Concordance for Everybody's St. Francis : by Maurice Francis Egan... with pictures by M. Boutet de Monvel.

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1.    EGAN PROFESSOa EMERITUS OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE AT THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSI
2. t . 3 II. III. The Beginning of the New Life The Wolf of Gubbio and the Coming of Sa
3. er Francis at the head of a band of his pleasure-loving companions Francis carrying a st
4. r sister waiting on St. Francis ... 177 Death of St. Francis 187 EVERYBODY'S ST. FRAN
5. there is September, in the is So far as beauty concerned, no question that he was happ
6. uestion that he was happy in People who love the place of his birth. beauty would go
7. People who love the place of his birth. beauty would go to Umbria, even if Fran- and a
8. less, that he might belong to the whole world had not become one with Assisi and Umci
9. elong to the whole world had not become one with Assisi and Umcis β€” once Bernardo
10. , and in Rome, too, though not with the same purpose. deified Once a year Augustus b
11. fear, may pass, And I submission help, Fate's envy, the dread chance and change of
12. submission help, Fate's envy, the dread chance and change of things.^ so averting, if
13. help, Fate's envy, the dread chance and change of things.^ so averting, if ^Browning:
14. that of the emperor's. ITALY DURING THE LIFE OF ST. FRANCIS Italy β€” if we may spea
15. s, the rule of the German emperor meant slavery; that of the pope, the hope of freedom,
16. t hinder them from opposing the pope in other temporal matters, if they saw III fit.
17. Lateran the pope heard threats of civil war; the strength of the empire was growing
18. strength in a palace in Palermo for his chance to spring. It was not a happy time grea
19. is chance to spring. It was not a happy time greater for the birth of a poet Assisi
20. been more prosperous, or more besotted love for the things of this world. The than
21. re besotted love for the things of this world. The than Propertius. peasants in Umbri
22. better off than their neighbors, had no time for They believed firmly in what they c
23. d in France and on the road to Almighty God; to do honor to the Son of the been but
24. and on the road to Almighty God; to do honor to the Son of the been but no poor man
25. onor to the Son of the been but no poor man or woman would have really the better f
26. u little Lord Jesus," Peter Bernar"thou art done would probably have said make you
27. make you poor; we, the rich of Assisi, will β€” rich. Here of is workmanship infide
28. for Spain, thee. all But, dear and the world shall Lord, be sure that know what the
29. FRANCIS In mortal hatred of poverty, in love of luxury, the end of the twelfth and t
30. th century were not exceeded by our own time. Faith without morals or good works was
31. y our own time. Faith without morals or good works was not rare in that time, which
32. rals or good works was not rare in that time, which nourished the germs of our moder
33. which nourished the germs of our modern progress into fuller tions life. The pagan super
34. f our modern progress into fuller tions life. The pagan supersti- which led Augustus
35. d at the shrine of the It patron of his family as a propitiation. was an age of faith,
36. of credulity, which is not. If gift of God, All kinds of horrible beliefs were wel
37. gave up the meek Christ to the waiting desire for mob, or a sudden wealth or woman wo
38. the waiting desire for mob, or a sudden wealth or woman would lead him sell his with e
39. sell his with equal suddenness to devil soul to the and make hell his portion, thoug
40. n, though always with the hope that the good St. John or the kindly St. Magdalen wou
41. became in substance the body and blood, soul and divinity, of the risen Christ when
42. hemers. That the accidents of color and form and taste concealed the mystic substanc
43. manity and divinity met was a truism of life. For [11] EVERYBODY this belief cathedr
44. S ST. FRANCIS built, were not merely to honor a pure spirit in heaven, far-off. unkno
45. ur without it. It was, and is, the very life of the Catholic Church. In judging the
46. hurch. In judging the conditions of the time of Francis of Assisi, this truth or ign
47. of the time of Francis of Assisi, this truth or ignored is often forgotten by person
48. nored is often forgotten by persons who will see the past only through modern eyes.
49. the expression of the central truths of life. Without knowing what the sacrifice of
50. d the conditions of the under which the man time of St. Francis of Assisi existed,
51. e conditions of the under which the man time of St. Francis of Assisi existed, as to
52. rrents of modern currents and without a knowledge processes of evolution. It is of Ufe th
53. ts and without a knowledge processes of evolution. It is of Ufe the meaning and necessary
54. g and necessary, too, to comprehend the matter of their view of the Italians in the re
55. y father about ities meant spiritual no sense a revolt against his teachings, and had
56. uently arising and with in Italy in the time of St. Francis, which he had no sympath
57. ncor against of the any system tion. of government or social organiza- In fact, he did not
58. n fact, he did not trouble himself with government or political systems; he thought only o
59. ncis would scarcely have entered into a world more un-Christlike than that surround[1
60. joy at the birth of a son, represented one phase of the burden society, for Peter
61. ation commercial to spirit. the To make good bargains, show the proud nobles that he
62. give his own, not caring much who wept one of the with cold and hunger outside his
63. tside his gates, were conditions of his life. He was many moyen prosperous sensuel.
64. es, were conditions of his life. He was many moyen prosperous sensuel. men of his ti
65. ny moyen prosperous sensuel. men of his time He valued what he practical, a is β€” h
66. ” homme of his could see. was intensely sense. It model He common son, probable that
67. . It model He common son, probable that other Angelo, resembled him; but Francis was
68. anged his name from John to Francis, in honor of her and the far land she loved, wher
69. men [141 YOUTH OF ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI life understood the splendors of chants prof
70. HE MONEY-CHANGERS IN THE TEMPLE At this time there were bishops in Italy and else ev
71. and they accepted the mission. In their opinion their personal rights were the rights o
72. contagion of poverty, the essential of one of their vows, and lived the lives of a
73. rfection taught by the founder of their religion and the duties demanded times. of them
74. hat grew and flourished in Italy at the time, that of Cathari was wide-spread. was a
75. e best method of relieving the wretched soul from accursed. the weight of matter, wh
76. tched soul from accursed. the weight of matter, which ManiTheir cheism and Gnosticism
77. f the book of Christianity and society. life threatened In vain Pope Inno- cent III,
78. y, and strong. Men were voluptuously in love with the temlife. poral things of The b
79. . poral things of The beginnings of the progress in the sciences and the arts, which we
80. e fl81 ! YOUTH OF ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI life, evident, but they did not constitute a
81. titute and they were as nothing without love. The is little Francis was a spoiled ch
82. nardone was rich enough to give an easy life to the Madonna Pica, whom he had brough
83. ous son who, she firmly believed, would one day be a great prince. too; but, then,
84. rince. too; but, then, he She loved her other son, was so like her husband's family I
85. er other son, was so like her husband's family It has always been the fashion for biog
86. given the pedigree of the great French family of Bourle- At any had a very noble and
87. of Bourle- At any had a very noble and life. romantic point of view of [19] The Pro
88. the Italian speech was nurtured in the language of Provence. He was to be the preux che
89. be the preux chevalier, a great son of God; a merchant, perhaps, like his father,
90. ps, like his father, also, but with the poetry of Provence grafted on the shrewd, prud
91. nt to Italy makto who was to give a new world and to Christendom. He was fight the an
92. omas facts of of Celano, to whom we owe many life, Francis Bernardone's early is nev
93. facts of of Celano, to whom we owe many life, Francis Bernardone's early is never in
94. never intemperate except in the use of rhetoric. In his heart he knew well that this at
95. n the tales of the paladins than in the art of reading and writing, was in the eyes
96. ing and writing, was in the eyes of the world not only It gay, but good. was not from
97. eyes of the world not only It gay, but good. was not from the point [20] of view of
98. not from the point [20] of view of the world that Thomas of Celano, the YOUTH OF ST.
99. o. THE BRINGING UP OF THE BOY For of of mind and the discipline his body, Francis wa
100. rch of St. George. It is insinuated the good of his that the neighbors pointed out t
101. nderstand Bernardone. a He was hoped in man of common sense, opulent, ambitious, an
102. ardone. a He was hoped in man of common sense, opulent, ambitious, and of the merchan
103. bitious, and of the merchant stock that time to become barons and princes [211 EVERY
104. eas and ways and his stories of the gay science, of song and farandola, for his mother
105. you expect? of Francis may live as the God, and give many children to the Lord." o
106. f Francis may live as the God, and give many children to the Lord." or, She was alwa
107. erful and charming son of hers would in time do great work on earth for God? was a t
108. ould in time do great work on earth for God? was a time for pageants, for symbolica
109. e do great work on earth for God? was a time for pageants, for symbolical of all kin
110. religious painting what the hymn is in poetry," was first used. Great painters touche
111. ane pageants that Francis excelled. THE LOVE OF PAGEANTRY The Italy, Provengal poets
112. ed himself as a [23] EVERYBODYS and the other pronounced argot of ST. FRANCIS velvet,
113. ST. FRANCIS velvet, jongleur, in a suit one half of ordinary stuff half of silk and
114. Siena; and from these we may gather the nature of the goings-on of the gay band of Ass
115. he ascetic Thomas thought of it when he life it made was. the extravagance of the ea
116. he early of Francis appear a thing more evil than really In July both the gay compan
117. Were Than Ah! had he but the emperor's wealth, fitted in his love more steadily is pl
118. but the emperor's wealth, fitted in his love more steadily is place Saint Francis at
119. its leader, This came about through his love Francis. It is recorded that the of the
120. VERYBODYS his gaiety ST. FRANCIS how to many times: "If you learn be gracious and mu
121. not reasonable that you should, all for God, Who with interest, β€” β€” strive to b
122. a poor bored him during business hours, man who chant. for the son of Bernardone wa
123. ardone was a careful mer- "If this poor man came in the name of a baron or a count,
124. have received him!" And after the poor man he went, leaving a crowd of customers t
125. that ture? I am content. whole I shall one day be acclaimed by the world? Does not
126. ole I shall one day be acclaimed by the world? Does not that astonish you more off fr
127. you more off from the brilUancy than my good spirits in this jail?" one of those pre
128. ncy than my good spirits in this jail?" one of those premonitions that flash across
129. hose premonitions that flash across the soul of youths and are expressed laughingly?
