Concordance for Dalaradia; or, The days of King Milcho / by William Collins ...

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1.   ene. The Baed of It MouRinB. was Summer time, in the year of grace, 432. The green w
2. hed in silence and repose. in all their beauty and sublimity, raised their furrowed an
3. ies that smiled down upon it, mnding in many a silver coil, and laughing and leaping
4. holy and mysterious priests of the 6un-god, the Braid, a bright and beautiful rive
5. phere, giving evidence of animation and life in that lone and sequestered valThese w
6. er or lashed to fury by Crom, their sea-god, startled their souls with fear, and ca
7. namit of Slieve Mis, impending in awful state over the lovely scenes below, outspread
8. f ancestors, famous for tliolr physical beauty and renoAvned for their prowess in war
9. auty and renoAvned for their prowess in war and the His castle, with bawn and fosse
10. rom boyhood to the toils and dangers of war, he was of a fierce and stubborn dispos
11. t Nial. Though stricken in years at the time we introduce him to our readers, he was
12. duce him to our readers, he was still a man of massive and stalwart proportions, an
13. f massive and stalwart proportions, and one on whom time, though it had silvered hi
14. d stalwart proportions, and one on whom time, though it had silvered his hair and be
15. ame that had so often braved danger and death in the shock of battle. But since the d
16. e peaceful son, Laegari, to the throne, peace had reigned in the bosoms of the Irish
17. doned; and the tic *e lords, whose sole pleasure and enjoyment was war, were fain to pas
18. , whose sole pleasure and enjoyment was war, were fain to pass their timiC in the l
19. in the arduous and sometimes dangerous pleasure of hunting; the red deer and wild boar
20. ftiitliful retainers and slaves, whose duty it was to watcli Shivery, at this commo
21. erors. They were generally prisoners of war, captured in tlie rude raids and forays
22. rk, giving forth a tinkling sound every time the fail studeii*. It is nearing simset
23. charity in the sweet face which reminds one of heaven and the angels. Her profusion
24. en tresses seems to add a more delicate beauty to the countenance, which is aglow with
25. r The face is beaming with intellectual beauty. forehead. Her large, beautiful eyes ar
26. siastic feeling takes possession of her soul. In repose, they partake of a rich mist
27. ter, who sits beside her, though of the same age and stature, and in the full bloom
28. ure, and in the full bloom of youth and beauty, is a different creature in manner and
29. d cultm-ed of the land. Nurtured at the same bosom, and seldom or never apart since
30. or never apart since childliood, their love for each other had grown with theii 8 m
31. t since childliood, their love for each other had grown with theii 8 mutual fondnecs
32. ed itself in such clear and undisguised form as could scarcely fail to be perceived
33. y, was of a playful and mirth-provoking nature. Her mii'th, however, was innocent and
34. lla with all the fondness of a sister's love. Equal in stature, but more delicate in
35. hough not in feature, than Sybilla, her beauty was of a different type, and presented
36. her face and shoulders, and wantoned in many a careless curl about her face. Her blu
37. rose tree, picking the roses to pieces, one by one, and scattering them around her.
38. ee, picking the roses to pieces, one by one, and scattering them around her. As she
39. trate the mysteries sun-ounding the Sun-god? 9 others wlio serve at the altars and
40. py must they be who pass then* Uvea All other gods sink into nothingness bein the ser
41. thee, for thy smile is the light of the world and thy glory exceedeth all praise!" Th
42. Una followed her example, and the rite being over, again seated herself by Sybilla's
43. Sybilla, you have often told me that in other lands men do not worship Bel, but inani
44. dy, tells how the Gauls aiid Romans and other barbarian nations worship idols, and lo
45. have heard my father say, men worship a god whom they do not know or see, and yet b
46. lla, scornfully. " They belie /e not in war; their ignoble hearts never throbbed wi
47. heir ignoble hearts never throbbed with one thought of glory or distinction in the
48. the Sunburst flag the emblem of Erie's god. And no wonder,*' continued the enthusi
49. ories of that day! It warms my fatliers soul with light and love, and kindles in his
50. t warms my fatliers soul with light and love, and kindles in his heart a fiery flame
51. ely, Sybilla, you, who are so gentle of nature, so sweet and loving, and so gifted wit
52. aces becoming a maiden, do not wish for war! Would you see your father, who loves y
53. a, that you harbor such a thought." " I love my father, Una, and my two brave brothe
54. na, and my two brave brothers more than life, and would give my life at the smallest
55. thers more than life, and would give my life at the smallest price to save * F rc:i
56. he or ill; but the pei*petuatioii of my religion and the glory of my comitry are dearer
57. ould rend my heart to part from those I love so well, still I w^ould not shrink from
58. not shrink from the sacrilice, did our God ordain tliat war should ensue. I love i
59. the sacrilice, did our God ordain tliat war should ensue. I love it not, and deeply
60. ur God ordain tliat war should ensue. I love it not, and deeply deplore the causes T
61. e causes The wliich lead to it, and set man against his fellow man. 1 do not say th
62. d to it, and set man against his fellow man. 1 do not say this because my w^ars of
63. ^ars of King Nial were just. father was one of his trusted and bravest chiefs, and
64. eir vineyards and their shrines without one touch of pity or remorse. They next inv
65. , they hoped for greater conquests. The world was theirs, all but this spot of earth
66. d as lire Ard Kiagh. They wished to the death to conquer us, and, ^dth and sw^ord pur
67. pride within my heart at mention of my religion and country ; and if I cannot make myse
68. ything unbecoming yom- sex. You are too good and kindhearted to entertain an unwoman
69. d kindhearted to entertain an unwomanly idea. It is I who am sometimes unfeminine, a
70. oming my station. The waywardness of my nature is such, that I am impulblvtly prompted
71. tly prompted to act contrary to what my prudence sug- 12 of a light humor, and sometimes
72. d not mean to chide." " You are a dear, good creature, Una, and as loving and fond a
73. toward the gate. An aged and venerable man with long, white hair and beard approac
74. and we were beginning to fear that the beauty and attractions of Tara would wean you
75. flattery, and the bard's eye discovers beauty where his heart is interested." '' It m
76. '' It may be so, but wlio can judge of beauty better than the gests. 1 am A bard? " I
77. better than the gests. 1 am A bard? " I will not discuss the question, Fergus; your
78. r me in all tliat pertains to grace and beauty. But you must be wearied ; let us not d
79. ried to grasp the spear For the name of one had stricken him there, And he looked a
80. of all that is beauteous and sublime in nature, where the hills, on whose purple sides
81. h character and admire the romance, the life, the generous freshness of thought, and
82. ome of the noblest traits of our common nature. When this is so in our own day ; after
83. y ; after centuries of perse(!ution and slavery, robbery and spoliation, such as no oth
84. ery, robbery and spoliation, such as no other spot in the world has witnessed or born
85. poliation, such as no other spot in the world has witnessed or borne,so black and dem
86. aracter, tliat its gentlest deeds would pain the adamanlist the Irish tine heart of
87. d brehon taught and sung,when music and poetry, these twin sisters of heaven, were che
88. days of Ireland, when her chivalry, her honor and her name stood foremost in the worl
89. onor and her name stood foremost in the world. But alas for our country: " Her pride
90. country: " Her pride has gone by." The soul-stirring strains of a Davis or a Moore
91. ned a less warlike and more appropriate one for the banquet hall. His toilet being
92. te one for the banquet hall. His toilet being completed, he hastily quaffed a goblet
93. ed softly around the room, adorned with many a trophy of war and the chase, and lit
94. the room, adorned with many a trophy of war and the chase, and lit up with a smile
95. in thick masses on his breast. This was one of his hours of relaxation, when the gr
96. side, sought repose in the presence and love of his children. Since the death of the
97. nce and love of his children. Since the death of their mother, a softer feeling seeme
98. d to have crept into his heart, and his desire for their company in his leisure hours
99. auteous maidens, and gazed with eyes of love upoi; a fond and doting father; the kin
100. enizens of the forest, and of a hundred other things, wliich he playfully and laughin
101. is seat His warriors followed, and each one, in his accustomed place. according to
102. s chair and attended to his every want. Other slaves, from almos' every nation known,
103. mbolled in the watei^ of the Braid, and many different kinds of shell-iish, raw and
104. ables of the debris that remained, each one filled for tlie guest whom he tended, a
105. sh barbarians of Kome ; 18 of the siiii-god wave in triumph from Toinora* tn tempes
106. rce as thou did'st in thy yoimger days. Time, though it has laid its wi*inkled hand
107. n his sorrows, when wounded on a bed of pain and encompassed by countless enemies, a
108. ans to-morrow, Fergus would be bound by duty, and by honor led, again by the side of
109. , Fergus would be bound by duty, and by honor led, again by the side of his prince in
110. he hour m of danger!" " I doubt it not, good Fergus," answered Milcho, pleased with
111. ess, And wild boar?" " fo*:)ling tlieir time in tlie cliase of the wolf are as peace
112. o preaches against the noble pastime of war; rails and anathematizes our holy Druid
113. and vestals; sets up a new and miknown God for us to worship, and desires to overt
114. , and desires to overthrow Bel, our sun-god "By the soul of Nial!" exclaimed tli ek
115. s to overthrow Bel, our sun-god "By the soul of Nial!" exclaimed tli eking, excitedl
116. ling dotard! As his years creep on, his mind becomes enfeebled with old age. The Dru
117. ares to trumpet it unscathed in Erie ? "One whom brave Nial brought in chains from
118. strous. But that i know thy well-tried love for mine and nie, good Fergus, 1 would
119. w thy well-tried love for mine and nie, good Fergus, 1 would think thee facetious, a
120. st." " I do not jest, my prince, and no one mourns it more than I." " What is his n
121. to the younger warriors he was unknown, many old men were present who had seen liim
122. replied the person addressed, " but so many vears have elapsed since then, that we
123. apsed since then, that we thought their prophecy had come to nought. " I liave heard my
124. e was a soft, timorous kind of womanish soul, and feared to disobey," replied the ir
125. oldier contemptuously." " What harm can one weak and puny man do to Erie or Dalarad
126. sly." " What harm can one weak and puny man do to Erie or Dalaradia ? " observed Ca
127. ar that frown upon his brow it bodes no good to this Sicm*, should he stmnble in his
128. France, his birth 21 The number of our war vessels darkened historians thronged. t
129. , whose sorrowful notes melted into the soul, and flooded the heart with anguish. It
130. s to our homes in Erinn. Among them was one, a pale and trembling boy, unfit to bea
131. y companions the bnse and brutal swine. god he worshiped or what creed was his, we
132. creed was his, we never sought to know. One day we missed him from the hills, and s
133. but could not find him he had fled. In time he was forgotten, and now, after tlie l
134. iu*ns to Erinn to preach us a gospel of peace and slavery, and overthrow our god murm
135. rinn to preach us a gospel of peace and slavery, and overthrow our god murmer of astoni
136. of peace and slavery, and overthrow our god murmer of astonishment rose in the hall
137. alaradia," continued Milcho, his fierce nature gleaming in his eyes, "Will you forsake
138. is fierce nature gleaming in his eyes, "Will you forsake the gods of your fathers, a
139. w idols, but Bel shall still remain the god of Dalaradia." Calling to a slave to re
140. r had taken for Bel, was at its height ,one youth remained a silent but deeply inte
141. did not take the oath. ! We CHAPTER m. love's YOIJNa DBEAM. •• Alas I I have no
142. n Po$. After the departure of the king, many of the guests, wearied with the fatigue
143. his example, left tho banquet hall but many of the young chiefs remained, quaffing
144. d pouring generous libations to the sun-god. The music of the harp mingled with the
145. to them with fiery touch, the grand and soul-stirring melody of his impassioned hear
146. ike fall, gently harped some old lay o^ love, devotion and chivalry, and accompanied
147. it with his voice in the soft, flowing language of ; ; warriors paid him the highest ho
148. * princes, and no expedition or feat of war was undertaken without consulting them.
149. nsulting them. They sat in the chair of honor at the festive board, and, as the mead
150. or wine cup went round, their plaintive love ditties or martial chants were listened
151. and sword on thigh, singing the hymn of war, and many a swinging blow they struck t
152. on thigh, singing the hymn of war, and many a swinging blow they struck too. the Gr
153. el. The 24 Their skill was a subject of universal wonder, and even in after times, the bi
154. ldus Cambrensis, praised the unequalled beauty of their music in the most enthusiastic
155. nor throb of wave disturbed its placid beauty. Lovely in its moonlight glory, it seem
156. where some dreamy lover might sigh his soul to the night winds, or enraptured bard
157. pon it in all their brightness beams, a man, suddenly emerging from the thickest pa
158. is noble countenance showed that he was one prodigally endov/ed by nature, both phy
159. that he was one prodigally endov/ed by nature, both physically and intellectually, wi
160. e, and in a marked degree, enhanced its beauty. He was dressed in the costume of the p
161. de and slowly paced to and fro the open space between the trees that shaded the river
162. ich we write, 9vas ancient ; its origin being lost in the twilight of antiquity. stro
163. of arm and SONG. ** of conquering name, will sound the loud-harp to his glory and fa
164. pride and thy name, And long as the Sun-god o'er Erie shall shine, *• Praise, g.o
165. rie shall shine, *• Praise, g.ory and honor and fame shall be thine, Proud song cea
166. eld before him the bright and beautiful form of Sybilla, her eyes laugliingly lookin
167. blushClaspes playing and dancing on her love-lit, dimpled face. ing the maiden in hi
168. , and in a voice that thrilled his very soul with the charm of its melody and music,
169. when not in thy presence." " It looked, good Mahon, as if you had forgotten me, you
170. d thee ; from tliy praise might work me evil. my Ijirth, my mother meant me for a ve
171. tery of thy sex." " I did but speak the truth, Sybilla ; the untutored promptings of
172. face, for Mahon, 'tis a brave and noble one." " 'Tis you that flatter now, Sybilla,
173. a, and what your heart would hide, your love unwittingly has ushered to your lips. B
174. t thank the gods for this sweet hour of love and bliss, that gives, to me, the brigh
175. it was but the innocent tliought of her soul, hung her head in shame, and feared to
176. er lover's face. But Mahon had seen the love glance that lighted up her countenance,
177. eart tlirobbed with a tumult of glowing love, flung back the truant tresses that wan
178. otliei-'s faces with all the fondness, truth and love, that burned williin them, and
179. faces with all the fondness, truth and love, that burned williin them, and which sp
180. rol. As they thus sat, wrapped in their happiness and love, oblivious of all the world be
181. hus sat, wrapped in their happiness and love, oblivious of all the world beside, and
182. appiness and love, oblivious of all the world beside, and dreaming those bright dream
183. ouse." " But there must be something to cause my father to retire so early, and to ta
184. le a doctrine which if adopted by them, will overthrow the ancient faith of our isla
185. ow the ancient faith of our island, and cause us to "What is astir to-night, Mahon,"
186. bend in homage to an unknown and hidden God, whom we cannot see." " Does he come wi
187. tent and devout votary of Bel, the sun; god. mockino-lv, as he answered : "No, he c
188. elf." laus-hed Mahon "And who is he?" " One, at mention of whose name your father's
189. wars and never blanched at danger or at death Who can he be, thus favored by the gods
190. on us ; for our doom is sealed if this man is allowed to teach in Erie " exclaimed
191. and looking upward to the ! ; ! ! ; 29 death-like paleness overshadowed her face, he
192. Terrified at the sudden and unexpected change in his beloved, he remained irresolute
193. her, smiled upon him with gratitude and love. But his last words still rung in her e
194. ast words still rung in her ears and as memory returned, a pang shot through her heart
195. why this weak and puny Christian should cause you and yom* father so much fear is som
196. uch a blissful hour, in the delights of love and the joyful commingling of souls. "
197. ow and measured tones, as if fearful of being overheard, " know tlien, that this Sicu
198. oretold, that he would bring danger and evil to Erinn. Among a multitude of slaves w
199. terposition of my father, who saved her life. She begged of him to take her to his c
200. , not a slave. She returned my mother's love tenfold, and to requite that love my mo
201. her's love tenfold, and to requite that love my mother gave to me her name. This Sic
202. r, whom I fear and my father hates, was one of those who w^ere brouglit by Nial to
203. he and his tribe were shunned, and his religion banned, for it was Christian. It was hi
204. sulted her gods, and the answer was the same. With her dying breath she warned my fa
205. e, and though my father may be stern of nature, I know that in his heart lie dreads th
206. nd I, Mahon, though I trust in Bel, the god of our fathers, cannot help believing t
207. rugged chase, and passed unperceived by many of the chiefs. He desired Fergus to har
208. nd swear imdying homage !" to their sun-god "Ila!" exclaimed Sybilla, her enthusias
209. ther's spirit is not conquered yet, and will not while one true heart remains in Dal
210. s not conquered yet, and will not while one true heart remains in Dalaradia. You li
211. onjured up the banquet scene, ^'all but one, perhaps." " Who was the recreant ? Kam
212. Kame him, that I may blot Imn ; from my memory !" Again the youth liesitated. Too nobl
213. at his answer would probably decide his fate; and that the proud heart which had onl
214. us of her country, in haughty pride and beauty, as she impatiently awaited his answer.
