Concordance for A new treatise on the duty of a Christian towards God : being an enlarged and improved version of the original treatise / written by J.B. de La Salle ; translated from the French by Mrs. J. Sadlier.

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7. The images appearing here are the best quality possible considering the condition and
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9. ed or illustrated impression. first The symbol —'^ (meaning "CONTINUEO"), or the sym
10. bol —'^ (meaning "CONTINUEO"), or the symbol y (meaning "END"), whichever applies. s
11. se too large to be entirely included in one expoaure are filmed beginning in the up
12. er, left to right and top to bottom, as many framea as required. The following diagr
13. r "•#'.! ^1^ \\ TOWARDS (V •••^ GOD. TiptSJON .*-i- I AK Er^iUR^ED Aim IMPR
14. ebec, ^ 0-' : A i NEW TREATISE ON THB y DUTY OF A CHRISTIAN 1 I TOWARDS BEING GOD. A
15. N THB y DUTY OF A CHRISTIAN 1 I TOWARDS BEING GOD. AN ENLARGED and IMPR OF THE, ^ ORI
16. y DUTY OF A CHRISTIAN 1 I TOWARDS BEING GOD. AN ENLARGED and IMPR OF THE, ^ ORIGINA
17. iNTii Louis de Quele?;, by the grace of God, and the favour of the Apostolic See, A
18. led " A new Treatise on the ChrisParie. Duty to God, from the press of Poussielgue,
19. new Treatise on the ChrisParie. Duty to God, from the press of Poussielgue, This wo
20. incipal duties of the Christian apprise life, to make them loved and practised, and
21. rsign of our Secretary, day of October, one thousand eight hundred J. and ihirty-se
22. ds of speaking and studying the English language. The very education fact of its univers
23. studying the English language. The very education fact of its universal adoption is by th
24. anguage. The very education fact of its universal adoption is by these excellent masters
25. d book of instniction left on the whole Duty of a Christian. Here nothing is unexpla
26. s all the grand and beautiful system of Religion.' to the simplest the most sublime myst
27. f devotion, all is laid open before the mind, Ri a way so earnest, so impressive as
28. f rivetting attention, and inducing the mind rest, the to dwell on these all-importa
29. To the principal work TTie Christianas Duty to God, at is added the RxUes of Christ
30. principal work TTie Christianas Duty to God, at is added the RxUes of Christian Pol
31. rous and important qnestion^, which the man of never treat lightly, (food «ens« p
32. irreparably consequences ! The that 1^ idea of my existence is so closely allied wi
33. I cannot reflect on the formei wilhoiil being struck by the Nothing iiiin liiat exist
34. ho is, and is by himself; it in we have being, motion, life, and reason. He has creat
35. y himself; it in we have being, motion, life, and reason. He has created us by his p
36. t existence demands worship. rational A God, a idea man, a is religion, one cannot
37. ence demands worship. rational A God, a idea man, a is religion, one cannot be witho
38. demands worship. rational A God, a idea man, a is religion, one cannot be without t
39. rship. rational A God, a idea man, a is religion, one cannot be without the other. The o
40. ional A God, a idea man, a is religion, one cannot be without the other. The of rel
41. is religion, one cannot be without the other. The of religion rts as natural to man
42. one cannot be without the other. The of religion rts as natural to man as is that of God
43. ther. The of religion rts as natural to man as is that of God: the child receives i
44. ion rts as natural to man as is that of God: the child receives impress with ready
45. ss with ready docility, and the old it. man is almost alwayi wh forced to return to
46. ons only be silent, and all men tliin I will range themselves It is under the banner
47. e themselves It is under the banners of Religion. all that with the hope of being useful
48. of Religion. all that with the hope of being useful to we publish New Treatise fitly
49. to we publish New Treatise fitly on the Duty of discharging it. the Christian toward
50. f discharging it. the Christian towards God, an. the anc div means of Every one wil
51. rds God, an. the anc div means of Every one will here find the gioundu see, of his
52. God, an. the anc div means of Every one will here find the gioundu see, of his faith
53. is future hope solidly established, and will ed kn( by the examples which follow the
54. he truths of faith is and the duties of religion, that nothing is impossible to him who
55. , and to avail himself of the aid which God gives " to men of good will.** Far from
56. of the aid which God gives " to men of good will.** Far from taking to ourselves an
57. he aid which God gives " to men of good will.** Far from taking to ourselves an hono
58. s not of to us, all we acknowledge with pleasure that it is from the works de La Salle,
59. oo TreatiM whi INTRODUCTION ^rror on of God, NECESSITY OF A RELIGION, AND THE IT. O
60. eatiM whi INTRODUCTION ^rror on of God, NECESSITY OF A RELIGION, AND THE IT. OBLIGA- e la
61. DUCTION ^rror on of God, NECESSITY OF A RELIGION, AND THE IT. OBLIGA- e latter. it in in
62. OF STUDYING I created 18 , U8 by honour God, a 1. — NECESSITY OF RELIGION. rhe id
63. created 18 , U8 by honour God, a 1. — NECESSITY OF RELIGION. rhe idea receives t The ex
64. U8 by honour God, a 1. — NECESSITY OF RELIGION. rhe idea receives t The existence of t
65. od, a 1. — NECESSITY OF RELIGION. rhe idea receives t The existence of the univers
66. necessarily suppose a wise and powerful cause. men That cause lish thin an. I is God
67. ose a wise and powerful cause. men That cause lish thin an. I is God all ; He it is w
68. ause. men That cause lish thin an. I is God all ; He it is who has created all thin
69. ed all things, and who regulates divine wisdom. according to the eternal laws of His c
70. aws of His created beings, the groundfi will see, ) Of all man alone is is endowerf
71. beings, the groundfi will see, ) Of all man alone is is endowerf ed with intelligen
72. is is endowerf ed with intelligence and liberty; he alone capable of faith knowing, wil
73. ing, willing, and loving; nevertheless, God, who is I 1 who ia wisdom itself, has o
74. g; nevertheless, God, who is I 1 who ia wisdom itself, has only given these faculties
75. self, has only given these faculties to man to the receives, odwill.** lot to end t
76. hey are, prove beyonu all U8, doubt the necessity of a religion, that Vainly will is to s
77. beyonu all U8, doubt the necessity of a religion, that Vainly will is to say, a con- of
78. he necessity of a religion, that Vainly will is to say, a con- of MM. nexion of obed
79. , a con- of MM. nexion of obedience and love from the rational being to hii Creator.
80. of obedience and love from the rational being to hii Creator. it the body be said tha
81. o hii Creator. it the body be said that God is too great and too far elevated above
82. est in the honour whir.h we render Him. God. it is true, has no need of out 6 homag
83. that tes> and must honour his Creator, love and gratitude to Him who has called him
84. gratitude to Him who has called him mto being. Can a father possibly dispense wd;h th
85. Can a father possibly dispense wd;h the love and lespect ? which his children owe hi
86. nd lespect ? which his children owe him God is, then, our father, hence we ought to
87. is, then, our father, hence we ought to love Him He ; b infinitely good, we ought th
88. we ought to love Him He ; b infinitely good, we ought therefore to attach ourselves
89. nternal, comprehending faculties of our soul ; all the should be external, so that t
90. body in the may concur public, with the soul worship paid to God ; and has because t
91. r public, with the soul worship paid to God ; and has because that men, being desti
92. paid to God ; and has because that men, being destined to live in society, should ass
93. utual edification, and of exciting each other to the practice of their from the very
94. of their from the very beginning of the world, gether to render find homage light to
95. render find homage light to the common duty. Thus, men have come toLord, and every
96. worshipped in the the whole people. The same which reveals man the existence also of
97. he whole people. The same which reveals man the existence also of a Being oi whom h
98. ich reveals man the existence also of a Being oi whom he entirely depends, shows him
99. shows him nVTRODIKJTION. vhtLt it 7 The form of this the obligation of paying 's Him
100. gst the va ;*ious nations of tid teS' m principle has been every where the same, to say,
101. S' m principle has been every where the same, to say, the necessity of honouring a s
102. been every where the same, to say, the necessity of honouring a supreme power, respect a
103. isposing Providence. Bo true it is that man ceases not to hear an inward voice whic
104. : — im; He " Homage to the Master of life ! " Ives to 2.-i-THB NECESSITY OF STUDY
105. the Master of life ! " Ives to 2.-i-THB NECESSITY OF STUDYING RELIGION. werful, vas all H
106. Ives to 2.-i-THB NECESSITY OF STUDYING RELIGION. werful, vas all H» the To believe in
107. H» the To believe in the existence of God, the immortality of the soul, the or, a
108. To believe in the existence of God, the immortality of the soul, the or, at least, rewards
109. xistence of God, the immortality of the soul, the or, at least, rewards and punishme
110. t least, rewards and punishments of the other world, having nothing satisfactory to s
111. t, rewards and punishments of the other world, having nothing satisfactory to say aga
112. far great truths, yet to live as though one were persuaded of Llie contrary being t
113. ugh one were persuaded of Llie contrary being the case, is an inconsistency which can
114. rue that the most formidable enemies of religion There would religion are darkness of mi
115. midable enemies of religion There would religion are darkness of mind and depraviiy ol h
116. on There would religion are darkness of mind and depraviiy ol heart. : all the be fe
117. n, and 16 body and would be none —not one —were men without passions. away with
118. ut neither the guilty negligence of the one, nor the cor- society, ruption of the o
119. e, nor the cor- society, ruption of the other, can ever do which is. 10 has Now tains
120. s, the secret conall ciousness of every man, ip, reK- —the universe and that it c
121. —the universe and that it cow- are so many witnesses attesting the existence of Go
122. ny witnesses attesting the existence of God. at they xciting 'fhus, Thethought, the
123. xciting 'fhus, Thethought, the to prove will, and the intelligence of the soul, all
124. prove will, and the intelligence of the soul, all tend its its spirituality, and con
125. its spirituality, and consequently, are immortality. Such being the fear, case, how we to a
126. and consequently, are immortality. Such being the fear, case, how we to account for t
127. o ; that I can say this is that I shall one world I shall either fall intv 'iitilia
128. that I can say this is that I shall one world I shall either fall intv 'iitiliaiiliii
129. liaiiliiiiyijiiifi^itt^r XNTBODVCTIOIV. God to be know that if there be a God, he m
130. IOIV. God to be know that if there be a God, he muHt punish all those, who like mys
131. s to serve him all around tells me that God does exist nevertheless, annihilation l
132. rather to believe only what may be that time will not be given me to repent; of that
133. r to believe only what may be that time will not be given me to repent; of that I am
134. and by the voice of oonscience ; but no matter. I shall set tae evidence aside and go
135. of him who thus sports with his eternal fate Can he dare to in the flatter himself t
136. dare to in the flatter himself that he will share throughout eternity happiness of
137. r himself that he will share throughout eternity happiness of the virtuous man — he, t
138. that he will share throughout eternity happiness of the virtuous man — he, the ? wicke
139. hout eternity happiness of the virtuous man — he, the ? wicked and perverse follo
140. clinations — or can he imagsame light God of all justice will regard in the his ?
141. — or can he imagsame light God of all justice will regard in the his ? vice and virtu
142. an he imagsame light God of all justice will regard in the his ? vice and virtue
143. of all justice will regard in the his ? vice and virtue —the impious who blaspheme
144. stice will regard in the his ? vice and virtue —the impious who blaspheme : name, an
145. who adore him with awful veneration is knowledge, then, that of religion the most imin p
146. veneration is knowledge, then, that of religion the most imin prosperity, is portant fo
147. he most imin prosperity, is portant for man it is it which moderates him and sustai
148. hing, in adversity, ; teaching him that time and eterhity all it is it that secures
149. ity of States, by making established if man submissive to the authorities fear it b
150. ubmissive to the authorities fear it by God himself, and that not only from the ; o
151. imself, and that not only from the ; of punishment, but by the obligation of conscience re
152. nt, but by the obligation of conscience religion is which forms the clement prince and t
153. belongs not to us, but forbids even the desire thereof; nay, goes farther still, and c
154. but ; enjoins us to pardon injuries and love our enemies it teaches INTRODUCTION. OS
155. emies it teaches INTRODUCTION. OS to do good to for those thot; ^ho hate and revile
156. quieu, struck with these truths, " that religion which who persecute us. appears to be b
157. persecute us. appears to be but for the other the happiness of life, should yet const
158. us. appears to be but for the other the happiness of life, should yet constitute man in t
159. o be but for the other the happiness of life, should yet constitute man in this worl
160. appiness of life, should yet constitute man in this world/' —" Society without eb
161. life, should yet constitute man in this world/' —" Society without eb'gion " says t
162. f ferocious beasts." more important for man than the study of religion, since relig
163. ore important for man than the study of religion, since religion herself makes it obliga
164. r man than the study of religion, since religion herself makes it obligatory on us. The
165. lf makes it obligatory on us. The first duty which it imposes on ui is the study of
166. , and yield* all the faculties of their soul. Young people, who are about to enter t
167. oung people, who are about to enter the world, never foi^et the precepts of the Churc
168. he example of those who have themselves will instruct unhappily deserted the path of
169. instruct unhappily deserted the path of virtue. Read none but good books, which and mo
170. erted the path of virtue. Read none but good books, which and more in the truths of
171. books, which and more in the truths of Religion ; you mor^ —the better instructed jou
172. tter instructed jou its are, the firmer will be your faith, and the more yoa to be d
173. more yoa to be dazzled blas- study your religion, the more will you be impressed with di
174. led blas- study your religion, the more will you be impressed with divine beauty. Ne
175. more will you be impressed with divine beauty. Never permit your mind nor fail by the
176. d with divine beauty. Never permit your mind nor fail by the vain sophisms of the ir
177. ligious for reason, —never take phemy vice, raillery for proof. Shun bad comFly fr
178. cannot to corrupt your morals. and you will preserve faith. — iuafliiiifflWtiilM'
179. t once to to err or fall away from your duty, Him who awaita ! you with outstretched
180. temptible human respect — Example. —One of those Christians who have it, nothin
181. " Here lies the who departed from this world without having sought know why he came
182. -SV, TflBW- :fi- A NEW TREATISE ON THB DUTY OF THE CHm^xU^S TOWARDS GO AND THB MEAN
183. TING HIMSELF THEREOF. Part I'wBt CF THE KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF OOP lit—OF THE KNOWLEDGE
184. HEREOF. Part I'wBt CF THE KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF OOP lit—OF THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD. I
185. KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF OOP lit—OF THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD. I. CHAPTER OF THB ORBED, WHICH
186. D LOVE OF OOP lit—OF THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD. I. CHAPTER OF THB ORBED, WHICH IS THB
187. hort, simple, easy to remember, and the same every where, hence it was that the drew
188. invariably attributed to them. The word Symbol signifies a sign or an abndgment, be- c
189. ed to them. The word Symbol signifies a sign or an abndgment, be- cause the professi
190. l signifies a sign or an abndgment, be- cause the profession of faith to distinguish
191. nd because i«i contains in an abridged form all the truths which a christian is bou
192. - :^«««WBia»*** -*V' :*.^-, »1 1,2 DUTY OF THB CHRISTIAN ed into three parts. T
193. sed in the first article, and speaks of God the Father and the creation of the seco
194. akes in the six following articles, the world and treats of the Son of God, the redem
195. les, the world and treats of the Son of God, the redemption of man arid ; third is
196. ts of the Son of God, the redemption of man arid ; third is composed of the speaks
197. unishments reserved for men after their death, according to the good or the evil they
198. men after their death, according to the good or the evil they shall have tlie univer
199. eir death, according to the good or the evil they shall have tlie universal judgment
200. e good or the evil they shall have tlie universal judgment; and the : three concluding ar
201. the evil they shall have tlie universal judgment; and the : three concluding articles it
202. ecite the Apostles' Creed is to make as many acta of faith as there are truths conta
203. e truths contained in it : hence, it is good and useful to recite it often, but more
204. ise in the morning, so as to testify to God that we propose to spend the day as a C
205. die in the faith of the Church, should death surprise us during our sleep: this is t
206. en. in The words of the Apostles' Creed God the Father Almighty" ^c. ExAaiFLE. are
207. " ^c. ExAaiFLE. are these : " I believe One of the tyrants of old having sought, by
208. ** What do you believe ?** Wbtiireupon one of them replied: "Listen! am going to m
209. ng aloud, in a firm tone " I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven
210. r faith : " 1 believe / am a Christian, Death before unthe — belief." There is said
211. e sixth to St James nation of articles, man id aild of the the Less the seventh to
212. E / IL have believe, 4fc. any acta t is good when we propose Bn going lie THB NECESS
213. s good when we propose Bn going lie THB NECESSITY OF REVELATION. Man's greatest interest
214. going lie THB NECESSITY OF REVELATION. Man's greatest interest is to know the end
215. know the end for which he sent into the world, and what will become of him after his
216. which he sent into the world, and what will become of him after his death ; his min
217. , and what will become of him after his death ; his mind, however, being so limited i
218. ill become of him after his death ; his mind, however, being so limited in its cais
219. im after his death ; his mind, however, being so limited in its cais in the ring our
220. himself to the exposition of them which God has vouchsafed to give him by repacity,
221. give by up >elieve ?" the truths which God has revealed to men, some contained in
222. s all the sacred books written from the time of Moses to that of Jesus Christ ; and
223. nd unbroken transmission. From the very time of their sojourn in the desert, the Heb
224. thers transmitted td their children the knowledge they contained as the most precious inh
225. ble to introduce outth to the slightest change, without exciting the clam rous oppo«
226. uted to Moses by an entire nation whose religion, civil usages, and their constitution s
227. whose religion, civil usages, and their constitution so that one cannot itself, were all fou
228. usages, and their constitution so that one cannot itself, were all founded on that
229. le, have ^^ ; dispute the fact of Moses being its author, without disputing tlie exis
230. le, which would be sheer absurdity. The other books contained in the Holy Bible have
231. hining miracles and by prophecies which time has literally fulfilled they must, ther
232. they must, therefore, have been sent by God. The miracles which attest the authenti
233. vidence so plain that there is no posAt one time it was an entire sibility of their
234. nce so plain that there is no posAt one time it was an entire sibility of their bein
235. time it was an entire sibility of their being doubted. kingdom stricken at different
236. its waters to lei: tlie people pass at one time it was the course of the sun at an
237. waters to lei: tlie people pass at one time it was the course of the sun at another
238. the sun at another, an arrested to give time to secuJ-e the victory entire army of o
239. e to secuJ-e the victory entire army of one hundred and ^eighty-five thousand men s
240. digies, and a thousand others of a like nature, of which several were attested by sole
241. tablished expressly to perpetuate their memory, can neither be overlooked by the most
242. licly declare that such and such events will certainly come to pass at the time, in
243. ents will certainly come to pass at the time, in the place, and with all the circums
244. ons, and yet the most improbable at the time when fhey were foretold such are the ca
245. if it was not Him who is the master of time, and whose eternal decrees have regulat
246. d as the ministers ; and ambassadors of God it is thus that their books came to be
247. divine, and containing the true word of God. The authority of the books of the New
248. books of the New Testament rests on the same foundations, and is equally incontestib
249. estible. The New Testament contains the history of the life, miracles, and doctrines of
250. w Testament contains the history of the life, miracles, and doctrines of the Son of
251. , miracles, and doctrines of the Son of God, written by his disciples, all contempo
252. iw'-* •«*. lit 16 also the heretics, DUTY OF THB CVQISTIAN ,,-ir Apostles, and co
253. s, and consequently withM) reach of the truth. So whose interest it was to dispute th
254. lves with endeavouring to pervert their sense. The Church has ever cherished a profou
255. e publicly read in aU Che assemblies of religion ; she has always regarded them as the w
256. has always regarded them as the word of God, and emanating from the Holy Spirit, an
257. om the Holy Spirit, and as such that no one could either add to, or diminish them w
258. true ; and if so, it is quite true that God himself has spoken to men. must then re
259. and it ia for us to oppose the word of God to the audacious license of impiety and
260. you to u tell us clearly what think of God.'' The philoso- go, and return in eight
261. d return in eight days." The eight days being past, the deputies called again, and he
262. ight days.'' Eight days pher said : " I will — after they received the same answer
263. : " I will — after they received the same answer. The deputies were hearing from
264. e hearing from the philosopher only the same words, and they demanded to know how lo
265. days. He replied " I must make you the same answer as often aa at length tired of :
266. ten aa at length tired of : you ask the same question. I know that God is I know and
267. you ask the same question. I know that God is I know and feel that he exists, but
268. shall be able to say what he is." " Who will explain to me what God is, if it be not
269. t he is." " Who will explain to me what God is, if it be not God iumselfr' Saint Au
270. explain to me what God is, if it be not God iumselfr' Saint Augustuie^ before his c
271. sion, went to church af — — TOWARDS GOD. nth. 17 So the au- wledged avouring in
272. excellent explana* tions of the word of truth, and as I listened from time to time, m
273. e word of truth, and as I listened from time to time, my heart, touched by the eloqu
274. f truth, and as I listened from time to time, my heart, touched by the eloquence of
275. , touched by the eloquence of that holy man, oft4)n as his occupation |)ermitted, a
276. y awakened conversion to tears : to the truth." He have said after hit 1 y Spirit, di
277. p8alms !" which they sang in church The same holy doctor said " Oh, my God there is
278. urch The same holy doctor said " Oh, my God there is nothing in the world affects m
279. id " Oh, my God there is nothing in the world affects me so deeply as to hear thy voi
280. oks of thy Sacred often, oh, ! " How my God : ! to what and it ia license } a pleas
281. y God : ! to what and it ia license } a pleasure that surpasses all others. may ever fea
282. rant, oh. Lord that I at if our wrong " sense." {Confess.^ liv. 7. ch. 6.) e proofs b
283. ilosoit ARTICLE / believe in IIL days." God. lin, and ht days es were )nly the EXIS
284. e )nly the EXISTENCE OF 60D. there is a God, is a truth which makes itself evione m
285. EXISTENCE OF 60D. there is a God, is a truth which makes itself evione may say so, t
286. makes itself evione may say so, to the mind, and we have but to open our eyes and r
287. behold Who then has made that immense ! God iirch af has suspended in air those shi
288. he firmiu vault? Who /i — ; 18 meiit, DUTY and daily renew ? Of TUB CHMSTIAN mosl
289. M l(:i cover its surface the prodigious quantity of fish which the ea contains within it
290. contains within its bosom who, but only God, can l)e ho author of all these wonders
291. eight of absurdity to attribute them to chance ? When we behold a magnificent palace,
292. design and laid on the colours. If any one told us that all this was the work of c
293. e told us that all this was the work of chance that the stones of the edifice had cut
294. an<4 that they had shaded themselves by chance into such admirable arrangement, should
295. to say that the universe was formed by chance alone ? Finally, let us consider oursel
296. d design, and we see that He who called man into being has thus given him a manifes
297. and we see that He who called man into being has thus given him a manifest proof of
298. en him a manifest proof of his infinite wisdom. Who but God eould have executed a work
299. t proof of his infinite wisdom. Who but God eould have executed a work so admirable
300. we have not only a body, we have also a soul that soul is 'lot material, for matter
301. t only a body, we have also a soul that soul is 'lot material, for matter is incapab
302. a soul that soul is 'lot material, for matter is incapable of thinking Nevertheless,
303. incapable of thinking Nevertheless, the soul is it is then of a spiritual nature. un
304. , the soul is it is then of a spiritual nature. united to the body, and tlieir union i
305. is so close thri vvIkh the body is in a good condition the soul partakes of it« oc
306. Ikh the body is in a good condition the soul partakes of it« oc joyment ana, on the
307. partakes of it« oc joyment ana, on the other hand, when the bod^. ;"jr&, Who is it t
308. Who is it that has thus united and the soul too is in pain. commingled two substanc
309. has thus united and the soul too is in pain. commingled two substances so different
310. ed two substances so different in their nature, and estHblisht d that admirable corres
311. ble correspondence between them who but God alovie ? Again, thesa b^ntip^snts of jo
312. ids, : .a a nev/ i)roof that there is a God thej — — — ; — :^i. ' ; '•^<^
313. '•^<^->X^fi^K»>^ — ; — a TOWARDS GOD. tho mosJ are involuntary, and beyond o
314. to call them forth or bantHh th«Mn a* pleasure, consider it in peoits which can 1>e iv
315. y organs gularity ign, and us given jut God that is 'ul ; nking soul ;vl: n 5t« I'
316. nd us given jut God that is 'ul ; nking soul ;vl: n 5t« I'p. ited are, and and then
317. end, and who disposes of u^ -^f hia own will and pleasure. That Supreme Ruler is God
318. who disposes of u^ -^f hia own will and pleasure. That Supreme Ruler is God. and hence t
319. ill and pleasure. That Supreme Ruler is God. and hence the cry: My God! which escap
320. eme Ruler is God. and hence the cry: My God! which escapes us iii my gndlen grief o
321. which escapes us iii my gndlen grief or pain, or when attacked by unlooked or misior
322. exclamation, which pr*/ '^eds not )f a soul frri'ii 'ti I., being the involuntary "
323. r*/ '^eds not )f a soul frri'ii 'ti I., being the involuntary "testimony ii naturally
324. of arts and sciences, but none who knew many, it is true, have been mistaken in thei
325. s true, have been mistaken in their not God choice, but they have all and each felt
326. ce, but they have all and each felt the necessity of recognizing a divinity. Tliis univer
327. essity of recognizing a divinity. Tliis universal consent and agreement of all nations an
328. nations and of men differing l»om each other in genius of all ages, and in customs,
329. toms, separated by immense intervals of time and place this can be no arbitrary conv
330. time and place this can be no arbitrary convention it can only be the effect of a light wh
331. s on all mankind, light proceeding from God himself and which even the most eunple
332. himself and which even the most eunple mind cannot misunderstand. The heavens annou
333. tand. The heavens announce the glory of God, and the firmament publishes the wonder
334. ublishes the wonders of his power. What other being could have said to the sun " Go f
335. es the wonders of his power. What other being could have said to the sun " Go forth f
336. they have not made themselves, but that God has made them. What other than G«k1 co
337. elves, but that God has made them. What other than G«k1 could make the plants to gro
338. ' 1 , ; — — — ; — : — thej I God. •«»«(«HB«B»«w- ^^^>^^41?ii::
339. («HB«B»«w- ^^^>^^41?ii::••#: 20 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN Example. A certain imp
340. HE CHRISTIAN Example. A certain impious man, as pert in his demeanor as he was shal
341. n his demeanor as he was shallow in his reasoning, one diy presented himself at the house
342. nor as he was shallow in his reasoning, one diy presented himself at the house of M
343. at I am an atheist" At these words, the man of God drew back in horror; and taking
344. an atheist" At these words, the man of God drew back in horror; and taking hold of
345. d he abruptly, " examining that strange being which they call atheist, for I have nev
346. hey call atheist, for I have never seen one before." Disconcerted and abashed by tl
347. and abashed by tliese words, the young man hastily withdrew. Merault. ARTICLE I be
348. . ARTICLE I believe in IV. 4*c., ^•c. God, UNITY OF GOD. Reason and faith which m
349. lieve in IV. 4*c., ^•c. God, UNITY OF GOD. Reason and faith which make known to u
350. which make known to us that there 18 a God, teach us also that there is but one, a
351. a God, teach us also that there is but one, and that there could not be more, beca
352. more, because there cannot be more than one being who exists of himself, and depend
353. , because there cannot be more than one being who exists of himself, and depends on n
354. ho exists of himself, and depends on no other cause. And is it not evident that being
355. sts of himself, and depends on no other cause. And is it not evident that being supre
356. other cause. And is it not evident that being supremely great, he must be alone in hi
357. equal he should be no longer a Supreme Being ? i'» All the perfections of God prove
358. eme Being ? i'» All the perfections of God prove also his unity: there ill" can be
359. e also his unity: there ill" can be but one immense being that is to say, who perva
360. nity: there ill" can be but one immense being that is to say, who pervades and fills
361. t is to say, who pervades and fills all space, and beyond whom there is nothing more.
362. here is nothing more. There can only be one being wl^o is infinitely perfect that i
363. is nothing more. There can only be one being wl^o is infinitely perfect that is to s
364. ss. It is, doubtless, surprising that a truth so evident should have been ever overlo
365. s error was the natural eflfect of When God created man, he made himself manifest t
366. the natural eflfect of When God created man, he made himself manifest to sin. him f
367. reated man, he made himself manifest to sin. him from that moment man clearly under
368. f manifest to sin. him from that moment man clearly understood that thero — »«*
369. OOD. n his de^ 31 all presentto was but one Supreme Being, on the Creator of things
370. e^ 31 all presentto was but one Supreme Being, on the Creator of things, and ind piou
371. , and ind pious whom all things depend. Man transmitted to his pos- happy e terity
372. nsmitted to his pos- happy e terity the man " of spy- glass coxcomb. . pure and hol
373. of spy- glass coxcomb. . pure and holy religion, which formed for a time and preservati
374. e and holy religion, which formed for a time and preservative from evil. The first g
375. formed for a time and preservative from evil. The first generations, of men had then
376. generations, of men had then no need of other testimony than tliat of their fathers t
377. gh it could never be forgotten, nor But Religion demanded sacrifices, and the yet obscur
378. which they it there is ;hat there than one ler cause. he must should be ;, had rec
379. hey it there is ;hat there than one ler cause. he must should be ;, had received from
380. adore what they could not see; thua^the idea of God was confounded with that of the
381. at they could not see; thua^the idea of God was confounded with that of the creatur
382. nours. This deplorable error made rapid progress men sank so low as even to adore beasts
383. ry thing, save ; \\ — ty: there who s God himself. per- nothing perfect nd whom c
384. eary darkness into which he had fallen, man adored even the work of his own hands ;
385. to inclose the divine Spirit within the form of a statue, and so far forgot the God
386. form of a statue, and so far forgot the God who had created him, that he thought he
387. he thought he could in his turn make a god. Each nation had its own particular dei
388. urn make a god. Each nation had its own particular deities, of whom some presided in heave
389. d not even stop there, for in course of time even the passions and vices had altara
390. mMmt*n ' » '-^m^---^DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN all Thes^ nations surp
391. ^^1 'i'tii I 'ill; but as i-egai-ded Religion they were debased and degraded as has I
392. ord they had distinguished men in every art and science, and yet they were profound
393. had distinguished men in every art and science, and yet they were profoundly ignoraiit
394. t they were profoundly ignoraiit of the nature of the Divinity. And it is worthy of no
395. st absurd of all, was not only the most universal, but also the most deeply-rooted, and t
396. eep and constant meditation, attained a knowledge of the unity of God, but they never pub
397. n, attained a knowledge of the unity of God, but they never publicly inculcated the
398. t come to the assistance of reason, and God himself spoken to man to malce knovi^n
399. ce of reason, and God himself spoken to man to malce knovi^n what he is, and in wha
400. ovi^n what he is, and in what manner He will be honourourselves should have been plu
401. r knew. We ; ii :'iU Example. Epictetus being asked what God is, replied " If I were
402. 'iU Example. Epictetus being asked what God is, replied " If I were able to tell yo
403. plied " If I were able to tell you what God really is, God should God be no longer
404. re able to tell you what God really is, God should God be no longer what he is, and
405. tell you what God really is, God should God be no longer what he is, and I myself s
406. nger what he is, and I myself should be God. '' alone can explain what he is, and t
407. self — ARTICLE V \t i'(' / believe in God, GOD. G
408. in God, GOD. God is so great, and our mind is so li
409. d, GOD. God is so great, and our mind is so limited
410. CTIONS OF GOD. God is so great, and our mind is so limited, that it ti impossible fo
411. nd by that of reason. Nevojtheless that knowledge, imperfect though it be, We : TOWARDS 0
412. t be, We : TOWARDS 000. suffices for 29 man in this life. Nothing gives us a grande
413. OWARDS 000. suffices for 29 man in this life. Nothing gives us a grander than that w
414. hat which he himself tells us "I am who idea of God AM," that is to say the Being of
415. h he himself tells us "I am who idea of God AM," that is to say the Being of beir.g
416. who idea of God AM," that is to say the Being of beir.g^the principle of From this it
417. that is to say the Being of beir.g^the principle of From this it all which exists, and o
418. , and on whom all depends. follows that God is possessed of everv oerfection, and t
419. e intelligence, hanng neither body, nor form, nor colour. God resembles nothing of a
420. nng neither body, nor form, nor colour. God resembles nothing of all that surrounds
421. at we touch is material, in the highest God is and a being infinitely perfect is no
422. s material, in the highest God is and a being infinitely perfect is not material. The
423. ies are limited and imperfect: those of God embrace all things. He existed before a
424. ll things, for He has he was before all time he never had a beginBefore the birth of
425. ing, and shall never have an end. ages, God existed of himself, and he existed alon
426. isted of himself, and he existed alone. God is All-powerfid. He can do all, whatsoe
427. -powerfid. He can do all, whatsoever he will by his word alone he has drawn all crea
428. nothing, and He might create a thousand other worlds if he judged it necessary. " He
429. hey did exist, do they obey His voice." God is eternal. ; made all — To Him 'epli
430. l. ; made all — To Him 'eplied should God If then nothing is impossible, and noth
431. difficult globes are suspended in empty space without other support or stay than his
432. es are suspended in empty space without other support or stay than his will the sea o
433. without other support or stay than his will the sea obeys his orders, and never ove
434. verflows its prescribed bounds, and all nature observes the laws which He has laid dow
435. of >entire The celestial ; ; ; iiatute. God is independent. The principle of all th
436. ; ; ; iiatute. God is independent. The principle of all that exists, hft holds from no o
437. e of all that exists, hft holds from no other being than himself. The inexhaustible s
438. ll that exists, hft holds from no other being than himself. The inexhaustible source
439. an himself. The inexhaustible source of wealth, he distributes it^t his pleasure to wh
440. urce of wealth, he distributes it^t his pleasure to whomsoever he pleases supremely happ
441. supremely happy, he has need of no onc^ being sufficient for himself, and being Jie a
442. onc^ being sufficient for himself, and being Jie absolute mastef of all things, he h
443. or. For our ; DUTY OF TUB CHBISTIAN we It is God. are cont
444. selves, DUTY OF TUB CHBISTIAN we It is God. are continually and universally depend
445. ut his assistance, we could do nothing. God is immutable. What he is, he has ever b
446. he himself, " and fihall be for ever. I change not" Man is never in a fixed and perman
447. " and fihall be for ever. I change not" Man is never in a fixed and permanent condi
448. xed and permanent condition ; his body, being subject to the revolutions of the diffe
449. revolutions of the different stages of life, passes successively from strength to w
450. weakness, from health to sickness, from life to death ; bin will changes, either thr
451. , from health to sickness, from life to death ; bin will changes, either through fick
452. h to sickness, from life to death ; bin will changes, either through fickleness, or
453. ecause he finds a reason for seeking at one time that which he had before neglected
454. se he finds a reason for seeking at one time that which he had before neglected ; bu
455. which he had before neglected ; but in God there is neither change nor even the ri
456. neglected ; but in God there is neither change nor even the riiadow of change. God is
457. neither change nor even the riiadow of change. God is infinite, that is to say that h
458. change nor even the riiadow of change. God is infinite, that is to say that his es
459. ery perfection is infinite. In his very nature he is supremely perfect. Thus God is no
460. ry nature he is supremely perfect. Thus God is not only good, but iiifitiitc'ly goo
461. supremely perfect. Thus God is not only good, but iiifitiitc'ly good he is not only
462. God is not only good, but iiifitiitc'ly good he is not only just, but infinitely jus
463. but infinitely just and ^o with all the other perfections us nothing has had power tf
464. , and He exists in all things, or gives life and motion unto all. rather all things
465. create another, and if He did, that new world would still be within the limits of His
466. at we are continually under the eyes of God He hears all our words. He sees all our
467. es and the darkest night is to Him llie same as the brightest day. The proof of this
468. hes of our own conscience. la vais is ; God — : ; — :ff. TOWARDS GOD. ideiit ot
469. vais is ; God — : ; — :ff. TOWARDS GOD. ideiit ott ^1 without ind with- and el
470. ore even the and his erfection, f f! ry nature good, but ust; and | ad power t be prea
471. n the and his erfection, f f! ry nature good, but ust; and | ad power t be prearth,
472. away from his own thoughts, fearful of being overwhelmed with shame before a judge w
473. etest it. Let us then never forget that God is always with us, and that we are neve
474. ns. I'his thought shall remove us fr<5m evil, for the enemy of our enlvation shall b
475. in the remeinl)rance of the presence of God. And how could we dare to coinaiit sin
476. God. And how could we dare to coinaiit sin iiiuler His eye? Could we have the bold
477. ve to his son: "My son," said he, "have God in your mind all the days of your life.
478. n: "My son," said he, "have God in your mind all the days of your life." It is also
479. e God in your mind all the days of your life." It is also the advice of St. Augus" I
480. is also the advice of St. Augus" If any one would tempt you to sin," says that grea
481. t. Augus" If any one would tempt you to sin," says that great tine * Go and find fo
482. , "make him this oeply me a place where God cannot see me but if there be no spot w
483. see me but if there be no spot wherein God is not present, then tempt me no more,
484. im before His face." That on© thought, God sees mc will support us against the att
485. s face." That on© thought, God sees mc will support us against the attacks of the d
486. us against the attacks of the devil, it will give us strength to surmount them, and
487. us to fulfil our duties with fidelity. God governs all things, He cares for all cr
488. led providence. Nothing happens in this world without His order, or His permission. T
489. wills. He commands. He rewards it. The evil does not happen by the order of God, on
490. he evil does not happen by the order of God, on the contrary He forbids il, and pun
491. neither does He prevent it, because He will not restrain man's will, which He has l
492. revent it, because He will not restrain man's will, which He has left free, and bec
493. it, because He will not restrain man's will, which He has left free, and because He
494. d because He is powerful enough to draw good do€& the sinner try to stifle : ; hi
495. m : 'tmnn. .<«»i./#.i ^ 26 even fron. evil. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN to iii 'le Hi; L
496. mnn. .<«»i./#.i ^ 26 even fron. evil. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN to iii 'le Hi; Let us
497. le Hi; Let us never suppose, then, that God givfMi chance the creatures whom he has
498. us never suppose, then, that God givfMi chance the creatures whom he has made since he
499. sparrow falls to the ground without the knowledge of your heavenly Father: yea, even the
500. theless we are not to imagine that this universal care and attention are any trouble to G
501. l care and attention are any trouble to God, or in the least All is equally easy to
502. only occupies himself finite power and wisdom. with great affairs, without stooping t
503. without neglecting the greater: but the wisdom of God, being infinite, embraces all wi
504. glecting the greater: but the wisdom of God, being infinite, embraces all without a
505. ing the greater: but the wisdom of God, being infinite, embraces all without any trou
506. uble or the slightest effort. From this principle " There is a providence," springs a The
507. he first is, that he submit himtwo-fold duty for man. self without reserve to the gu
508. is, that he submit himtwo-fold duty for man. self without reserve to the guidance o
509. at providence we are to adore it in the evil which befallr^ us as well as in : the g
510. l which befallr^ us as well as in : the good — in adversity as well ap in prosperi
511. ickness and ?n joy. We ought at those " God wills it, and He wills it only for my t
512. nd He wills it only for my times to say good may His holy name be blissed !" If He s
513. !" If He sometimes permits the virtuous man to suffer and to be in want, whilsl the
514. st, so that he may magnificently in the other life, and because he knows that this pa
515. that he may magnificently in the other life, and because he knows that this passing
516. he knows that this passing aflfliction will aid in securing his eternal salvation.
517. uring his eternal salvation. The second duty is to confide in providence, and to loo
518. , and to look solely to the goodness of God for all that is necesLary to us, both f
519. that is necesLary to us, both for this life and the other he wishes to put his virt
520. sLary to us, both for this life and the other he wishes to put his virtue to the rewa
521. life and the other he wishes to put his virtue to the reward it .r mffFttnlM'^' '•m-
522. r mffFttnlM'^' '•m-- >"%: : : TOWARDS GOD. ; 27 Ai God givf*8 ince he hag 'himsel
523. ' '•m-- >"%: : : TOWARDS GOD. ; 27 Ai God givf*8 ince he hag 'himself to gdoms an
524. e air," says our Lord, " .hey sow it is God himself who provides uot, neither do th
525. ayed in all his glory, was not equal If God thus clothes the grass of the field, to
526. thus clothes the grass of the field, to one of them. how much more will he care for
527. he field, to one of them. how much more will he care for you who are his children ?"