130. ound himself. No crisis had come in his life. He was in love with no woman. him ; Th
131. crisis had come in his life. He was in love with no woman. him ; The light fire tha
132. nti spoke later, he also had said: With other women I beheld my love; Not that the re
133. had said: With other women I beheld my love; Not that the rest were women in mine β
134. ss, β€” so and he His ill that he faced death. convalescence was long. He his yearned
135. of sports, the song of Pierre Vidal in honor Milan and Italian freedom, and the gay
136. IS OF ASSIST he found that the old zest love, before all was gone; which ladies, all
137. e had stood on the threshold of another world, where there was the chaste raptures of
138. ian for action. influences. Now was the time noble Assisian Gautier de Brienne, the
139. , asking him what was of the his aim in life. "Earthly honor," Francis answered. "An
140. at was of the his aim in life. "Earthly honor," Francis answered. "And which the serv
141. d, "the master or And why," continued, "will you forsake the master lord for the sla
142. , so his Francis was essentially a busy man; companions laughed at him, and said he
143. ions laughed at him, and said he was in love. "I am indeed thinking of a bride," nob
144. more rich, and more beautiful than the world has ever seen." Cervantes laughed the b
145. octrines, would imitate [33] EVERYBODYS many who would titles ST. FRANCIS There were
146. wn, but few who would serve the poor as one of the poor. Each knight had a lady wit
147. ion of Christ on earth and his faithful one on Calvary; "for she is the very base a
148. vangelical counsels." To be united with God was his one desire, through prayer and
149. ounsels." To be united with God was his one desire, through prayer and through the
150. els." To be united with God was his one desire, through prayer and through the espousa
151. ervice β€” he knew. ascetic is, Between God and nature there was view no conflict.
152. €” he knew. ascetic is, Between God and nature there was view no conflict. Then he mus
153. . Then he must be an trained athlete in God's Asceticism in the Middle Ages did not
154. m in the Middle Ages did not imply that nature was evil or the legitimate pleasures of
155. ddle Ages did not imply that nature was evil or the legitimate pleasures of the worl
156. evil or the legitimate pleasures of the world evil, but only that the non- ascetic mi
157. r the legitimate pleasures of the world evil, but only that the non- ascetic might n
158. th" when devotion to things higher than nature might be needed. "For whom is all this
159. ll this bread?" asked Ma- [34] f! X for God wti > YOUTH OF ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI do
160. y not our own? Shall we not give all to God?" Francis ansmiled swered for them. And
161. a tears. Pica through in her There were many shabby churches bria. Um- To them Franc
162. nored, and that the poor might have for God what they could not afford to IN SPIRIT
163. ostle. the moment, and for a day became one of the many beggars in the piazza, thus
164. moment, and for a day became one of the many beggars in the piazza, thus imitating u
165. of This was his first victory over his love sensuous dehghts and soft garments, luc
166. ogether. He shivered at the approach of one of these all poor wretches; fastidious
167. f them, he paled at the thought. But on one momentous day he met a rode. things, β€
168. he had been on solemn sacrifice and the love of God, but at this sight he turned his
169. een on solemn sacrifice and the love of God, but at this sight he turned his horse'
170. s brother in Christ. He gave the amazed man new all the money he had, and was shini
171. t he most hated he had embraced for the love of Christ. He felt that the wonderful [
172. 38] YOUTH OF ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI from change had begun which was to make him, one wi
173. change had begun which was to make him, one with a being made in the Ukeness of God
174. begun which was to make him, one with a being made in the Ukeness of God, God Himself
175. one with a being made in the Ukeness of God, God Himself. began to see what the vis
176. ith a being made in the Ukeness of God, God Himself. began to see what the vision o
177. uld wander in the fields again. the old one of those walks he knelt one day in dire
178. in. the old one of those walks he knelt one day in direct chapel of St. Damian and
179. n direct chapel of St. Damian and asked God to knelt him. The voice answered him, a
180. even a greater The sides great house of God was threatened on all by the lust of po
181. eatened on all by the lust of power and wealth which sanctuaries. had crept into the v
182. Francis to build the very walls of the universal church. He took some very precious stuf
183. rse, in Fohgno. nardone was away at the time. that matter to Francis? But what did n
184. gno. nardone was away at the time. that matter to Francis? But what did not his father
185. as most extravagant? And why should the good Peter, who could never refuse his Frenc
186. e a child; Our Francis was the voice of God; he had heard clear; his way was he thr
187. e priest of St. money he had before the good Damian for the restoration of the It ru
188. ian [401 in search of the money, at the same time vowing vengeance on YOUTH OF his s
189. 401 in search of the money, at the same time vowing vengeance on YOUTH OF his son, S
190. ncis had kept some of for how could any man of his son's wit have sold at Foligno s
191. fs at so small a price? Francis praised God and prayed for a month at St. Damian, a
192. t. Damian, and then returned to Assisi. God gave Francis great comfort in those day
193. s great comfort in those days. He found peace; all he gave his will to God, and longe
194. e days. He found peace; all he gave his will to God, and longed above things to part
195. He found peace; all he gave his will to God, and longed above things to partake of
196. Francis rejoiced at this. Was there not One who had been scourged at the pillar aft
197. d Francis to the Bishop of Assisi that, being devoted to God, he was responsible only
198. Bishop of Assisi that, being devoted to God, he was responsible only to Him. consul
199. peased. "My all lord," said Francis, "I will give is his, him that even my very clot
200. ceforth truly say, Our Father, 142] Who art in heaven; YOUTH OF for all ST. FRANCIS
201. ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI Him do I He is my wealth, and in place my hope." After this renu
202. to his sisters the birds, his poems of love of Our Lord in the sweet Provencal spee
203. oved him more than her wretched garment other children. Many feet, a time she was to
204. an her wretched garment other children. Many feet, a time she was to see him in Assi
205. ed garment other children. Many feet, a time she was to see him in Assisi, clothed i
206. poor. [44] II THE BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE IRANCIS now a free felt that he was man
207. IFE IRANCIS now a free felt that he was man. Poverty to him meant entire hberty to
208. . Poverty to him meant entire hberty to love God and God's creatures. To renew the y
209. erty to him meant entire hberty to love God and God's creatures. To renew the youth
210. him meant entire hberty to love God and God's creatures. To renew the youth of Chri
211. th rich men. quarrel with riches In his idea of the world, the more Dives had a plac
212. quarrel with riches In his idea of the world, the more Dives had a place, but Lazaru
213. e on the earth, and that human ment and peace could come to every loving poverty. bei
214. ace could come to every loving poverty. being only by honoring and saying; but the In
215. as a hard mansions. Christ on earth had many house of The mansions of the popes and
216. ent but for those who wished to imitate life the divine of Christ on earth, who wish
217. and children was also led to salvation, good; to love truly and constantly an earthl
218. ren was also led to salvation, good; to love truly and constantly an earthly maiden
219. nstantly an earthly maiden and was also good and beautiful and worthy of a knight: b
220. t: but for him who would be united with Love itself who would open the door that shu
221. would open the door that shuts out this world from that other of eternal joy and peac
222. oor that shuts out this world from that other of eternal joy and peace, there could b
223. orld from that other of eternal joy and peace, there could be no wife or child or fat
224. o reservation. All A LOOK AHEAD In this time of wars, when the Western world was in
225. In this time of wars, when the Western world was in the making, men ardently desired
226. was in the making, men ardently desired peace. But peace could not be made on a mater
227. making, men ardently desired peace. But peace could not be made on a material The ant
228. ince had from [46] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE his childhood hved in an atmosphere of
229. han by birth, but representing been the cause of imperial domination, he had his guar
230. and He was to be the most luxurious to God or ruler of his epoch, irresponsible th
231. r The scent of orange-blossoms in hell. man him and surrounded him in strange Orien
232. the Gerthat masterful pontiff, who and man emperor of the support of the bishops m
233. he Apostate. willing And yet he was the same man who was Bohemia to the order of to
234. ostate. willing And yet he was the same man who was Bohemia to the order of to eive
235. to eive up Agnes of [471 EVERYBODYS any other than permitted it. ST. if FRANCIS her s
236. nasrulers of his he acted, in like most other worldly time, a spirit of policy. The e
237. is he acted, in like most other worldly time, a spirit of policy. The ecclesiastics
238. its upon him and his community that his knowledge and experience might not be turned to t
239. nd his community that his knowledge and experience might not be turned to the advantage of
240. lly powerful. [481 BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Francis with sorrow; for he was conditi
241. d This filled Pope pomps whose Oriental knowledge and gorgeous only a simple Francis lear
242. ple Francis learned to hate; he was his man whose business in life was to love made
243. hate; he was his man whose business in life was to love made. neighbors and all thi
244. s his man whose business in life was to love made. neighbors and all things God had
245. to love made. neighbors and all things God had It was, too, a secular dogma of the
246. had It was, too, a secular dogma of the time depended on the that the machinery of l
247. e depended on the that the machinery of life The emperor possession of land and weal
248. life The emperor possession of land and wealth. in proportion to or the prince was imp
249. e emperors recognized the danger of the principle of heredity among giving bates. all pos
250. ng giving bates. all possible met it by wealth and power to celithe nobles, and As an
251. German Empire. was progressing in felt Law Germany, but In the Sicilies Frederick
252. icilies Frederick that he could develop law for his own support. of Germany, during
253. reat struggle Barbarossa for supremacy, many of the Ger- man bishops had decided aga
254. barossa for supremacy, many of the Ger- man bishops had decided against the pope; b
255. e pope; but Innocent III had managed to change this, and the German prelates and clerg
256. more and more attaching them- When his time came, all this made Frederick of Assisi
257. the conquest of Italy. began his At the time when Francis real life Italy was a plac
258. began his At the time when Francis real life Italy was a place [50] BEGINNING OF THE
259. y was a place [50] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE of Without the temporal power, it made
260. ancis was well begun, the empire was at one who, while he headed a crusade, by refi
261. oluptuous keenest, ruler in Europe. THE MIND OF FRANCIS To the vicebe rich was to be
262. oral prince; To be you a bishop to be a will, monk but as was to live personally poo
263. ich organization knowing the panoply of war. Yet Francis, who wrote in his rule for
264. Francis, who wrote in his rule for the life of those this, joined him: guard yourse
265. f beware of all malice and avarice, and world and the cares of from the solicitudes o
266. herefore let none of the brothers, this life. ever he The Lord commands us in the go
267. or whithersoever he may go, manner, or cause it or receive money or coin in any [511
268. ng or for books, or as the price of any labor, or, indeed, for any reason, except on
269. y reason, except on account of manifest necessity of the sick brother. For we ought not t