215. nd needs not to swear his fealty to his god or c( untry, for it is centred in his h
216. ent she believed that she had given her love to a traitor. Her pride was humbled, he
217. me and manly countenance, glowing witli love and fervor before her, a mingled feelin
218. bt and certainty took possession of her mind; and, as she hesitated, the struggle be
219. as she hesitated, the struggle between love and pride raged furiously in her bosom.
220. pride raged furiously in her bosom. But love conquered. Controlling her emotion, and
221. om. But love conquered. Controlling her emotion, and laying her hand gently on his shou
222. imming witli tears, and a sweet look of love and hope beaming on her fcice; '' O, Ma
223. be not angry with your ! Sybilla;' dear love; but O, Sybilla! never It would pain my
224. ar love; but O, Sybilla! never It would pain my heart to tliink that you again. doub
225. o tliink that you again. doubt harbored one doubt of your Mahon's constancy." '^ I
226. rt, ''I am me not angry, my believe and love." Slie flew to tlie arms which opened t
227. s, and pledged tlieir lives to tlie sun-god, this fledgling of Tirowen shrank from
228. affliction shall fall. servant of your god, that warns you thus of danger. Fly to
229. in your prayers remember Com*a and his love and zeal for you and yom*s." The terrif
230. r heart sink within her, and a spasm of pain scorch its very core. The awful charge
231. orch its very core. The awful charge of being a traitor, and a confederate of the Chr
232. abetted or protected tlieni, fiHcd her soul with horror; the doubts which she, but
233. astonished and bewildered at the sudden change of events, could scarcely believe his s
234. Druid, breaking so unexpectedly on his happiness, the very strength and vigor of its blo
235. all these combined, served to fill his mind with a gloomy feeling bordering on fren
236. ht for the future to dread or to dree ? Good to rejoice in, or Evil to flee ? What
237. ead or to dree ? Good to rejoice in, or Evil to flee ? What —Mangan, Milclio, afte
238. d a frown was on his brow, and ever and mind ill at ease. anon he gave vent to his t
239. pid energy. Stern and bold as he was by nature, unknowing human fear, and reckless in
240. , and reckless in field or foray of his life, despite his utm^ost efforts he could n
241. urn to Erie, flashed on the chieftain's mind and filled his The refierce heart with
242. elieve. Thy sons and thy daughters they will believe, and the lire of grace shall co
243. e of Iberia cannot drown ; a gloomy and soul which overshadows it with its intensity
244. th its intensity and freezes within the life-currents of my heart. It is ever presen
245. the banquet hall; and in my dreams the form of this Christian slave looms up before
246. ea The gods are angry, and it may great evil to mine and me. be the thunders of thei
247. and me. be the thunders of their wrath will fall on Dalaradia. Have our vestals for
248. name by night, and every hour of waking life is haunted by it. I am encompassed by l
249. escending from the tower, and summoning one of the sentinels, who kept watch and wa
250. them, rose from the table ; and in tlie same restless and impatient manner, as on th
251. able shape, by some awful convulsion of nature, suddenly burst into a foaming basin be
252. ray, but still vigorous in strength and beauty, rose majestically over its waters, pro
253. of the Banshee. By a violent effort of will, he tore himself away from the spot, to
254. nded and entangled by the spell of some evil spirit, he leant against a tree, agitat
255. deavoring to pursue. torch held by some one whom he could not see, and whose form,
256. me one whom he could not see, and whose form, probably, was lost among the intricate
257. ir, thy altars,* Heup, shall smoke with many a sacrifice!" The midnight star was set
258. ed, sepulchral voice, demanded : " What man art thou who seekest admission into our
259. sepulchral voice, demanded : " What man art thou who seekest admission into our sac
260. ees anear now some avvd'ul face, taking form for an instant on the back ground of gl
261. deep-toned, as tlie trees ; ; those of judgment, miingling witli Vvdld cries of cntlius
262. ed to inspiration, sought exhaustion or death. Smrounded by su(*Ji gloomy siglits and
263. ed ; in the centre were vast altars, ow one of 41 which a sacrificial fire was burn
264. ut to speak, when the Druid said : Well art thou known to u.^, "Hail, Milcho of Dal
265. ains of Gaul. the wise men, to attain a knowledge of your destiny, and of ! him you " fea
266. nistering figures transfixed the doomed man with arrows and lances. Then it was, th
267. s, that while he was convulsed with the death agony, the chief Druid advanced, and ap
268. imiult singing songs of incantation and death, and wildly clashing brazen cymbals ove
269. d Milcho " Shall this Christian work me evil, and shall his spells render my davs br
270. y daughter, Sybilla, as a vestal to the God. To punish thee for thy perfidy, he has
271. the bride of the Gods, is affianced to one, who is, or will soon be, a Christian M
272. e Gods, is affianced to one, who is, or will soon be, a Christian Mahon, the chief,
273. istian is wending his steps hither, and will soon confront thee. If thou permittest
274. e passed from the earth, to the eternal world, where the God Heus reigns, and receive
275. earth, to the eternal world, where the God Heus reigns, and receives the souls of
276. t conference V. with her foster sister. Love's sunshine and griefs shadows camo And
277. she was looked upon with reverence, as one wlio would soon be the bride of Bel, an
278. nged aiid unquestioned; believing that, being under the special protection of the god
279. ould befall her, and slie might roam at will when and where she pleased. Tlierefore,
280. here she pleased. Tlierefore, it was no matter of surprise to the soldier on guard to
281. one; all When she did seem perturbed in mind on this night, the sentry, if he did at
282. dly with excitement, conflde to her the cause of her absence, and all that had passed
283. ^eiy iieart of her fi-iend. *' Sybilla, will you not forgive me \ It is my first fau
284. know 1 read forgiveness in your look, I will tell you all. you liave been troubled a
285. been in search of me until now. But the time passed away so happily tliat I lieeded
286. ppily tliat I lieeded not tlie lapse of time, and liearing the lioneyed words of lii
287. ring the lioneyed words of liimwliom my soul cleaves to, did not deem ! the lights i
288. gladness, orgetful of all else in tlie world beside ; even of you, Sybilla, wlio wer
289. a in her ear, her he^rt fluttering with emotion, and hiding her face on Sybilla's breas
290. t to conceal her blushes. " And does he love you, Una ? Has he plighted to you his "
291. has given this to me as a pledge of his love;" and taking from her bosom a golden br
292. ms, held it to her view. you return his love as pure and faithful as *' And, Una, do
293. ed Bel." " Then may you be happy in his love, and may the gods shower down their cho
294. you, sister. You are worthy of a brave man's heaj't, and Congal's is the brightest
295. in Ualaradia." "I scarce can realize my happiness, Sybilla ; and were it He 46 not for ke
296. ripe lips, and Una's eyes sparkled with love and happiness. deep sigh involuntarily
297. , and Una's eyes sparkled with love and happiness. deep sigh involuntarily stole from the
298. gazed on her beautiful face. A did not cause me any fear, Una; and since you have op
299. nce you have opened your heart to me, I will be as confiding, and tell you that 1 al
300. n the happiest and most miserable of my life;" shading her face with her hands as sh
301. echless astonisliment. Lost in her o^vn happiness, she could not imagine that others coul
302. ds. By a violent effort controlling her emotion, and brushing her tears aside, Sybilla
303. do not blame you for the secret of your love for Congal, for I, too, must plead guil
304. l, for I, too, must plead guilty to the same charge. But oh! would that he w^ere as
305. d that he w^ere as worthy of a maiden's love as my brother, or that his heart were a
306. th all a woman's trusting? tieacherous. love, and gave to him my heart, and he repai
307. the Druids, and my own ; burning with a love I never felt before, gave my heart to-n
308. felt before, gave my heart to-night to one who is a Christian !" Una started in ho
309. ed w^ord. The hit ter perceived it with pain, for she felt sure of the sympatliy and
310. for she felt sure of the sympatliy and love of Una, and, wiiile the action shot a p
311. d not know that sucli a brave and manly form could hide a perjured heart. He was the
312. l, and a hundred maidens sighed for his love. But he said he loved but me alone. I l
313. words he reiterated his vow^s to me. My soul w^as entranced by the delicious melody
314. d my heart made captive. I confessed my love as he held me to his breast, and his wa
315. t. It was a dream and while his vows of love and truth still lingered on his lips, t
316. a dream and while his vows of love and truth still lingered on his lips, the vision
317. dear until ; ! me Una, ; ' . 4^ loving nature of Una was toncliecl, and, flinging her
318. nd kissed and sootlied her with all thG love and fondness of a si.^ter. After giving
319. ised for the purpose of thwarting their love and annulling their happiness. But Sybi
320. hwarting their love and annulling their happiness. But Sybilla was convinced that it was
321. Sybilla was convinced that it was none other than the ArchDruid himself. She had see
322. ed to con" There is no hope for me. The judgment of the sole her. gods has fallen upon m
323. hem in thought. I shall retire from the world, and in the groves of the vestals dedic
324. is promise to the gods and Conra. Tliis time 1 shall not fail; and if a life of peni
325. . Tliis time 1 shall not fail; and if a life of penitence and prayer Cim avert from
326. the anger prophesied by the holy unholy love caused me to err;! Di'uid, it shall be
327. and I see the path clear before me. You will be happy, Una, in my brother's love, fo
328. You will be happy, Una, in my brother's love, for he is noble, true, and generous ;
329. d oh may they ascend to Bel, and be the cause of untold happiness to thee and thine.
330. cend to Bel, and be the cause of untold happiness to thee and thine. When the first beams
331. e compassionate and My My ! 49 tlie snn-god kiss Slievc Mis, thy nnnie will be on m
332. tlie snn-god kiss Slievc Mis, thy nnnie will be on mj lips at tlie altar; and when h
333. rs almost choked lier utleriinco, ''why will you leave me? I, who liave been yom^ si
334. friend since childhood, nursed on tlie same knee and fondled at the same breast wli
335. ed on tlie same knee and fondled at the same breast wlio have ever loved you with th
336. io have ever loved you with the fondest love, and never until to-night lived one hou
337. st love, and never until to-night lived one hour out of your presence. The gods may
338. ghtest in Emania. prophesies nought but evil, if from the king he gets not gold aud
339. priests of Bel, or — ; ! some deadly evil will befall you. My lather wishes me, E
340. sts of Bel, or — ; ! some deadly evil will befall you. My lather wishes me, Even d
341. ready. oppose Conra, he would fear the fate of Ni^d, who was overtake n by tlie ven
342. it in mv heart to-nio-ht, and all your love or remonstrance else ; cannot change an
343. your love or remonstrance else ; cannot change and tell him t I my purpose. am I'eadv.
344. o lier feet, "I also am rejidy. i'liere will !" two for the sacrilice; for where you
345. lice; for where you go, I go "Una, your love for me plays strange antics with your l
346. . Would you, after gaining my brother's love and pledging to him your vows, scatter
347. he winds, and render him njiserable for life " "I loved you, Sybilla, before I loved
348. 60 ian and even did he consent to your desire, Conra nuglit not approve of your enter
349. ed her enthnsinsm, wlien she bmiglit to mind the many occasions when straying near t
350. thnsinsm, wlien she bmiglit to mind the many occasions when straying near the groves
351. ere angered with us, and put the cup of happiness to our lips only to dasli it and our li
352. nd our liopes to The evening brought us love and liappiness, but the pieces. midnidi
353. eads you and surely to a path where you will And love and happiness ; ; in being the
354. and surely to a path where you will And love and happiness ; ; in being the bride of
355. y to a path where you will And love and happiness ; ; in being the bride of Eel." " I fee
356. you will And love and happiness ; ; in being the bride of Eel." " I feel weary, Sybi
357. I never dream of cnger to press Ij too, will And repose my happiness again." ''(rive
358. ger to press Ij too, will And repose my happiness again." ''(rive not way to your grief,
359. ve not way to your grief, my sister; it will be but momentary, and in another's smil
360. t momentary, and in another's smile you will forget it, or at least deaden it of its
361. ut do not tell my l)rother of my unholy love ; for it would shame me to look upon hi
362. e subtlest promptings of your brother's love shall not drag it from me." ^'Thanks, U
363. 'Thanks, Una, for your promise; and now one prayer to Bel, and then good night." Th
364. se; and now one prayer to Bel, and then good night." They knelt facing the east, and
365. out their hearts in prayer to their sun-god, Una praying for a surcease of sorrow,
366. of sorrow, and Sybilla again vowing her life at his shrine. Little did they deem, as
367. n would soon slatter the idols of their god, and Cliriiitianity sit enthroned amid
368. VI. grief. wrath and mahon's Though my many faults defaced me, a cureless Could no
369. faults defaced me, a cureless Could no other arm be found, Than the one which once e
370. s Could no other arm be found, Than the one which once embraced me, To Malion, lift
371. t was ill at ease, for a dark weight of pain and anguish was concentrated around it.
372. e bright and dazzling hope of Sybilla's love, wliich, but a few moments before, had
373. dawned upon him in all its reality and beauty, and tilled him mth so delicious a rapt
374. n so rudely snatched from him, that his mind was tossed in a sea of trouble, doubt a
375. emed bewildered and dazed by the sudden change in his The tranquil and serene beauty o
376. n change in his The tranquil and serene beauty of the night acprospects. The more he p
377. event, which had so suddenly marred his happiness, and crushed his hopes, the more despon
378. k thoughts which troubled him ; and his desire to forget, in sleep, the painful forebo
379. hen he had given up all hope of repose, nature succumbed to fatigue, and sleep But it
380. ing face of Conra intervened but w^itli one arm encircling the waist of Sybilla, an
381. the waist of Sybilla, and, raising the other with menacing gesture, he in an angry m
382. came back in vivid distinctness to his mind, and he remembered with painful accurac
383. long and earnestly, to shape out in his mind the path that duty prompted him to purs
384. to shape out in his mind the path that duty prompted him to pursue. Distracted and
385. nd cast their shadows on the river, his imagination brought lovingly before him the form an
386. ination brought lovingly before him the form and face of lier who had, but a few hou
387. had, but a few hours before, sealed his happiness, and afterwards heaped coals of fire up
388. he ill-omened Druid broke in upon their happiness, and uttered his dread and fearful deIt
389. e river flowed by in all its impressive beauty and grandeur ; the bii'ds sang their lo
390. l was calm, peaceful, and in repose and happiness, save the burdened heart and sorlong he
391. and sorlong he thus remained, in rowful soul of Malion. gloomy thought andcontemplat
392. stood, the object of his thoughts, the cause of all his trouble and anxiety, the bel
393. there she stood before him, in all her beauty, grace, and majesty, the symmetry of he
394. ence of the robe wliich had nmliied her form on the previous evening, and looking mo
395. , which seemed to impart a more radiant beauty to her cheek, and a brighter lustre to
396. ening it in shadow. Mingled feelings of love «nd distrust, swept, with lightning ra
397. rt, as they stood thus confronting each other ; but so strong and ] owerful were the
398. ong and ] owerful were the pleadings of love in his favor taken in jux« taposition
399. which plainly told the anguisli of his soul, that, despite her lirm resolution to U
400. f again forgetting her vow, and letting love obtain the mastery. But suddenly rememb
401. me, base wretch, faithless alike to thy god and me. Thy soul is perjured, and thy h
402. faithless alike to thy god and me. Thy soul is perjured, and thy heart is false ; t
403. Approach me not; touch not the robe of one who soon shall be a vestal of the gods.
404. of thy home atone for thy periidy, thy sin and shame." Mahon had approached to wit
405. iall be placed Bq gone I" upon thee, it will encircle the head of a traitor 1 summon
406. as the lightning of Go, while it is yet time, for be assured, Conra will imBelus. pa
407. e it is yet time, for be assured, Conra will imBelus. part to him thy treacliery and
408. Sybilla, I go here, ; there is no more happiness for me when But may been have lost thee
409. ve lost thee, thou moon-lit pearl of my soul. the gods deal with me in their anger,
410. an burned within my heart for thee. Thy love was dearer to me than fame, glory, weal
411. love was dearer to me than fame, glory, wealth, or conI shall return to quest, and now
412. solitude, forget the vain and frivolous world. The hope was sweet that lured me on; b
413. st or vestal ever felt the with a purer love when kneeling at the holy thee. No ; 50
414. ney immediately; and none of the chiefs being present in the court, the effects of th
415. ture, leaving behind him his hopes, his happiness, and his heart, in the green woods of D
416. re, — Tlie meaning, then, of country, virtue, faith, Flashed on me lightning-like I
417. wn on the way-side dust, and vowed till death life to these. That was my bridal vow.