528. rovidence in all that happens to us our fate cannot be in better hands; and never wi
529. te cannot be in better hands; and never will so good a Father abandon the children w
530. t be in better hands; and never will so good a Father abandon the children who confi
531. his watchful care. ; — i ".1 : r, is universal n the least >ies II easy to inhimself t
532. himself the minor ving but a to smaller wisdom of uble or the springs a jbmit himirovi
533. cited by two infamous old men to commit sin. The holy woman blushing at their shame
534. way I turn I am embarrassed if, on the one hand, I consent to gratify your base pa
535. ur base passion, I shall not escape the judgment of that God who sees us all for He is m
536. I shall not escape the judgment of that God who sees us all for He is my judge and
537. to commit so vile an action. If, on the other hand, I consent not to your desire, I s
538. n the other hand, I consent not to your desire, I shall not escape your revenge, and I
539. our revenge, and I see plainly that you will speedily procure my death. But I fear G
540. ainly that you will speedily procure my death. But I fear God, and so would rather un
541. l speedily procure my death. But I fear God, and so would rather undergo every torm
542. e, and thus fall i.ito the hands of His justice." The consequence was that she was cond
543. nsequence was that she was condemned to death on the false charges brought against he
544. he curing his 3 wretched old men ; but God knew how to testify the innocence of Hi
545. vant, and the two old men suffered that death to which their unholy vengeance would h
546. er whom they could not seduce to commit sin. This heroic firmness of Susanna was th
547. ontinual remembrance of the presence of God. Certain flatterers were extolling the
548. as comlug in, and commanded the furious element to respect his 111 in provi- od for all
549. espect his 111 in provi- od for all the other nw ^VPPI z " < «j*4; .««:#., 28 powe
550. ^VPPI z " < «j*4; .««:#., 28 power. DUTY or THE CnRISTIAN Of Lib courtiers cours
551. comes from Him who is the source of all good. If I am pursued and persecuted by Saul
552. m pursued and persecuted by Saul, it is God who hath willed it. If I am expelled fr
553. y capital by Absalom, my own son, it is God who has willed it." : t> < M. de Chanta
554. aunched above before it left thy hand." Life of St. Jane de Chantal. Madame •* The
555. of Turenne, said thai killed that great man was loaded from eternity." That thought
556. i killed that great man was loaded from eternity." That thought is as true as it is ener
557. i^iiy ARTICLE VL / iij'i^i. believe in God, ^c, 6fC, THE MYSTERY OF THE HOLY TRINI
558. E MYSTERY OF THE HOLY TRINITY. Although God is substantially but one, there are nev
559. NITY. Although God is substantially but one, there are never- God the Father, the S
560. substantially but one, there are never- God the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost
561. ystery of the most Holy Trinity. It was God himself who revealed this mystery in a
562. s three persons in fiiil — Him in the form of a dove. it, Jesus Christ has also ma
563. our faith, and there none of which our religion so often reminds us. All our prayers be
564. invocation of the Holy Trinity, and the sign of the cross which recurs so often in t
565. of the Holy Ghost. Although the divine nature then is o?ie and indivisible, the three
566. h it is composed are entirely distinct, one from the other the Son is the same God
567. sed are entirely distinct, one from the other the Son is the same God as the Father b
568. inct, one from the other the Son is the same God as the Father but not the same pers
569. one from the other the Son is the same God as the Father but not the same person,
570. the same God as the Father but not the same person, and the Holy Ghost, although he
571. the Holy Ghost, although he h also the same God as the Father and the Son, is yel e
572. Holy Ghost, although he h also the same God as the Father and the Son, is yel equal
573. ee persons are not three Gods, but only one, because they have but one and the same
574. ds, but only one, because they have but one and the same divinity; thence it follow
575. one, because they have but one and the same divinity; thence it follows that the th
576. e others, since they have all three the same greatness, the same power, the same ete
577. have all three the same greatness, the same power, the same eternity. Tliis mystery
578. the same greatness, the same power, the same eternity. Tliis mystery, that is to say
579. ame greatness, the same power, the same eternity. Tliis mystery, that is to say, this in
580. , that is to say, this incomprehensible truth, is beyond the reach of our understandi
581. n, for we say not " Three Gods make but one God" but only "Three persons forming bu
582. or we say not " Three Gods make but one God" but only "Three persons forming but on
583. od" but only "Three persons forming but one God." Neither are we to figure to ourse
584. but only "Three persons forming but one God." Neither are we to figure to ourselves
585. ourselves three persons having body and soul like unto us, for the three persons of
586. he Son, begotten of the Father from all eternity, and the third is the Holy Ghost who pr
587. s is the sum of all that it has pleased God to make known to us of the mystery of t
588. ity a mystery so sublime that the human mind could never comprehend it but God, who
589. uman mind could never comprehend it but God, who is truth itself, and who can neith
590. uld never comprehend it but God, who is truth itself, and who can neither deceive nor
591. — : — .wmdr.:%^^^ 'f'tt(,. lif * 90 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN and stru !:;. .i Nothi
592. d submit our reason to the authority of God. It is not merely in things which relat
593. is not merely in things which relate to God that our reason is at fault, for even i
594. t fault, for even in natural things how many are there that we cannot understand, ye
595. ost delicious fla vour, with a thousand other phenomena which natuie every day presen
596. ldren, they believe it on the word of a man in whom they have confidence. When the
597. in whom they have confidence. When the nature of God is in question, all men are but
598. hey have confidence. When the nature of God is in question, all men are but as chil
599. all men are but as children. They shall one day attain the fullness of mature age t
600. ruit of piety to contemplate it, in the other life, is the sovereign ; ; felicity." T
601. f piety to contemplate it, in the other life, is the sovereign ; ; felicity." The so
602. fe, is the sovereign ; ; felicity." The soul of man is a magnificent image and refle
603. he sovereign ; ; felicity." The soul of man is a magnificent image and reflex of th
604. of the Trinity like the Father, it has being ; like the Son, it : il'V and like the
605. : il'V and like the Holy Spirit, it has love. Like the Father, the Son, and the Holy
606. Son, and the Holy Ghost, it has in its being, its intelligence, and its love, one an
607. in its being, its intelligence, and its love, one and the same happiness, has intell
608. being, its intelligence, and its love, one and the same happiness, has intelligenc
609. intelligence, and its love, one and the same happiness, has intelligence — one and
610. ligence, and its love, one and the same happiness, has intelligence — one and the same
611. he same happiness, has intelligence — one and the same all Nothing can be taken f
612. iness, has intelligence — one and the same all Nothing can be taken frorri it unle
613. l Nothing can be taken frorri it unless life. be taken. Perfect in its being, its in
614. t unless life. be taken. Perfect in its being, its intelligr;nce, and its love, it un
615. n its being, its intelligr;nce, and its love, it understands all that it is, it love
616. it loves all tliat it understands, its being and its operations are insepai «ble ha
617. it can only preserve and secure its own happiness. • •U' Example. Two men who were bl
618. n who were blind from their birth, were one day conversing: one of the two was igno
619. m their birth, were one day conversing: one of the two was ignorant — r.-) WARDS
620. Q t should merely and impious, but the other was both pious and well structed : faul
621. ed : fault, for ? cannot of The impious man said " I should like to know what was G
622. n said " I should like to know what was God doing for all eternity, before he creat
623. like to know what was God doing for all eternity, before he created the world?" The othe
624. for all eternity, before he created the world?" The other replied: "That is just as4d
625. nity, before he created the world?" The other replied: "That is just as4dle a quesyou
626. eplied: "That is just as4dle a quesyou. God was occupied with himself, and it might
627. nking of creating a hell for the future punishment of those who would not believe in him,
628. rve him." there can be three persons in God, each of the three being God, although
629. three persons in God, each of the three being God, although there is but one God ? Tr
630. persons in God, each of the three being God, although there is but one God ? Truly
631. three being God, although there is but one God ? Truly it is a strange thing, and
632. ee being God, although there is but one God ? Truly it is a strange thing, and I th
633. ruly it is a strange thing, and I think one is very foolish to believe what they "
634. o not understand !" " that there is but one God, in three really distinct other, pe
635. t understand !" " that there is but one God, in three really distinct other, person
636. s but one God, in three really distinct other, persons, each of whom is God, and in b
637. istinct other, persons, each of whom is God, and in believing thus, I act not as a
638. not as a fool, assuredly, but as a wise man should !" " Prove that to me," cried th
639. " Prove that to me," cried the godless man, " and I will make you tion as before I
640. to me," cried the godless man, " and I will make you tion as before I if I Mi • *
641. of ey 3 shall my stick which is a very good one, and a very handsome one, too." And
642. y 3 shall my stick which is a very good one, and a very handsome one, too." And pra
643. is a very good one, and a very handsome one, too." And pray how do you know that yo
644. ur stick is handsome ? What can a blind man know of a present of beauty shades clea
645. at can a blind man know of a present of beauty shades clearly ? 1. "To Auof ••i, S
646. )ve reign sflex ) of Son, it 3. Like ts being, unlesi its ppiuess, it and ; under-
647. ainly not," was the reply, " we have so many reasons for believing it all men who ar
648. lours, and we believe them, but it is a God who has revealed to us the mysteries of
649. of which we spoke just now, and yet we will not believe him Have we not much more r
650. nce of the Holy Trinity, and in all the other mysteries, than in the existence of col
651. he existence of colours ? The Christian religion, which teaches us all the mysteries ot
652. learn them of her If we believe during life, and die as Christians should, we shall
653. l be no longer blind. Then we shall see God face to face and as he We — ! !654. !DUTY OF TUB CHRISTIAN ARTICLE 4 ! i VII. / b
655. RISTIAN ARTICLE 4 ! i VII. / believe in God, the Father AlmigJUyf Cre656. n and Earth. OP THE CREATION. ti ' This world whicn we here behold, has not alwayi an
657. and this fact is sufficiently manifest, being proved in various ways. In going back t
658. ires. There is no monument, no fact, no history to tell us tiiat the world had previous
659. o fact, no history to tell us tiiat the world had previously existed. The book which
660. ccistod, — refers the creation of the world to that precise date is itself most anc
661. most ancient of all books, and like all other portions of the Bible, it is the most a
662. t word of that book is In the beginning God created the Jieavens and the earth, tha
663. ay, that he made all things of nothing. God had existed of himself, and nothing exi
664. ed them solely by his word and by his " God spoke" says the Scripture, " and all wa
665. ays the Scripture, " and all was made , will. he commandedy and the universe was cre
666. the universe was created" The voice of God is no other than his Almighty will. Let
667. rse was created" The voice of God is no other than his Almighty will. Let us transpor
668. ce of God is no other than his Almighty will. Let us transport ourselves in spirit t
669. ut any restraint, in whatever way seems good to him. God employed On the first the s
670. int, in whatever way seems good to him. God employed On the first the sea. He uas m
671. the sea. He uas made." of majesty! day, God created the heavens, the earth, and the
672. ll, is, that each plant received at the same time the power to re-produce itself by
673. s, that each plant received at the same time the power to re-produce itself by the s
674. d which it contains. On thf fourth day, God created the sun and the moon, and adorn
675. ich strikes the eye and astonishes tlie mind. The fifth day, He created the fishes a
676. ring forth the creeping creature having life, and the fowl that may fiy over the ear
677. ce nt of the not have On the sixth day, God created the animals *' Let the earth br
678. for fulfilling their destiny. irth, and being formed, God Finally, resolved to give a
679. their destiny. irth, and being formed, God Finally, resolved to give all the other
680. , God Finally, resolved to give all the other creatures them a master, and He the lig
681. and He the light then created the first man whom He named Adam. can be nothing more
682. phers be a t .^mmt.mmuki iiKr' -w.r' 34 world. buted DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN '"JiT thou
683. .^mmt.mmuki iiKr' -w.r' 34 world. buted DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN '"JiT thought the worl
684. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN '"JiT thought the world eternal others have attri* formation to
685. living, attributed the creation of the world and even the liberty of man to the acci
686. the creation of the world and even the liberty of man to the accidental meeting of ato
687. on of the world and even the liberty of man to the accidental meeting of atoms. Thi
688. f Lucretius, is a disgrace to the human mind. According to Thales, the origin of all
689. Heraclitus believed it to be from fire. One philosopher pretended that man was born
690. om fire. One philosopher pretended that man was born of the foam of the sea, heated
691. ther, that he came of the oyster, which being matured, became a fish, the fish became
692. e a fish, the fish became an amphibious animal, which in ita turn became a quadruped,
693. ame an ape, and the ape, in its perfect state, became a man. , Some its ; .$ ; iF:' T
694. the ape, in its perfect state, became a man. , Some its ; .$ ; iF:' Thomas CHAPTER
695. Thomas CHAPTER II. OF THE ANGELS AND OF MAN. The angels and man are the most perfec
696. F THE ANGELS AND OF MAN. The angels and man are the most perfect creatures whom God
697. man are the most perfect creatures whom God has created, because they alone are gif
698. ieved that they were created ^'\-M when God said : " Let light be made" the opinion
699. hen God said : " Let light be made" the opinion of St. Augustin. " God made the angeli
700. be made" the opinion of St. Augustin. " God made the angeli in heaven,*' says the H
701. lessed spirits were sent as deputies to man Gabriel was sent to Zacharias and to th
702. HOMAS Jacob, Gideon, Moses, and several other personages of the Old Testament were fa
703. e with which they execute the orders of God. All the angels were created free, cons
704. have remained faithful and merited the happiness for which they were destined but the fi
705. er y because of the radiance with which God had adorned him, chose to forget all th
706. , crying, " Who is like ; v>i I 1^ unto God?" Who shall be is like unto him res i^i
707. ecipitated into hell, tormented for all eternity. la c>Tder that we may have an opportun
708. may have an opportunity of proving our love for him, and of earning a greater rewar
709. r him, and of earning a greater reward, God permits us to be tempted b}' these spir
710. rits of darkness hut he gives us at the same time the graces which may enable us to
711. of darkness hut he gives us at the same time the graces which may enable us to resis
712. y the merits of Christ's sufferings and death. The angels who remained faithful were
713. he joy of the Lord, to bo blest for all eternity, in the contemplation of his adorable p
714. ed writings, that the occupation of ; ; DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN the angois their aid.
715. STIAN the angois their aid. is to adore God and sing his praises ; also, to present
716. f, that even Sds. le smallest child has one of these heavenly spirits lo guard and
717. ld us from the malignant attacks of the angel of aarkness ; that we have in him a tru
718. s of respect, gratitude, confidence and love Will it not induce us to be docile to t
719. respect, gratitude, confidence and love Will it not induce us to be docile to their
720. nd to imitate them in their fidelity to God !" '"it !!' return of the Jews from cap
721. a considerable sum which he had lent to one of his relations, named Gabelus, advise
722. to conduct him to Ecbatana, where this relation lived. The young Tobias having gone out
723. ntered the archangel Raphael, under the form of a wayfaring young man, who immediate
724. el, under the form of a wayfaring young man, who immediately offered to be his guid
725. heavenly conductor informed Tobias that God willed him to espouse Sarah, the daught
726. espouse Sarah, the daughter of Raguel, one of hia own relatives. On hearing this,
727. n relatives. On hearing this, the young man was struck with fear, remembering that
728. ng that Sarah had already been tlie The angel rewife of seven husbands, who were all
729. assured him, however, promising that no evil should befall him if he would only take
730. ias faiththe holy Example. —After the man fiiUy did. Gabelus, being invited to th
731. e. —After the man fiiUy did. Gabelus, being invited to the wedding, brought with hi
732. wedding, brought with him iij : TOWARDS GOD. s; also, to SI "^i ^ho invoke ese bles
733. out to retrace their way to Palestine. Being returned to the paternal house, the you
734. paternal house, the young Tobias adored God, according as he had been admonished by
735. ereupon the holy his iifi for us to old man was instantly restored to sight. !, It
736. sight. !, It ;or sent by le our safety, angel of is faithful, guide, w^ho in the way
737. he had thus fulfilled his mission, the angel made himself known, saying to the elder
738. on's M'ife, from the devih For I am the angel Raphael, one of the seven who stand bef
739. m the devih For I am the angel Raphael, one of the seven who stand before the Lord,
740. ore the Lord, ever ready to execute his will. When you prayed and wept, and when you
741. g the dead, 1 presented your prayers to God, and he was pleased to receive them fav
742. ceive them favourably therefore, and be cause you were pleasing to God, it was necess
743. fore, and be cause you were pleasing to God, it was necessary that yon should be tr
744. be tried by sufl^Bring." He then said " Peace be with you!" and disappeared. These se
745. vity, end, and sum which us, ARTICLE OP MAN. In order to distinguish tures, n. the
746. . In order to distinguish tures, n. the other visible crea- m advised Ecbatana, iving
747. crea- m advised Ecbatana, iving 1 gone man from Raphael, God seemed to re-collect
748. cbatana, iving 1 gone man from Raphael, God seemed to re-collect himself before cre
749. g hira (imediately Bar Rages, od willed one of hia A^as struck been tlie angel re)u
750. willed one of hia A^as struck been tlie angel re)uld befall bias faith- t with him "
751. ll bias faith- t with him " Let us make man" said " to our ovm image and likehe, ne
752. then he infused into him an intelligent soul, capable of loving, willing and thinkin
753. ing and thinking and it is in this that man roBembles God, and is capable of posses
754. ng and it is in this that man roBembles God, and is capable of possessing him for a
755. nd is capable of possessing him for all eternity, if he render himself worthy of that ha
756. ty, if he render himself worthy of that happiness by the practice of those virtues marked
757. him. It became necessary for the first man to have a companion she was taken from
758. re — : -awC'-*J»«a^„ H4' if 36 to DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN I form but one and the
759. H4' if 36 to DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN I form but one and the same family, loving eac
760. 36 to DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN I form but one and the same family, loving each otlier
761. OP THE CHRISTIAN I form but one and the same family, loving each otlier na the child
762. E CHRISTIAN I form but one and the same family, loving each otlier na the children of
763. ier na the children of a common father. Man does not consist of a material body onl
764. onsist of a material body only he has a soul capable of thinking and of loving, a so
765. ul capable of thinking and of loving, a soul whose — ; nature is incorruptible and
766. nking and of loving, a soul whose — ; nature is incorruptible and which is destined
767. visited the neighbouring forests. This animal was highl}? prized by the emperor, who,
768. ing that he might stray away where some one not knowing to whom he belonged, might
769. is neck, with the inscription come from God we me not ; I belong to Ccpsar." belong
770. me not ; I belong to Ccpsar." belong to God we are his property. He has marked us w
771. rty. He has marked us with his seal our soul and its faculties, our body and all our
772. ium of our passions. of the Example. —One Roman in which his people had succeeded
773. hful of the IIL or THE SPIRITUALITY AND IMMORTALITY OP THE SOUL, New Law who ; profess to b
774. THE SPIRITUALITY AND IMMORTALITY OP THE SOUL, New Law who ; profess to believe in th
775. UALITY AND IMMORTALITY OP THE SOUL, New Law who ; profess to believe in the immorta
776. New Law who ; profess to believe in the immortality of the pouI for the patriarchs and prop
777. that belief the motive of all actions. God their The great men of antiquity, Plato
778. by some traditional remembrances, that death is not the otid of all man's nature, bu
779. nces, that death is not the otid of all man's nature, but that he stil! survives to
780. that death is not the otid of all man's nature, but that he stil! survives to himself,
781. of the two substances the body and the soul, which constitute — his being. And in
782. and the soul, which constitute — his being. And in fact, we can no more doubt that
783. in fact, we can no more doubt that our nature is tomposed of two substances, than we
784. nces, than we ran doubt our owb TOWARDS GOD. ch other as existence, for, 39 he has
785. an we ran doubt our owb TOWARDS GOD. ch other as existence, for, 39 he has soul whose
786. . ch other as existence, for, 39 he has soul whose ly ; live forevor had a stag ! wa
787. s capable of such an endless variety of knowledge and But the doctrine of the of sentimen
788. the of sentiments cannot be nifvterial. soul's immortality rests not on simple conje
789. sentiments cannot be nifvterial. soul's immortality rests not on simple conjecture, nor on
790. general coii« viction of mankind, the idea which God has given us of his goodness,
791. ii« viction of mankind, the idea which God has given us of his goodness, of his po
792. his goodness, of his power, and of his justice these are the m Vi — : i y ->•' ; w
793. y e belonged, ^d a golden n " Touch : 1 God —we the marked us ody and all jet us
794. soui;,. kvho profess 3 patriarchs true God of all their Aristotle, jy the light an
795. al stroke, ation of the constitute r )t nature is our owB foundations of a truth as co
796. r )t nature is our owB foundations of a truth as consoling for the good, as it is dre
797. dations of a truth as consoling for the good, as it is dreadful for the M'icked. Aft
798. is dreadful for the M'icked. After his sin, man was condemned to death, and his bo
799. readful for the M'icked. After his sin, man was condemned to death, and his body wa
800. ed. After his sin, man was condemned to death, and his body was to return to the dust
801. the dust whence it was taken but if his soul were to perish with his body if that pr
802. ul were to perish with his body if that principle of life emanating from the Creator was
803. rish with his body if that principle of life emanating from the Creator was to be an
804. and unmeaning. So the dogma of a future life, and the consequent immortality of the
805. ma of a future life, and the consequent immortality of the soul was always one of the funda
806. , and the consequent immortality of the soul was always one of the fundamental artic
807. uent immortality of the soul was always one of the fundamental articles of the prim
808. e fundamental articles of the primitive religion, it was the joy and hope of our first p
809. oy and hope of our first parents, as it will also be ours if we faithfully observe t
810. f of a future existence and that of the immortality of tlie soul, has been generally receiv
811. nce and that of the immortality of tlie soul, has been generally received by all the
812. ally received by all the nations of the world; idolatry, far from destroying it, had
813. very abuse of that belief which formed one of the sources of idolatry for the apot
814. or the apotheosis of great men, and the custom of paying them divine honours after the
815. paying them divine honours after their death would never have been established, if t
816. established, if they had believed that death ended all both soul and body. In creati
817. had believed that death ended all both soul and body. In creating a being of such v
818. d all both soul and body. In creating a being of such vast capacity as our soul, God
819. ng a being of such vast capacity as our soul, God could have had no other part than
820. eing of such vast capacity as our soul, God could have had no other part than that
821. city as our soul, God could have had no other part than that of rendering it happy in
822. hing worthy of it, and of its works. Is happiness to be found in this world ? Is the most
823. works. Is happiness to be found in this world ? Is the most vbiLjoaa .uan always? the
824. ys? the happiest? Alas! we see by daily experience that the cjntrary is the case. The divi
825. at the cjntrary is the case. The divine justice is yet another proof of the immortality
826. ine justice is yet another proof of the immortality of the sonl: often do we see in this wo
827. ty of the sonl: often do we see in this world, vice triumphant, and virtue humbled to
828. he sonl: often do we see in this world, vice triumphant, and virtue humbled to the l
829. see in this world, vice triumphant, and virtue humbled to the lowest pitch the impious
830. hat order should be re established that vice should be punish* ^H — ; ri — & —
831. t how would that order he estab- ed and virtue rewarded. divine justice exercise ? its
832. e estab- ed and virtue rewarded. divine justice exercise ? its rights, if llie som were
833. f llie som were not immortal ; f! El It will perhaps be said that remorse is the pun
834. ill perhaps be said that remorse is the punishment of crime but what would remorse be with
835. de that to deny the spirituality of the soul, and ts consequent immortality, is to f
836. ituality of the soul, and ts consequent immortality, is to falsify not only the belief and
837. to falsify not only the belief and the opinion of all nations, but even reason and com
838. son and common I I ^ right the ti or an sense. ' 4 W 'M >*•, ages and by almost all
839. all nations, it pursues him go where he will, and rends his very heart, notwithstand
840. s to his passions, makes him dread that eternity from which he has nothing good to expec
841. that eternity from which he has nothing good to expect; he would fain not he doubts,
842. thought of the future betrays h guilty soul. arises before the unbelieving," says Y
843. y tremble they doubt and believe." This truth, professed in all is, doubtless, a fear
844. ofessed in all is, doubtless, a fearful truth for the impious ; — — — on the co
845. and afflicit is, moreover, his hope for eternity. tions of the present life just, The
846. hope for eternity. tions of the present life just, The — m [;.''i^in Some hours be
847. e — m [;.''i^in Some hours before his death, Bemardme de author of The Studies of N
848. h, Bemardme de author of The Studies of Nature, seeing his children weeping around his
849. l that I am quitting the earth, but not life. my beloved ones shun evil do good live
850. rth, but not life. my beloved ones shun evil do good live as Christians and wo shall
851. not life. my beloved ones shun evil do good live as Christians and wo shall one day
852. do good live as Christians and wo shall one day meet again." Example. Pierre, St.
853. ARTICLE K IV. SIAN. THE FALL OF When man was gifts, just, holy, forth from the h
854. his Creator, he happy, and adorned with many excellent his mind being also illumined
855. py, and adorned with many excellent his mind being also illumined with a divine ligh
856. nd adorned with many excellent his mind being also illumined with a divine light, re*
857. ivine light, re* came iii — ; TOWARDS GOD dcr be cstabs, if 41 veaimg to him all
858. tho soui misli merit of I? We m:iv the soul, ily and the belief and it common natio
859. ations, all pursues him withstanding se eternity which he from )uld fain not , but canno
860. k that strenrjfih igs and afflic- B for eternity. lemardnie de 3, S9eing his these ;o tl
861. S Christians masters were required. His will was right, and without any tendency to
862. was right, and without any tendency to evil; nothing disturbed the trancjuillity of
863. hing disturbed the trancjuillity of his soul his body was not subject to pain, or an
864. of his soul his body was not subject to pain, or any inconvenience, and he was not d
865. ed to die. Nevertheless, the majesty of God required of man the devotion of his hea
866. theless, the majesty of God required of man the devotion of his heart, and proofs o
867. evotion of his heart, and proofs of his love and of his obedience hence it was that
868. trial paradise, he forbade him to touch one particular fruit, giving liim, however,
869. l paradise, he forbade him to touch one particular fruit, giving liim, however, the use of
870. owever, the use of all the others. This one commandment^ so easy to be observed, es
871. easy to be observed, especially at that time when man was still innocent, and had no
872. observed, especially at that time when man was still innocent, and had no leaning
873. ll innocent, and had no leaning towards evil, being on the contrary, rather inclined
874. ocent, and had no leaning towards evil, being on the contrary, rather inclined to goo
875. ing on the contrary, rather inclined to good, was accompanied by the most fearful me
876. thing less, indeed, than the penalty of death. But notwithstanding all the favours wh
877. he favours which they had received from God, and disregarding his threats, the woma
878. seduced by the devil, who had taken the form of a serj^ent and having herself eaten
879. and they lost all the advantages which God had given them at their creation. Their
880. uls were overspread with darkness their will became perverse; passion obscured the l
881. inations became ^^orrupt and tending to evil. iln losing their innocence, and separa
882. n, while their bodies became subject to pain, sickness and death. The fiightful cons
883. es became subject to pain, sickness and death. The fiightful consequences of the sin
884. eath. The fiightful consequences of the sin of Adam have passed to all his descenda
885. o all his descendants, because that his sin has itself fallen on all men, who are d
886. descended from him. When lie disobeyed God, he destroyed himself, and with himself
887. iss. All have sinned, through the first man, and all have disneltner books, nor : :
888. £';] t oI>eyed in s him ; so that his sin, transfer. 9d to us, makes us Creator,
889. n before our birth. An incomprehensible truth tliis IS, but it is one that religion p
890. omprehensible truth tliis IS, but it is one that religion permits us not. tu doubi.
891. ible truth tliis IS, but it is one that religion permits us not. tu doubi. It Is, in fac
892. luisall guilty, m DUTY OP THE CHRISTIiUf tian religion the dog
893. , m r 3" 42 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIiUf tian religion the dogma to which she entirely refers,
894. which she entirely refers, because that sin, which is the source of all our evils,
895. e of all our evils, is also the primary cause of the need which we had of a Mediator
896. tor and a Saviour, to reconcile us with God, to expiate our It is also one of the s
897. us with God, to expiate our It is also one of the sins, and to redeem us from slav
898. one of the sins, and to redeem us from slavery. — dogmas most clearly set forth in t
899. niquity, io mother had conceived him in sin. The Apostle St. Paul says that by one
900. sin. The Apostle St. Paul says that by one man sin has, entered into the world, an
901. . The Apostle St. Paul says that by one man sin has, entered into the world, and by
902. e Apostle St. Paul says that by one man sin has, entered into the world, and by sin
903. at by one man sin has, entered into the world, and by sin, death and that all men hav
904. sin has, entered into the world, and by sin, death and that all men have thus been
905. as, entered into the world, and by sin, death and that all men have thus been made su
906. ll men have thus been made subject unto death, because through that one man all have
907. ubject unto death, because through that one man all have sinned. We are all born gu
908. ct unto death, because through that one man all have sinned. We are all born guilty
909. children of wrath, and hence Ihat first sin, in which we are born, is called origin
910. inal, or and that his ; /4i transmitted sin. 1 than their The pagan philosophers th
911. pagan philosophers themselves, with no other help own reason, suspected that man mus
912. o other help own reason, suspected that man must be born guilt, under some sort of
913. t of although they could not attain the knowledge of the truth as we know it. It was the
914. y could not attain the knowledge of the truth as we know it. It was the sight of the
915. as we know it. It was the sight of the many miseries which he has to endure from bi
916. to this conclusion. belief of original sin, man is himself a mystery still more in
917. his conclusion. belief of original sin, man is himself a mystery still more incompr
918. meanness so much darkness so earnest a desire for happiness and I — — such profou
919. o much darkness so earnest a desire for happiness and I — — such profound wretchednes
920. h profound wretchedness. He approves of virtue, yet he practises it not he condemns ev
921. ue, yet he practises it not he condemns evil, yet commits it in every possible way.
922. ay. It is only the doctrine of original sin which can explain — away ill: these d
923. d reconcile these contradictions. is in man of goodness and of intelligence comes f
924. goodness and of intelligence comes from God, and is the remnant of our nature as it
925. mes from God, and is the remnant of our nature as it wis first created, like the mould
926. autiful even in 'decay. Ifi^norance and vice are the effects of sin, which has disfi
927. Ifi^norance and vice are the effects of sin, which has disfigfured the fair work of
928. which has disfigfured the fair work of God, and defaced his image so that it can n
929. at there if at all, recognised. Of this same rigorous justice w« behoW an example w
930. all, recognised. Of this same rigorous justice w« behoW an example when a king punish
931. rebellious Aubjeo* by degrading TOWAUnS GOD. refers, beI'ils, L 4 is also .1 Xj)iHt
932. iator our Olio of the pture. IS born in sin. luis. n ill en- it all now 56 tlirougb
933. now 56 tlirougb and hence original, or other help it be born attain the ight of the
934. ays imperfect. The laws diawii of human justice are but the shad'-'/ of tlie laws of Go
935. ce are but the shad'-'/ of tlie laws of God; and though they may assist our faich,
936. impenetrable mystery. (lod has created man, tc render him and all his posterity He
937. rsevered in righteousness, he would his God. have communicated his own happiness to
938. ould his God. have communicated his own happiness to all his offspring and ensured to the
939. s offspring and ensured to them a happy eternity but his disobedience has ruined all, an
940. ruined all, and the consequences of his sin, that is to say, ignorance, concupiscen
941. ignorance, concupiscence, the misery of life, the death of the body and the loss of
942. concupiscence, the misery of life, the death of the body and the loss of the soul, h
943. e death of the body and the loss of the soul, have all fallen upon us. Thus we shoul
944. e been forever shut out from heaven, if God, in his infinite mercy, had not provide
945. —And ; I'itliout the " Where the Lord art thou ?" God called Adam, and said to An
946. tliout the " Where the Lord art thou ?" God called Adam, and said to And he said "
947. ons. itelligence ture as it 3me nobU> d vice are work of I scarcely, example degradi
948. the tree, and I did eat." And the Lord God said to the woman " Why hast thou done
949. ceived me, and I did eat." And the Lord God said to the serpent: "Because thou hast
950. Because thou hast done this thing, thou art cursed among all cattle, and beasts of
951. arth shalt thou eat all the days of thy life. I will put enmities between thee and t
952. lt thou eat all the days of thy life. I will put enmities between thee and the woman
953. her heel" To the woman also he said " I will multiply thy sorrows, and thy conceptio
954. .-'• -$ : v : ^ ,,*»' E i ;' 1 m 44 DUTY OF THR CHRISTIAN ^i r . ,l:-;ii hearken
955. rk thou eat thereof all the days of thy life. Thorns and : j|;'*l and thou shalt eat
956. of which thou was, taken for dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return." ; :
957. i III. BELIEVE IN JESUS CHKIST. ARTICLE Man was pity I. THE PROMISE OF A SAVIOUR. l
958. OF A SAVIOUR. lost without resource, if God had not taken on him he had offended in
959. nd was, therefore, unable to repair his sin, since he could not : offer any satisfa
960. ction atr all equal to the offence. But God, through his own gratuitous mercy, whos
961. are as incomprehensible as those of his justice, even before He pronounced Adam's conde
962. He promised that from the woman should one day spring him who was to crush his hea
963. destroy the power of the demon. In this sense was the promise regarded by our first p
964. away tliai this promise was fulfilled. God had reserved to himself that long inter
965. icit manner. In fact, the promise which God had given to Adam was subsequently conf
966. onsecrated to the worship of Baid the T God. ^ Go forth," ord to him " from thy m\
967. m\ toll slialt riiorns and lalt which I will show thee. I numerous people, and all c
968. people, and all country, unto the land will make of thy descendants a nations shall
969. . seed." The promise was renewed in the same words to Isaac and to Jacob. The latter
970. ator promised from the beginning of the world; he even pointed out the period of that
971. t the period of that great event, when, being on his deathbed, and amiouncing to ins
972. wk^ die tinie of his to be born of the family of Juda, and appearance was indicated w
973. he sceptre, — 'i, 'cy, whose gave his justice, ition, that is to say, the pre-eminenc
974. of Juda. Three hundred years after the death of Jacob, God, wishing to deliver his p
975. hundred years after the death of Jacob, God, wishing to deliver his people from the
976. he power of working miracles. That holy man, having guided the people even to the b
977. d, and feeling himself at the point ©f death, assembled the Hebrews, and renewed to
978. romise of a Liberator mightier than he; one who alone could introduce them into the
979. f which Oanaan was but the figure. Thus God still kept his people in expectation of
980. all others tills was the Saviour of the world, whose doctrine was one hi; new covenan
981. aviour of the world, whose doctrine was one hi; new covenant, before whom Moses 46
982. Tl OF TRK CHRISTIAN day was and of whom God himself say " This ia rny beloved Son h
983. d face to (aco, and deputed to ^ive the law to his people. to enlighten the univers
984. ten the universe, to : — Example. — One day when Daniel was pouring out his Bou
985. ating with fervour for his peo])lej the angel appeared to the Prophet, and instructed
986. to the Prophet, and instructed him, by God's command, as to the time when the Mess
987. ructed him, by God's command, as to the time when the Messiah, whom hfi called the I
988. e Messiah, whom hfi called the Internal Justice, and the Holy of Holies, was to and als
989. nd so long looked for, should be put to death. He told him that God had vouch' safed
990. hould be put to death. He told him that God had vouch' safed to grant him that sign
991. because he was " a ajipear on the earth same Christ, man of desires." Daniel, chap.
992. s " a ajipear on the earth same Christ, man of desires." Daniel, chap. ix. rt With
993. in the darkness and confusion of idol- God was entirely forgotten, and the devil a
994. maintain it, until it seemed as though man* kind was never to emerge from an error
995. from an error so ancient, so uni» But God had resolved to versal, and so firmly b
996. promised Adam, and to recall men to the knowledge of the truth. So great a renovation wa#
997. d to recall men to the knowledge of the truth. So great a renovation wa# to be the wo
998. wa# to be the work of the Messiah^ »nd one of the most sen«ible characteristics o
999. nations he was also to con» vert them. God had not concealed this future blessing
1000.comp ahed, at d ways, several even at a time when seemed incrediuiie. J J TOWARDi OO
1001.e Jews, and that of both, ho would lonu one These prophets were the people, adorers
1002.ut his his |)0O])lej men of his coming. God pointed out all pro|)hets, all the the
1003.nited in the person of the Saviour. his life, He foretold, by hit was circumstances
1004.ces which accompanied his birth, to his death and his resurrection; so that the histo
1005.death and his resurrection; so that the history \viiu!i that ookod for, md vouche was "
1006.s written ere yet he had conie into the world. David, that holy and inspired king, is
1007. David, that holy and inspired king, is one of those who foretold him in the cleare
1008.d secured )n II the pa»> rn served ugh man* it, so uni> isolved to ed Adam, Messia
1009. Lord, and recognizes him as the Son of God; he predicts that all nations shall own
1010.e. He announces his ignominy, his cruel death, and the species of torments which he w
1011., and his robe drawn by lot; but at the same time he declares that he shall not be s
1012. his robe drawn by lot; but at the same time he declares that he shall not be subjec
1013.e father of H future age, the prince of peace, and finally, he styles him Emmanuel. "
1014.; ! i.*l' Messiahi is 5 coming to con» same prophet, " all nations shall bow down b
1015.e blind see, and the dead shall come to life ngain." ; essing fof I a divine s, seve
1016. most abject of men; he calls him " the man of sorrows," laden with infirmities, fo
1017. shall spit upon his DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAW i('^l'i;^^^ t.:| » 8a
1018.s a lamb." The prophet adds that by his death he shall become the head of a numerousp
1019.an this, save in the Gospel the written history of the Saviour ? And yet this predictio
1020.years before the birth of Our Lord. The other prophets foresaw the mystery of the Mes
1021.the Messiah with equal clearness. Thus, one of them predicted that Bethlehem, the s
1022.other predicts that he shall be sold by one of his disciples for thirty pieces of s
1023.ents him to us as a king, though a poor one, he being to enter Jerusalem seated on
1024. to us as a king, though a poor one, he being to enter Jerusalem seated on an ass, ev
1025.Jerusalem seated on an ass, even in the time of his triumph. The prophet Aggeus publ
1026.Wm. mm It •".I'S- coming that prophet being occupied with the captivity of his peop
1027. was suddenly elevated by the spirit of God to higher thoughts, and predicted that
1028.om which mankind was to be freed by the death of Christ deliverance which was to cons
1029.ssion of sins, and the eternal reign of justice. He announced that in the that a new al
1030. alii, last week Christ would be put to death ance was to be confirmed, and the ancie
1031.ient sacrifices : : ; i!«- " After the death of Christ," adds the prophel:, " there
1032.on shall abolished. : ; I'l I : TOWARDS GOD. ed to f 40 exe»* up to be adds numero
1033.eived them, and it would seem as though God had preserved that nation amid the ruin
1034.eserved that nation amid the ruin of so many others that it may render its un; These
1035.nations, his od of jtivity of to to was God i^v'eeks of irs, lus, there from >hrist
1036.oive Land on the Old Testament, and the other on the New the resemblance will be foun
1037.nd the other on the New the resemblance will be found so close that there is no poss
1038.o close that there is no possibility of being mistaken. In the first place there can
1039.ancieii the Pagan writers. and constant opinion in the East that about that timt Judea
1040. forth conquerors who should subjugat " Many tlie entire world." Tacitus relates the
1041. who should subjugat " Many tlie entire world." Tacitus relates the same thing. were
1042.tlie entire world." Tacitus relates the same thing. were persuaded," says that histo
1043.se days Judea was to give rulers to the world." This general expectation was based on
1044.ral expectation was based on the famous prophecy of JacoU who had foretold that the Mess
1045."J m • i' •»: f 50 house of Juda ; DUTY OF THI CHRtSTTAW and also on that of Da
1046. prophecies were taken in their literal sense by the carnal Jews and by the Pagans, w
1047.ed the spiritual dominion of the MesThe prophecy, siah with the sway of a conquering pri
1048.e the nations, and bring them under the law of Jesus Christ. The Gospel points out
1049.the third day, &c. rNM him Example. The knowledge of the true God was still preserved in
1050. him Example. The knowledge of the true God was still preserved in the kingdom of E
1051.e, who was queen of that country at the time of the Apostles, sent one of her oflftc
1052.untry at the time of the Apostles, sent one of her oflftcers with gifts to the temp
1053.when as he journeyed along, reading the prophecy of Isaiah, it pleased the Lord to order
1054.slaughter.** " Thinkest thou," said tbe man of God, " that thou under" How can I,"
1055.er.** " Thinkest thou," said tbe man of God, " that thou under" How can I," said th
1056.t thou readest ? " ficer, " unless some one show me ? " and having inviteu Phillip
1057.o announce to him Jesus Christ, and the necessity of Baptism. The officer reflpcted on wh
1058.e Son of in these words ; : — TOWARDS GOD. 10 51 had fixed our hundred were and b
1059.r hundred were and by the ol* the Mosle prophecy, liecies is that the then descended fro
1060.what had happened, and giving praise to God for the great It is said, and with stro
1061. thus became the Apostle. baptized him. God" They "'•.( 1 the natiotiii / § '- A
1062.ARTICLE )d e, I. was still who was sent one M 4; ERY OF THE INCARNATION. es, lem, a
1063.er rand, )f when it Isaiah, only Son of God, the Word, who existed from all bosom o
1064.far It is not the as to take a body and soul like unto ours. Father who was made man
1065.oul like unto ours. Father who was made man, nor neither is it the Holy Ghost, but
1066.Son, the second person of the Most Holy eternity in the Trinity. The hasten after of the
1067.his mystery was accomplished can by the mind of man, nor expressed in words but this
1068.ery was accomplished can by the mind of man, nor expressed in words but this is wha
1069.e Gospel teaches us concerning When the time appointed by divine wisdom had arrived,
1070.rning When the time appointed by divine wisdom had arrived, ft. in ; The manner % m m
1071. e believed Bed his faith the Son of an angel appeared before the Blessed Virgin he s
1072.st thereto he united a sou), and at the same time was effected thitl indissoluble un
1073.ereto he united a sou), and at the same time was effected thitl indissoluble union o
1074.uble union of the divine with the human nature iu ; ; : i.'i'!/ V, '•» f/ ss LTTY O
1075.ly Son of Ctod the person of the Son of God. became man, without ceasing to be God,
1076.od the person of the Son of God. became man, without ceasing to be God, and thereby
1077. God. became man, without ceasing to be God, and thereby operated the Mystery of th
1078.e Bbssed Virgin is really the Mother of God, having Mary, although conceived and br
1079. although conceived and brought forth a Man-God. she became a mother, still remaine
1080.hough conceived and brought forth a Man-God. she became a mother, still remained a
1081.tlte Holy Ghost. Tnus, Jesus Christ, as man, has no ;ather, and God arranged it so,
1082.esus Christ, as man, has no ;ather, and God arranged it so, that St. Joseph should
1083.r the veil of a chaste marriage; but as God, Jesus Christ has a Father, who begot h
1084.st has a Father, who begot him from all eternity, and whose equal : There is in Jesus Ch
1085.e equal : There is in Jesus Christ only one person, but there is. are in him two di
1086.in him two distinct natures: the divine nature, by which he is God like unto his Fathe
1087.ures: the divine nature, by which he is God like unto his Father, and the human nat
1088.God like unto his Father, and the human nature, by which he is ma n like unto ourselve
1089.sessing all the qualities proper to our nature. Notwithstanding that this mystery is i
1090.nfinitely beyond the reach of the human mind, yet we ought to believe it firmly, bec
1091. we ought to believe it firmly, because God, who is the sovereign truth, has reveal
1092.rmly, because God, who is the sovereign truth, has revealed it to as moreover it is n
1093. although imperfect, may In effect, our soul, which is spiritual and assist our fait
1094. assist our faith. incorruptible in its nature, is united to a material and corruptibl
1095.ces, different as they are, forming but one single man, who is thus at the same tim
1096.ent as they are, forming but one single man, who is thus at the same time spirit an
1097. but one single man, who is thus at the same time spirit and body, incorruptible and
1098.one single man, who is thus at the same time spirit and body, incorruptible and corr
1099. that the divinity of the Word, and the nature of man, united without being confounded
1100.divinity of the Word, and the nature of man, united without being confounded, form
1101., and the nature of man, united without being confounded, form but one single Jesus C
1102.f man, united without being confounded, form but one single Jesus Christ, true God a
1103.ited without being confounded, form but one single Jesus Christ, true God and true
1104. form but one single Jesus Christ, true God and true man, begotten of the Father in
1105. single Jesus Christ, true God and true man, begotten of the Father in eternity, an
1106.and true man, begotten of the Father in eternity, and in time born of a virgin ; as God,
1107.otten of the Father in eternity, and in time born of a virgin ; as God, (Omnipotent,
1108.nity, and in time born of a virgin ; as God, (Omnipotent, and as man surrounded wit
1109. a virgin ; as God, (Omnipotent, and as man surrounded with infirmity for, with the
1110.th infirmity for, with the exception of sin and its insejiarable consequences, igno
1111.sty he was subject to sleep and all the other infirmities of our nature with this dif
1112.ep and all the other infirmities of our nature with this difference only, that ho subm
1113.at ho submitted to them by his own free will and choice, whilst we endure them again
1114.oice, whilst we endure them against our will. But we must not imagine that the divin
1115.But we must not imagine that the divine nature was at all changed by the Incarn* ; ; ;
1116. by the Incarn* ; ; ; .1 tion : TOWARDS GOD. ftS God, without ceasing to be all tha
1117.ncarn* ; ; ; .1 tion : TOWARDS GOD. ftS God, without ceasing to be all that He is o
1118. vouchsafed to unite himself with human nature, but he lost nothing by that union his
1119.miliations and his sufTeiings it was as man that Jesus Christ suffall only on human
1120.l only on humanity fered, and it was as God that he gave an iiuliiite value to his
1121.ave an iiuliiite value to his it was as man that he became a little child, so BufTe
1122.e Godman that he was the Saviour of the world. ; ; ; ; ExAMPLni. —A certain "hereti
1123.tain "heretic, of the sect of Eutyches, being p-esent in a company where there was a
1124.rsuade the Iti child tha^ there was but one nature in Jesus Christ. order to convin
1125.de the Iti child tha^ there was but one nature in Jesus Christ. order to convince him,
1126. joined them together so as to make but one piece. " It is thus" said he " that the
1127.e " But," replied tho in his person but one single nature." boy, " suppose you put
1128.eplied tho in his person but one single nature." boy, " suppose you put a little ingot
1129. a little ingot of gold in the place of one of those pieces of iron, redden the two
1130.nd put them together, so as to make but one piece. I ask you, then, will the pieco
1131.to make but one piece. I ask you, then, will the pieco be all gold, or all iron ? wi
1132.ll the pieco be all gold, or all iron ? will not each piece remain what it was befor
1133.t each piece remain what it was before, will not one be still an ingot of gold and t
1134.ece remain what it was before, will not one be still an ingot of gold and the other
1135.t one be still an ingot of gold and the other a bit of iron, though they may be faste
1136.hey may be fastened together ? Yes they will, and you cannot deny it. Here you would
1137.ere you would then have two pieces, the one of gold, and the other of iron, which,
1138.ve two pieces, the one of gold, and the other of iron, which, although entirely disti
1139.ch, although entirely distinct in their nature, will yet make but one piece. Thus it i
1140.ough entirely distinct in their nature, will yet make but one piece. Thus it is," co
1141.inct in their nature, will yet make but one piece. Thus it is," concluded the child
1142.uman natures, though distinct from each other, make nevertheless but one single per-
1143. from each other, make nevertheless but one single per- •1./ ' i — — v''V r,
1144.E MYSTERY OF THE INCARNATION CONTINUED. God became man to redeem us from the and fr
1145.F THE INCARNATION CONTINUED. God became man to redeem us from the and from the torm
1146.ts of hell, and to merit for us eternal life, to which we had lost all claim, as wel
1147.y our own prevarications as by original sin. We had of bondage of sin ; ! 64 DUTY O
1148.s by original sin. We had of bondage of sin ; ! 64 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN 4: W mm .i
1149.al sin. We had of bondage of sin ; ! 64 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN 4: W mm .i'.ii I 'fi'i
1150. m m itt" mk M V S i It ' ^m^- fended a God of infinite majesty, and his justice co
1151.nded a God of infinite majesty, and his justice could on.j be satisfied by a reparation
1152.reparation commensurate to the ofTence. Man could not of himself ofl!*er to God a s
1153.ce. Man could not of himself ofl!*er to God a sufficient satisfacIt was only the ti
1154.could he then merit forgiveness. Son of God made man, true God and true man, who wa
1155.then merit forgiveness. Son of God made man, true God and true man, who was capable
1156. forgiveness. Son of God made man, true God and true man, who was capable of offeri
1157. Son of God made man, true God and true man, who was capable of offering that satis
1158.ring that satisfaction by suff*ering as man and By as God imparting to his sufferin
1159.sfaction by suff*ering as man and By as God imparting to his sufferings an infinite
1160.erings an infinite value. iry of divine wisdom sin is punished this wonderful m;. but
1161.an infinite value. iry of divine wisdom sin is punished this wonderful m;. but the
1162.he sinner is Si. cu so in Jesus Christ, justice and mercy the injury done to God is abu
1163.t, justice and mercy the injury done to God is abundantly reare reconciled paired,
1164.abundantly reare reconciled paired, and God is honoured as he ought to be. Jesus Ch
1165. perfect Mediator he is, too, allied to God by his divinity, and to us by his human
1166. of suffering like us, because he has a nature like unto ours, and on the other hand a
1167.has a nature like unto ours, and on the other hand able to reconcile us with God by h
1168.he other hand able to reconcile us with God by his sufferings, he being himself God
1169.ncile us with God by his sufferings, he being himself God a mediator who, by his perf
1170.God by his sufferings, he being himself God a mediator who, by his perfect holiness
1171.ould propitiate in our favour. suppose, truth may be better understood by comparison
1172.ing has been insulted, nay, outraged by one of the meanest of his subjects, neither
1173.subjects, neither the criminal, nor any other subject of the king can offer to the ma
1174.is crown, and the sharer of his throne, being touched with compassion for that man's
1175. being touched with compassion for that man's hopeless condition, should descend fr
1176.her, and offer to submit himself to the punishment due to the malefactor in order to obtai
1177.nceived th it such profound humiliation being a . : ; ; ; ; *# S'l i'i satisfaction o
1178.ithout departing from the way of strict justice, may extend his forgiveness to the offe
1179.e offender. Well this is precisely what God has done for us through the InHow admir
1180.e all in this greatest testimony of his love what ! — iV'iifi; i: I :-;?'' ' '.»!