270. nd it the devil seeks to bhnd those who desire or value more than stones. Let us there
271. left all things, we lose the kingdom of God for such a trifle. And if we should cha
272. God for such a trifle. And if we should chance to fmd money, let us no more regard it
273. all is vanity." And if perchance, which God forbid, it should happen that any broth
274. in except only because of the aforesaid necessity of the sick, let all the brothers hold
275. a false brother, a thief, a robber, and one having a purse, unless he should become
276. llect money for anything or to help any one to seek or make money; but they might w
277. re was environs a message of the simple life with a vengeance! its Was it strange th
278. his disappoint[52] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE ment working like madness in his soul,
279. W LIFE ment working like madness in his soul, or that Angelo, Francis's brother in b
280. ertain pride in so gentle and patient a man. curate of St. delicately Francis And t
281. satisfied his hunger with them, in and God gave him pleasure [541 the eating; BEGI
282. s hunger with them, in and God gave him pleasure [541 the eating; BEGINNING OF THE NEW L
283. e [541 the eating; BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE for was not there his dear and pure Sis
284. of Lady Poverty. A PANTHEISM ABOVE THE GOD PAN Following of his interpretation of
285. e church of Mary new of the Angels. The idea of forming a religious It order had not
286. ming a religious It order had not taken form in his soul. was enough that he should
287. ious It order had not taken form in his soul. was enough that he should obey the voi
288. ought of doing no more. He did not dare Theology he revered, to aspire to be a priest. b
289. rn itself immediately with the glory of God he detested. One might make poems, but
290. tely with the glory of God he detested. One might make poems, but live it was bette
291. ms, but live it was better to them, and one should make only the live. poems he cou
292. ing compared with men and the things of nature. To get nearer to Christ was to get nea
293. t nearer to Christ was to get nearer to nature. He loved poetr>% but it must be the po
294. re. He loved poetr>% but it must be the poetry of the heart, [551 EVERYBODYS not of th
295. misuse a ST. FRANCIS were of All things God; book or to tread on a written sheet wa
296. ok or on the sheet might be the name of God or at least the In the eyes of letters
297. blessed by Christ. what was natural and good in Paganism β€” paganism β€” was Christ
298. s Christian. soil The worm in the was a symbol lily of his of the humility of Christ,
299. was a pantheist starve or to steal. and love, the ravening wolf of the highest panth
300. uthority of a priest. His simplicity of nature and his purity of heart were evident. F
301. ression was joyful BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE and sweet; his smile was exquisite, and
302. smile was exquisite, and he indeed, had good teeth. His neck was thin, his shoulders
303. says Thomas of Celano, and he preached peace, only peace, through the way, narrow an
304. of Celano, and he preached peace, only peace, through the way, narrow and yet joyful
305. ssumed the peasant's gown, with to this time he a cord to bind it about the waist. T
306. for the feast of St. Mathias is not the same to- was taken from St. Matthew; there w
307. souls. For my [601 BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE yoke is sweet, and my burden light." Bu
308. rist. Assisi, His precursor, an unknown man, had run through the streets of calling
309. rough the streets of calling out, "Well-being and peace," and had then disappeared. o
310. streets of calling out, "Well-being and peace," and had then disappeared. of the Prin
311. eared. of the Prince of The real herald Peace had spoke in simple words, to all of so
312. fenses against that perfection which is God, of penance, and of the amend- now come
313. now come. He who would listen, ment of life. Here were the roads to peace. "The pea
314. n, ment of life. Here were the roads to peace. "The peace of the Lord be always with
315. ife. Here were the roads to peace. "The peace of the Lord be always with you," he sai
316. is,^ "which, most beautiful 2 things in nature, the flower and the butterfly, should b
317. uld be touched only by delicate hands," one fmds the story of noblest and richest h
318. at his constancy, observance of what to many seemed impossible β€” the counsel of Ch
319. ad known Francis the boy and the youth. Being a serious man, first he marveled at the
320. the boy and the youth. Being a serious man, first he marveled at the change in him
321. a serious man, first he marveled at the change in him, and at it struck > him that thi
322. sco Sabatier. [62] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE errant, might be capable Bernard, in a
323. errant, might be capable Bernard, in a world of anything. Time good wore on. oppress
324. apable Bernard, in a world of anything. Time good wore on. oppressed, as all men wer
325. e Bernard, in a world of anything. Time good wore on. oppressed, as all men were bot
326. ol to acts of seemed to lead this young love and self-sacrifice. THE FIRST BROTHER D
327. f the sanctity of this strange it young man, of seemed to him that only the grace G
328. n, of seemed to him that only the grace God could have worked this miracle. Berfor
329. Francis in the threw himself on his bed same room, and pretended to sleep; but Berna
330. VERYBODY low tone, S ST. FRANCIS And so God! my God!" and only that. he remained un
331. low tone, S ST. FRANCIS And so God! my God!" and only that. he remained until the
332. olved to depart from the ways as of the world, and to follow thee my leader." of Fran
333. must ask our Lord Jesus Christ what he will have us do; for his will must be ours.
334. Christ what he will have us do; for his will must be ours. Let us go, then, to the b
335. use, where a such a wonderful work that good priest is; let us hear mass, and then p
336. est is; let us hear mass, and then pray God that by our three times opening the mis
337. y our three times opening the missal He will show us the way which it pleases Him we
338. were joined by a It Peter dei Cattani, man seemed no doubt strange that who had sp
339. n the con- templation of of the Master; God should not know [641 the will but Franc
340. he Master; God should not know [641 the will but Francis never took more BEGINNING O
341. is never took more BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE than one step at a time. The second was
342. ook more BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE than one step at a time. The second was the sign
343. NING OF THE NEW LIFE than one step at a time. The second was the sign. made only whe
344. one step at a time. The second was the sign. made only when God gave At terce, the
345. The second was the sign. made only when God gave At terce, the priest in the bishop
346. e priest in the bishop's house made the sign of the cross and opened the missal thre
347. l He what and follow me," for the first time, in the words from St. Matthew. For the
348. words from St. Matthew. For the second time, in the words thou hast, and give it to
349. nor scrip, nor bread, And for the third time, in those from let Mark, "If any man wi
350. d time, in those from let Mark, "If any man will follow me, him deny himself, and t
351. me, in those from let Mark, "If any man will follow me, him deny himself, and take u
352. ord Jesus who has vouch- show forth his life in the holy gospel!" Bernard was not an
353. paid sufficiently. THE MINSTRELS OF THE GOOD GOD Francis was astounded by such a thi
354. sufficiently. THE MINSTRELS OF THE GOOD GOD Francis was astounded by such a this av
355. ed by such a this avarice. Could well," man be God's servant? "Very Francis said, t
356. uch a this avarice. Could well," man be God's servant? "Very Francis said, taking h
357. There was much gossip in Assisi at this time. The companions of Francis had impoveri
358. IN ASSISI A Β»^ ^ BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE every this, and in every field. And hea
359. eside was drawn to Francis, who at this time dwelt in the lepers' hospital with Brot
360. s a men of Assisi doing penance. robust man who Uked obedience Searching for Franci
361. course in His his extremity was to ask God for a sign. prayer was answered; he too
362. His his extremity was to ask God for a sign. prayer was answered; he took the road
363. ling on his knees, might be admitted as one companions. "Dearest brother," said Fra
364. ions. "Dearest brother," said Francis, "God has given a great thing to thee. If the
365. hould come to Assisi in order to choose one of its citizens as his knight or his ch
366. FRANCIS lost and Francis would have no time fine clothes for the changing his of th
367. r went to the town to fmd cloth Giles's habit. On their way they met an old v/oman in
368. g. of the Lord, dear brother," "For the love sister." said Francis, "give thy fine c
369. rfulness in obeying brought him instant peace and new pleasure. And thus Brother Gile
370. eying brought him instant peace and new pleasure. And thus Brother Giles became "his kni
371. her Giles's in April, 1209. No a record life previous to his conver- sion has been f
372. purely historical features of a saint's life were of little interest to the thirteen
373. son. Father [70] : BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE The four brothers set forth to let the
374. others set forth to let the Hght of the love of God shine before men. Francis sang c
375. et forth to let the Hght of the love of God shine before men. Francis sang cheerful
376. aces or affections of the orator of the time. He was ardent, direct, simple, aiming
377. ays; better his believe is what Brother good." Only, advice when them as wild men fr
378. men from the woods came and showed them honor, Giles would say, "Our true glory is lo
379. t their success in moving hearts to the love of God and the amendment of life was ma
380. success in moving hearts to the love of God and the amendment of life was marvelous
381. to the love of God and the amendment of life was marvelous. This was especially so i
382. hesis of Francis, who was their at this time fifteen years of age. this Three others
383. id constantly [72] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE up their own that his followers had giv
384. e to fight in order to defend The goods world cannot be kept without appeals to the l
385. d cannot be kept without appeals to the law and without contentions, without violen
386. thout contentions, without violence and war. the ruin of the love of All this means
387. thout violence and war. the ruin of the love of All this means For these reasons God
388. ove of All this means For these reasons God and our neighbors. we shall never willi
389. y possess the things of the earth." THE WORLD VERSUS POVERTY The bishop could say not
390. ictines and the Crucified. Even at this time, before the Emperor Frederick was old e
391. s, and even bishop against There was no peace for the church because she was growing
392. Guido himself [74] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE knew, too, that the burden of his posit
393. l brothers must work, lutely Christlike life. that was but following the life of Chr
394. stlike life. that was but following the life of Christ, but they must work not for g
395. must work not for gain, but for the our time β€” that the knew what β€” β€” necessit
396. at the knew what β€” β€” necessities of life. "He who will not work and each must wo
397. at β€” β€” necessities of life. "He who will not work and each must work at the work
398. em at Rivo ought not to eat, Torto; yet one who had put a large it sum on later the
399. and laymen. his Cathohc Vaudois, and to other Assisi The Bishop of in the summer of o
400. Assisi would not oppose him, the blood being thicker than water when alien Francis w
401. to PI o o r o H w BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Rome, Guido presented them to Cardinal
402. ness of his physical invited the little life. The cardinal band to be his guests. He
403. willing to do even this, if it pleased God. The "Pray for cardinal was amazed and
404. touched. me," he said, "and hold me as one of your little brothers." , AT ROME was
405. Rome, where haste was looked upon as a vice, and that one day he and his poorly cla
406. ste was looked upon as a vice, and that one day he and his poorly clad flock It is
407. w refuge, Torre dei Conti. a propitious time. on dissensions everywhere, and dissens
408. vested interests. BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE He had them humbly. driven out, and the