418. the way-side dust, and vowed till death life to these. That was my bridal vow. ; My
419. irst impulsive thought that entered his mind ; but the young chief belonged to a nob
420. laradian warrior, he shrank from giving pain to his ancient friend, and embittering
421. etrayed Jiis the Druid. hospitality and love, and under the guise of friendship, had
422. an angry gesture soon recalled him to a sense of duty, and bowing lowly, he trembling
423. gesture soon recalled him to a sense of duty, and bowing lowly, he tremblingly appro
424. thal with a chosen band of followers to man tlie walls, took his station at the hea
425. ors, who had often stood by his side on many a field of danger, read in his countena
426. estic, for well they knew that Milcho's soul shone in his face, and ]< 'y and gladne
427. of the gods gave warning that Sicur and one who was There was a murmur of doubt and
428. a guard, bring him and his retainers to justice. But consternation fell upon the king a
429. s of Bel, shall witness the ignominious death of the traitor. Follow him with blood-h
430. of kindness towards her. read her very soul, and the harshness apparent on his brow
431. and now, Sybilla, knowing all this, and being educrited from childhood to consider yo
432. o consider yourself a vestal of our day-god, will you, the first-born daughter of m
433. sider yourself a vestal of our day-god, will you, the first-born daughter of my hous
434. ved of your father's heart, forsake our god, who has been the protector of our coun
435. el if, for a moment, 1 have erred in my love for one who was but a traitor, it was a
436. r a moment, 1 have erred in my love for one who was but a traitor, it was a woman's
437. er. But I never proved false to Bel, my god and the god of my fathers I have been d
438. ver proved false to Bel, my god and the god of my fathers I have been destined for
439. asping her in his arms, " your mother's soul spoke there." "Daughter o:*^ my in lier
440. ese ill-omened Cliristian dogs who plot evil to mine and me." " If, by obeying your
441. to mine and me." " If, by obeying your will," she answered, kissing his cheek, hear
442. e resplendant gems than I shall give to honor the bridal or the gods and thee. I shal
443. ed thy father's heart and infused a new life into his veins. Retire thee to thy cham
444. part to her the events of the mterview. art " Thou my hope, my My CHAPTEE Tin. maho
445. ahon's weary journey. Yainly I think In duty (lone to find content Each dawning day
446. ch dawning day wakes nie to shrink From life, from which the soiil seems rent. — W
447. liis own bitter sorrow, left the noble animal he bestrode His to pursue his own free
448. ehind, and though they did not know the cause of his dejection, believed that somethi
449. had occurred at the They had castle to cause his sudden and abrupt departure. marked
450. con- As jectures as to its origin. " I will wager a mether of stout ale, that that
451. our chieftain's gloomy thougiit," said one who seemed to be the oldest of the part
452. received ! C4 Tramiiig of his father's death; I myself, as I sat on the battio " mer
453. said the third of tlie gronp, "for thou art always prating of goblins i:tA fairies,
454. d banshees, and spirits, and extracting evil from every omen that appears. The lioar
455. er? ! " O Tliou can'st tell some sliips will be lost at sea because storms frequentl
456. use storms frequently occur, and can'st prophecy that the Imnter may sometimes be scratc
457. gs became verilied."' " Ay, truly, thou art a great propliet of one blood?'' " When
458. Ay, truly, thou art a great propliet of one blood?'' " When the great Nial died," a
459. r as was their wont." "If that be so it will breed discontent in Emania," remaik" ed
460. ounter." *^ FIc is gainirg the wood and will soon be in its shadows; so let us follo
461. trength, to have taken root in the soil many centuries before. The sun was declining
462. . The first intimation of the flight of time, which the young chieftain received, wa
463. thoughts of his companWondering at the cause which impelled him to tread ions. such
464. t where you have led me." For the first time, the thought flashed on Mahon that he h
465. ies." Ibar and Feilim were of the sanic opinion, and as both were eager to leave the gl
466. ank, and await the dawn of monjii^ir 67 being assented to, tliey led their horses to
467. ney. cj'oss, Tliis place to It was some time before they conld obtain a desirable po
468. dvance of the others, crushed the noble animal and unseated his rider. Carbre, with th
469. ng up, they beheld an old and venerable man, with a pine torch blazing in his hand
470. fanned by the wind into a blaze and at other times nearly extinguishing it, rendered
471. ng them behind." "I knew there was some evil over us," said Feilim, in whining tones
472. h to Let us remain and see what morning will bring pursue ? lorth? The water has sti
473. r has stiffened my joints, and I feel a pain in the old wound the boar gave me." " H
474. s countenance; and his eyes glowed with love and benevolence. That he was not a Drui
475. during the day, ceased to prognosticate evil. " are belated travelers, gentle sir,"
476. ality which my humble hut can afford, I will freely give it, in I was the name of th
477. eely give it, in I was the name of that God who so freely provides for all. at my d
478. oming up the valley; and praised be our God it led me to find you. I knew not what
479. not what it was until I p erceived the man, "and you are still in ! 69 poor creatu
480. d it in safety." sigh escaped the old A man Mahon spoke, and as he gazed on the man
481. ur trouble." " I seek no reward in this world for any act of charity I may do. Mine I
482. ny act of charity I may do. Mine I hope will be found in a brighter and a betits We
483. would fain rest my limbs until the day-god again lights up the valleys and the hil
484. up the valleys and the hills." The old man made no answer, but walking before them
485. oncealed and shaded by rocka and trees. will, then, so "As you I ; ; ; CHAPTER 6T. I
486. the crj^stal well Remote from men, with God he paissed his dayn Prayer all his busi
487. s dayn Prayer all his business, all his pleasure praise. —Pa/rnell. where you see the
488. not afraid, Owen is waiting for us and will give us kindly greetmg. In silence they
489. entered. Before them appeared the tall form of a man of gigantic stature, in the fu
490. Before them appeared the tall form of a man of gigantic stature, in the full flush
491. nd massive shoulders, the extraordinary life. lengtli of his arms, and the huge girt
492. ven. His crommeal and beard were of the same hue, and gave to his features a pleasin
493. d on the walls, liung Ijows, spears and other implements of the cliase. The luit was
494. belated and wearied travelers, offered peace, comfort and rest, after the fatigues o
495. antlers M'hich hung on the Willis, and being seated, their kindly hosts brought from
496. ishes of lish and venison, and a goodly quantity of oaten cake. Carefully removing the b
497. y on his heart, bansparingly. ished all other feelings from his heart ; and a gloomy
498. struck the gfcings, and — — 72 the beauty of the air he played, fell upon the rav
499. on his position, his manner and mode of life. That he was something other than what
500. and mode of life. That he was something other than what he seemed, he readily surmise
501. e harp, and so wholly had he thrown his soul into the invocation, which he believed
502. which he believed he was making to his God, tended to confirm Mahon's suspicions t
503. concluded he could no longer *^,m-b his desire of questioning him: " Methinks, good Co
504. desire of questioning him: " Methinks, good Conall, thy melody, to judgt^ by its sw
505. harp an iuvocation strains. to the day-god, and one you first learned in the sacre
506. iuvocation strains. to the day-god, and one you first learned in the sacred groves
507. ut a poor mimicker of my masters in the art of : ; 73 ^ meekly replied Conall, " an
508. ded in the groves of the Druids but the time is at hand when it will be heard in gro
509. Druids but the time is at hand when it will be heard in grove, and camp, and countl
510. of our Island. It was an invocation to God. Not to Bel the god of the Druids, but
511. as an invocation to God. Not to Bel the god of the Druids, but to the only true and
512. Druids, but to the only true and living God, to whom be all praise and glory !" Mah
513. possessed, and appeared not to mark the change which so suddenly took possession of th
514. fore him. To the last surmise which his imagination conjured, up he gave expression, lookin
515. the sons of Milesius ever forsake their God to join in the mummeries and superstiti
516. ns of a people tliey despised ? Though, truth to say, they are all God's children and
517. ed ? Though, truth to say, they are all God's children and the light will shine for
518. ey are all God's children and the light will shine for them as well as for us. But I
519. eve not in their creed." " There are no other creeds in Erinn. Tlie idols of the Tutl
520. ng before the glorious light of the Sun-god, and are hid deep in mountain caves or
521. e recesses of the forests. Belus is our god, and we know none at a loss to unravel
522. Vol. 5. The 74 "Yes, there is another; one before whom Belus shall pale, for he is
523. jesty of His power and glory. He is the God I worsliip, the liing whom I adore! His
524. tlien, in the name of holy Bel, is this God of yours?" passionately exclaimed Mahon
525. ionately exclaimed Mahon, his impetuous nature getting the better of his judgment and
526. etuous nature getting the better of his judgment and courtesy, and fiercely stamping on
527. men, and suffered for us an ignominious death on the tree. He is the Christ the Cruci
528. ree. He is the Christ the Crucified the God of the Christians, and 1 am an humble a
529. nworthy follower of tlie Look upon this sign; the emblem of Salvation, wliose cross.
530. e talisman in his hand should work some evil spell upon them. The anguish of Feilim
531. . bued with the prevailing ideas of the time, were not sunk so deep in the mire of s
532. revail against the followers of the Sun-god. Let us depart. The wolves of the wood,
533. me excited to know more of the singular being with whom he had so unexpectedly been t
534. and, if possible, extract from him his history. Telling his followers to remain quiet,
535. d his seat, and Feilim, who had by this time recovered from his fright, took his pla
536. le ; but I confess that I have heard BO many fearful stories concerning these Christ
537. followers, when brought in contact with one. curiosity is great to My 76 know, wlia
538. rs, and adopt the creed of this strange god, whose name It would please me well to
539. n in Erinn. story." " The title, —and one which I tale is brief, Prince Mahon,
540. oot in the land, that the ambassador of God was stoned and forced to fly as an outl
541. d in my house the persecuted and hunted man sought shelter. He found it, and repaid
542. g to me the faith of his divine master. Being of a religious disposition, I had long
543. disposition, I had long entertained the idea of entering the Druidical priesthood, a
544. ering the Druidical priesthood, and was being educated for that high office by one of
545. being educated for that high office by one of their most learned scholars. Seeing
546. , the stranger in my house inquired the nature of my studies. I opened to him my heart
547. and aspirations. He read my books, and, one by one, by his subtle reasoning and elo
548. irations. He read my books, and, one by one, by his subtle reasoning and eloquence,
549. y books, and, one by one, by his subtle reasoning and eloquence, persuaded me of the fall
550. on me ; new ideas took possession of my soul I began to doubt tlie efficacy of Eel a
551. s idols, and panted to know more of the god of whom he had as yet but seldom spoken
552. ad as yet but seldom spoken. Finding my mind prepared for the goodly seed which he w
553. ch he was a worthy follower. It pleaded God to bestow on me the light of faith ; an
554. me the light of faith ; and before tiie good Saint left for Britain, he baptized and
555. a soldier of Christ. He prophesied that one greater than liimself should come to Er
556. as he heard the young Prince express a desire to hear the gospel and a sanguine iiope
557. a sweet, imforetold tlie coming of the man-God. passioned voice, he read the sermo
558. weet, imforetold tlie coming of the man-God. passioned voice, he read the sermon on
559. heard, upon their hearts. "This is the God," he continued, " whom Palladius taught
560. ontinued, " whom Palladius taught me to love and adore. After his departure I left a
561. ols of the gods crumble before him, and Truth and Faith, as taught by the blessed Pat
562. ssed Patrick, trimnph over idolatry and sin." " And who is this, Patrick ?" eagerly
563. ising like a vision before him. " He is one who was a former slave of the king of D
564. e said that "with Laegari, the violent, will the land be humbled by the coming of Pa
565. mbled by the coming of Patrick; that he will root out Druidism from the land; that h
566. oot out Druidism from the land; that he will erect cities, churches, union-houses, w
567. ion-houses, with gables and ingles, and many kings will take up pilgrim staffs." **
568. with gables and ingles, and many kings will take up pilgrim staffs." ** A Tailcenn
569. take up pilgrim staffs." ** A Tailcenn will come over the raging sea, With his perf
570. ded staff, of his house. all his people will And answer amen, amen." come. Patrick h
571. ve golden satellites, to whom were That time is offered the firstlings of the flocks
572. ffered the firstlings of the flocks and other rich gifts, is over- and bearing the st
573. s approaching. Perhaps, to-morrow's sun will see the cross gleam on the mountains of
574. ard to-night, and hasten to embrace the truth which Patrick I am but an unworthy serv
575. n the power to carry out the behests of God, and redeem this fair land from Tarry w
576. for a while, and when the idolatry and sin. great missionary of Christ approaches,
577. spatched a messenger to LaToireniat who will soon return and warn me of his coming.
578. e colonists who settled in Ireland from time to time, and they were wont to offer to
579. sts who settled in Ireland from time to time, and they were wont to offer to it the
580. fer to it the firstlings of animals and other gifts. It is called the Cen Crucwh in t
581. called the Cen Crucwh in the Tripartite life of and there, it is said, that it was m
582. Nun oj that it was sm-rounded by twelve other idols formed of bronze. Kenmare, , tLei
583. inculcated by Conall, sunk deep in his mind, and he wished to test the sincerity an
584. and he wished to test the sincerity and truth of his expressions by witnessing himsel
585. rds you have spoken, and con them in my mind as I lie on my The last clause couch op
586. nce of Tir-owen as long as he deigns to honor it with his presence and as for hospita
587. oor to-niii-ht." o fully supplied it.'' good Conall, is filled with thoughts to whic
588. vening hymn, and pray that the light of truth may be vouchsafed to you, and that you
589. hat you may rise on the morrow with the love of the true God shining in your souls."
590. on the morrow with the love of the true God shining in your souls." Making the sign
591. God shining in your souls." Making the sign of the cross on his forehead, he took t
592. ing with Owen, sang a hymn of praise to God and his Virgin Mother. Then, devoutly r
593. spread on the floor, and underneath, a quantity of dried moss, which, heart, " My 80 to
594. ous bed. As each retired for the night, many and deep were the thoughts tliat agitat
595. re about to occur, that would, not only change tlie whole current of their lives, but
596. r impress upon L-eland, and perhaps the world. « 1 81 CHAPTER •Rs merry, 'tis X. D
597. X. DAY IN THE FOREST. When merry in the good green wood, the mavis and merle are sin
598. eir developments, and so freighted with good or evil for him, passed before him in r
599. lopments, and so freighted with good or evil for him, passed before him in review ;
600. m, passed before him in review ; and no matter how favorably he endeavored to analyze
601. d to analyze them, he could not extract one ray of comfort from the deep and tangle
602. ation of the Druid who charged him with being a Christian, and which accusation was t
603. Christian, and which accusation was the cause of ^lie felt his heart swell with indig
604. ere this, had imparted to Milcho, with many exaggerations, the scene in the grove,
605. of Dalaradia might be on his trade, his sense of danger warned him to remain, or else
606. he power and greatness of the wonderful God whom he worsliiped. He wislied to hear
607. e Christian croed, should be branded as one, and stigmatized as a traitor to the an
608. the brand of infamy upon his brow. And fate or misfortune led him whither? To the l
609. Cliristian. Tlie more lie revolved the matter in his mind, the more perplexing he fou
610. lie more lie revolved the matter in his mind, the more perplexing he found Grown wea
611. at down to the morning repast. The meal being finished, Conall reminded his guest of
612. eft the hut and entered the forest. The beauty of the day, the mild l)reathings of Sum
613. hat flitted from tree to tree in joyous happiness and untrammeled freedom, lent a charm t
614. he chase was the pastime of king and In peace they folpeasant at the period of which
615. e write. lowed it, because it resembled war more than any other pastime and its fat
616. because it resembled war more than any other pastime and its fatigues and trials pre
617. tand tlie stern During the intervals of peace, sliock and dano;er of battle. tl}ey co
618. he plains, where once the Gael ruled in love and freedom. Two small boats were hasti
619. our bow, Ibar; a slice of that fat buck will be no bad acquisition to our meal if I
620. , and gravely hearkened They propounded many to the great trntlis he taught them. qu
621. le way, to instil into their hearts the love of the true God which was burning in Id
622. into their hearts the love of the true God which was burning in Ids own. As yet he
623. joy took possession of the Christian's soul to find him his and throwing arms aroun
624. urned It was a holy and happy hour, and one long thanbfe to God. remembered by both
625. and happy hour, and one long thanbfe to God. remembered by both with praise and lov
626. God. remembered by both with praise and love. Their emotion having subsided, Mahon o
627. red by both with praise and love. Their emotion having subsided, Mahon opened liis liea
628. s innermost secrets. Ho re- counted his love for tlie vestal, Sybilla, and all the i
629. e mother to the babe, told him to be of good cheer; that a noble princess,like Sybil
630. uld never l)ecome the vestal of a false god ; but would spurn his base iduls from h
631. uls from her, and listen to the word of truth, and believe, when the Apostle Patrick
632. n the conversion of those who seek your life, and humble and conquer them with the w
633. umble and conquer them with the word of God. The Druids, themselves, have foretold
634. from the toils." These bold words gave courage and hope to the young chieftain's heart
635. nd went to your assistance. The hand of God was re and led you to light and victory
636. ed Him to make me the instrument of His desire. When such glorious fruit is garnered b
637. what may we not expect wlien His chosen one sluiU come." " The Druids are all power
638. are learned in tongues, and skilled in reasoning are beloved by tlie people, and obeyed
639. beyed by them in all matters concerning religion, and it will be a hard task, me thinks,
640. all matters concerning religion, and it will be a hard task, me thinks, to part with
641. You are lighting the battle against the evil one. In my novitiate, 1 wrestled with h
642. re lighting the battle against the evil one. In my novitiate, 1 wrestled with his p
643. ve you not taught me, Conall, that your God is a God of love, and that He will assi
644. t taught me, Conall, that your God is a God of love, and that He will assist those
645. t me, Conall, that your God is a God of love, and that He will assist those who make
646. your God is a God of love, and that He will assist those who make intercession I "I
647. know am We to Him ? " Yes, it is " Then evil one." He written so in the Book of Trut
648. am We to Him ? " Yes, it is " Then evil one." He written so in the Book of Truth."
