Concordance for Evaline, or, Weighed and not wanting : a Catholic tale / By P.J. Coen.

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1.   rriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love, Which alters when it alter
2. ue minds Admit impediments. Love is not love, Which alters when it alteration finds
3. * Didst thou but know the inly touch of love, Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire wi
4. ith snow, As seek to quench the fire of love with words." Shakspeare NEW YORK P. : O
5. ls become and re- less frequent, for no one thinks of those riot, maining outside,
6. se plunder or and the to watchman whose duty requires him weather the storm ; and we
7. Evaline ; or, with his bat to inspire evil-doors with awe, or to notify his brothe
8. inner hour was half-past six —and the family of the house retired to the sitting- ro
9. over some needle- work, singing at the same time with great feeling the plaintive s
10. some needle- work, singing at the same time with great feeling the plaintive song
11. d — to feel the silken web that young love, pure as the dew-drop, was weaving roun
12. give our readers a sketch of her early history. Eva, for such was her name —how she
13. . Eva, for such was her name —how she will tell came further to be called Ev aline
14. erfect intimacy with her on every page. Being so religious, it was her greatest care
15. not Wanting. 9 children with a sincere love of God, and a a fear of offending Him,
16. ting. 9 children with a sincere love of God, and a a fear of offending Him, and wit
17. nd so the money that came to her by the death of for the her son and daughter-in-law,
18. eath of for the her son and daughter-in-law, she hus- banded with the greatest care
19. greatest care children. She gave them a good Engand instilled into lish education, t
20. them a good Engand instilled into lish education, them a desire for acquiring knowledge.
21. d instilled into lish education, them a desire for acquiring knowledge. A few up, year
22. education, them a desire for acquiring knowledge. A few up, years rolled on, and Billy,
23. ca and having an uncle there course, in good circumstances—this, of an encourageme
24. ragement. was Fortune favored the young man's in the great efforts. He got along we
25. give practical illustration in the his love for way of remittances, of her who had
26. earing the sad tidings of grandmother's death. Oh ! how this news smote will It his l
27. other's death. Oh ! how this news smote will It his loving heart. But death come reg
28. ews smote will It his loving heart. But death come regardless of our feelings. knocks
29. , or at least later, a forgetfulness of pain, sooner or always comes. Distance, too,
30. of the old told that the which debt of nature could not long be deferred, combined to
31. ht have ambition, and too mained too as one of the family, but she had much much na
32. ition, and too mained too as one of the family, but she had much much native independe
33. an work out/' she said, girls, "like so will many other and I'm sure I I feel more h
34. rk out/' she said, girls, "like so will many other and I'm sure I I feel more happy
35. t/' she said, girls, "like so will many other and I'm sure I I feel more happy occupi
36. ore happy occupied. to succeed." am I a good seamstress, too, and I'm sure cannot fa
37. amstress, too, and I'm sure cannot fail Many were and brother the entreaties of her
38. out on his journey until he had had the pleasure of seeing his 12 Evaline ; or dear sist
39. tation What an example worthy of imito many of our girls who, puffed false up with
40. de, neglect to learn domestic duties, a knowledge of which, so easily attainable by " ser
41. ainable by " serving out' ? respectable family, is in indispensable to the proper disc
42. fery, but who blush not to toil away at other life, avo- cations useless in married a
43. but who blush not to toil away at other life, avo- cations useless in married and no
44. s again, Weighed and not Wanting. 13 we will take our leave of him, and wish his mis
45. ur heroine thirty years served, a young man of some of age resided. Not very young,
46. e young ladies of our youth-worshipping will say. But we must assure them that his y
47. bservation, He met ; with some reverses will effect in this country and troubles fai
48. ure gray hairs. He was an adventurer by nature in the —not indeed ways of love, but
49. by nature in the —not indeed ways of love, but in 14 Ev aline ; ot, those of ente
50. of enterprise, and was fond of gaining honor, wealth and popularity, no matter how r
51. erprise, and was fond of gaining honor, wealth and popularity, no matter how risky of
52. aining honor, wealth and popularity, no matter how risky of accomplishment. It was thi
53. n of respectable parents. him a college education. and distinctions, They gave He won hon
54. of which we write he in was doing well, being engaged some academies and colleges in
55. hy I that plaintive air ? Why so I sad? will Though you are about leaving, often. st
56. eaving, often. still I — must see you will write to uncle's, and you can then bett
57. can then better than for now, appoint a time and place meeting. a Nay, don't be so d
58. m, to me at least, except a passin. ing beauty, and his interest and share my uncle's
59. 's business, ' on which I set no value. Love the heart that's pure, how Weighed and
60. . ' ij for plain so e'er the face/ and, love, Marry are not for ; money' I — these
61. r ; money' I — these my I maxims. Yes love the frank, the free, the open heart. Bu
62. open heart. But uncle's partner cannot love although he strives to create such a fe
63. reserve that wonder he does not press a other quarter. ters to a It is suit in an- ti
64. er quarter. ters to a It is suit in an- time to bring matI close, which will do when
65. in an- time to bring matI close, which will do when uncle next touches the ject. un
66. realization in it is even so." ; Be of good will heart, Evaline brighter days these
67. ization in it is even so." ; Be of good will heart, Evaline brighter days these yet
68. t Wanting. 1 You I never confessed your love to me, as you have said, before this ev
69. lways given you to believe —as lover. will your friend, your true and constant I I
70. y be your protector even at the risk of life. Your Two Two interests shall ever be i
71. t a single thought, hearts that beat as one.' " The hours had been stealing impel c
72. sleep ; or for a inter- were under the same roof long time and when parting they ch
73. a inter- were under the same roof long time and when parting they changed pledges o
74. ow lost sight Evaline of the lovers. we will suppose to be sojourning toiling the at
75. ys and her evenings of sequestration we will leave our readers to conjecture, for, 2
76. nt to en- bower ; and now, while ab- we will endeavor to give a brief sketch of both
77. of both as a supplement to what we have beauty, already given. Evaline, though not str
78. kness favor. Her and sweetness won felt universal The milk-man happy whenever Evaline res
79. d sweetness won felt universal The milk-man happy whenever Evaline responded Weighe
80. er loss sorely, for never did she allow one to depart unrelieved, as long as she co
81. he could assist him. She had received a good English education, as we have said. She
82. st him. She had received a good English education, as we have said. She could converse fu
83. iste, gress. Of knew nothing gift as an art, ; though her ear was delicately and sh
84. tely and she had that rare from correct nature of being borne away by the spirit of an
85. he had that rare from correct nature of being borne away by the spirit of any air she
86. With trust this rather ungraphic sketch will we our readers be satisfied. Let us now
87. now come to Jean Babtiste. He was, like many of his countrymen, rather low of statur
88. rymen, rather low of stature. His chief beauty lay in a well formed head, over which h
89. th graceful a massive forehead, wherein poetry and philosophy seemed enthroned an expr
90. a massive forehead, wherein poetry and philosophy seemed enthroned an expressive eye, and
91. Evaline. of a kind, gentle temperament necessity required it, ; He was still, he was fir
92. ly among the fair He was no Weighed and beauty worshipper, not Wanting. 25 in; althoug
93. h not sensible to that charming gift of nature but he admired the qualities of the min
94. ure but he admired the qualities of the mind and heart more than beauty of person, f
95. alities of the mind and heart more than beauty of person, for his philosophy overruled
96. art more than beauty of person, for his philosophy overruled his poetic fancy. And now hav
97. r a kindred Difference of country or of religion never entered into the thoughts of eith
98. subsequent union, for they realized the truth that where genuine love all exists, it
99. y realized the truth that where genuine love all exists, it dissolves such differenc
100. in the by the Church, 26 Evaline ; or y matter of disparity of worship. Well, affec- o
101. and heroine placed their tions on each other, and never was there ; purer love than
102. each other, and never was there ; purer love than theirs but, " true love never yet
103. re ; purer love than theirs but, " true love never yet ran smooth." Let us now go ba
