cean, whose waters are the unfathomable Wisdom, overflowing on earth. Miriam expounded
3358. Trinity ; ing, the then after relating man, unfolded the mystery of the Incarnatio
3359.ing, in the very words of St. John, the history of the Eternal Word, till He was made f
3360.pupil uttered; never by cavil or doubt. Philosophy had given place to religion, captiousne
3361.or doubt. Philosophy had given place to religion, captiousness to docility, incredulity
3362.ve looks, come over Faand asked her its cause. ! w "I hardly dare have related to tel
3363.ere. "The Word (what a noble name!), of God's love, the externation of that is, the
3364.The Word (what a noble name!), of God's love, the externation of that is, the expres
3365., becometh flesh. Who shall furnish His wisdom, the evidence His life-giving life, whi
3366.ll furnish His wisdom, the evidence His life-giving life, which it to Him ? Shall He
3367.is wisdom, the evidence His life-giving life, which it to Him ? Shall He take up the
3368.orruption ; and shall there be call any one on earth daring and high enough to hims
3369.whispered Miriam ; " but there shall be one holy enough, and humble enough, to be w
3370.ther Almost 800 years before the Son of God came into the world, a prophet spoke, a
3371.ars before the Son of God came into the world, a prophet spoke, and recorded his word
3372.e called Emanuel,'* which in the Hebrew language signifies 'God with shall conceive us,'
3373.which in the Hebrew language signifies 'God with shall conceive us,' that " is with
3374.' that " is with men. fulfilled in This prophecy was of course of God's the conception a
3375.illed in This prophecy was of course of God's the conception and birth ence. Son on
3376. was " asked Fabiola, with great rever- One whose very name is blessed by every one
3377.One whose very name is blessed by every one that truly Mary is the name by which yo
3378.hat truly Mary is the name by which you will know her: Miriam, its original in her o
3379. its original in her own tongue, is the one by which I honor her. Well, you may sup
3380.n her own tongue, is the one by which I honor her. Well, you may suppose, was she pre
3381., for such high destiny by holiness and virtue loves her Son. ; but as ever clean ; no
3382.t 14. : — ; freed, but exempted, from sin. The tide of found before her the dam o
3383.ch could not brook that the holiness of God should mingle with what it Bright as co
3384.lood of Adam, when the breath of the of God sent it sparkling through his veins, pu
3385.drew it from the side of the slumbering man, were the blood and the flesh, which th
3386.lood and the flesh, which the Spirit of God formed into the glorious humanity, that
3387.nted to our sex, are you surprised that many, like your sweet Agnes, should of their
3388.rgin as the pattern should find in her, virtue ; whom God so elected, the model of eve
3389.ttern should find in her, virtue ; whom God so elected, the model of every and shou
3390.s, yoked, even by the tenderest of this world, seek to fly " to the chariot-wheels of
3391." to the chariot-wheels of of undivided love like upwards on wings hers ? After a pa
3392. Miriam proceeded briefly to detail the history of our Saviour's birth. His laborious l
3393.y of our Saviour's birth. His laborious life, youth. His active but suffering public
3394.listener and ready learner. At last the time for rest had come, when Fabiola humbly
3395. asked " Are you too fatigued to answer one question more?" "No," was the cheerful
3396. hope," said Fabiola, "can there be for one who cannot say she was ignorant, thing
3397.ffected eager; ness after every sort of knowledge but can only confess that its she scorn
3398.y confess that its she scorned the true wisdom, and blasphemed for Giver; one who has
3399. true wisdom, and blasphemed for Giver; one who has scoffed at the very torments wh
3400.d at the very torments which proved the love, and sneered at the death which was the
3401.ich proved the love, and sneered at the death which was the ran- ; soming, of fied ?