1181.?'' ' '.»! II'.J.: i -}^^'',1 TOWTABDS GOD. uld on.j asi 55 .M, ''. :. offence, sa
1182. :. offence, satisfac* only the vho was man and lie. By punished id mercy ,ntly re-
1183.ly re- st Medius by he has a o reconslf God; This pleasing r. suppose, by one nor a
1184.onslf God; This pleasing r. suppose, by one nor any Y of the nee; all ably beof the
1185. the nee; all ably beof the larer of it man's 3ne, lay ad with f before lent it due
1186.e, lay ad with f before lent it due may being a e greatice, and incomprehensible favo
1187.mself of his glory to assume our fallen nature, to subject himself to all our infirmit
1188.red against calling Mary, the Mother of God, publicly approved of this heretical pr
1189.n, ought not to be styled the Mother of God, but only mother of Jesus Christ. These
1190.Holy Council, assembled by the grace of God in the city of Ephesus, to Nestorius, t
1191. for thine obstinacy in maintaining the same, thou hast been deposed from every grad
1192. very root. Having wandered for a loijg time from place to place, the wretched man d
1193. time from place to place, the wretched man died in the greatest misery, and impeni
1194.ensus .i' 't' to b fir V' >m l.f \- M . DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN ''jjj'i.ilra:'*; 'i
1195.d There it was that, in the year of the world its origin. 4004, the Son of God came i
1196. the world its origin. 4004, the Son of God came into the world, at the dead hour o
1197.gin. 4004, the Son of God came into the world, at the dead hour of night and in a poo
1198.stable, the poverty of Joseph His birth being too great to pay for admission to an mn
1199.ching their flocks by night. " Glory to God ** sang the heavenly messengers, making
1200.ng known the joyful tidings, " Glory to God in the highest and on earth, peace to m
1201.ory to God in the highest and on earth, peace to men of good will!" Eiffht jlays afte
1202.e highest and on earth, peace to men of good will!" Eiffht jlays after his birth •
1203.hest and on earth, peace to men of good will!" Eiffht jlays after his birth •it li
1204.he command which they had receiveu from God by an angel, gave to him the name of Je
1205. which they had receiveu from God by an angel, gave to him the name of Jesus, which s
1206.save all men, and to deliver thena from sin and hell. To the name of Jesus has been
1207. Christ Our Lord, because that he has a particular claim on all christians, whom he has re
1208.s was circumcised, he was recognised as God and as king by three Magi, who guided b
1209.rn king of the Jews. The doctors of the law, being interrogated by Herod, king of G
1210.ng of the Jews. The doctors of the law, being interrogated by Herod, king of Galilee,
1211.iah was to be born in Bethlehem, Herod, being alarmed by this announcement, and alrea
1212.nnouncement, and already meditating the death of the divine infant, engaged the Mag t
1213.ts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh but being warned by an angel that Herod only soug
1214.cense, and myrrh but being warned by an angel that Herod only sought to kill the infa
1215.infant, they returned by another way to same day the blessed Virgin i ; their own co
1216.rgin i ; their own country. ! ' TOWARDS GOD. nd Mary mily had le world the dead f J
1217.y. ! ' TOWARDS GOD. nd Mary mily had le world the dead f Joseph His birth hepherds to
1218. tho birth of Jesus, the Blessed Viigin God" peace be joyful •th, and St. Joseph
1219.birth of Jesus, the Blessed Viigin God" peace be joyful •th, and St. Joseph took hi
1220.k him to the temple, to present him icj God, according to the custom of the Jews, h
1221.o present him icj God, according to the custom of the Jews, he being the The Blessed V
1222.according to the custom of the Jews, he being the The Blessed Virgin at the same time
1223. he being the The Blessed Virgin at the same time fulfilled first-born. the law of p
1224.eing the The Blessed Virgin at the same time fulfilled first-born. the law of purifi
1225.the same time fulfilled first-born. the law of purification, and ofCeved what the l
1226.w of purification, and ofCeved what the law ordained that is to say, a lamb for her
1227.d for herself, a [)uir of what exloves, being the gifts usually made by the poor mple
1228.les of humility and of obedience to the law Herod, seeing that the Magi returned no
1229.ore, conceived the design of putting to death all children under two years — its v^
1230.. Joseph, apprized of this design by an angel, fled into hoping make Egypt with Jesus
1231.after lifies lver them f Christ, IS the death of that barbarous prince. He then retur
1232.festival of the Pasch, according to the custom of the Jews, when he remained behind in
1233.ll who heard liim were surprised by his wisdom and his answers. At the age of thirty y
1234.he Baptist in the river Jordan at which time tho Holy Ghost descended upon him in th
1235.ho Holy Ghost descended upon him in the form of a dove, and the eternal Father decla
1236.uted the fast of Lent. Our Lord at that time permitted himself to be tempted by the
1237.t to fear temptation, and ; was taken m DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ,1:1;; i^u.,, also the
1238. me the hand of thy divine Son, so that being blessed by him, I may avoid the evil wh
1239.t being blessed by him, I may avoid the evil which is displeasing to him, and practi
1240.is displeasing to him, and practise the good which is agreeable to him ; that I may
1241.ience and in all •14: iiji , •> his other virtues, so that I may become worthy of
1242.egan immediately to promulgate that New Law which he came to teach mankind Of the n
1243.the Chanaanite, and Judas Iscariot. The Law which Jesus Christ brought into the wor
1244.Law which Jesus Christ brought into the world is truly admirable, forming a body of d
1245.in even the slightes degrcL. It teaches man his duty to God, to his iieighl/our and
1246.the slightes degrcL. It teaches man his duty to God, to his iieighl/our and 'to hims
1247.htes degrcL. It teaches man his duty to God, to his iieighl/our and 'to himself: it
1248.'to himself: it is perfectly adapted to man, as considered in the body, and to each
1249. in the body, and to each individual in particular, in every possible variety of circumsta
1250. to all times. amination of this Divine Law, we that Pie who was its author must ha
1251. to M> im^' his heart, his pas- rend«r Knowledge of man's nature, of his mind, ler >r as
1252.is heart, his pas- rend«r Knowledge of man's nature, of his mind, ler >r as ns gre
1253.rt, his pas- rend«r Knowledge of man's nature, of his mind, ler >r as ns great childr
1254.nd«r Knowledge of man's nature, of his mind, ler >r as ns great children his Lless
1255.es to this moral code, they would be as good and as happy as it is possible to bo in
1256. happy as it is possible to bo in th)» world and, in fact, let us picture to ourselv
1257.le that is to say, a society of men who love God as their common Father, who regard
1258.at is to say, a society of men who love God as their common Father, who regard each
1259.as their common Father, who regard each other as bretliren indeed, and who have among
1260.n indeed, and who have amongst them but one heart anA one soul having all the same
1261.who have amongst them but one heart anA one soul having all the same object in view
1262.have amongst them but one heart anA one soul having all the same object in view, and
1263.t one heart anA one soul having all the same object in view, and journeying all towa
1264.in view, and journeying all towards the same end, which is heaven, no one ever ! : "
1265.wards the same end, which is heaven, no one ever ! : "V" V.J ( — * ; agreeable an
1266.J ( — * ; agreeable and in all making good to up his far right subservient to pass
1267. interest, but, on the contrary, giving happiness to promote that of others, syrnpathiz-
1268.,..s*' : lediately to such would be a state peace, which is the sweetesi fruit of c
1269.*' : lediately to such would be a state peace, which is the sweetesi fruit of charity
1270., nor contention rare spectacle for the world ! —And ; if composed of true Christia
1271.ter, and rtholomew, nd e his bro- riot. world is )erfect tha be slightes i;hbour and
1272. unhappy, because nont would be wicked. Wealth would then be wealth indeed, and evils
1273.t would be wicked. Wealth would then be wealth indeed, and evils wonld be no longer su
1274.y, and take the load of misfortune from one, to make it also common to all by Chris
1275.surance of a happier futurity, and even death would only be regarded as the transit f
1276.e regarded as the transit from temporal happiness, to that which is eternal. Yes, such wo
1277.ractice. ety of friends, and the entire world would become a terres! ';'! ;,>*.:«
1278.y closest exto confess trial paradise." religion ; 08t perfect are,, doubtless, beyond t
1279.han sufficient to satisfy any i^itional mind. The mysteries of of our understanding
1280.anding •i •• ' il. to .111 •• DUTY IF THE CHRISTIAN whai sanctity there is
1281.er fear Hini who can cast both body and soul ; T ju Into heil *' r Love iJod with ai
1282.oth body and soul ; T ju Into heil *' r Love iJod with ail thy heart, and remember t
1283. Be not ashamed of mo before men, and I will recoj^mse thee before my Father in heav
1284.f thin* eye, thy hand, or thy fbdt ho a cause of scandal to thee, pluck them out —
1285.rejoice and be glad, for a great o*" —love even thine enemies — be forgiven —j
1286.w he clothes the lily of the fields. Do good — forgive, that thou .iiayest — —
1287.it be that a book at once so the —the language of an of an ambitious sectary? — What
1288.at manners and morals — what touching beauty and grace maxims! — what —what prof
1289.grace maxims! — what —what profound wisdom discourse what presence of mind— V in
1290.found wisdom discourse what presence of mind— V ingenuity and good sense answers
1291.hat presence of mind— V ingenuity and good sense answers —what con man? his Is t
1292.resence of mind— V ingenuity and good sense answers —what con man? his Is that th
1293.uity and good sense answers —what con man? his Is that the tone that he — whose
1294. his Is that the tone that he — whose history work of men ? Is it possible relates wa
1295.ribes his imaginary character of a just man, covered with all the opprobrium of cri
1296.me, yet worthy of all the reward due to virtue, he describes Jesus Christ feature for
1297.felt its force, for in — where is the man, or the sage suffer and to die without
1298.ut either Hi -"^ ..iMavMaK—.^ TOWARDS GOD. precept; ill only ihn ; 61 y und soul
1299.S GOD. precept; ill only ihn ; 61 y und soul that thou luo before in heuvuti. If thi
1300. . thee. Be not the birds he again, -Do good »u .iiayest iilged. — vithout or its
1301.istance is there Socrates dying without pain, without ignobetween them miny, found i
1302. character to the last; and bad not his death done honour to his life, we might doubt
1303.nd bad not his death done honour to his life, we might doubt whttiier Socrates, with
1304. just long before Socrates decided what justice was. Leonidas had died for his countt /
1305. countt / before Socrates had made it a duty to love one's country. Sparta was sober
1306./ before Socrates had made it a duty to love one's country. Sparta was sober, ere ye
1307.ore Socrates had made it a duty to love one's country. Sparta was sober, ere yet So
1308.d in virtuous men before he had lefined virtue. But where had Jesus Christ learned tha
1309.lgated both by precept and example? The death of Socrates, calmly talking philosophy
1310.? The death of Socrates, calmly talking philosophy with his friends, is the sweetest death
1311.sophy with his friends, is the sweetest death imaginable that of Jesus Christ, expiri
1312.s and infuriate tormentors. Yes, if the life and death of Socrates are those of a sa
1313.uriate tormentors. Yes, if the life and death of Socrates are those of a sage, the li
1314.th of Socrates are those of a sage, the life and death of Jesus are the life and the
1315.rates are those of a sage, the life and death of Jesus are the life and the death of
1316.ge, the life and death of Jesus are the life and the death of a God. Shall we ventur
1317.and death of Jesus are the life and the death of a God. Shall we venture to say that
1318.f Jesus are the life and the death of a God. Shall we venture to say that the histo
1319.a God. Shall we venture to say that the history contained in the Gospel is merely a fic
1320. — ! A: ; • — ; ; ; — ! —what mindman )f vhat con the sage )ut either
1321.: ; • — ; ; ; — ! —what mindman )f vhat con the sage )ut either lis ima
1322.rist It is much easier to conceive that one individual should have formed the subje
1323.lity, and the Gospel has the impress of truth, so grand, so sti'iking, so every way i
1324.e inventor or author invention, and the history of Socrates, whit' .,^ ' Tk thinks of d
1325.; (i'll as ExAMPLE^i his friends, while DUTY OF THK CHRISTIAN —Diderot was The he
1326.tion of the Gospel. his by the visit of one of daughter recite a po»> friend could
1327. principles of Christian faith. And how many others like them, would have admired th
1328.had not the Gospel commanded us to shun evil and to practise every virtue V— ARTIC
1329.d us to shun evil and to practise every virtue V— ARTICLE t V. THE LIFE AND MIRACLES
1330.tise every virtue V— ARTICLE t V. THE LIFE AND MIRACLES OF JESUS CHRIST. Jesus Chr
1331.ht by his own hand and in his own name. prophecy be a proof of divine intervention, the
1332.cles is no less convincing. If we saw a man wield contronl over the laws of nature,
1333.w a man wield contronl over the laws of nature, for instance, walking on the surface o
1334.the blind, or bringing back the dead to life, we should have no doubt that this man
1335.life, we should have no doubt that this man was an ambassador from God. feel that s
1336.bt that this man was an ambassador from God. feel that such deeds as these are far
1337.ds as these are far beyond the power of man, and that it is God alone who can sus p
1338.beyond the power of man, and that it is God alone who can sus pend the ordinary cou
1339.pend the ordinary course of the laws of nature. So it wag that our Lord proved his mis
1340.e Gospel relates he brought the dead to life, he commanded the winds and the waves i
1341.racles of Our Lord were — ; ; TOWARDS GOD. of one cite o) ; 63 a poik expressing
1342.f Our Lord were — ; ; TOWARDS GOD. of one cite o) ; 63 a poik expressing tiilosop
1343.as much manifestations of his useful to man goodness as of his pow< and they were n
1344. vain did the Pharisees demand of him a sign ostentation. fioui heaven in vain did H
1345.ui heaven in vain did Herod express his desire to see a prodigy operated in no one ins
1346. desire to see a prodigy operated in no one instance did he do anything extraordina
1347.dinary to gratify curiosity, but at the same time he never refused to cure the sick
1348.y to gratify curiosity, but at the same time he never refused to cure the sick or di
1349.multitude of witnesses the cure of this man who had been palsied for thirty-eight y
1350.eight years, and also that of the blind man took place in the city of Jerusalem. Th
1351.ogue becoming alarmed, interrogated the man who had been blind, and also his parent
1352.nvestigation served only to confirm the truth of , : m , .',V.-. : t, ;» 1 ; 1* ..Vi
1353.l more before the public. y:.ri : power nature, —restoring to life, we mbassador 'ar
1354.. y:.ri : power nature, —restoring to life, we mbassador 'ar beyond can sus So it
1355.yen of the Pharisees and Doctors of the Law, who were his declared eneniies> and th
1356.t?" said they amongst themselves, "this man worketU many miracles ; if we let him g
1357.y amongst themselves, "this man worketU many miracles ; if we let him go on all the
1358.es ; if we let him go on all the people will htf lieve in When Our Lord the dead him
1359.ove that he was the Messiah nor had any one of the ancient prophets been at all lik
1360.eeing or Liord who was to come into the world. great prophet hath arisen amcngrfit us
1361.t prophet hath arisen amcngrfit us. and God hath visited hii people." A were i . 64
1362.e Not only did our Lord himself perform many miracleb, but he also gave to his disci
1363.said " Heal the sick, raise the dead to life, cleans« to them drive out devils." An
1364.he name and on the part of he author of nature, and the effect of these marvels is pla
1365.se means that they converted the entire world. The universe, in its evangelized state
1366.world. The universe, in its evangelized state is a manifesi ami enduring proof of the
1367. miraculous deeds of the Aposiks. Hence Religion could not have been established on a fi
1368.s, are within the reach of the simplest mind, while they are at the same time calcul
1369.he simplest mind, while they are at the same time calculated to convince even the mo
1370.mplest mind, while they are at the same time calculated to convince even the most ei
1371.en the most ei}hg'htened understanding. God raised up a host of inspired mon, who,
1372. raised up a host of inspired mon, who, many ages before, predicted with the most pe
1373.e face of »-{i Judea, multiplied in an infinity of ways, and repeated in ev?ry quarter
1374.ovable belief? Example. A certain young man being present where some one was exclai
1375.le belief? Example. A certain young man being present where some one was exclaiming a
1376.tain young man being present where some one was exclaiming against miracies, consid
1377.ing against miracies, considered it his duty to speak out in defence of his faith. H
1378.uoted Celsus, Julian, and Porphyrus, as being unimpeachable witnesses, all of whom co
1379.onfess that Jesus Christ astonished the world by his miracles. He then cited the opin
1380.orld by his miracles. He then cited the opinion of J. J. surprise '-'"J',,. — Rouspea
1381.were too cedulous. I ask of you now but one thing, which I am sur<^ ^ov vv^ill gran
1382.of \ TOWARDS OOD. impossible ! " 85 was man resumed: "Well! the answer from every t
1383.ety, even in the palaces of kings, at a time wheii Baptism was a warrant for martyrd
1384.self practised in the highest degree of Law which he gave unto us, and his entire T
1385.e gave unto us, and his entire The more life was but a faithful exposition of his do
1386. more strongly are we impressIt was his pleasure ed with the eminent holiness of his lif
1387.ure ed with the eminent holiness of his life. to pass through the state of childhood
1388.liness of his life. to pass through the state of childhood, so as to leave a model fo
1389.nd by such docility and submission what progress does l>e not make in learning and in vi
1390.ss does l>e not make in learning and in virtue Jesus Christ was pkji»."5ed to content
1391.i. — %' . I*" ; :;k''- ^ I r ^r: r 66 DUTY OP THE CHRISTlAIf ungrateful son on his
1392.pire the fullest confidence, but on the other hand he never failed to rebuke the hard
1393.ied, we shall every where behold him in pain, and in sorrow, toiling and suffering.
1394. those to whom he announced the word of God he bore without a murmur the annoyance
1395.ever once did he revenge himself on any one. It has above all in the different circ
1396.e prayed for his tormentors. The entire life of Jesus Christ was one continued exerc
1397.rs. The entire life of Jesus Christ was one continued exercise of the most profound
1398.er shunned the grandeur and pomp of the world. Never did he publish his own greatness
1399.racles. In him, detachment from worldly wealth, went BO far as the absolute love of po
1400.dly wealth, went BO far as the absolute love of poverty ; he not only his children,
1401.ildren, — — ; ; ; ; ; ; — TOWARDS GOD. despised honours but sought humiliatio
1402.knowltag* which he had of the vanity of pleasure, made him picfer crosses and sufferings
1403.plainly manifested that he was sent* by God. certain holy man was accustomed to say
1404. that he was sent* by God. certain holy man was accustomed to say consulted him on
1405.lime degree of perfection, while at the same time e\ ry difficulty shall be smoothed
1406.degree of perfection, while at the same time e\ ry difficulty shall be smoothed away
1407.what manner he took his repasts and the many privations which he endured for our sak
1408.tion soever yoa may be placed, and your life shall be truly angelic !" m i.,'i . t"
1409.us hatred, and design of putting him to death. The time being at hand when Jesus Chri
1410.and design of putting him to death. The time being at hand when Jesus Christ was to
1411.esign of putting him to death. The time being at hand when Jesus Christ was to give h
1412.aving eaten the PaK^,hal Lamb, with his other disciples as prescribed by the Law, he
1413.is other disciples as prescribed by the Law, he arose from the tabl1414.ad just done, and so to perpetu ate the memory of bis ^HSsioi>, and death, even to the
1415.etu ate the memory of bis ^HSsioi>, and death, even to the conBummation of the vcrld.
1416., testifying to them the fervour of his love for man, announcing to them tlieir appr
1417.ing to them the fervour of his love for man, announcing to them tlieir approaching
1418.epaired to the garden of Olives, where, being arrived, he withdrew a little from his
1419.cting as he prayed, on the eiiormity of sin, the greatness of the sufferings which
1420. pass away from me, nevertheless not my will but thine be done " An angel was then l
1421.less not my will but thine be done " An angel was then lent to console and strengthen
1422.das, who had withdrawn from amongst the other Apostles after supper, presented himsel
1423.t directly up to Jesus, and kissed him, being the ognal on which he hai agreed with t
1424.with the people whom he — ! . TOWARDS GOD. atred, 1 o } ^--i; and brought So groa
1425.s the forbearance of Our Lord tlia'. to death, as to give secure our les to pre;o m t
1426.en udas, who mob after sup- of a , wily being the The whom he even then he addressed
1427. Jesus to the house of Annas, father-in-law of Caiaphas, who was then high-priest.
1428.te those replied who heard me, and they will bear testimony to what I have said." Ju
1429.stimony to what I have said." Just then one of the soldiers struck him, but he mani
1430.to have a pretext for condemning him to death nevertheless, their design did not succ
1431.er he really was the Christ, the Son of God. Jesus answered that he was, and that h
1432.ered that he was, and that he should be one day seen by men On hearing seated at th
1433. On hearing seated at the right hand of God, his Father. this, the pontiff arose fr
1434.sses now required, and that he deserved death. This sentence was instantly confirmed
1435./' 's ill : tv^' ; < to phesy unto this DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN us, Oh Christ ! who it
1436. all this outrage, a much more sensible pain was inflicted on him by Peter. That dis
1437.whereupon a maid servant taxed him with being a follower of Jesus, and Peter denied t
1438.he was. Others having insisted upon his being a Galilean, he again denied and a serva
1439. concert the means of having him put to death they sent him to Pontius Pilate, govern
1440.plied that they had no power to put any man to death, and renewed their clamorous e
1441.hat they had no power to put any man to death, and renewed their clamorous entreaties
1442.of answer, treated him with contempt as being a fool, and having clothed him in a whi
1443. deliver him up nevertheless, having no mind to displease the Jews by liberating a m
1444.d to displease the Jews by liberating a man accused of advising the people not to p
1445.s would not hear of any merely trifling punishment, so that Pilate was obliged to seek som
1446.so that Pilate was obliged to seek some other means of reIt just then occurred to him
1447.n occurred to him that storing Jesus to liberty. for the Koman governor, on the great o
1448. on the great of the Pasch, to liberate one prisoner giving the There being then in
1449. liberate one prisoner giving the There being then in prison a noted choice to the pe
1450. the pietovium, and sitting down on his judgment seat, he it forehand, was customary Mea
1451.he Jewa, said to the Jews, '^ BehoM the man/" ndding, that though he had thus punis
1452. i' But they answered that thoy had no other king but Cassar, and that heir hiw requ
1453.uired tliat .fesus slioiild be piJit to death, fox Being still more having styled him
1454. .fesus slioiild be piJit to death, fox Being still more having styled himself the So
1455.l more having styled himself the Son of God. alarmed by these lact words, P'iate st
1456. was innocent of the blood of that just man. In order to encourage him, the Jews "
1457.ad, so that the soldiers laid hold of a man named Simon, who was coming in from the
1458. the wiiy, and thus deprive them of the pleasure of crucifying kirn, for we cannot suppo
1459. him, wagging *>i their and T(iinple of God, and heads self : in derision, — if c
1460.three days rebuild it, save now thythou art indeed the Son of God, come down now sa
1461. save now thythou art indeed the Son of God, come down now saj'ing, " Thou who fiom
1462.ed with Jesus, he cannot save himself." one on either Two robbers who side, applied
1463. derisive reproacb*»* ; Dijvertheless, one of the him the two was TOWARDS OOn. f>
1464.etold that he was to be treated for the love of U«, and that he would heal our woun
1465.l, and made known to her the portion of time which was to be spent in prayer^ not on
1466.llowed. She showed her every where that nature had to suffer; in the refectory, in the
1467., with as much candour as firmness that nature has much to suffer here; one thing, see
1468.ss that nature has much to suffer here; one thing, see plainly however, consoles me
1469. who were ;o out with a loud voice " My God 7 into thy hands corn" him the two wag
1470.th to strike him, he kV ' .. ^ i i^r 74 DUTY OF THE ; CHRISTIAJf •^" H '.' Whilst
1471. Whilst Jesus was hanging on the cross, many extraonli* nary things took place the e
1472.he Areopagite ; to say, that eithe: the God of nature was Buffering, or tha J! -•
1473.pagite ; to say, that eithe: the God of nature was Buffering, or tha J! -•* 4 i: ^ e
1474.ring, or tha J! -•* 4 i: ^ end of the world was at hand. These wonders produced no
1475., struck their breasts, and said " This man was indeed the Son of God." Meanwhile,
1476.d said " This man was indeed the Son of God." Meanwhile, the Jews, not choosing to
1477.spear. foretold, " Thou snalt not break one of his bone's " and in iin other place,
1478.ot break one of his bone's " and in iin other place, " They shall behold him whom the
1479.they pierced." But Joseph of Arimathea, being desirous to bury the body of Jesus, ask
1480.ate to take it down from the cross, and being joined by Nicodemus, they embalmed it w
1481.derstand that nevertheless, it must his soul was separated from his body be observed
1482.his divinity was neither separated from soul or body, but remained inseparably unite
1483.ed with both. Jesus Christ submitted to death, and by his death he : ; •anctified o
1484.s Christ submitted to death, and by his death he : ; •anctified ours ; and has meri
1485.s the favour of liaving diut penalty of sin converted into a voluntary sacrifice mo
1486.to the humiliation of the acceptable to God. grave, so as to divest that state of t
1487.ble to God. grave, so as to divest that state of the horror with whicJi nature regard
1488.st that state of the horror with whicJi nature regards it, and to fill us with the con
1489.of .^fe, assures us of the ful- T0WAR08 GOD. fllment of 76 It is what tho Apostle h
1490." It is it is sown in weakness, sown an animal body it shall : shall rise in rise a sp
1491. that you are never vexed, be moved, no matter what is done or said This question was
1492.s wife. " How could I be angry with any one, or comas follows plain of any wrong th
1493.wards those who tortured and put him to death, suffices to cover me with confusion, s
1494.I. HE DESCENDED INTO HELL. Jesus Christ being dead, his soul descended into Limbo, th
1495.INTO HELL. Jesus Christ being dead, his soul descended into Limbo, the place where t
1496.e beginning of the^ worl were kept in a state of expectation. These holy souls lovec.
1497.on. These holy souls lovec. and praised God, looking forward to the coming of the d
1498. had been closed against mankind by the sin of our first parents, and was only to b
1499.rents, and was only to be opened by the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. In th
1500.sus Christ. In the presence of Lis holy soul united to his divinity, the spirits of
1501. of the just, •'DUTY OF rilE CHRISTIAN '5* -- e^en in tlioir
1502.cause it was fitting that he who by his death, throw open its gates, should himself b
1503.heir joy when they beheld for the first time the adorable soul and divinity of the L
1504. beheld for the first time the adorable soul and divinity of the Liberator With what
1505.lating him. Renounce ir like manner all other aflJections, and attach yourself him al
1506. and attach yourself him alone both for time and for eternity." blessed souls ! —
1507.ourself him alone both for time and for eternity." blessed souls ! — ! — t*-. 1. •
1508.dence arrange it, in order to place the death and resurrection of Christ beyond a dou
1509.s enemies : *:.'^ ^v v-^ ii:; M TOWARD! GOD. n ' < i •.. If the body of Jesus had
1510.tomb more than twenty-four liours after being hiid there, the Jews migiit have said t
1511.s to say, that ho iiad again united his soul and body) came forth gloriously f'oni t
1512.gloriously f'oni tlie tomb whereupon an angel descended from heavtn, and ; •:'..vV^
1513.f Jesus had taken away his body; at the same time tiiey undertook to exculpate them
1514.us had taken away his body; at the same time tiiey undertook to exculpate them befor
1515.rded, had come from Jerusalem with some other |)ious women to embalm their master's b
1516.back alone to the se[)ulchie beiuld the angel sitinig there, who assured her that Jes
1517. she was gone, Our Loid appeared to the other holy women wiio staid behind in th'i ga
1518.iio staid behind in th'i garden. On the same day he showed himself to two of tlie di
1519. in their midst, spoke to them for some time, and re! :i 1 Viv-ff".; ^:i n-^: * •i
1520.he would not believe the But eight days other A|W)stles that Jesus had been theie. af
1521.claimed thus that for forty Lord and my God!'* It days Jesus Christ showed himself
1522.he lessons he had given them before his death, instructed them on the establishment o
1523.fore them, and so convinced them of the truth of his resurrection. 'i ^ 'Ik 'It' •i
1524.'i ^ 'Ik 'It' •iti' Example. Jonas is one of the most striking figures of our Sav
1525.him, he embarked for Tharsis. The Lord, being angry with him for his disobedience, pe
1526.y cast lots, and the lot fell on Jonas. Being thus made sensible of his fault, he con
1527.; nevertheless, the Lord wishing at the same time to save the prophet's life, and to
1528.ertheless, the Lord wishing at the same time to save the prophet's life, and to make
1529. at the same time to save the prophet's life, and to make him a figure of the Saviou
1530.upon the prophet, instructed by his own experience, accomplished his mission and converted
1531.cast into the earth, — m GOD. And arisifjg 79 therefrom on the third
1532.Messiah: " Tliou wilt not that thy Holy One should undergo the corruption ©f the t
1533.on of Jesus Christ, is to prove al tlie same time his divinity and the truth of all
1534. Jesus Christ, is to prove al tlie same time his divinity and the truth of all that
1535. al tlie same time his divinity and the truth of all that he has taught Thus, if Jesu
1536.re are sacraments, a heaven, a hell, an eternity, dec. The testimony of the Apostles reg
1537.hey seem quite sure of what they record being true, and relate it with the utmost acc
1538.they saw Jesus, or if they mistook some other pearance for him. To impute to them a s
1539.a Id have been reproached for it, not a soul would have listened to them, If their m
1540.eir malady must have been precisely the same in all and their minds must have wander
1541.d their minds must have wandered in the same direction. Let any one who could fancy
1542.wandered in the same direction. Let any one who could fancy such a thing possible,
1543.an find two persons labouring under the same kind of insanity. But as far as the Apo
1544.I.nW •i^ *• is a possibility that a man may be deceived, imagine that he sees w
1545.e really does not see 6v he may mistake one object for another; but when a great nu
1546.hen a great number of men are under the same illusion, so that o'' a whole multitude
1547.on, so that o'' a whole multitude there will not be found one more clear- and *'/^ s
1548.whole multitude there will not be found one more clear- and *'/^ sighted or with a
1549.n but once but common S'unso spurns the idea that a similar mistake could be made wi
1550.conversed long and frequently. A single sense may sometimes be deceived, but that all
1551.hould be at fault that we should at the same time imagine that we saw, heaid, and to
1552. be at fault that we should at the same time imagine that we saw, heaid, and touched
1553.imagine that we saw, heaid, and touched one who in reality we neither saw, heard, n
1554.ars his followers, appeared not only to one of them, i)ut to several amongst They t
1555. pei-fectly well, . -X !," *•, now to one, now to another, to Magdalen, and the o
1556.e, now to another, to Magdalen, and the other devout women, to Peter, to the disciple
1557.efTt ct of illusion ? Can anj' rational mind suppose that so many men were deceived
1558. Can anj' rational mind suppose that so many men were deceived at the s.-ime time, a
1559.so many men were deceived at the s.-ime time, and in precisely the snme manner; that
1560.nder their hajidsJ nis feet, m. TOWARDS GOD. 81 But it may he objected, that the Ap
1561.er palpable fact is in question, a,a as good a witness as a philosopher; and do not
1562. do not the judges every day decide the fate and fortunes oi' the accused on the dep
1563.xl v'l ;]t';if. Where any is unlettered man , • .- t .•.. ft. 1564. iv again be objected that the Apostles being persuaded that their master was to rise
1565.that he would rise again, but after his death they took so little note of that promis
1566.r they could have imposed on the entire world by announcing facts in which they thems
1567.d undoubtedly be exceedingl}^ base, who being determined to deceive both the world at
1568.ho being determined to deceive both the world at large and theii" own conscience, and
1569. to falsehood, would have us adore as a God him whom they knew to be an impostor. N
1570.suspicion of them ? They brought to the world the purest and holiest morality there w
1571.st and holiest morality there was not a vice which they did not combat, nor a virtue
1572.a vice which they did not combat, nor a virtue which they did not inculcate. Had they
1573.nculcate. Had they been actuated by the love of gain, would they not have flattered
1574. . •"'• ' >_>. -.Iv f-*.'^';r' ! 62 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN Would they not have ma
1575.nd would they have referred to a future life the reward of the sacriWould r.ot fices
1576.formed by them tile their con* numeroua one havB to deceive world? first The his pe
1577.their con* numeroua one havB to deceive world? first The his peri (id, fraud, care of
1578.he Apostles, who, immediately after the death of Jesus Christ, commenced preaching ev
1579.his assertion of theii'sl None. Did any man undertake to prove that Jesus had not a
1580.s* Oh how forceful is the silence of so many adversaries interested not only in disp
1581.but in publishing tlieir victory to the world, if victory they could obtain Men only
1582. interest, as far as the things of this world were concerned. They had deserted him i
1583. to imagine that they eould deceive the world, nor yet shrink from the iVai- of e:^ A
1584.s contemporaries. cr^ao : ! i ! TOWARDS GOD. ; (s'l "* • ' ' ' t they of exy t mu
1585. appoar the ever-varying interest of so many persons must become fixed and unchangea
1586.sputes, nor discussions, which must and will But that is not all the arise in every
1587.the tortuic, and they are then promised life and rich rewards if they will only ceas
1588. promised life and rich rewards if they will only cease to give ti^stimony of Jesus
1589.ked but for a word, nay, even If even a sign of consent, but they remain immovable.
1590. what way the Jews sought to refute the truth of the resurrection they assert that, b
1591. maintain thsn it rose from the dead if one of those propositions be found true, tl
1592.ns be found true, tlij f'dsehood of the other will of course follow. The guards had b
1593.found true, tlij f'dsehood of the other will of course follow. The guards had been c
1594. md moreover, they had to watch Ujt for one night The Apostles, on the (ther hand,
1595.ight into which they were thrown by the death of theif master they had everything to
1596.s current with a child, but how could a man, endowed with eoru^ mon sense and judif
1597.how could a man, endowed with eoru^ mon sense and judifment, for a mom.ent ber*?ve tl
1598. important question ever moot(*d in the world. Nor is this all the soldiers conless t
1599.Christ to be conveyed away, while their duty : to guard it. They were guilty then, t
1600. showing of culpable negh}ct, and every one knows the severe was puniiihaienf, wuic
1601.uch greater ? How is it, then, enemy of religion has never been able to forward the slig
1602.proof of any reproach, or any inflicted punishment It It --i.. : by the Sanhedrim on those
1603.s ? such thing. What! there had been so many precautions takyn to prevent the crime,
1604.e uj)on themselves. ; • 1 ^ M TOWARDS GOD. Bui, it SiJ may bo asked, why was it t
1605.make lis rCuSurreclioa as public as his death, it would have been as impossible t.o d
1606.d have been as impossible t.o doubt the one as the other, and his adversaries would
1607. as impossible t.o doubt the one as the other, and his adversaries would have been st
1608.t would have been useless like the If a man chooses to close his eyes, will he see
1609.the If a man chooses to close his eyes, will he see any others. better for the light
1610.he see any others. better for the light being- made brighter around him ? And then, s
1611.the skeptics of our own times? Does any one suppose that they would be more d1612.more than sufficient in ordinary cases, will not hold good, or produce conviction wh
1613.icient in ordinary cases, will not hold good, or produce conviction when miraculous
1614. facts are in question. To pretend that God must furnish for his miracles the most
1615., the silence of their adversaries, the death of millions of mariyrs, the conversion
1616.lions of mariyrs, the conversion of the world, the entire reform which men in embraci
1617.nsv<3qiio;)tly of his divinity, and the truth of all that which he has taught miracle
1618.ethren," says St. Augustin, " tiie ! 86 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN i ¥-. M Rcsurrectioti
1619. first witnesses of (he " resurrection. will pay you well," said the Je'/zs to " if
1620. you well," said the Je'/zs to " if you will give out that, while you were asleep, h
1621.HEAVEN AND SITTETH AT THE RIGHT HAND OF GOD. Forty days • ^ afte; b'^ resurrectio
1622.els, wlw told them that the Lord should one day come down from heaven as they had s
1623.s Christ is seated at the right hand of God his father, to make as understand, by a
1624.al, and that all the dignitaries of the state are to pay him the respect and obedienc
1625.o himself. Now the Scripture represents God seated on his throne, king of heaven an
1626. Jesus Christ sits at the right hand of God, it is to be understood that he being,
1627. of God, it is to be understood that he being, as God, equal to his Father, he is, as
1628.t is to be understood that he being, as God, equal to his Father, he is, as maa< ;
1629.nwinity has the y;b)rioui jirivilege of being united to the Word. '^'^^•• '• i
1630.rawing duw Uut chiistisemcnts of divine justice. Jesus Christ is in heaven as our King
1631., he can always save those who approach God through [lis mediation. Having then for
1632.n for our high-priest Jesus, the Son of God, who ascer»ded to the highest heavena,
1633.our necessities, for our Pontiff is not one who is unable to com})assionate our wea
1634.* •'• • .' ^/ / .' self free from sin. • .,•'•;.'• -. ';. t" '.»' F
1635. head is to the body ; he imparts to it life, and animates it with his spirit; every
1636. it with his spirit; every grace, every good thought, all ;. '••'»*.,• ,': -*
1637.. ' if'j >-• ;* holy desires, and all good works, in short all virtue proceeds fro
1638.sires, and all good works, in short all virtue proceeds from that fulness which is in
1639. •* of the mysteries of the Saviour's life, his heart was inflamed with love, whic
1640.our's life, his heart was inflamed with love, which broke out in the following praye
1641.o follow thee to that heaven where thou art Scaicely was the prayer uttered, when i
1642.n it was granted. He expired he died of love for his Saviour! ! ! ! — — ! ! : La
1643.TO JUDGE 'm. * AND THE DEAD. ARTICLE OF DEATH. I. Thou shalt die ! such Adam after hi
1644.arried Nothing is more certain than our death, it and nothing more uncertain than whe
1645.is earth we now inhabit, and enter upon eternity. At our death we TOWARDS GOD. mufst lea
1646.nhabit, and enter upon eternity. At our death we TOWARDS GOD. mufst leave all, relati
1647. upon eternity. At our death we TOWARDS GOD. mufst leave all, relations, 80 without
1648.nts, without exception, and and emAt to death, too, all shall leave us, all but virtu
1649.death, too, all shall leave us, all but virtue It" and vice, the very thought of death
1650. shall leave us, all but virtue It" and vice, the very thought of death be insupport
1651.irtue It" and vice, the very thought of death be insupportable the loveis of this wor
1652.ath be insupportable the loveis of this world, to the voluptuous, in short to all sin
1653. much, and but to tiie solidity of that virtue which they have known ! — despise Not
1654.iing is ; more uncertain than shall the time and the manner suddenly or of a lingeri
1655. of a lingering disease ? Shall we have time to prepare ourselves, or shall we be ta
1656.me old age? Alas none can tell the only sin or in the state of grace ? of our death
1657.as none can tell the only sin or in the state of grace ? of our death we die ••.V
1658.y sin or in the state of grace ? of our death we die ••.V';-'v- ./i.i ml — ! ;
1659.ved; men but what they have sowed ; and death is Another certainty is, that the desti
1660.f the dying is imrnuthat if we die in a state that death decides all taljly fixed and
1661. is imrnuthat if we die in a state that death decides all taljly fixed and that if we
1662.uee we shall be eternally happy mortiil sin, we shall be everlastingly wretched. Si
1663. shall be everlastingly wretched. Since death is inevitable, and must decide our eter
1664.inevitable, and must decide our eternal fate, we ought to prepare ourselves for it,
1665.are ourselves for it, and profit by the time In this the stake is our greatest, nay,
1666.s Jesus Christ, "What doth it [)rofit a man to gain the whole world, if he lose his
1667.doth it [)rofit a man to gain the whole world, if he lose his own soul V* Alas will i
1668.ain the whole world, if he lose his own soul V* Alas will it aftbrd one any consolat
1669. world, if he lose his own soul V* Alas will it aftbrd one any consolation in the et
1670.ose his own soul V* Alas will it aftbrd one any consolation in the etornnl furnace,
1671.fortune while here on earth ? Truly, he will then see the extent of his error, and t
1672.n see the extent of his error, and that virtue was the " I have been the master of the
1673.n the master of the greatest only solid wealth. wnpire in the world" said Septimus Sev
1674.eatest only solid wealth. wnpire in the world" said Septimus Severus, when dying, "I
1675.d !" ; ; ; ! usually gather the echo of life. mmi ...,;,-,i,.'... ft 'in i;*;f..-t..