104. k in search of Evaline, whom, as our we will find at her uncle's house and, as we fl
105. ves, wc have now all due permission, we will see how matters fare with her. Three or
106. ing as closely intertwined, beat- with one pulsation, for her to indulge a doubt w
107. ntryman would you like for a husband ?" one of them would ask. " A Frenchman, " wou
108. ould ask. " A Frenchman, " would be the other's sponse. " Well, ; refirst I I wouldn'
109. er in order to end !" " Well, it never mind the English 1 though should be tattered
110. no summer Oh, I excursion escapes them. love the 28 Evaline; or, Frenchmen V sation
111. the initials subscribed to the picture, one and the same person that he is represen
112. subscribed to the picture, one and the same person that he is represented thereby,
113. paint Meanwhile all resolved to up the many graces and accom-, plishments of Charle
114. whom Evaline had been so often bored on other occasions, but never so ever, line ; mu
115. but never so ever, line ; much as now. Time, how- was flowing on cheerlessly for Ev
116. ferent circumstances, which, indeed, it will not be necessary for us to describe. Af
117. e that your affections have undergone a change Your inquiries but as Pope says, 'Whate
118. o its of safe delivery might be had. We will endeavor by and bye to furnish our read
119. y, and of the ambassador. At present we will enter on a description of the house in
120. ects two very desirable —business and pleasure. The first story of the house, formerly
121. story of the house, formerly devoted to other purposes, was now converted It into a s
122. ofusion of the latest styles of Crispin art ; within, and hanging relatives outside
123. , mirrors that reit united the two into one grand, spacious apartment. flected the
124. , afforded a delicious resting place on one while nearly opposite was a tete-a-tete
125. pposite was a tete-a-tete got up in the same style of rich upholstery. The chairs we
126. s it full pride and conall its were, of wealth and attendant importance. the In one co
127. wealth and attendant importance. the In one corner of its room reposed a piano bene
128. rom progressing? I It can't come all to good, fear. These French are flighty adventu
129. Romanism then we, poor Protestants, all God help us, are doomed to perdition. O hor
130. table. ; We but here- don't exclude any one from heaven they are always crying out,
131. ying out, tics!' 'lost Now whom fancy a man looking for a shall wife he verily beli
132. shall wife he verily believes never see God in glory. with such a How can he live h
133. nduce Eva to to turn hope she loves the religion of her forefathers too coat. much be a
134. or Protestants to marry- in their own I religion, and Catholics in theirs. And Eva as fo
135. heirs. And Eva as for foreigners—-I'm death faith in fickle on them. men. a have no
136. faith in fickle on them. men. a have no will French- rue the day she marries Frenchm
137. olic! I don't deny but Jean — what do will you call him ? — yes, Jean Baptiste r
138. utside of his own so persuasion. ; They will think otherwise like of course but it b
139. wise like of course but it be with them many others, that after having entered into
140. ded them, removed from their eyes, they will see things as they are, and learn, alas
141. do. They boys who having seen water for time, the and invited by its glassy bosom, a
142. s to to daring by the example into make one grand plunge the sparkling element, beg
143. nto make one grand plunge the sparkling element, begin to realize their rashness, is an
144. imming, and plunging into the sparkling element — if boys did not ven- ture into the
145. they could never learn to swim. And ' * courage is half the battle/ they say. A faint h
146. dom gets a hus- band dear. ; so we need courage as to marry, my of And regards differen
147. of And regards difference country, and religion — I don't think so much about tell th
148. ot get angry to say, you must hear what will I and you then be better able say, then
149. - best possible thing for the ciety." " good of Oh, never mind society, and doctors,
150. ing for the ciety." " good of Oh, never mind society, and doctors," said her husband
151. said her husband. " My niece's comfort, happiness, peace of mind — -that's what I look
152. sband. " My niece's comfort, happiness, peace of mind — -that's what I look to." "
153. My niece's comfort, happiness, peace of mind — -that's what I look to." " And why
154. ith a Frenchman, as well as an English- man? if love for you be less in you had bee
155. enchman, as well as an English- man? if love for you be less in you had been born Fr
156. n Ireland me ? be less, had I been born Love fixes is ; up a great many difficulties
157. I been born Love fixes is ; up a great many difficulties. Love is blind, for you kn
158. ixes is ; up a great many difficulties. Love is blind, for you know and 'tis well he
159. f the parties about to marry only " — love." ' Yes, you do well to say if the part
160. say if the parties about to marry only love/ ever love aright? I But do they don't
161. parties about to marry only love/ ever love aright? I But do they don't wish my nie
162. t Wanting. 39 You have But there a poor opinion of French gallantry," said his wife. "
163. criterion to I reliable judge by in the matter of age. have seen himself, and so has E
164. d thirty. me ! if you only saw the Why, many grey I that are scattered through his o
165. observing them a short 40 Evaline ; or> time since, as you were selling him a pair o
166. no infallable criterion to judge by of one's age. When fair I I married your mothe
167. , although my I thir- tieth year at the time. And many a time ; she quizzed me to I
168. my I thir- tieth year at the time. And many a time ; she quizzed me to I over them
169. hir- tieth year at the time. And many a time ; she quizzed me to I over them so have
170. ; she quizzed me to I over them so have good reason remember the fact. On the other
171. e good reason remember the fact. On the other hand, have seen men of forty summers al
172. rs so that they seem to bloom ; through one everlasting summer, never experiencing
173. him it." off at once then end to A very good idea, indeed, could only I my child-, w
174. t." off at once then end to A very good idea, indeed, could only I my child-, we man
175. project since last we it is talked the matter over. You know more than probable is th
176. ed, I guess. We then challenged her the other evening to letter in write— indeed we
177. tter in write— indeed we had the view many trials, in which she seemed to excel, w
178. risky ; it would be too it while on the other hand would be very easy to wards/ " 1 a
179. and attentively all not Wanting. 43 the time, and who showed by her looks that she w
180. e the plot which was so shocking to her honor and her pride, said in chiding tones "
181. g her husband, " you ought to have more sense than to encourage so mean an ered, will
182. ense than to encourage so mean an ered, will act —one, too, which if discov- do mo
183. encourage so mean an ered, will act —one, too, which if discov- do more than any
184. ear," said Mr. Dorset, I'm sure " there will be no discovery. the Frenchman, when he
185. e Frenchman, when he gets the letter, ; will discontinue his attentions and Eva perc
186. his attentions and Eva perceiving this will learn to forget, or to despise." " All
187. get, or to despise." " All very fine in imagination," said his 44 wife ; Evaline ; " or, if
188. aline ; " or, if but believe me a young man their it * and a young woman make up to
189. oman make up to get married, minds they will do anyhow. The more they they get. thin
190. r Didst thou but know the inly touch of love, Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire wi
191. ith snow, As seek to quench the fire of love with words — and if this be true of o
192. h words — and if this be true of open opposition, to what may we not expect of treachery
193. d ? be the result discover- And ; ed it will be, is sooner or later and once a it, r
194. , depend upon the hearts of the victims will be welded to- gether with a firmness an
195. venture, anyhow," said her husband. The matter was father so arranged ; by the and dau
196. to Ev aline ; and the note, as black in nature as it was in ink, was inserted into a v
197. ch amused important letter. the English family, was the personage appointed to deliver
198. to give him even the motest hint on the matter ; besides, was none of gale, the fleecy
199. it heavy blew a snow-storm had set and element was driven now into the boys face, now
200. he endeavored to lighten calling to by mind the urgen- cy of the expedition —whic
201. y the way, exclusive of the it absolute necessity was under of getting snow, needed no di
202. itting, as did, with equal it grace, no matter how he threw on down his coat-collar, h
203. is boots energetically and now turned ; being nicely fixed up anew, he gave the bell
204. nducted his embassy, following chapter. will be told Weighed and not Wanting. 49 Cha
205. ighed and not Wanting. 49 Chapter IV. " Good evenin\ young Miss," said Paddy, acgirl
206. sponded to his ring of the door-bell. " Good evening, sir," she politely an- swered.