3402.r Lord there lived a woman who bore the same name as His spotless Mother but she had
3403. His spotless Mother but she had sinned sin. publicly, degradingly, as you, Fabiola
3404.Re- heart, she contemplated she came to love intensely. His gracious and condescendi
3405.d, forgetting herself, she only thought love, how she might manifest her herself. "
3406.t her herself. " so that it might bring honor, however slight, to Him, and shame, how
3407.t, on She went into the house of a rich man, where the usual its courtesies of hosp
3408.vine guest, into the house of a haughty man who ; spurned, in the presumption of hi
3409.ld that she was forgiven on account her love, and was dismissed with kindest comfort
3410.ent to show how unsullied and repentant love may walk hand in hand, beside Him who s
3411.ued wdth her Fabiola sat by her tale of love. side, sank into a placid slumber. brim
3412.n imitation of dered over her Saviour's love, so had she been as ready to forgive he
3413.ntative of his Master to her. ; but the one that slumbered so tranquilly beside her
3414. true and might well represent Him some time, Miriam awoke, she found her miswas not
3415.miliation she did not stir, but thanked God with a full heart that her sacrifice ha
3416.t was Christian. She felt for the first time mr : : -(W CHAPTER ?HE XXXIII. MIRIAM'S
3417.mr : : -(W CHAPTER ?HE XXXIII. MIRIAM'S HISTORY. next morning, when Dionysius came, he
3418.tulated them both on rest. having had a good night's at the idea ; Both laughed it b
3419. rest. having had a good night's at the idea ; Both laughed it but concurred in sayi
3420. of Fabiola, said " Venerable priest of God, I confide to your fatherly care this c
3421.e you more than a physician " "I am, my man replied; "unworthily I hold likewise th
3422. I hold likewise the higher a priest in God's Church." Fabiola unhesitatingly knelt
3423.are not the first of said to her "Be is good courage, daughter ; your house whom God
3424.ot the first of said to her "Be is good courage, daughter ; your house whom God has bro
3425.ood courage, daughter ; your house whom God has brought into His holy Church. It no
3426.as brought into His holy Church. It now many years since I was called in here, under
3427. was to baptize, a few hours before her death, the wife of Fabius." : ately after giv
3428.iChristian ? " and I doubt not that her life spirit has been hovering about you thro
3429.nseen to this blessed hour. And, before God, she has been unceasing in her supplica
3430.asing in her supplicaby the side of the angel filled tions on your behalf." Joy tenfo
3431.e could we now list of give. With Greek one their mistress, the old nurse, Euphrosy
3432., EmerentiIt was her delight to make by being the ready messenger between the ana, th
3433.lness, as her strength improved, Miriam life many will particulars of her previous t
3434., as her strength improved, Miriam life many will particulars of her previous to Fab
3435.her strength improved, Miriam life many will particulars of her previous to Fabiola;
3436. our story commenced, there lived in we will give her history in a continuous form.
3437.menced, there lived in we will give her history in a continuous form. Some years Antioc
3438.e will give her history in a continuous form. Some years Antioch a who, though not o
3439.rs Antioch a who, though not of ancient family, was rich, and moved in the highest cir
3440.debt. He was married to a lady of great virtue, who became a Christian, at first secre
3441.ame a Christian, at first secretly, and man ; afterwards continued so, with her hus
3442. the meantime their two children, a son education under her care. had received their dome
3443. his father first discovered his wife's religion. He had much from his mother of been wi
3444.ndant on Christian worship and hence he knowledge, of which he afterwards made so fatal d
3445.ul and artful, with of preparing for no love for any restraint upon his passions, or
3446.He looked forward to distinction in the world, and to his full share in all its enjoy
3447. and besides Antioch, he was acquainted language, then generally spoken at gracefidly, a
3448.atin, which he spoke readily and In the family, the accent. seen, though with a slight
3449.his mother's control, and insisted that religion of the continue to follow the dominant
3450.inue to follow the dominant and favored state. As not so to the daughter, who was rel
3451.ate. As not so to the daughter, who was religion ; three years younger, he did much care
3452.nmanly it to take much trouble about to change especially, or of weakabandon that of t
3453. that of the empire, was, he thought, a sign more imaginative, and more under But wo
3454.e imaginative, and more under But women being ness. in any fancies of the sway of the
3455.ged to a rich whose exercise of her new family from Edessa, to continue in the free cu
3456. to her high mental faith. ; a model of virtue, simple and unpretending. It was a peri
3457.ted every influence, and every or allow art, employed to induce her to release this
3458.lease this property, it to merge in the family resources, and be made available toward
3459.ieving their embarrassments. And on her death-bed, laid this among other solemn paren
3460.. And on her death-bed, laid this among other solemn parental injunctions, she filial
3461.junctions, she filial on her daughter's sense of duty, that she never in this arrange
3462., she filial on her daughter's sense of duty, that she never in this arrange- would
3463.led Eurotas, made his appearance in the family. ; No one head seemed to know him and h
3464.made his appearance in the family. ; No one head seemed to know him and he evidentl