409. Paul. The poor little palm, somehow or other, brought to his slim figure of Francis.
410. brought to his slim figure of Francis. mind the The cardinal answered that he knew
411. ew that Francis was a veritably perfect man, resolved to follow to counsels and to
412. pope said that he would hke to see this man again, so Innocent HI and Francis met.
413. of the utter, voluntary poverty of the life proposed by this man, yet to disapprove
414. ry poverty of the life proposed by this man, yet to disapprove of it would be, as t
415. st the teachings of Christ: "for if any man say that the observperfection contains
416. is poor woman at the royal table. Could God do less for His children born of povert
417. eternal kingdom to fail, his followers? Will he then, to give Still them what cient
418. to give Still them what cient for this life? the pontiff hesitated. Clair- He had v
419. tiff hesitated. Clair- He had vaux seen other failures in his time. itself had not fu
420. He had vaux seen other failures in his time. itself had not fulfilled the hopes of
421. HI heard Francis, and there flashed of mind the memory [82] another vision BEGINNIN
422. Francis, and there flashed of mind the memory [82] another vision BEGINNING OF THE NE
423. 82] another vision BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE he had had, in which he had seen the tr
424. y, and went away singing the praises of God. The Cardinal them to of St. Paul gathe
425. . They were not sufficiently learned in theology to be permitted to teach on matters of
426. ng once been saved from starvation by a man who, appearing suddenly, gave them brea
427. concluded that the cities offered them God. *'The country was the greater chances
428. s the greater chances for spreading the love of made by God and the cities by man,"
429. ances for spreading the love of made by God and the cities by man," said one of the
430. e love of made by God and the cities by man," said one of the brethren, bred in the
431. ade by God and the cities by man," said one of the brethren, bred in the country, "
432. CROOKED RIVER "Not so," said Francis; "God made all." And they moved toward Assisi
433. ver. There, in the deserted cabins, the space was so small that Francis had to write
434. , but Francis [86] BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE told them, looking of the upon the autu
435. st always as well as with sympathy with nature poverty. THE VERY LITTLE BRETHREN The E
436. rancis did not go to meet him, but sent one of the who warned him of the sorrows th
437. y brethren, of Francis at Rome over the prudence of the of the sacred college pope and t
438. could Nobody had ever spoken like this man. And the first fruits of his work was t
439. nd the first fruits of his work was the peace he made benot hold the crowds that came
440. ans, the majors and the minors. By this convention the minors were relieved from serfdom,
441. minors were relieved from serfdom, and war [87] EVERYBODY could not be S ST. FRANC
442. ied except by the consent both parties. time the priest Sylvester, who had claimed f
443. o, Francis its first priest. About this time, was struck by the humility of the word
444. e he loved best? And was it not held in honor by Christ? Ah, little his brothers shou
445. nger," Now, the fast was a said a friar one night. solemn thing to this brother, an
446. might not seem luxurious at an unusual time. in eating alone A sick brother longed
447. iars dwelt at Rivo BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Torto until one day a peasant rudely dr
448. o BEGINNING OF THE NEW LIFE Torto until one day a peasant rudely drove an ass into
449. ission," said Francis, taking this as a sign, "is not to keep a stable for asses, bu
450. Christ. his own little daughter in the love of 18, This was to take place on March
451. blessing of Innocent III for his way of life; but even more he had desired the permi
452. Francis had terpretation of the word of God, a pathetic horror of the learned. As t
453. . The this influence of Francis all was time that received his decisions with [911 e
454. aradise. He was looked on as the living symbol of Christ, must be repeated, that abstr
455. al to the medieval folk. Here was a not man who did what Christ had counseled those
456. murmurs against this imprudent, unwise, life. and unworldly way of Common sense was
457. wise, life. and unworldly way of Common sense was against it; but, then, from the poi
458. f the Roman patrician, the aristocratic citizen of Jerusalem, and the well-fed money-ch
459. himThis self was not a person of common sense. opinion was not that of Brother Bernar
460. self was not a person of common sense. opinion was not that of Brother Bernard, the ki
461. iteral, or of Brother Junipero, who was one haps it of the jongleurs du bon Dieu, b
462. and Francis, singing of the wonders of God in nature, kept love aflame within thei
463. ancis, singing of the wonders of God in nature, kept love aflame within their hearts.
464. g of the wonders of God in nature, kept love aflame within their hearts. To-day we a
465. a day? must be remembered that at this time Francis was not thinking of improving t
466. g of improving the general condition of labor. A beggar who asked alms and a great pr
467. - As he grew older, and the counsels of prudence and common sense prevailed among his br
468. and the counsels of prudence and common sense prevailed among his brethren, and they
469. to wear the meanest clothes and to live One in mud-thatched huts, his heart wept. d
470. not I." His brothers who were near him many times heard him say, "Foxes have holes,
471. s of the air have nests; of but the Son man hath not where to lay his head." What c
472. his head." What could people of common sense do with such a man? He had forced the h
473. d people of common sense do with such a man? He had forced the hard-headed Innocent
474. ordially, and all of a sudden the whole world was running loved, after him. Unless we
475. meto thing in our hearts that yearns to love as he we must put this phenomenon down
476. rhetorical recited the breviary as way one tells us that the brethren really loved
477. itual and vocal unison, "Our Father who art in heaven!" ANECDOTES OF FRANCIS The he
478. FRANCIS The heart or not at of the all. time would be wholly exalted Francis said to
479. d be wholly exalted Francis said to the man who was willing to give his money to hi
480. all I do to be saved?" asked the honest man. "Give all you have said, to the poor."
481. ." of the oxen. The peasant unharnessed one "This one," he I "I will take with me w
482. oxen. The peasant unharnessed one "This one," he I "I will take with me when give g
483. ant unharnessed one "This one," he I "I will take with me when give go to the Portiu
484. e when give go to the Portiuncula; that one [97] I will to the poor." EVERYBODY Fra
485. go to the Portiuncula; that one [97] I will to the poor." EVERYBODY Francis, S ST.