649. evil one." He written so in the Book of Truth." will aid me to overco]ne the promptin
650. ." He written so in the Book of Truth." will aid me to overco]ne the promptings of t
651. hall ascend with, lis l)lessing and His love. your's, and it may please Him to heai-
652. thev shall fall fi'om their Their lufty state, and their pride shall be turned to sha
653. place, shall rise temples to the living God, bearing on tliousand bells tlieir fron
654. ousand bells tlieir front the emblem of man's salvation. A in celebrating the jubil
655. vation. A in celebrating the jubilee of peace; and aromid the holy altars a thousand
656. r own territory, When the white wand of will be greater than any Druid's. your tribe
657. on the Rath of TuUough Oge, 1 trust it will be grasped by the hand of a Christian;
658. hand of a Christian; and tiiat she who will share your glory, though now a pagan, w
659. l share your glory, though now a pagan, will be then as firm and as steadfast in Chr
660. s, and enthusiastic in your prophecies, good Conall ; but you may not see them all r
661. of the Druids, and their boasted idols will soon be put to the test. It will be an
662. idols will soon be put to the test. It will be an unequal battle, however,for whoca
663. r,for whocan prevail against the living God ? None." Mahon lapsed into silence, but
664. t hope burned within him, and a strange courage animated his heart. As they returned to
665. a tliousand dyes, spread before them in nature's fairest embroidery, as pleasing and d
666. to their great protectors. Around tlie one, the wanton bee hovered, kisssiug the h
667. oney from its dewy leaves; and from the other the chirp of tlie wren the young brood
668. nd laughingly sped on to meet the sea. ]Nature seemed in her brightest mood, and the c
669. of They branches, and the voice of some one approaching. paused to listen, and as t
670. of Mahon, and had come to wrest him to judgment and death. He trembled, and, in a falte
671. d had come to wrest him to judgment and death. He trembled, and, in a faltering voice
672. ed Owen what tidings had he to convey. "Good tidings !" answered Owen, as soon as he
673. ing themselves in the mountains." "Now, God be not the prophecy being fulfilled, Ma
674. in the mountains." "Now, God be not the prophecy being fulfilled, Mahon?" exclaimed Cona
675. untains." "Now, God be not the prophecy being fulfilled, Mahon?" exclaimed Conall in
676. uncontrollable joy. "It is! it is! Tiie time is come, and the beloved of the Lord is
677. and cheered them on That hoary reverend man. But soon the king his aspect changed *
678. ged * the Saint said, scornfullie, That death thou hast for me prepared, Thou surely
679. to the Prince, and his eye kindled with pleasure as he looked on his bright and beaming
680. -adia, to visit Milcho, his old master. Being seated, 01 so nnir.oroiis wore tlie mTi
681. ard and believed, that he made but slow progress on tlie way, and was often obliged to c
682. lbowed his w:iy ness of speech with the good Saint. But through the dense throng unt
683. t next his heart and taking eration and love. the one he had formerly worn, and whic
684. heart and taking eration and love. the one he had formerly worn, and which was giv
685. crucifix from the hand of Conall; but, being afraid to utter a remonstrance, wisely
686. n our hut, and pom* forth our praise to God for om' deliverance." ^'I fear to cast
687. ^'I fear to cast a shadow on your joy, good Conall," said Bratha, sorrowfully, " bu
688. said Bratha, sorrowfully, " but 1 have other and adverse news tc tell." 92 " Concern
689. day, pass through the l)niids, seek his life. valley of Gluin, as I rested on the to
690. tter for us." returned Conall. "Patrick will meet them on the banks of the Praid, an
691. he Praid, and their cries for vengeance will be turned into sighs and lamentations."
692. n the sky; but bask in the sunshine and happiness of the present. As I have said, we shal
693. dangeroas, and was not without peril of life and limb ; for the road was often preci
694. of tlie night that had outstayed their time. Soon the hut faded from their view, an
695. oilsome and fatiguing march of the huge nature's brightest verdure, and morning. Thoug
696. mplished before the following day; and, being under his guidance, were obliged to cm-
697. , and the former, when occasion and the nature of the ground offered a chance for conv
698. and the nature of the ground offered a chance for conversation, instructing and enlig
699. ers harried downward to From the dreary beauty of hoary mountaintop and the sea. misty
700. nd eagerly pressing forward to meet the man of whom they had heard so much. Our tra
701. to hang, spell-bound, on his words, and many whose hearts were moved l^y his teachin
702. the crowd, and succeeded in obtaining a good position in front of tlie Saint. But wh
703. ood before them, the of the Propliet of God. Appointed One, holding in liis hand th
704. , the of the Propliet of God. Appointed One, holding in liis hand the ross of Chris
705. ed balm and hope, and com- How fort and love. They looked upon him it the right hand
706. ey looked upon him it the right hand of God, whose destiny as one coming from was,
707. the right hand of God, whose destiny as one coming from was, to ciu'b tlie licen- ;
708. nd ; and substitute the gospel light of truth where all, until now, had been darkness
709. ignity of St. Patrick, and his personal beauty, combined with his rare eloquence and f
710. ed vestments w^hich he wore. He held in one hand the Crozier or Staff of Jesus, and
711. He was now sixty years of age, but his form was erect, and tall ; the bearing fearl
712. ive were his eloquence and pathos, that many an eye became moistened, and the Saint
713. , as he unfolded the terrible agony and death of the Redeemer, his heart throbbed tum
714. ars swelled to his eyes and filled with love and adoration, mingled with sorrow and
715. interrupt the service of the Most High God ?" " I come in the name of Belus, the g
716. d ?" " I come in the name of Belus, the god of Erinn, and of Milcho, my father, the
717. of your crimes.'^ your task a difficult one. Prince," replied Patrick, calmly, "and
718. Prince," replied Patrick, calmly, "and one which, perhaps, Belus himself could not
719. ke him hence, and bear him to •'^ You will find the king." Mahon, beckoning to his
720. ying his hand on his shoulder, he said "Peace, be still. They shall not have power to
721. ce. I was his slave, and he was to me a good and generous master. But he was a heath
722. was a heathen, and I often prayed that God would shed his light upon him. It paine
723. Erinn the only true I bring with me the truth that shall faith of the living God. ill
724. he truth that shall faith of the living God. illumine your soul, and raise you from
725. faith of the living God. illumine your soul, and raise you from darkness to light.
726. e gods and prophets, and rend, from the evil one, the allegiance due to Christ, whom
727. s and prophets, and rend, from the evil one, the allegiance due to Christ, whom I t
728. ur stubborn necks in adoration, and nal life For they cast from you the false and id
729. Now, by the sacred fire of Bel, if thy God has power to serve thee, call on him, f
730. halt want his aid to save thee from the death thy blasphemies deserve." " Let us brin
731. ive chase/' exclaimed their keeper; "it will be rare sport to follow in the the Sain
732. impostor a few paces of a start, as it will prolong the sport." seize this traitor,
733. sp, and led him a few paces in advance, one standing on each side to guard and deta
734. Buscar, Ban," shouted the savage Ah on, good Leury to the hounds, " catch him seize
735. ined piteously as if seized with sudden pain, and feared to touch him. Uttering a fe
736. ain led them to the attack. "Seize him, good Bran," he shouted to the foremost houii
737. lated Leury, ^^the prophet of the false God has woven his spells around 1" 100 " Yo
738. s wrought its own destruction; and, the death thou hast for me prepared, thou !" sure
739. t his bands, and tremblingly set him at liberty. fear took possession of their hearts,
740. ain wliat course to pursue. Even to the mind of Conall, the Christian, there was som
741. ing in this unexpected interposition of God's Providence so terrible that, for a wh
742. is knee, supplicated him to pray to his God to have mercy on liim, and grant him th
743. Congal and his followers looked at each other in mute surprise and wonder. Cathal, as
744. ground, and worshipped the Christian's God, renouncing their idols, and the servic
745. of Bel. St. Patrick returned thanks to God for this grand demonstration of His pow
746. proacliing, bringing to him the word of life. Acquaint him of the things thou hast w
747. and Priests of Bel. Before the word of God they shall flee, even as the snow befoi
748. u knowest of sufferings more than mine, love my I In watching me. — Werrur, on Mil
749. Without, all was e:ladness and Deauty, peace and joy but within the castle walls, no
750. hoed through the corridors; no sound of life broke the dull monotony of silence, tha
751. ly had settled on Sybilla's heart' Tier beauty, was still as bright as ever, and perha
752. more fascinating charm to the wondrous beauty slione brightly ; ; ; ; The sun ; A ; 1
753. t hide from the loving gaze of Una, the pain and misery tliat were gnawing at her he
754. r heart. The latter knew, too well, the cause of her sorrow; and endeavored, with all
755. tliough she did not disclose to Una the nature of these interviews, her foster-sister
756. ier were preparing their character. her mind for the great change which was about to
757. their character. her mind for the great change which was about to take place in lier l
758. e which was about to take place in lier life, and buoying her with hopes of happines
759. ier life, and buoying her with hopes of happiness and peace, which would be liers, when s
760. buoying her with hopes of happiness and peace, which would be liers, when she became
761. , but it was evident that her heart was being blighted by the dread sacrifice she was
762. bout to offer, on the altar of parental duty. She returned the fond and affectionate
763. of old, and discoui'sed with pride and pleasure, of her brother's love for her, frequen
764. th pride and pleasure, of her brother's love for her, frequently expressing a wish t
765. ver the book which Conra had given her. One evening Una stole unperceived upon her,
766. at that moment, Sybilla unconscious of being observed, began to sing, in a low, swee
767. ath has vanquished thee. 'Tis vain lost pleasure to deplore, Rest, weary heart, and sigh
768. o hear the magic tone, That breathed of love for thee alone 'Twas sweet to dream of
769. hee, proud hopes of fame But fame, like love, lies wounded, aoT% Rest, weary heart,
770. sigh no more. IV. The wlld-bird*s note will fill the vale, The hawthorn blossom sce
771. t for a moment but dissolve ; morning ; will dissipate its murky sliadows and chase
772. nd wild, and so lost to confidence, and sense, that her sister fears to confide in he
773. girl, Una ; for, as to-morrow, the day-god sinks in the wave, thy Sybilla shall en
774. hall enter the sacred groves, where she will forget all her earthly sorrow, and her
775. all her earthly sorrow, and her earthly love. So my father and Conra have or'^ — d
776. s smiles of fortune, and believed, with one " No ! Why to share its joys and sorrow
777. joys and sorrows, it could fondly bear life's burden to the close. It was a vain an
778. d, was a traitor to his country and his god. My brothers loved him fondly as myself
779. im fondly as myself, and trusted in his honor. What has he become ? To-day, the deare
780. y traitor lives, and if he dies there's one the less in Erinn. Wronged, outraged in
781. Wronged, outraged in my feelings and my love, the sunshine of youth's happy n.orning
782. n in the cloistered shades, my thoughts will find, if not content, at least repose."
783. a low and tender tone, " that to-morrow will place a gulf between us, and that we wh
784. nd always been so near and dear to each other, shall separate for life." " But it wil
785. dear to each other, shall separate for life." " But it will not sever our friendshi
786. her, shall separate for life." " But it will not sever our friendship Una ; we can m
787. is held at Tara." " Ah but Sybilla, who will supply your place when you are gone ? S
788. days," continued Sybilla, '' and it is time he had returned. The very thought of th
789. he is bent, sends a shudder through my soul. I long and yet I dread for his return.