207. aster, Miss ; this I ways and I if more will sich runs as this, don't many know what
208. I if more will sich runs as this, don't many know what get become of me. Is the wint
209. " girl in aston- ishment, at the little same time looking the You have no errand! wh
210. l in aston- ishment, at the little same time looking the You have no errand! what th
211. , " and read a young French gentlehere, man who Baptiste. I will lives Monsieur Jea
212. French gentlehere, man who Baptiste. I will lives Monsieur Jean soon to dinner. He
213. ves Monsieur Jean soon to dinner. He it will be in give him the letter when he comes
214. ke Just me ;" and here he turned round, one just learning the steps of a round danc
215. e doubt," said she; "a what little rest will serve you." " Faix ! then, that's I wan
216. maybe I'm not as green my looks. But no matter. Anypoor ways a cup of tay would warm h
217. ied him in her heart. She, owing to the education she got in the town of G , where as goo
218. ion she got in the town of G , where as good English, uttered with good accent, stri
219. G , where as good English, uttered with good accent, strikes the ear as in any other
220. good accent, strikes the ear as in any other town in Ireland or out of it, Weighed a
221. out of it, Weighed and not Wanting. 55 being a correct English speaker, was sorry th
222. ehead intellect was enthroned. Sheil, a Many a Grattan, Cahill a Curran, a Kenny, a
223. e. kitchen foot, . And x\o\\ he crossed one and now another, so that neither feel j
224. o longer able to check the effervescent nature of : his thoughts, he suddenly ejaculat
225. ly ejaculated " May the Lord fasten the life in you ; Weighed and Miss! not V/anting
226. Miss! not V/anting. 57 and happy is the man that will get you." " Why do you say so
227. V/anting. 57 and happy is the man that will get you." " Why do you say so?" "asked
228. an eye on in the wliola coorse of " my life." That's not a very long one yet, my de
229. e of " my life." That's not a very long one yet, my dear." " Long pies, or short, '
230. saw — " Out et pop a custard, as and other cczteras. Paddy was much bewildered fet
231. eighed and in all not Wanting. taste as good, is 59 others. less They ; and cost muc
232. . less They ; and cost much and economy one of So, the chief supports of the househ
233. it —as to he the might have expressed idea of his himself —at prospective housek
234. dn't look at the likes of me. a plainer will girl, Faix too, It and plainer cooking
235. tiste, The bell rings. was Jean who, on being inform- ed by the maid of the boy ing h
236. he would just up stairs 6o to Evaline ; change clothes, or, and would be down not long
237. . He was effecting the necessary parel. change in his ap- He in passed the comb carele
238. s me r Paddy did not give the ply, girl time to re- but stepped across to the kitche
239. im less The thought flashed moment that one so faithtribute of a tear. was not wort
240. thtribute of a tear. was not worthy the will We tail not attempt to describe in deit
241. ail not attempt to describe in deit the state of his mind, for can better be imagined
242. pt to describe in deit the state of his mind, for can better be imagined, particular
243. can better be imagined, particularly by one who has ever had, like Jean Baptiste, h
244. like Jean Baptiste, his blighted. first love He it put the unwelcome mis- sive in hi
245. speare and Byron are right 62 Evaline ; will or, but whether the tide or lead to for
246. t whether the tide or lead to fortune % God knows where—that's " the rub." You'd
247. ressing the boy, " and Jane see to Anne will make you I comfortable, as soon as she
248. se absolutely wont to do, more than was change unavoidable ; —which little from his
249. ostle was a glorious saint, of Ireland. Many of our countrymen, 64 Evaline; or, who
250. se they think it too Irish. I hope you "will never be so devoid of good sense as to
251. I hope you "will never be so devoid of good sense as to follow their example. No ;
252. pe you "will never be so devoid of good sense as to follow their example. No ; Let it
253. young gentleman looks very melancholy. one dead? or " is it Any a love affair ?" F
254. melancholy. one dead? or " is it Any a love affair ?" Faix" replied Paddy, " the ch
255. of them would thin'. is it tell me But one thing at the is sartin — no one ; dea
256. e But one thing at the is sartin — no one ; dead house of my masther affair as so
257. masther affair as so might as well be a love any- thin' worse." " Is there anything
258. " Is there anything worse than a disin love, think appointment you, Paddy ?" — We
259. sooner be disappointed than once in in love, my felt dinner. " It seems to me you h
260. It seems to me you have 'tis never the pain of love," said the girl smiling. " Faix
261. s to me you have 'tis never the pain of love," said the girl smiling. " Faix ! then,
262. " said the girl smiling. " Faix ! then, time enough into a say. bad market, as the o
263. m not in a bit of a hurry about getting love pains, or " I any other pains either."
264. ry about getting love pains, or " I any other pains either." think you are quite righ
265. she continued, a few minutes you and I will sit down ninst together." is "There no
266. sit down ninst together." is "There no one I'd sooner see for- me barrin' own four
267. Evaline ; " or, I of tay in the pot, no matter where might be scampin' around. " I'll
268. " I'll do the part of your sister this time, Paddy." Paddy his felt highly complime
269. his reflections, looked the picture of happiness. As which soon, as the dinner-table was
270. been sufficiently acted upon he by her many pressing him felt invitations to allow
271. thrue as the gospel, isn't snowin' now One —nor fine * there a piper in Cork/ I
272. he girl — roosters, Pad" well all the same, Miss, but I forgot. Well, even the ear
273. r the my grandfather To make a long was one of the number. before day-break story s
274. girls get to- Weighed and gether they " will not Wanting. sport, 69 make mane it any
275. ather was a frolicksome at of a lad the time —just about a twenty, and happened to
276. be 'takin' little with a young girl in one of the tents." " What do you mean by ta
277. t {or and strong " I graw > that is for love." have never seen a girl drink anyfear,
278. rink anyfear, in thing intoxicating for love, or part of the country. my Do you mean
279. ining. So now that we un- derstand each other regarding those technicalities, I pray
280. your narration." " Very well, Miss ; I will now go on. Weighed and I not Wanting. J
281. r gum-tickler, which he in the posed of same easy way. ' \ Twill be a good while/ sa
282. posed of same easy way. ' \ Twill be a good while/ says he, before these 72 Ev alin
283. re r at hard and fast, boxin ? for bare life. My grandfather was not long about gett
284. when they were whipped, on the point of being should come up and tap who my grandfath
285. reeches, and a red waist-coat coat. — mind i a red waist- a wattle out of a tent f
286. do business. I'm your friend. Strike no man but the man who his party strikes strik
287. I'm your friend. Strike no man but the man who his party strikes strikes laid you
288. I Every " know," she replied that ?" " one day," continued that Paddy, it would gi
289. dy, it would give their ' book oath was one of the good people' ; that said came fr
290. d give their ' book oath was one of the good people' ; that said came from the other
291. good people' ; that said came from the other world and they he must be one of friend
292. people' ; that said came from the other world and they he must be one of friends, my
293. rom the other world and they he must be one of friends, my grandfathers who was tak
294. my grandfathers who was taken away some time girl before. The could not suppress a s
295. n fairydom it is " but tell me how ' no one believes except the in fairies, or good
296. one believes except the in fairies, or good even people' Irish is ; and amongst the
297. sh is ; and amongst them the belief not universal while in this country no one believes i
298. not universal while in this country no one believes in such preternatural appariti
299. twas quite asy to explain all that. The good i j people' are not to be found out of
300. turn sometimes. And fairies the reason 'good people/ or and, " is don't leave Ire?"
301. assent. before the fairies drowned the world the were ; wanderin' around just for pl
302. ld the were ; wanderin' around just for pleasure as the different countries and in were
303. the different countries and in were all one them days there was vent them from noth
304. ing. , JJ be devartin themselves at the time in that part of the world called now so
305. mselves at the time in that part of the world called now so it Ireland, just becase ;
306. with the dimensions of the island for a pleasure garden." " But," asked the girl, " coul
307. said — " you have a great fairy lore, knowledge, ; Paddy, of is indeed your story reall
308. what some people may may be some " 'tis truth in the existence of these strange creat
309. e of these strange creatures." Some all truth ! ejaculated ' Paddy ; "why and truth.
310. l truth ! ejaculated ' Paddy ; "why and truth. Seem' is belie vin'; Weighed and sever
311. Wanting. Jg people have seen them from time ndin . to time, hurlin' and horse- She
312. ople have seen them from time ndin . to time, hurlin' and horse- She did not task hi
313. too slue deeply thought, rooted in his imagination, for her to disabuse him of them. So to
314. who No, 1 wrote it ?" > " C{ sir/ tell Will you me who are the memThere bers of the
315. you me who are the memThere bers of the family ?" " Yes, sir ; to be shure I will. —
316. he family ?" " Yes, sir ; to be shure I will. — 80 is Evhline ; the or, masther an
317. daughthers " —Grace and Evalina." any other young Has Yes, there been lady at the h
318. rather dollar make for home now, for it will be late when you arrive. Here is a for
319. when you arrive. Here is a for candies. Good night !" Good night! kindly, sir I'm ;
320. e. Here is a for candies. Good night !" Good night! kindly, sir I'm ; very thankful
321. his hat, and politely wishing the girl good night, too, he disappeared, and cheered
322. how he could best spend his dollar. We will let him journey on alone ; and accompan
323. to so brighten 84 Evaline ; or, up with love when looking sending a frame, at me, th
324. e arms that hung around neck so short a time ago to caress, refuse to able, my now e
325. to able, my now embrace ? ; Woman I is change- they say but thought Evaline all chang
326. l is excellent in the sex. the curse in love, and O 'tis approved, When women cannot
327. and O 'tis approved, When women cannot love when they're beloved.' " Evaline, " he
328. the I ? I picture, " you know how much love. Do ! you reciprocate dearest, speak !