486. ciples, smiled at the simplicity of the man. "I accept," he said; "yet first let us
487. ite as much they seemed "Let us make "I will to regret the loss of the ox. a bargain
488. all animate things was marvelous. This one fact that all the legends, and on which
489. disliked who believed that Francis him. One day when brother was particularly unhap
490. rious fault on his part, some ingrained sin, for he knew that Francis loved all cre
491. eshment fell upon him. Francis read his mind and said " Come to me. When: ever you d
492. d and said " Come to me. When: ever you desire to talk of heavenly things, [98] .»«
493. only way it. cannot be in the least the evil, d from modern as analytical Coventry P
494. " And the was made happy. forlorn young man THE WOLF OF GUBBIO Whether or, the stor
495. nearer to of us. The story of Francis, God than most who was a saint was un uomo d
496. FRANCIS Now, the citizens seems that at one time Francis dwelt in the city of Gubbi
497. CIS Now, the citizens seems that at one time Francis dwelt in the city of Gubbio. we
498. ear the town, and the wolf gave them no peace by day or night. Mothers were afraid to
499. were children he could not endure; his opinion to blame. The wolf had never been spoke
500. ist, his and he acted only according to nature; for wolves must eat. The citizens had
501. citizens had not remembered that he was God's creature, and that, therefore, they s
502. e went out to meet the wolf, making the sign of the cross. His brethren accompanied
503. h open mouth. Francis made over him the sign of the cross, and said gently "I comman
504. before, β€” and he was willing to "you evil here, hear reason. ''Brother Wolf," con
505. is, have done great hunting and killing God's own without His permission, and not o
506. eating animals, but men created in the God; and so you have made yourself a thief
507. nd voices that hatred. But I would make peace between you and the men of Gubbio, if y
508. tween you and the men of Gubbio, if you will offend no more. image of They will pard
509. you will offend no more. image of They will pardon you, and neither men nor dogs sh
510. ng manner of the Middle Ages, exacted a symbol of the good faith of the wolf. Brother
511. he Middle Ages, exacted a symbol of the good faith of the wolf. Brother Wolf must gi
512. eople of Assisi fed him every day. This peace having been arranged, the wolf, much to
513. tizens, meekly followed Francis to hear sin him preach. Francis told them that was
514. s that befell them. said, The flames of God's punishment, he with the wolf standing
515. befell them. said, The flames of God's punishment, he with the wolf standing near him and
516. ely, more terrible than the teeth of an animal that can destroy only the body. "Go, th
517. the body. "Go, then, dear brethren, to God, and do penance for your offenses again
518. e for your offenses against Him, and He will save you from the flames of hell." And
519. less his brother was impressed with the nature of the oath, to keep him from returning
520. is, in Gubbio, happy at the prospect of peace, blessed Francis as with one voice. fav
521. spect of peace, blessed Francis as with one voice. favorite in Wolf became a great
522. place gently," he recalled "vividly the virtue and holiness of St. Francis." FRANCIS A
523. THE TURTLE-DOVES Francis believed that God gave to those ers, special grace who lo
524. FRANCIS was not to be called accursed. One day Francis met a youth of amiable appe
525. uel hands and be killed." And the young man, by the grace of God, of gave the cage
526. ed." And the young man, by the grace of God, of gave the cage sweetly doves to Fran
527. Jesus Christ most gragood youth became one ciously." And so in time the of the ble
528. od youth became one ciously." And so in time the of the blessed order of Francis, gr
529. er of Francis, grace of and died in the God, which Francis had sought for to set th
530. NTA CLARA yourselves be taken? you from death, and give nests to you, wherein you may
531. had given them his blessing. The mighty love in the heart of Francis drew all pure-h
532. what men called miracles. There are for many records of his way with sinners; no sin
533. with Gnosticism, which, with respect to other people's opinions, due fore- was a runn
534. engaged of in doing noble acts for the love God, did not look on the contrary, in O
535. ged of in doing noble acts for the love God, did not look on the contrary, in On fl
536. ok on the contrary, in On flee women as many cases, undesirable. they found them so
537. Testament to be handled furtively. The man who sacrificed the earthly love, in the
538. ely. The man who sacrificed the earthly love, in the highest sense the prelude to a
539. ificed the earthly love, in the highest sense the prelude to a more celestial passion
540. nder giving it it because up, he it was evil, but because, in If to fine souls made
541. ce into that holy place where heart and soul meet in an atmosphere from which all th
542. saint. common. Abelard, in the work of God for this world. The re- form which Fran
543. n. Abelard, in the work of God for this world. The re- form which Francis began would
544. the work of God for this world. The re- form which Francis began would have been inc
545. condemnation for a maiden who, drawn by love of God, made her way to a convent. So w
546. tion for a maiden who, drawn by love of God, made her way to a convent. So when Cla
547. heard of him, of course, for her little world was full Besides, her cousin Rufmo was
548. see Friar Rufmo. It is certain that she many times, always in met Francis "honorable
549. il of the wars about her she longed for peace and to follow Christ as Francis had don
550. ich and noble Her father, Favorino, was one of the family. family of Scefi, Sasso R
551. le Her father, Favorino, was one of the family. family of Scefi, Sasso Rosso β€” at an
552. ather, Favorino, was one of the family. family of Scefi, Sasso Rosso β€” at and seigni
553. at Assisi. He had determined to make a good marriage for the charming little Clara;
554. d at eighteen, according to the popular opinion of Assisi, was in danger of becoming an
555. t of Verona quite capable of falling in love at an earlier age? Thomas of Celano, wh
556. ltivator of a garden, gives him another chance for a pun, and two years after her deat
557. ance for a pun, and two years after her death, Pope Alexander IV, in his bull of cano
558. ke a play on the word "Ortolana." noble family of Her mother was of the Fiumi. Born in
559. was The day when she chose between the world and poverty. β€” β€” She went to mass a
560. alms, the splendor of ments, as was the custom. beautifully adorned, new spring garHer
561. d wait for a The priest went If so, the sign came. sign? down to where she humbly st
562. a The priest went If so, the sign came. sign? down to where she humbly stood, and ga
563. ds. The palm of utter sacrifice for the love of Christ was to be hers. The people we
564. sanctity was in prised. men's mouths. A prophecy of it had been made to Ortolana before
565. beads of pebbles. of her. S ST. FRANCIS Many of other edifying things were told On M
566. pebbles. of her. S ST. FRANCIS Many of other edifying things were told On March and
567. e salvation of her neighbor and her own soul, for the essential Franciscan doctrine
568. essential Franciscan doctrine was that one saved one's soul in saving one's neighb
569. Franciscan doctrine was that one saved one's soul in saving one's neighbor. all fo
570. iscan doctrine was that one saved one's soul in saving one's neighbor. all for Chris
571. was that one saved one's soul in saving one's neighbor. all for Christ sacrificed t
572. neighbor. all for Christ sacrificed the world, which would, he knew, be ungrateful. C
573. ngrateful. Clara ardently desired to be one sacrifice, as with Christ, to continue
574. e, by becoming utterly dependent on the will of God. Her secret garden was to be the
575. coming utterly dependent on the will of God. Her secret garden was to be the chapel
576. ucify herself daily Damian's, that gray same, little building, to-day the olive-tree
577. to rest until provide." Thomas Almighty God of Celano says, could otherwise When fi
578. lly youth, to stand between Clara and a good marriage that would benefit both the fa
579. od marriage that would benefit both the family of Scefi and the Fiumi? The kinsmen of
580. r tonsured head and held fast to the "I will be the bride of no man," altar-cloths.
581. fast to the "I will be the bride of no man," altar-cloths. but she said; "I have c
582. r part. Christ." last I am the bride of opinion at In deference to infuriated public th
583. OUNDS THE ORDER OF POOR LADIES With her mind at St. rest, Clara went to the church o
584. her uncle tried to strike her, terrible pain. arm was smitten by a She, was clothed
585. cut off. She was now so poor that even nature's adornment was denied her. These two b
586. pidity over Europe. At first the manual labor. as is little community lived only by C
587. r needs. were lay brothers, known their life as Zealots of the Poor Ladies. It was d
588. e as Zealots of the Poor Ladies. It was duty to beg for poor charges. the necessarie
589. o their garden, the end, even after the death of Francis, Clara persisted in the rule
590. the rule of utter poverty. late in her life, When, Gregory IX was made pope, she re
591. y putting into Against the most violent opposition she persevered in practice the rule of
592. s, and until the was not day before her death that she suc[120] zavoa-aJTHUT hut a vi
593. hers, known as Zealots of the "ty to oi life tor iheir the necessaries poor charges.
594. d for the Zealots. To :. even ofter the death of *f Francir., Clara utter pover she r
595. ng into of Gl^ Against the most violent opposition she persevered in practice the Franci^i
596. u.jΒ»tii and was not the dav before her death that^ s]ie stkES ST. FRANCIS A^J).THE T
597. neighbors. for Christ and They demanded peace, they demanded love. One has only to re
598. and They demanded peace, they demanded love. One has only to read European history
599. hey demanded peace, they demanded love. One has only to read European history of th
600. ded love. One has only to read European history of that period to find out how httle lo
601. ry of that period to find out how httle love or peace there was. life, If Christiani
602. at period to find out how httle love or peace there was. life, If Christianity offere
603. out how httle love or peace there was. life, If Christianity offered the bread of w
604. stians feared to in sacrifice. was only one This was to do what do to have no reser
605. to have no reserves there β€” In his ''Life of Clara," Thomas of Celano said, "Now,
606. id, "Now, through its old age, the weak world was belief rapidly failing, the eyes of
607. , the monastery except for a reasonable cause. The chaplain β€” Clara forbidden to go
608. that they might always be seen by each other and by others. Francis found great cons
609. to come to her from Christ through him. Life in the Middle Ages, I aid; must repeat,
610. t, was sacramental to those who and all good were conveyed by symbols, and to devout
611. even to believing sinners, Francis was one of the physical symbols of God. souls,
612. ncis was one of the physical symbols of God. souls, Francis pointed out to Clara gr
613. mmunity of of the difficulties of daily life, men many which might have disturbed th
614. of the difficulties of daily life, men many which might have disturbed their peace.