790. eturn." " His errand may be a fruitless one," returned Una, watching her looks as i
791. htr heart; "He whom he went to seek, is one, if rumor belies him not, who will not
792. k, is one, if rumor belies him not, who will not surrender or sell his liberty, at a
793. not, who will not surrender or sell his liberty, at any man's beck or bidding; and I fe
794. t surrender or sell his liberty, at any man's beck or bidding; and I fear me, their
795. r bidding; and I fear me, their meeting will lead to blood." "And I am the unhappy c
796. l lead to blood." "And I am the unhappy cause of it all," exclaimed Sybilla, hiding h
797. hut from sight the dark scene which her imagination pictured. "Nay, if the gods ordained it
798. engeance on me. But I tears can wash my sin away, my future life shall atone for th
799. I tears can wash my sin away, my future life shall atone for the erring and sinful p
800. t all earthly desires, and live for our God alone." Una was about to reply when a r
801. ster visage, and his eyes sparkled with pleasure at ISybilla's words. He had been concea
802. rifice is offered on the altar the gods will accept shall come for thee it as thy gi
803. uld have to pass, conspired to fill her mind with serious and solemn thoughts, and a
804. d swelled her breast with a more ardent desire to consummate the w;ll of her father. H
805. consummate the w;ll of her father. Her sense of duty to her parent, combined with he
806. te the w;ll of her father. Her sense of duty to her parent, combined with her own wi
807. llay her grief at pairing fiom tiie 108 world but despite her utmost efforts to shake
808. e it off, a forbod* ing of disaster and evil brooded over her spirits. She remained
809. er, and the path that led to the But no sign of living thing was to be seen ; no sou
810. river. The castle itself, was still as death. The few retainers who remained, fearfu
811. accompanied by Elie and Ova, was in the habit of straying through the woods, or wande
812. But they had no effect on tlio troubled soul of Milcho. There was a wound in his hea
813. nt pang to his troubled spirit; and the idea of his capture by Tir-owen's retainers
814. ch was eager to court sympathy from the other. — 110 Sybilla," began Milcho, taking
815. er to intercept Oonra and his train. It will be but another day in the march of life
816. will be but another day in the march of life, and will soon be Conra must wait ; he
817. t another day in the march of life, and will soon be Conra must wait ; he and the go
818. cussed this question last night, and he will be prepared for any news I send him. Li
819. or mountain gorges, and baffled, for a time, the hunters on his path; but he cannot
820. me it is not a sacrifice, for I know it will bring to you peace, dear father, and to
821. rifice, for I know it will bring to you peace, dear father, and to me repose." " It w
822. e, dear father, and to me repose." " It will bring to us happiness, Sybilla, and con
823. nd to me repose." " It will bring to us happiness, Sybilla, and continue to our house tha
824. Sybilla, and continue to our house that honor and glory which the greatest in Erinn w
825. ould be proud to share." " That thought will uphold me in righteousness, and nerve m
826. mmate thy vow, shall be indeed a day of happiness to me." " Then may it be soon, for I kn
827. is my Ill heavy with sad thoughts. Thou art oppressed with grief, and 60 laden with
828. o approach thee." " Have I failed in my love to thee, Sybilla ?" " No but there are
829. billa, much as she desires her father's love, thoughts. wishes him to share it with
830. them as was Remember, dear father, they will be here to love his wont. you when I am
831. mber, dear father, they will be here to love his wont. you when I am gone." "In trut
832. love his wont. you when I am gone." "In truth, Sybilla, you have reminded me of a dut
833. uth, Sybilla, you have reminded me of a duty which I have neglected. My thoughts hav
834. call them to receive your kiss ? Oh it will make ; ! them so happy." "Do, m}^ ciiil
835. th delight into her dark, dancing "Thou art worthy of thy proud race, as noble as t
836. d race, as noble as thou eyes. sorrow." art loving, and in tliy presence I forget m
837. ng, and in tliy presence I forget my on being perceived by those below, beckoned them
838. her face. It was a beautiful group, and one which a painter would Sybilhi, love to
839. and one which a painter would Sybilhi, love to delineate. The king, forgetting for
840. ; his eye sparkling with the momentary pleasure that filled his soul; and his noble cou
841. the momentary pleasure that filled his soul; and his noble countenance beaming with
842. ed him "every inch a king/' The queenly form oi Sybilla, in stature above her sister
843. pressive in its surpassing symmetry and beauty, presented a v^ery striking contrast to
844. at beamed upon them, and were gifted by nature with her* noblest attributes ; but phys
845. wore a more placid expression, and his mind seemed more Her countenance shone with
846. ne with a holy resignation and at ease. love, when she looked into his, which seemed
847. w^ith even a brighter and more exnlted beauty than ever hefore The beamed upon it. Th
848. over that quiet valley, and a mantle of beauty and brightness enfolded it in its embra
849. scene, "tJiat never before did the sun-god shine so fair upon Dalara' ii. Never ha
850. bright a day as tliis. The smile of our god seems more beauteous and potent, since
851. his votaries; and the light of his eye will dim A — 114 and Ills blast, with deat
852. get the glory of liis country, and liis duty to the gods!"* " Search your own heart,
853. is words, though they stung her to the soul, had not a taint of displeasure or cont
854. s Bel's and Bel's only. l>efore the day-god sirdiis to rest, that vow will be consu
855. e the day-god sirdiis to rest, that vow will be consum- mated." Akd Kiagu. —There
856. eration, swore to the whole nation, the same o iths which the chiefs of the tribes s
857. tury custoiiis." 115 "I did not mean to pain you, my cliild. But the heart is Srone
858. line of could for a moment forget your duty, why not Laegeri ? Weakness does not al
859. could not undergo for your country and religion ?" " To me it is no sacrifice to devote
860. hen I shall become a vestal. But did my religion and my country require that I should su
861. r To be such great ambition leads "Thou art worthy of thy house, Sybilla! Despite t
862. orbodings whicli have lately filled my soul, it shall still retain its splendor and
863. for deeds of arms, chivalry, music and poetry, and never shall its fame be dimned by
864. , as I gfize on thee. Thou hast all her beauty, and the spirit of thy brave brothers,
865. at they were come My heart w^ould be at peace did they bring with them the traitor Ma
866. long to embrace them for the deed. 'Tis time they bud ! arrived." "Tiie day-god is y
867. Tis time they bud ! arrived." "Tiie day-god is yet high in the West, and they may c
868. rrives." " Mhj Belus grant it. But 'tis time they were here." 116 " Some one approac
869. t 'tis time they were here." 116 " Some one approaches by the liver's bank. I see t
870. our brothers, and greater than have met one even greater than the Ard thou, fatlier
871. r head. "What means tliis, Una? Has the evil one taken possession of these girls, th
872. d. "What means tliis, Una? Has the evil one taken possession of these girls, that t
873. ecome so demented!" "They but speak the truth, O King! What they have seen I myself h
874. Sicur , and have become Christians." " God of my Fathers! can this be true ?" excl
875. ne, He unless armed with the power of a god could accomplish. We f)reached to us an
876. ther at the moment appeared. "fix! thou art welcome. No son of mine at least, shall
877. r Mahon ?" " They approach, father, and will soon be here." " Then may the vengeance
878. is ears, yet fearful — not 118 of the truth, and withal hoping tliat lie misinterpr
879. . Sicur is the servant of the Most High God, to w^hom is given tlie power of crushi
880. touch. great fall down and worsliip the God whom he adores. The wonders he performs
881. ecame powerless in our hands. We met to war against him, but he changed our hatred
882. ainst him, but he changed our hatred to love ; and our stubborn hearts were filled w
883. im in hate, but his word prevailed; and truth. now we worship the God of Sicur we are
884. revailed; and truth. now we worship the God of Sicur we are Christians !" "Accursed
885. ce accursed be him who has wrought this evil on me!" exclaimed Milcho, unable fierce
886. on me!" exclaimed Milcho, unable fierce war waged within his longer to control his
887. s encompassed thee with his spells. the evil he has wrought shall be atoned for, and
888. the signal to the reward of his crimes, man the battlements, and let every Dalaradi
889. n. Of all your warriors and cliiefs not one remains to answer your call. They are w
890. nd are no longer worshippers of the sun-god or the idols of Dalaradia. Even now, yo
891. looked into her face. It was pale, but courage and determination were written there. H
892. " Of all my children and followers, not one remain true !" " Yes, father, there is
893. remain true !" " Yes, father, there is one Sybilla. Test her love." " Will you rem
894. father, there is one Sybilla. Test her love." " Will you remain true to the faith o
895. there is one Sybilla. Test her love." " Will you remain true to the faith of Bel, an
896. n this Bwine-herd who approaches ?" " I will." " Will you meet death before you brea
897. ine-herd who approaches ?" " I will." " Will you meet death before you break your vo
898. pproaches ?" " I will." " Will you meet death before you break your vow ?" " Yes, if
899. ermines so I" " It is so determined. In one hour I shall be in the paraleft; and, l
900. . I am ready for tlie sacrifice.^ "Then one last embrace on earth, my daughter. I s
901. Belus Such a deatli were better than a life ! of slavery. I shall meet it unflinchi
902. h a deatli were better than a life ! of slavery. I shall meet it unflinchingly ; and wl
903. ckle around me, turn my eyes to the sun-god, and my last look shall win a smile fro
904. g the large iron gates which barred the progress of the advancing enemy, and gathering a
905. nemy, and gathering all the inflammable matter within his reach, he applied a burning
906. rick, appeared before the walls. At the same time Conra, the Druid, and a train oi p
907. appeared before the walls. At the same time Conra, the Druid, and a train oi priest
908. nder rain of beam and rafter! Oh I that death-shriek heavenward ringing that wondrous
909. hope, and sweet emotions mingled in his soul, when Congal, the friend of his boyhood
910. istian Apostle, at first bewildered Ids mind, and he looked with fear upon him. But
911. d he looked with fear upon him. But the good Conall was ever by his side ; and liis
912. ing It seemed as if a ray of the divine love, which to his words. burned within his
913. he morning, and a burning rnd consuming love tilled their veins. Before that holy ma
914. ve tilled their veins. Before that holy man ot* Grod, the clouds of superstition, w
915. nls, were dissipated; the mysteries and evil rites of Druidic worship, which had so
916. nd they stood erect in the sun-light of God's love, strengthened, ransomed and rede
917. y stood erect in the sun-light of God's love, strengthened, ransomed and redeemed. F
918. rteen centuries have since passed away. Time, in liis flight, has wrought many chang
919. away. Time, in liis flight, has wrought many changes. Nations liave fallen. EmBut th
920. ds of the earth. Esto Perj>etua, At the time appointed, they set out for Milcho's ca
921. very ground they trod, and the violent death of Leury, had spread with lightning rap
922. unded at the deeds of the extraordinary man among them, left their homes, and haste
923. dulge, alone, in day-dreams of hope and love. Breathing a prayer to God and His Bles
924. of hope and love. Breathing a prayer to God and His Blessed A 123 Mother, for her s
925. ections must have crowded upon Full his memory, as he traversed each well-known spot!
926. Slemish, and then Slieve-Mis, bears the same sound, while its appearance remains the
927. sound, while its appearance remains the same.* When within a mile of the castle, whe
928. rank. He could only see the outline of one of their faces, as the Saint stood befo
929. ieve." " Believe je in repentance after sin ?" « We believe." " Believe ye in life
930. sin ?" « We believe." " Believe ye in life after death ? Believe ye the resnrreo t
931. We believe." " Believe ye in life after death ? Believe ye the resnrreo tion at the d
932. e resnrreo tion at the day of believe." judgment ?" "We " Believe ye the unity of the ch
933. We " Believe ye the unity of the church Life of f SU Patrick. 124 « We believe." "
934. hildren of !'' the only true and living God The voice of the multitude was hushed.
935. on. They ?poke not, nor questioned each other, for their souls were tilled with wonde
936. ad, and they knew not what changes this man might work in Erinn.* The rite being co
937. this man might work in Erinn.* The rite being concluded, St. Patrick blessed them, an
938. the Word that shall give him light and life." The maidens bounded away at his biddi
939. d cried in a loud voice "Blessed be the God of Patrick! The Christians' God!" The m
940. be the God of Patrick! The Christians' God!" The multitude re-echoed the shout and
941. ws for you, Prince, which I think it my duty to tainer of Milcho. He commanicate." "
942. cho. He commanicate." " And what is it, good Artgal ? " " Conra the Dtuid, with a tr
943. erted liim, and wish to be a Christian. Being on guard on the battlements I was th-<
944. knew at the castle that you were ono.^ good Artgal ?" " I have swam the Braid and r
945. the castle ?" " 'Tis scarcely probable. good runner might outstrip them yet." " Then
946. illa is saved from the clutches of that evil Druid, there is nothing in all broad Ti
947. ee her, and all the Druids in Dalaradia will !" not wrest her from me " Then go. 1 a
948. the woods. It is probable, that at any other time the herculean strides of Ibar and
949. oods. It is probable, that at any other time the herculean strides of Ibar and Owen
950. of the moment, his feet seemed to keep time to the rapid whirl of his thoughts, and
951. , he ran. I'he thought uppermost in his mind was, that Sybilla was in the Druid's po
952. i is ! ! every moment 127 confessed her love, and wliere he was so abruptly confront
953. om their lips. They had been waiting in one of the gardens of the castle, since the
954. as the Saint appeared, his words would change But the unexpected and dreadful tlie ob
955. his head he answered " Accursed be your God 1 And thrice accursed thou, ignoble tra
956. , " There is our Bolus to thee I oome t God ; tlie God of our fathers. '' ! O I 123
957. s our Bolus to thee I oome t God ; tlie God of our fathers. '' ! O I 123 A piercing
958. as Mahon, Ibar and Owen rushed a second time against the gate. Their united efforts
959. and summoning all their strength, with one united blow, landed it against the gate
960. rm and undiminished fervor. "O Bel! the God of Erie and of my fathers, receive thv
961. ce avert the evils whic!. I offer up my life. threaten Erinn, and may my example be
962. ded and erring men, who have taken Thou art anto false gods and wandered from thy s
963. e. let not tlie gry with thy people for being led astray ; but glory of Eiie depart.
964. y come to rend thy temples, and the sun-god fall Their voices can be heard now, eve
965. r sacred precincts I !" father wdth the evil symbol in his liand " He comes, my daug
966. red precincts I !" father wdth the evil symbol in his liand " He comes, my daughter. B
967. Yestal. It is the appointed hour. Thou art a daughter of Bel, and when tlie altar
968. ghter of Bel, and when tlie altar fires art bright, thou shalt not be forgotten. th
969. nd virgins shall pray for thee, and thy memory remain green in their O ! ! ! ! O ! —
970. A hearts. The herd approaches. And now one kiss, one look at Bel, and then for the
971. The herd approaches. And now one kiss, one look at Bel, and then for the warrior h
972. cho embraced Sybilla, he turned to take one look at the day-god; and ther, Imrlino;
973. , he turned to take one look at the day-god; and ther, Imrlino; an anathema a2:ains
974. st the Christians and tlie Christiai.'o God, shouted the words " Follow me," and pl
975. rough the gate in safety. He had barely time to reach the open air, wlien Milcho's c
976. , but ere his eyes closed, saw the dark form of Conra the Druid, standing over him.
977. long, For your dear, dear sake. Praying many a prayer so wrong That my heart would b
978. would break. —Mangan. Dear my land, I love you dearly, but Fm sick of toil and str
979. rd to part you, but I'm longing for the life, Far away from crowds and cities, dear
980. ar away from crowds and cities, dear my love, 1 led with thee With my own, my darlin
981. nce and subtle arts would have won back many of those, who had so suddenly deserted
982. the old faith and adopted tlie new. But God had ordained it otherwise. While tlie m
983. the Saint. Thoui^:h unconscious of the cause that gave rise to it, it sent a tlirill
984. approached. Taking his hand in his, the good Saint helped to raise him from the grou
985. rom the ground, saying " In the name of God, Arise Blessed are they who believe in
986. r not Mahon arose. A bright and burning love illuminated his bosom, and with a smile
987. told them of the mission of the Son of God on earth, his teachings, his labors and
988. to them the mysteries and doctrines of death. the incarnate One the faith he taught,
989. s and doctrines of death. the incarnate One the faith he taught, and all the dogmas
990. med It was midnight. A silence still as death reigned in beauty upon the Braid. aroun
991. ht. A silence still as death reigned in beauty upon the Braid. around. The trees were
992. upon the tent at its base, wherein the family of Milcho sat. Tents had been hastily e
993. to summon them to Mass, and blessed his God for such a sweet and edifying sight. Kn
994. had so generously shed the light of his love upon the benighted land of Erinn. Tears
995. of the hour, coupled with the wailing, death-like dirge which fell in such saddened
996. lled his heart with melancholy, and the fate of him whom the Bard bemoaned so feelin
997. ie allegiance sliown by Ferf^ns to tlie memory of Milcho, is but what is felt by every
998. ansman to his Prince. But now, when the love of God has entered their hearts, and th
999. o his Prince. But now, when the love of God has entered their hearts, and their pri
1000.es are Christian, how grand and blessed will be this land, and how bright and dazzii
1001.and how bright and dazziingly the faith will I see before me lofty domes arise, with
1002.ltars floats while the harp of the Bard will be heard in palace and hut, soundmg the
1003.e glories i.)f the ever living and true God. Blessed be His name, for wonderful is
1004.essed be His name, for wonderful is the change His hand has wrought in Erinn Fergus ce
1005. sat brooding on his heart. The fearful death of his father, and the uncertainty of t
1006. his father, and the uncertainty of the fate of Sybilla, weighed heavily upon him. H
1007.; the promulgation of the faith and the happiness of the people who owed, to him, allegia
1008. I followed him in all his wars, and in peace sat at his banquet board. 1 w\na But li
1009.ns lie between his Creator and himself. Time will appease their grief, billa. and yo
1010.e between his Creator and himself. Time will appease their grief, billa. and your si
1011.rs still live. but meanwhile it is your duty to guide and direct them aright, and en
1012.Patricius in all matters ; but had I my will I would march my followers into the ver
1013.r his protection. None dare violate the law. But Sybilla must be saved at all hazar
1014.His wound is but trifling, to-morrow he will probably re^ turn to Tir-owen, to his d
1015.re dost thou has pleased our that lie ; God mean to reside Congal ?" " I've been th
1016.een thinking of leaving Dalaradia for a time, and sojourning with our brothers in th
1017. origin, for, to the great confusion of history/ the inhabitants of Ireland, those at l
1018.ota." Bedb. A — 136 " It is but for a time, good Fergus. My father's fate liangs h
1019.Bedb. A — 136 " It is but for a time, good Fergus. My father's fate liangs heavy o
1020.ut for a time, good Fergus. My father's fate liangs heavy on my heart, and I would i
1021.as her sisters but, since you object, I will hearken to Fergus' I shall repair to Ki
1022. and I shall tliere devote myself to my religion and country." ; " It is a good resolve,
1023.o my religion and country." ; " It is a good resolve, my Prince, and though my hand
1024.the halls of ilcurran ; and, praised be God not as it was wont to do, in honor of w
1025.sed be God not as it was wont to do, in honor of war and blood, but to the honor and
1026.d not as it was wont to do, in honor of war and blood, but to the honor and glory o
1027., in honor of war and blood, but to the honor and glory of our blessed Lord." "Your f
1028.earts that uttered them are cold. Erinn will shine forth in the future, and a brigli
1029.ower Antrim, which is said to have been one of the residences of Milcho." Cusick's
1030. of the residences of Milcho." Cusick's Life of St, Patrick. ** * — 137 of almost
1031.bold, and our arms are strong. But they will be bolder and stronger, when girt with
1032.d under the Christian banner of the Our God has shed his light upon Erinn, and her
1033.grand And O Prince Congal, and glorious will be the result !" think, think of what y
1034.eat Apostle who is among us." " I shall labor among my people, and hold a loving riva
1035.y with Prince Mahon, for well I know he will do good in Tir- owen." a noble youth, a
1036.rince Mahon, for well I know he will do good in Tir- owen." a noble youth, and well
1037.on He is beloved by tlie holy for which God has ordained him. Patricius ; and a ble
1038.ffering up the holy sacrifice. The Mass being concluded, he spent an hour in exhortin
1039.d not, as yet, been touched by the This being done, the Saint, taking w.iters of rege
1040.aradia, to iaiial>it:mts. Ciimplete the good work which had been begun, and at Beal-
1041.e Saint, llie tinne,* meet him at Tara. idea of rescuing Sj^billa from the groves, a
1042.ad come thus far with the Saint, '' and will soon erect a church to Him who has so m
1043.ed His light upon them." Blessed be our God !" exclaimed St. Patrick, astonislied '
1044. ardor of the Dalaradians. The light of God has truly penetrated their souls, and t
1045.s truly penetrated their souls, and the Truth which took centuries to bend the stubbo
1046.he savage Scandinavian, in his thousand history attest. galleys, burst upon their shore
1047.Elizabeth, the scourge of the Church of God, could neither, by her arts or arms, er
1048.mon, The Sainc departed, leaving behind many a happy heart, and many a joyous soul.