1676. m I •V 'W< t — ', / '- :*^ ! 00 It DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN Ml! ^.-l " . • - t I
1677. attention. As it is the mark of a weak mind to be engrossed with insignificant matt
1678.s, so also does it denote a wellordered mind to employ itself with those which are o
1679. than to die wiell ? Is it too much for life to prepare itself for death ? Is it too
1680.too much for life to prepare itself for death ? Is it too much to employ the few year
1681. it too much to employ the few years of life in preparing for eternity ? Does a man
1682. the few years of life in preparing for eternity ? Does a man condemned to death attach
1683.life in preparing for eternity ? Does a man condemned to death attach any great val
1684. for eternity ? Does a man condemned to death attach any great value to the things ol
1685.ch any great value to the things ol the world ? Such, then, ought our dispositions to
1686.uch, then, ought our dispositions to be death pursues us, and will inevitably strike
1687.ispositions to be death pursues us, and will inevitably strike us down, perhaps at t
1688.o put off our preparation for What at a death till we are seized with a fatal malady.
1689.seized with a fatal malady. moment when one is unable to attend to even the most tr
1690.concern, how can he acquit himself of a duty the most arduous and the most momentous
1691. which demands all the faculties of the soul How c i man receive the Sacraments with
1692.s all the faculties of the soul How c i man receive the Sacraments with fruit when
1693.p the dark mazei of his conscience at a time when soul and body are tortured and wei
1694. mazei of his conscience at a time when soul and body are tortured and weighed down
1695.ghed down with the pangs and horrors of death ? How can he prove to God that he detes
1696. horrors of death ? How can he prove to God that he detests sin, he who has so love
1697.How can he prove to God that he detests sin, he who has so loved it, and delivered
1698.sinner who as he possibly could ? quits sin, it is sin, on the contrary which deser
1699.as he possibly could ? quits sin, it is sin, on the contrary which deserts the sinn
1700.ts the sinner. The consequence is, that God- almost invariably permits those who ha
1701.ho have lived impenitent, to die in the same state. When the contrary happens, it is
1702.ve lived impenitent, to die in the same state. When the contrary happens, it is by a
1703.he contrary happens, it is by a miracle God : ! ! — — ! ; can work that miracle
1704.ption to expect it while living on in a state of sin. 3i pre* "t tit ^'^•i- TOWARDS
1705.expect it while living on in a state of sin. 3i pre* "t tit ^'^•i- TOWARDS GOD. E
1706.of sin. 3i pre* "t tit ^'^•i- TOWARDS GOD. Examples. 91 forced to quit his —A y
1707.was said to be most austere, Old, after many entreaties, was at length admitted. Dur
1708.change our lot with that of an emperor, being well aware that death will speedily "V
1709.at of an emperor, being well aware that death will speedily "V . ''•, '!' '• /i?
1710.an emperor, being well aware that death will speedily "V . ''•, '!' '• /i? ' v.
1711.ant it is to have 'sown in tears ;* the pain and the privation is passed, and the jo
1712.which then commencesshalUast throughout eternity." Five montha after his profession, he
1713. the whole community. " How great is my happiness!" he exclaimed, "you have opened to me
1714. that I have endeavoured to prepare for death how sweet it is to die when one firmly
1715.e for death how sweet it is to die when one firmly hopes to pass from earth to heav
1716.of these words, " What doth it profit a man to gain the whole world, and lose his o
1717. doth it profit a man to gain the whole world, and lose his own soul ? ! ^^i^ — !
1718. gain the whole world, and lose his own soul ? ! ^^i^ — ! — ! v.->p(.:.j What ca
1719. ! v.->p(.:.j What can ot the the just man regret at his death ? The good's His he
1720.t can ot the the just man regret at his death ? The good's His heart has been ever de
1721. the just man regret at his death ? The good's His heart has been ever detached from
1722. when after having long suffered the of death. We most cruel pains, she was at length
1723.ds. : superb monument was raised to her memory, whereon she is represented in a sittin
1724.ve, and seeing '>• li'.i. i'.n 9Z his DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN mother weeping, said t
1725.en told Yet he wat that in order to see God, we must die V : me Bcai'cely seven yea
1726. years old ! ARTICLE "It die, is II. OF JUDGMENT. and after death appointed" says St. Pa
1727. "It die, is II. OF JUDGMENT. and after death appointed" says St. Paul, "for judgment
1728.er death appointed" says St. Paul, "for judgment." ; all men once to I «i ,...:^-.;^ \w
1729. ; all men once to I «i ,...:^-.;^ \w. immortality of the sou' necessarily supposes a judg
1730.redly the just is to decide its eternal fate and the godless man cannot have one and
1731.decide its eternal fate and the godless man cannot have one and the same destiny. F
1732.al fate and the godless man cannot have one and the same destiny. Faitli teaches us
1733.the godless man cannot have one and the same destiny. Faitli teaches us that there s
1734.l be even two judgments, the private or particular, and the general judgments. The particu
1735.ticular, and the general judgments. The particular judgment is that which every soul must
1736.d the general judgments. The particular judgment is that which every soul must undergo i
1737.particular judgment is that which every soul must undergo immediately after death, r
1738.ery soul must undergo immediately after death, regarding the evil which it has. commi
1739. immediately after death, regarding the evil which it has. committed, and the good w
1740.e evil which it has. committed, and the good which it should have practised but did
1741.should have practised but did not. This judgment will fix its doom for all eternity. Imm
1742.ve practised but did not. This judgment will fix its doom for all eternity. Immediat
1743.This judgment will fix its doom for all eternity. Immediately after this particular judg
1744.or all eternity. Immediately after this particular judgment, those souls which are only fo
1745.nity. Immediately after this particular judgment, those souls which are only found guilt
1746.nter heaven those who are free from all sin are instantly admitted into heaven whil
1747.ile such as are stained with any mortal sin are cast into hellj awaiting the genera
1748.hich shall take place at the end of the world. Tben shall be the general judgment, wh
1749.of the world. Tben shall be the general judgment, wherein the sentence already' pronounc
1750.the sentence already' pronounced in the particular judgment shall be published and confirm
1751.e already' pronounced in the particular judgment shall be published and confirmed. The g
1752.be published and confirmed. The general judgment shall be preceded by fearful signs, whi
1753.e upon the earth. Then the final moment being arrived, in the twinkling of an eye the
1754.of the the ssea shall last trumpet. The sign of the Son of man. that is to say, a iu
1755.ll last trumpet. The sign of the Son of man. that is to say, a iuniinuus cross shal
1756., with great power and majesty, TOWARDS GOD. to reri'lcr to «» ovory on? accordin
1757.tulod by Angels, who shnll separate the good IVora Ah how terrible will that separat
1758.separate the good IVora Ah how terrible will that separation bo, and the wicked. ! b
1759.separation bo, and the wicked. ! be the fate of those separated 'I'he be placed at t
1760.at his left. laid open before the whole world, so that even that which had been most
1761.arefully concealed in the depths of the soul shall be draM'n forth and revealed. The
1762.raM'n forth and revealed. The righteous man, despised and trampled on in this world
1763.s man, despised and trampled on in this world, shall then appear adorned with the lus
1764.appear adorned with the lustre of those good wo'ks which he had concealed from the e
1765.ices and crimes which he had Then shall vice appear as it really is, 80 carefully hi
1766.famy. who has turned a deaf ear in this life to the seducing discourse of the wicked
1767.red for hia faith But how great, on the other hand shall be the despair of the libert
1768.aced amongst the Saints the children of God! With what detestation will he then reg
1769. children of God! With what detestation will he then regard that vice which before a
1770.at detestation will he then regard that vice which before appeared so sweet and so d
1771.fore appeared so sweet and so different will ! how just shall ! ''-1 ! M — seducin
1772. only the array, and the prelude of the judgment what impression will be then made on ou
1773.prelude of the judgment what impression will be then made on our minds by the actual
1774.ual sentence of the Sovereign Judge All being profoundly silent, the Son of God shall
1775.All being profoundly silent, the Son of God shall address to those on his right han
1776.pared for you from the beginning of the world!" Then shall He turn to the reprobates,
1777., than the jur>t shall go to reign with God for all eternity, and the wicked shall
1778.ur>t shall go to reign with God for all eternity, and the wicked shall be : ! — — ^
1779. ,| . ' U •• /I " ; K li hi^-r J 04 DUTY OP THE CHBIBTIAN precipiliatcd into hel
1780.ppear with confidence before the Bon of man ! It is has en redeem UoIyC We there ie
1781.aving taken pains Thanks to the Christo form and foster them in his mind. tian educa
1782.the Christo form and foster them in his mind. tian education which he had received,
1783. form and foster them in his mind. tian education which he had received, although he had
1784.although he had lorf til purity and all sense of virtue, yet he had not lost his Fait
1785.he had lorf til purity and all sense of virtue, yet he had not lost his Faith. One nig
1786. virtue, yet he had not lost his Faith. One night, after having spent the day in th
1787. in which he seemed to stand oefore the judgment-seat of God. It is scarcely possible to
1788.ed to stand oefore the judgment-seat of God. It is scarcely possible to conceive ho
1789.im, Pardon, I have seen the Judge ah my God!" His debauched companions, hearing tha
1790. and console him. ! aimself up to every vice, et perfecti and the of the S die sam p
1791.l i he cried, "ye are not my friends; I will not see you any more I have seen my Jud
1792.sty ehone on his countenance And oh how many accusations, hov many questions which I
1793.enance And oh how many accusations, hov many questions which I could not answer! All
1794.al perhaps this veiy day. Pardon, oh my God I shall never cease to cry Pardon me ha
1795.m the Father and tli« Son, and has the same divinity as the two other persons. Tims
1796.n, and has the same divinity as the two other persons. Tims the Holy (ihost is equal
1797.hty, infinite, as they are ; he has the same perfection^, and in a word, is the same
1798.same perfection^, and in a word, is the same God as the Father It is in his name, as
1799.perfection^, and in a word, is the same God as the Father It is in his name, as in
1800. the Son that we have been baptized the same Godhead with the Father and the Son we
1801. Son we are to From this it pay him the same homage and adoration. follows that the
1802. to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost This same Holy Spirit descended on the Apostles o
1803. on the Apostles on Whit-Sunday, in the form of tongues of fire, filling them thus w
1804.tongues of fire, filling them thus with courage and strength to preach tlie Gospel, and
1805. tlie Gospel, and He also imJo seal its truth by the effusion of their blood. parted
1806.his only Son, wlio has we do not at the same time believe in the i.? I 1 <',,W n' f
1807.nly Son, wlio has we do not at the same time believe in the i.? I 1 <',,W n' f , ^ *
1808.attributed the sanctifi- is a spirit of love, and that through our souls that charit
1809. imparts to us that grace, which is the life of the soul, as the soul is of the body
1810.us that grace, which is the life of the soul, as the soul is of the body the soul ha
1811., which is the life of the soul, as the soul is of the body the soul has no life but
1812.he soul, as the soul is of the body the soul has no life but in as much as it is uni
1813.the soul is of the body the soul has no life but in as much as it is united with the
1814.ace neither has it any tendency towards God but through the influence of the Holy G
1815.• X .sii . »- .* ii ' ' 96 !•'.• DUTY OF THE CHRI8TIAW ''rir: 'Hie Holy Ghost
1816.st is called in Scripture the Spirit of Truth, which menus, that he is the source of
1817.ich menus, that he is the source of all truth, and the tnas. ter bv whom it is taught
1818.com* municated to them the most sublime knowledge. It waa He, too, who spake through the
1819.o is salvation." Thua turn us away from evil, and inspire us to do good. it is the H
1820.us away from evil, and inspire us to do good. it is the Holy Ghost that we resist wh
1821.f the thoughts which would turn us from sin, and lead us to the ; practice of virtu
1822.m sin, and lead us to the ; practice of virtue. Example. tlie — Simon the magician w
1823.erful that his followers called him the Virtue of God, But when St. Peter and St. John
1824. his followers called him the Virtue of God, But when St. Peter and St. John went i
1825.d the numerous miracles of St. Phillip, one of the seven deacons, Simon believed in
1826.use thou hast believed that the gift of God may be bought: go, and do penance !" Ve
1827.o persuade the emperor Nero that he was God, he promised to ascend into heaven befo
1828.>y the devil but St, began to pray, and God hoard his prayer. 'J'he demon ceased to
1829.d Simony, that is to say the detestable sin of those who would buy or sell the gift
1830.iwho, making profession of believing in God, of adoring and serving him, expected t
1831.. Nevertheless, the adorers of the true God did not always form one society, united
1832. adorers of the true God did not always form one society, united by visible and exte
1833.ers of the true God did not always form one society, united by visible and external
1834.one, as the chosen people, had a common law and common practices of religion. But J
1835.ad a common law and common practices of religion. But Jesus Christ, coming into the worl
1836.gion. But Jesus Christ, coming into the world to save all men, gave unto them new mea
1837.hem new means of salvation ; it was his pleasure to gather them into one body, and to gi
1838.it was his pleasure to gather them into one body, and to give to them a new Law, wh
1839.nto one body, and to give to them a new Law, which is the Law of grace. The Apostle
1840.to give to them a new Law, which is the Law of grace. The Apostles, having received
1841.five thousand when he preached a second time* The number of the faithful increased e
1842.ed by the Holy Spirit, displayed to the world the rarest example of pure and perfect
1843.postles afterwards preached ning of the world, that : There was always !•. * Hi ' '
1844. ' ' i^t . •r«i' '!,!' If A;' 9B the DUTY OF TUB CnKlSTIAN •ff'* "'I"" •'•
1845. •'•• . .' •* % ; • * word of God with the same success throughout all Ju
1846. .' •* % ; • * word of God with the same success throughout all JudoR, Galilee,
1847. and the greater part of the then known world, announcing the Gospel, that is to say,
1848.ples of Jesua Christ The Pagans, on the other hand, opposed its estub All that was gr
1849. thom, declared at once against the new religion but, notwithstanding the fury of the Je
1850.twithstanding the fury of the Jews, the opposition of earth*s potentates, and the general
1851.f mankind, so long blindly devoted to a religion entirely sensual, the Apostles founded
1852.cious deposit of Faith transmitted from one generation to another, even till it has
1853.s. ' ' . I h-'i'* •-., -i In order to form an idea of the marvellous establishment
1854. I h-'i'* •-., -i In order to form an idea of the marvellous establishment of Chri
1855.from the very dregs of society, without wealth, without learning, without human suppor
1856.aster had even promised nothing in this world but persecution, torment, and death suc
1857.his world but persecution, torment, and death such were the Apostles. Can it be suppo
1858.o undertake the conversion of the whole world had they not been animated by the spiri
1859.they not been animated by the spirit of God ? How could they have set about convert
1860.te as they were of human aid, having no other arms than the cross, no other weapon th
1861.having no other arms than the cross, no other weapon than the word, nor other defence
1862.oss, no other weapon than the word, nor other defence than invincible patience, these
1863.reached a doctrine which captivates the mind while it restrains the heart they preac
1864.ioch, in Alexandria, in Kphesus, in Ths world started Corinth, in Athens, and even in
1865., in Athens, and even in llonio. up ill opposition to the new doctrines, and every thing w
1866.ons, banishment, imprisonto its farther progress ment, torments all were resorted to, an
1867. human all the adverse efforts of human wisdom, aided by the passions, interest, polic
1868. most outrageous violence. To give up a religion which prescribes painful and irksome pr
1869.rksome practices, which prohibits every vice, and to embrace one more tolerant to th
1870.ch prohibits every vice, and to embrace one more tolerant to the senses, one which
1871.mbrace one more tolerant to the senses, one which permits men to give a free course
1872.ing easy to understand but to forsake a religion which fosters the passions, and embrace
1873.e passions, and embrace the cross and a life of penance, thereby exposing one's self
1874.and a life of penance, thereby exposing one's self, moreover, to the loss of all wo
1875. the loss of all worldly goods and even life itself, this is what persuasion and con
1876.can we forbear from saying The dnger of God is there ! For, in short, the Apostles
1877.in order to convince the nations of the truth of what they taught, or they converted
1878.. If they wrought miracles, then it was God himself who presided over their enterpr
1879. they succeeded in convincing the whole world without miracles, the proof of their di
1880. opposed thereto. The conversion of the world, if operated without miracles, would be
1881.been as a father to St Ambrose, had the same affection for Victorinus of whom we are
1882.elebrated orator, had been professor of Rhetoric at Rome ; he had passed his life in the
1883.of Rhetoric at Rome ; he had passed his life in the study of the — iV- . >:< V •
1884.< V • •... .' 100 liberal sciences, DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN and had attained a gre
1885. distinguished of the Roof them. He had man J senators. He had, in fine, followed h
1886.nction then considered the highest that man could attain. Yet he was still a pagan,
1887.ert such a heart Behold the means which God employed in doing so. Victorinus began
1888.e Holy Scriptures, ajid having for some time applied himself to that study, together
1889.ed himself to that study, together with other books explanatory of the Christian " I
1890.hristian " I have someReligion, he said one day to St. Simplician thing to tell you
1891. St. Simplician thing to tell you which will interest you very much I am a Christian
1892.within the inclosurc of four walls that one is a Christian ?" so it went on for som
1893.s a Christian ?" so it went on for some time, as often as Victorinus protested that
1894. — Christian, Simplician made him the same and a reply, and the other tlways put i
1895. made him the same and a reply, and the other tlways put i\\ '.•» 1.,;. it off wit
1896.eared to exasperate his pagan anger and opposition would be sure to crush him, if once cal
1897.not bring himself to incur. But after a time courage and generosity were given him f
1898.ring himself to incur. But after a time courage and generosity were given him from abov
1899.f his close application to the study of religion, and the docility with which he opened
1900.he hastened to tell St. Simplician at a time, too, when that holy man was least expe
1901.mplician at a time, too, when that holy man was least expecting hinj " Let us go to
1902.ristian, nor content myself longer with being one hi heart." Simplician, transported
1903.n, nor content myself longer with being one hi heart." Simplician, transported with
1904. transported with joy, immediately tooH truth was, that friends, as their The |li\' /
1905. The |li\' /*< ; till" I'' W n* TOWARDS GOD. him to thft 101 chuich, ana had his na
1906.brity and high reputation of that great man. At length the happy day arrived when h
1907.ho demanded '.,. -r..;A.>'iV'.-i''.'l ; custom in the Roman church to make this profes
1908.through respect, would have waived this custom, and perrniUed Victorinus to piivilege
1909.ines which were to guide him to endless happiness. sooner had he appeared in the tribune
1910. from mouth to mouth, and although each one restrained his joyful emotion through r
1911.although each one restrained his joyful emotion through respect for the sanctity of the
1912.t voice, his belief in the truths which form the basis of our faith. Willingly would
1913.ved ; i.; .<;< • , .1 ; 102 3rd, that DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN To remain so much the
1914.gainst the church of Christ did not end life of the Apostles ; /or a period of not l
1915.e powers of the earth continued to make war against it During that time there are o
1916.nued to make war against it During that time there are on record ten persecutions fo
1917.rs, and The 'in" •* ' tiiU*. with the matter of history that while those persecution
1918.e 'in" •* ' tiiU*. with the matter of history that while those persecutions lasted, s
1919.ank, sex and age. Buffered torments and death, in testimony of their Faith. it is 1
1920.o make them still more painful ; and at other times, the wounds were torn open again,
1921.nvincib most infectious and unwholesome being reserved for them; into these dungeons
1922.received, with their feet shackled, and being made to lie down on the broken stones w
1923.lly forbidden to hold converse with any one, because it was a well-known fact, that
1924.ir sufferings they were wont to convert many infidels, even to the gaolers and the s
1925.ldiers who guarded them. The concluding punishment was either to be beheaded, or burned fo
1926. burned for the Christians, the and dea mind su natural .^nd hen with th ft have aga
1927. enen tended tions, th tyrs wai TOWARDS GOD. lilive, 105 a high rock into tho sea,
1928.a b for prey. V "-""^^} .»»./« 'vi ; courage. ••:>'•. ftf:,.' ^ Neither was it
1929.ts and souls. We find in Ecclesiastical History, examples of courage and of fortitude,
1930. in Ecclesiastical History, examples of courage and of fortitude, which are, not only a
1931.rtures, the bare recital of which makes one shudder some even suffered with joy, an
1932.red his executioners to turn him on the other side, wishing that the fire might catch
1933. fire might catch his whole frame. What language in the midst of the most fearful tormen
1934. Christian heroes obtain that mvincible courage which enabled them to brave torments an
1935.hich enabled them to brave torments and death ? Who was it that gave them that streng
1936. was it that gave them that strength of mind superior to all that tyrants could devi
1937.en sustained frcm above, .md hence that religion, which they sealed and cemented Never c
1938.ld with their blood, is indeed a divine religion. have subsisted, had not an Almighty ha
1939. not an Almighty hand held it up ft But God against attacks so multiplied and so vi
1940.he persecutions, the more did the foith progress the blood of the martyrs was as H fruit
1941.' f,DUTY OF THK CHRISTIAN m- \M^ that the whole
1942. OF THK CHRISTIAN m- \M^ that the whole world, after having furiously persecuted the
1943. obliged to exclaim: " How great is the God of the Christians I" and then it embrac
1944.from making any public display of th^ir religion, under pain of death. Far from obeying
1945.public display of th^ir religion, under pain of death. Far from obeying this command
1946.isplay of th^ir religion, under pain of death. Far from obeying this command, the Cat
1947. in their accustomed place. The Emperor being informed of this, ordered the prefect t
1948.der with horror, for he was not a cruel man and he secretly apprised the Catholics
1949.ejoiced in so favourable an opportunity being given them to shed their blood in defen
1950.efence of the faith. The prefect set In one of the streets leading to the out with
1951.am going," she replied, " where all the other Catholics are going." " Stop, then !" s
1952. the emperor to put " I know it," every one to death that I shall find there ?" she
1953.peror to put " I know it," every one to death that I shall find there ?" she answered
1954.IP. 'il- O '^-^ with my child, the only one that God hath given me, that both he an
1955.O '^-^ with my child, the only one that God hath given me, that both he and I may h
1956.ven me, that both he and I may have the happiness of dying for the faith of Christ." The
1957.edingly confused by this incident, and, being unable to withhold his admiration for t
1958.able to withhold his admiration for the courage and constancy of the Catholics, he dela
1959.disciples of the Saviour. Ecclenaatical History UWARDH GOD. 105 ARTICLE ' III. MARKS OF
1960.e Saviour. Ecclenaatical History UWARDH GOD. 105 ARTICLE ' III. MARKS OF THE CHURCH
1961. society of the fkithful collected into one and the same body, governed by its legi
1962.the fkithful collected into one and the same body, governed by its legitimate pastor
1963.; the Pope, the successor of St. Peter, being his representative on earth.— Neverth
1964.The Church is oney because there is but one single we may attain salvation, and bec
1965.all .,»• 1'- .\\ members profess the same faith, participate in the same sacramen
1966.fess the same faith, participate in the same sacraments, are animated by the same sp
1967.he same sacraments, are animated by the same spirit, united in the same bond of char
1968.mated by the same spirit, united in the same bond of charity, aspire to the same end
1969.the same bond of charity, aspire to the same end, and obey the same pastors. 2nd. p.
1970.y, aspire to the same end, and obey the same pastors. 2nd. p.ile 4 , '" f' The Churc
1971. is the author of 3rd. her sanctity. is Universal; that is to she embraces all time for s
1972. Universal; that is to she embraces all time for she has always existed, without any
1973.existed, without any interr iption, and will exist till the consummation of ages, ac
1974. promise of her divine Founder. All the other societies, on the contrary, bear on the
1975. she is neither limited ; The Church by time nor space : ; too, is clearly ascertain
1976.either limited ; The Church by time nor space : ; too, is clearly ascertained, is whi
1977.that none of them Church of Christ. The space the faithful, of whom she is composed,
1978. the faithful, of whom she is composed, being spread over all the countries of the ea
1979.ntries of the earth, whilst each of the other societies is contained within some one
1980.ther societies is contained within some one kingdom or state. The Church is far mor
1981.is contained within some one kingdom or state. The Church is far more extensive than
1982.h is far more extensive than any of the other societies, calling themselves Christian
1983.Church embraces all ; I.'jl It 106 4th. DUTY OP THB CHRISTIAN The Church is Apostoli
1984.een ever since governed iWi^y p: -/ The other societies, In separating their successo
1985.ch, have lost that succession. by Every one, therefore, can easily ascertain vi'het
1986.behold her. Every .where she appears as one great body, professing the tlie same fa
1987. as one great body, professing the tlie same faith, believing same sacraments, and t
1988.ofessing the tlie same faith, believing same sacraments, and true in the same myster
1989.ieving same sacraments, and true in the same mysteries, receiving implicitly confidi
1990. also called the St. Roman Church ; be- cause the Pope, the successor of Rome, is her
1991.ive of his miraI can assure you, before God, that cles and his teachings. if that h
1992.nst it, and exclaim, as he used to do * Good God ! hast thou spared me so long, And
1993.t, and exclaim, as he used to do * Good God ! hast thou spared me so long, And he w
1994., 1..','!, j»r -i'i- lilt Mm m TOWARDS GOD. •• 107 Go, teach all nations, teac
1995.manded you. And lo I am with you all In virtue of days, even to the consummation of th
1996.esus Christ, who is the Fountain of al! being ever enlightened and directed by his sp
1997.enlightened and directed by his spirit, truth which is the spirit of truth, she can n
1998.is spirit, truth which is the spirit of truth, she can never promulgate error. Hence
1999.if <;. . piUar and great tJie ground of truth. Hence it is, too, that the relates to
2000.proposing to the faithful the truths of religion, or in condemning the errors which rise
2001.i.x:. if ' . The Church is the chair of truth she speaks to men in the name of God, a
2002. truth she speaks to men in the name of God, and when we submit our mind to her tea
2003.the name of God, and when we submit our mind to her teachings and decisions, it is t
2004.o her teachings and decisions, it is to God himself " He who heareth that we offer
2005.seth you, despiseth me also ; whosoever will not hear the Church, let him be unto th
2006.of our pastors is, therefore, the voice God. Hence the Apostles, aware of the high
2007.t, placed at the head of the firpt " It judgment they pronounced, these remarkable words
2008.ced, these remarkable words oath seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us " in order
2009.erstand that their decision was that of God himself. It was, in fact, necessary tha
2010.le, there woiiid \m reason to doubt the truth of its decisions, and the faithful woul
2011.wind of doctrint It was then the divine wisdom of Jesus Christ which secured to his Ch
2012.secured to his Church th» privilege of being preserved frsm all erroi in her teachin
2013.ns, and of transmitting to priests that same power, with whatever reserve they may d
2014., and remitting the penalty incurred by sin 3rd, in that of governing the faithful
2015., the rule which the church has made in virtue of the authority given her by Christ, f
2016.. Jerome was very uneasy in his desert. Being asked with whom he was in communion, wh
2017.. Damasus in these terms " Following no other chief but Jesus Christ, I am attached t
2018. '•.^''•••'.* •• perhaps no one phrase which has been (an that for near
2019.y two centuries) so much abused as that one Outside the Church there is no salvatio
2020.urch there is no salvatioji, and yet no truth is more easily demonstrated. What we ar
2021. about to say on this important subject will prove that the Catholic Church must nee
2022.st her by modern philosophers. There is one God : man, being his creature, is oblig
2023.er by modern philosophers. There is one God : man, being his creature, is obliged t
2024.modern philosophers. There is one God : man, being his creature, is obliged to obey
2025.n philosophers. There is one God : man, being his creature, is obliged to obey him, t
2026. to obey him, that is to say, to do his will, and to honour him in the way that he h
2027.t he himself hath prescribed. From this truth, confirmed as it is even by common sens
2028.ruth, confirmed as it is even by common sense, it follows that there is a religion, a
2029.ommon sense, it follows that there is a religion, a church, beyond which there is no sal
2030.urch, beyond which there is no salva in other words, a truth comprising all truth, a
2031.ich there is no salva in other words, a truth comprising all truth, a light tion cont
2032. in other words, a truth comprising all truth, a light tion containing ail light, and
2033. light tion containing ail light, and a virtue beyond which there is no is ; There '
2034. •»"•' /•r •Mi % j'-y^^'U 'L virtue. That religion which to is say self; it
2035. /•r •Mi % j'-y^^'U 'L virtue. That religion which to is say self; ity founder is ag
2036.e to y©u iu : My ought to be able from God, or rather he is God himreally the true
2037.ht to be able from God, or rather he is God himreally the true one, 4 his the only
2038. or rather he is God himreally the true one, 4 his the only I one which comes from
2039.imreally the true one, 4 his the only I one which comes from God, and the virtues w
2040., 4 his the only I one which comes from God, and the virtues wliich itself ,!• mm
2041.e those which alone conduct to him. Any religion which cannot speak in this way of it
2042. 1 )F1 can never be taken as the true religion, since sert that it is so. cannot even
2043.se ^' way, to warn those wrong way: you will be lost if you go on " In fact all reli
2044.; : If Ji.-lii ' ' •.•••. : 110 DUTY OP TUB tHHIRTIA?^ to their .'> approve
2045.tHHIRTIA?^ to their .'> approve of whaf Will any one say that all rolif^ions are equ
2046.^ to their .'> approve of whaf Will any one say that all rolif^ions are equally goo
2047.one say that all rolif^ions are equally good ? That would be to assert the grossest
2048.surdity, and maintain yes and no on the same subject. Will it, on the other hand, be
2049.aintain yes and no on the same subject. Will it, on the other hand, be said that all
2050.no on the same subject. Will it, on the other hand, be said that all are false, by wa
2051.d thereby deny the existence of natural religion, that li to say, the connection which s
2052.ch should exist between the intelligent being and his Creator secondly, he must be ra
2053.e facts, believed throughout the entire world, facts which manifestly prove that God
2054.orld, facts which manifestly prove that God has spoken to men thirdly, he must be t
2055.to the Diety. But if it be evident that man must have a religion, it is not less cl
2056.t if it be evident that man must have a religion, it is not less clear that there can be
2057.s not less clear that there can be only one which is true only one which is pleasin
2058.here can be only one which is true only one which is pleasing to God, or can lead t
2059.h is true only one which is pleasing to God, or can lead to everlasting happiness h
2060.sing to God, or can lead to everlasting happiness how can it be supposed that he who desp
2061.pposed that he who despises the Supreme Being who has created him, or who insults him
2062.d him, or who insults him by a criminal life, can have the same fate as he who adore
2063.ts him by a criminal life, can have the same fate as he who adores and loves him, an
2064.m by a criminal life, can have the same fate as he who adores and loves him, and who
2065.ontrary own belief. — — : — : his life error and truth, vice and virtue cannot
2066.ief. — — : — : his life error and truth, vice and virtue cannot have the same e
2067. — : — : his life error and truth, vice and virtue cannot have the same end, or
2068. : his life error and truth, vice and virtue cannot have the same end, or conduct to
2069. truth, vice and virtue cannot have the same end, or conduct to the same happiness t
2070.ot have the same end, or conduct to the same happiness there is then ; ; but one Rel
2071.ve the same end, or conduct to the same happiness there is then ; ; but one Religion, but
2072.he same happiness there is then ; ; but one Religion, but one Church. This point as
2073.ame happiness there is then ; ; but one Religion, but one Church. This point ascertained
2074.there is then ; ; but one Religion, but one Church. This point ascertained, which o
2075.ch of all the religions in the in order world is the true one, ? which It is all men
2076.gions in the in order world is the true one, ? which It is all men must embrace to
2077.o us by an uninter Prophets ; and whose truth has been proved that one, in a word, ru
2078. ; and whose truth has been proved that one, in a word, rupted chain of the success
2079.which manifest the divinity of the true religion that neithei is there salvation for lii
2080.i who having it in his power to see the truth, will not take the trouble of* adopting
2081.aving it in his power to see the truth, will not take the trouble of* adopting it; n
2082.ust reason to doubt the divinity of his religion, does not tako tlie necessary means to
2083.o tlie necessary means to ascertain the truth. It is not the Church then that condemn
2084. and bad faith. she only announces that Truth is one, even as God is onCf and that th
2085.faith. she only announces that Truth is one, even as God is onCf and that they who
2086.ly announces that Truth is one, even as God is onCf and that they who wilfully wand
2087.s unity, which is the essential mark of truth. But, it may be asked, what then is to
2088. be asked, what then is to become of so many children who die without baptism, of so
2089.children who die without baptism, of so many Pagans, Mahometans, Jews, heretics and
2090.e Holy Scripture says nothing as to the fate of children who die un baptised, and th
2091.struction is their own work. do not see God, but there is reason to hope that they
2092.vation. nations who might have the true religion, but refuse to emBut should it brace it
2093.ll be justly condemned. happen that any one was invincibly ignorant, or had no mean
2094.ant, or had no means of discovering the truth, then we might reasonably hope that God
2095.uth, then we might reasonably hope that God would rather work a miracle in his favo
2096.means of salva* Either their lion which God has granted to themselves ? ; '. ••
2097.. rv A' i'* ^ \* V,. 112 compliiints ^: DUTY OF THE iK'ur CHfilBTIAN V .i. which the
2098.o are not of the faith ? rooting up the evil which is in you, and which may destroy
2099. destroy you forever. Rest assured that God will never condemn tliose who sincerely
2100.troy you forever. Rest assured that God will never condemn tliose who sincerely seek
2101.r condemn tliose who sincerely seek the truth in order to embrace it, as he will assu
2102.the truth in order to embrace it, as he will assuredly punish those with severity wh
2103.tating several years in his choice of a religion, " Hail to thee, oh true Church thou wh
2104.h true Church thou who alone leadest to life eternal, lot my soul repose in the sh '
2105.o alone leadest to life eternal, lot my soul repose in the sh 'de f Fur from me the
2106.eight, but I sound not all tlie depth." will ileal lose time in examining how God
2107.nd not all tlie depth." will ileal lose time in examining how God — ! ! — ' —
2108." will ileal lose time in examining how God — ! ! — ' — — — > The Princes
2109.abeth Christina of Wolfenthought it her duty, before she married Chailu-s of Austria
2110.-morrow I shall become a Catholic. In a matter of so groat importance, the surest way
2111.er father expressed himself of the sune opinion, and he Examples. buttel, to>> :.h- —
2112. Catho* demanded of the bishops whether one could be ^^%\tA in the Church of Rome t
2113. of course, replied that ftT»!s::redly one could save his soul in the Church, and
2114. that ftT»!s::redly one could save his soul in the Church, and that, moreo'-.i, the
2115. either, whereupon irig iiiiswered that one could be saved rt that out of their Cli
2116.who compose the Churcl Catholic are and form but one body, of which Jesus Christ is
2117.se the Churcl Catholic are and form but one body, of which Jesus Christ is the head
2118.s, the Sacraments, the prayers, and all other good works .liich are done within the C
2119. Sacraments, the prayers, and all other good works .liich are done within the Church
2120.ity of the Church. All the members of a family labour for the advantage of tho whole,
2121.h the Church, whose members compose but one fiuniiy and one compact body. St. Paul
2122.ose members compose but one fiuniiy and one compact body. St. Paul compares the Chu
2123.nd no similitude could give us a bettor Idea of n ,mt is meant by the Comnmnion of S
2124.eculiar function nevertheless, they all form but one and the s^ine l>ody. They have
2125.unction nevertheless, they all form but one and the s^ine l>ody. They have all the
2126. and the s^ine l>ody. They have all the same head, tl»e sam<» in the state tion in
2127. all the same head, tl»e sam<» in the state tion in all the spiritual treasures ; ;
2128. - •I''. 1- •* • 114 ''.•1,',. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN same life. Boul, the t
2129. 114 ''.•1,',. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN same life. Boul, the tlieir functions of eac
2130. ''.•1,',. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN same life. Boul, the tlieir functions of each mem
2131.r, and all the body ; all concur to the same end, which is the preservation of the b
2132.bers conspire for the advantage of each other, and lend each other, in case of benefi
2133. advantage of each other, and lend each other, in case of benefits are for the The go
2134.er, in case of benefits are for the The good of I '.. "^ • .. . •^«-*Si;i V* ti
2135.e. So, in '*. faithful, animated by the same spirit, living the Church, all the unde
2136.t, living the Church, all the under the same \ >..• ;:.'^';^ • [ ' ;(*.-*•.•
2137.s for all the body, and receives at the same time the price of the labours, virtues,
2138. all the body, and receives at the same time the price of the labours, virtues, and
2139.in order to profit by these advantages, one must be a member of the Church those wh
2140.ull share in these gifts and blessings, one must even be a living member of the Chu
2141.be a living member of the Church, or in other words, one must be in the state of grac
2142.ember of the Church, or in other words, one must be in the state of grace. Those si
2143., or in other words, one must be in the state of grace. Those siimers in whom the Hol
2144.re dead members can they pretend to the same advantages as those who are full of lif
2145.ame advantages as those who are full of life ? A dead arm^ though it remain attached
2146.o that society in which alone are found truth, charity, justice, salvation, and the m
2147.n which alone are found truth, charity, justice, salvation, and the means of attaining
2148.nt, comprising all those who still wage war on earth against the enemies of salvati
2149.the Church Suffering, which is composed life The : ; ; of the souls who are yet expi
2150.th him for us Uie Saints on their side, love us as their brethren, and assist We off
2151.nd assist We offer our supplications to God on us by their prayers. behalf of the s
2152.in purgatory we give alms, and p^erfonn other good works that he may relieve them in
2153.gatory we give alms, and p^erfonn other good works that he may relieve them in their
2154.the liappiness of tlie Saints, we bless God for n-' > ,' •••'Ti.'r -'!*;•,
2155.r all the Church. When about martyrdom, being condemned to be burned alive for the Fa
2156. " I entreat thee to remember me before God ? " The holy mar tyr replied, " I must
2157.ght Church Catkolic, throughout all the world. 'r. .•>•.,: /'' J-:\,i ' for the W
2158.Church that remission of sins is found, God grants that favour only to those who be
2159.stians are first cleansed from original sin but as it too frequently happens that t
2160.ituted a Sacrament for the remissirn of sin, committed after Baptism this is the Sa
2161.ptism this is the SacramenI of Penance. God is always disposed to forgive us, provi
2162.incere sorrow for our sins. There is no sin which cannot be effaced by this means.