3465.velations it is sufficient to add, that being the elder brother, but con- scious that
3466. sustaining the position of head of the family and administering quietly a settled pro
3467.e with Rome. Eurotas, instead of a rich family, into which to pour superfluous wealth,
3468. family, into which to pour superfluous wealth, found only a a large fortune, and a co
3469. ; to save from ruin. But and else, his family pride prevailed and after many reproach
3470.e, his family pride prevailed and after many reproaches, all bitter quarrels with hi
3471.s brother's property, and of the entire family. After a few years of weary life, the f
3472.tire family. After a few years of weary life, the father sickened and On his death-b
3473.ry life, the father sickened and On his death-bed, he told Orontius that he had nothi
3474.ted, remorseless, and no less ambitious man, who soon prescribed as the basis of mu
3475.us virtually absolute submission to his will, while he should act in the capacity of
3476.city of an inferior, and the understood principle, that nothing was too great or too litt
3477.as too great or too little, nothing too good or too after the ruin wicked to be done
3478. the ruin wicked to be done, to restore family position and wealth. To stay at Antioch
3479.be done, to restore family position and wealth. To stay at Antioch was impossible whic
3480.e which had overtaken the house. With a good capital in hand, much might be done els
3481.as still untouched the sister's fortune death. and ; both agreed that this must be go
3482.ould give them together proposed that a time they should all live pose ; upon her me
3483. did not answer their purand when every other course had failed, Eurotas began to hin
3484.had failed, Eurotas began to hint, that one rid of at who stood so much first in th
3485.nseen violence, of success. of which no law could take cognizance, and which no one
3486.law could take cognizance, and which no one would dare reveal, offered him the best
3487.would dare reveal, offered him the best chance Among ist at the privileges of Christia
3488.s use. crated object, for she continued One day, early in the morning, she knelt be
3489.im, where he was closeted with the dark man, in whose ! presence she always tremble
3490.store what she valued more than all her wealth. He was on the point of yielding to her
3491.ou truly sincere what you offer ? " " I will surrender any thing, all I have, to res
3492. profanation the Holy of Holies." "Then sign that paper," said Eurotas, with a sneer
3493.n he in saw himself overreached, by the man to whom he had sugsister. But it was to
3494.h the formalities required by the Roman law. For a short time she was treated sooth
3495. required by the Roman law. For a short time she was treated soothingly then hints g
3496. ; began tius to be given to her of the necessity of moving, as Oron- and his friend inte
3497.d given proof of valuing, more than any wealth. For, as St. Ambrose relates of his bro
3498.t the only survivor at least she saw no other person saved. Those, therefore, that di
3499., on returning to Antioch, reported her death, together with that of the remaining pa
3500.er with kindness. slaves, After a short time, Fabius instructed one of his agents in
3501., After a short time, Fabius instructed one of his agents in Asia to procure a slav
3502. Catacombs. : : ;; CHAPTER XXXIV BRIGHT DEATH. j^T was a few days after the occiiiTen
3503. an old related in our last chapter but one, that Fabiola was told, man in great an
3504.chapter but one, that Fabiola was told, man in great anguish, real or pretended, de
3505.ou, for is otherwise that I am a ruined man " ! "How ment. debts." " I possible?" a
3506.t." ; Her first impulse was to turn the man out of the house but the thought of the
3507.t the thought of the sister came to her mind, and yhe civilly said to him "Whatever
3508.hatever debts. Fulvius has contracted I will discharge; interest, but with only lega
3509.instructions, accordingly, to the freed-man who managed her affairs, to pay this su
3510.n those conditions, which reduced it to one half the demand. But she soon engaged h
3511.ion as would ensure him comfort through life. These temporal matters being soon disp
3512.rt through life. These temporal matters being soon disposed of, she divided her atten
3513.rt of the day, could even be carried on one into the garden before the house, where
3514.him. up his side and Emerentiana on the other, would also frequently discourse on Chr
3515.tance, when he had been treating of the virtue and meaning " of the sign of the cross
3516.ting of the virtue and meaning " of the sign of the cross to be used in baptism, whe
3517.ed them to practise faithfully what all good Christians did, that is, to which they
3518.ointed, or the sacrifice make this holy sign upon themselves already, "in the course
3519.slow waste of illness, in child or ful, Love is so hope- and so blind ! There was a
3520.he slight was emaciated and weak, and a time to time. cough was heard from she could
3521.t was emaciated and weak, and a time to time. cough was heard from she could look ou
3522.so placed that from early dawn all upon one spot parterre. more fair to them villa
3523.ad ; an entrance it ceme- but from this time ; the name of Agnes for near its had al
3524.ight and air to the room below. Towards one this point Miriam loved to look, as the
3525. much venerated and loved. for it Early one morning, beautiful and calm, she observ
3526.ing a trespass. They passed by this and one of them, having looked down, called the
3527.ving looked down, called the is "This " one of those underground lurking-places of
3528.ound lurking-places of the Christians." One of their rabbit-holes into the burrow."