329. ithin is still me saying —Evaline the same. is " But there the letter, giving a fl
330. ion, and that she has been forced to It sign it. would be a pleasure to know go to t
331. s been forced to It sign it. would be a pleasure to know go to that, for in such case he
332. t acted not with her hand. I in concert will her uncle's, and probe the mystery to t
333. ystery to the core. And " until ; never will I condemn you, as clear Evaline," ture
334. as light and even then, though forsaken will cherish and betrayed, lection of a fond
335. ions that occupied 86 the Evaline ; or, mind of Jean Baptiste during the eveDoubts a
336. e eveDoubts and hopes chased each ning. other in his mind, like light and shade on a
337. nd hopes chased each ning. other in his mind, like light and shade on a landscape. N
338. ey to the would sink lowest depths. Now mind built up pleasing fancies of love and f
339. . Now mind built up pleasing fancies of love and fidelity, still scrupulouly cherish
340. laintiveness of the and the de- pressed state of his feelings Weighed and O would I n
341. 87 When And all the heart then knew of pain Was swept away in transient tears. When
342. hope whisper'd then, were a boy again, life seemed formed of sunny years, My fancy
343. f sunny years, My fancy deemed was only truth I ; O would that The happy could know a
344. f a fleeting tear ; But still the heart will fondly cling ; To hopes no longer prize
345. ly cling ; To hopes no longer prized as truth And memory still delights to bring The
346. To hopes no longer prized as truth And memory still delights to bring The happy visio
347. not strange that, from the de- pressed state of his feelings, Jean Bap* tiste's thou
348. 88 Evaline ; before he or, there was a time, long before he knew her it —lone lov
349. ime, long before he knew her it —lone love, knew what was to when he was happy. No
350. saken, as he feared he was, by her, his memory fluttered back on airy pinions to the d
351. thered hopes, no frustrated no blighted love, but that portion is hapthe piness with
352. lay ! himself down, but alas his racked mind knew thither, not the balm of refreshin
353. a beautiful landscape his on which the god of day shed golden beams in all their s
354. und him to try if he could discover any one gaslight, for in the faint he fancied h
355. ; 91 name called but unable to see any one, he concluded he dreaming. had been He
356. r had he been long transported from the world of sense until his mind was again haunt
357. been long transported from the world of sense until his mind was again haunted by dre
358. orted from the world of sense until his mind was again haunted by dreamy apparitions
359. look around he caught a glimpse of the form of a vessel just sinking beneath the ti
360. , and that, cruel though the waters had one friendly wave had proven to the borne h
361. by the appearance of a beautiful female form gliding, angel-like, across the waves,
362. nce of a beautiful female form gliding, angel-like, across the waves, and smiling pla
363. ted it, dreams. He re- garded too, as a good omen, though it of course he lief. atta
364. ards him. taking our leave of him for a will And now while, we ask our kind readers
365. the house of Evaline's uncle. to in The family, however, endeavored while away the tim
366. ily, however, endeavored while away the time pleasantly the parlor— now that the b
367. long delay. But what most buted to the pleasure of the evening were a few songs sung by
368. great with great credit to yourselves, man)' airs but as yet you havn't given favo
369. irst favorite air in for now, I for the time my life,. have heard you allude to a pr
370. orite air in for now, I for the time my life,. have heard you allude to a preference
371. art" said the mother. " That's the very one precisely," said her husband ; and sure
372. nd, returning terrible from the Russian war. saw been engagements never during my s
373. re a gallant part, yield, But there was one who would not And that was woman's hear
374. Determined not to flee, Though, if the truth be told, afraid That he might vanquishe
375. woman's heart.' " 98 " Ev aline ; Long life or, to you both, delighted my fine girl
376. atch, to possess the wonderful power of being able to lash the tranquil current of hi
377. ry, " that young rascal away up to this time of night. I'll fix him, I bet." Weighed
378. get My dear," said why so angry about a will trifle ? I The poor boy do have a a jou
379. " " Pshaw !" said her father, " gentle! man's return, indeed Why him couldn't the b
380. e to go wrong and 'Twould never even by chance. be well the as was the case betimes wi
381. ith his original, ; blunderings came to good he but I'd wager a trifle, if he get in
382. r a trifle, if he get into conversation will let with the Frenchman, that something
383. t of the letter that ; still, as to the good effect can in any way come from the I u
384. st him to the foot of the stairs, to by chance-he should forget perform this last tion
385. nking you'll catch from the master this time." 102 " Evaline; Are the or, young ladi
386. ladies in the parlor yet," asked Paddy. Being answered : in I the affirmative, he con
387. ed think they'll get "Well, me off this time." So at he ran up stairs, and knocked g
388. hat the deuse, has kept you out to this time of night ?" " I didn't like, sir," repl
389. ight" to ed boy, give the letter to any one but ; the gentleman himsel' tould it an
390. but I thought was right " set, You're a good boy," said Mrs. Dorencouraging him. "Ju
391. rencouraging him. "Just tell us, like a good boy, what the gentleman afraid, the mas
392. er husband, not first, giving the boy a chance to speak " I'm sure the gentleman said
393. ly, for not needed." " That's " was the truth, sir," said Paddy ; he didn't say one w
394. truth, sir," said Paddy ; he didn't say one word about sending 104 a letther I ; Ev
395. Evaline; or> but as soon as he read the one brought him I — oh ! he changed a hun
396. e changed a hunin dred colors, thought, one minute. And as he put the letther in hi
397. probably was the most conversant of the family with English literature, not even " —
398. ng read the passages. What Evalina fine memory you have anything you read once, you fo
399. better, am glad to find that you are a good deal I smarter than think. was at grst
400. night sleep. ; and, indeed, you need a good And be sure to be up early to it clear
401. o me the snow shall have ceased by that time." his assent Paddy bowed firmed by a ve
402. about the French gintleman to mortial 4 man or woman, lest I'd let the cat out of t
403. ein' out so long, Molly for to tell you truth, I went mythe astray in the snow. Now I
404. in the snow. Now I don't spake tell it one word about sel'. that, for didn't Arrah
405. do was to say waited for an didn't get one, answer, and that afther all, bekase it
406. y, to warm my heart, Paddy thought, and good luck to you !" correctly, that this acc
407. !" correctly, that this account of the cause of his delay would prevent the maid fro
408. ng. 109 Chapter VII. " Upon my word and honor," addressing his wife said Mr. Dorset,
409. from the probability that the Frenchman fate, will re- sign himself to his action to
410. he probability that the Frenchman fate, will re- sign himself to his action to in an
411. ility that the Frenchman fate, will re- sign himself to his action to in and take no
412. o in and take no affair? It further his love seems so far so me we can indulge the h
413. far so me we can indulge the hope, and good. Had Paddy acted difissue of the projec
414. 1 o Evaline; or, mystery that we could form no tions. calculaaffairs The so present
415. st wait ! now your own but ideas, for I time to develop the consequences satisfactor
416. ould be lonely without poor Paddy ; the time wouldn't pass half so pleasantly only f
417. y admit evening, —but it is the first time ; and consider beside." " the storm, an
418. resumed Evalina, " do stories." tell us one of Paddy's amusing " Shall I tell it in
419. ne ; or, full we must which say she did justice to the task of imitating Paddy's vernac
420. his Anglo-Saxon diaits and made its own language, like faith, contraband. : Grace commen
421. h, contraband. : Grace commenced a poor man, " There was once who had but one cow,
422. poor man, " There was once who had but one cow, and the poor, dear crather was the
423. with evenin' you might see the poor his man wife and little childer around him, tak
424. may be breakin' them. Well, the poor ; man was very so willin' to industrious and
425. ey all doted on him. " In the coorse of time his calf —and sure, was, that didn't
426. her owner prevent her from making every other cow in hersel' aiqual to village. littl
427. ick, and off died. badly then. The poor man >».. Twould be a great Him it sight be
428. ther tor the call had nevcj been in the world/ he said. caii Now on he ins had hands
429. and sure whatever ways himsel' and the family could get along without the milk, she,
430. about the poor the loss of their likely man and cow ; the family at their calf, too
431. loss of their likely man and cow ; the family at their calf, too, and soon to follow
432. tis hard to an Irishman that won't do a good 5 Weighed and turn to a neighbor not Wa
433. he desarve it at all. So, owin' to the good neighbors, the for poor family didn't w
434. in' to the good neighbors, the for poor family didn't want anythin' ; and as " for the
435. reason to cry much for her mother. But one day the poor ; man took this a notion i
436. for her mother. But one day the poor ; man took this a notion into his head wife,
437. poor crather of a calf, 'twould be the death of her " if ' she lost her nourishment/
438. if ' she lost her nourishment/ Billy, ' Death, or no death/ says I'll drive her out t
439. her nourishment/ Billy, ' Death, or no death/ says I'll drive her out to grass, and
440. for hersel' the best ways she can/ And man to his word, so he did 6 1 1 Evaline ;
441. the milk least, month calf and by that time the little would be a hardy. all But 't
442. with He declined their kind offers all many thanks and blessin's for they had done
443. sin's for they had done for him and the family. "A you now. month stole away over away
444. not Wanting. 117 Faix ! then 'tis about time for you to think of her, Billy asthore,