1049. leaving behind many a happy heart, and many a joyous soul. Conall immediately summo
1050.d many a happy heart, and many a joyous soul. Conall immediately summoned Cathal and
1051.hich he sent you. we wish to speak, and form some plan to effect her rescue His firs
1052.u hnd a right to demand her." ** Then I will demand her, and this very day, too, at
1053.to the mercy of the angry Know you not, good Conall, that they consider their Druids
1054.uids groves profaned by the presence of one who is not of their order? Even a princ
1055.rd the old Druid in his den." "Would to God I could accompany you," said Mahon, wit
1056.ed arm. " But though I be not there, my soul will be with you, and I will pray for y
1057.m. " But though I be not there, my soul will be with you, and I will pray for your s
1058. there, my soul will be with you, and I will pray for your success and speedy return
1059.ir my groves, and triumph over them." " God grant you may, Congal, and with Him to
1060.aid you I think not of failm^e." " Some one approaches," said Cathal , drawing the
1061.e beautiful than when the glow of After being saluted tlie roses was tinctured on the
1062.d. listening to Patricias, and while my soul was melted to tears by his impassioned
1063.w4th a scowl on his His looks portended evil. I face, glaring at the apostle. fear m
1064.ing at the apostle. fear me he bodes no good to us." " But, art sure, Una, tliat it
1065.fear me he bodes no good to us." " But, art sure, Una, tliat it was the Druid ?" "
1066.creed of Erinn. Prayers cannot move his soul. He is so wrapped up in his own faith t
1067.is own faith that even a miracle cannot change him. Know you not that he aspires to be
1068.," returned Mahon, " and 'tis pity that one so gifted as he should be lost . to the
1069.uld be lost . to the fold of Christ." " God, in his own good time, will bring it ab
1070. the fold of Christ." " God, in his own good time, will bring it about," said Conall
1071.fold of Christ." " God, in his own good time, will bring it about," said Conall, " a
1072.f Christ." " God, in his own good time, will bring it about," said Conall, " and in
1073.ad, departed for the sacred groves. But one short week ago and they would have deem
1074.at they were ready for any emergency or chance that would lead them to break the idols
1075.ay. Three liours were consumed in their progress, at the expiration of which time they a
1076.ir progress, at the expiration of which time they approached the It was guarded tirs
1077.y the his comrades assailed it with the same result. 145 wicket was again opened, an
1078.e of Belus! You have been false to your god, but before you : 1 desecrate his shrin
1079.eet with the vengeance of your outraged god !" " Break down every barrier, clansmen
1080." sliouted Owen, snatching a spear from one of the soldiers and striking the god. B
1081.om one of the soldiers and striking the god. But a moment sufficed to tumble him fr
1082.to their sanctuary. But he had not gone many paces when a dark smoke burdened the ai
1083.e air. Arrows of flame shot up into the element, and the sky became crimsoned with luri
1084.nctuaries were on tire. The groves were one mass of flame, and far as the eye could
1085.* "Think you so, Conall?" " I do. Conra will present her before the Ard-Riagh, who,
1086. pledged to meet Patricius at Bealtiime time at Tara, and who knows but we shall mee
1087.here they have for years been happy, it will only add another pang to their melancho
1088.illingly shall I go, and with pride and pleasure look on the overthrow of the pagan gods
1089.of the Christians must prevail, and she will return with you and Mahon, redeemed and
1090.echilous. bore the name ''Retreat Until Death." Amongst —Moore's Hiator^ of Irdund.
1091.completed. Owen, in your castle. Bratha will bring me intelligence of Let us re the
1092.Druid, Conall, but you touch a chord of duty to return." my heart, and 1 feel it my
1093.by the paleness of his feaHis mantle of many colors, folded loosely about him, tures
1094.and looks coniidingly into his face, is one who, for beauty and foodness is, perlia
1095.iidingly into his face, is one who, for beauty and foodness is, perliaps, imequalled i
1096., whether it were the promptings of the evil one or the teachings of Conra that infl
1097.ther it were the promptings of the evil one or the teachings of Conra that influenc
1098.ielding spirit, along with her mother's beauty. And many a time you and I have seen he
1099.it, along with her mother's beauty. And many a time you and I have seen her on the B
1100.ng with her mother's beauty. And many a time you and I have seen her on the Braid, w
1101.rother, siie has ever been an enigma. 1 love her, Una, with all the intensity of a b
1102., with all the intensity of a brother's love, and it grieves my soul to tliink tliat
1103. of a brother's love, and it grieves my soul to tliink tliat she, the best beloved o
1104.her's proud spirit. She Fna, the We The god of the wind. no loves licr nntive land,
1105. and is afraid that Patrick's teachings will alienate the children of Erinn from a l
1106.l alienate the children of Erinn from a love of liberty and make them debase1107.te the children of Erinn from a love of liberty and make them debase1108.t made her a Cliristian and. a child of God would be the happiest hour of my life."
1109.of God would be the happiest hour of my life." " Let us hope for the best, Una ; the
1110.ts Patricius, I believe luv proud heart will be softened. But I know not why she sho
1111.hates him with all the intensity of her nature.'' " She loves him, Congal, with all tl
1112. I do. On that night you confessed your love to me." " Well, on that night Mahon and
1113. and Sybilla met, and she confessed her love for him. And were it not that Conra int
1114.ot bend to listen to the vindication of one whom a Druid had said to be false.'* "
1115.that Mahon loves Sybilla with as fond a love as I bear to you ?" " Yes, Congal, as t
1116.es, Congal, as true and lasting as ever man's love for " Was Mahon woman." " Then M
1117.ngal, as true and lasting as ever man's love for " Was Mahon woman." " Then Mahon, b
1118.hon woman." " Then Mahon, brother of my soul, I pity thee 1" 151 "Wliy, Congal?'' he
1119.er's, and naught short of a miracle can change it." " Have we not seen miracles effect
1120.as among us ?'' " Yes, but he could not change her heart." "She did not hear him. Led
1121.Tir-owen, Mahon. Her heart w^ent out in love to him, and his image illuminated her s
1122.e to him, and his image illuminated her soul. Conra stole upon them in their hour of
1123. Conra stole upon them in their hour of love, and by his base insinuations alienated
1124. the gods, and endeavored to redeem her sin by death. That she was saved from such
1125.ds, and endeavored to redeem her sin by death. That she was saved from such an ordeal
1126.Congal, I cannot but think that Sybilla will yet become a Christian." " O Una, my be
1127.loved, thy words give fresh vigor to my soul, and 1 would give the proudest gem in t
1128.a band of followers, went forth to make war against Sicur, and you know the result.
1129. w^hich is a fountain of tenderness and love will succumb to the gospel of mercy and
1130.ch is a fountain of tenderness and love will succumb to the gospel of mercy and love
1131.will succumb to the gospel of mercy and love. I, who have been more than her sister
1132., who have been more than her sister in love, have embraced the faith. Her brotliers
1133. Bel but of Christ, surely, Congal, she will melt and become one of us." " O Una, co
1134.urely, Congal, she will melt and become one of us." " O Una, could your aspirations
1135.brace our creed. But have you done joiw duty toward her as a brother ? Have you clai
1136.ave not heard from him since, and it is time he were here. A clansman of Tir-owon, a
1137.ere here. A clansman of Tir-owon, as in duty bound, brought me intelligence of the d
1138.y bound, brought me intelligence of the death of the old chief, my father's comrade.
1139. Sybilla heart I wish prove prophetic." will be the bride of Mahon." " Freely from m
1140.Something within my heart tells me Some one approaches !" But hark so. rustling amo
1141.t aside, and emerging from the gloom, a man appeared who, perceiving Congal, salute
1142.d, and with bowed head stood know tliey will. ! A before liim. " Welcome, Bratlia !"
1143. bring from the banks of the Braid ?" " Good news, Prince Consral Conall has instruc
1144.liver to you tlie intelligence that the good Patricius is advancing on Tara, and he
1145.icius, the ambassadors of Christ." " It will please Conall well to hear your words.
1146.icius expects to meet you at Tara." " I will meet him there, not only to give public
1147., but also to rescue my sister from the evil thrall in which the Druids have bound h
1148.which the Druids have bound her." " You will be aided by Mahon and his clansmen, and
1149.ansmen, and when ou start for Tara, you will have a retinue such as no Ardiiagh ever
1150.id. Mahon also is ready. He is the only one in Tir-owen, with the exception of thre
1151.t a spell over him, and that the Druids will dissipate it at Tara. He, howev(»r, wi
1152.ll dissipate it at Tara. He, howev(»r, will E believes that Sicur will overcome the
1153., howev(»r, will E believes that Sicur will overcome their spells, and wants you Su
1154.company him. gal, I bring you/' " It is good, Bratha. I would not be absent from Tar
1155.he golden shields of Nial. Methinks the Convention this year will be a memorable one. Trul
1156.Nial. Methinks the Convention this year will be a memorable one. Truly, it will be s
1157.onvention this year will be a memorable one. Truly, it will be so to me, if I can r
1158.year will be a memorable one. Truly, it will be so to me, if I can recover my lost s
1159. was heard chanting a hymn of praise to God, in sweet and impassioned language. It
1160.praise to God, in sweet and impassioned language. It fell upon their ears in tones of du
1161.ILLA. In me, comnmnion with this purest being, Kindled intenser zeal, and niade me wi
1162.led intenser zeal, and niade me wise In knowledge, which in hers mine own mind seeing, Le
1163.se In knowledge, which in hers mine own mind seeing, Lett in the human world few mys
1164.mine own mind seeing, Lett in the human world few mysteries: How without fear of evil
1165.orld few mysteries: How without fear of evil or disguise Was Cythna what a spirit st
1166.t a spirit strong and mild, I — Which death, Yet Yet or pain, or peril, could despi
1167.and mild, I — Which death, Yet Yet or pain, or peril, could despise, melt in tende
1168.enius wild. mighty, was enclosed within one simple child — — The lievolt of Isl
1169.n it was enthroned have crumbled before time, tempest and war, the memories of its o
1170. have crumbled before time, tempest and war, the memories of its olden splendor and
1171.n kings and tyrants quailed to hear The war-cry of the Gael, The days And Freedom's
1172.dy the kingly board. 8ilent and cold in death tliey Ho sung green Erin's name, Her gl
1173.rs the patriot's heart, Though bound in slavery's chain, And Freedom yet shall strike t
1174. or the ocean-washed Head of Malin. Her war-ships lined tlie coasts, numerous as th
1175.or; and to such perfection had military science 2:rown, thata bngleblast from Tara coul
1176.oportions. It was the seat of learning, art and The * Agricola, at the time of St.
1177.earning, art and The * Agricola, at the time of St. Patrick's landing, was in Britai
1178. fostered by the kings and chiefs, and, science. under then* protecting banners, flouri
1179.r and the Boyne, before they blend into one ; the liills of Cavan to the far nortli
1180.ost magniiicent kingly residence in the world. It was decorated with all the splendor
1181.as decorated with all the splendor that art could lavish on it. The grand monarch,
1182.race and dignity, was a patron of every art and science that was instructive and en
1183. dignity, was a patron of every art and science that was instructive and ennobling His
1184.Navan, in the County of Meath. This was one of the celebrated annual fair and royal
1185.of Ireland. festival was held here from time immemorial down to the reign of Roderic
1186.eceived its Irish name La Lughnasa (pr. Law Loonasa) L e. the day of Lugaid's Festi
1187.ized by the Druids. A t Magee's Popular History of Ireland. 158 brehon, a Druid, a phys
1188.raw omens and auguries, by means of his science and heathen arts ; the physician's duty
1189.ence and heathen arts ; the physician's duty was to perform cures for his king, and
1190.ose of praising, or of satirizing every one, according to his good or evil deeds ;
1191. satirizing every one, according to his good or evil deeds ; it was the liistorian's
1192.ing every one, according to his good or evil deeds ; it was the liistorian's office
1193.ries and adventures of the nobles, from time to time; the musician's office was to p
1194. adventures of the nobles, from time to time; the musician's office was to play upon
1195.rous train of cup-bearers, butlers, and other servitors, under their orders.* Eight r
1196.jects, and obeyed more faithfully, than many of his more warlike predecessors. The F
1197.ike predecessors. The Feis Temhrach^ or Convention of Tara, was a great general assembly,
1198.t to repair every third year, about the time of the Feast of Bealtinne, in May, when
1199.regulations, and to give their sanction One of the to the annals and historic recor
1200.sly from a sacred fire dedicated to the honor of their god. At it, an especial seat w
1201.ed fire dedicated to the honor of their god. At it, an especial seat was assigned t
1202.ad met for conturieB, graced by all the wisdom, genius and beauty of the Island. But n
1203.B, graced by all the wisdom, genius and beauty of the Island. But never was such magni
1204.ts assembling in the year of grace 433. being Bealtinne-time, it was also tlie Ard-E-
1205. the year of grace 433. being Bealtinne-time, it was also tlie Ard-E-iagh's birth-da
1206.oi human beings crowded every available space, the roads were thronged with other tho
1207.ble space, the roads were thronged with other thousands hurrying to the scene. They t
1208. was rather a series of buildings tiian one whole. The principal one stood in the c
1209.uildings tiian one whole. The principal one stood in the centre, flanked by two oth
1210.th, though inferior in size to the main one, exceeded in dimensions tue otiiers. Th
1211.od, passed their novitiate, previous to being admitted to join the Order. As the Drui
1212.as if some dire calamity overshadows my soul/' I will rest " " It seems strange, Dub
1213.e dire calamity overshadows my soul/' I will rest " " It seems strange, Dubthach, th
1214.bodings should return at such a festive time. The croaking of the ravens around this
1215.ithout, has woke these feelings in your mind. I would fain wish you to bear me compa
1216.sful in your suit, return for me, and I will accompany you. You will find me here. I
1217.n for me, and I will accompany you. You will find me here. I am preparing my mind lo
1218.ou will find me here. I am preparing my mind lor the great encounter which I know, o
1219.nt spot is fitted for my thoughts. Go I will await you." Placing the gem on his fing
1220.epose of the holy virgins of Bel?" 161 "One, holy Sister, wlio is armed with author
1221.ere my mission lies, and must enter." " Art thou a Druid ?" " I am Conra, the chief
1222.hief Druid of Dalaradia." " Cum^a, thou art a holy and learned priest, and steadfas
1223.stood in the centre, on which lay open, many rare manuscripts and books embossed in
1224.ly Conra, ever inspires me with renewed courage, and brings balm to my heart." " Thy in
1225.or thy gifts, but to remind thee of thy duty on the morrow." " What may it be, good
1226. duty on the morrow." " What may it be, good Conra, I am eager to obey." " It is thi
1227.f Druid of the Sacred Isle, invokes his god for holy fire from heaven, mark well th
1228.m heaven, mark well the result. The day-god's eye will kindle the holy fire he send
1229.mark well the result. The day-god's eye will kindle the holy fire he sends it as a s
1230.l kindle the holy fire he sends it as a sign of his approval of those who pray to hi
1231.se who pray to him. To none else is his love given. At the ; on the torch of Dubthac
1232.stition and idolatry wliich his rays of love dart moment when permitted to stalk bro
1233.. The temples of Bel are menaced by the Evil one, and darkness is brooding over Erin
1234. temples of Bel are menaced by the Evil one, and darkness is brooding over Erinn!"
1235.r Erinn!" " Your words are enigmatical, good Conra, and, I fear me, are now I do not
1236.re the assembled nobles of Erinn ?" " I will, if the hour is at hand. I gave thee my
1237.. Thy brotlicrs, thy sisters, and Mahon will be there 1" 163 I not long ago repudiat
1238. need be, die !" as he died " But Sicur will be there also I'' " What ? Sicur, my fa
1239.nformation was of different import. Not one in all broad Tir-owen, save the traitor
1240.of followers, though not in the martial sense in which you question me, but still wit
1241. fell." " Then let them fall Com.e what will, the unholy spells of this base swine-h
1242.hast spoken well, Sybilla, and the gods will reward thee for thy constancy." " As it
1243. was not fated that I should die a holy death with my father, I, at least, can live a
1244.my father, I, at least, can live a holy life." " For some noble purpose hast thou be
1245.ou been reserved, Sybilla, and thy name will yet be heard and kept in remembrance wh
1246.stal fires are lighted on the altars. I will come for thee to-morrow, and conduct th
1247.riests of Bel, the vengeance of the day-god shall fall upon him, and the liglitning
1248.noble swine-herd, and the altars of the god of Erinn blaze with a brighter and a Th
1249.efore. Be thou !" ready when 1 come " I will. But good Conra, there is a passage in
1250.thou !" ready when 1 come " I will. But good Conra, there is a passage in this book
1251.onra, there is a passage in this book a prophecy regarding this Sicur, which I would fai
1252.ve thy aid in unravelling, if thou hast time." " I have not, daughter. Dubthach awai
1253.im to contemplation and heavy thoughts. man has cares on the morrow, which will req
1254.hts. man has cares on the morrow, which will require his subtlest thought to overcom
1255.Sicur, tlioii wilt sec the power of his god revealed, and the idolater and apostate
1256.illa, 1 must say farewell." " Farewell, good Conra. You will find me ready when the
1257. farewell." " Farewell, good Conra. You will find me ready when the hour approaches.
1258.ngs for the hour — _ '*" !" wh')n she will become a member of the holy Sisterhood
1259.oly Sisterhood " It is well, Conra. Too many have already proved false, ?n(i those w
1260.d false, ?n(i those who remain, I fear, will be sorely tried to-morrow. Wend your wa
1261.came here." Christians. " Their numbers will diminish with the morn. Bel but waits f
1262.ords prove prophetic! There has been no peace in my heart since this foreigner landed
1263.oreigner landed. But I must to Lead on, good Conra; Til the Banquet Hall, to the Kin
1264.t waked the rapture of the strings. For many an age in hall of kings listening patri
1265.swelled the arclent strains, Where With beauty of maids, and valor of her swains.**
1266. songs of the bards. The people were in good humor with each other, the weather, the
1267.The people were in good humor with each other, the weather, their Ard-E.i«gh, and th
1268..i«gh, and the joyous anticipations of pleasure they all promised themselves on the moi
1269.oks were turned in the direction of the particular group we have mentioned, as much as to
1270.ir boisterous laughter ?" asked a young man, who, by the mantle which he had flung
1271.nd, laughingly listened to the friendly war of words. " Yes," he replied, " they ar
1272. in om* The mirth ?" "Curb your temper, good Dima," " replied the soldier. not of wl
1273.in her den, Kiaran, than use such saucy language to any man, mucn less to a Dalaradian.