3529.abbit-holes into the burrow." in," said one. "Let us go "Yes, and second. how shall
3530.t hear, but she saw what fol- lowed it. One who had looked down more silence. caref
3531. the light, called the others to do the same, but with gestures which enjoined pulle
3532.osed that they had seen some serpent or other noxious animal below, and had amused th
3533. had seen some serpent or other noxious animal below, and had amused themselves with c
3534.orgies near uuei y,iru w the liver, and being invited to join in them, she had not on
3535.d the modest peasant child received the honor of annual of her former assailants disc
3536. the very entrance into a cemetery, and one First fur- nished with such large churc
3537.d lesson, collect and derived from this custom. Any one perusing the present rite of b
3538.llect and derived from this custom. Any one perusing the present rite of baptism in
3539.olic Church, especially that of adults, will see condensed into one office what used
3540.that of adults, will see condensed into one office what used its to be one ancientl
3541.sed into one office what used its to be one anciently distributed through a variety
3542. and More solemn still was the unction, other mysterious rites. which was not confine
3543.lso faithfully learnt, and committed to memory. But the doctrine of the Blessed Euchar
3544.d preparatory exercises the penitential time of Lent passed quickly and solemnly, ev
3545.m received its great developments after peace had been gained ; and much that belongs
3546.ven ceremonies and accessories were the same in the three first centuries as now. If
3547.xample is thought worth following, some one will perhaps illustrate a brighter peri
3548.le is thought worth following, some one will perhaps illustrate a brighter period th
3549. the cemetery of Pontianus, cele* These will be found, particularly in the baptism o
3550.rough the night, commenced. When it the time for the administration of baptism arriv
3551.uction, was admitted till for the first time to the table of his Lord, and nourished
3552.ssful, so fully repaid they had been to one another for months, that no feelings. w
3553.ve expression to their Fabiola' s grand idea and absorbing pride, that day was, that
3554.f her former slave : now she had not in virtue, not in beauty of character, not in gre
3555.ave : now she had not in virtue, not in beauty of character, not in greatness of mind,
3556.eauty of character, not in greatness of mind, not in heavenly wisdom, not in merit b
3557.t in greatness of mind, not in heavenly wisdom, not in merit before God herself infini
3558.in heavenly wisdom, not in merit before God herself infinitely her inferior. to ; o
3559. in all this she felt But as a child of God, as heiress of the an eternal kingdom,
3560.e mensorrows, tioned, she for the first time noticed the shortened breath, heaving c
3561.yed, said to her " My dear sister, what will you do, when grief. I have " left you?"