445. his wife. 4 But no matther, is 'tis all one, for the poor nicely. baste doin' well
446. u, so I was, anyways ; and I'm glad had one to see afther the business that I oughn
447. — was all she said but she spoke this time, he thought, more piously than ever bef
448. usly than ever before. " Well, the poor man scampered along ; and when he got calf
449. atch the cow if ' I can/ 'says the ould man with to himser, and bring her home fiel
450. im, than she scoured away, for the bare life, in the direction of the hill. " By a g
451. e, in the direction of the hill. " By a good deal by the to do he overtook in her, a
452. hill she goes And sure enough, with the man in Billy hoult of her. " Well and good,
453. e man in Billy hoult of her. " Well and good, what should see on enterin' but a crow
454. and brake-downs but they stopped every one, as soon as they saw the at stranger, a
455. hey stopped their chat look at the poor man in hoult But one of them that hapin the
456. chat look at the poor man in hoult But one of them that hapin the of the cow. pene
457. hapin the of the cow. pened to know him world, and was on " ' that account friendly t
458. him, : says to him very politely Billy, will ?' you have a blast o' the pipe " ' I i
459. 'm a friend of yours, Billy/ says ; the other and approachin' him, he whisin the ear
460. mine, and this I must have her there's virtue in quiverin', bit of black-thorn,' and
461. le. " * You shan't have the cow shouted one of the crowd. Never! never! shouted out
462. tunder all Well, sure, poor Billy lost courage for a and faix ! there was to good raso
463. t courage for a and faix ! there was to good rason betther off man ; be affeard I
464. x ! there was to good rason betther off man ; be affeard I —and fainted dead and
465. and came skippin' up to him. " Tis the good people have Billy, ' my cow, I see/ say
466. entirely or what's worse, lay a hand on one of the childer'. " Well, he faced for h
467. tin' his foot all After gettin' along a good the time. Weighed and bit, till not Wan
468. foot all After gettin' along a good the time. Weighed and bit, till not Wanting. i 1
469. shone out of the heavens. do your heart good singin' his beautiful to hear the lark
470. ; or, Go ' to sleep, you takin' foolish man/ says at this Biddy, What's you up time
471. man/ says at this Biddy, What's you up time of mornin' " " ' * ?' I'm goin' to the
472. You'll fair, woman in is dear/ a bad be time enough market. for I'm sure the day to
473. the and sure money you'll lay out there will be much betther spent in the house, and
474. as he kep' his sacret, f ' rise I have good new is it, for you/ ? " ' ' Arrah ! wha
475. s to the gets money be, — Sure ' ways one n' 'tisn't ? afther stall you'd Billy a
476. w that Billy bought at the fair brought good luck with her into the house. die as th
477. rd if it had been well authenit ticated history, and though was not classed in the cate
478. not Wanting. 127 Chapter VI I We past. will suppose a few days already has ceased a
479. ight sun looks cheerful in the heavens. Many are availing themselves of the fine day
480. dawning of this day with a kind of sad pleasure. to set his He was anxious mind at ease
481. sad pleasure. to set his He was anxious mind at ease by learning some- thing definit
482. - thing definite. He wished to know the truth of Evaline's unaccountable estrange- me
483. ught like the billows of the ocean, his mind which seem to grow out of each other, l
484. his mind which seem to grow out of each other, leaving but a interval momentary of ca
485. ng but a interval momentary of calm. At one ; time he was the prey of despair other
486. a interval momentary of calm. At one ; time he was the prey of despair other a ray
487. t one ; time he was the prey of despair other a ray of hope would flash at anfitful,
488. h at anfitful, its but withal consoling mind ; —-now one, beam across his now anot
489. its but withal consoling mind ; —-now one, beam across his now another gained sta
490. one, beam across his now another gained state of the ascendancy. his Such was the min
491. ate of the ascendancy. his Such was the mind as he journeyed along to the house of E
492. n indulging the, to him, very agreeable idea that the intimacy between his niece and
493. have a from the latter in regard to the matter. less ardent in Had tion, all Jean Bapt
494. r of her womanly and He has weighed the matter carefully during the past few days ; de
495. e interview. it to the final test of He man while arrives, and finds the old gentle
496. ls, He is recognized at once by the — one of if whom " passes across to her fathe
497. ench gentlemen. "All in a right, pet; I will attend to him moment. I I'm glad you to
498. , feigning to observe the for the first time, Frenchman politely now he very asked h
499. ry much." Well, sir, anything you ask I will it an- swer fair if I can — that is,
500. uestion I may ask " impression that any will all be fair, for I would not presume to
501. rrogaobjectionable. seem me you have an opinion in the matter, too ; and of course you
502. ble. seem me you have an opinion in the matter, too ; and of course you can judge of t
503. presume] that she have never had the to honor of an introduction you ; and know I was
504. staying with you up her is it for some time wish to after giving situation. know ho
505. is" Weighed and (producing the strained will as I not Wanting. " of 133 letter) her
506. ose so," repeated Jean Baptiste, laying particular emphasis on the words. that I " Well, s
507. n of her signature, I was not deserved. will trouble 134 Evaline; or, you, with no f
508. or, you, with no further questions, but will leave the development of this mystery t
509. eave the development of this mystery to time." " One thing in felt I do tell you," s
510. development of this mystery to time." " One thing in felt I do tell you," said the
511. e Here he gave a knowing glance French- man. " And I think it is not right for one
512. man. " And I think it is not right for one of your years to take advantage of her
513. of firmness with which his his injured honor had nerved him, fire, eye glancing and
514. ed, come But to I a finale without your knowledge. do find fault with you to bring undue
515. , but tion enough, too, to entertain an opinion of her own. You for love her I permit m
516. ntertain an opinion of her own. You for love her I permit me to say that your love c
517. r love her I permit me to say that your love can not I exceed mine shall yet Evalina
518. or, The surge of despair with which his mind had been deluged, was now somewhat calm
519. fresh blossoms still he felt that happy time would come. " Ever her at Shakspeare ha
520. n a it work than some written. in whose language is They apply themselves in' to the stu
521. authors order to master Weighed and the language ; not Wanting. 137 and, by the bye, Mos
522. aken. Two ' heads are but I better than one,' they say ; fear in your mother's head
523. ur mother's head alone this case better will prove than our three. the Why, bless my
524. va, or Evalina and nothing ple to meet, truth ' as he calls her, for ' more probable
525. ble hills don't,' peo- though the whole will feel will out.' it ! How angry she make
526. don't,' peo- though the whole will feel will out.' it ! How angry she make it about
527. Just your own case. What would your any chance feelings be !" if you by discovered you
528. on, unenviable and would have given the world they had never been actors felt in so v
529. " is the mat- ter," for you to show no sign of a plan, or plot, in hav- ing got cou
530. with regard to Jean Baptiste's letter, will endeavor to con- vince her that from th
531. d by cluded from the fact of the writer being French, that probably her name had Eval
532. as the letter beI trayed only a frothy love at best, looked upon the writer as an a
533. in his my own name, but having found by chance a sheet of paper with the written in he
534. says," he continued, " ' speak of a all man I as you find him/ is I think from have
535. ut such ? things dear." " I You have no experience, my judge from story-writers, papa." !
536. disparity A few years are nothing let I man. However and the matter rest for the pr
537. are nothing let I man. However and the matter rest for the present, will endeavor to
538. er and the matter rest for the present, will endeavor to dissuade Eva from her resol
539. ity, and religious per- suasion : these will be the I strongest points on which to d
540. e I strongest points on which to dwell. will oppose a continuation of the intimacy a
541. t her have I than thwart her uselessly. will not embitter her days by opposition, no
542. selessly. will not embitter her days by opposition, nor force her into a marriage she does
543. oads, giving promise of an afternoon of pleasure, of which persons of different ages and
544. d the merry crowds had they not had the one, all-important matter to adjust with th
545. had they not had the one, all-important matter to adjust with their father regarding c
546. re our readers in our last chapter. The matter was finally arrang- ed thus subject, :
547. in their confirma- tory evidence of the truth of his assevera- 144 tions ; Ev aline ;
548. g on or, their assent to his superior ; wisdom and prudence pantly descanting flip- na
549. eir assent to his superior ; wisdom and prudence pantly descanting flip- nationalities a
550. ns, she shook her head ominously It the time. in was about three o'clock the after-
551. ook of the Weighed and not Wanting. 145 one long before the time. By a casual obser
552. nd not Wanting. 145 one long before the time. By a casual observer this lack of spri
553. our cheerless reflections, to a better cause. it was assigned Ever before she was ;
554. ng? cannot be, they consoled themselves idea, that in she has yet had any positive 1
555. ne ; or> letter, regarding the ; as the time was so short and they concluded, in lov
556. ime was so short and they concluded, in love, and and rightly, that felt she was onl
557. ry word of h-is em- bodies the greatest wisdom. But papa, we " are interrupting you."
558. have to speak are at least all for your good they are so intended. ! 148 Evaline ; n
559. , by the way, had been, well by 11 this time, impressed on his memory. Jean Baptiste
560. well by 11 this time, impressed on his memory. Jean Baptiste," replied Evalina. " O !