1274.an, than use such saucy language to any man, mucn less to a Dalaradian. You do not
1275.ned the creed of a swine-herd, liand, a death of fire!" " But have his fitting death
1276. death of fire!" " But have his fitting death for such a warlike heart. children beco
1277.become recreant to the gods?" " All but one, the princess Sybilla." *'And she," sai
1278.nd as soon as she becomes a Vestal, she will rank above all the Vir- He A ; gins of
1279.y, " but I would like to gaze upon lier beauty. I saw her mother on her marriage day,
1280.aran, and, if report belies her not, as good as she is beauteous." " Slie is sprung
1281.oble race, Barrfinn ; but methinks thou art mistaken concerning her brothers. They
1282.thers, towards the river, " that when a man once gets a new-fangled idea in his hea
1283.that when a man once gets a new-fangled idea in his head no matter how absurd it may
1284. gets a new-fangled idea in his head no matter how absurd it may be ; no matter how op
1285.ead no matter how absurd it may be ; no matter how opposed to sense, law and logic, he
1286.rd it may be ; no matter how opposed to sense, law and logic, he is not content with
1287.ay be ; no matter how opposed to sense, law and logic, he is not content with keepi
1288.no matter how opposed to sense, law and logic, he is not content with keeping tiic mi
1289.s not content with keeping tiic mine of knowledge to himself, but he must needs publisii
1290., but he must needs publisii it to tiie world become a reformer, and, though duath be
1291. of his rashness, maintain it witli his life. Our annals tell us that, when Orim« t
1292.ayed the sceptre in Erinn, there du^elt one Kinncait, — — * In the twelfth year
1293.d in imbuing a few companions with this idea. For years he labored to instill it int
1294.live years. But they were offended, and evil was the condition of Erinn during this
1295. was the condition of Erinn during this time. For the earth did not yield its fruits
1296.land were barren ; there used to be but one grain upon the stalk, one acorn upon th
1297.sed to be but one grain upon the stalk, one acorn upon the cak, and one nut upon th
1298. the stalk, one acorn upon the cak, and one nut upon the hazel. Shipless were her h
1299.d, and striereignty. king Kinncait with death, agam made Erinn fruitful. Now, to my t
1300.ait until their ire became aroused, and cause us to suffer for his blasphemies. Fi>r,
1301. more pernicious and degrading." " Thou art a pidlosopher, Dima, and more fitted fo
1302.ver of wool. JDost think this Cnristian will overthrow Bel T' "Psha!" returned Dima,
1303.s, there are fools and weaklings in the world, and while these exist there will be du
1304. the world, and while these exist there will be dupes. He has entangled the Daluradi
1305.u the meshes of his net*" itkm way. 170 soul of Heber !" exclaimed the soldier, fier
1306.t of this Christian. He believes not in war. He says we were born to live in peace
1307.in war. He says we were born to live in peace and harmony, like doves in a nest ; tha
1308.ays Bel is a monstrous ha but who false god; tliat his God, one with three heads, n
1309.nstrous ha but who false god; tliat his God, one with three heads, never sliows him
1310.us ha but who false god; tliat his God, one with three heads, never sliows himself
1311.self to his followers, is the only true one. And tliat Heber and Heremon, and Miiet
1312.and bards, who have lived here from the time of the Deluge, were wrong in worshiping
1313.eluge, were wrong in worshiping the sun-god, and that tliey arc now sulfeiing etern
1314. earth." " The blasphemer should suffer death." " Said I not so, Barrfinn ? This fore
1315.reigner should not bo permitted to live one day in Erinn." " Pliaw !" said Kiarim,
1316.ni of Bel, 'twoilld be glorious to pass one's life in her service I" 171 "Hush !" w
1317.Bel, 'twoilld be glorious to pass one's life in her service I" 171 "Hush !" wliisper
1318.s. " By all tlie gods of Erinn but thou art a lucky dog, Kiaran," exclaimed Dima, "
1319.est Druids in the sacred Isle. Barrfiim will now cease ids jesting, for the honor ha
1320.iim will now cease ids jesting, for the honor has been given too publicly to be ignor
1321.nk I would be unequalled. By keeping on good terms with tlie butlers and breviers, a
1322.rfinn,'^ interrupted the bluff Boldier, good-hnrnoredly, '' 1 liave been liouortd ju
1323. tlie penalty in a stoup of wine. And I will. For I have received a greater honor th
1324.d I will. For I have received a greater honor than you w't of." " Have we not seen yo
1325.h-Druids of Erum V^ "Yea. But a greater honor awaits nic on the morrow!" " Perchance^
1326., and from thence to the ! "A palace !" other in astonishment. Sacred College was an
1327. in astonishment. Sacred College was an honor, which even the king could not obtain,
1328.ess Sybilla, even for an hour, of whose beauty and sanctity all Erinn had heard, and w
1329.s gray hairs, to enjoy the privilege of being by her side, and gazing on her beauty f
1330.of being by her side, and gazing on her beauty for a moment. It was the proudest hour
1331. the proudest hour of the old soldier's life, and he enjoyed it to the utterat eacli
1332. an old standard-bearer of Milclio, the honor of escorting and protecting his dauglit
1333. enter vhe booth and have some wine; it will serve to drown all envious feelings, an
1334.to drown all envious feelings, and is a good antidote for a troubled spirit." "Kiara
1335.ford to spend a few lioman coins on his good luck, for it is n,> barren 173 honor he
1336.his good luck, for it is n,> barren 173 honor he will enjoy to-morrow. But for my par
1337.luck, for it is n,> barren 173 honor he will enjoy to-morrow. But for my part, I pre
1338.ere of a booth. Here we can see the day-god as he sinks to rest, and pour a loving
1339. to the Princess Sybilla." permitted, I will join you with all my heart, good Dima,"
1340.ted, I will join you with all my heart, good Dima," said an old and venerable man, s
1341., good Dima," said an old and venerable man, stepping to Kiaran's side, and address
1342. all but Sybilla, have gone over lo the Evil One. Is it so ?" "It is not true, Kiara
1343.but Sybilla, have gone over lo the Evil One. Is it so ?" "It is not true, Kiaran. N
1344. a vestal. I suppose, Fergus, your harp will chant a strain in her honor." Fergus sm
1345.s, your harp will chant a strain in her honor." Fergus smiled. The information he was
1346.. And though he hated liypocrisy in any form, he was determined by all legitimate me
1347.mself a Christian, without the question being put to him directly, he did not conside
1348. as would not compromise him but at the same time, would not smack of anything conde
1349.ould not compromise him but at the same time, would not smack of anything condemnato
1350.ail, and on the succeeding day not only change the heart of Sybilla, but of the Ard-Ki
1351.nd to ; heart's hope. ''Aye! Kiaran, it will. Never did its most ambitious flight wi
1352.s on the day Sybilla becomes a child of God. It will soar high as the eagle over tl
1353. day Sybilla becomes a child of God. It will soar high as the eagle over tlic valley
1354.were outnumbered, and we feared for the fate of our But when the strains of thy harp
1355.the to\\Ti, and clutched our slaves and other booty, over the dead bodies of the EoTh
1356.ng the strings, and canst harp a lay of love or praise for the daughter, as well as
1357.r praise for the daughter, as well as a war-song for the sire " That I can, good Ki
1358.s a war-song for the sire " That I can, good Kiaran, and right willingly shall I per
1359.la, and my heart But fill up, comrades, will be expectant to hear thy song. !" the w
1360.tten everything ! ! V We else." the day-god is sinking low, which warns me that my
1361.king low, which warns me that my master will think his charioteer is also a laggard
1362." said Barrfinn, rising. " Let us drink one bumper to the memory of Nial ere we par
1363.ising. " Let us drink one bumper to the memory of Nial ere we part," said Kiaran. " Wi
1364.mp would suit me better, Kiaran. But no matter. Here's to the memory of thy great hero
1365.r, Kiaran. But no matter. Here's to the memory of thy great hero, and another meeting
1366. the rath, to warn my spearmen of their duty at early morn." 1 must also depart, Kia
1367. glorious panorama the There soared the sign of Pm-ity, of Truth, and ImCross. — m
1368.the There soared the sign of Pm-ity, of Truth, and ImCross. — mortality, the burden
1369.den borne by the Saviour, the emblem of man's redemption. Stealing unperceived to a
1370.of St. Patrick. There he was met by the good Saint himself, Prince Mahon, Congal, Ca
1371.iots," bearing with them the pride, the beauty, and tlie manhood of Erinn. From each o
1372.Tara converged a countless crowd, whose many-colored and varying, but i>icturcsque c
1373.d reach, a sw^arm of liuthe rising sun. man bikings darkened the roads, filled the
1374. trumpets woke the slumbering ecbojs to life, and the sound of their harps filled th
1375.inguished on this day ; and, until such time as the Arch-Druid drew fire from heaver
1376.ruid drew fire from heaver from the Sun-god it was death to kindle a flame* Fjom th
1377.ire from heaver from the Sun-god it was death to kindle a flame* Fjom the four points
1378.lieir hearths. For days previous to the one appointed for the opening of the ceremo
1379.o the usage of liis predecessors, among other reasons, for the purpose of reforming t
1380.and laws of his kingdom, at the general convention of the nation. When the nobles and Olla
1381. in addition to these, there were three other buildings, one of which was called the
1382.hese, there were three other buildings, one of which was called the " Stronghold of
1383.nes and erics were imposed This was the time in which the great festival of the Gent
1384.ho would light it, but he should sutfer death for it." TripartiU iJje of SL Pat/fiok,
1385.enclosure of the building. But when the Convention met to originate or confirm laws and ru
1386.riots." It was built in a semi-circular form, open to the heavens, and at a point on
1387.cThe Cromlech, rificers durst enter, on pain of instant death. a huge, rude mass of
1388.ificers durst enter, on pain of instant death. a huge, rude mass of granite, without
1389.ently watch the proceedings, and have a good view of the temple. When tlie chiefs ha
1390. that lit up his feature s revealed the pleasure tliat sparkled in his heart. The fame o
1391. sparkled in his heart. The fame of her beauty, and her heroic resistance of the Chris
1392.proud pagan hearts assembled there each one as heroic as her own beat in unison wit
1393.e. Her towering stature, her marvellous beauty, and her proud, imperial look, combined
1394.med these hearts with an admiration and love only equalled by that wduch they profes
1395.ale face. affection, her tenderness and love exhaled the dew of her soul to her eyes
1396.derness and love exhaled the dew of her soul to her eyes, and her pride and patrioti
1397.e and heart, renegades to the faith and god of Erinn ; she saw her brutners and sis
1398.nmost core, to save them from a pang of pain, faithless and disiioiiored before the
1399., compassion mingled witij jeproach and love* himself. 181 The king priests sat on h
1400.. JSext to Inm came Conra. The Sun, the god of their idolatry, was approaching meri
1401. idolatry, was approaching meridian. In beauty and brightnes he shone upon the spires
1402.tees looked upon him, they read in each other's faces a triumphant answer to the unpl
1403.day they believed the Christian and his God were there. He would be vanquislicd. Th
1404.ayed in adoration and homage to the sun-god. The king and his chiefs knelt mute and
1405.trembling waited for the power of their god to be made manifest. It was an awful, a
1406.d. seemed the impersonation of hate and evil, as with outstretched hand he pointed t
1407.s hiding tlie face of their boasted sim-god, and tlie people's blood with terror ;
1408.e. Then, as if the breath of the living god had breathed upon it, leaped out a flam
1409.and a briglitness that have never waned love from the radiant fountain of God's hear
1410.waned love from the radiant fountain of God's hearf, sent in his mercy, to the paga
1411.slied. For a momert they looked at each other in wonder. Then the king, with dark and
1412.e turning toward the king, said : " The man who has kindled this lii-e O King is on
1413.an who has kindled this lii-e O King is one, who ! honor of the Saviour, that gods,
1414.kindled this lii-e O King is one, who ! honor of the Saviour, that gods, and broke do
1415.down the 183 not immediMtely destroyed, will wrest from you, jom kingdom and if this
1416.re is not extinguished to-day, and NOW, will never be extinguished in Erinn. He brin
1417.nement to be swift !'' as our vengeance will be just and terrible Mahon, bowing lowl
1418.rted on his mission, leaving behind him many hearts burning with different impulses
1419.g and his follow^ers looked as the holy man of God confronttd them. None saluted hi
1420.is follow^ers looked as the holy man of God confronttd them. None saluted him, none
1421.. None saluted him, none rose to do him honor; for the king had commanded them to sho
1422.sy. Biit despite his command, there was one, as the Saint passed on his way to the
1423.heart was touched by divine grace." The beauty and benignity of the Saint's countenanc
1424.eared among them. Relying solely on the God whom he adored, and the strange faith w
1425.of St. Patrick, served to mollify for a time, even his wrath. " stran<>:e scene foll
1426.e followed. The Kino- asked St. Patrick many questions the Druids contended with him
1427.aordinary evidence of the power of this god, of whom they had never heard before, a
1428.cially obdurate and blasphemous in liis language. He cursed the Saint and his god, and c
1429.s language. He cursed the Saint and his god, and called upon Belus to annihilate hi
1430.stor," exclaimed the angry Druid. " His god is false, he is the ally of the Evil On
1431.His god is false, he is the ally of the Evil One am: If he is more powerful than the
1432.od is false, he is the ally of the Evil One am: If he is more powerful than the god
1433.e send a swine He has insulted om* holy religion herd as his ambassador and broken tlie
1434.stoms of the land and for these crimes, death is decreed. He has impiously profaned o
1435.ignant as Conra. ; ! ! 'i He ; Cusack's Life of St. Patrick. 185 holy temple, and in
1436. 185 holy temple, and interrupted us in one of oiu' most solemn He lias intr'ided o
1437.of our sacred rites. groves, and by his evil spells and incantations, taken from Bel
1438.tliem. For these crimes lie must suffer death, and for this, O King we demand his blo
1439.rible blasphemies against the most High God. " 1 spurn ye and your accursed symbol,
1440.igh God. " 1 spurn ye and your accursed symbol," he shouted pointing, with a gesture o
1441.If there is any power in it, or in your god, perform it on me before the men of Eri
1442.ing orders for his immediate arrest and death, slowly the "Christian raided the cross
1443.ell dead at the feet of the Saint " Let God arise, and let his enemies be s^ettered
1444.urst on their astonished ears, but this time in the tones of a female. Malion heard
1445. aside, with their strong arms opened a space for Mahon to pass. •' Room — 187 ;
1446.and its cooling and ref resiling waters will soon revive her." Quickly following thi
1447.t. " Where is Sicur? Bring him to me. O God of the ChrisI believe in Thy name, for
1448. tians lielp an erring child how I have art truly the God of Heaven and Earth been
1449.n erring child how I have art truly the God of Heaven and Earth been tempted by the
1450.of Heaven and Earth been tempted by the Evil One, and deceived by the arch-fiend, Br
1451.aven and Earth been tempted by the Evil One, and deceived by the arch-fiend, Brothe
1452.t hou forgive me?" Sybilla, and I bless God that Tie *' Ay, freely, willingly, has
1453.n to thee the grace of His mercy and !" truth " Mahon! I have been blind, and groping
1454.ing in the darkness but, praised be thy God! mine eyes are opened at last." Catlial
1455.heir bosoms heaved with a glad and holy happiness. They gazed upon her with adiniratiun,
1456.ized St. Ere, after his conversion, and many thousand men the soiae Fetrie^s ^^ Essa
1457.r s ishone before Mahon ; lier glorious beauty lit up with tli tenderness and indelina
1458.o save her. '' O Sicur! Patricius, holy man of God save me save n: for I believe !"