3562.est sister. stood her, and said Pray to God, who will refuse you nothing, that I ma
3563.r. stood her, and said Pray to God, who will refuse you nothing, that I may not lose
3564.o us by intercession, to interi^ose for will pray to Agnes* and avert so Sebastian,
3565. am sure tlifere nothing serious in the matter; the warm weather, and the genial clima
3566.weather, and the genial climate of nia, will soon restore you. We will sit again tog
3567.imate of nia, will soon restore you. We will sit again together Campaby the spring,
3568.pring, and talk over better things than philosophy." Miriam shook her head, not mournfully
3569. dearest; should see this happy day. it death, as I God has spared me till But His ha
3570.ould see this happy day. it death, as I God has spared me till But His hand is on m
3571. is on me now for has been hitherto for life; and I hail it with joy. ! know too wel
3572.urn " for me but I would not rob you of one hour of your mystic white- ness." Diony
3573. ness." Dionysius came, and saw a great change in his patient, It was as he had for so
3574. his patient, It was as he had for some time. The insidious point of the dagger had
3575.she prayed long and fervently, and with many tears, then returned. "Sister," she sai
3576.ed. "Sister," she said with firmn'ess, "God's will be done, I am ready to resign ev
3577.ister," she said with firmn'ess, "God's will be done, I am ready to resign even you
3578.all arrive from the East, the bearer of good tidings." On the Sunday following, " Su
3579.. Forgive me, if I have been wanting in duty to you, and in good example." This was
3580.ave been wanting in duty to you, and in good example." This was more than Fabiola co
3581., and said, " Put I to my lips the and, sign of salvation Dionysius, * St. when reme
3582.n remember me said I can speak no more; good at God's altar when am departed." bouse
3583.er me said I can speak no more; good at God's altar when am departed." bouse of a l
3584.in a house supposed to be infested with evil spirits. De Civ. D. lib. in the Ambrose
3585.Civ. D. lib. in the Ambrose Mass in his Life, torn. ii. Oper. ed. Bened.) xxii. c. 6
3586.t length raising her hand then bringing sign. it to her breast, it fell dead there,
3587.as they do much hope. over her but this time she mourned who have Portrait of Oar Sa
3588.Christian Emperor, after a medal of the time. IPart ®})trir.-bictorg. CHAPTER I. TH
3589.to ourselves to be walking in solitude. One by and actions, one, those whose words
3590.alking in solitude. One by and actions, one, those whose words and even thoughts, h
3591.en describing not an ordinary period of peace and every-day life, but one of warfare,
3592. ordinary period of peace and every-day life, but one of warfare, strife, and battle
3593.period of peace and every-day life, but one of warfare, strife, and battle. Is it u
3594.k around us the ? We have been reviving memory of the cruellest persecution which the
3595.yet the Church of Christ has to sustain many ^ years of sharper persecution than ces
3596.A sucand oppressors kept up the fearful war upon after without intermission, in one
3597.war upon after without intermission, in one part of the world or another twenty yea
3598.ithout intermission, in one part of the world or another twenty years, even Constanti
3599. Christians under their dominions. Like one of those rolling storms which go over h
3600.e rolling storms which go over half the world, visiting various laoClXEBIAS. After am
3601.his persecution wreak its fury first on one country, then on another, destroying ev
3602.menia, while it left no place in actual peace, but hung like a blighting storm-cloud
3603.storm-cloud over the entire empire. And world of yet the Church increased, prospered,
3604.h increased, prospered, and defied this sin. Pontiff stepped after Pontiff at once
3605.op in his see, and ordained priests and other ministers to take the place of the fall
3606.nd conflicts, that the foundations were being laid of a mighty system, destined to pr
3607. in after ages. persecution drove The " many from the cities, into the deserts of Eg
3608.he deserts of Egypt, where the monastic state grew up, so as to wilderness rejoice an
3609.e, and had died a peevish destitute old man, and Galerius had been eaten up alive e
3610.red amidst tortures inflicted by Divine justice equal to any lie had inflicted on Chris
3611.r sockets, and Licinius had been put to death by Constantino the spouse of Christ, wh
3612.about to enter into her great career of universal diffusion and rule. It was in the year
3613.o, having defeated Maxentius, gave full liberty to the Church. Even if ancient writers
3614.de of the poor Christians on this great change. It was like the coming forth, and tear
3615.meet in the cemeteries nearest to them, many ; * Isaias xxxv. 1, 3. did not or know
3616.e going to lead him forward into a long history. This will belong to some one better fo
3617.d him forward into a long history. This will belong to some one better for qualified