615. n many which might have disturbed their peace. and sewing altar linen after for the f
616. Francis was induced to have part of his habit lined with common fur; but he insisted
617. uld be sewn on the outside, so that the world would know how luxurious he was. their
618. luxurious he was. their lot without The good nuns probably managed this. Francis, hu
619. bly fearing the adoration seemed almost one. in of Clara, seldom visited her, thoug
620. t she might see friars: him, he said to one of the Clara and tell ''Go to Sister sa
621. nd [125] EVERYBODYS ST. FRANCIS sisters will say to her, too, that she and her meet
622. er, too, that she and her meet me after death and be greatly comforted." But both kne
623. ch In tribulation before the day of his death. the meantime Clara seemed to divine hi
624. e which Rome, seeing through the eye of prudence sense, tried to force and upon her. The
625. ome, seeing through the eye of prudence sense, tried to force and upon her. The third
626. nd mental, that Christ suffered for the love of man. In the earlier days when Franci
627. l, that Christ suffered for the love of man. In the earlier days when Francis had o
628. ad only begun to long for this union in love and suffering, Christ appeared to him a
629. pon the Eighteen years after the divine love first took entire possession of him, Ch
630. entire possession of him, Christ in the form says, of a seraph "leaving," as rewarde
631. aph "leaving," as rewarded his ecstatic desire, the same St. Bonaventure fire "a wonde
632. ," as rewarded his ecstatic desire, the same St. Bonaventure fire "a wonderful wonde
633. nderful wonderful in his heart, no less sign and a impressed on his [127] EVERYBODYS
634. this reason he began In to speak in the language of his country. the beginning of his mi
635. oets before Dante had among created the language that was to be national. He must speak
636. national. He must speak to the people. Good acts that them were not enough; he must
637. s to them in the could be understood by language of their homes. In the sixth year of hi
638. poet. In prose, to his brothers in the world, he wrote in Latin when he wrote at all
639. om preached without singing. It was the custom of the [1281 ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE
640. the speech of the "vulgar." Without the poetry created, example, without the taste for
641. ndation of the third order forced for a time a truce of peace to exist in Italy. Fra
642. hird order forced for a time a truce of peace to exist in Italy. Francis would have t
643. ive solely in the practical blessing of love extended to all There were those who co
644. contemplation of Christ; these were The many must find other roads to "He who appear
645. f Christ; these were The many must find other roads to "He who appears to you to be a
646. to "He who appears to you to be a child peace. was the burden of his preaching, "may
647. reaching, "may to-morrow be a pillar of God's house." There were those living in th
648. house." There were those living in the world who would become children of the devil
649. of the devil," knew this, and he longed life more like that laid make down in to the
650. die for them. house on earth there were many rooms beside the little cells in which
651. n his Father's dwelt. FRANCIS AND HUMAN LOVE and the the doves, and He it is blessed
652. he doves, and He it is blessed the true love of the youth maid, as he blessed the ne
653. nests of recorded that for two spouses life who loved each other during a long he o
654. hat for two spouses life who loved each other during a long he obtained the This was
655. Bona Donna, and occurred long after the death of Francis, f 130 1 ST. FRANCIS AND THE
656. founded. He loved the joys of domestic life. To have given him children of his own
657. children of his own would have of great happiness; but this he sacrificed that he might h
658. vocation"; in the Franciscan there were many niches. For the child or for apostles t
659. r for apostles there earthly sacrifice. love. must not be wife or They must be free
660. . must not be wife or They must be free life, the In his earlier of tormented by the
661. Brother Ass," he said to himself, "thou art unworthy; thou art fit only to be beate
662. id to himself, "thou art unworthy; thou art fit only to be beaten." a And on one oc
663. ou art fit only to be beaten." a And on one occasion, when the vision of happy home
664. our are thy daughters and thy sons, the other two are thy man-servant of each, β€” β€
665. ers and thy sons, the other two are thy man-servant of each, β€” β€” and thy woman-
666. of each, β€” β€” and thy woman-servant. Mind, Brother Ass; for these thou must troub
667. hen; go at once to clothe them, or they will die in this intemperate winter. If this
668. it for thee to trouble thyself for the one Lord?" He warned his brethren of the st
669. llow the doctrine of Christ, there were other ways to heaven: for the youth, love and
670. re other ways to heaven: for the youth, love and marriage; for the mature, children
671. r the mature, children and the cares of life; and for the old, the sunset glow of co
672. or the old, the sunset glow of conjugal love. But for Francis himself all these beau
673. ning caught an echo a place for Joy and Peace. the world? in Italy β€” of this The wo
674. an echo a place for Joy and Peace. the world? in Italy β€” of this The world First,
675. ce. the world? in Italy β€” of this The world First, the world must, in the name of C
676. Italy β€” of this The world First, the world must, in the name of Christ, must be pe
677. force men if to fight in every trivial cause his caprice or his pride invented? Men
678. not be joyful they were worried by the knowledge that their possessions might be seized
679. eir possessions might be seized by this same feudal lord, and their wives and childr
680. them naked and after- ward died such a good death β€” a death which all There was L
681. naked and after- ward died such a good death β€” a death which all There was Lucches
682. fter- ward died such a good death β€” a death which all There was Lucchesio, who true
683. a legitimate occupation for a Christian man of business until Francis made him the
684. ntil Francis made him the first β€” the world. order of member of the third order men
685. that there were only two things in the world, God and a man's soul, and to know God
686. here were only two things in the world, God and a man's soul, and to know God and t
687. only two things in the world, God and a man's soul, and to know God and to purge hi
688. wo things in the world, God and a man's soul, and to know God and to purge his soul
689. orld, God and a man's soul, and to know God and to purge his soul of all that was u
690. soul, and to know God and to purge his soul of all that was unlike God was all. " R
691. o purge his soul of all that was unlike God was all. " Read the gospels," he said,
692. to Lucchesio was what he said to every man and woman who lived the normal life of
693. very man and woman who lived the normal life of men and women in the world. Now he b
694. the normal life of men and women in the world. Now he became, within the comprehensio
695. became, within the comprehension of the world, everybody's Francis; for to everybody
696. ncis; for to everybody he now appealed. life The contemplative he accepted the life
697. life The contemplative he accepted the life was the Christ himself had declared to
698. le of Francis, "There are seven degrees life: fire, in the plative unction, ecstasy,
699. asy, contemplaglory. tion, taste, rest, life is and The contemplative to leave all t
700. ve to leave all things for the glory of God, V to seek only things heavenly, to pra
701. praise canticles. ingly, to read often God continually is by hymns and To and cont
702. d from all, to be united to Giles also: God alone." And Brother one / "Since no can
703. to Giles also: God alone." And Brother one / "Since no can enter upon the contempl
704. nce no can enter upon the contemplative life unless he has practised in the first fa
705. voutly active behooveth that the active life be pursued with toil and with all solic
706. nd yet she did not cease from her work. life, it In the Franciscan philosophy, he wa
707. om her work. life, it In the Franciscan philosophy, he was goodly active who built bridges
708. o within his own heart, nor would he be man were to live a able to come to a perfec
709. re he had zealously gone, as he went to many other places, nations. to preach to too
710. had zealously gone, as he went to many other places, nations. to preach to too ill a
711. by Brother Pacifico, been a poet in the world. In this letter who had we is the essen
712. d order. First of all, who would follow God must learn the lesson of love from the
713. uld follow God must learn the lesson of love from the sacrament of the mass, in whic
714. ied body and blood the nutrition of the soul. actively Then peace He, Francis, must
715. he nutrition of the soul. actively Then peace He, Francis, must must come after love.
716. peace He, Francis, must must come after love. be, like Christ, free from family ties
717. after love. be, like Christ, free from family ties and the burden of property, and hi
718. active and the contemplative followers life; but for the whole world, no. [138] The
719. ative followers life; but for the whole world, no. [138] The work ST. FRANCIS AND THE
720. S AND THE PEOPLE name of Christ, of the world, in the must be carried in on by human
721. e must be carried in on by human means. God Himself, sending His Son as man, had do
722. means. God Himself, sending His Son as man, had done this He ; had dignified human
723. ER AND FEUDALISM In the Middle Ages men life to things, would have amazed assert tha
724. o things, would have amazed assert that God did not work by visible or that the mos
725. Visible that nothing invisible of human life is evil in itself. and were one in the
726. that nothing invisible of human life is evil in itself. and were one in the union of
727. human life is evil in itself. and were one in the union of the fatherhood the Crea
728. fatherhood the Creator. Every member of peace. of the third order must be a man of th
729. of peace. of the third order must be a man of the Later, the founders too, Quakers
730. r so simple or so logical. This rule of love and peace, spreading through Italy, liv
731. le or so logical. This rule of love and peace, spreading through Italy, live in gave
732. w for the feudal who could not, against law and public opinion, by the omnipresent
733. l who could not, against law and public opinion, by the omnipresent friars, seize the g
734. chesio who gave Francis the stimulus to form this society for persons living in the
735. this society for persons living in the world. Luc- had been eager for success; he di
736. een eager for success; he displayed his wealth on all occasions, and his wife. Bona Do
737. he loved passionchesio had been of the world worldly. Francis, too, by his insistenc
738. insistence that the smallest detail of life might be sanctified by divine love, ate
739. l of life might be sanctified by divine love, ately, fl401 ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPL
740. s youth. To be great in the eyes of the world, it was no longer necessary to be grand
741. ly heroic. great in the eyes of Christ, one might do little all, To be many things
742. Christ, one might do little all, To be many things unknown to the world ; but above
743. e all, To be many things unknown to the world ; but above one must be cheerful, for C
744. things unknown to the world ; but above one must be cheerful, for Christ must be se
745. ith joy. Not even the greatest physical pain should drive out the joy of suffering f
746. drive out the joy of suffering for the love of God. But faith and prayer are useles
747. ut the joy of suffering for the love of God. But faith and prayer are useless witho
748. e eccentric. Those who are rich for the good of others. One cannot be outwardly poor
749. se who are rich for the good of others. One cannot be outwardly poor in the courts
750. wardly poor in the courts of kings, but one may be always poor in spirit. Golden co
751. of kings, yes, and pearls and velvet to honor a temporal prince; but for those who wo
752. wn vanity. Magnificence was right where one's state of life demanded it, but ostent
753. ity. Magnificence was right where one's state of life demanded it, but ostentation ne
754. ificence was right where one's state of life demanded it, but ostentation never. In
755. 215, Francis gives a description of the death of the rich man who had not loved God a
756. a description of the death of the rich man who had not loved God and had trusted i
757. death of the rich man who had not loved God and had trusted in men. [141] "Wilt EVE
758. ST. FRANCIS thy sins?" asked the dying man. He answered, "I will." "Wilt thou from
759. ?" asked the dying man. He answered, "I will." "Wilt thou from thy substance, as far
760. , and then the miserable friends cursed man died a bitter death. "After this," Fran
761. erable friends cursed man died a bitter death. "After this," Francis said, "his relat
762. ir Penance must lives, and not wait for death-bed repentance. Moreover, their hands m
763. d public sentiment wrought [142] at the change in by the manner in ST. FRANCIS AND THE
764. he manner in ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE life. which Francis appHed the counsels of t
765. became unfashionable Feuds ceased for a time, because hatred was denounced by this w
766. . The Capulets and the Montagues kissed one another on the cheeks, knelt at the sam
767. one another on the cheeks, knelt at the same altar, and wondered why they ful creatu
768. why they ful creature. had never known peace before. Retainers of haughty barons, wh
769. h gold, but place to lay His head. with love, those who suffer." The spirit of love
770. love, those who suffer." The spirit of love and of freedom vitalized Italy, or, rat
771. ed Italy, or, rather, from the heart of love rose the soul of freedom. There was a h
772. rather, from the heart of love rose the soul of freedom. There was a higher power on
773. simple and peaceful, had asked why all good [ 143 1 everybody's lived, ST. FRANCIS
774. ANCIS But the secular Christians in the world could not live as they in love and peac
775. in the world could not live as they in love and peace. authorities did not look on
776. orld could not live as they in love and peace. authorities did not look on the penite
777. tection of the Bishop of Rimini. cities many Honokilling the brethren were highly ta
778. d said: fight the battles of hatred "We will not merely that a castles. man do joy-
779. red "We will not merely that a castles. man do joy- may ful possess more lands and
780. e work ; that we may live to perpetuate love and peace." To give cheerfully and to r
781. that we may live to perpetuate love and peace." To give cheerfully and to receive che
782. o could not work, and yet looked on his necessity as a curse instead of a blessing, likew
783. e endured and even used for the greater God by folk in the world. Asceticism in the
784. used for the greater God by folk in the world. Asceticism in the Puritan sense Franci
785. in the world. Asceticism in the Puritan sense Francis did not under- and to be used w
786. ike him, were called to sacrifice these good things stand. for the love of Christ. A
787. rifice these good things stand. for the love of Christ. All things were good, THE RO
788. for the love of Christ. All things were good, THE ROBBERS OF MONTE CASALE The of sto
789. FRANCIS am a "Father," said Angelo, "I man such and by the grace of Christ, I can
790. ecame hard, still intolerant, used hard language to them. told "Go, robbers and to them.