1459.her. '' O Sicur! Patricius, holy man of God save me save n: for I believe !" " Aris
1460.ir old friend Kian The awful and sudden death silently knelt by his side. Conra, and
1461.t of tbe Church, and become children of God. The tidings of Sybilla's conversion an
1462. Sybilla's conversion and Conra's feari death, soon spread among the multitude, and g
1463. for admission It seemed as if a ray of God's glory had into the true fold. fallen
1464.from heaven, and a spark of liis divine love and subAnd truly, it limity, had center
1465.r did liistory record such a victory of truth over error such a signal and final triu
1466.th all the fond endearments which their love could show, testified their joy at her
1467.lone remained his heart was too full of happiness, and words could silent not paint the b
1468. poured forth a song of praise, Mahon's soul joined in unison, and his voice blendCl
1469.ouls. It was the happiest moment of his life; he sat beside Sybilla; her proud broth
1470.rs g:izing upon her with tenderness and love, as with upThe wonaroua turned gaze, sh
1471.e wonaroua turned gaze, she appealed to God for mercy. beauty of her form and featu
1472.ed gaze, she appealed to God for mercy. beauty of her form and features, and the sweet
1473.ppealed to God for mercy. beauty of her form and features, and the sweet and entrano
1474.ng melody of licr voice, ravirflied the soul of Malion, and in a very ecstacy of del
1475.y of delight, he returned thanks to his God, the hot tears streaming down his cheek
1476.dened the valley, and its tones woke to life tlie sleeping thousands. It was Easter
1477.d he intoned the words of the Mass. " I will go unto the altar of God ; to God who r
1478.the Mass. " I will go unto the altar of God ; to God who rejoiceth my youth," the m
1479. " I will go unto the altar of God ; to God who rejoiceth my youth," the multitude
1480. eloquence and lucid explanation of the truth, firmly and for ever, implanted in thei
1481.lieved, were filled with a more intense love for the wonderful God, whom they worshi
1482.h a more intense love for the wonderful God, whom they worshipped. Among the throng
1483. they worshipped. Among the throng were many Druids. Wrapped in their tunics they lo
1484. power, bowed at the shrine of the true God, the They instilled tidings were, by th
1485.by them, conveyed to the King. into his mind an intense hatred of the holy man ; and
1486. his mind an intense hatred of the holy man ; and in exaggerated terms, gave an acc
1487. which he taught. A ; 191 mocked at the idea of the Trinity three in one. the monarc
1488.ked at the idea of the Trinity three in one. the monarch witli wratli, and inflamed
1489.s heart They knew that en this day, the fate of blood. ; — They filled to deecis o
1490.d tluit the glory which lielus, through many centuries had shed on tlie land, would
1491.nt, if not by tlieir superior skill and reasoning, l)y murder. Poor Pagans They knew not
1492. triumph over their enemy, and with the death which he would surely die. were vain to
1493.aint here, that meeting on Tara's Hill. History recounts it. It is embalmed in song and
1494.liglitened by the spirit of — How — God, he performed many and wonderful miracl
1495.spirit of — How — God, he performed many and wonderful miracles, and nuKhmanifes
1496.nd demonstrated the absurdity and false reasoning of the Druids of Bel; these and a thous
1497.the Druids of Bel; these and a thousand other fr.cts, which tlie cliildren of tlie fa
1498. remind him of his promise, to slay the man who was working such evil in Erinn; whi
1499.e, to slay the man who was working such evil in Erinn; while many, lighted with grac
1500.o was working such evil in Erinn; while many, lighted with grace, followed the Saint
1501.ent. Filled with hope, thanksgiving and love, the holy Patrick left the royal hall o
1502.vertlowing, for the mercies tlie river. God had shown him, in liis hour of trial; a
1503. leave the Saint unpi'othis (ll^A« k*s Life ol Si. on Patrkk. 193 qnietly behind hi
1504.complices hid in the bushes, seeing the fate of their comrade, fled in the direction
1505.der him ; and again returning thanks to God for his delivei'ance, resumed his way t
1506.ffled look on her features, told of the peace within. The haughty scorn, so lately de
1507.departed ; while in its place a look of love and resignjvtion shone. Every lineament
1508.what we imagine of the angels ; and her beauty, seemed, in the mellow moonAt least, so
1509.together, we could mingle our hearts in one, and I could you Christian." " Mahon, l
1510. ago, that this would come to pass. But God decreed that I should sniffer humiliati
1511.ds balm upon my spii'it, and gives me a happiness which I have never before known." well.
1512.ou, Sybilla, and brings comfort to your soul." " Nay, I am but a novice. Yesterday I
1513.r years, are more worthy to possess the happiness which faith can give, than my proud, ob
1514.ourself. Conra wronged me. He sought my life, and wrought me ill, with your sire and
1515.ificed to his wrath, because I dared to love one, destined for his shrines, I sought
1516.d to his wrath, because I dared to love one, destined for his shrines, I sought my
1517. sought my own territory ; but my heart being weary with its weight of love and woe,
1518.my heart being weary with its weight of love and woe, imheedingly I went astray in t
1519.cd their doctrine to me; but it pleased God that I should beWhen I returned to Dala
1520. then." I was a Christian " O Mahon the memory of our meeting then, will never be effa
1521.O Mahon the memory of our meeting then, will never be effaced from my poor heart. Th
1522.s former false joys and hopes, and your mind, filled with nobler and frander thought
1523.e ameliorates all things, and faith and love can conquer the heaviest sorrows of the
1524.e heaviest sorrows of the heart." *^ It will , 195 but I never again can revisit Dal
1525.I never again can revisit Dalaradia ; I will never again look upon the waters of the
1526.te 'i Conra himself he deceived me. The Evil One was enthroned He told me the in my
1527. Conra himself he deceived me. The Evil One was enthroned He told me the in my hear
1528.hristian dared to erect a shrine to his God over my father's aslies, and the profan
1529.heart prompted, Sybilla ; and both were evil." *" He also said you were a wanderer a
1530." iicnd possessed liim, and he died the death he had designed for me." '' O Malion I
1531.f Heaven, and the brightest follower of God on earth. In my heart I cursed his Clir
1532.cken shudder passes through me, as tlie memory before liim. of liis bla })hemies rises
1533. rises before me, and the suddenness of God's vengeance, that struck him dead with
1534.n I beheld the power of the Christian's God, and the scorn and mockery in my heart
1535.. But my heart was blinded by pride and evil passions, and I looked with scorn and c
1536. upon, even tliose of my own Conra, thy life was a blood, whom 1 considered traitors
1537. wound is yet fresh, and thoughts of it will only serve to keep it longer green. God
1538.ill only serve to keep it longer green. God decreed that these things should happen
1539.appen, and we should be obedient to his will. Let me rather tell what events happene
1540.ich the Druid threw upon my name." ** I will listen willingly, Mahon, and do all in
1541.n lifted from my eyes, and how apparent God, when lie living lie, pleases, can make
1542. lie living lie, pleases, can make tlie truth appear !" and unassuming manner detaile
1543.n the hut of Conall I told the story of love, he told me that thou wert too bright a
1544.gor to Boul, even before I met the holy man of God ; and often in lonely hours I pr
1545.Boul, even before I met the holy man of God ; and often in lonely hours I prayed fo
1546., and Cathal, Elie and Ova tremble with emotion at mention of thy name. Artgal and Brat
1547.fered by Conall, who is now a priest of God, for thy soul's sake, in the church of
1548.ll, who is now a priest of God, for thy soul's sake, in the church of Dalaradia. Fer
1549. we feared not the result. Praise be to God our hopes have been verified !" '* But
1550.ayers have been answered, Mahon, and it will be one leading feature of my life to pr
1551.ve been answered, Mahon, and it will be one leading feature of my life to pray for
1552.nd it will be one leading feature of my life to pray for tliose, who, by the purity
1553.yers, have found grac^ in the siglit of God, and made intercession for me. Ova and
1554.Elie, when in the convent of Dalaradia, will remember you in their prayers, and Oath
1555.prayers, and Oathal, when at the altar, will not, surely, forget you." " And Sybilla
1556.And Sybilla, when Cathal is a priest of God, and Ova and Elie have become the bride
1557. dia, what dost thou intend to do ?" '' life of penitence and prayer, Mahon, is meet
1558.is meetest for " Thy A me." " I know of one, Sybilla, whose halls are lonely, and w
1559.ee as the winds of heaven. And there is one who lords it over those broad domains,
1560. much by inheritance as by his people's love. thousand spearmen leap to his bugle-ca
1561.by his side to share his honors and his love, he would not change Dalaradia delights
1562.e his honors and his love, he would not change Dalaradia delights thee his state to be
1563. not change Dalaradia delights thee his state to be Ard-Riagh of Erinn. no more. Long
1564.y have I loved thee, bright pearl of my soul. Thy heart was once mine. O Sybilla giv
1565.ds of Tir-owen, where thy Mahon's heart will ever beat in unison with thine, and, bl
1566. holy Church, and happy in our people's love, we too will be happy. The holy Patrick
1567. and happy in our people's love, we too will be happy. The holy Patrick himself, wil
1568.ill be happy. The holy Patrick himself, will smile upon our union, and bless us. Spe
1569.he smiles upon him I O speak idol of my soul !" His impassioned manner and burning w
1570.er and burning words sunk deep into her soul. She looked upon his manly and noble fa
1571. and Congal draw nigli, turned, witli a love-lighted Binile in her eye, her sweet fa
1572.t face to his, and softly whispered " I will go with thee to Tir-owen." He had barel
1573.o with thee to Tir-owen." He had barely time to clasp her hand in his, when TJna, ru
1574.e depart on the morrow O for Kilcurran. Will you not accompany us?" " I know not, Un
1575.ood, we consider Besides, Catha] it our duty to bear them company thither. has been
1576.er the tuition of Conall, and Kilcurran being at no great distance, we can always com
1577.ce, we can always communicate with each other. If Mahon would only accompany us, our
1578. waters of baptism, and follow the holy man of God, whithersoever he goes. The hand
1579. of baptism, and follow the holy man of God, whithersoever he goes. The hand of God
1580.God, whithersoever he goes. The hand of God truly guided Kiaran to the grove where
1581.e where Patrick knelt to pray ; and the death of Laegari's spearman has struck terror
1582.the Ard-Riagh is not appeased. Once the good Patrick leaves, it will burst forth, an
1583.eased. Once the good Patrick leaves, it will burst forth, and, instigated by the Dru
1584.orth, and, instigated by the Druids, he will have revenge on the Christians. In peac
1585.he Christians. In peaceful Kilcurran we will lind repose. Sybilla needs rest, and in
1586.fferent scenes, far from the Braid, she will forget her sorrows. I know her sisters
1587.e only for the future." 199 be a bright one 1 feel assured, Sybilla. We will rove t
1588. bright one 1 feel assured, Sybilla. We will rove through the woods of Kilcurran, as
1589.ou to give your consent to complete our happiness." " Freely I accord it, Congal, provide
1590.the tent oi her sifiteri. that it " And will —— — too CHAPTER XXIL THE The COR
1591.ms. But kini^lier far before heaven and man Are tlie emerald fields and the fiery-e
1592.and the fiery-eyed clan The sceptre and state, and the poets that sing, And the sword
1593. on his allies, and thrice on his clan. One Strabane, clash on their bucklers, one
1594. One Strabane, clash on their bucklers, one more, they are still What means that de
1595. of the hill ? gaze they above them ? a war-eagle's wing I *Tis an omen I hurrah I
1596.TuUough-oge Rath the flowers bloomed in beauty; the lark caroled her jocund song to th
1597. gladsome bceno, on which the eye would love to feast, and It 801 the heart, forgetf
1598.ght foliage of the woods. They numbered one thousand men, and were the soldiers of
1599.l, attended by Cathal, Owen, Bratha and other her. priests, followed in their train.
1600.il the Prince himself placed his chosen one in it. They had scarcely taken their po
1601.n the rath, the music ceased, and for a space a solemn silence reigned. Suddenly the
1602.e hand, led him to St. Patrick's At the same time, Congal, approaching Sybilla, led
1603.d, led him to St. Patrick's At the same time, Congal, approaching Sybilla, led side.
1604.age was celebrated in Tir-owen. Mahon's happiness was complete, and joy danced in his eye
1605.d read to him the laws of his clan, his duty to his country and people, and the laws
1606.of ing given his adherence to ail which custom had imposed on such occasions, O'Cathan
1607.ould arrive ?" " Ay, truly dids't thou, good Conall, and praised be God thy words ha
1608.ids't thou, good Conall, and praised be God thy words have come to pass. But were i
1609. Princess Sybilla, and is happy in your happiness." " He and thou will ever be remembered
1610.happy in your happiness." " He and thou will ever be remembered in our prayers, dear
1611.se to think of thee. Since the light of truth dawned upon my heart, thy name has been
1612.been ever dear to me. If the prayers of one BO unworthy can ascend to heaven, thy d
1613.unworthy can ascend to heaven, thy days will be full of peace and happiness, and lov
1614.end to heaven, thy days will be full of peace and happiness, and love." "My heart is
1615.ven, thy days will be full of peace and happiness, and love." "My heart is full to overfl
1616.ill be full of peace and happiness, and love." "My heart is full to overflowing, Syb
1617.ll to overflowing, Sybilla, and joy and happiness possess my soul. For is not green Erinn
1618.billa, and joy and happiness possess my soul. For is not green Erinn to-day, rescued
1619.and her sons and daughters, children of God i Incense burns upon His altars, and th
1620. is dissipated, and the sun Truly, this man has light of Truth beams upon the land.
1621.nd the sun Truly, this man has light of Truth beams upon the land. wrought a wonderfu
1622. pride." '' Think not of it, daughter ; God's ways are mysterious. Thy sudden conve
1623.n banished Mahon from thee, and was the cause of his finding salvation. Thy smile wou
1624.hee, in the flames of thy dwelling. But God and his angels were watching over thee,
1625. Mahon to thy rescue." " And here comes one, who, under God, was instrumental in gu
1626.scue." " And here comes one, who, under God, was instrumental in guiding me also,"
1627.l. " 'Tis but a poor recompense for thy good services, friend but thou art remembere
1628. for thy good services, friend but thou art remembered in my heart," he said, grasp
1629.is hand. " Thy words, gold." my prince, will be treasured dearer than thy "I doubt i
1630.asured dearer than thy "I doubt it not, good Artgal," said Sybilla: "Thy love is kno
1631.t not, good Artgal," said Sybilla: "Thy love is known to me, and, though poor the of
1632.she placed it around his. He dropped on one knee to leceive it, and his heart beat
1633.ie harpers and bard« chanted a rann in honor of Tir-owen and Dalaradia. They rehears
1634.lories their prowess in the Held; their wisdom in the counThey recited in glowing thei
1635. knee Then, in homage to her valor, her virtue and her sanctity. warmed by the theme,
1636. extemporaneous hymn of tnanksgiving to God, blessing Him for His mercies, and supp
1637. Him to always look down with an eye of love, upon green Erinn. As they ceased, the
1638., St. Patrick arose and left the As the good Saint hall followed by Mahon and his ch
1639.s chiefs. appeared before the soldiers, one and all knelt on the ground to receive
1640.ef address, he bestowed spread over the world. on them his blessing, and affectionate
1641.arms were laid aside, and the remaining time passed in mirth. It was an ancient cust
1642.time passed in mirth. It was an ancient custom, and one wliich usage had made perempto
1643.in mirth. It was an ancient custom, and one wliich usage had made peremptory. But n
1644. never did chief or clansman pledge his love for the prince of his choice, in more h
1645.rted for their homes, bearing with them many presents from the young chief, and with
1646.young chief, and with their hearts with love of him, and his boundless hospitality.
1647.th, and gave to every country in Europe Religion and Literature. And in many a well-foug
1648. Europe Religion and Literature. And in many a well-fought iield, against Dane and N
1649.rom the hrst ravages of their lives for God and country. the Northmen to the battlj
1650.re ranged on tlie side of ileligion and Liberty. Cathal, as the reader is aware, became
1651.ed with Congal, in Dalaradia, until his death, whicli occurred ten years alter the in
1652.owed in the train of the Saint till his death. Conall and Owen lived to a green old a
1653.itual wants of tlie Dalaradians, and in death were laid side by side, in the church e
1654.beloved by him and iSYl>illa; and wJ^cn God called And from 20T to repose, their la
1655. were soothed, and their cye8 closed in death by the Tir-owen chieftain and Sybilla o
1656.t so dear as thy minstrelcfy, Bright is nature in every dress, Rich in unborrowed love
1657.he holy, the fair, the free, Beloved in life and deplored in their fall ? Fling, fli
1658. their fall ? Fling, fling the forms of art aside. Dull is the ear which these char
1659.ey go to I —Furlong. student of Irish history, the scenes I liave endeavored to depic
1660.ve endeavored to depict in these pages, will not come amiss. He knows they are histo
1661.rically correct. The subject is a grand one. If I have not come up to his standard
1662.Ancient Erinn, the fault lies not in my will, but Under what depressing circumstance
1663.rse fortune " Sybilla " was written, he will never know. To those who si 3er at the
1664.med by him, I can only say, read Iricjh history. The conversion of the Irish from Pagan
1665. Irish from Paganism to Christianity is one of the brightest cliaptei'S in the hist
1666. one of the brightest cliaptei'S in the history of the world. It was effected almost wi
1667.ghtest cliaptei'S in the history of the world. It was effected almost without blood.
1668.lSj and educated minds became imbued in one day with t^^e saving truths of the Gosp
1669.of preaching and teaching to instil the same truths into One woul the duller and mor
1670.teaching to instil the same truths into One woul the duller and more besotted natio
1671. descendants clung to that creed, their history attests. Their martyr-roll outnumbers R
1672.never be effaced, never obliterated but will endure until their native mountains mou
1673.ust and the sun sinks into the ocean of eternity 1 WILLIAM COLLINS. Bkooklyn, N. T., 22d
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Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/