2163.\r:. .vi ;•» J 4 :'^:^^v.:v' no It , DUTY OP THE CHRI8TIATC |!;! ^'•^ •:•,
2164.d the motive of their confidence. It is God alone who can forgive sin ; hence, when
2165.idence. It is God alone who can forgive sin ; hence, when the priest pronounces the
2166.unces the sentence of absolution, it is God him; The promise which God has made who
2167.ution, it is God him; The promise which God has made who j: effaces the sin by his
2168.e which God has made who j: effaces the sin by his ministry. ',"''.".! ' |'"-*i:'ii
2169.ed to his Church the power of remitting sin " Receive ye the Holy Ohosl" said he to
2170. of a person who, after having offended God, could never recover the grace he had l
2171.ty, while feeling himself hurried on by time towards the fatal term of his reprobati
2172.s, be taken not*- to abuse the mercy of God, or presume upon it, in order to sin mo
2173.of God, or presume upon it, in order to sin more What! should we offend him because
2174.is Let us not deceive ourselves in this matter infinitely good ? that abuse of his mer
2175.ive ourselves in this matter infinitely good ? that abuse of his mercy is the crime
2176.ich of all others offends him most, and God w^ho forgives all those who worthily ap
2177.ent of reconciliation, may not leave us time to have "ecourse to it. How many people
2178.ave us time to have "ecourse to it. How many people have been cut off in their sins,
2179.ster. " Because the Catechism says that one must have more sorrow for his sins than
2180.e more sorrow for his sins than for the death of his father and for my part, I have ;
2181.griev3d far more for sins." my father's death than evei* I did for my His master told
2182.that perhaps \q did not clearly TOWARDS GOD. i 117 understand what he had heard, an
2183.orrow which we feel for having offended God, is of a nature entirely distinct from
2184.e feel for having offended God, is of a nature entirely distinct from the grief arisin
2185.ing from the The former is a hatred and death of a friend, or parent ? a detestation
2186.riend, or parent ? a detestation of the sin committed the latter is the effect of t
2187.t for a dear Do you hate, do you detest sin ? are j^ou resolved relation. rather to
2188., do you detest sin ? are j^ou resolved relation. rather to die than to sin again ? If s
2189.esolved relation. rather to die than to sin again ? If such are your sentiments, yo
2190.short, true On hearing this, the worthy man began to contrition." breathe more free
2191.ESURRECTION OF THE BODY. our body shall one day rise shall arise again with the sam
2192.one day rise shall arise again with the same bodies they had in this life. The body,
2193.n with the same bodies they had in this life. The body, laid in the earth, shall go
2194. it may have undergone, its ashes shall one day be gathered together and reanimated
2195.ogether and reanimated by the breath of God. Life is but a dream, and death a sleep
2196.er and reanimated by the breath of God. Life is but a dream, and death a sleep; but
2197.breath of God. Life is but a dream, and death a sleep; but the resurrection will be t
2198.and death a sleep; but the resurrection will be the beginning of a hfe which shall n
2199. hfe which shall never end. There is no truth more clearly established in Holy Writ,
2200.ery beginning. " I know," said the holy man Job an article of faith, that • .•'
2201.^|; '*'. •^•' •-ih :' liveth, and will raise me up at the last be clothed agai
2202.my skin, and in my flesh I shall see my God whom I myself shall see, and my ^yes sh
2203. my Redeemer I shall day and ; the no.w Law that this truth is made clearly manifes
2204. shall day and ; the no.w Law that this truth is made clearly manifest. " The day com
2205.rave shall hear the voice of the Sou of God, and they wlw will &" , !. 118 • ', 1
2206.e voice of the Sou of God, and they wlw will &" , !. 118 • ', 1 DUTY OP THE CHSIfi
2207. and they wlw will &" , !. 118 • ', 1 DUTY OP THE CHSIfiTIAIf ; « «• »! 'fr f
2208.f , • 'M V" ' 1 ,i » • . have done good works, shall arise and live forever but
2209.and live forever but they who have done evil shall arise to be condemned." " In a
2210.ved before us from the beginning of the world, they who are now on the earth, they wh
2211.and rise again at the last day with the same bodies they had in this life. It is God
2212.y with the same bodies they had in this life. It is God who will work this prodigy b
2213.ame bodies they had in this life. It is God who will work this prodigy by his Omnip
2214.es they had in this life. It is God who will work this prodigy by his Omnipotence. A
2215.s drawn all things from notliing by his will alone, so shall he with as much ease, g
2216.suscitate in the spring ? The grain and other seed which is cast into the earth, deca
2217.th again fairer than at first it is the same with our body which, like unto a seed,
2218.r a season, to come forth again full of life. The bodies of the just shall not then
2219.un, and shall be free from all sorts of pain and inconvenience, full of strength and
2220.he body, which has had its share in the good doi>e by the soul while they were joine
2221. had its share in the good doi>e by the soul while they were joined together, shall
2222.o sleep in the dust of the earth," says one of the Prophets, " shall awake, some fo
2223.-«• .•• :L •'•1 *';' TOWARDS GOD, ! lit) What a spectacle shall then mee
2224.all then meet our eyes what soiiliments will arise in our hearts, when we hear the s
2225.adful voice shall echo over and come to judgment " the earth, " Arise, ye dead when we s
2226.l see all mankind assemble, without any other distinction than that made by tlieir ow
2227. cruel torments rather than violate the Law of God, because they Example. —In the
2228.torments rather than violate the Law of God, because they Example. —In the i ,. ,
2229. and the skin torn off his head, and he being still alive he was cast into a caldron
2230., said to the king: "You now put- us to death but the Ruler of the world shall one da
2231.w put- us to death but the Ruler of the world shall one day raise us up to life everT
2232. death but the Ruler of the world shall one day raise us up to life everThe third s
2233. the world shall one day raise us up to life everThe third said with confidence " I
2234.em as nothing in defence of the Laws of God, because I ho[)e that they shall be one
2235.God, because I ho[)e that they shall be one day restored to me." The fourth spoke i
2236. better for us to Jbe slain for obeying God, these terms then to preserve our lives
2237. •. ', -3 ; »,. » the resurrection, God will render glorious these bodies which
2238.. ', -3 ; »,. » the resurrection, God will render glorious these bodies which we r
2239.rom him." The others manifested similar courage and intrepidity. Nevertheless, the youn
2240.thou shalt not fear these torments, but will follow thy brethren to death " Antiochu
2241.rments, but will follow thy brethren to death " Antiochus, more than ever em aged, po
2242. and caused the rnothei t<3 undergo the same torments as her sons. in ; ; ! ! • m
2243.: III: u. • •••>' " — — 120 DUTY OP THE CHHISTIAIf CHAPTER I * '•«.',
2244. CHAPTER I * '•«.', XIII. BELIEVE IN LIFE EVERLASTING. •b' ' J, -* 1: : «•-.
2245.i.. '''S.-Vt-# f» '.,. .^>: •'" OirR soul, immortal in its nature, on quitting th
2246.. .^>: •'" OirR soul, immortal in its nature, on quitting the body, from this life t
2247.nature, on quitting the body, from this life to another, from this visible world to
2248.this life to another, from this visible world to a world invisible. The Pagans themse
2249.o another, from this visible world to a world invisible. The Pagans themselves believ
2250. Pagans themselves believed in a future life, wherein man was to be punished or -^co
2251.lves believed in a future life, wherein man was to be punished or -^compensed accor
2252. his works. The expectation oi a future life is therefore the dogma of all mankind,
2253. dogma of all mankind, and the faith of nature. There is, then, another life to come a
2254.aith of nature. There is, then, another life to come after this, and that life shall
2255.other life to come after this, and that life shall never have an end. shall be etern
2256.py or eternally miserable, according as God has found us Just •>r wickcu at the m
2257. Just •>r wickcu at the moment of our death but as the soul may be stained with num
2258.u at the moment of our death but as the soul may be stained with numerous trivial fa
2259.which must exclude it from heaven for a time, yet do not make it deserving of hell,
2260.nd guilty, at their departure from this world, of certain venial sins, or who otherwi
2261.otherwise have not satisfied the divine Justice for the penalty which remains after mor
2262. the penalty which remains after mortal sin h-2263.nce as thine own v>e are going to enter religion." " That is to say," replied the ciiild
2264. mine assuredly our shares are far from being equal," and he soo after followed their
2265. bury himself with : — ; ; GoDEscAKD. Life of St. Bernard. ARTICLE In order to go
2266. • I. ON PURGATORY. immediately after death, the its baptismal innocence, or — TO
2267.its baptismal innocence, or — TOWARDS GOD. it ; 12i by penince for nothing defile
2268. can entef recovered But human weakness being so great, it is very heaven. difficult
2269.urselves pure amid the contagion of the world, and to bo found at the final moment en
2270.he final moment entirely free hence the necessity of a place from stain or imperfection ;
2271. although remitted, as to their eternal punishment, by the Sacrament of Penance. In the ti
2272.nt, by the Sacrament of Penance. In the time of the old Law, this truth was perfectl
2273.ment of Penance. In the time of the old Law, this truth was perfectly well known, a
2274.nance. In the time of the old Law, this truth was perfectly well known, and all who w
2275.his soldiers, slain in battle " it is a good and salutary thing to pray for the dead
2276.hey ma}' be delivered from their sins." truth has been more clearly defined by the de
2277. and may not be remitted either in this world or the other. Although the Church has n
2278.be remitted either in this world or the other. Although the Church has not decided wi
2279.reat several of the fathers are even of opinion that they differ from the pains of hell
2280.the elect, friends of Jesus Christ, and being destined to reign vith him, they will b
2281. being destined to reign vith him, they will be able to indemnify us a hundred-fold
2282. • . , 'I ..-..• " 122 -hjive [)lty DUTY OF TUK OHKI8TIAN on L u you, at least,
2283. on those to whom yon tvve so even your life, and the wealth } m poshave compassion
2284.hom yon tvve so even your life, and the wealth } m poshave compassion on our lamentati
2285.n alms, a prayer, the sacrifice of some pleasure or enjoyment, which you will make on ou
2286.f some pleasure or enjoyment, which you will make on our behalf, nay, the slightest
2287. our misfortunes, and neglect us in the time of our place of woe ; many ; obligation
2288.ct us in the time of our place of woe ; many ; obligations, — : — Will you dare
2289. of woe ; many ; obligations, — : — Will you dare give yourselves up to joy whil
2290.ou dare give yourselves up to joy while necessity ? we are plunged in devouring flames V*
2291.assion if we saw him in so deplorable a state, and we could not refrain from stretcji
2292.heir own These souls carmot satisfy the justice of God but by paying they are as prison
2293.ese souls carmot satisfy the justice of God but by paying they are as prisoners ret
2294.y having the Holy SacCharity makes it a duty rifice offered up on their behalf. for
2295. It is even our interest to fulfil this duty, for the souls whom we may have relieve
2296.for the souls whom we may have relieved will be sure to interest them selves for us
2297.aven, and that most efl!icaciously they will become powerful protectors for us as re
2298..' •',:i;t!T LI x-*fl Hi •;-4( Even justice compels us to be mind©f the souls in p
2299.i •;-4( Even justice compels us to be mind©f the souls in purgatory and that beca
2300.sions, or otherwise for having offended God on our account it may be a father or mo
2301.y have enjoined us to give alms or malw world and the next. ful ; ; ; l\-" '!-" •?
2302. . '^ * .*! • I 'tt.*'' ,' 'I TOWARDS GOD. restitution (ietaiiied in 123 to do, t
2303.Mi'LE. St. Perpetua, St. Felicitas, and other sorvanta of Ciirist, having been arrest
2304.rison, where Perpetua was favoured with many In the first of these, the Lord made kn
2305.uffer niari^idom in the second, she saw one of her brothers, who had It appeared to
2306. appeared to her that the boy died some time before. suffered the most dreadful torm
2307.d with a devouring thirst, without ever being able to reach the edge of a basin or po
2308.r, she saw her brother agaiii, but this time he appeared clean and conifortable, ref
2309.ble, refreshing himself, and roaming at will over the plain where the basin was. Thu
2310. abode of the glory and magnificence of God, being the dwelling-place prepared by h
2311.e of the glory and magnificence of God, being the dwelling-place prepared by him for
2312.o ; '* live in his fear, and die in his love tire but in order to treasures, make us
2313.le its joys, it would be necessary that one of the blessed souls should come down "
2314.th its it t'i entered into the heart of man to conceive the glory that God hath pre
2315.heart of man to conceive the glory that God hath prepared for his elect." can, the
2316.ranscendant Let us imagine, if joy of a soul entering into heaven we ! m Oh what a m
2317.ment is that, when the miseries of this life being for ever at an end, an eternity o
2318.is that, when the miseries of this life being for ever at an end, an eternity of happ
2319. this life being for ever at an end, an eternity of happiness is com! menced is ! With w
2320.eing for ever at an end, an eternity of happiness is com! menced is ! With what it ; deli
2321.ld its what satisfaction, what trangits God, and feel that its fata ever decided ha
2322.od, and feel that its fata ever decided happiness secured ^Iv. •:-?../;;,:• '. .IT.i
2323.for a captive when he has recoveied his liberty, and escaped from the hard yoke of slav
2324.erty, and escaped from the hard yoke of slavery! what joy for a prisoner, long immured
2325.n beholds the light of day what joy for one who has been long tossed on the stormy
2326.amid tempests and quicksands, where his life was continually ! . '• I ' " ' J *
2327.these, of the joy, the conBolation, the happiness of a soul which, after the long cap. ti
2328.oy, the conBolation, the happiness of a soul which, after the long cap. tivity, the
2329.r ever, amongst the elect to dwell with God himself, the Author cf its being, the t
2330.ell with God himself, the Author cf its being, the term of its desires, the centre of
2331.ing him for aU fear of again losing him eternity, and to be a partaker in his happiness
2332.m eternity, and to be a partaker in his happiness But it is not enough to know the bliss
2333.also try to merit it by the practice of good works. ** Narrow is the way," says Jesu
2334.h what we seek. What should we not have courage to do ourselves a little violence, to d
2335.r to overcome human respect, in view of happiness Where then is our faith ? where our rea
2336.abour all their lives to amass a little wealth, knowing, nevertheless, that they must
2337.at heaven which is to be " To secure an eternity possessed and enjoyed for ever of happi
2338.rnity possessed and enjoyed for ever of happiness," says St. Augustin, ''an eternity of l
2339. of happiness," says St. Augustin, ''an eternity of labour and toil would not be too muc
2340.uld not be too much to give, and yet we will not give it even a moment." A short p r
2341., to sensuality; and our duties, to the love of pleasure And yet we as pire to becom
2342.suality; and our duties, to the love of pleasure And yet we as pire to become the associ
2343.t'Tf: TOWARDS OOD. 125 —the heroeb of religion be earned ; ; Heaven is a reward, which
2344. vanities, goods, and pleaaureo of this life, we are neither innocent, nor repentant
2345.entant, and are, therefore, unworthy of being admitted into heaven. Ah how consoling
2346.an to know that every thing he does for God shall be abundantly recompensed that ev
2347.cup of cold water given in his name, or one aspiration of the heart to him, shall n
2348.s, the disgraces which throw the wicked life! into despair, become for the just so m
2349.e! into despair, become for the just so many sources of merit by the resignation wit
2350.which he receives them, and the hope of being indemnified for them in heaven, which h
2351.that he daily sends the treasure of his good works it is for heaven that ! it is ,*^
2352.lso endeavour to procure for others the same advantage, and more especially our own
2353. the truest and best way of proving our love for them. We can do nothing more advant
2354.ays St. Chrysostom, " who macerates his God. body by alf possible austerities has l
2355.ties has less merit than he who gains a soul for God it is something greater to save
2356.less merit than he who gains a soul for God it is something greater to save one's b
2357.for God it is something greater to save one's brethren than to work miracles." It w
2358.salvation of souls which has induced so many apostolical men to quit country, and pa
2359.d baptise their children in danger of * death! He," says St. John, "who gaineth his b
2360."who gaineth his brother the risk to to God, shall save his soul and cover the mult
2361.ther the risk to to God, shall save his soul and cover the multitude of » hii sins.
2362.ultitude of » hii sins. -2. t^SA ! 126 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAIT ^- -i. Example. M. Bo
2363. I every day beg of him to terminate my life, either while I aro announcing his gosp
2364.o announcing his gospel in the chair of truth, or exercising !" in the sacred tribuna
2365.ed tribunal the ottice of his mercy and justice A prayer Uke that, dictated by ardent a
2366.d the pulpit to preach on the glory and happiness of the Saints. His delivery had in it a
2367. He is a Saint, he died speaking of the happiness of heaven." A child who was present was
2368.ng of paradise and he has gone there it will ; ; ; . Carron, Life of Bow soul. TOWAB
2369. has gone there it will ; ; ; . Carron, Life of Bow soul. TOWABDS GOD. ISH ARTICLE U
2370.ere it will ; ; ; . Carron, Life of Bow soul. TOWABDS GOD. ISH ARTICLE UV HKLL. HI.
2371.; ; . Carron, Life of Bow soul. TOWABDS GOD. ISH ARTICLE UV HKLL. HI. 1 is n. hell,
2372.ternally punished with the demons. This truth, like all the others of our creed, has
2373. 8peaks,in the Gospel, of a fiery furby God. nace, a place of torment where there s
2374.r corrupt ; they risk the penalty of an eternity of torment for the pleasure of a v'ngle
2375.nalty of an eternity of torment for the pleasure of a v'ngle moment. [lains are of two s
2376.re of two sorts, that of loss, and that pain of loss consists in the privation of th
2377. privation of the sight and presence of God, whereas that of the senses consists of
2378.ng to the expression of St. Augustin, " will attach itself to the corporal members w
2379.which have served aa the instruments of sin, and also to the intellectual faculties
2380. damned are deprived of the presence of God, and they suffer, moreover, the most fe
2381.the most cruel tormenU both of body and soul, plunged in total despair, and without
2382. ' .: .A- W -Jij:T My . , ! 4; i28 :' . DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN it '' ' '-.H -' * •'
2383.' '-.H -' * •' But, may be said tliat God is too merciful to punish for an eterni
2384.punish for an eternit}* a single mortal sin which was perhaps but of a moment's dur
2385.ration. The answer is that the mercy of God is not, cannot be opposed to his justic
2386.of God is not, cannot be opposed to his justice, which latter requires , ,.» that a fo
2387..» that a for, in the first place, the sin '*^ f. man who dies impenitent should b
2388.for, in the first place, the sin '*^ f. man who dies impenitent should be of that m
2389.n who dies impenitent should be of that man eternally punished; is in some measure
2390.- Vt vi;- which mei'its consequently an eternity of punishment; 2nd, mortal sin combats
2391.ich mei'its consequently an eternity of punishment; 2nd, mortal sin combats and destroys,
2392. an eternity of punishment; 2nd, mortal sin combats and destroys, as far as it is a
2393. as it is able, an eternal and infinite good, it ought therefore to be punished with
2394.ternal in its duration, seeing that mai being '^nite is not capable of sustaining a t
2395. of sustaining a torment that is in its nature infinite 3rd, human justice sometimes p
2396.at is in its nature infinite 3rd, human justice sometimes punishes a crime that was sho
2397.that was short in its duj'ation, with a punishment that is eternal as far as the life of m
2398.unishment that is eternal as far as the life of man is concerned, such as perpetual
2399.t that is eternal as far as the life of man is concerned, such as perpetual exile,
2400.untry. Why, then, should not the divine justice banish forever from the celestial mansi
2401. out from heaven by wilfully dying in a state of final impenitence ? Young people, be
2402.nt take the firm resolution of avoiding sin which would inevitably lead you to perd
2403. all worldly interests if you save your soul, all is gained if you lose it, all will
2404.soul, all is gained if you lose it, all will be indeed lost, for you, even had you g
2405. universe while here on earth to die in sin ; ; : ; ; Examples. Some young libertin
2406.of living, and at last said to him " Ah will be well caught if there is, after all,
2407.caught if there is, after all, no " You will be still worse taken in," returned the
2408.n in," returned the there is a hell, as religion teaches us." his : way ..ill- '!#. ; j
2409.#. ; j The Gospel relates that the rich man being in hell, and seeing Abraham in gl
2410. j The Gospel relates that the rich man being in hell, and seeing Abraham in glory, a
2411.nd cool my tongue, for I am ! ; TOWAKDS GOD. Buffering in these 129 " ! son/' said
2412.nts Abraham, " remember that thou hadst good things life, —" My :'„ %• -Si ^-
2413. " remember that thou hadst good things life, —" My :'„ %• -Si ^- \ , • duri
2414.THE PROFESSION OF CHRISTIANITY, AND THE SIGN OF THE CROSS. .'..^^., ;.: .; z;^^ •
2415. cii3ci])les profession of our faith is one of our most es- >• •' ':;. ;f !J*'
2416.' ':;. ;f !J*' •< '* for Jesus Christ will not recognize as hih those who have bee
2417.aiik from declaring their faith openly. One of the best means of showing that we ar
2418. make religiously upon ourselves august sign of the cross. There are two ways of mak
2419.cross. There are two ways of making the sign of the cross: llie fiist is by making w
2420.els, and all the faithful should do the same. We make the sign of the cross on our f
2421.aithful should do the same. We make the sign of the cross on our forehead, to show t
2422.eady to make profession of believing in God and in Jesus Christ and on the breast,
2423.rist and on the breast, to show that we love the cross of Christ, and hearti- . ', ,
2424.rofess. The second method of making the sign of the cross is by olacing the right ha
2425.of ing Uie Holy Ghost." When making the sign of the ^ross we profess the unity of Go
2426.gn of the ^ross we profess the unity of God by saying these words in the namey in t
2427.nd that of the Redemption by making the form of the cross on which the Son of God ii
2428.e form of the cross on which the Son of God iiade man, died for us and the myitery
2429.the cross on which the Son of God iiade man, died for us and the myitery of grace,
2430.ly believe ! ; ; 1 " m^^ 130 ryinir the DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN riglit, to tlie hand f
2431.1 am going ; ; to perform this action I will the Father," signify again: by order of
2432.gain: by order of the Most Holy Tiinity will 1. . I do this in "...c;-^^ ¥f: render
2433.y Ghost. We should not fail to make the sign of the cross at least ; obey it faithfu
2434.d upon our undertakings the blessing of God. ; » We should also make it, at least
2435.tation, to the end find that we may ing God. • . be delivered therefrom, and pres
2436.le. young girl blushed while making the sign of the cross on an occasion when it is
2437. - .* r-' of her cowardice, and want of love for Jesus Christ: " What " said he, " J
2438.e cross to redeem you, yet you blush to form on yourseh the august sign of your rede
2439.you blush to form on yourseh the august sign of your redemption " He added, " I hope
2440." He added, " I hope that in future you will glory in belonging to your adorable Mas
2441. bless you, ten through the passion and death of Our Lord Jesus Christ! ! ! Labausse
2442. to^ ••; •^•^ 2' - ; ; TOWARDS GOD. 131 SECOND TREATISE. •• •• '?
2443.• •• '? \ .* ^ .8 ON THE LOVB OF GOD AND OUR NEIGHBOUR. CHAPTER God had from
2444. LOVB OF GOD AND OUR NEIGHBOUR. CHAPTER God had from Law on fainter I. '''..-i-^''
2445.AND OUR NEIGHBOUR. CHAPTER God had from Law on fainter I. '''..-i-^'' OP THE COMMAN
2446.DMENTS IN GENERAL. the beginning of the world engraved hia f , .'4 • ,.••.r.•
2447.'!. • /'. , • .'.'• the heart of man ; but, as the impression became as time
2448. man ; but, as the impression became as time passed away, he resolved to publish it
2449.when they had learned " We what was the will of God, replied with acclamation shall
2450.y had learned " We what was the will of God, replied with acclamation shall do what
2451.which filled the air around. The people being struck with terror, hid themselves in t
2452.vance as far as the boundary line which God had ordered him to make around the foot
2453.st of the cloud, was heard the voice of God, distinctly pronouncing the ten "/ am t
2454. pronouncing the ten "/ am the Lord thy God, ^c, tS^c." commandments These ten comm
2455.ch he had to command us, manifested his will, and commanded that it should be observ
2456.^v| i.' ,a,*i' I , ,*.•* 1 -• Thi,; law is for us, as well as for the Israelite
2457.;•*"•»»/ >• ' . «l': ' natural law, the all men, and is comprises the duty
2458. law, the all men, and is comprises the duty of the standard of comparison which wil
2459.uty of the standard of comparison which will decide all law of society ; it "« ""'
2460.ard of comparison which will decide all law of society ; it "« ""' ''^Ji.''' "f ^(
2461.C^f^| • i' • •• - their eternal fate. <,.'.''l.':' . ii:, -n. . ui*V ••<
2462.' .*<, -v ;. J I »; ^- " , . * t. 132 DUTY OP THE CIIKISTIAW ^- -f Tlie three firs
2463.precepts of the Decalogue point out our duty towards God, and the seven others, that
2464.he Decalogue point out our duty towards God, and the seven others, that which we ow
2465.ich we owe to our neighbour ; hence the love of God and our neighbour is the abridgm
2466.we to our neighbour ; hence the love of God and our neighbour is the abridgment of
2467. our neighbour is the abridgment of the Law. II 9, * '•*.v. Example. A venerable
2468. 9, * '•*.v. Example. A venerable old man, seeing a number of children pressing a
2469.marked, 1st., that they who do not fear God are almost invariably miserable 2nd., t
2470.work clone on Sunday has never made any one the richer ; 3rd., that ill-gotten weal
2471.., tliai giving alms has never made any one the poorer 5th., that morning and eveii
2472.d has never been a happy or a fortunate one." Petit Souvenir have will monarchs mus
2473.r a fortunate one." Petit Souvenir have will monarchs must remind us that God ; ; ;
2474. have will monarchs must remind us that God ; ; ; CHAPTER / am Tins all 'v !.* : 11
2475. THE FIRST COMMANDMENT OF the Lord, thy God, S^c. first believe in commandment orda
2476.. first believe in commandment ordains: God; 2nd., hope in him; 4th., 1st., that we
2477.; 4th., 1st., that we should with 3rd., love him our heart; adore but him alone, 1 ^
2478.. . m^ '^: supernatural and theological virtue, by which the iruilis that the Church t
2479.s that the Church teaches, because that God, who can neither deceive nor be deceive
2480.ents. By tradition is meant the word of God, which, without Laving been penned down
2481.ses it to the faithful by an infallible judgment and with supreme auGod has given her th
2482.in her teaching, even to the end of the world. ought, therefore, to believe all that
2483.d and to be saved. Faith does honour to God, rendering homage to Him as the supreme
2484. rendering homage to Him as the supreme truth it is, as St. Paul says, a sacrifice, a
2485.acts of faith on the truths of our holy religion, in order to testify to God our submiss
2486.r holy religion, in order to testify to God our submission to his revealed word. Th
2487.submission, which we owe to the word of God and to the teaching of the Church, is s
2488.ike our senses. Is not the testimony of God, who can neither be deceived nor deceiv
2489. us, more worthy of belief than that of man, or even than the ividence of our own s
2490. ividence of our own senses, and of our mind, whose faculties are in themselves so l
2491.ational than to believe, on the word of God, things which we do not understand in t
2492. not because we comprehend, but because God has said it faith is founded on the wor
2493.said it faith is founded on the word of God, and 12 mitting our to his infallible '
2494.and 12 mitting our to his infallible 'i mind :••:.! v;:*^- '•.;• '••'iir
2495.nv'V' ':.;i.' '-'{.J ; : i|:' »• 134 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN -.V -4 >. '• ';.»
2496.. mysteries of faith but by revelation: God has revealed them, and he has, moreover
2497.n to the thority to propose them to us. knowledge of the truth, he has also provided mean
2498.to propose them to us. knowledge of the truth, he has also provided means of as. cert
2499.e most capable of convincing a rational mind. Public facts, and shining miracles are
2500.ncontestible proofs which establish the truth of religion. ** Jesus Christ," says St.
2501.ble proofs which establish the truth of religion. ** Jesus Christ," says St. Auj'ustin,
2502. works." Miracles are then the voice of God, and no one can, without impiety, rejec
2503.acles are then the voice of God, and no one can, without impiety, reject a doctrine
2504.uld be an impious absurdity to say that God had displayed his almighty power to aut
2505.i-"-' *.> teaches, since to reject even one article the faith. would be to lose '*:
2506.'." 'J*' r^'f -i ' ^^ i: :'fe' It is to sin against faith if we voluntarily doubt a
2507.eaches, and we expose ourselves lo such sin when we have the temerity to read impio
2508. the danger shall perish therein." also sin against faith when, through human fear,
2509. suffer all soils of torments, and even death itself, rather than dissemble their fai
2510.their faith before tyrants. Finally, we sin against faith when we neglect to seek i
2511. seek instruction on those truths whose knowledge is necessary to salvation. It is throug
2512.ion. It is through this negligence that many Christians live in ignorance of that wh
2513.ich they ought to know, and thus commit many sins which they do not even perceive. W
2514.aith, whereby we believe on the word of God lively or practical faith, which is acc
2515.or theoretical faith, which charity and good works bears no such fruit infused faith
2516.ding which we obtain by the practice of virtue implicit faith, which makes us believe
2517., and the Redemption the four <»nds of man what relates to the Commandments, the S
2518. do not Christ now believe, but the day will come when you shall if not in You shall
2519.if not in You shall then believe as the time, it will be in eternity. devils do they
2520. You shall then believe as the time, it will be in eternity. devils do they believe,
2521.then believe as the time, it will be in eternity. devils do they believe, and yet are to
2522. Hope is a supernatural and theological virtue by which we expect with a firm confiden
2523.th a firm confidence in the goodness of God, all the blessings which he has promise
2524.ing less than the eternal possession of God himself; that happiness is infinitely a
2525.eternal possession of God himself; that happiness is infinitely above ourselves and our e
2526.ourselves we are not able to merit such happiness ; but God, who loves "s notwithstanding
2527. not able to merit such happiness ; but God, who loves "s notwithstanding our miser
2528.elieves in him may not perish, but have life eternal. Tbe sight of our miseries shou
2529..j; ' '"*, .' ~ v. - 'T - 7 "i- • 130 DUTY OF THE CIIHISTIAN If', ...•* ,• ,-"
2530.,1 «... , V • Vent us from hoping in God, and looking for the possession of the
2531.ble his mercy which is infinite the tht virtue merits of Jesus Christ which are inexha
2532. the Christian's ope. After such and so many assurances it would be hm insult offere
2533.rances it would be hm insult offered to God not to hope in him. As God will have us
2534.t offered to God not to hope in him. As God will have us believe when he speaks, so
2535.fered to God not to hope in him. As God will have us believe when he speaks, so also
2536.e us believe when he speaks, so also he will have us confide in him when he promises
2537.is humbh, sincere, and nersevering, for God never breaks his promise. Heaven and ea
2538.ed that if we do not want confidence in God, he will grant us all that he has promi
2539.if we do not want confidence in God, he will grant us all that he has promised. Chri
2540.o opposite vices: desWe siu pair on the one side, and presumption on the other. aga
2541.on the one side, and presumption on the other. against Hope when we despair of salvat
2542.en we despair of salvation such was the sin of Cain, who, having killed his brother
2543.too great to be forgiven." Despair is a sin the most horrible in the sight of God,
2544.a sin the most horrible in the sight of God, because it outrages his goodness, the
2545., because it outrages his goodness, the one of all his perfections which he most lo
2546.. "A mother may abandon her child but I will never abandon those who put their trust
2547.your sins were red as scarlet, and your soul black : ; ; : We ; ; t:«;i.^?^ "<.*;
2548.i.^?^ "<.*;•, ,* as coal, trition V I will never cast you off* when you seek me wi
2549. with con. and confidence." There is no sin which our Lord haa not expiated by his
2550. which our Lord haa not expiated by his death, and for which ho has not merited pardo
2551.his tenderness us. .•I:.*-.--'!/ That good Father requires only him our repentance
2552.ness. ' ':>' ; •I! ; : -'^i.^ TOWARDS GOD. 131 We selvo- alsu Bill agtiinst of (^
2553.se who, forming for them])l'I1ovo false idea of the mercy of God, that ; they .i*.-
2554.hem])l'I1ovo false idea of the mercy of God, that ; they .i*.- may save their "soul
2555. offend liim or who, counting on a long life, persuade themselves that it will Bufli
2556. long life, persuade themselves that it will Buflice to think of the business of sal
2557.shall have passed away. " Tiie mercy of God is great He will forgive me the mulmany
2558.d away. " Tiie mercy of God is great He will forgive me the mulmany have been deceiv
2559.m. let us not defer giving ourselves to God, for we illusion know not what will be
2560.s to God, for we illusion know not what will be the duration of our life. May not de
2561.ow not what will be the duration of our life. May not defth surprise us at any momen
2562.rise us at any moment ? It is true that one sinner was converted at his last moment
2563.t, but it was a miracle operated at the death of Jesus Christ, and woe to him wliose
2564.lvation depends on a miracle! Again, we sin against Hope when we lack submission to
2565.ce of Providence in the affairs of this world, believing ourselves unhappy when we su
2566.sses, or afflictions, murmuring against God, or wishing ourselves dead, which is in
2567.d how can we thus want confidence in so good a Father, who assures us that the very
2568.irs of our heads are numbered, nud that one of them cannot fall without his pormiss
2569.ission ? All that happens to us in this world is for our greater good, and may merit
2570. to us in this world is for our greater good, and may merit for us eternal happiness
2571.ater good, and may merit for us eternal happiness let us well understand that health, ric
2572.ell understand that health, riches, and other wordly advantages may be injurious to o
2573.urious to our salvation, and that it is good to gufl'er a privation of any of them w
2574.gufl'er a privation of any of them when God wills it so let us also be persuaded th
2575.urselves exposed to any trial. Example. God permitted St. Francis of Sales to be vi
2576. he was finishing his studies in Paris, being then but sixteen years of age, the enem
2577.the enemy of salvation suggested to his imagination thai that false ; .'' ' .. ••:' '-.
2578.' * ' ' ; m-v ' . jiJ .iiii — 138 * DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN t. •' -v.* he was of
2579.mptation made such an impression on his mind, that he lost his rest, and could neith
2580. and perceiving that he ceased to taite pleasure in any thing, repeatedly inquired as bu
2581.y inquired as but the devil, who JO the cause of so remarkable a change iad fdled his
2582.il, who JO the cause of so remarkable a change iad fdled his mind with this illusion,
2583.of so remarkable a change iad fdled his mind with this illusion, was one of those wh
2584. fdled his mind with this illusion, was one of those who are called dumb, because o
2585.hom Ihey torment. He saw himself at the same time bereft of all the sweetThe blissfu
2586.hey torment. He saw himself at the same time bereft of all the sweetThe blissful cal
2587.sful calm which he had enness of divine love. joyed before that storm came on, now a
2588.pe nourished me with the expectation of being one day replenished with the delights o
2589.rished me with the expectation of being one day replenished with the delights of th
2590.ished with the delights of the house of God, and immersed in the Oh lovely tabernac
2591.heart, which was like unto the pangs of death, ot ihe greatest torment that can be en
2592.est torment that can be endured in this world. His days were spent in sighing and gro
2593.h of St. Stephen to invoke the mercy of God on account of his miserable condition,
2594.Mother of Mercy to be his advocate with God, and to obtain from his goodness that "
2595.y as to be destined to hate him for all eternity, he might at least love him during his
2596.him for all eternity, he might at least love him during his life with all his heart.
2597., he might at least love him during his life with all his heart." A prayer so far re
2598. the shades which had gathered over his mind were suddenly dispelled, and he was res
2599.d he was restored to his wonted joy and peace. ; ! ! : liiS i 1 i t'liki,!' *.• ''^
2600.Y. !:>*' a supernatural and theological virtue, b; >k • • ^ v^ • „ . • \ •
2601.' > U * Ty < • v.A. ' ••' TOWARDS GOD. which >•' «fj * '> ' 130 *' '^^ «
2602.e is inflnitoan^ our neighbour as ourly good and infinitely amiable " This is the fi
2603.s the first and greatest selves for the love of (iod. lovo things ; we God above all
2604. for the love of (iod. lovo things ; we God above all ' ; ''.Jt >" k "..' ' 1 "^Vi
2605.not, of himself, supremely amiable ; do love him ? not his infinite perfections, his
2606.as created us he preserves and supports love him ? us; he has formed heaven and eart
2607. heaven and earth and all creatures for God has our use does not all that ohUf^e us
2608. our use does not all that ohUf^e us to love him ? done for us even more than all th
2609.y children he intends for us, when this life is past, an eternal his grace felicity
2610., after all that, can we refuse him our love ? What! is it necessary to prove to Is
2611. not that sentia child that he ought to love his father ? ment inherent in the heart
2612. father ? ment inherent in the heart of man ? Nay, do we not cherish, with inexpres
2613.h we enjoy in the exercise of this holy love. Oh what pure and perfect joy what soot
2614.burns? No, all the pleasures which this world has to oflfer are not to be compared to
2615.re not to be compared to that delicious peace which God infuses into the soul that lo
2616. compared to that delicious peace which God infuses into the soul that loves him. L
2617.icious peace which God infuses into the soul that loves him. Let us, then, attach ou
2618. him. Let us, then, attach ourselves to God, and let us hasten to give him up our h
2619. hasten to give him up our heart before sin has rendered it unworthy of beiog prese
2620.appy but in loving him, and the more we love him, the happier we shall be Yes, God a
2621. love him, the happier we shall be Yes, God alone can constitute our happiness : a
2622.ll be Yes, God alone can constitute our happiness : a man to whom God is wanting is unhap
2623. alone can constitute our happiness : a man to whom God is wanting is unhappy, even
2624.onstitute our happiness : a man to whom God is wanting is unhappy, even iii the mid
2625.even iii the midst of riches, glory and pleasure he desires every thing, and is never co
2626. , . ; y. „.. .Jl^ ... ' 140 -^-i.'II DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN His desires are satisf
2627.and nothing pan trouble the calm of his soul even in poverty, ho ib in sufferings, h
2628.med with * ' joy. We should, therefore, love Cod with # • . III-. ..I , J our hear
2629.ing and our last end. That great Master will have it that we give him our whole hear
2630. lose all rather than his grace, and to love nothing but through and for him. It is
2631.thing but through and for him. It is to sin against this commandment to make a su*
2632.st this commandment to make a su* preme good of any thing else but God, as the ambit
2633. a su* preme good of any thing else but God, as the ambitious do of honours, the mi
2634.he voluptuous of sensual pleasures. The love of God must also be active " If any one
2635.tuous of sensual pleasures. The love of God must also be active " If any one loveth
2636.ove of God must also be active " If any one loveth me," says our Lord, "he will kee
2637. any one loveth me," says our Lord, "he will keep my Comall ; ; : inandments.*' love
2638.will keep my Comall ; ; : inandments.*' love to ; In fact, we desire to please those
2639.; : inandments.*' love to ; In fact, we desire to please those whom we and the means o
2640. means of pleaf?ing them is to do their will, to CI:' '. > *, .> .* '**': iff' 'I
2641. act which proves the sincerity of that love we ought also to prove it by works, for
2642.ught also to prove it by works, for the love of God cannot be idle ; it is a fire wh
2643.o to prove it by works, for the love of God cannot be idle ; it is a fire which nev
2644. is indeed extinct But it is not loving God enough, merely to observe the first com
2645.ve the first commandment ; we must also love our neighbour, that is to say, we must
2646.m and procure for him, if possible, the same good as we would wish for ourselves: "
2647. procure for him, if possible, the same good as we would wish for ourselves: " For,"
2648.ost tender chanty, so that they had but one heart and one " 6eb<^)id " h lid the Pa
2649.nty, so that they had but one heart and one " 6eb<^)id " h lid the Pagans themselve
2650.h lid the Pagans themselves, " how they soul. atjcomplish faithfully — ; ' nil *
2651.aithfully — ; ' nil *• •''? "f' . love each other aB|''- 1' • "" ." '•" "
2652.— ; ' nil *• •''? "f' . love each other aB|''- 1' • "" ." '•" " St. Paul re
2653.ngle precept and, in fact, if we really love our nei^'hbour. ^e shall be very unlike
2654. in his re ard that is forbidden by the other couimandmenits we w ill not sp ak injur
2655. not sp ak injuriously of or to him w<' will out •tfer him any violeri^-e we will
2656. will out •tfer him any violeri^-e we will do him no wrong we ; ; : ; ; ! I ~. <'
2657.•- ' A TONVMJDS ; 0OI». ur ' . ' but will on the contrur)^ do him all thi. will n
2658.t will on the contrur)^ do him all thi. will not (leceivo him good we can. But wo mu
2659.^ do him all thi. will not (leceivo him good we can. But wo must not iinagino that t
2660.o have some tie of kindred o« " If you love," says Our Fjord, " only thof»tof frie
2661. Fjord, " only thof»tof friendship who love you, what do you in tliat,? Tiie ra«(a
2662. much." nuMi, because thev have all the same Creator and the sani« origin; because
2663.« origin; because they all compose but one single family, of whom God is the fathe
2664.because they all compose but one single family, of whom God is the father; because the
2665. compose but one single family, of whom God is the father; because they are all cre
2666.e all created foi and have all been the same end, which is eternal felicity purchase
2667.ch is eternal felicity purchased at the same price, which is the blood of Ji'su& Chr
2668.'su& Christ, who died for all men. This love ought, therefore, to embrace even our e
2669. head the {)recej)t it " I say unto you Love your enemost distinct and formal. good
2670. Love your enemost distinct and formal. good to those who hate you, pray for those w
2671./ • persecute and revile you ; return good for evil, that you reign unto your heav
2672.secute and revile you ; return good for evil, that you reign unto your heavenly Fath
2673.sh ill to those who hate us and that to love them, to have care for them, to render
2674.o, with grace, it is not impossible and God gives that grace to those who ask it of
2675. that grace to those who ask it of him. God commands it, and he commands nothing im
2676.mands nothing impossible; but it is his will that w. ^.hould do all we can, with the
2677.equire o\y^ *iid above. We show ?hat we love our neighbour when we exercise towards
2678.al works of mercy are, to bring back to virtue those who ^are wandering away from her
2679.paths, to instruct the ignomnt, to give good advice to those who stand in need of it
2680.TIAN W k excellent model of the perfect love of Christ, who, having destined him for
2681.o suffer much, had giveu to him a great mind, great courage and great charity " The
2682.h, had giveu to him a great mind, great courage and great charity " The charity of Chri
2683.rity of Christ presseth us," says he in one of his " considering that he died for a
2684.. What then, shall separate us from the love pf Jesus Christ ? Shall it be afflictio
2685.oved us ; for I am assured that neither death, nor life, nor powers, nor any thing cr
2686.or I am assured that neither death, nor life, nor powers, nor any thing created shal
2687.created shall ever separate us from the love of God in Jesus Christ Our Lord. If any
2688.shall ever separate us from the love of God in Jesus Christ Our Lord. If any one lo
2689.of God in Jesus Christ Our Lord. If any one love not Our Lord Jesus Christ, let him
2690.od in Jesus Christ Our Lord. If any one love not Our Lord Jesus Christ, let him be a
2691.t:. St. Paulinus, expended considerable wealth (even to impoverishing himself), in rel
2692.having discovered his merit, set him at liberty and sent him home n. again. Godescard,
2693.The » . .•( IV. ON ADORATION. fourth duty which is compris'^d in the first comman
2694.ompris'^d in the first command- adoring God, or rendering to him thathomHge aud wor
2695.worship, that of Latria which is due to God, that of Hyperdulia which we owe to the
2696.ration is a profound humiliation of the soul before the Supreme Majesty before Him w
2697. .<>'•• .,.•*> •.' , « TOWARDS GOD. ven and earth, at 143 V «.•: •^7-
2698.mountains bend respectfullj before that God who sends thunder and tempest as the mi
2699.ain when On beholding the greatit seems good to him in his mercy. ness of God, the a
2700.seems good to him in his mercy. ness of God, the adoring soul humbles itself, is co
2701. in his mercy. ness of God, the adoring soul humbles itself, is confounded^ and as i
2702.it praises and blesses the holy name of God it returns thanks for all the mercies a
2703.\i * -v-, ;.. ; --=' ; ;:.-^: ;'. -Vv/, will. These internal sentiments display them
2704.most august. We should, then, render to God every day, particularly moi'niug and ev
2705. us never fail to acquit ourselves of a duty BO important and so essential let our f
2706.nt us from fulfilliiiu this 'niperative duty. Does a child blush to testify his gtat
2707. which wo offered in the morning to our God. Let us then hutnblo ourselv^is in his
2708. • . .: * .' , • V c^''r % * .^ 144 DUTY OP THE CHKISTIAN H •;.*/:••», ^
2709.rayers and of piety are but the body of religion tJie interior sentiment of adoration be
2710.on tJie interior sentiment of adoration being the soul thereof, Without this disposit
2711.terior sentiment of adoration being the soul thereof, Without this disposition of th
2712.all exterior acts must fail in pleasing God, and would but draw upon OS that reproa
2713.t is far from me." Adoration belongs to God alone. We, indeed, honour ^he Saints, a
2714. to invoke them that wo may obtain from God, through their intercession, those grac
2715. which we stand in need; but it is from God alone we ask them, in the name of Jesus
2716.rited them for us by his sufferings and death. We also honour their relics, as the pr
2717.ect represented we recognise in them no other virtue than that of recalling to our du
2718.presented we recognise in them no other virtue than that of recalling to our due to Go
2719.ue than that of recalling to our due to God; vants. It is : minds the memory of the
2720.ur due to God; vants. It is : minds the memory of their originals. Thus, in kneeling b
2721.esus Christ, the Blessed Virgin, or any other Saint, it is not the image of Christ, b
2722.and the glory they enjoy in heaven. Men sin against the adoration due to God by ido
2723.n. Men sin against the adoration due to God by idolatry, by ; superstition, and by
2724. paying to creatures the worship due to God alone, like the Pagans, who rendered di
2725.e. There are fools in tho ! — TOWARDS GOD world or 145 ; who say: •"* There ; i
2726.here are fools in tho ! — TOWARDS GOD world or 145 ; who say: •"* There ; is no G
2727.d or 145 ; who say: •"* There ; is no God," and they adore none : rather, as the
2728.the Apostle says " They make unto them- other divinities their pride, the love of ric
2729.them- other divinities their pride, the love of riches and impurity, gluttony, &c. b
2730.minalavishing saoriI)le in the sight of God, and it consists in logious incense on
2731.ce of the Deity in a depraved heart. We sin by fvperslition when we make use, in th
2732. »ot approve, and pretending to ootain particular ends by their means, such as a knowledg
2733.rticular ends by their means, such as a knowledge of the future, of hidden taking note of
2734.lucky days, dec. tilings, &c. all these being only fit to draw down the malediction o
2735.nly fit to draw down the malediction of God on those who practise or have recourse
2736.o practise or have recourse to them. We sin by irreverence in profaning churches, t
2737. * ^"'nts, their images, holy water and other such things, .11 more by the sacrilege
2738.h, or to strike a person consecrated to God, &;c. selves pleasures, <."''-ii) \n; >
2739.must offer sacrifice to Jupiter and the other Pagan divinities, if they would retain
2740. lliem for ever, from about his person. One of his confidants having inquired the r
2741.s wise answer " Men who sacrifice their religion to their interest he : ''': '.. -.^.^
2742.':lk i.;-^ • . . . ' 1 > ..*..! every one of their duties I have no whose disgrac
2743.-;, c » ; ?j|i! w.-^-^.'V';; 146 their DUTY OP THE God." CHRISTIAIf /': ;•• ,.
2744.j|i! w.-^-^.'V';; 146 their DUTY OP THE God." CHRISTIAIf /': ;•• ,.•:>•'«
2745.«•. r chastised and hum* it also his duty to give a public reward to those Christ
2746.ity of those who were faithful to their religion, he confided to these generous and inco
2747.umed St. Stephen, "ye would punish wi'h death him who would trample on the image of a
2748.t, the King " of kings ! Ecclesiastical History, : *•, • . "" ARTICLE The Church >.