561. yes ; that's it. I have got such a bad memory - for retaining foreign names ,, —Wel
562. nting. is ! 149 ; Why, is Eva, the call man over thirty and yet you he him young gr
563. —which makes hairs it worse/' " What matter a few grey ; they are no indication of
564. remarks— " think he " is too old for one of your age." uncle, the difference of
565. lder, I. Besides as he to is some years sense than he ought have more In my mind, two
566. ars sense than he ought have more In my mind, two young, giddy heads ought not unite
567. te their giddy hearts. I think a little prudence, which is invariably comes as years adv
568. h is invariably comes as years advance, one of the parties. very desirable in Don't
569. d. Shakespeare was a first very prudent man, and a of rate judge human nature. I An
570. prudent man, and a of rate judge human nature. I And apropos of the case in point wil
571. ure. I And apropos of the case in point will quote a passage from talk him : ' let s
572. rom Shakespeare 1 and now you follow As God made you he matched you/ it seems to me
573. not Wanting. i5i may conclude that you love the Frenchto man, and are bound Evalina
574. may conclude that you love the Frenchto man, and are bound Evalina was silent. marr
575. ed within her bosom limbs trembled with emotion, and her cheeks grew pale and flushed b
576. shed by turns. The three little words I love him, rushed from the heart to the regio
577. ompose her. He loved her too much in to cause her further pain. Wherefore, — 1 52 E
578. ed her too much in to cause her further pain. Wherefore, — 1 52 Evaline ; or, the
579. used you so but much I trouble of said, mind ; what have was well in- tended. surely
580. surely Allow me to then to ask — and time, you ought this have no difficulty in a
581. difficulty in answering — do you not love Charles, my partner for to like who has
582. as been some and who seems you so much? will He ' is young and handsome, and rich, s
583. force me to do what is so repugnant to love him ; my feelings. I don't ? how then c
584. m. you, social companion, bnt I, do not love please And were in order to my dear unc
585. affections of my heart? I feel sure you love me too much ' to force For what is me,
586. bliss, And " is a pattern of celestial peace.' " Let us pass him aside then/' said h
587. is, any young lady's fancy still, your happiness I should be consulted, and will urge on
588. ur happiness I should be consulted, and will urge on you no It further propositions
589. Jean Baptiste wrote a letter here, some time ago, superscribed Evalitie—is — 1 5
590. e if Frenchified, my permission to make change." mischief these changes bring What !"
591. d the affrighted girl. " Just keep your mind quiet ; it is not so bad as you think."
592. " If I you promise me to keep tranquil, will tell you all in a few words." Evestill,
593. s not and returned it to me, observing, same time,— I now see how correctly—that
594. and returned it to me, observing, same time,— I now see how correctly—that as a
595. s in his your name might be so rendered language. I regarded the I adventurer, for have
596. garded the I adventurer, for have not ; man as an much faith in those Frenchmen to
597. ring the ; name it Evalina turned up by chance and as wasy our own hand- writing, by c
598. had intended." Poor Evaline had by this time, grown deadly pale, which her uncle obs
599. —but he was caressing an unconscious being. She had were astir fainted off. The wh
600. e had were astir fainted off. The whole family with commotion. All retorato ; tives av
601. parched. presented a little A trembling man wine and water. She sipped the tered ph
602. at Eva has been taken suddenly ill, and will I not be able to return take her to all
603. hus- r58 Ev aline ; all or, band, " and will be well. I under- stand her case. See,
604. o her cheeks, and her pulse much out of time. dear, I In a few minutes more, my care
605. dear, I In a few minutes more, my care, will consign her to your and to that of the
606. his fiery hand, and smote the heart of one he would have been the last to injure.
607. r to your bed-room, Emma, and the girls will help you to undress her." daughters acc
608. hy, forget ! all about it." Well, never mind I Just sip a little of this nice potion
609. nd then settle yourself to sleep again. will Your all pulse beats nicely, and you be
610. reamy wander- ; Weighed and ings of the mind, not Wanting. 161 in which she lisped v
611. s me," said her uncle, to the in answer many wishes to which she " to had given expr
612. to the rest." " You may as well set her mind at ease by refuse to do so telling* her
613. ply, for think, as your aunt says, your mind. cause will contribute to settle Well,
614. or think, as your aunt says, your mind. cause will contribute to settle Well, of the
615. nk, as your aunt says, your mind. cause will contribute to settle Well, of the then,
616. e po- own and wound up with a quotation Will from Shakespeare. you promise ; Weighed
617. intimacy sible in ? if pos- Surely that man, different to you country and religion,
618. that man, different to you country and religion, cannot suit you/' " Of 1 course, said
619. ou/' " Of 1 course, said all Grace, she will break off him. further correspondence w
620. /' added worse, Evalina " yes, and what will is a Catholic. first Surely she not be
621. lic. first Surely she not be the of her family to marry a superstitious papist." " You
622. the contrivance entered into without my knowledge has in all probability already — 164
623. ds are bonds, his oaths are oracles His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate : ; Hi
624. h V ; " Yes, such is his character as a man and he has been grossly wronged, and of
625. Your ; intentions I admit to have been good but you should have reflect given yours
626. you should have reflect given yourself time to applicability. on their Jean Baptist
627. erved to be treated And now owe it as a duty to him and to myself Weighed and not Wa
628. t come what way the of our intimacy — matter before him in its proper light." " You
629. You object to him also, because of his religion. Now, dear it uncle, allow in me to say
630. t of " !" it Why, my dear, I'd give the same protection to any Catholic in the world
631. same protection to any Catholic in the world myself; but that doesn't go to prove th
632. whole crowds nonbe lost. catholics the world over, will all How in the name of commo
633. s nonbe lost. catholics the world over, will all How in the name of common sense can
634. ver, will all How in the name of common sense can 1 66 Ev aline ; live or, you ever h
635. aline ; live or, you ever happy with a man who to must look upon you -according th
636. t forms of beliet from hers were not of God, but did that that not prevent a privat
637. ience believer of any denomination from being a child of God." " I don't see the logi
638. any denomination from being a child of God." " I don't see the logic of the distin
639. eing a child of God." " I don't see the logic of the distinc- tion." " I see ; it ver
640. dual : Weighed and not Wanting* 167 may will not be aware of his error, and so be a
641. a bona fide believer, and in such case God not take into account his involun- tary
642. to account his involun- tary error, but will look upon him as His own." " That's jus
643. ealots fight ; His can't be wrong whose life is in the right In faith and hope the w
644. e is in the right In faith and hope the world will disagree, But all mankind's concer
645. n the right In faith and hope the world will disagree, But all mankind's concern is
646. ty : All must be false that thwart this one great end ; ' And 11 all of God, that b
647. rt this one great end ; ' And 11 all of God, that bless mankind, or mend ?" Certain
648. rtainly ! That has been " always all my idea," said Mrs. Dorset. in Let us be united
649. ted unto Christ brotherhood of charity. one common are all, We no the matter what o
650. charity. one common are all, We no the matter what our form of fingers of belief, lik
651. mmon are all, We no the matter what our form of fingers of belief, like one hand —
652. hat our form of fingers of belief, like one hand — -all invigorated by the life-c
653. ke one hand — -all invigorated by the life-current which flows into them source ;
654. ent which flows into them source ; from one common or as our Lord 1 68 Evaline ; it
655. I am the vine, you are for even as the one parent stem infuses life into the sever
656. for even as the one parent stem infuses life into the several branches, differ thoug
657. ugh these may much fruit ; in size, and beauty, and richness of us. so with No forms o
658. ternal worship, we are all nourished in matter the life-giving by streams of which spr
659. hip, we are all nourished in matter the life-giving by streams of which spring from
660. -giving by streams of which spring from one common I Christianity." " You are both
661. Mr. Dorset. leaving points of belief to reasoning fools, as the poet says, I think it oug
662. those trial not Wanting. 169 we do not love, is a harder love ; than to give up tho
663. anting. 169 we do not love, is a harder love ; than to give up those first we do : t
664. Now, as the old fish in I there are as good the sea as have ever been caught/ think
665. sea as have ever been caught/ think it will be very easy for Eva to find will one o
666. nk it will be very easy for Eva to find will one of her own persuasion who please he
667. will be very easy for Eva to find will one of her own persuasion who please her, "
668. doubt," said Mrs. ' Dorset still every one's mind is a king- dom to him/ which he
669. ," said Mrs. ' Dorset still every one's mind is a king- dom to him/ which he wishes
670. ,- that things have come " to this." No one can be more sorry than ; I," said Mr. D
671. quer her and be obedient to " my better judgment." exclaimed Evalina. Obedient!" I "When
672. r would be wrong you to sacrifice my to honor ings — —my feel; all that a girl sh
673. confessing penitent. to must reveal the truth tears flooded her in refreshing ; Jean.
674. iberality, and sanction the intimacy to progress, which he had, through a spirit ot prej
675. Protestant who could embrace the whole world, regardless of their forms of belief. S
676. of their forms of belief. She took the man little as nature moulded him, and cared
677. s of belief. She took the man little as nature moulded him, and cared Christianity he
678. o what nationality he belonged, or what form of i** professed, he was all 172 that a
679. fessed, he was all 172 that a Evaline ; man should be. or And It as for the Mrs. Do
680. sh with them. Indeed, much all of their opposition was caused, in probability, by their no
681. , confidants rather than by Evalina her love by any fixed principle of propriety, in
682. r than by Evalina her love by any fixed principle of propriety, inherited or acquired, re
683. religious estrangement. Our his readers will remember that after interview with Jean
684. und him to be an outspoken, independent man ; and had begun to perceive that a nati
685. Wanting-. 173 that he could be a reli- man, an honorable man, a able man, an hones
686. t he could be a reli- man, an honorable man, a able man, an honest man — in a wor
687. e a reli- man, an honorable man, a able man, an honest man — in a word, a man of
688. an honorable man, a able man, an honest man — in a word, a man of heart and soul.