3618. long history. This will belong to some one better for qualified, The the task of f
3619.t is neces- sary for its completion. We will then suppose ourselves arrived at the y
3620., fifteen years after our last scene of death. nent laws have given security to the C
3621.security to the Christian the Church is Time and permareligion, and likewise more fu
3622.he Early Ages of the Church. : ^-fW ^:i Many who on by the return of peace had hung
3623.: ^-fW ^:i Many who on by the return of peace had hung down their heads, having by so
3624.some act of Aveak condescension escaped death, had this time expiated their fall by p
3625.k condescension escaped death, had this time expiated their fall by penance ; and no
3626.* If at this period our friendly reader will follow us out of the Nomentan gate, to
3627.with which he is already acquainted, he will find sad havoc among the beautiful tree
3628.shed by a vision, and completely cured. Being now baptized, she was repaying her debt
3629.lgrims, that came from all parts of the world. One afternoon, when Fabiola returned f
3630. that came from all parts of the world. One afternoon, when Fabiola returned from t
3631.e morning I noticed, among the crowd, a man not yet fifty, but worn by mortificatio
3632.tears, such groans, such sobs, as moved Many approached him, and whisall around to c
3633. know was he ? " pered, ' Brother, thou art in great distress ; weej) not will all
3634. thou art in great distress ; weej) not will all so, the for saint is merciful.' the
3635.sconsolate or heart-broken, except only one man." But he seemed to be "Go next?" on
3636.solate or heart-broken, except only one man." But he seemed to be "Go next?" on, go
3637. in Fabiola; "what did he "After a long time," continued the fossor, "he arose, and
3638.r tomb. I thought I had seen it before, many years ago." "And then?" " Turning round
3639.tly to the tomb. After a pause of great pain to himself, so agitated voice faltered,
3640.she died?' 'Of consumption,' I replied. God he ejaculated, with the sigh of relieve
3641.e seen his face, I had But I am sure he will return city." after I not courage to me
3642. sure he will return city." after I not courage to meet his eye. again ; for he went to
3643.adst, then, this consoling foresight in death Noe and the Ark, as a eymbol of the Chu
3644.Forum, when he round atten- saw a group one of persons gathered whom to they were e
3645.o He therefore drew In the centre was a man, younger than himself; but if he looked
3646.ut if he looked older than he was, from being wan and attenuated, the other did so He
3647.was, from being wan and attenuated, the other did so He was bald and and red, and cov
3648., and his gait and tone were those of a man habitually intoxicated. His clothes wer
3649.e person neglected. "Ay, ay, Corvinus," one youth was saying to him, "won't you get
3650.ome, and don't you think the Christians will have their turn about now ? " "Not they
3651. about now ? " "Not they," answered the man we have described, "they have not the p
3652.ember we feared it, when much more from being the very contrary. bloated, with a face
3653.shed his entius, first edict, after the death of Max- about liberty for the Christian
3654.st edict, after the death of Max- about liberty for the Christians, but next year he I
3655. it would surely be very natural," said one. "And " very just," added another. turn
3656.d another. turning Christian. Oh, never mind," said Corvinus, " they will always let
3657. Oh, never mind," said Corvinus, " they will always let one off for any thing, rathe
3658." said Corvinus, " they will always let one off for any thing, rather than stand
3659.than they would have done from the wild one the desert. He cursed them, and threw s
3660.ent on. Corvinus moved slowly along the same road, that the Cathedral of Eome. * Eus
3661.w Suddenly a sharp growl was heard, The law of retaliation, such as was prescribed
3662.ch as was prescribed also in the Mosaic law, " an eye for an eye, a tooth for a too
3663.tims of some fatality, connected with a particular object, approached the for emperor's vi
3664.he bars, He went close and provoked the animal, by gestures and words saying: "Very li
3665. likely, indeed, that you are to be the death of ! me Tou are very safe in your den."
3666.your den." In that instant, the enraged animal made a inflicted spring at him, and thr
3667.frightful lacerated wound. The wretched man was picked up, and carried to his lodgT
3668. fixed his eyes upon him with a look of one delirious, or demented. " Do you know m
3669.se hateful Where have you been all this time? How Christians. many of them have you
3670.you been all this time? How Christians. many of them have you caught?" And he laughe
3671.d he laughed out- — — ! rageously. "Peace, peace, Corvinus," replied the other. "
3672.ughed out- — — ! rageously. "Peace, peace, Corvinus," replied the other. "You mus
3673.. "Peace, peace, Corvinus," replied the other. "You must myself be very quiet, or the
3674. shed more of their best blood than any man ? Have : ! you been forgiven upon it ?