2749. RESPECT DUE TO CHURCHES the house of ; God ; he fills it with his in glory and his
2750.e arch of old Yes, temples are house of God, and the gate of heaven !" as it were,
2751.ven !" as it were, a new heaven wherein God abides with' men. Is not He who dwells
2752. in that august tabernacle the selfgame God whom the blessed adore in heaven ? Like
2753.ly place speaks to us of the mercies of God the sacred font, where with the life of
2754. of God the sacred font, where with the life of grace we have received the inestimab
2755.sentiments, and should they not make us love to linger in a place so highly-favoured
2756.red ? How does it happen, then, that so many go there but with reluctance, and while
2757.nce, and while there feel only disgust, being occupied solely with vain fancies, even
2758.t all those mementos of the goodness of God speak directly to the heart ? How outra
2759.ageous it is to return such boundi less love with cold, culpable indifference. mg :
2760.*.T1i»/..». I, *»# «4 V 148 ^.'ii» DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN ' •"} ! ; • '• h
2761. tim« themi|elves in the preseno*. .?f God. of piayer not one is ever seen to turn
2762.in the preseno*. .?f God. of piayer not one is ever seen to turn his head aside. U
2763. unhe&rds see two Turks converse at the time of prayer. If i, any thing is said to a
2764.makes no reply he may be beaten, and he will not even ; ; look to see who struck him
2765.e who struck him. Ah but these infidels will ono day put to shame those Christians w
2766. the III. OF THE SECO^-D COMMANDMENT OF GOD. name of God in vain. injuri- The ous t
2767.THE SECO^-D COMMANDMENT OF GOD. name of God in vain. injuri- The ous to It is I sec
2768.- The ous to It is I second commandment God and the Saints. forbids us all swearing
2769.ly hood, injustice, or even to confiiin truth without a reason. promise i Sweari is T
2770.romise i Sweari is To we swear, to take God or some Saint to witness what times us(
2771.omise. Swearing may be either an act of religion or a sin, according to the circumstance
2772.g may be either an act of religion or a sin, according to the circumstances and dis
2773.' impn When jtistice, it is an act of religion, it must be done with truth, Blasph Sai
2774.n act of religion, it must be done with truth, Blasph Saints, oi It is bl 9r and judg
2775.ruth, Blasph Saints, oi It is bl 9r and judgment. Without truth, the oath I .•.••-
2776.s, oi It is bl 9r and judgment. Without truth, the oath I .•.••- •• ''I' wi
2777.oath I .•.••- •• ''I' without justice, the oath is ; ment, that is to say, wh
2778.aken with levity, or without sufficient cause, it is rash and indiscreet. A rash oath
2779.itsalf * and becomes perjury; an unjust one and without juti^is false, could It is
2780. ' ^ ; TOWARDS 60D. true 140 just, is a sin, and may become considerable, accordcir
2781.es of oath which is called promissory ; being used to make more ce*tain the execution
2782.o intention of doing commits a grievous sin, and is, in fact, guilty and ing to We
2783. With regard to the fulfilment of what one has sworn to do, mere are three circums
2784.se are, 1st, when the thing promised is evil in and forbidden to be done, for God ca
2785.s evil in and forbidden to be done, for God cannot require the performance of an ac
2786.rmance of an act which is sinful in its nature; 2nd, when a thing which was practicabl
2787.e to the Ecclesiastical authority, lest one might err in giving judgment in his own
2788.authority, lest one might err in giving judgment in his own case. If the thing promised,
2789. 'a ' a"'--''* promise is an enormous sin. .. Swearing, without necessity, is ver
2790.s an enormous sin. .. Swearing, without necessity, is very often criminal, at all times u
2791.ng. a word, or a discourse injurious to God, attribute to to his .••.• i%:. B
2792. i%:. Blasphemy It is ttr is Saints, or Religion. >• >*.'•;.' blasphemy to could not
2793.m, such as taxing him with pardefects ' God tiality, injustice, or the ; ^* * • l
2794. or the ; ^* * • like. v; blaspheming God to deny to him that which is his due, s
2795. of liii It is /* * 150 creatures, that DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN He takes no notice of
2796. takes no notice of the affairs of thii world, &c. It is blasphemy against God to spe
2797.thii world, &c. It is blasphemy against God to speak with contempt of disrespectful
2798.orst kind to speak it » **. be through custom, and the sin is still greater if the bl
2799.ak it » **. be through custom, and the sin is still greater if the blasphemy is sp
2800. or through contempt. It is blaspheming God to join to his adorable name certain te
2801.hat case, a sort of malediction against God. It is blasphemy against the Saints, to
2802. by the Church, <&;c. It is blaspheming Religion, to turn it into ridicule, to blame its
2803. speak ill of the Sacred Scriptures, of God, even though 2804.V ;' Then there are also blasphemies of mind and heart these are thoughts and desire
2805. perfections or to things which concern religion such is the blasphemy of the fool who s
2806.ool who said in his heart " There is no God." This is a horrible, an execrable sin,
2807. God." This is a horrible, an execrable sin, and deserving of the most terrible pun
2808.sin, and deserving of the most terrible punishment. Blasphemers are no longer stoned to de
2809.nt. Blasphemers are no longer stoned to death, nor are their tongues pierced ; but le
2810.m not triumph the more of that, for the time of chastisement will soon come, when th
2811.e of that, for the time of chastisement will soon come, when they, wretches that the
2812.etches that they are, shall receive the punishment due to such crimes. Imprecations are ex
2813. to befall ourselves or others, such as death, damnation, 6ie., «kc., whether in pro
2814. 1st., some of them are oaths with some change of terms; 2nd., others are oaths or cur
2815. my conscience," " As 1 am before : — God," dec, niit dec. tQi> Christians should
2816.,!*•"• JJlj'lx i TOWARDS ft is >« GOD. injut'.o'js l&l not cursing, to call a
2817.njut'.o'js l&l not cursing, to call any one hy His outraging that person, and expos
2818.se, allowabU^. him to offend names, but God, ••.»• i. Neither is it swearing
2819. fellow men, by bringing in the name of God ; but it sometimes happens that people
2820.es happens that people make promises to God himself, to perSuch a form things which
2821.e promises to God himself, to perSuch a form things which they know are pleasing to
2822.ow are pleasing to him. promise made to God is called a vow. A vow is a deliberate
2823.. A vow is a deliberate promise made to God, to do a thing which may be supposed ag
2824.ion. By a vow we bind ourselves towards God to do the thing promised, under pain of
2825.rds God to do the thing promised, under pain of committing sin. The obligation of pe
2826.hing promised, under pain of committing sin. The obligation of performing what we h
2827. of performing what we have promised to God rests on the circumstances, indicated,
2828.ower to dispensa with a promise made to God but this power she never exercises with
2829. faith. He had delayed, it seemed, some time after ichool was over, and got home a l
2830.swearing, moreover, by the holy uame of God. The poor lad, shocked at himself for h
2831.ied, " Oh ! me if you !" The father jou will, but do not swear, I implore was confou
2832.again to utter a blasphemy. Ah from how many sins might children, if they were true
2833.'.' c}-'.. '; {', ^;j* •M , " — 152 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAll CHAPTER Remember to I
2834. holy the Sabbath Day, 'i^ 1 belongs to God, and there is none which w# to dedicate
2835.edicate to his giory but as the wants o life prevent us from giving ourselves up ent
2836.rselves up entirely to the exercises of religion, God has reserved to himself a certain
2837. entirely to the exercises of religion, God has reserved to himself a certain day o
2838.ving him. This precept is as old as the world. God, immediately after he had created
2839.m. This precept is as old as the world. God, immediately after he had created the w
2840.d, immediately after he had created the world, consecrated that day, to the end that
2841.o the end that men might celebrate tlie memory of the creation and the mysterious repo
2842.ished that great work. That day whereon God rested was, in the Old Law, the seventh
2843. day whereon God rested was, in the Old Law, the seventh day, and was called the Sa
2844.been substituted for Saturday, from the time of the are not EvEKY day bound ; •
2845.Apostles, and by divine inspiration, in memory of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ bec
2846.ose. It is then intended to honour that God« victorious over death, by whom we hav
2847.ed to honour that God« victorious over death, by whom we have been redeemed. " Six d
2848. seventh is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God ; on that day tiiou shalt do no work, n
2849.which they required for the morrow. The law of the Gospel is less rigorous, and per
2850. and permits all works of charity or of necessity, together with those which are called l
2851.ny thing that might tend the service of God. It is, therefore, a great sin to busy
2852.rvice of God. It is, therefore, a great sin to busy ourselves on that day with any
2853.enary affairs, unless obliged by actual necessity or requir* living, whereby we earn our
2854.e 153 ed for the divine service, public necessity, or the indispei^ wants of life. Trades
2855.ic necessity, or the indispei^ wants of life. Tradesmen who work on that day, under
2856.commit a But it would be even a greater sin to give one's great sin. self up to pro
2857. it would be even a greater sin to give one's great sin. self up to profane dissipa
2858. even a greater sin to give one's great sin. self up to profane dissipation, or to
2859.on of those days than the Does works of sin, which render us slaves of the devil ?
2860.ich render us slaves of the devil ? uot sin, which is always a great evil, even whe
2861.evil ? uot sin, which is always a great evil, even when committed on any ordinary da
2862.duct announce an utter forgetfulness of God, and a more marked contempt of his holy
2863.oly -. . * '.' .;? * .' i >« A ',-'.<; Law ? not enough to abstain from servile wo
2864.e must also employ the Sunday in the of God, by applying ourselves to acts of piety
2865.he essential purpose of the precept. If God commands us to suspend our ordinary lab
2866.us from attending to his service. Would God be at all honoured by listless idleness
2867., or by em- ploying ourselves in of any good work tending to the service •|H"'vi-i
2868.d never be suffered to encroach on tiie time allotted lo prayer, to linging the prai
2869.ed lo prayer, to linging the praises of God, or to our own instruction. Would it be
2870.ld it be sanctifying the day to give to God but a small portion of it ? The Church,
2871. or the relief of bour. It is true that God, our own God • '1 X':-'' ^/r^^ ''W*.
2872.f of bour. It is true that God, our own God • '1 X':-'' ^/r^^ ''W*. ':f«^V;>:^:
2873.sanctifioAtion ',>•( *- \ V^' v.# 1S4 DUTY OF THl CHBIITIAN but she does not make
2874.sert on the Sabbath should be stoned to death, but he said again to Moses, " Speak to
2875.pt holy he who violates it shall suffer death if any one labour on the Sabbath, he sh
2876.o violates it shall suffer death if any one labour on the Sabbath, he shall be cut
2877.do any work on that day shall be put to death." ; of the Sabbath God command was puni
2878.hall be put to death." ; of the Sabbath God command was punished witlii death man w
2879.Sabbath God command was punished witlii death man who was found : ; ; ; ; ExoduSf xxx
2880.h God command was punished witlii death man who was found : ; ; ; ; ExoduSf xxxi. b
2881.n who was found : ; ; ; ; ExoduSf xxxi. being in one of the Marian One Sunday, Father
2882. found : ; ; ; ; ExoduSf xxxi. being in one of the Marian One Sunday, Father C was
2883.xoduSf xxxi. being in one of the Marian One Sunday, Father C was passing along on t
2884.aking, and asked them if there were not other days in the week to do such work, or ho
2885.y savagely answered that such was their will and piety. The priest went on his way b
2886.iest went on his way but in a few hours pleasure. after, when returning from his visit,
2887.fuse in their expressions of lively and sin ; «era repentance. Edifying letter*. 1
2888.11. ^••vv. •'•• : ! . TOWARDS GOD. 155 CHAPTER V. ^ OP THE FOURTH COMMAND
2889.s may ^ he long in the land. 'inferiors God, by his fourth Commandment prescribes t
2890.ir father and mother they must respect, love, and ob'»y them, and assist them in al
2891.ist them in all their wants. tThe first duty of children towards their parents is at
2892.o their children the representatives of God, whose place they hold with regard to t
2893. ii., to dosjiise > (• ' ' •• ' 1 God himself, since the insult offered Him w
2894.esent. Thus, in to them, refers also to Law, God had 'j 4 , decreed that such an of
2895.. Thus, in to them, refers also to Law, God had 'j 4 , decreed that such an offence
2896.such an offence should be punished with death ** If any one," said He, " revileth his
2897.should be punished with death ** If any one," said He, " revileth his father or his
2898.father or his mother, let him be put to death." The second duty of children is to 1 .
2899.r, let him be put to death." The second duty of children is to 1 .'^ heir parents. C
2900. still do for him ? They have given him life since he came into thj v/orld they have
2901.'' : '':' ' ^^^: V ''!, .; ;• ,6 156 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ' -* • * • » 1 %
2902.cannot even be human monster. The third duty of a child towards his parents is obedi
2903.ark by which it for that is just before God." may be known whether you respect and
2904.." may be known whether you respect and love them sincerely; a child who disobeys hi
2905.th reluctance, has for them neither the love nor respect which he owes them. Finally
2906.which he owes them. Finally, the fourth duty of Children towards their parents, i«
2907. This all on ' ' ' '.1 < '^ felt by any one who has a heart ought, in reality, to f
2908.t ought, in reality, to find a sensible pleasure in paying back to a father or a mother
2909.om them, and to fail in performing that duty would be a monstrous piece of ingratitu
2910.ce the Holy Scripture dethe feelings of nature. nounces those who render themselves gu
2911.his father, and crime " ! How cursed of God is he who grieveth his mother, by refus
2912.their old age or in their last illness. Many parents will owe their eternal happines
2913. or in their last illness. Many parents will owe their eternal happiness to the duti
2914.ss. Many parents will owe their eternal happiness to the dutiof their children in having
2915.ildren in having them receive the their death. Children are also bound faithfully to
2916.so bound faithfully to execute the last will of their parents, and to pray and have
2917.attention Sacraments before after their death. Fathers and mothers owe four things to
2918.owe four things to their Children:) and good example. They are bound to feed, clothe
2919.uction, correction, or means of living. duty either to teach them, or have others te
2920.is also their III-; .^^-'4' -l' TOWARDS GOD. ments of 157 f.'* .;<,...(. 4\Ai >;-:^
2921. ments of 157 f.'* .;<,...(. 4\Ai >;-:^ God and the Church, and the prayers which t
2922.ir children are about to enter upon any state of life, parents should consult God, *
2923.en are about to enter upon any state of life, parents should consult God, * /'! •
2924.y state of life, parents should consult God, * /'! • know whether they are called
2925.o make known to them the duties of that state. They are obliged to correct them, that
2926.selves, order that they may always give good example to their children, anu never do
2927. presence let them be well assured that many parents will be condemned for having be
2928. them be well assured that many parents will be condemned for having been the cause
2929.s will be condemned for having been the cause of their children's sin ; for not havin
2930.ving been the cause of their children's sin ; for not having brought them up in a C
2931.ferred what St. Pau. Romans " Let every one," said he, " be sub: i.f*' •«%,•>
2932.for there is none which Cometh not from God. The prince is the minister of God for
2933.from God. The prince is the minister of God for good we must, therefore, submit our
2934.. The prince is the minister of God for good we must, therefore, submit ourselves to
2935.ot through fear of chastisement, but by duty of conscience. Render tribute to whom t
2936.d a sort of usurpation on the rights of God, whose place they hold. The Prince of t
2937.'1 •t' . .. '•\i m Wf A^ .'.'*( 158 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN he woj lui - '• •
2938. to respect them as their fathers. This same commandment ordains for all the faithfu
2939. on every occasion treat them with that love, respect, and obedience due to their sa
2940. are charged to exercise on the part of God. It " He is to all tLe ministers of his
2941.ir ofHce is to instruct their pupils in religion and human learning to watch over their
2942.ing to watch over their conduct, and to form their hearts and minds. They, on their
2943.ll their duties to them. Pupils, on the other side, owe to their teachers respect, lo
2944.er side, owe to their teachers respect, love, docility, and gratitude. A master cons
2945.and gratitude. A master consecrates his time, his attention, and his health, to the
2946.health, to the forming of his pupils in knowledge, arts, and in virtue ; he sacrifices to
2947.f his pupils in knowledge, arts, and in virtue ; he sacrifices to them his liberty, re
2948.d in virtue ; he sacrifices to them his liberty, reducing himself to a sort of slavery
2949. liberty, reducing himself to a sort of slavery he endures with patience the weariness
2950.and tedium of listening for ever to the same sounds. What claims has he not on their
2951.their affections while he thus makes so many sacrifices for them, that they may reap
2952.ing bridle, which arrests them in their evil course, and holds them back from the ve
2953.oderate, should in no ways lessen their love for him. He reproves them, it is true,
2954.ge him to make. We sometimes see in the world men who have been most carefully educat
2955.ough igno ranoe. If you would learn the cause of this disorder, in terrogate those wh
2956.hose who knew them in their youth ; you will hear that they were rebellious spirits,
2957.o reprimand; they thought themselves at liberty to treat their masters just as they lik
2958.ir masters just as they liked, and took pleasure in magnifying even their most trifling
2959.f what they are doing for you but a day will come when you shall know the value of a
2960.come when you shall know the value of a good education, and how much you are and oug
2961.when you shall know the value of a good education, and how much you are and ought to be i
2962.o be indebted to them. The advantage of education is beyond all price, and the trifling r
2963.efits remain with you during jour whole life the gratitude of the pupil to hia maste
2964.ur she could not obtain. But ean filial love bo thwarted by trifling obstacles No !>
2965. t ,^^. • • .* I'- •V' 160 ., , DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN <•»• i'. though s
2966.•»• i'. though she was of a feeble constitution, she set out on foot, Bnd followed, for
2967.ed the deliverance ef the author of her life. Abbe Carron.— On Education. ; .•
2968. author of her life. Abbe Carron.— On Education. ; .••'. 111* ,;,'.. .|,.,. was lod
2969.t he ceased not to bewail that grievous sin of his youth, and as often as he receiv
2970.on any fresh insult, he of* fered up to God the anguish it caused him, entreating h
2971.im his own bad treatment of his father. One day, when the wretched son struck him t
2972.. >.>''•'« •» By this commandment God forbids anj one, on his own private aut
2973.» By this commandment God forbids anj one, on his own private authority, to take
2974.own private authority, to take away the life of another, or yet his own. This crime
2975.is an outrage on the sovereign power of God, y-l Y4r^4^'''l •*-' who alone is the
2976.*-' who alone is the absolute master of man's life — to 1 ,1'i^" riiT:- ti';- ;>.
2977.o alone is the absolute master of man's life — to 1 ,1'i^" riiT:- ti';- ;>.».- .0
2978.';- ;>.».- .0 .,V. • , . . \ TOWARDS GOD. Him alone it 161 that life, which h^ a
2979. . \ TOWARDS GOD. Him alone it 161 that life, which h^ alone the greatest injustice
2980.ch h^ alone the greatest injustice that man, to deprive him of that which One is gu
2981. that man, to deprive him of that which One is guilty of murdeares: and most precio
2982. assisting the actual transgressor. The law of God does not merely forbid murder, b
2983.ing the actual transgressor. The law of God does not merely forbid murder, but it a
2984.d hearts all emotions of anger, and all desire of revenge denouncing all the effects o
2985.abusive words, bad treatment, all these being in themselves a species of homicide, an
2986.re exceedingly culpable in the sight of God ? ness it is to steep one's hands ii th
2987. the sight of God ? ness it is to steep one's hands ii the blood of a brother for f
2988.as they were, never knew or practised a custom so barbarous. They were ambitious of ob
2989.,'.m i : T . '«' A '^ — reason as to religion. not a less crime to destroy one's own
2990.o religion. not a less crime to destroy one's own life. Life is a which God has con
2991.. not a less crime to destroy one's own life. Life is a which God has confided to us
2992.a less crime to destroy one's own life. Life is a which God has confided to us, and
2993.destroy one's own life. Life is a which God has confided to us, and it is his wifl
2994.ibition, is to usurp his prerogative He being the sole arbiter of life. What renders
2995.rerogative He being the sole arbiter of life. What renders this crime doubly horribl
2996.eprives the wretched perpetrator of acy chance of repentance, and casts him headlong i
2997.; .;,• ,'.4> V ' -r' ! ,*^"^%N^^ 1(^2 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAIT madness uf hell it is
2998.frightful and never ending tormentg But God does not content himself destroy the li
2999.od does not content himself destroy the life \vith forbiildJng tjs to If • >IT 111
3000. also prohibits all thnt may injure the soul, and especially scandal., wlvijh dastn
3001.ly scandal., wlvijh dastn the spiritual life of our neighbour. Scatvl-il cccssihi ev
3002.l-il cccssihi evl m disposing others to sin, or in turning them away froni viitue.
3003.aith, nor less criminal in the sight of God. He«» e Je^us Christ pronounced the m
3004.ndal to their brethren or are to th the cause ** ^i bin. Woe '* said he " to those bv
3005. scandal com^th whosoever sciindalizeth one of these little ones, it were btiirer f
3006.ea." may judg J of the enormity of this sin by the horror with which JesoB '^Jhrist
3007.scandal, we shall at once recognize the justice of the terrible panishment reser\'ed fo
3008.terrible panishment reser\'ed for it by God. What is it that the scandalous sinner
3009. sinner does I He stands up against the will of God, which is that all meu " The wil
3010.does I He stands up against the will of God, which is that all meu " The will of th
3011.ill of God, which is that all meu " The will of thy heavenly Father " says phould be
3012.dal an obstacle is thrown in the way of God*s holy will, since those whom He would
3013.acle is thrown in the way of God*s holy will, since those whom He would have to be e
3014.e eternally happy, are thereby led into sin, and danger of eternal death. The scand
3015.eby led into sin, and danger of eternal death. The scandalous sinner annuls the benef
3016. Redemption. Jesus Christ came into the world to save Bouls and shed his blood to red
3017.ite and endless misery. Suppose a young man to have virtuous inclinations do* ciie
3018.e was a pleasing object in the sight of God. But he had the misfortune to get into
3019. '^^, "."'•'•'•'ijV — ! TOWARDS GOD company with a no religion 163 — who
3020.ijV — ! TOWARDS GOD company with a no religion 163 — who libertine who gloried in ha
3021. who gloried in having no piety gave to virtue an odious and ridiculous name, and cept
3022.o professed to observe its preOur young man being moved* by his discourse, be- and
3023.ofessed to observe its preOur young man being moved* by his discourse, be- and censur
3024.y his own example. The youth learns the evil which he knew not before he receives th
3025.pressions, and at length falls into the same evil courses pursued by the other. Beho
3026.ions, and at length falls into the same evil courses pursued by the other. Behold hi
3027.to the same evil courses pursued by the other. Behold him, thenceforwird, the slave o
3028.ld him, thenceforwird, the slave of the same passions, addicted to the same vices. G
3029.e of the same passions, addicted to the same vices. God would have saved that soul,
3030.e passions, addicted to the same vices. God would have saved that soul, for which g
3031.e same vices. God would have saved that soul, for which gins to fear his scoffing ed
3032.r which gins to fear his scoffing ed of virtue. The libertine : ; '>•• \> .. > »-
3033.ous sinner causes its destruction. That soul was sence of drags it God down for all
3034.uction. That soul was sence of drags it God down for all eternity, destined to have
3035. was sence of drags it God down for all eternity, destined to have enjoyed the preand th
3036.. • • into everlasting misery. What punishment expect ? or is there any torment too up
3037.his hands in a brother's blood, yet the evil he does him is infinitely more horrible
3038.into his bosom, and thereby destroy the life of his body. That soul by him seduced,
3039.reby destroy the life of his body. That soul by him seduced, shall cry out vengeance
3040.l cry out vengeance against him for all eternity, and its cries shall be heard by the So
3041. Woe then, to him who teaches youth the evil which they knew not before woe to him w
3042.! woe to him who turns others away from virtue and piety by senselesss raillery woe to
3043.im who gives or lends books contrary to religion or morality woe, in fine, to him who ca
3044.ndal, of whatsoever sort it be, or who, being able to prevent scandal, fails to do so
3045.h all his might he is guilty of all the sin ot which he is the cause, and he shall
3046.uilty of all the sin ot which he is the cause, and he shall be punished for all the e
3047.e, and he shall be punished for all the evil that may arise, even after his death, b
3048.the evil that may arise, even after his death, by reason of the scandal which he has
3049. iJi 'i' '' .. n, ...... ... .v.. . 164 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN : , "' y'i. had himsel
3050.nd to his had become disgusted with the world, though barely enterWhat could have led
3051. when my son has passed of childhood, I will have him choose his religion and the ag
3052.f childhood, I will have him choose his religion and the age The time for the choice was
3053.him choose his religion and the age The time for the choice was come, and the unhis
3054. for the choice was come, and the unhis God. fortunate youth chose for himself deat
3055. God. fortunate youth chose for himself death Oh unhappy son! was found dead in his c
3056.tudent possessed in a high degree every virtue ; : Jjf' »•; ^' ki l^i 1 Ilip-*.".-.
3057.-.:^ i, ";i ;5(«?-,. •";?•,: young man by a misfortune too coraluon to youth,
3058.im to libertine. return to the paths of virtue he would not heed them. that might ador
3059.t heed them. that might adorn a — But God spoke to him in his turn. The unhappy y
3060.e to him in his turn. The unhappy young man awoke one I ,*:... night in dreadful pa
3061.n his turn. The unhappy young man awoke one I ,*:... night in dreadful pain, and ut
3062.an awoke one I ,*:... night in dreadful pain, and uttering the most crowded around,
3063.s brought who exhorted him to return to God. The dying youth could only look at him
3064.n vain would I invoke the assistance of God, for I see hell open to And turning h m
3065.• '> Bv that is the Sixth Commandmcut God 1 prohibits eveiy thing .' • V 4 . ,
3066. • . ' contrary to the purity of the soul and of the l>ody, which sins are regard
3067.rs, those who give themselves up to the vice of impurity, says that neither one nor
3068.the vice of impurity, says that neither one nor the other shall ever enter the king
3069.impurity, says that neither one nor the other shall ever enter the kingdom of heaven.
3070., or against purity: hence it is before God a heinous sin to speak obscene words or
3071.urity: hence it is before God a heinous sin to speak obscene words or to sing lasci
3072.mmodest pictures or to be indiscreet in one's looks, or commit any act, statues eit
3073.s, or commit any act, statues either on one's self or another, that may please or g
3074. or disorderly inclination. There is no vice more opposed to the sanctity of God, an
3075.no vice more opposed to the sanctity of God, and none that he punishes more severel
3076.requently avenged himself, even in this world, on those who committed it, as we see f
3077. those who committed it, as we see from many examples recorded in the scriptures. Th
3078.amples recorded in the scriptures. This sin shall be punished even in infidels who
3079. punished even in infidels who know not God, because it is contrary to the reason w
3080. them, because that in giving way to it man degrades himself, for that, being in hi
3081.y to it man degrades himself, for that, being in his own nature elevated above the ot
3082.des himself, for that, being in his own nature elevated above the other animals, he th
3083.ng in his own nature elevated above the other animals, he thereby brings himself down
3084. What a sacrito desecrate the temple of God Thb bare dishonour the members of Jesus
3085.e dishonour the members of Jesus Christ idea ought to fill us with horror but our de
3086.or but our detesta*;ion of that hideous sin will be fully confirmed if we only cons
3087.ut our detesta*;ion of that hideous sin will be fully confirmed if we only consider
3088.. It destroys the health, it dissipates wealth, dishonours families, and covers with i
3089.Lii •ill*' ^•."».^'. 166 •'. • DUTY OP TMB CHRISTIAN .1 ". ., <*!•»-.•
3090.re so in the who miserably I ' prime of life, istence in ignominy, in pain, . and or
3091. prime of life, istence in ignominy, in pain, . and or drJigs out a wearisome exin d
3092.rd to the extinguishes the light of the mind, and renders it incapable of serious ap
3093.ncapable of serious application. 3'oung man who is addicted to this shameful vice c
3094.ng man who is addicted to this shameful vice can think of nothing solid: his passion
3095.his passion follows him every where and will permit him to think of nothing else ; e
3096.e heart is still more diseased than the mind, and he has an almost unconquerable dis
3097.onquerable disgust for prayer and every other exercise of piety ; he is, in fact, tha
3098. of piety ; he is, in fact, that carnal man of whom St. Paul speaks, who conceives
3099. the things of (iod ; even the sight of good people is offensive to him, because the
3100.h censure on his own scandalous crimes. evil " says Jesus Christ, " hates the light,
3101.," he never draw- Tho ; effects of this sin uie soul it A — eth near to 1 V ly wo
3102.ver draw- Tho ; effects of this sin uie soul it A — eth near to 1 V ly works might
3103. quickbe«oraes callous ibr there is no vice which casts a deeper it lest his ; dark
3104. a deeper it lest his ; darkness on the soul concvirn him ; the dearest interests to
3105.the threats no more ; ; and promises of God is are alike despised eternal happiness
3106.es of God is are alike despised eternal happiness or eternal misery no Wi: :\^..< V ,;•
3107.tion he becomes a spectacle for all the world, yet he sees not himself. He even loses
3108.t himself. He even loses his faith, for religion cannot ally herself with a dissolute li
3109.on cannot ally herself with a dissolute life. In order to stifle remorse of conscien
3110.^lows final impenitence; he dies in his sin, and an;.e»rs before the tribunal. ol
3111., and an;.e»rs before the tribunal. ol God covered with the guilt of ar* entire li
3112.od covered with the guilt of ar* entire life, according to * Tne disorders of youth
3113.t only obliged to avoid this abominable sin, but also every occasion that may lead
3114. casions which lead the oftenest to the sin of impurity are, 1st, excess in eating
3115. carnal and sensual, deprives it of all idea of God, and keeps it, as it were, bent
3116.and sensual, deprives it of all idea of God, and keeps it, as it were, bent down to
3117.jud, Luxury in drees, which becoming to one's self and *'.'. cause of sin and of sc
3118. which becoming to one's self and *'.'. cause of sin and of scandal, is always the si
3119.coming to one's self and *'.'. cause of sin and of scandal, is always the sign that
3120.se of sin and of scandal, is always the sign that olmstity is dead or dying in the s
3121.n that olmstity is dead or dying in the soul. 3i'd, Idleness, for to live withou* do
3122.ithou* doing any thing is to exidleness being the pose one's self to continual tempta
3123.y thing is to exidleness being the pose one's self to continual temptation mother o
3124.to continual temptation mother of every vice. 4th, Bad company, since nothing is p .
3125. who have lost the fear of (iod and all sense of natural modesty, and who induce othe
3126.odesty, and who induce others to commit sin, cither by their discourse or example.
3127.nd to break off' all con" If the wicked will draw you tc^them,'* nexion with them. s
3128. you shall soon become like unto them." Being thus oUiers a ; ; >• -* ; instructed
3129.us oUiers a ; ; >• -* ; instructed by Truth itself that vice is contagious, — tha
3130. -* ; instructed by Truth itself that vice is contagious, — that the wicked impa
3131.k, speak, and act as they do, we should sin grievously by exposing ourselves to so
3132.e. Bad companions are the plague of the soul Even as they who are inwardly decayed c
3133.ation the corruption ot their heart and soul; for of what do such f>ersons speak mos
3134.late with the utmost satisfaction, they will not blush to ealarge on the most shamef
3135.a merit of their very crimes, nay, they will sometimes go so far k'-^fl^'- — —
3136.r k'-^fl^'- — — — ! — — . 166 DUTY OF THE ciiKiarrAr* as to boast of some
3137.ision. does not all this expose a young man who is still virtuous, if he does not i
3138.aw from such pernicious com« poison of sin enters his heart at first h(^ is re. fa
3139.rst h(^ is re. false shame, and has not courage to reuruve tliose who are offending God
3140.age to reuruve tliose who are offending God, or oppose the evil they are committing
3141.se who are offending God, or oppose the evil they are committing he is afraid of dis
3142. is afraid of displeasing thou^,. or of being mocked and derided if he do not as Ihey
3143. him shudder he gives himself up to the same disorders, and ends by being ashamed of
3144.f up to the same disorders, and ends by being ashamed of his former modesty. 5th, The
3145.e reading of bad books, which fills the mind with a thousand dangerous thoughts, and
3146. a thousand dangerous thoughts, and the imagination with a crowd of indecent phantoms, then
3147. into the hetfrt, and produces ruin and death. One bad book is sufl^cient to corrupt
3148.he hetfrt, and produces ruin and death. One bad book is sufl^cient to corrupt a mul
3149.The effect is still more fatal if it be one of those aboniinable works where passio
3150.igion capable of destroying the fear of God, and shaking the foundations of Faith.
3151.rier once broken down iiito what excess will not they go, who have swallowed the poi
3152.ns, and it once taken away, the torrent will break in and ravage all. Faith, so long
3153.all. Faith, so long as it exists in the soul, is a sort of warrant that virtue may r
3154. in the soul, is a sort of warrant that virtue may return if we do wrong, we at least
3155.f once he has lost his Faith Is not the evil then almost irremediable, and ! : pany
3156. of a person who has fallen into such a state, were it not for our knowO you, then, y
3157.n, young ledge of the infinite mercy of God ? people who have as yet escaped this c
3158.horror wiuni ure otFered to you. Should one of them fall into your bands, do not ev
3159. it only for olitaining iuto adorn your mind or to improve your style. You can deriv
3160.nger to morality consult an enlightened man, and ho will point oi^t to you more tha
3161.lity consult an enlightened man, and ho will point oi^t to you more than you could r
3162. you could read in the course of a long life works which uniw all the graces of styl
3163.advantages which belong n>erely to this world would be too dear if purchased at the p
3164.ence to those which may corrupt you, it will then be passion that makes the Btructi(
3165. ijotnp with so tliat demon of impurity many charms and seducing graces, it. the mos
3166.and seducing graces, it. the most solid virtue could scarcely withstand ! There •.-.
3167.U: Wam i avoiding these occasions until one goes to confession, and is obliged to d
3168.per to leave them off before presenting one's self at the tribunal of penance, for
3169., for that is the surest guarantee that one really proposes to c-jmmit these sins n
3170.pany them, which often make part of the sin itself; that would be to make confessio
3171.en commit a sacrilege> thereby exposing one's self to utter perdition. It will ofl*
3172.osing one's self to utter perdition. It will ofl* ; not do to put ^•j. ',;•;., f
3173.ho would free themselves from this foul sin should T ' 1( confess frequently to the
3174.should T ' 1( confess frequently to the same confessor, a pious and enlightened dire
3175.ions the which may lead to it cherish a particular devotion to Blessed Virgin, and offer u
3176."-••„ .• intention. 15 : 170 . DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN :>• ' i-. ;. ' .'< A
3177.ge excepting only the just Noah and his family, because that " all jlesh hud Five infa
3178. twenty-four thousand Israelites put to death in one fire day for their sins of impur
3179.our thousand Israelites put to death in one fire day for their sins of impurity and
3180.fire day for their sins of impurity and God, by his praises and rewards declaring h
3181.abundant proof that the Lord holds this sin in itter abomination, and that he frequ
3182.uently punishes it even in ; ; — this life 'I.- by chastisements the most terrible
3183.of that young person, the book in which Religion was not treated with respect. And yet i
3184. why diffuse throughout the great human family a poison which you considered deadly as
3185.tes them as be pleases, and it \j, !iis will that we should respect the order which
3186. others what he has given to them. This law is imprinted in our he.'tvt: let us con
3187.not that they should do unto us. If any one takes away from us that M'lkfch belongs
3188. "j '1 ; , >. .;i .'_• ' fill TOWARDS GOD. ; 17t we immediately cry out against h
3189.ice would really be but another has the same right to complain when we disregard the
3190.complain when we disregard the rules of justice in depriving him Without justice societ
3191.les of justice in depriving him Without justice society could not subof that which is h
3192.ure our neighbour in sist bis goods, in one way or the other. He who tdkeih the goo
3193.ur in sist bis goods, in one way or the other. He who tdkeih the goods of another. Sa
3194.f insluill never inherit the kingdom of God, justice to take the goods of another b
3195.luill never inherit the kingdom of God, justice to take the goods of another by surpris
3196.our neighbour either by the weight, the quality, or the measure "f merchandise sold to
3197. from their parents from strangers that being a real theft which is severely censured
3198.ssion of their property and enjoy their wealth even before their death, which event he
3199.nd enjoy their wealth even before their death, which event he considers too long dela
3200.art must be truly a barbarous and cruel one, utterly than ; ' ?.. > >V '-'' . ' " ^
3201. wages of servants or workmen. " If any man hath done any work for thee " said Tobi
3202.e lent. * is, moreover, an injustice to cause any damage to our neigh* hour, such as
3203...»-, «;•; , ' , •' • > ir. 172 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN V . ;r't-'-^ .., . i->
3204.not enough to repent, nnd ask pardon of God ; we must also make restitution to our
3205.d down with our neighbour's goods. When one is not able to make restitution just at
3206.poor of this we are assured by the wise man, when he says, that we ought to asrdst
3207.eir distress. St. John says that if an} one, having wealth, closes his heart agains
3208.. St. John says that if an} one, having wealth, closes his heart against his brother w
3209.ed with a superfluity, according to our state and condition. Although the word alms t
3210.y be said, nevertheless, that there aie other kind of alms still more meritorius, and
3211. their salvation, either by giving them good example, by procuring it for them, or b
3212.sanctification. '• .I' ^* doubtless a good deed to save the life of a poor man dan
3213.I' ^* doubtless a good deed to save the life of a poor man danger of perishing with
3214. a good deed to save the life of a poor man danger of perishing with hunger but to
3215.but to contribute to the salvation of a soul, is an act whose value wijj only be kno
3216.t whose value wijj only be known in the other world. It is who is in ; V TOWARDS " GO
3217.e value wijj only be known in the other world. It is who is in ; V TOWARDS " GOD. sha
3218.er world. It is who is in ; V TOWARDS " GOD. shall 173 his sins. He *' says St. Joh
3219. " who gain his brother, shall gave his soul and cover the multitude of He who instr
3220.n action so praiseworthy performed by a man of obscure " But who are you ? " he ask
3221.ll you know who I am it suffices to and one of those who profess the holy Law. This
3222.o and one of those who profess the holy Law. This law not only forbids us to steal
3223.of those who profess the holy Law. This law not only forbids us to steal the goods
3224.er." The gentleman was so struck by the beauty of tl^! morality, that he turned the ba
3225. |)our in structed in the Piysteries of Religion. Letters, e not letii in A famous usure
3226.etters, e not letii in A famous usurer, being at the point of death, sent for a (•
3227. A famous usurer, being at the point of death, sent for a (• « . »'. .» • , it
3228.r. The latter having found that all his wealth had been acquired by the unjust practic
3229.tice of usury, told him that " But what will behe must absolutely make restitution.
3230.me of my children ? " inquired the sick man. " The sal- man oiitri- e wili your sou
3231.n ? " inquired the sick man. " The sal- man oiitri- e wili your soul " returned the
3232.man. " The sal- man oiitri- e wili your soul " returned the priest " ought to be dea
3233. to be dearyou than the welfare of your family." 1 cannot agree to do what you require
3234.to do what you require," said the dying man, " and I must only run the risk.'' So h
3235.is bed, and soon after died. And what a death !— How it should cause those to tremb
3236.ed. And what a death !— How it should cause those to tremble who owe the wealth whi
3237.ould cause those to tremble who owe the wealth which they possess to fraud vation of e
3238.•)'. '. ,'r'..'-, ^; tr ' V > . 174 DUTY OF THE CHBISTIAM ) CHAPTER /r IX. > ' 0
3239.ighbour. By (ice the Eighth Commandment God prohibits all inju*. towards our neighb
3240.ne by false or unfavourable is reports. God truth itself, : and all that is contrar
3241.y false or unfavourable is reports. God truth itself, : and all that is contrary to t
3242.h itself, : and all that is contrary to truth is of. \wnsive to Him this is the found
3243.ripture against uttering not true. This vice is in fact most strongly op|/osed the s
3244.p|/osed the society or fellowship which God has established is amongst men. 'For wh
3245.to .'t,«.'l.'7v' Sll^'-.c-j^r Ih- what one thinks. This principle is so evident th
3246. Sll^'-.c-j^r Ih- what one thinks. This principle is so evident that even the Pagans unde
3247. opposite of ••t .'. -, pretence of being useful to ourselves or our neighbour; i
3248.im, for instance, attributing to hira a vice which he has not, or a fault which he h
3249.ongue of the calumvolting to an upright mind niator " according to the expression of
3250.ng less than deposing against the known truth. The false witness, besides the attroci
3251.of the most horrible impiety as regards God, whose dreadiul name enormity of * •)
3252. name enormity of * •) i #. ' TOWARDS GOD. he iVo it serve to support falsehood a
3253.ey have committed together with all its evil coiisequences; they must re-estab- prof
3254.'. bour, that is to say, to publish the evil that he really has So long as his fault
3255.ld we like to have our own hidly of his good name. Certainly not we den faults or ia
3256.t the crimes which exclude from eternal happiness. Like lire that is carried along by the
3257.what it cannot consume it is a restless evil which disturbs society, creates dissens
3258.The detractor has to answer for all the sin, of which he has been the cause he has
3259.r all the sin, of which he has been the cause he has sinned in all those who repeated
3260.s sinned in all those who heard it with pleasure, for it is not only forbidden to speak
3261.t is not only forbidden to speak ill of one's neighbour, but even to listen to detr
3262.but even to listen to detraction. If no one would lend an ear to slander, then tlie
3263.. j,*'^ • fj/-, J.-:: .» ,:-,. b the sin. « kinds of detraetion, the blackest a
3264.t fatal its results, is that of telling one person in secret what ano« ther has sa
3265. of him who hears them, to hatred and a desire of revenge, which terminates i i irreco
3266.• : — '.•.-.> - i,i!^ • t. 10 , DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ' * . :.0-iS.. or givi
3267.from wounding charity, we do but fulfil one of its most natural and most urgent dut
3268.d most urgent duties it is really doing good to our neighbour, when we endeavour to
3269.ying himself and others it is doing him good, when we prefer to his reputaiiave it i
3270.taiiave it in their power to remedy the evil, from falling into it; in that case, so
3271.r is all but irreparable. In fact, when one has imputed to another a fault which he
3272.destroyed but when he has only told the truth in his disclosure, then he cannot retra
3273.scarcely possible for him to repair the evil he has done or caused to be done he mus
3274.an to that effect by publishing all the good that he knows of the same person, in or
3275.shing all the good that he knows of the same person, in order to efface, or at least
3276.itJiout suf^< By the Eighth Commandment God If- - " •".-..,^..i I . TOWARDS GOD.
3277.t God If- - " •".-..,^..i I . TOWARDS GOD. ficient is m :.*' >.»•. reason is t
3278.eason is to do him serious irjury. Rash judgment then contrary to justice and not less h
3279. irjury. Rash judgment then contrary to justice and not less hurtful to charity. That v
3280.e and not less hurtful to charity. That virtue, so strongly recommended to us in the G
3281.k favourably of our br'^thren, to put a good on their actions, and to excuse in them
3282.er is not manifestly bad. " thinketh no evil it sees no crime which is not evid'^^nt
3283.nly when it is proved." Indeed, when we love any one we are more disposed to believe
3284.it is proved." Indeed, when we love any one we are more disposed to believe him inn
3285.them do unto It would be still a rasher judgment and also more crimius. nal, to attribut
3286.bad intentions to actions in themselves good and laudable, and to suspect evil motiv
3287.elves good and laudable, and to suspect evil motives in those whose external conduct
3288. through the fair actions appearance of virtue only vice itself, can only proceed from
3289. fair actions appearance of virtue only vice itself, can only proceed from Virtuous
3290.eople commonly judge a dark and corrupt soul. others by themselves even as they are
3291.nsider others to be terior semblance of virtue, and are unwilling to believe that such
3292.lieve that such appearances can conceal vice. Occupied with their own faults, for ^'
3293.ey prepare for themselves a favourabl-' judgment at the tribunal of God, for Jesus Chris
3294.favourabl-' judgment at the tribunal of God, for Jesus Christ has assured us that w
3295.hrough charity concealed in his house a man who, if taken, was to be put to death.
3296.e a man who, if taken, was to be put to death. The impe^ ial officers demanded ol " I
3297.annot anthe bishop if he knew where the man was. swer you," said Firmus " because I
3298. torments, so as to force him where the man was, and he was even threatened with ..