689. ble man, an honest man — in a word, a man of heart and soul. All this was Jean a
690. t man — in a word, a man of heart and soul. All this was Jean a Catholic Baptiste.
691. ste. ; Nay, more ; he was a religious ; man a man in name and gious life. of sterli
692. Nay, more ; he was a religious ; man a man in name and gious life. of sterling pie
693. religious ; man a man in name and gious life. of sterling piety in reality, unswervi
694. ptiste's Wherefore, much than at of the opposition he had shown during the interview was m
695. must say that he would his niece to any time have preferred marry an Englishman —a
696. au ideal, and the ter- rible effect his opposition her system, that he looked upon futile
697. much. Charles was a different stamp of man from Jean Baptiste. bered that he had I
698. rom Jean Baptiste. bered that he had It will be remem- failed to ; produce an impres
699. x, is the fair altogether unworthy of a man. this, Evalina was not slow to perceive
700. still her ideas of him were always the same. Charles, however, was not devoid of ma
701. me. Charles, however, was not devoid of many noble traits of character. He was indus
702. is lot to of hold intercourse. He was a man heart, too —a man who ; could love, a
703. tercourse. He was a man heart, too —a man who ; could love, and love sincerely bu
704. s a man heart, too —a man who ; could love, and love sincerely but his love was to
705. art, too —a man who ; could love, and love sincerely but his love was too imits fl
706. could love, and love sincerely but his love was too imits flammable. His heart thre
707. ol as had never en- shrined such an his element. affections He could, therefore, turn f
708. n as he perceived she was not a kindred being which he never acquaintance ciprocate h
709. ee after a short still if he, found his one to re love, heart was by Weighed and na
710. short still if he, found his one to re love, heart was by Weighed and nature ever.
711. ne to re love, heart was by Weighed and nature ever. not Wanting. 177 formed to be tru
712. d to be true to her for Jean Baptiste's love was of a different kind. He first ; did
713. of a different kind. He first ; did not love with his whole heart at racter first si
714. the cha- and the more favorable the his love in- analysis had been, the more proport
715. ttle ment was more philosophic than His love was a steady growth from a seed unto a
716. e uptorn save by an awful convulsion of nature leaving sad traces of its existence beh
717. s overjoyed interview, still at the her mind was far from for she being at ease, had
718. ll at the her mind was far from for she being at ease, had yet a great — Ev aline ;
719. d her visit to her uncle's was to her a time of deep anxiety. Her heart was agitated
720. ve her attes- tations first ? Of what ? nature would be the glance of his black pierci
721. t be a look of con- tempt, of scorn, at one so base, so worthless and so ; or would
722. e, so worthless and so ; or would it be one ? of fondness, and of love as before fl
723. r would it be one ? of fondness, and of love as before flattered herself She that he
724. would receive a her kindly as beseemeth man of chivalry —yea, and lovingly, for,
725. to doubt 179 knows me too my ! word of honor." Consoling reflections ? Ah left ! but
726. a sequestered part of the city where no one would know him. him, where she could ne
727. of an only child, knowing to that only one chance reto mained you of ever clasping
728. an only child, knowing to that only one chance reto mained you of ever clasping him yo
729. asping him your breast again a sentient being, while a thousand thronged around your
730. , while a thousand thronged around your mind to make you fear that ere long you clay
731. m your home and your kindred, with only one solitary hope, of a reunion, and that,
732. re mental ab- straction in if which the mind indulges as instinct to by natural gath
733. resent separation Have you ever been in love ; and, if, so the had your love been cr
734. been in love ; and, if, so the had your love been crossed? Has flowery pathway that
735. f some the intricate through which true love has almost invariably to pass before If
736. lize 1 Weighed and not Wanting. 1 8 the state of Evalina's mind. are Ah ! they of sad
737. not Wanting. 1 8 the state of Evalina's mind. are Ah ! they of sad moments —these
738. etween doubtful hope and positive fear. Time will is ever on the wing and the sun sh
739. n doubtful hope and positive fear. Time will is ever on the wing and the sun shine o
740. with this her present Can she bear it? Will she not sink like the noble Caesar afte
741. again. ever do cross he my pathway, he will find Evaline the same." Months have, we
742. he my pathway, he will find Evaline the same." Months have, we passed, and still wil
743. ame." Months have, we passed, and still will imagine, already relentless fate contin
744. still will imagine, already relentless fate continues to*shroud lovers. in mystery
745. afy not Wanting. ; 183 costume soft the beauty of the flowers ; the murmurings of the
746. to the thoughts that flashed across his mind hand- by reason of the dissimilarity of
747. uld shoot across the of Jean Baptiste ; mind but Evalina was not now so comforted, f
748. to rest her eyes even for a moment. Her mind was now less the prey of one continued
749. ment. Her mind was now less the prey of one continued change- agony. It is in such
750. was now less the prey of one continued change- agony. It is in such a state of mental
751. ontinued change- agony. It is in such a state of mental anxiety find her, and despair
752. ming over glassy bosom, giving the gay, pleasure- seeking passengers a survey of its siz
753. surface of its waters, while anon, now one now another, moves by the gracefully bi
754. we read in Ialian writers, and which we will be pardoned lish, for not rendering int
755. uld ever contrast unpleasantly with the state of her 44 own mind me hope, : You But n
756. pleasantly with the state of her 44 own mind me hope, : You But never bade 'tis true
757. to he ; ! I must him he at once : no I will wait until finishes. How much He loves
758. ral —and oh, what a No confessions of love Weighed and not Wanting. 187 side. unbr
759. s could, that her affections were still same, though they had been sorely tried in t
760. ble of bereavement ; while she read the same tale in the plaintive tone of his voice
761. had been received to ; while the whole family extended him the hand of house of the f
762. t, and Weighed and its not Wanting. 189 progress was henceforth unimpeded obstacles by t
763. enceforth unimpeded obstacles by the of family opposition. The marriage-day was fixed,
764. th unimpeded obstacles by the of family opposition. The marriage-day was fixed, and at no
765. led to the hymeneal altar. We Suffice will not detail the marriage cerefestivities
766. k in the Catholic Church —that Church man to which never tole- rates the uncrown
767. wide for thy grasp nor the ages of the world, with their countless incidents, too le
768. , is thy magic power ! Without entering will into particulars, we use this dashing p
769. s of happi- our hero and heroine. Their love increased from day to day. life Their f
770. . Their love increased from day to day. life Their for, to is was a paradise upon ea
771. earth the is — use the words of poet, love." "love heaven, and heaven teresting ch
772. e is — use the words of poet, love." "love heaven, and heaven teresting children t
773. s of the ones were to them the greatest pleasure —a pleasure its so infinite that none
774. were to them the greatest pleasure —a pleasure its so infinite that none can worth, re
775. a mother. So were passing on Eden-like happiness ; their days, in but the tranquil- Weig
776. f their existence was partially checked one day by a letter from France, which brou
777. m France, which brought the news of the death of Jean's father. His widowed mother wa
778. ing heart little —that Jean, her only one, would proceed at once to France with h
779. ys of her widow- hood. Jean had by this time realized some money, and sunny France,
780. eir and parting with Mr. Dorset and his family was touching, and was keenly ticularly
781. arly felt, par- by Evaline ; but filial duty pre- 192 Evaline ; or, dominated over J
782. line ; or, dominated over Jean, and the love of a wife over Evaline. On their arriva
783. y the clasped her son to her heart with love of a mother, and then gave Evaline a no
784. she, addressing her son and daughter-in-law, they will pick up French. the little I
785. ssing her son and daughter-in-law, they will pick up French. the little I will be so
786. they will pick up French. the little I will be so happy then with darlings" —anot
787. acquired such ; a fluency in the French language she was overjoyed at not having been ne
788. er, as first lan- with the children, in nature's guage It —the silent language of si
789. ren, in nature's guage It —the silent language of signs. was the old lady's pleasure t
790. t language of signs. was the old lady's pleasure to take Weighed and not Wanting. 193 Ev
791. not Wanting. 193 Evaline out to see the many places and objects of interest for whic
792. the Catholic ceremonial. Her reflective mind was being gradually all impressed with
793. lic ceremonial. Her reflective mind was being gradually all impressed with of Paris ;
794. line said ; or, difference, " mother-in-law, — she, " addressing her What a diffe
795. while every Episcopalian church chills one." Lo ! the I first seed of God's grace.