3675. got rid of them all, that I may do the same. If Vengeance and fury not, they will c
3676.e same. If Vengeance and fury not, they will come, they will come why should they no
3677.ance and fury not, they will come, they will come why should they not have tormented
3678. Corvinus; I have suffered as you have. will But I have found the remedy, and ing."
3679.his seat beside him, and spoke mercy of God, and His readiness to forgive the worst
3680. a living proof. of sinners The unhappy man seemed to be in a sort of stupor; if he
3681.ity, in hope, rather than certainty, of being attended " to, went on to say And now,
3682., went on to say And now, Corvinus, you will ask me, how ? is for- giveness to be ap
3683.how ? is for- giveness to be applied to one who believes all this of It is by Bapti
3684.lieves all this of It is by Baptism, by being born again Ghost." water and the Holy "
3685.and the Holy "What?" exclaimed the sick man loathingly. " By being washed in the la
3686.exclaimed the sick man loathingly. " By being washed in the laver of regenei'ating wa
3687.to be plunged into water" (the sick ; : man drops shuddered, and moaned) suffice, ;
3688.fficulty that he and the of the enraged animal. Occasionally he broke servant could ho
3689.sms of blasphemous violence against out God and man. on moaning thus And then, when
3690.lasphemous violence against out God and man. on moaning thus And then, when this su
3691. busily em- ployed inquiring after some one about the Januses in the Forum. the per
3692.aximian Herculeus Augustus, the seventh time." Here they found sundry entries, with
3693. roll of mouldy parchments of that date time, * and the number corresponding to the
3694.arties. " It is the first " that I ever time in my life," said the knew a person who
3695.t is the first " that I ever time in my life," said the knew a person who had got cl
3696.ume, sir ? * A. D. 303. " Certainly, by God's mercy." ; " I thought as much at good
3697. God's mercy." ; " I thought as much at good morning, sir. I shall be happy to accom
3698.I shall be happy to accommodate you any time, at as reasonable rates as my father Ep
3699.dy Fabiola? " "Certainly," answered the other; "come this way." Neither alluded, as t
3700., to old times, nor to the intermediate history of either. There seemed to be an all un
3701. to be it men, as they hoped was before God. Fabiola had remained at in home that a
3702. visitor approach, and an indescribable emotion thrilled through her, when she found he
3703. a tone of deep humility and earnest of justice, as well as simplicity. should never ha
3704. before you, had not an obligation me." many I of gratitude, obliged "Orontius," she
3705.ur great Apostle charges on us, that we love one another." (he signified his assent)
3706.eat Apostle charges on us, that we love one another." (he signified his assent) " I
3707.have upon you for any lower motive than one of strict duty. I I know what gratitude
3708.for any lower motive than one of strict duty. I I know what gratitude owe you for th
3709.he kindness and aifection lavished upon one now dearer to me than any sister can be
3710. towards her the neglected." offices of love which I had be "And thereby my angel of
3711. of love which I had be "And thereby my angel of sold sent her to me," interposed Fab
3712.ent her to me," interposed Fabiola, "to life. was Remember, Orontius, that Joseph by
3713.e might save his so race." "You are too good, indeed, towards one worthless," for re
3714.ce." "You are too good, indeed, towards one worthless," for resumed the pilgrim; ki
3715.the pilgrim; kindness to another "but I will not thank you your this, who has repaid
3716. this, who has repaid you so richly. to one Only morning I have learnt your mercy c
3717.ot understand you," observed Fabiola. I will tell Then you all plainly," rejoined Or
3718.ejoined Orontius. " I have now been for many years a munities in Palestine, of membe
3719.s a munities in Palestine, of member of one of those commen who live separated from
3720.hose commen who live separated from the world in desert places, dividing their day, a
3721. Divine praises, contemplation, and the labor of their hands. Severe penance for our
3722.ressions, fasting, mourning, and prayer form the great duty of our penitential state
3723.ng, mourning, and prayer form the great duty of our penitential state. Have you hear
3724. form the great duty of our penitential state. Have you heard of such men here?" " Th
3725.nd the consolation he has given me. But one thought troubled me, and prevented left
3726.uld I discharge my obligations " ? Only one means remained. my creditor as a slave,
3727.ns remained. my creditor as a slave, to labor for and scornful reproaches in could gi
3728.you were brought embraced." " I to that life, which you have so generously I fled, a
3729.have so generously I fled, as you know, one sorrowful night from Rome, accompanied