3299.J; • . >:..s : 178 |l-'--',;.,.>iri.; DUTY OF THE CHKIBTIAN ** ! death •..l^<,v,
3300.',;.,.>iri.; DUTY OF THE CHKIBTIAN ** ! death •..l^<,v, either [ know not neighbour
3301. He was brought struck with his eminent virtue, also pardoned the man whom he . agains
3302.h his eminent virtue, also pardoned the man whom he . against truth or against my b
3303.also pardoned the man whom he . against truth or against my before the emperor, who s
3304.is we learn that it is better to suffer death than to utter a falsea>od, or to speak
3305.conversation. 'v''*:*';- ......ir=" And one day when some of his friends, began to
3306.ery means in our power. — I.; ; .'• Life of St. ^fugustiHt by Posaidius. CHAPTER
3307.rohibited by his Sixth Commandment, all God forbids by the ninth, all im- must not
3308. thoughts and desires. fulfil the whole Law under this head %y merely abstaining fr
3309.n. No, that is not sufficient, for even God who fathoms the depths of the the desir
3310.n God who fathoms the depths of the the desire is a crime. deart and of the will, is n
3311.the desire is a crime. deart and of the will, is not satisfied 'vith external purity
3312.ry ' i»f • lis- 1,\ thought of doing evil renders us guilty in hia eyes when ii i
3313.berate, that is to say when we knowing* Evil thoughts/' ly dwell upon it, and take p
3314.l thoughts/' ly dwell upon it, and take pleasure therein : separate from God." Thev, the
3315.d take pleasure therein : separate from God." Thev, therefore, bring death to our s
3316.arate from God." Thev, therefore, bring death to our soul if we are not careful to pu
3317.d." Thev, therefore, bring death to our soul if we are not careful to put them away,
3318.ery first approach. Thus it is that the Law of (iod reaches the very root of the Ex
3319.aw of (iod reaches the very root of the Experience proves evil, and stifles it in its very
3320. the very root of the Experience proves evil, and stifles it in its very oriji^in. t
3321.d stifles it in its very oriji^in. that one comes not all of a sudden to commit cri
3322.es that we are led into them. The tions evil begins by a passing thought which is al
3323.ought which is allowed to remain in the mind, and is entertained with pleasure; from
3324.in in the mind, and is entertained with pleasure; from thought springs desire, and from
3325.ned with pleasure; from thought springs desire, and from desire one passes to external
3326.; from thought springs desire, and from desire one passes to external acts. "It is fro
3327.thought springs desire, and from desire one passes to external acts. "It is from th
3328.he heart" says Jesus Christ, " that all evil thoughts, fornication, and murder, proc
3329.r, proceed." That divine Master ph-tces evil thoughts at the head of all crimes, bec
3330.ource. The true means of repressing the desire, is to reject the thought, as the })est
3331.venting the bad action is to stitle the desire thereof cannot, indeed, preserve oursel
3332.c'inselves. We need not expect unbroken peace in this life, for taking pleasure in th
3333. need not expect unbroken peace in this life, for taking pleasure in them, one of wa
3334.unbroken peace in this life, for taking pleasure in them, one of warfare. Virtue does no
3335.this life, for taking pleasure in them, one of warfare. Virtue does not consist in
3336.aking pleasure in them, one of warfare. Virtue does not consist in not being but in ma
3337.warfare. Virtue does not consist in not being but in manfully resisting all the evil
3338.being but in manfully resisting all the evil suggestions of our passions, and in kee
3339.way our attention, elevate our heart to God, and employ ourselves in some useful oc
3340.n. It ij! fi ffreat remedv against that vice to applv one's seU seriously to some us
3341.freat remedv against that vice to applv one's seU seriously to some useful labour,
3342.evil find us always busy, and his darts will Let us be faithful and fear nothing W t
3343.e is subdued. If we attach ourselves to God, he will never permit us to be tennpted
3344.dued. If we attach ourselves to God, he will never permit us to be tennpted bedevil
3345.J\ . il.'*.-J-. / 180 »••««< • DUTY or THE CHRISTIAN ; • .., •, ., -* y
3346.have struggled, far from doing us harm, will he«;ome ijie isau " of our triumph, an
3347.nother, by the tenth krljids us evon to desire their possession. Let us here remri.'k
3348.ftl difference which exists between the Law tk/ God and ^hv- Jaws of men the latter
3349.erence which exists between the Law tk/ God and ^hv- Jaws of men the latter regulat
3350.ly the '\ierior action" of men, because man sees only what meets b*Jt the Law of Go
3351.cause man sees only what meets b*Jt the Law of God forbids even the desire or the h
3352.an sees only what meets b*Jt the Law of God forbids even the desire or the his eye
3353.ts b*Jt the Law of God forbids even the desire or the his eye most sec^-et thoughts, f
3354. the his eye most sec^-et thoughts, for God perceives the very depths of tlie heprt
3355. any thing. or a farm, it is because we desire to have it but that desire is perfectly
3356.s because we desire to have it but that desire is perfectly legitimate when, in making
3357.ompJther to take or to retain the ! ; ; God, having forbidden us by ; mandment proh
3358.idden us by ; mandment prohibits is the desire of obtaining unjustly which belongs to
3359.belongs to our neighbour the inordinate love of riches, and an unjustifiable eagerne
3360. an unjustifiable eagerness in amassing wealth it is, in short, that cupidity, which S
3361.l styles the root and the source of all evil, and which God denounces as follows —
3362.t and the source of all evil, and which God denounces as follows — that — " »
3363.e to house, and land to land, even till space faileth thee, ' :• .' though thou alo
3364.heaping together, and accumulating ns A man who is given up to though one was never
3365.ting ns A man who is given up to though one was never to die. that passion is solel
3366. t.v J\ ' ' by night, and sacrifices to life. ' • his repose, hia health, pretende
3367.' • his repose, hia health, pretended happiness, which immagination tells hii d found i
3368. tells hii d found in the possession of wealth, he renders hiuiselt miserable, and his
3369.ease his treasure in a word he knows no other God than money. Hence it is that ission
3370.is treasure in a word he knows no other God than money. Hence it is that ission an
3371.serve two masters that we cannot at the same time love God and money. It is rutt tha
3372. two masters that we cannot at the same time love God and money. It is rutt that He
3373.masters that we cannot at the same time love God and money. It is rutt that He forbi
3374.rs that we cannot at the same time love God and money. It is rutt that He forbids u
3375.r affections upon them, or to make .^ur happiness consist in possesvsing them it is not w
3376.at ue condemns, but only the immoderate desire of obtaining it. And, after all, how co
3377. could the possession of rich cs confer happiness ? Evanescent are they and perishable, c
3378. by excessive care to be In ken from us one day or another, without any manner of d
3379.rry even the smallest portion from this world lo the next riches which will cause us
3380.rom this world lo the next riches which will cause us the keenest anguish when we ar
3381.his world lo the next riches which will cause us the keenest anguish when we are forc
3382.s, fix not thy heart upon them ; and if God has no* disposed it so that you were bo
3383.o* disposed it so that you were born to wealth, seek not to become rich. This is the c
3384.R, NY. 14580 (716) 872-4503 Q< il^r 182 DUTY OF THE CHBIBTIATf US by Christ himself!
3385. rust nor the moth doth consume where a man's treasutg ! I it, there is his heart a
3386.he gave this advice to his son " If any man have worked for thee, pay ! — ; r,.^*
3387. and we are bound to obey her, because, being guided by the Holy Ghost, she speaks to
3388.ly Ghost, she speaks to us on his part. God will only regard as his children those
3389.host, she speaks to us on his part. God will only regard as his children those who r
3390.eth me." And in another place, " He who will not hear the and ! Church, let him be u
3391.ct them. I' would be invleed disobeying God if we refused to submit to those who ru
3392. .»' ;->^i,! •• Cturch, which all good Catholics are bound faithfully to obthe
3393.. serve — .•. -y ..'-. V-.f >,'< .. being supposed to have a pre* Holy See, a fri
3394. o! " I pray you give me an advice, his one day said to him whether am J to think w
3395.t the decisions of the : Examples. —A man ,' '.,'.>• ,/-' ..• *. \ • .'. V
3396.-, < i- . n,' ' , .•.• : 1 ;.v: * God " will if casion, not damn us," Said a
3397. i- . n,' ' , .•.• : 1 ;.v: * God " will if casion, not damn us," Said a bad Chr
3398., not damn us," Said a bad Christian on one ocwe keep his own Commandments, even th
3399. the Church." another " I never saw any one who despised the Commandments of the Ch
3400.serve with fidelity the Commandments of God." Lasausse. : . > -e',' • , - , , •
3401.applying ourselves to acts of piety and religion. Some of these festivals have been esta
3402.s of our Lord's his Presentation in the life, his Incarnation^ Nativity, his Circumc
3403.the divine Eucharist. These ni^^steries being the source of all the graces v/e re cei
3404.rce of all the graces v/e re ceive from God, and of the salvation for which we hope
3405.crease of faith, hope, and charity. The other festivals are intended to commemorate,
3406.Virgin and the Saints, the graces which God poured the Apostles, . ,-y . , ', :^' I
3407.t to our view the ineffable hap> At the same time, convinced piness which is their r
3408.our view the ineffable hap> At the same time, convinced piness which is their reward
3409. which we are continually remind* ed by experience, let us beg of them to employ on our be
3410.n our behalf their credit with Almighty God, and to obtain for us through the merit
3411.their footsteps, to the end that we may one day ar* rive at that eternal felicity w
3412.brings before our eyes the blessings of God and the examples of the Saints. In the
3413. the examples of the Saints. In the Old Law God prescribed to the Israelites a cert
3414. examples of the Saints. In the Old Law God prescribed to the Israelites a certain
3415. number of festivals, to perpetuate the memory of the won* It is after this divine der
3416.ve been established, in order to honour God, to instruct the faithful, and to nouri
3417.n children, to b de acquainted with the cause oif nistory. The Church commands the fe
3418.t h her wish that parents should do the same This is what God prescribed to the Is*
3419.parents should do the same This is what God prescribed to the Is* by their children
3420.k you what does this worship mean," you will say unto them : " It is the vi^ _ ^j >
3421.er Saint is then proposed to us, praise God for of his blessings, and beg of him th
3422.red on that day, to the end that we may one day share in the happiness the We shoul
3423.he end that we may one day share in the happiness the We should beseech them to intercede
3424.intercede Saints now enjoy. for us with God, and to obtain for us that assistance o
3425.on the Sabbath day, a certain number of other Jews whom necessity retained in his arm
3426.ay, a certain number of other Jews whom necessity retained in his army, represented to hi
3427.reatness, replied : " Is there a mighty God in hea« ven who commands us to celebra
3428....^^ Jews modestly, " He is the Living God and the Omnipotent Master of heaven." "
3429.ndment. Sacrifice is the holiest act of Religion, and tliat which renders to God the mos
3430.of Religion, and tliat which renders to God the most perfect honour ; so the obliga
3431. ^\ We •5« . * f- V'"' ' . -*'.' t8G DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAIf and the participation
3432.he most solid reasons: each parish is a family of whom the priest is the father and th
3433.ssemble with their chief to render unto God the solemn worship of Sacrifice and of
3434.id for all the faithful assembled under one head, and in their name they ought then
3435.hich their pastor knows better than any other ; they are therefore more useful. To fo
3436.r the entire Mass; the commandment were one fl*>"v» when the Mass was already far
3437.tention, piety, and respect, not merely being present in the body we must also join w
3438.also join with the priest who speaks to God in the name of all present, and offers
3439.st then apply o\» ry, and dishonouring Religion. selves to prayer during all the time o
3440.ligion. selves to prayer during all the time of the holy Mass, ma* We *',;H?j.-»-,
3441.ly Mass, ma* We *',;H?j.-»-, ! TOWARDS GOD. king use either of a 187 .,1 book, or
3442.er of a 187 .,1 book, or beads, or some other means of >. » keeping the attention fi
3443.da;; ^ , -i we ouglit also to assist as other exercises of the Mass on Sundays and ho
3444.hurch. A Christian virgin named Anysia, being on her way to the assembly of the faith
3445. Going up to her, he said: "Stay! where art thou going?** vent the faithful festiva
3446.the sigu on her forehead to obtain from God strength to withstand the coming ten^pt
3447. was offended, l>ecause she made him no other answer than that sign. Laying hold of h
3448. she made him no other answer than that sign. Laying hold of her who art he said ang
3449. than that sign. Laying hold of her who art he said angrily " Answer me thou ? wher
3450.e said angrily " Answer me thou ? where art thou going ? " She replied courageous"
3451.d thou shalt adore him with us." At the same time he tore away the veil which had co
3452.u shalt adore him with us." At the same time he tore away the veil which had covered
3453.aunt, thou wretch Bhe said Jesus Christ will punish " Whereupon the soldier became s
3454.. She fell bathed in her blood, but her soul was crowned with celestial glory. Fleur
3455.to say, when once capable of discerning good from evil, and cense* quently, of commi
3456.en once capable of discerning good from evil, and cense* quently, of committing mort
3457.nd cense* quently, of committing mortal sin ; the second is to confess By this wise
3458., standing still in their old habits of sin. In tha second place she would thereby
3459.re easily to obtain absolution, without being obliged to renounce their sins or refor
3460. to renounce their sins or reform their life. this By commandment M the first is to
3461.astor, or, with his permission, to some other approved priest. Although the Church, t
3462.ch, through condescension, requires but one annual confession, in order to accommod
3463.rder to accommodate those who find that duty hard and painful, yet it is her desire
3464.at duty hard and painful, yet it is her desire that all should confess more frequently
3465. her intention, nor does it satvsfy her desire, especially when any one has had the mi
3466.satvsfy her desire, especially when any one has had the misfortune of falling into
3467.d the misfortune of falling into mortal sin. God obliges all who feel themselves gu
3468. misfortune of falling into mortal sin. God obliges all who feel themselves guilty
3469.dispensing with this obligation, has no other purpose than to prevent us from becomin
3470. to prevent us from becoming fixed in a state of sin, to the utte ruin of our soul. W
3471.nt us from becoming fixed in a state of sin, to the utte ruin of our soul. When the
3472.a state of sin, to the utte ruin of our soul. When the body fore, To bound ; 'i::^r-
3473.o we not expose ou^• to die in mortal sin, life ? of our For those by remaining i
3474.not expose ou^• to die in mortal sin, life ? of our For those by remaining in it f
3475.maining in it for the greatei the rest, experience proves that one is not sufficient for k
3476.reatei the rest, experience proves that one is not sufficient for keeping up confin
3477. keeping up confine themselves to that, art generally engaged in some criminal cour
3478. choose to give up, and hence even that one confession if I bad one ; hence they do
3479.hence even that one confession if I bad one ; hence they do not even fulfil the Com
3480.h, who, by imposing on her children the law of innual confession, obliges them at t
3481. innual confession, obliges them at the same time to bring to the Sacrament the disp
3482.al confession, obliges them at the same time to bring to the Sacrament the dispositi
3483.t of the .Church, but only adding a new sin to those In a word the Commandment of t
3484.n. The Church has not fixed the precise time for the annual confession ; but as she
3485. confession ; but as she ordains in the same Canon that all should communicate at Ea
3486.s coiv fession should be made about the time of Lent, so as to serve as a preparatio
3487.ples. The venerable Bede relates in his history of England, that Conrad, a very pious p
3488.onfession in the whole year 8 Christian life ; who •< 4 '• ' • . ' 4 ;i« '..!
3489.remity, implored him not to die in that state. But the unhappy man, having remained s
3490.t to die in that state. But the unhappy man, having remained some time " It if sile
3491.t the unhappy man, having remained some time " It if silent, fixed a wild stare on t
3492. I If . , 1l" • ^ 'i — — : Beds History of Engtatult book S. ¥t. . 100 DUTY OP
3493.History of Engtatult book S. ¥t. . 100 DUTY OP THB CHBIBTtAN certain preacher A com
3494.owing spectacle, a infltniction n young man was i driving furiously alonff the stre
3495.tor " A doctor" he criesr-" At Easter I will have a doctor " You may guess — : ! h
3496.or " You may guess — : ! how m^ great will naturally, concluded that he Mi ren ! w
3497.urselves?" Hurrying on in the'career of vice are suddenly cast down by some fatal ac
3498. accident the noblest part of you ^your soul is more than wounded—it is dead ; you
3499.ful, not of himself, it is true, but in virtue of his mission received like unto ; —
3500.ssion received like unto ; — — from God, and who is able to restore you to life
3501. God, and who is able to restore you to life; your answer is ever ' At Easter at Eas
3502. answer is ever ' At Easter at Easter I will apply to that physician * And how many
3503. will apply to that physician * And how many are there who put no term to their dela
3504.ive your IV. OF THB FOURTH COMHANDMENT. God about great Easter day The Church by al
3505.ment with • I* , r. respect at Easter time, and each in his own parish, and threat
3506.ication all those who fail to ful^ that duty. All the faithflil, and even children w
3507.t as the daily bread of the children of God, and thoy knew no grief more sensible t
3508.itij.' deprived of it. In the course of time, charity waxed cold, people absented th
3509.themselves from the holy Communion, and many Christians went so far as to pass sever
3510. but we do not fulfil the extent of her desire. In fact, it can scarcely be supposed t
3511. fact, it can scarcely be supposed that one Communion in the whole year should be E
3512. to preserve and maintain the spiritual life, which is the life of grace it is even
3513.intain the spiritual life, which is the life of grace it is even to be feared that w
3514.ad Communion, far from fulfilliiigr the law, is a horrible sacrilege and an outrage
3515.avthe conscience purged from all mortal sin it is to show ; .>• * • ^«« ' •
3516. Paschal Communion to bo deferred for a time, when there is any just and reasonable
3517., when there is any just and reasonable cause. There is no reason for postponing it,
3518. it, so just or rational as the need of being perfectly purified ; but it to us this
3519.elay is to be made use of for preparing one's self, and should be curtailed as much
3520.1 . « ,-,.•' • I,. • ' " — 102 DUTY OP upon us until Till CURIlTIAIf is Uie
3521.ent •' : to his parish prieM, lie him Will your Uuveronce good enough to come into
3522.rish prieM, lie him Will your Uuveronce good enough to come into the sacristy and he
3523.ke my Easter Communion. the Church, and one of her Commandments is Receive thy God
3524. one of her Commandments is Receive thy God about great Easter day.' " Very good,"
3525.thy God about great Easter day.' " Very good," said the priest, — ' mmwH " but rem
3526. then, that I lead " You wish to make u good life, returned the parishioner. your Ea
3527., that I lead " You wish to make u good life, returned the parishioner. your Easter
3528. shah not eat,' and although you are in good health, you eat meat every day. And aga
3529. ? " He replied " I always fast fast on good Friday be assured I do." " But I know,
3530.ou can make }our l|aster Communion, you will have to reform your life." — if you p
3531.Communion, you will have to reform your life." — if you please, for I — ____^^^
3532.med Emb irdays. consists in talcing but one meal ^nd in abstaining from cer* tain t
3533.r drink till after the hour of Vespers, being six o'clock in the evening. To this rig
3534.s, even during the night they spent the time, moreover, in the greatest recollection
3535.ntenance of the fast, that there be but one meal taken. The fast of the Ember-days
3536. the year, to draw down the blessing of God on the gifts of the earth, and to implo
3537.f the earth, and to implore him to give good ministers to his Church, that being the
3538.give good ministers to his Church, that being the time when those who are destined fo
3539.ministers to his Church, that being the time when those who are destined for the aug
3540.here a portion of the night in praising God by the singing of psalms and reading of
3541.tival in a proper manner, and to derive good fruit from its due observance. The law
3542.good fruit from its due observance. The law of fasting is obligatory on all the fai
3543.P THB CHRISTIAN rf ;"*'*••jf'.>> or other infirmities, or hard and fatiguing labo
3544.g labour renders ft impracticable ; any one to wiiom any of these excpptions applie
3545.o inform their priest for it is a great sin not to observe the fasts prescribed by
3546.there to violato theni is no legitimate cause for dispensation without necessity is t
3547.gitimate cause for dispensation without necessity is to sin against God himself, who comn
3548.or dispensation without necessity is to sin against God himself, who comnevertheles
3549.ion without necessity is to sin against God himself, who comnevertheless see a grea
3550.ns who, without any reason, violate the law of fasting ; but the law is none the le
3551.n, violate the law of fasting ; but the law is none the leas binding, and the multi
3552.il they have attained the age of twenty-one, yet young people are not the less boun
3553.f which cannot injure their health. The same applies to all those whose infirmities
3554.plies to all those whose infirmities or other reasons exempt them from the rigour of
3555.they ought to do it in part, uniting in mind and heart with the Penance of the whole
3556.e of the whole Church, and making up in other good works for ; We that which they are
3557.he whole Church, and making up in other good works for ; We that which they are not
3558.d Christian, who was very guilty before God, chanced to read a book entitled the Hi
3559.od, chanced to read a book entitled the History of Fasting. He was struck by the rigour
3560.s were followed to the very letter, how many years of strict fasting would have been
3561.ing would have been imposed upon me for many of the iniquities of which I am guilty!
3562. days they all abstained from wine, and many there were who used only bread and wate
3563.bread and water, nor did they take that one meal till the evening was come." What h
3564.e read made a lasting impression on his mind, and gave rise to serious reflection, u
3565. to serious reflection, until at length God touched his heart. Penetrated with a li
3566.that intention never fasted ; ' TOWARDS GOD. gilence is maintained, 199 'r. he ente
3567.lence is maintained, 199 'r. he entered one of those monasteries whorein a rigorous
3568.eir short repoae to ring the praises of God during the night Lasaubsb u ""' ••
3569.ey are to be wiped away, and the divine justice satisfied ; we each have passions to su
3570.view, the Church, in imposing on us the law of abstinence, has other particular rea
3571.posing on us the law of abstinence, has other particular reasons which we ought to kn
3572. on us the law of abstinence, has other particular reasons which we ought to know Friday s
3573. for the sanctificatiou In the lapse of time the fast of these days of the Sabbath.
3574. use of meat, and the Church makes it a law to which all are bound to submit. Even
3575. Even children are uot exempt from this law, when once they are able to ob^ : We /
3576.";: •\<\'- .; Cm. ... • ,'' • 106 DUTY OF THE OHBHTIAR cerve it It is only the
3577.at can dispense with it in the sight of God, and this veiy the person inability mus
3578. Let none then be deceived by the false reasoning of the who making a wrong application o
3579. distinction of meats ; but it is not a matter of indifference in the s'ght of God to
3580. matter of indifference in the s'ght of God to obey or disobey the au thority estab
3581.ermit themselves the use of meat on the soul. Doubtless it is which can in itself ho
3582.btless it is which can in itself honour God days when is, the more prevalent the di
3583.salvation in y»>:'. &.• Examples. In one of the larger cities ot France, a child
3584.s prepa> ring to approach for the first time to the holy Table. It was tiie unhappy
3585.mpassion, and brought him seeat, at the same time reproaching him What was her surpr
3586.ion, and brought him seeat, at the same time reproaching him What was her surprise f
3587.ng against my conscience, so I hope you will not be angry if I do not accept what yo
3588.lf for his injustice, asking him at the same time who had given him such prudent adv
3589.r his injustice, asking him at the same time who had given him such prudent advice.
3590.s and leading them back from the way of sin and error Marguet. Essay on the Lxws of
3591.answered only by her tears. What is the matter with you? said I, or is there any one s
3592.atter with you? said I, or is there any one sick at your house ? '' She hesitated ;
3593. '^••r,;*-^: , ' t ; :^4k — ! 198 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN f'i months her father
3594.a liitle, she thus resumed " During the time I have mentioned, there has not been on
3595.me I have mentioned, there has not been one Friday or Saturday that we did not leav
3596.er, but she told me she was sick and in pain, and falling on her knees she said to m
3597.ees she said to me " I know I must obey God rather than men, so that I can never br
3598.afraid of doing wrong by resisting your will so long. My dear mother, I beg your par
3599.ing, nor do nothing more than to beg of God that he may make you understand the sin
3600.God that he may make you understand the sin you commit ! meat on days when it is pr
3601.vice. I come then to ask at what hour I will find you in the church. My child in eat
3602.parent's conversion as the reward which God had granted to her heroic perseverance.
3603.reat- pie of his wife. daughter A short time after, I inquired of she had never spok
3604.ainly recognized " &:^-''>i';n^ TOWARDS GOD. the soul. 100 working of divine grace
3605.ognized " &:^-''>i';n^ TOWARDS GOD. the soul. 100 working of divine grace in that in
3606.iimof the Cut^ihUm of Dijon, CHAPTER OP SIN. XIII. of ly Sin, which means a disobed
3607.m of Dijon, CHAPTER OP SIN. XIII. of ly Sin, which means a disobedience to the all
3608.ll evils the greatest, since it offends God Law who is of God, fa supreme.. \. •
3609.vils the greatest, since it offends God Law who is of God, fa supreme.. \. ••i
3610.est, since it offends God Law who is of God, fa supreme.. \. ••i moreover, a mo
3611.rous ingratitude, for by it we offend a God who has created us, and who still pre s
3612.ike unto a beloved child who outrages a good That we may better underfather what a h
3613.t a heinous crime stand the enormity of sin, let us consider what it has cost Jesus
3614.orror. terrible chastisement with which God punishes sin ; all the miseries spread
3615.le chastisement with which God punishes sin ; all the miseries spread over the eart
3616.pread over the earth, all the trials of life, sickness, and death, are the fatal eff
3617., all the trials of life, sickness, and death, are the fatal effects uf one single si
3618.ss, and death, are the fatal effects uf one single sin, committed by our first pare
3619.th, are the fatal effects uf one single sin, committed by our first parents. Sin is
3620.le sin, committed by our first parents. Sin is of two sorts. Original and Actual. O
3621.wo sorts. Original and Actual. Original sin is that wherein we are born. All mankin
3622.sed Virgin, have been stained with this sin. Actual sin b that which we wilfully co
3623.have been stained with this sin. Actual sin b that which we wilfully commit, after
3624.ving attained the use of reason. Actual sin is committed in four different ways: by
3625. thought, word, deed, and omission. The Law of God forbids not only the evil action
3626.t, word, deed, and omission. The Law of God forbids not only the evil action, but e
3627.on. The Law of God forbids not only the evil action, but even the thought or desire
3628.he evil action, but even the thought or desire of doing it ; it not only restrains the
3629. and the tongue, but also regulates the mind and heart; it is in the heart that diso
3630.nce begins : the heart is the source of sin, of which words and deeds are but the e
3631.d deeds are but the exterior effects. A sin is Actual sin is of two sorts, mortal a
3632.t the exterior effects. A sin is Actual sin is of two sorts, mortal and venial. mor
3633.rts, mortal and venial. mortal when the matter is considerable, and when it is con>Ven
3634.considerable, and when it is con>Venial sin is that of smaller mitted with free con
3635.t, or not committed deliberately if the matter be of greater importance. Mortal sin is
3636.matter be of greater importance. Mortal sin is the greatest of all evils, for it de
3637.d of all claim to the celestial inherit good. It is, : •» r * .• . -. :.V:-'-f
3638.o ance ; DUTT OF THE CHRISTIAX it gives death to the soul by separating it from God,
3639. OF THE CHRISTIAX it gives death to the soul by separating it from God, as the soul
3640.death to the soul by separating it from God, as the soul is the life of the body, a
3641. soul by separating it from God, as the soul is the life of the body, and it When on
3642.arating it from God, as the soul is the life of the body, and it When one has render
3643.ul is the life of the body, and it When one has renders us worthy of eternal damnat
3644.tion. the misfortune to commit a mortal sin he becomes the slave of the devil, the
3645.es the slave of the devil, the enemy of God, the object of his hatred who is its li
3646.od, the object of his hatred who is its life, his everlasting vengeance. Can there b
3647.everlasting vengeance. Can there be any evil What horror should we not have of sin,
3648. evil What horror should we not have of sin, unto that ? And with what care should
3649.ffer rather than commit a single mortal sin. We should fly sin as we would a serpen
3650.mmit a single mortal sin. We should fly sin as we would a serpent Suppose we were t
3651.eet a serpent, and bad reason to expect being devoured by him, with what haste we wou
3652. us ? Well shall we do less to save our soul than we would for the preservation of t
3653.ervation of the body ? If unfortunately one had committed a mortal sin, it would be
3654.nfortunately one had committed a mortal sin, it would be necessary to repent immedi
3655.ly, and fre* quently to pronounce, with one's whole heart, acta of con* trition and
3656.hole heart, acta of con* trition and of Love of God, and to prepare for confessing a
3657.rt, acta of con* trition and of Love of God, and to prepare for confessing as soon
3658. to say, those which do not deprive the soul of the grace that sanctifies, but tvhic
3659. peFdition, yet subject us to temporary punishment Even the smallest sin is a great evil,
3660. temporary punishment Even the smallest sin is a great evil, because it offends God
3661.shment Even the smallest sin is a great evil, because it offends God. Mor&> over, ve
3662.sin is a great evil, because it offends God. Mor&> over, venial sin when neglected,
3663.ause it offends God. Mor&> over, venial sin when neglected, exposes to mortal sin.
3664.l sin when neglected, exposes to mortal sin. "He who despiseth smaller faults" says
3665.by degrees into greater, and in the end will be eternally lost" Let us then never co
3666.ally lost" Let us then never commit any sin deliber^ ately or with consent ; but ra
3667. of the Apostle, even the appearance of evil. and of tike — ! We Example. ^ •
3668.;>*. . .*••£>'> . tcotUd induce to sin. sinning, I shall disobey God, ! and ob
3669.induce to sin. sinning, I shall disobey God, ! and obey the devil. What injustice w
3670.ow could I commit so great a crime, and sin against my God ? " [Joseph to the mfe o
3671.it so great a crime, and sin against my God ? " [Joseph to the mfe of Potiphar.)
3672.e « It is better for me to die than to sin in the presence of Lord" (Susannah.)
3673." (Susannah.) —" We ought to obey the Law of •,» '7.*.. .X -t " — TOWARDS OO
3674.'7.*.. .X -t " — TOWARDS OOD. 201 ' * God rather than the king." (Maccabees.) " I
3675.cabees.) " In proposing to me to offend God. and to ruin my soul by sin, what will
3676.ing to me to offend God. and to ruin my soul by sin, what will you give nie if I rev
3677.e to offend God. and to ruin my soul by sin, what will you give nie if I revolt aga
3678.d God. and to ruin my soul by sin, what will you give nie if I revolt against — .'
3679. .' •'..*' > ' * _* -'• '.. have in God a master so great, so good, so liberal,
3680. '.. have in God a master so great, so good, so liberal, who has been ever bountifu
3681.to me, and from whom I ex< pect eternal life, glory, and happiness and yet you would
3682.hom I ex< pect eternal life, glory, and happiness and yet you would have me disobey offen
3683.th, his vengeance " " Before you commit sin, seek a place where God is not present,
3684.fore you commit sin, seek a place where God is not present, where he sees you not,
3685.is not able to deprive you instantly of life and cast you into hell." " Away begone
3686.ne I shall not be the fool to poison my soul by enjoying for a few brief moments, th
3687.ness of a draught which would very soon cause me grievous suffering, and which would
3688.ch would render me deserving of eternal death, nay, inevitably bring it upon me, if I
3689.t wipe away I —" Him, and lose my own soul *" ? i-f- :••:'[ fh^; — — ; —
3690.V" ','.'.'• XIV. SINS. OF THE CAPITAL man is wont to commit are usually re: duced
3691. % X -.; Qivy, anger, and sloth. young man, going through a forest, was attacked b
3692.ir with his horrible roaring. The young man, being strong and couraHe geous, was no
3693.th his horrible roaring. The young man, being strong and couraHe geous, was not disma
3694.yed but boldly stood his ground. had no other arms than an axe which according to the
3695.usted hy his wounds the dragon lay some time extended on the ground, and our travell
3696.this monster, for if you leave him even one you are lost. Of what avail is it that
3697. are free from certain passions if even one be allowed to govern you ? Most commonl
3698.wed to govern you ? Most commonly it is one particular vice which destroys the soul
3699.to govern you ? Most commonly it is one particular vice which destroys the soul. Examine w
3700.ou ? Most commonly it is one particular vice which destroys the soul. Examine whethe
3701. one particular vice which destroys the soul. Examine whether, in your combats with
3702.he infernal lion, you have not left him one, wherewith to devour you or whether in
3703.recting your passions, you do not spare one darling propensity which may be quite e
3704.even till the end, and struggle on till death never wearying in the combat, nor seeki
3705.defeated all our enemies otherwise they will lay hold of us when we ^east expect it,
3706.LE OF PRIDE. I PKTr5i3 is an inordinate love and esteem of one's self, .ausing us to
3707.5i3 is an inordinate love and esteem of one's self, .ausing us to prefer ourselves
3708.efer ill to ourselves and nothing it to God ! pride is offensive to •jrod because
3709.nce proceeds vanity and the overweening desire of praise and esteem. The proud man mus
3710. desire of praise and esteem. The proud man must be admired and applauded for all t
3711.e attention of others, and to mr.ke the world believe him better than he is; thence c
3712. contempt of his neighbour. The exalted opinion which he entertains of himself causes h
3713.ir thence comes disobedience. The proud man will not submit to the orders of his su
3714.hence comes disobedience. The proud man will not submit to the orders of his superio
3715.affair of his salvation, his whole care being to ornament his body with the trappings
3716. flesh " through the gay circles of the world, drawing around him a crowd of adorers
3717.be truly ridiculous. detestable is this vice and how carefully should we avoid it Le
3718.s remember that pride is odious both to God and man, and that God is pleased to con
3719.er that pride is odious both to God and man, and that God is pleased to confound th
3720.is odious both to God and man, and that God is pleased to confound the proud, but g
3721..v' .%. his grace to the hnmble. is the virtue opposed to pride, and is, the foundatio
3722.if we consider what we really are, what cause shall we 'not find for humbling ourselv
3723.o whence it came, let us reflect on the state of our soul, and what shall we see? Ign
3724.ame, let us reflect on the state of our soul, and what shall we see? Ignorance in ih
3725.and what shall we see? Ignorance in ihe mind, corruption in the heart what a propens
3726.tion in the heart what a propensity for evil, and what inconstancy for good We have
3727.sity for evil, and what inconstancy for good We have in ourselves nought but nothing
3728.in ourselves nought but nothingness and sin if we have any thing in us good or esti
3729.ness and sin if we have any thing in us good or estimable we have it from Gcd the ad
3730.e we have it from Gcd the advantages of mind and body, the gifts of nature and of gr
3731.vantages of mind and body, the gifts of nature and of grace, all «ome from God. One w
3732. of nature and of grace, all «ome from God. One who is penetrated with this conviC
3733.ature and of grace, all «ome from God. One who is penetrated with this conviC' !
3734. — .:,M^' "' ; : •.«*: "f ' 904 It DUTY OF THE cnRIITIAN Hon is far removed fro
3735. he finds himself iti possessioo of any good qualities, he refers to God all the glo
3736.ioo of any good qualities, he refers to God all the glory and merit but his faults
3737.on, and humbles himself for them before God. Happy are they who are humble of heart
3738.oured by his vices, would fain humblt a man, who though of low birth, was endowed w
3739. him with having no ancestors boast The other, far from being irritated, " If my orig
3740. no ancestors boast The other, far from being irritated, " If my origin disgraces me,
3741.ce yours " Let us then leani to respect virtue where. lar merit, — of whom he could
3742.NESS. an inordinate attachment to not a sin to have riches, but it is a sin to fix
3743.o not a sin to have riches, but it is a sin to fix our hearts upon them, to seek th
3744.m with too much eagerness, to place our happiness in possessing them, and to us9 unjust m
3745.them. Avarice produces forgetfulnoss of God, by inducing man to make his treasures
3746.duces forgetfulnoss of God, by inducing man to make his treasures the object of his
3747.hence it is that St Paul sets down this sin as a species of idolatry. Men have only
3748.e thoughts are given to the amassing of wealth; they are but little affected with the
3749.; they are but little affected with the desire or the hope of eternal goods, while BO
3750.s money to his health, nay, even to his life, and denies himself the commonest neces
3751.ng use of them, he is poor with all his wealth, What madness is his an'l wants in the
3752. the midst of plenty. ; ! Finally, this vice gives rise to duplicity, for the miser,
3753.iptures " as he who loveth money such a man would sell his own soul." He who is gov
3754.eth money such a man would sell his own soul." He who is governed by this passion kn
3755. governed by this passion knows neither good faith, nor honour, nor conscience he be
3756.years, and reflection reduce and weaken other passions, but avarice seems to revive a
3757. his wretched hoards the nearer he sees death approaching, the more closely does he c
3758.ical futurity. Gospel, " This night thy soul shall be demanded of thee, for whom sha
3759. heaped together ? " He shall leave his wealth to others, and himself shall retain but
3760. away." Let us endeavour to acquire the virtue opposed to avarice, which virtue is a c
3761.re the virtue opposed to avarice, which virtue is a christian detachment from th« thi
3762.ian detachment from th« things of this world, whether we be in poverty or in affluen
3763.• • :• 'ffi 4. ;>,'?:•.:• 200 DUTY OP THE CIIRIBTIAlf ; nor desire to poBs
3764..:• 200 DUTY OP THE CIIRIBTIAlf ; nor desire to poBsesB what belongs not to us these
3765.from satiating our desirr \\\y The iust man is lKi;>{)ier serve to excite them stil
3766.but we sliall be rich indeed if we fear God, shun evil, and do good." If we have wh
3767.all be rich indeed if we fear God, shun evil, and do good." If we have where> with t
3768.ndeed if we fear God, shun evil, and do good." If we have where> with to support us
3769. be content. Hjence, let those who have wealth remem))or that they can take nothing wi
3770. they can take nothing with them to the other world ">! them pour them out upon the p
3771.can take nothing with them to the other world ">! them pour them out upon the poor, s
3772.ogether witu a most traijicai end. This man, being possessed by the demon i)f avari
3773.er witu a most traijicai end. This man, being possessed by the demon i)f avarice thou
3774. and add heap to heap. Fearful lest any one should deprive him of his treasures, he
3775.trived that it was imperceptible to any one not acquainted with the secret. No soon
3776. and silver, which were to him as gods. One da^ when he had gone to deposit some mo
3777.hen he had amused himself thus for some time, he would have retired, but the door co
3778. long as he was aMe, but how coulu' any one hear h'.u p.'."* ho wo . ever think of
3779.r him in such a ^ ).. 'o^ Meanwhile his family, seeing that he did not return, became
3780.murdered in a word that he had lost his life by : — liMf^" iff-|';i: . TOWARDS GOD
3781.ife by : — liMf^" iff-|';i: . TOWARDS GOD. 2on '^ lome fatal acciHent. Suddenly a
3782.pposed to Nothing is more uegm 'iing to man than this shameful vice nothing more o|
3783.re uegm 'iing to man than this shameful vice nothing more o|5posed t the sanctity of
3784.not ven to know it In order to set this vice in all its real horro we have only to c
3785. unhappy effects. It begets a aatred of God, Christian chastity. ; ' >^ "• . an a
3786.>^ "• . an aversion for the duties of religion, hardnt ^^s of heart, in fine the ruin
3787.o the gravt. He who is addicted to this vice cannot be ignorant that God looks upon
3788.ed to this vice cannot be ignorant that God looks upon it with horror; hence he see
3789. a feeling of hatred towards him who is one day. to be his judge and to punish him
3790.punish him with rigor. The exercises of religion are totally incompatible with this vice
3791.gion are totally incompatible with this vice when onc^ ii obtains the mastery. Praye
3792. tiresome, and is neglected the word of God condemns, and it is no longer listened
3793.o ; in order to approach the Sacraments vice must be renounced, so they too are aban
3794.alls into a lethargy, that ii to say, a state of insensibility in which nothing any m
3795.•if:; "'iV »''{' 208 to his health ; DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN he forgets all his int
3796. the consequence, and fears nothing but being disturbed in the enjoyment of his guilt
3797.yment of his guilty Hence the horror of death vv^hich torments the pleasures. voluptu
3798.o cite him before the dread tribunal of God. Let us then detest a vice so fatal, an
3799.d tribunal of God. Let us then detest a vice so fatal, and make ourselves secure wit
3800.ourselves secure with the assistance of God's grace, in the contrary virtue, advice
3801.istance of God's grace, in the contrary virtue, advice, nor remonstrance Christian cha
3802.ith respect to purity, according to the state in which Providence has placed us. This
3803.rovidence has placed us. This beautiful virtue renders us like unto the angels thiMuse
3804.hiMuselves it is infinitely pleasing to God, and he rewards it in a munificent mann
3805.the clean of heart, for the}' shall see God." To preserve this virtue, which is exp
3806. the}' shall see God." To preserve this virtue, which is exposed to many dangers, ther
3807.eserve this virtue, which is exposed to many dangers, there are two means which Jesu
3808.er not into temptation !" To watch over one's self, is to guard against all that mi
3809.ve the slightest wound to this precious virtue. must watch our ej'es, that they never
3810.ot to bad discourse ; we must guard our mind, po as to keep away all thoughts and id
3811.art, so as " As soon as a to stifle all evil desires in their very birth. bad though
3812. very birth. bad thought arises in your mind," says St. Bernard, " repulse it with f
3813.ard, " repulse it with firmness, and it will depart from you but if you suffer it to
3814.suffer it to remain a moment, its image will excite ia your heart a pleasure fatal t
3815., its image will excite ia your heart a pleasure fatal to your innocence that pleasure w
3816.a pleasure fatal to your innocence that pleasure will lead to consent, consent to action
3817.e fatal to your innocence that pleasure will lead to consent, consent to action, act
3818.o consent, consent to action, action to habit, : : We ; ; : .«' ' habit to necessity
3819.n, action to habit, : : We ; ; : .«' ' habit to necessity, /. V.;:. i .. and necessi
3820. to habit, : : We ; ; : .«' ' habit to necessity, /. V.;:. i .. and necessity to eternal
3821.' habit to necessity, /. V.;:. i .. and necessity to eternal death." By rejecting immedia
3822. /. V.;:. i .. and necessity to eternal death." By rejecting immediately and with for
3823.re tempted in order to have recourse to God. Let us pray him often and with fervour
3824.r, either to preserve : ! ! ; . TOWARDS GOD. ut 209 ftt -is*. . Lr •«;'"'., from
3825.Blessed Virgin, our If we are faitliful angel guardian, and our patron Saint to this
3826.tion, by becoming firmer in the path of virtue. Example. There was in a certain city a
3827.cholar who justly passed for a model of virtue, and who frequented Going one the Sacra
3828.del of virtue, and who frequented Going one the Sacraments in the most edifying man
3829.uring inn, was. and he refused for some time, but they insisted, urged, and They sat
3830.nd he became intoxicated: while in that state he was induced to commit a shameful cri
3831.nt it was . that he was struck dead! my God and how How terrible are thy judgments,
3832.unhappy companions of this poor wretch, being seized with terror, immediately went to
3833.% . f — O ! crime of having plunged a soul into hell Collet. ARTICLE OF ENVY. IV.
3834.ers are Been to have, inspired only the desire of imitating them, then the feeling it
3835.at the envioua feel they do not so nmch desire to possess these estimable qualities as
3836. : •'.I •^^• - 1 ; 210 the >'•' DUTY OP THE good fortune of others as a CHBI
3837.^^• - 1 ; 210 the >'•' DUTY OP THE good fortune of others as a CHBISTIAIT posit
3838.serable victim How low and base is this vice, and is his own executioner. ow fatal a
3839.envied falls into disgrace, the envious man rejoices, and exults in his downfall ;
3840.his downfall ; and he takes a malignant pleasure in seeing him humbled, though at the sa
3841.re in seeing him humbled, though at the same time, he may never have injured him^ in
3842. seeing him humbled, though at the same time, he may never have injured him^ in any
3843.e injured him^ in any way. A vindictive man attticks only his enemies, or those fro
3844.us hate those against whom they have no cause of complaint, but only their virtues th
3845.rime is the possession of some peculiar virtue or talent How monstrous Is the heart of
3846.or talent How monstrous Is the heart of man, then, capable of such depravity ? The
3847.hypocrisy, and success as the effect of chance, not of superior talents or abilities.