791. n of food set aside for the servants of God. 1 Driven from the door, the three star
792. hree starving robbers went away cursing God and man. Young Angelo was pleased with
793. rving robbers went away cursing God and man. Young Angelo was pleased with himself,
794. ill that those whose souls were through sin must be treated loved sinners so in the
795. tle ones of Christ, lacking as yet only good-will. sore, Foot- weary, perhaps, a lit
796. nes of Christ, lacking as yet only good-will. sore, Foot- weary, perhaps, a little a
797. cis," and they went, wondering that any man could be so good as not to hate them, f
798. ent, wondering that any man could be so good as not to hate them, for Francis they k
799. ration. They were in doubt whether even God could forgive them their terrible sins.
800. But Francis told them that the mercy of God is greater than any sin, and, besides,
801. at the mercy of God is greater than any sin, and, besides, St. Paul [149] EVERYBODY
802. form ceived their and repent. with this knowledge, they asked to be among the friars. The
803. s a feast for him." Thus during all his life Francis loved sinners and worked for si
804. or in his theory the of the defiance of God's laws soul, as leprosy was a disease w
805. heory the of the defiance of God's laws soul, as leprosy was a disease was a disease
806. WAYS OF BROTHER JUNIPER Brother Masseo good and been bred also Marignano was very v
807. son cherished his words. "Thou scholar. art not, Francis, nor art thou of It good t
808. s. "Thou scholar. art not, Francis, nor art thou of It good to look upon high birth
809. r. art not, Francis, nor art thou of It good to look upon high birth nor art thou a
810. of It good to look upon high birth nor art thou a puzzles after me to know why kne
811. puzzles after me to know why knelt the world runs thee." Upon thanked this, Francis
812. pon thanked this, Francis humbly he and God. Masseo that to find the meanest And Go
813. od. Masseo that to find the meanest And God had then told Brother looked from His h
814. m His heaven of creatures to do a great world work β€” a creature so it sinful that a
815. hat all the might know that was not the man that did this work, but the glory of Go
816. an that did this work, but the glory of God shining and working in him. And Masseo
817. licity, but so cis. literal that to the other brothers he was often a trial, and to t
818. and to those who had still some of the world in them a scandal. fl511 If little chil
819. they were to the spirit of the perfect love that casteth out fear. instance. Brothe
820. the thoughtless, not understanding the good intention of this innocent, howled in s
821. They insisted that have him manacled as one is mad. "No punishment too bad for me,"
822. at have him manacled as one is mad. "No punishment too bad for me," said Juniper. "Even le
823. " said Francis, when this little of the good God had done something more innocently
824. d Francis, when this little of the good God had done something more innocently outr
825. pride of the sacris- though there were other ornaments almost equally worthy of the
826. woman came in to beg something for the love of Christ. "Wait," said Juniper. "God w
827. love of Christ. "Wait," said Juniper. "God will not miss alms for thee from all th
828. e of Christ. "Wait," said Juniper. "God will not miss alms for thee from all the ric
829. 51 EVERYBODYS gold fringe. ST. FRANCIS "God does not need these bells," he said; "t
830. his knife. had hardly begun to eat when experience recalled some of Juniper's little ways.
831. his voice. Brother Juniper delighted in being scolded; [156] ST. SO he of FRANCIS AND
832. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE was filled with love during the torrent that fell reproaches
833. t porridge and butter. It took him some time to get just what he wanted, and he want
834. ian's cell. In answer to his knock, the good man rose, and, candle in hand, looked a
835. cell. In answer to his knock, the good man rose, and, candle in hand, looked at hi
836. was tired when you me to-day; therefore will act like I have brought you which an in
837. must not waste the porridge. Since you will not eat this good porridge, which was f
838. e porridge. Since you will not eat this good porridge, which was formerly hot, do me
839. at it." The guardian saw of at once the good intention of Brother Juniper, and he do
840. Brother Juniper, and he doubtless had a sense [1571 humor, too, for EVERYBODYS greatl
841. expected did not do in the case them of God, as a child expects daily bread of its
842. expects daily bread of its father. What God of other folk did not in the least conc
843. daily bread of its father. What God of other folk did not in the least concern this
844. wing, as he did, that the was mentioned many times in the Koran and that the same bo
845. ed many times in the Koran and that the same book acknowledged the divine and uncarn
846. t- ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE "If I mas time. could talk to the emperor," he often l
847. e. could talk to the emperor," he often love of said, "I would beg him that, for the
848. of said, "I would beg him that, for the God and me, he would command by law that no
849. for the God and me, he would command by law that no lark should be trapped or kille
850. , so that our sisters the larks and all other birds might have enough to eat; and tha
851. nd that, because on that day the Son of God was born of the Blessed Virgin in a man
852. see than to [1591 hear. EVERYBODYS Not being aloud of his ST. FRANCIS not celebrate
853. oo; but he saw him with the keen eye of love; Francis all things were sacramental. f
854. cked to the chapel at Greccio The to do honor to the symbol of the Lord. heart of Ita
855. hapel at Greccio The to do honor to the symbol of the Lord. heart of Italy was touched
856. ld and from that moment every and every animal had a certain If all sacred character f
857. . THE INDULGENCE OF THE PORTIUNCULA The love of Francis for the humble Portiuncula a
858. triumph that filled the ecclesiastical world with amazement, and made this attention
859. ulgence Francis demanded was the unique one reserved by fl61] EVERYBODYS ST. FRANCI
860. emporal penance as well as the possible punishment in the progressive state after death, β
861. possible punishment in the progressive state after death, β€” purgatory, β€” through
862. nishment in the progressive state after death, β€” purgatory, β€” through which the o
863. tory, β€” through which the once guilty soul advanced nearer to the blessed vision o
864. dvanced nearer to the blessed vision of God. As time passed, the church mitigated p
865. nearer to the blessed vision of God. As time passed, the church mitigated public pen
866. was a foregone conclusion that a guilt. sin of theft, for instance, would not be fo
867. for instance, would not be forgiven, no matter how stowed by the many absolutions were
868. e forgiven, no matter how stowed by the many absolutions were be- priests, unless re
869. h, sorrow was not enough; there must be punishment, and beneficial punishment. Remission o
870. here must be punishment, and beneficial punishment. Remission of the temporal punishment d
871. l punishment. Remission of the temporal punishment due to sin for a fixed time, after the
872. ssion of the temporal punishment due to sin for a fixed time, after the spiritual g
873. poral punishment due to sin for a fixed time, after the spiritual guilt had been re-
874. 1^ AH I .TZ ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE punishment for sin from his baptism day he entered
875. . FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE punishment for sin from his baptism day he entered the cha
876. il the Christian died with the temporal punishment for his sins unperformed, the prison of
877. dulgence should be limited to a certain space of time within thirty-six hours. After
878. should be limited to a certain space of time within thirty-six hours. After this, Fr
879. e protection of Rome. his increasing No man could now persecute them as heretics; t
880. utterly independent of the pomp of this world, since the destitute httle Portiuncula
881. ored than evils, St. Peter's itself. He other feared wealth for his order more than i
882. ls, St. Peter's itself. He other feared wealth for his order more than it all but he c
883. s if the Franciscan kingdom was of this world. This he sought to correct by laying st
884. rrect by laying stress on the spiritual honor the pontiff had bestowed on his poor li
885. ed learned men would despise this noble one, It is really deserved their homage! th
886. embly wept with him and burned with the love of Christ. It was his first and last at
887. and song might be loved, β€” they were one, β€” distinctions left to others. feare
888. β€” distinctions left to others. feared science, but he loved poetry. Music but technic
889. to others. feared science, but he loved poetry. Music but technical philosophy he writ
890. ut he loved poetry. Music but technical philosophy he write the holy if in theology friars
891. ical philosophy he write the holy if in theology friars His and might names in flowers i
892. I had two loaves of bread, I would give one for a hyacinth." The flowers were his f
893. of the purity of Christ; or on a rose, symbol of her who was the Rose of Sharon; nor
894. name But books were best avoided. When one could live with nature and sing with of
895. best avoided. When one could live with nature and sing with of God. nature, why shoul
896. could live with nature and sing with of God. nature, why should one read? he though
897. live with nature and sing with of God. nature, why should one read? he thought, not [
898. nd sing with of God. nature, why should one read? he thought, not [1681 knowing tha
899. rs and gold, you would call it no small God has built for you a mansion that benefi
900. for learning? Francis would not permit one of his young friars who had asked him f
901. learned to read might read the word of God; but why learn to read the black letter
902. en when to illumined and azure? Was not God's sky more splendid, and His love writt
903. as not God's sky more splendid, and His love written there and everywhere? Book-lear
904. the rich, and he and his were poor. HIS LOVE OF POETRY AS A MEANS OF GRACE When was
905. , and he and his were poor. HIS LOVE OF POETRY AS A MEANS OF GRACE When was a question
906. A MEANS OF GRACE When was a question of poetry, the written words might be used to pre
907. irds Francis was a born singer. praised God in song and gave deUght to the it [169]
908. d gave deUght to the it [169] EVERYBODY world, could songs, S ST. FRANCIS sung men do
909. S ST. FRANCIS sung men do less? He had many first of all those Provengal songs he h
910. verino to hear the noted "singer of the good God," who called vices by their real na
911. o to hear the noted "singer of the good God," who called vices by their real names,
912. ames, and who would burn out the cancer sin with the fire of love with all pity for
913. urn out the cancer sin with the fire of love with all pity for the sinner. Divini he
914. e said, "lead me far from men, and give God." He was the Brother Pacifico to me who
915. dictation. Before Francis gave to this God and all the world poem of the sun and f
916. re Francis gave to this God and all the world poem of the sun and f created things, h
917. gospel must be the rule of and that the soul that wilfully resisted Christ's teachin
918. himself and by those miracles which men life, accepted their eyes without question,
919. as the tears of a penitent sinner. had many struggles with the demon; but he looked
920. imself when he laughed. "The servant of God," he said, "in eating, drinking, dissle
921. "in eating, drinking, dissleeping, and other corporal works, must creetly fortify hi
922. o that Brother Body say, shall not have cause to murmur and to cannot stand upright a
923. pright and attend to prayer, nor do any other good works, because you do *I [171] EVE
924. and attend to prayer, nor do any other good works, because you do *I [171] EVERYBOD
925. ER-ASCETIC A BROTHER spoke is of a poor man is sneeringly. to be rich." "He poor, b
926. eringly. to be rich." "He poor, but his one desire "Take off your tunic," commanded
927. gly. to be rich." "He poor, but his one desire "Take off your tunic," commanded Franci
928. yourself naked at the feet of this poor man, confess your fault, and ask him to pra
929. to pray for you." There was no room of life. for pride in his scheme To him the poo
930. r poor mother?" "In all the house there will is nothing that we only the can give he
931. that she for I believe firmly that this will may sell it; be more pleasing to Virgin
932. t; be more pleasing to Virgin than that God and the Blessed it." we should read fro
933. hat he of It It is related knew without being brethren to told the needs his and thei
934. ts. Brother Elias, him that the prudent man who tried to was revealed rebel make th
935. I should receive some refreshment. Pray God for me, for it is recorded that will if
936. ray God for me, for it is recorded that will if a sinner change his ways, God his re
937. or it is recorded that will if a sinner change his ways, God his revoke His sentence."