3730.owful night from Rome, accompanied by a will obey you as briefly as possible. man "
3731.a will obey you as briefly as possible. man " — his voice choked him. I "I know,
3732.interrupted to charter a vessel for The same, the curse dear of our house, the autho
3733.d in The religious community, or common life, were so called. : seek some other coun
3734.ommon life, were so called. : seek some other country. settled for We crossed over to
3735.ow." all Orontius paused and wept for a time, then went on "At length, when was exha
3736.ecution was breaking out. For the first time in my life I rebelled against his comma
3737. breaking out. For the first time in my life I rebelled against his commands, and re
3738.inst his commands, and refused to obey. One day he asked me to walk out of the gate
3739.eadful must not survive the ruin of our family. Here we must both sat "We down to rest
3740. we must both sat "We down to rest, The time was come, he die ; the wild beasts woul
3741.beasts would consume our bodies, and no one last representatives. would know the en
3742.f its " So saying, he drew sizes, forth one, handed me the larger refused to take ;
3743.intly called for drink. A venerable old man, with a white beard, put a wooden bowl
3744. fatality this had happened but I bless God with all my heart, for having ; spared
3745.heart, for having ; spared me. That old man was Hilarion, a native of Gaza, who, ha
3746.Hilarion, a native of Gaza, who, having many years with the holy Anthony in Egypt, h
3747. establish the cenobitic and eremitical life in his own country, and had already col
3748.r holy as I recovered. I lives, saw the religion which I had persecuted in a sublime for
3749.ion which I had persecuted in a sublime form and rapidly recalled to mind the instru
3750. a sublime form and rapidly recalled to mind the instructions of my dear mother, and
3751.race, I bewailed my sins at the feet of God's minister, f and received baptism on E
3752.of the Church for I was born to eternal life, also, on that day. But what do you int
3753. The first was " to cancel my debt ; my will second was to lay an offering on the sh
3754.remember," he added, smiling, that your good * A. D. 303. t Confession of sins in pr
3755.er unintentionally deceived me into the idea, that she I coveted the jewels resolved
3756.ery wiiere sustenance and lodging but I will accept from ; you a cup of water and a
3757.ala, you are far from happy. long, long time." " no danger here," replied the lady;
3758.ught to have been so happy ? Graja, and good old departed Euphrosyne, have learnt to
3759. departed Euphrosyne, have learnt to be good myself, and have embraced Christianity
3760.ur house, where ! bala " ? " For a long time, lady, in my sorrows and remorse. For I
3761.s to my this morning, he has beaten me, life. husband take my But, thank God, I have
3762.en me, life. husband take my But, thank God, I have been and threatened to making m
3763.amed Eurotas. Oh he was indeed a wicked man, a man ! of black passions and remorsel
3764.rotas. Oh he was indeed a wicked man, a man ! of black passions and remorseless vil
3765.o prepare for him two narcotic potions; one for any enemy, he said, should he be ta
3766.ally concentrated poison, and the large one a more diluted and weaker dose. But my
3767. been committed, and that unintentional death may have ensued." Fabiola and Orontius
3768.ensued." Fabiola and Orontius looked at one another in silence, wondering at the ju
3769.ly," she replied. "Dost thou believe in One God in Jesus Christ, in Three Persons?"
3770. she replied. "Dost thou believe in One God in Jesus Christ, in Three Persons?" die
3771.o nected with his own, and his sister's history. lying much conUpon it were ; two sharp
3772.f both which were rusted with blood. In one he recognized his own dagger the other
3773.In one he recognized his own dagger the other appeared to one of those instruments of
3774.ed his own dagger the other appeared to one of those instruments of female vengeanc
3775.hed the blood of her, whom now we part, honor a sister I heaven. But for my from the
3776.en and gave her occasion to display her virtue, What say you, I date the dawn of grace
3777.y you, I date the dawn of grace upon my soul. Orontius?" " That I, likewise, from th
3778. heroism, began to did feel the hand of God upon me, that has and forgiveness." "It
3779.ws " it. May the Church, in her days of peace and of victories, never forget what she
3780.bted to it for our spiritual lives. May many, who will only read of it, draw from it
3781. for our spiritual lives. May many, who will only read of it, draw from it the same
3782. will only read of it, draw from it the same mercy and grace!" They knelt down, and
3783.of the just. And withdrew Miriam. after many rest years of charity and peace, in hol
3784.m. after many rest years of charity and peace, in holiness, Fabiola to in tompany wit

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/