796. h chills one." Lo ! the I first seed of God's grace. in " have never been a Protest
797. em I chilling For my part couldn't pray one of them, even if inclined.'' Evaline as
798. f inclined.'' Evaline asked for a great many and expla- nations regarding the Cathol
799. ere given by her mother-in- Weighed and law, not Wanting. 195 much to her apparent
800. e anticipating. Evaline's comprehensive mind saw the beauty of the Catholic ceremoni
801. g. Evaline's comprehensive mind saw the beauty of the Catholic ceremonial ; though she
802. ds, and reaches even with the throne of God; that candles throwing out their pure f
803. ped those subterranean vaults which, of necessity, had to be illuminated with the artific
804. composed of individuals and they, as a matter of course, have got each his own way of
805. inely inspired teachers himself, is and man, left to fallible. Still, strange to sa
806. tand. Were to ask every Catholic in the world separately his reason for believing any
807. teaching of Church as the is efficient cause. And what the Church but a congeries of
808. on of the name Church, each Surely this one will shirk the responsibility of his be
809. f the name Church, each Surely this one will shirk the responsibility of his belief
810. is no bet- ter than the private ants. I judgment of Protesthusband evening ; will get my
811. I judgment of Protesthusband evening ; will get my this to explain Infallibility to
812. ogative to which his Church lays claim, will become a Catholic If Catholic/' The bel
813. ed His Church with this wonderful, this God-like prerogative, it follows of necessi
814. his God-like prerogative, it follows of necessity that we are bound to hear her voice eve
815. and not Wanting. flows from her natural constitution. 199 It springs from the necessities of
816. e to join in the conversation, or least will understand what was passing. We we not
817. s objections and culties; diffi- and we will confine ourselves, beside, to a in mere
818. niz- ed body, animated by an indwelling soul, which is Christ, and directed by is is
819. true ; composed of possessed of men, a life it is but she and action, not controlla
820. given to her, and interknit " I in her constitution, by vine ; Christ. am the ye are the br
821. tles ; which words, this : if they mean life anything, must mean that as the vine di
822. ring forth fruit ; so, too, does Christ life fuse the current of spiritual through t
823. Weighed and in not Wanting. is 201 her nature. She an organism, a moral person, ever
824. living, and composed body and with you soul, which never cease to I carry on mutual
825. Lo, am all days, even to the end of the world." Moreover, the Church needs rogative,
826. Now, what this mis- It is to teach the world superna- tural truth. " Go preach to th
827. It is to teach the world superna- tural truth. " Go preach to the nations, all teachi
828. the Holy Ghost abide to teach them all truth, all and to with them throughout time.
829. truth, all and to with them throughout time. left And their in virtue of these prom
830. them throughout time. left And their in virtue of these promises they the successors t
831. r they had themselves begun. ficulties, Many dif- which they knew would spring they
832. uent Church would meet them with the to same authority be " the pillar as they, and
833. as they, and continue and ground of the truth." The a Infallibility of the : Church w
834. and of Sodom and Gomorrha in the day of judgment, than for that city." Would Apos- Chris
835. m, applies to their successors, for the same necessity remains to to teach, and the
836. plies to their successors, for the same necessity remains to to teach, and the same oblig
837. necessity remains to to teach, and the same obligation listen. And lastly, the doct
838. renaeus says " It not necessary to seek truth from others, which easily get we can fr
839. es have heaped into her depository, all truth : so that all who wish, can 204 Evaline
840. t all who wish, can 204 Evaline ; " or, life." draw from her the waters of Cyprian s
841. ustine says She is the holy Church, the one Church, the true Church, the Catholic C
842. The seemed She began to understand the nature of the Church, the importance of her mi
843. the importance of her mission, and the necessity our divine Lord forth into was under, w
844. th into was under, when sending her the world to continue the work He had begun, to i
845. grace versial readings, Weighed and of God, he " not Wanting. settle 2o5 hoped wou
846. not Wanting. settle 2o5 hoped would her mind. And, dearest Evaline," he said, pressi
847. o his heart; " the day you kneel at the same altar with me, will be the haphas alrea
848. ay you kneel at the same altar with me, will be the haphas already piest of my ! exi
849. haphas already piest of my ! existence. God given you His grace to inquire after th
850. iven you His grace to inquire after the truth ; oh be not wanting now to correit. spo
851. g of the Holy Father. Gentle reader, to will you come with us Rome, the eternal, the
852. he immortal Pius IX. to commemorate the Definition a Weighed and of the let not Wanting. 2
853. of the its Let us walk through delight- pleasure-grounds, and inhale the perfling fumes
854. flowers the air ; upon and then, if we will, let us take a seat on one of the bench
855. then, if we will, let us take a seat on one of the benches, and listen in rapture t
856. been raised to the wor- ship of a false god, or the true. distance vast In the may
857. — amphitheatre, which in pagan times many a gladiator fought, and in which, too,
858. youthful Pancratius, like 208 countless soul to Evaline; or> other Christians, gave
859. like 208 countless soul to Evaline; or> other Christians, gave up his in God presence
860. e; or> other Christians, gave up his in God presence of thousands of spectators, sm
861. always gathered to hear his convincing logic, his irrefutable arguments, and to hang
862. ere Jean Baptiste and Evalina. believed One them —the other was not yet a true be
863. e and Evalina. believed One them —the other was not yet a true believer. How many m
864. other was not yet a true believer. How many more like 210 Evaline ; ! or> were ther
865. ded their neighbors who pro- fessed the one genuine form of Christianity —how man
866. ighbors who pro- fessed the one genuine form of Christianity —how many went, ? lik
867. one genuine form of Christianity —how many went, ? like Evalina, to be instructed
868. t, ? like Evalina, to be instructed How many to criticise ? went there just merely t
869. merely to hear Dr. Manning ? It is How many went to not for us venture a guess ; th
870. ote of in His Eternal Book. Amongst the many convincing proofs of the genuineness of
871. the Catholic Church • — amongst the many arguments adduced show that she to was
872. ? Church reason as Surely their reason good as the reason of those " who clash with
873. "perhaps the 20,000,000 Catholics, the world over, are right after if all. Surely, i
874. ch is right I — believe to it is. May will!" God enlighten me do His holy - 212 Ev
875. ight I — believe to it is. May will!" God enlighten me do His holy - 212 Evaline
876. r herself, communings with and with her God. Lent had been passing on, and no sermo
877. llowed. Ah ! thought right Evalina, the Religion must be which has got so humble, for it
878. has got so humble, for its so saintly a man chief Bishop. Nor was this strange at s
879. her heart, and now needed blossom. but one ray more of heav- enly sunshine to burs
880. Catholic in heart I next Saturday, with God's help, will be one by profession. bapt
881. heart I next Saturday, with God's help, will be one by profession. baptized on tione
882. next Saturday, with God's help, will be one by profession. baptized on tioner in Sh
883. . Her husband's joy was boundthanked He God for the conver- sion of his beloved wif
884. reached before— for now he home, with love, he thought, greater than he had ever f
885. at her heart had received into it a new element, and that his had been acted upon by pa
886. cted upon by participation ; it was the element of that divine love, begotten of perfec
887. ion ; it was the element of that divine love, begotten of perfect union with Christ,
888. ious victory our Lord has achieved over sin and hell is — a victory in It is so f
889. his choir, the finest in the The Papal world, always sings the prescribed hymns inof
890. at presents itself 2i8 to the Evaline ; mind is, or, that the angelic host has desce
891. elic host has descended from on high to honor their God upon earth, by striking up a
892. s descended from on high to honor their God upon earth, by striking up a new hymn o
893. p a new hymn on instruments not made by man. Mass is over. Let us hurry on and asce
894. ceeds to bless the city thither and the world. Let us look down on fifty the vast sea
895. ngs ; his arms wide open to embrace the world, Weighed and and raising his not Wantin
896. , pronounces the Benediction. There was one new convert in the Sala — to it was E
897. for the child only in first ; his bene- time, she was is hope but to-day she love. c
898. e- time, she was is hope but to-day she love. child in faith, and hope, and To-day o
899. d. is To-day she not the " heretic girl soul/' but the Catholic wife of his heart. A
900. em both a happy Easter day. faith, They one in are now one, indeed —one in hope,
901. Easter day. faith, They one in are now one, indeed —one in hope, and one in char
902. ith, They one in are now one, indeed —one in hope, and one in charity. 2 20 Evali
903. are now one, indeed —one in hope, and one in charity. 2 20 Evaline ; or> Conclusi
904. can be attributed mainly to our having one, only one, object in view — to tell a
905. tributed mainly to our having one, only one, object in view — to tell a simple, u
906. ring with electric shock, con- veys but one message to or from our shores, being al
907. but one message to or from our shores, being altogether indifferent to the mighty oc
908. aris, and conducted you thence Rome, we will resign our office of to cicerone, and l
909. u, kind readers, within its its sojourn time-honored walls, and imbibe tion. atmosph
910. Forum in which the greatest speaker the world has ever seen, once delivered tions his
911. which he fondly called his own. We it, will leave you these in ; Rome for it for no
912. essors and gins, and consecrated by the life-blood of the martyrs. leave you in Ah y
913. he martyrs. leave you in Ah yes, and we will Rome to sojourn there, even ! unto thes
914. n his shoulders. to visit We him it is, will leave you in ; Rome in his palace-priso
915. n his palace-prison palace, indeed, and will ever be, but Weighed and it not Wanting
916. ll, for the 2 25 now Is a prison as old man does not go and his ears good outside i
917. son as old man does not go and his ears good outside its portals, but his eyes shoul
918. hurried to the Janiculum. Ah to yes, we will fer- Rome now in pour out vent prayers
919. ers at the shrine of the Apostles, that God His mercy may s dispel those mists of i

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/