938. that will if a sinner change his ways, God his revoke His sentence." Francis, much
939. t. Later, after the he died wearing the habit of his master. At the great meeting Por
940. approve of this. In the reports of the time men were all healed, dried vineyards br
941. iven, when Francis asked in the name of love. Of strange occurrences like these, of
942. ng of the trees. Above the for the holy world, but still in it, Francis sat with his
943. ith his brethren. It had been hard work man to reach this deserted place. He had as
944. f you are, my advice is to try to be as good as people say you are, so they will not
945. as good as people say you are, so they will not be disappointed." Francis knelt and
946. d fire to little he had not feared. "My will be quenched when it was unnecessary, "f
947. nched when it was unnecessary, "for how God beautiful, is!" how purifying, this cre
948. him, so Franthat the pride and pomp of life, a f 175 1 EVERYBODY S ST. FRANCIS hatr
949. ST. FRANCIS hatred of poverty, and the love of worldly prudence, were casting Lady
950. red of poverty, and the love of worldly prudence, were casting Lady Poverty from the hea
951. casting Lady Poverty from the hearts of many of those who professed to follow him. I
952. f those who professed to follow him. In truth, the religion was rent by conflicts bet
953. professed to follow him. In truth, the religion was rent by conflicts between the lover
954. ls compromise of the between Franciscan world. and the ideas But his agony of heart b
955. lation of the wounds Christ endured for love. The thought of them was always with hi
956. owing wings, was borne a most beautiful man whose hands and were stretched out [176
957. ’ worldiy prudein.t:, Sfcie hearts of c many In bct^ '--^ " irom the essed to follow
958. the liis compromise between Franciscan world. ideals and the ideas of the nearer to
959. ous aspect with which Christ, under the form of a seraph, looked upon him; yet to be
960. im thus fastened to a cross pierced his soul hke a sword of compassion and grief." H
961. last he understood by the revelation of God that this vision had been presented to
962. re in his heart and a no less wonderful sign impressed upon his flesh. began to appe
963. ough with nails, the heads of the nails being seen hands and the upper part of the fe
964. d and stained his tunic. The servant of God, seeing the holy signs thus deeply impr
965. race and by name, knowing that the holy man had seen some marvelous vision which ha
966. h thou hast received for the benefit of many, lest thou shouldst be condemned for hi
967. ommitted to thy At these words the holy man was so greatly care." moved that though
968. who had appeared to him had said to him other things which he must never And so long
969. so long as he should live reveal to any man. it is to be believed that these discou
970. Christ had been transformed by his true love into his own image, having fulfilled th
971. re the [180j ST. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE man, mount, bearing with him the image of t
972. rs of flesh by the finger of the living God. And because it is written that it is g
973. d. And because it is written that it is good "to conceal the secret of the king," th
974. the secret of the king," therefore this man, who was conscious of so royal a secret
975. om the eyes of all men. But inasmuch as God is wont for His own glory to reveal the
976. this angelic tokens, openly manifested many miracles by their power, that the hidde
977. hese stigmata might be clearly known by many signs. Back to the Portiuncula he went,
978. e had composed. mighty, omnipotent, and good Lord, belong praise, honor, and all ben
979. nipotent, and good Lord, belong praise, honor, and all benedictioni alone. Most High,
980. st High, are all these due. There is no man worthy Thy name to speak. Praise be to
981. splendor. Of Thee, Most High, he is the sign. Praise be to Thee for Sister Moon and
982. her Wind, For air and clouds, for quiet time and stormy, By which Thou dost sustain
983. raise to Thee for those who forgive for love of Thee Sustaining afflictions and trib
984. Blessed be those who keep themselves in peace! By Thee, Most High, will they be crown
985. hemselves in peace! By Thee, Most High, will they be crowned at last. Praise to Thee
986. st. Praise to Thee, my Lord, for Sister Death, From whom no man can flee! But woe to
987. my Lord, for Sister Death, From whom no man can flee! But woe to those who die in m
988. lee! But woe to those who die in mortal sin! Blessed are those who do Thy most holy
989. Blessed are those who do Thy most holy will! To them the second death can bring no
990. Thy most holy will! To them the second death can bring no evil. Praise ye, and bless
991. ! To them the second death can bring no evil. Praise ye, and bless my Lord, and than
992. well that all his with what men called prudence and common sense was corrupting his ide
993. ith what men called prudence and common sense was corrupting his ideals. They found m
994. preaching, admonitions, and example, I will not become their executioner, to punish
995. nizing that his kingdom was not of this world, he had resigned all temporal auover th
996. temporal auover them. Nevertheless, the prudence of the brethren he loved made him wretc
997. them know my wishes." but he could make peace between the bishop and the governor of
998. ch meant the preventing of a disastrous war, we owe the lines in the "Canticle of t
999. s in the "Canticle of the Creatures" in honor of forgiveness. The bishop, who loved h
1000.or foreign, tear the dying and precious one from those to whom he belonged? He was
1001.is now joyous again; left to his Sister God. He became Death was coming. of all He
1002.gain; left to his Sister God. He became Death was coming. of all He sang when he coul
1003.lways he begged his brethren to sing of God, of the sun, creatures, and he loved th
1004.le might be shocked at such a song on a death-bed and in a bishop's house," he reprov
1005.Portiuncula, saying, "Praise be to Thee Death!" To the the Portiuncula they carried h
1006.lessed holy city, because by be thou of God, thee shall many souls be saved, and in
1007., because by be thou of God, thee shall many souls be saved, and in thee many servan
1008. shall many souls be saved, and in thee many servants of God shall dwell, and from o
1009. be saved, and in thee many servants of God shall dwell, and from out of thee shall
1010.shall dwell, and from out of thee shall many be elected to the king- dom retti, of e
1011.cted to the king- dom retti, of eternal life!" "And having spoken St. these words,"
1012.is message, β€” but it, β€” not in this life. But to Donna Jocopa, the practical, th
1013.Jocopa, the practical, the woman in the world, but not of he wrote: And believe me, i
1014.lieve me, if thou wouldst see me not in death, arise as soon as thou shall get this l
1015.tatues of the saints, not to but as the symbol of the Madonna In a Jocopa had not wait
1016.e Lord that these holy birds should his death. show him some sign of affection at the
1017.y birds should his death. show him some sign of affection at the hour of his death;
1018.me sign of affection at the hour of his death; for on the evening of Saturday, after
1019.ings which they to have And now I go to God, commend you all." The tears whose grac
1020. floods of to the eyes of his brethren. One of them brought him a poor of Assisi ro
1021.I had done years "To thee, poor for the love of Christ, said. bring this," he as poo
1022.When his in the fortieth ST. FRANCIS 3, time came, on October 1226, year of age, he
1023.ospel of St. John should be read to β€” man, as sang: softly as the birds above the
1024.inishing with: "Bring prison, that I my soul out of may Thy name: the just wait for
1025.until Thou reward me." He died Then his soul passed as a bright star in a cloud, car
1026.right star in a cloud, carried, as upon many waters, live to heaven. Santa Clara, do
1027.ven. Santa Clara, doomed to without him many years to come, saw him when they brough
1028. the coFranciscans, β€” could only she, time she β€” without that her And for the th
1029.or the the gates of heaven opened for a time weary children of men. [190] ST. FRANCI
1030. FRANCIS AND THE PEOPLE years after his death, Francis, the Poor Two Little Man, beca
1031.his death, Francis, the Poor Two Little Man, became, through the mandate of the chu
1032. view of higher things to Italy and the world. Men looked up with the light of the et
1033.hem all, as every poor little child, in memory of the sacred faces. sun upon their led

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/