3848.nvy is the actual intention of injuring one's neighbour. ; From words 1^1^; ./^v^v-
3849.to deeds they thwart the designs of the other in every way they can, and take every m
3850.oseph with the design of putting him to death, and induced them It was envy that prom
3851.m as a slave. risees and doctors of the law to calumniate, persecute, and Let us, t
3852. never open our crucify the very Son of God. hearts to this detestable vice, and le
3853.y Son of God. hearts to this detestable vice, and let us do all we can to acquire th
3854.s do all we can to acquire the opposite virtue, which is a Christian affection, tliat
3855.ction, tliat renders us sensible to the happiness and to the misfo:^- ' TOWARDS GOD. tune
3856.happiness and to the misfo:^- ' TOWARDS GOD. tunes of our neighbour, for of our bre
3857.or of our brethren. This affection '4il God's sake, and for the salvatiou J," ..•
3858.re two merchants who lived near ' • I other in a city, and being mutually jealous t
3859.lived near ' • I other in a city, and being mutually jealous they It chanced, howev
3860.ved in the most scandalous enmity. that one of the two, beginning to reflect, on hi
3861.f the two, beginning to reflect, on his state, listened to the voice of religion, alt
3862. on his state, listened to the voice of religion, although it condemned his animosity ;
3863.go to This advice was followed, and the other merchant, being told who it was that se
3864.e was followed, and the other merchant, being told who it was that sent him so many c
3865. being told who it was that sent him so many customers, was deeply touched by such c
3866.was deeply touched by such conduct in a man whom he had regarded as his enemy. He w
3867.hank him, begged his pardon for the ill-will he had borne him, and entreated him to
3868.d. His request was readily granted, and Religion drew closely together those whom intere
3869.. £«.nf ON GLUTTONY, is an inordinate love of eating and drinking. are not forbidd
3870.and drinking. are not forbidden to feel pleasure in either the one or the other ; for it
3871.orbidden to feel pleasure in either the one or the other ; for it is by a wise fore
3872. feel pleasure in either the one or the other ; for it is by a wise foresight that Go
3873.er ; for it is by a wise foresight that God has seasoned with a feeling of gratific
3874.necessary for pieserving our health and life. wa this blessing when we seek only the
3875. wa this blessing when we seek only the pleasure alone must eat and drink in order to li
3876.1 «• .-Jt' '•r IV " 212 •uality. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN Our sole mmmM rU''^vi%
3877..•• \ wants of our duties and serve God, according to the words of the Apostle
3878. eat, or drink, do all for the glory of God/' If we wish to observe this precept of
3879., but of following the order To seek of God, who wills that we should preserve life
3880. God, who wills that we should preserve life. only the gratification of the senses i
3881.tification of the senses is gluttony, a vice un< worthy of man: it weighs down the s
3882.enses is gluttony, a vice un< worthy of man: it weighs down the soul, brutalizes tl
3883.e un< worthy of man: it weighs down the soul, brutalizes tlie mind, ruins the health
3884.t weighs down the soul, brutalizes tlie mind, ruins the health and shortens life. "
3885.lie mind, ruins the health and shortens life. " Gluttony kill!] more than the sword,
3886., and excess in eating. This detestable vice degrades man, and places him even below
3887.n eating. This detestable vice degrades man, and places him even below the beast. H
3888. people are seldom subject to it, for a man of eduIt begets cation and refinement w
3889.n of eduIt begets cation and refinement will carefully avoid it. sensuality, which c
3890.food. What H shame it is for a rational man to let himself be governed by sensualit
3891.and contempt of the laws of the Church. One who is addicted to that vice, is but li
3892.the Church. One who is addicted to that vice, is but little disposed to pr.'^ctise t
3893., if it be not for those who pass thojr time hi drinking, and who take pleasure in e
3894.ss thojr time hi drinking, and who take pleasure in emptying cups ? We ought, therefore,
3895.therefore, to have a lively horror of a vice so degrading to a man, and still more s
3896.vely horror of a vice so degrading to a man, and still more so to a Christian. Let
3897.asts, practise Christian sobriety, that virtue U8, satisfy the end should be to enable
3898.satisfy the end should be to enabled to nature, that we may be fulfil : ; ; : — m "
3899.ay be fulfil : ; ; : — m " -^ TOWARDS GOD. necessity, 213 i^ which regulates the
3900. fulfil : ; ; : — m " -^ TOWARDS GOD. necessity, 213 i^ which regulates the use of eati
3901.over ourselves that we and prolongs our life pass not the bounds of real necessit}',
3902.al necessit}', in an act, which of that virtue ; — A Christian regards food as tends
3903.istian regards food as tends to satisfy nature. he heeds neither the promptings of gre
3904.ave us a model he has always before his mind that salutary advice which our Lord " W
3905.he most efficacious means of keeping in mind the rules of temperance, and obtaining
3906.s means of keeping in mind the rules of temperance, and obtaining strength to follow them,
3907.ll draw down upon our- •r..:^v-;.j of God, and obtain the grace not to offend Him
3908.» Example. — excesses, perhaps there time. In all the records of crime, disorders
3909.ragical as St. what happened to a young man, in Africa, in Augustine's Cyril ; he w
3910.drinking, and spent a great part of his time in taverns, with companions as debauche
3911.ith companions as debauched as himself. One day, when he had, as usual, gratified h
3912.s beastly passions, he wetit This young man was named in a- state of intoxication,
3913.he wetit This young man was named in a- state of intoxication, and commenced operatio
3914.n, and commenced operations by stabbing one of his sisters. Alarmed by her cries, t
3915.hands in the blood of the author of his life. He also stabbed another of his sisters
3916. rather, of that execrable monster. How many crimes atrocious crimes committed by on
3917.ny crimes atrocious crimes committed by one man, in one single day St. Augustine wa
3918.rimes atrocious crimes committed by one man, in one single day St. Augustine was ve
3919.rocious crimes committed by one man, in one single day St. Augustine was very soon
3920.ly caused tn.people to assemble a third time ; and ascended the pulpi* ! — — 51?
3921. > . -»"',. ' - ^jsjiir^ ^Ldii. ; 214 DUTY OF THE CHBISTIAN with teartui eyes and
3922.never having thought it possible that a man could go to such lengtlis in iniquity a
3923.f cf the opportunity to show how far an evil passion can carry its unhappy victim. H
3924.tuary. But the anger which is a capital sin is of a very different kind, being an i
3925.apital sin is of a very different kind, being an impetuous emotion of the soul which
3926.very different kind, being an impetuous emotion of the soul which incites us to spurn,
3927.kind, being an impetuous emotion of the soul which incites us to spurn, with violenc
3928.ing that offends us. It springs from an evil principle, for it is the effect of a pa
3929.hat offends us. It springs from an evil principle, for it is the effect of a passion whic
3930. it meets with any obstruction. A proud man is carried away by whatever affects his
3931.emes for making money, and a voluptuous man is angry when his pleasures are broken
3932.pon. This anger IS neither according to God, nor to good sense it causes confusion
3933.ger IS neither according to God, nor to good sense it causes confusion and trouble i
3934.S neither according to God, nor to good sense it causes confusion and trouble in the
3935. it causes confusion and trouble in the soul, and the disorder to which *t giwes ris
3936.e ourselves in Christian mildness. This virtue makes us bear, for God*s sake, all mann
3937.ildness. This virtue makes us bear, for God*s sake, all manner of it represses all
3938.or of complaint to escape us, it causes one to have a serene and modest look, enabl
3939...f monastery, said within himself: " 1 will go into the desert, so that having no o
3940.l go into the desert, so that having no one with whom to quarrel, I' may have no oc
3941.ert, and took up his abode in a cavern. One day when he was congratulating himself
3942. and are every where to be combatted, I will return to my monastery." tempted to ang
3943.a wilful disgust of labour, which leads one to neglect every duty rather than Sloth
3944.abour, which leads one to neglect every duty rather than Sloth ••••.'.'•
3945. . is W^f m;:•'-.":: i^^. — ; 210 DUTY OF THE CUKI8TIAN whioli bo disturbed. T
3946.ss does not lead, because it throws the soul state of into a numbness and feebleness
3947.es not lead, because it throws the soul state of into a numbness and feebleness where
3948.o a numbness and feebleness whereby its evil it is prevented from resisting tirst, p
3949., propensities Its the njother of every vice. hence idleness is called most immediat
3950. '.-' '4'..v • indolence and loss of time the 'ndolent pass days, iDonthsi, and y
3951.y think not of fulfilling the duties of Religion player is either entirely omitted", or
3952.Aemselves better o( ihe duties of their state a young man, fr: instance, profits noth
3953.er o( ihe duties of their state a young man, fr: instance, profits nothing from the
3954. fr: instance, profits nothing from the education given him, doing nothing of what is pre
3955.n, without application consequently his mind remains uncultivated, his memory unexer
3956.ntly his mind remains uncultivated, his memory unexercised, and he leaves the house of
3957.unexercised, and he leaves the house of education almost as ignorant a& when he first bec
3958.s then his regret for iiiaving lost the time of his youth vain, vain regret it is to
3959.e, that loss is irreparable. The second vice which springs from idleness is pusillan
3960.possi" Wo !" says the ble, because they will make no effort. " to those who are fain
3961.. If it happens that they conceive liny desire of correcting tliemselves, that desire
3962. desire of correcting tliemselves, that desire is leeble, and does not last long; they
3963.ck into their original slothfulness. by desire," says the Holy Ghost, " they will and
3964.by desire," says the Holy Ghost, " they will and do not V* ill ; to-day they will on
3965.ey will and do not V* ill ; to-day they will one thing, to-morrow another today they
3966.ll and do not V* ill ; to-day they will one thing, to-morrow another today they wil
3967.one thing, to-morrow another today they will do well, and to-morrow they change thei
3968.y they will do well, and to-morrow they change their mind." Hence that cold " indiffer
3969.o well, and to-morrow they change their mind." Hence that cold " indifference which
3970.e which accompanies jiil their actions, being a lassitude of the heart which leavea n
3971.h leavea no taste for the fulfilment of duty hence, in fine, that in* ; ; undertake
3972.oaches which he draws upon him, nor the good example exhortations of those ; — of
3973. example exhortations of those ; — of sin there is in a slothScripture likens it
3974. ; thorns covered the ground of so ful, many otheis indolent soul ! \ How much •Hi
3975. ground of so ful, many otheis indolent soul ! \ How much •Hi* ; •(.;,.'< ' ; .
3976.il 9 words addressed to the slothful by God himself, in the " Go to the ant, oh slu
3977. upon thee, and overwhelm thee " Beg of God the virtue opposed to idleness, that is
3978.ee, and overwhelm thee " Beg of God the virtue opposed to idleness, that is to say, a
3979.to say, a holy activity, which makes us love our duties, and renders us prompt in th
3980.difficulties of our lot if we only have good courage God will soon render easy and s
3981.culties of our lot if we only have good courage God will soon render easy and smooth al
3982.of our lot if we only have good courage God will soon render easy and smooth all th
3983.ur lot if we only have good courage God will soon render easy and smooth all that at
3984. ; it is He who has imposed upon us the necessity of labour, and He will help us to pract
3985.upon us the necessity of labour, and He will help us to practise what He has command
3986.to the ant consider her ways, and learn wisdom of her " This advice of Solomon was of^
3987.r of souls, when addressing liis " This life is the harvest time, and lay in no w a
3988.ressing liis " This life is the harvest time, and lay in no w a people. provision of
3989. and lay in no w a people. provision of good works that may purchase heaven for )ou
3990.w long wilt thou sleep ? A certain holy man used to say every time he hear(' *' the
3991. ? A certain holy man used to say every time he hear(' *' the clock strike Oh my God
3992.ime he hear(' *' the clock strike Oh my God another hour of my life ha passed away,
3993.ock strike Oh my God another hour of my life ha passed away, and I must render an ac
3994.account of it, as of ever> moment of my life." its ; it "'*-. ^.-. I. J' ! ! ; •'>
3995.IVTS AND OF PKAYSR. INTRODUCTION ON THE NECESSITY OF GRACE AND THE MEANS OP OBTAINING IT.
3996.o accomplish thf Without that divine cf God, and save our own souls. assistance we
3997.f ourselves we are nol able to have any good thought ; but it is God who enables us.
3998.le to have any good thought ; but it is God who enables us." Grace is a supernatura
3999.us." Grace is a supernatural gift which God bestows upon us through His great mercy
4000.at is to say, by which we pass from the state ol mortal sin to that of justice or r?g
4001. which we pass from the state ol mortal sin to that of justice or r?ghteousness it
4002.from the state ol mortal sin to that of justice or r?ghteousness it n^akes us children
4003. r?ghteousness it n^akes us children of God, pleasing- in his sight, and heirs to t
4004. when we preserve it by shunning mortal sin. 2d. Actual grace, which consists in a
4005.ists in a holy thought enlightening the mind, and ill a good inclination, which exci
4006.hought enlightening the mind, and ill a good inclination, which excites and assists
4007., which excites and assists us when our will is to do good. Original sin having cast
4008.s and assists us when our will is to do good. Original sin having cast a thick darkn
4009.s when our will is to do good. Original sin having cast a thick darkness over the m
4010.n having cast a thick darkness over the mind, and a profound corruption into the hea
4011.gnorance, and with a strong tendency to evil, which is called concupiscence; these a
4012.eat sources of all our sins for we only sin because we are ignorant of our duty, or
4013.only sin because we are ignorant of our duty, or that, knowing it, wc prefer followi
4014.knowing it, wc prefer following our own evil propensities. We could never free ourse
4015. We could never free ourselves fvom the state of sin, nor do good, if God did not ope
4016. never free ourselves fvom the state of sin, nor do good, if God did not open the 3
4017.ourselves fvom the state of sin, nor do good, if God did not open the 3yes of our un
4018. fvom the state of sin, nor do good, if God did not open the 3yes of our understand
4019. imprint on our heart a leaning towards virtue. Grace enables us to know what is good,
4020.irtue. Grace enables us to know what is good, inspiring us with the desire, and givi
4021.now what is good, inspiring us with the desire, and giving will ; : We ; : ; ns the st
4022.nspiring us with the desire, and giving will ; : We ; : ; ns the strength to n\an, a
4023.—without and within— ' * TOWARDS If GOD. tn t \ natural tenaency to evil his Av
4024.ARDS If GOD. tn t \ natural tenaency to evil his Avonkness, seeing that m joined by
4025.hat m joined by the temptations of iti# world and of the devil ? How many snares are
4026.ns of iti# world and of the devil ? How many snares are sprtud ground his piith The
4027. snares are sprtud ground his piith The world seeks to dazzle his eyes by the display
4028. and turn it away from (Jod. The on the other hand, incessantly attacks him, presenti
4029.resist so to revolt against the spirit. many assaults if God ceased, a single moment
4030.lt against the spirit. many assaults if God ceased, a single moment, to sustain Hen
4031.iting the Lord's prayer, him. we beg of God that his name may be sanctified, that h
4032.at his name may be sanctified, that his will may be done on earth as it is in heaven
4033. deliver us from Ofidcr devil, . » • evil. then true, according to the doctrine o
4034.sus Christ, neither glorify the name of God, nor do his will, nor resist temptation
4035.her glorify the name of God, nor do his will, nor resist temptation, nor shun the sn
4036. temptation, nor shun the snares of the evil spirit, but by the assistance of God, b
4037.e evil spirit, but by the assistance of God, but with grace we can do all things, a
4038. we can do all things, according to the same apostle " I can do all through Him who
4039. longer a grace we have no right to it, God bestowing it upon us in his pure kindne
4040.it upon us in his pure kindness, and by virtue of the merits of the passion and death
4041.virtue of the merits of the passion and death of Christ. This grace is refused to non
4042.fault when we do not profit by it to do good and save our souls. It is not grace tha
4043.t fails us, it is we who are deficient. God has attached it to the Sacraments when
4044.of sanctification. In the second place, God hat promised to hear us when we address
4045.n unto . • — •4 fW'-ma^'" i"' 220 death. DUTY OP THE CHRHTIATf We may, therefor
4046.. • — •4 fW'-ma^'" i"' 220 death. DUTY OP THE CHRHTIATf We may, therefore, dra
4047..»•.•« J. vg". f • • p-acc of God, and, with His powerful aid, we shall b
4048.be enabled to keep his commandmonts for God commands nothing impossible, but only e
4049. end that He may assist us by his grace God never abandons those whom H« has once
4050.ple. St. Augustine resisted grace when, being pressed to return from the ways of sin,
4051.eing pressed to return from the ways of sin, he said to God: ** Lord give mo a litt
4052.return from the ways of sin, he said to God: ** Lord give mo a little more time yet
4053.d to God: ** Lord give mo a little more time yet a little while soon to-morrow, to-m
4054.r's officers, who had r • nounced the world merely from reading the life of St. Ant
4055.unced the world merely from reading the life of St. Anthony, and having besides, hea
4056.o-operated with grace, and he felt what one of the officers had been known to say "
4057." It costs much less to be a frioi)d of God, than to obtain a brilliant fortune, an
4058.d the favour oi It is only necessary to will it, and I stiall the emperor. instantly
4059.t of justification then, as it were, so many channels by which he communi* say, sens
4060. J :»•<•'*'•!: ; : : ' ^ TOWARD* GOD. ail 221 iiiv'uilile are sensible bcnse
4061.cnses. grace which they operate in th^" soul, Miwl the^ because they fall under the
4062.necessary to constitute a sacrament the matter, the form, and the intention of doing a
4063. constitute a sacrament the matter, the form, and the intention of doing as the Ther
4064.dministration of the Sacraments are the matter, as the words are the form. Tliese two
4065.ts are the matter, as the words are the form. Tliese two exterior things for instanc
4066.n- > •t*' •• * •» baptism, the matter is water ; words: "I baptize you in the
4067.— • ; , f k .•• by giving a new life. iLe matter of Confirmation consists in
4068., f k .•• by giving a new life. iLe matter of Confirmation consists in the imposit
4069.hands, the oil, and the holy chrism the form is in the words which accompany these t
4070.bishop prays the Holy Ghost to fill the soul with strength and grace and the effect
4071.rament is to strengthen and to make the soul flourish in its spiritual life. So the
4072.make the soul flourish in its spiritual life. So the Eucharist, of which the matter
4073.al life. So the Eucharist, of which the matter is bread and wine, imparts spiritual no
4074.ishment penance heals the wounds of the soul and Extreme Unction delivers us from tl
4075. from tlie lingeiing weakness caused by sin. Holy Orders provide the Church with th
4076.or our sanctiflcaLion, and have all the same effect but there are distinctions betwe
4077.are established to impart the spiritual life of grace, and hence it is that they are
4078.rs are to increase in us that spiritual life thus bestowed, and thej are accordingly
4079.j' ) M • 222 •" •.i*.n.<„,i-.'' DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN the living, seeing tha
4080.F THE CHRISTIAN the living, seeing that life •„* named sacraments of receive Uie
4081.e Uiem worthily, we must live the means being free from mortal sin. Secondly, there a
4082.t live the means being free from mortal sin. Secondly, there are three, viz. : orde
4083., V' ' ', and Holy Orders, whereby the soul is not only sanctified through grace, b
4084.h an indelible mark, consecrating it to God, in an especial manner. They who receiv
4085.ace is received, it may be destroyed by sin, but the divine seal. Imprinted by thes
4086.sacraments can be administered a second time to the same person. Besides the action
4087.an be administered a second time to the same person. Besides the action and the word
4088.once said, in a tone of deep " Alas how many invalids do we behold crowding, during
4089.le remedies for all the diseases of the soul. These sources of grace infallibly heal
4090.t to approach, or draw water from these life-giving fountains ? and how is it, too,
4091.ly to them with proper that so disposi- many sinners — with them the necessary dis
4092.APTER OF BAPTISM. II. ARTICLE I. ON THE NECESSITY OF BAPTISM. Baptism is a sacrament whic
4093.h effaces original makes us children of God and of the Church. It is sin, and the f
4094.hildren of God and of the Church. It is sin, and the first of all the sacraments, I
4095.ed shall be saved." These words are the form of Baptism, : .;f>^'L'*I::t# and common
4096.;f>^'L'*I::t# and common water ; is its matter. It is, therefore, to save it men that
4097. that Jesus Christ has insti- them from sin, and from which is the penalty of sin,
4098.m sin, and from which is the penalty of sin, and to render tliem, by a second birth
4099.r tliem, by a second birth, children of God and of the Church. Baptism remits origi
4100. of the Church. Baptism remits original sin in children, and in adults it also effa
4101.nd in adults it also effaces the actual sin they may have committed from the time t
4102.al sin they may have committed from the time they attained the use of reason, provid
4103.does not remove the effects of original sin, which are ignorance, concupiscence, th
4104.norance, concupiscence, the miseries of life, and the certainty of death. God leaves
4105. miseries of life, and the certainty of death. God leaves with us these consequences
4106.es of life, and the certainty of death. God leaves with us these consequences of or
4107. with us these consequences of original sin even after it has been effaced, to the
4108.end that they may serve to exercise our virtue bjf the combats we have to sustain, in
4109.s we have to sustain, in oider to avoid evil and do good. If we were delivered by ba
4110. sustain, in oider to avoid evil and do good. If we were delivered by baptism from i
4111.sm from ignorance and the propensity to evil, we should do good without any trouble
4112.nd the propensity to evil, we should do good without any trouble to ourselves, as it
4113. naturally and thence we should have no other merit than that of corresponding with g
4114.nding with grace, since the practice of virtue would cost ua nothing. Baptism stamps u
4115.ost ua nothing. Baptism stamps upon the soul a spiritual and an indelible character,
4116.ible character, which consecrates it to God, and dia< tuted baptism is to deliver e
4117.ia< tuted baptism is to deliver eternal death, ; ; '.l-ll'fro'pT^ Urn, ,.4] * ^ > ':-
4118..;H:':>..; 224 .^•ri^^^-:".. ->;.vi;. DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN give expeti This is th
4119. once consecrated to inalienable right. God belongs ever after to Him by an she II
4120.o the words of Jesus Christ: " Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Gho
4121. be supplied, either by maityrdom or by desire, and hence it is that bap. tism is cons
4122.hree kinds baptism by water, baptism by desire, and baptism by blood. Nevertheless it
4123. be received, and because they have the same effect. This sacrament is styled baptis
4124.of .•r-.-.\vT;'< •".•; ,ii,..t. . being given with water. The second is called
4125. water. The second is called baptism by desire, or by tears, because it consists in a
4126.nsists in a true and sincere regret for one's sins, accompanied by a great love for
4127. for one's sins, accompanied by a great love for God, and an ardent desire to be bap
4128.s sins, accompanied by a great love for God, and an ardent desire to be baptized it
4129. by a great love for God, and an ardent desire to be baptized it is also called the ba
4130.cause it is through the Holy Ghost that one immediately receives the grace of this
4131. grace of this sacrament, when, without being able to obtain baptism, one dies with a
4132., without being able to obtain baptism, one dies with a ; sincere oontrition for th
4133.cere oontrition for their sins. for the love of t;;, The baptism of blood consists i
4134.f t;;, The baptism of blood consists in God and for the faith ; suffering martyrdom
4135. <>" Ik.',.' • , . *ik^ k r * * ' yet one has been baptized it is who dies in def
4136.s own blood and because he receives the same grace that he would have received by th
4137.presents, in a more natural manner, the death of Jesus Christ, from which this sacram
4138., from which this sacrament derives its virtue and its efficacy. Example. " I knew a v
4139.very poor as regarded the goods of this world, was rich in the sight of Heaven, being
4140.world, was rich in the sight of Heaven, being full of the spirit of Jesus Christ, and
4141.to — >./V^ ?; •W-i-.-i- " ; TOWARDS GOD. give 225 a crown-piece, the fruit of h
4142. with all the usual ceremonies, yet any one may baptize in case of necessity, and t
4143.ies, yet any one may baptize in case of necessity, and the baptism is valid, provided tha
4144.the head of the person baptized, at the same time pronouncing " I baptize you in the
4145.ead of the person baptized, at the same time pronouncing " I baptize you in the name
4146. doubtful, and the child is to be again being, as Christ, in instituting it, -j^iSf '
4147.if it is doubtful whether the child has life, or whether it was previously baptized,
4148.or if tlie baptism was valid, or in any other extraordinary case " If you can the for
4149.her extraordinary case " If you can the form then is, while pouring on the water rec
4150., I baptize : •" / you, &;c." Baptism being absolutely necessary for all men, it is
4151.!' . i ,, v^'«•..-:^-•i 226 latter DUTY OF THE CHRIS riAIf to baptism without ;
4152.• 'a *• '' ' • .''!,; ' • .UV^i being incapable of receiving instruction, she
4153.hat it ia necessary to know of our holy religion ; they are admonished not to present th
4154.a heart entirely free from affection to sin, and they are exhorted to do penance fo
4155.ter and of Pentecost, unless that soino one was in danger of death, and it was for
4156. unless that soino one was in danger of death, and it was for that reason that the wa
4157. to in a remote region of the • ' New World, seeking win over souk .• •'* •
4158. • A.v'. .'»•• 'ii % ' -t - • One day a savage presented himself before h
4159.aordinary dispositions. As soon as this man had become acquainted with the sacred m
4160.t, which he received with transports of love and of gratitude. The missionary then w
4161. passed away before he returned to that same place. As soon as the savage heard of t
4162.ted since your baptism be not afraid, I will " How, father ?" replied the help you t
4163. •' r Z'M' -':: . f'^H.--'-"- after being baptized, •-'.•'. ? .t] .>-•' Av
4164. would outrage Him by committing mortal sin ? Thanks be to God, I do not find mysel
4165.by committing mortal sin ? Thanks be to God, I do not find myself guilty of any suc
4166.was struck with admiration, and blessed God, seeing thus that he was served and hon
4167. the forest. Edtfyins Letters ' TOWARDS GOD. 327 v|Ki i 5 ..> ARTICLE '' III. 'J' O
4168.nt, and the obligations incuired in The sign of the cross is very often made in rece
4169.ross of Christ, and to signify that the life of a Christian is a life of crosses and
4170.gnify that the life of a Christian is a life of crosses and sufTeringsj, and Several
4171.e which the Holy Ghost infuses into the soul of the baptized person, and heals ^* il
4172.trance of the church, to indicate that, being the slave of the he has no right to go
4173.o right to go farther into the house of God, because of the original sin wherewith
4174.e house of God, because of the original sin wherewith he is sullied. There he is ex
4175.bout to communicate to it the spirit of wisdom and of unuerstandlng. He then asks it w
4176. He then asks it whether it believes in God the Father Almighty, in Jesus Christ hi
4177.ost. Then, having asked the child if it will bo baptized, and having received an aff
4178.rotector in heaven, and a model for the life it ought to lead on earth. Having bapti
4179. •, ;./, , -I ., ... ,• <^ If lit . DUTY OF THE CHRISTU ^ name on the parish reg
4180. now num. bercd amongst the children of God. 'I'lio sponsors at the baptismal font
4181. before (iod, for the baptized, that he will faithfully acquit himself of the obliga
4182. font, that if the father and mother or other relatives fail to instruct it, they are
4183. to be baptized so that he might die in peace. Two other comedians then entered, one
4184.ized so that he might die in peace. Two other comedians then entered, one attired as
4185.eace. Two other comedians then entered, one attired as a priest, and the other as a
4186.tered, one attired as a priest, and the other as an exorcist. Approaching the bed, th
4187.regularly gone through, and when it was time to cover the baptized with the white ro
4188.d their made myself acquainted with its religion so much that 1 „ '\'4189. I have seen; and had I I adore lum and love him with all my heart and soul a thousa
4190. lum and love him with all my heart and soul a thousand lives to lose, nothing sould
4191.l and miraculous act of grace, by which God excited in the heart of th6 saint a tru
4192.I., fc- II),.-; "^ •• wi f^vi'f SSD DUTY OF THB CHRISTIAN ARTICLE When tism, IV.
4193.eceive the h(>ly bap. if we believed in God, if we would live according to the prec
4194.l our heart the devil and his pomps the world and and it was only when a formal and a
4195. been returned, amongst the children of God. tive r. "f .•!{. r v.. .. that we we
4196.of heaven and earth, in the presence of God and his holy angels, that we promised t
4197.ly angels, that we promised to obey the law of Christ, and to practise it in its fu
4198.ue we had not the use Oi" reason at the time of tent. our baptism but it was for us
4199.em every day by making on ourselves the sign of the cross, by reciting the Lord's pr
4200. our own property, but bements. long to God, our soul, our body, and all are his. T
4201.property, but bements. long to God, our soul, our body, and all are his. To follow t
4202.ll are his. To follow the maxim% of the world, to seek after its vanities, to love th
4203.e world, to seek after its vanities, to love the pomps of the devil, to be ashamed o
4204.t these vows are written in the book of Life, that God has account of them in heaven
4205.s are written in the book of Life, that God has account of them in heaven, and that
4206. shall be judged by them at the hour of death. On our fidelity hi fulfilling them dep
4207.ng snatched us from the thraldom of the Evil One, and called us to the kingdom of hi
4208.atched us from the thraldom of the Evil One, and called us to the kingdom of his So
4209.e. —We read named holy deacon, in iSe history of the Church that a Murrita, having an
4210.ing answered at the sacred : \* T0WAKU8 GOD. font for 2S) * •»; a young man name
4211.AKU8 GOD. font for 2S) * •»; a young man named Elpiphodorur, had the mJafortune
4212. become an apostate and a persecutor of One day, when he was publicly tormenting tl
4213.ld the witness of thine apostacy ; this will bear testi; against thee at the judgmen
4214.is will bear testi; against thee at the judgment seat of God. Look white garment wherewi
4215.i; against thee at the judgment seat of God. Look white garment wherewith I clothed
4216. I clothed thee at the gacred font ; it will call out for vengeance upon thee, and i
4217.ame to burn mony upon this thee for all eternity." The spectators were moved to tears by
4218.dorus withdrew, covered with confusion. History of the Church, CHAPTER ARTICLE CoNFiK:.
4219.n. • r£-" OF CONFIRMATION. I. ON THE NATURE AND EFFECTS OF CONFIRMATION. the second
4220.he perfection. The gracP! of Baptism is one of regeneration which makes ns children
4221.regeneration which makes ns children of God that of Confirmation is a grace of stre
4222.firmation is a grace of strength and of courage which elevates us to the dignity of a p
4223.elevates us to the dignity of a perfect man, and renders us capable of fighting and
4224. Christ, even at the expense of our own life. This effect wo see in the person of ea
4225.his grace than they became, as it were, other men, and announced Jesus Christ with in
4226.nd announced Jesus Christ with intrepid courage. The Holy the ; ; "f^St- .'^k'-i — ;
4227. the ; ; "f^St- .'^k'-i — ; S82 Ghost DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN still descends on thos
4228.nfirmation, and he produces in them the same effects, but in an iii sibfe manner, be
4229.ts, but in an iii sibfe manner, because religion is now so well established that it must
4230.e attributed to the Holy Ghost, that of Wisdom, which enables us to taste of the thing
4231.ch enables us to taste of the things of God that of Intelligence, which gives us to
4232.ch gives us to understand the truths of religion that of Counsel, which makes us walk in
4233.h makes us walk in the way of salvation Science, or Knowledge, which enables us to disc
4234.alk in the way of salvation Science, or Knowledge, which enables us to discern good from
4235. Knowledge, which enables us to discern good from evil Fortitude, which gives us str
4236., which enables us to discern good from evil Fortitude, which gives us strength to r
4237.s us steadily fulfil our duties towards God, our neighbour, and and finally, that o
4238.r, and and finally, that of the Fear of God, which in>« ourselves presses on the s
4239.d, which in>« ourselves presses on the soul a great respect for the divine Majesty
4240.y Ghost are Charity, which unites us to God by love Joy, which fills us with a holy
4241. are Charity, which unites us to God by love Joy, which fills us with a holy consola
4242. which fills us with a holy consolation Peace, which produces tranquillity amid all t
4243.tranquillity amid all the tumult of the world Patience, which enables us to bear anno
4244.s to bear annoyance and oj)position for God's sake Benignity, which prompts us to r
4245.all Longanimity, which prevents us from being disturbed by the various trials of life
4246.eing disturbed by the various trials of life Meekness, which induces us to bear with
4247.tity, which preserve our bodies in that state of purity which be- — ; — ; — ;
4248. temples of the Holy Ghost. Bishops, as being the successors of the Apostles, are the
4249.dministration of this Sacrament, are so many outward signs of the admirable effects
4250.irable effects which it produces in the soul. The bishop, turning towards those who
4251. to indicate that the . t;^' .* TOWARDS GOD. 233 HU. *'<)|- •*'''. i.'* • , ' '
4252.d of each, saying " I mark you with the sign of the cross, and I confirm you with th
4253.he imposition of hands, constitutes the form of Confirmation, teaching us at the sam
4254.orm of Confirmation, teaching us at the same t'me Imw precious are the ofTccts produ
4255.ength of the grace which then fills the soul, penetrating and strengthening it, even
4256.d strengthens the body balsam is also a symbol of the good odor of Jusus Christ, which
4257.the body balsam is also a symbol of the good odor of Jusus Christ, which the confirm
4258.uld give forth by the practice of every virtue. The imposition of hands and the unctio
4259.s and the unction with the holy chrism, being the matter of Confirmation, are equally
4260.unction with the holy chrism, being the matter of Confirmation, are equally necessary
4261.tely necessary for salvation, still any one neglecting to receive it, is guilty of
4262.nstituted it for our advancement in the life ; who • V - .1 •A J^. '?••,. ;
4263.race. Julian, the apostate, made up his mind to public profession of impiety and inf
4264. splendour to the impious ceremony. All being ready, the emperor made a sign for comm
4265.ny. All being ready, the emperor made a sign for commencing. But what was the astoni
4266.cing to the idols in ! « 2ai victitii, DUTY or THE CIIBI8TIAN and that the is fire
4267.by his cross Him do I acknowledge as my God, and It is I, or rather the God I glory
4268.e as my God, and It is I, or rather the God I glory in belonging to him. whom I ser
4269.. At the name of Jesus, who is the true God, they The emperor, who had were forced
4270.t had happened; they returned thanks to God, and recognized how terrible to the dem
4271.crament of Confirmation. Eccleaiastical History, •.'.•>: rft* '1 i ARTICLE II. h- '
4272.teries of Faith, ami » *'?' ft TOWARDS GOD. U> 23ft renew the profession of our bo
4273.n is, perha])S, even more of all mortal sin necessary than the first, and can in no
4274.ripture, '•it > nor a body subject to sin." ConHrmation is a Sacrament of the liv
4275. the living, and consequently spiritual life is supits effect is to posed to exist i
4276.pits effect is to posed to exist in the soul which receives it increase that spiritu
4277.ich receives it increase that spiritual life, and if it were previously dead, In ord
4278.fied or strengthened ? to be confirmed, one must either have retained their baptisF
4279.nce. the third disposition is an ardent desire of receiving the Holy It was by this Gh
4280.sought with fervw and perseverance, for God, who is all goodness, is ever ready to
4281. is ever ready to impart it to us. is " Wisdom a soul that ill-disposed, dwell in ; .
4282.ready to impart it to us. is " Wisdom a soul that ill-disposed, dwell in ; . ' .S'fi
4283.dwell in ; . ' .S'fiii'"'** Jfl5*-*';'M being dispersed by the perseJerusalem after t
4284.e martyrdom of Sv\ Stephen, St Phillip, one of the seven deacons, went to Samaria,
4285.Acts, 8th chapfc "'I. - •.< •;/ 890 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ARTICLE tions III. ON
4286.f Jesus Christ even at the peril of our life and the second is, never to blush for t
4287.illery nor the threats of men, nor even death itself The terrible punishment wherewit
4288.men, nor even death itself The terrible punishment wherewith Jesus, in the Gospel, threate
4289.hreatens those who fail to perform this duty, ought to show us how indispensable it
4290.aged and abused. Let us, then, oppose a courage worthy of the soldiers of Christ, to th
4291.shake our faith and let us maintain the cause of our Master with all possible zeal. W
4292. all possible zeal. Would we permit any one, in our presence, to tear the reputatio
4293.r a friend ? How then can we suffer any one to outrage before us the God who has gi
4294.suffer any one to outrage before us the God who has given us life, he who is our fi
4295.rage before us the God who has given us life, he who is our first, our real father,
4296.f our morals, and the regularity of our life that we are to confess Jesus Christ, an
4297. nothing is more honourable to our holy religion than a Christian and virtuous life. The
4298. religion than a Christian and virtuous life. The bishop, in administering Confirmat
4299.n administering Confirmation, makes the Sign of the Cross on the forehead of the per
4300.i never to be ashamed of practising the law of Christ that his doctrine. who oppose
4301.oppose sive than words, — — TOWARDS GOD. he *>ugnt to ness, 237 be superior to
4302.Christian, which hinders him from doing good, and prompts him to do evil rather than
4303. from doing good, and prompts him to do evil rather than disA young man, for instanc
4304.s him to do evil rather than disA young man, for instance, dares not please the wic
4305. sees that by fulfilling his duties, he will become n, nor even of their raillery, a
4306.l are its effects, and how unreatowards God sonable it is and what an outrage does
4307.is and what an outrage does it offer to God, when one fears less to lose his friend
4308.t an outrage does it offer to God, when one fears less to lose his friendship than
4309.. worthy of contempt! that What! on the one side God decrees we should preserve pie
4310.of contempt! that What! on the one side God decrees we should preserve piety in our
4311.disgrace with the impious than with our God ? What a crime it is to prefer the crea
4312.o prefer the creature to the Creator If God be for us, what have we to apprehend fr
4313.hat have we to apprehend from them ? If God be against us, what assistance can they
4314.When we perish, can they save us ? When God will condemn us, shall they be able to
4315. we perish, can they save us ? When God will condemn us, shall they be able to defen
4316.r our fidelity in the fulfilment of our duty But is not that, on the contrary, our r
4317.ary, our real and true glory ? When has virtue become the cause of confuBion and disgr
4318.true glory ? When has virtue become the cause of confuBion and disgrace ? What a tota
4319., and to all our natural feelings It is vice which ought to be ashamed, and not virt
4320.vice which ought to be ashamed, and not virtue it is to guilt that shame belongs, and
4321.e. Who, after all, are these censors of virtue these men whose displeasure is so much
4322.* "' • .'*" - ! ! — — — — ! ; good opinion so eagerly sought part, ? They
4323.• .'*" - ! ! — — — — ! ; good opinion so eagerly sought part, ? They are, for
4324.every moment of ;>,". 238 their lives ; DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN W4 they are continuall
4325.ld stifle that importunate voice and it science is to find some security in the number
4326.that they endeavour to draw others into sin. they outwardly inveigh against virtue,
4327.nto sin. they outwardly inveigh against virtue, they cannot but reepect it in their he
4328., distinguished by his birth and by his wealth, was on the point of obtaining a vacant
4329.rable importance, but he was accused of being a Christian, and his religion excluded
4330.s accused of being a Christian, and his religion excluded him from all honours and The g
4331. offices. what he would do. During that time he was visited by the bishop, who, taki
4332.he sword which hung at side, and at the same time presented to him the book of tuc h
4333.ord which hung at side, and at the same time presented to him the book of tuc holy G
4334. Gospels, telling him to choose between one and the The officer, without a moment's
4335.without a moment's hesitation, extended other. his right hand, and took the sacred vo
4336.orse ; ; ; ; — : il-jA-ai',;:.': " He will strengthen self, then, to God," said th
4337..': " He will strengthen self, then, to God," said the bishop you, and grant you th
4338.t you that which you have chosen. Go in peace !" On leaving the church, the officer p
4339.he faith of Christ, he was condemned to death, and expired in great torment. Merauw ;
4340. or THE SACRAMENT OF PENANCE. I. ON THE NATURE, FORM AND NECESSITY OF PKNANCB. Penance
4341.SACRAMENT OF PENANCE. I. ON THE NATURE, FORM AND NECESSITY OF PKNANCB. Penance is a
4342. OF PENANCE. I. ON THE NATURE, FORM AND NECESSITY OF PKNANCB. Penance is a Sacrament whic
4343.Penance is a Sacrament which remits the sin/i committed after Baptism, howsoever gr
4344.great or numerous, ticy maj I ; TOWARDS GOD. be, 239 proper dispositions. apostles,
4345.ip '.ijime of the Father," &c.; and the matter in those sina committed after Baptism.
4346.t is null and void for the remission of sin ; and, moreover, a sacrilege Is The for
4347.sin ; and, moreover, a sacrilege Is The form committed. Whoever, then, is guilty of
4348.ted. Whoever, then, is guilty of mortal sin, can onlv obtain a remission thereof, e
4349.erfect contrition, including the ardent desire of reit. Let no one say do penance befo
4350.uding the ardent desire of reit. Let no one say do penance befoie God !'* " That is
4351. reit. Let no one say do penance befoie God !'* " That is not sufficient," says St
4352.ment of Penance. I speak here of mortal sin, because venial sin may be wiped away b
4353.peak here of mortal sin, because venial sin may be wiped away by prayers and other
4354.al sin may be wiped away by prayers and other good works. It is useful, nevertheless,
4355. may be wiped away by prayers and other good works. It is useful, nevertheless, to s
4356.icult to distinguish venial from mortal sin ; and also because the absolution we re
4357.sorrow, and toil ; while, in the first, God, wishing all .stains to manlfL^i his ex
4358.reat mercy, blots out ein of . from the soul without demanding any exertion on the ;
4359.on the ; in the second, by a mixture of justice and mercy, he only forgives sin on the
4360. of justice and mercy, he only forgives sin on the fulfilment of certain hard and h
4361.art of the sinner — ! Mm ^M "f^'A 940 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN course of sin, curbing
4362.^'A 940 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN course of sin, curbing the passions of man, and oblig
4363. course of sin, curbing the passions of man, and obliging him to be for tho future
4364.t in re* gistinir the seductions of the world and the flesh. Three things are necessa
4365.en ascended in spirit to the regions of happiness and glory he mourned that his sins had
4366.entreated the Lord to open them, at the same time invoking the Saints to intercede f
4367.ated the Lord to open them, at the same time invoking the Saints to intercede for hi
4368.intercede for him. He next proceeded in imagination to Calv;irv there, dwelling attentively
4369., by my sins, have co-operated with all other sinners in mangling the body of a man-
4370.other sinners in mangling the body of a man- God, in crucifying, and putting Him to
4371. sinners in mangling the body of a man- God, in crucifying, and putting Him to deat
4372. God, in crucifying, and putting Him to death. 0, Jesus what harm have you done me ?
4373. me even to excess, you whom I ought to love with an infinite love, if that were pos
4374.u whom I ought to love with an infinite love, if that were posBible for me ? It is b
4375.cause you are infinitely amiable that I love you, and am sorry for having offended y
4376.t derive from our confessions, and what progress should we not make in the ways of God I
4377.gress should we not make in the ways of God If we followed ii the steps of that vir
4378. ; ; ! — — ; ! — — ^..»f?r*M'^ Life of M. Ds i^A Moths. ; I* TOWARDS GOD. 2
4379.^ Life of M. Ds i^A Moths. ; I* TOWARDS GOD. 241 ARTICLE U. OF CONTRITION. Contriti
4380.ition is a sorrow and a detestation for sin, with a This lirst disposition is Orm r
4381.ore. so necessary, that, without it, no sin, even venial sin, can A malady which ta
4382., that, without it, no sin, even venial sin, can A malady which takes away the use
4383.y the use of ever be remitted. a sudden death sup;^)lies speech dispenses with confes
4384. want of satisfaction, at least in this life, but nothing can dispense with Contriti
4385.t nothing can dispense with Contrition. God only promises forgiveness to those who
4386.he heart which must be sorry and detest sin. Contrition must be supernatural ; it m
4387.e Holy Ghost, and not by the impulse of nature seeing that to detest sin because it ha
4388.impulse of nature seeing that to detest sin because it has given rise to some tempo
4389.se to some temporal misfortune, such as punishment, sickness, or loss, is not a true contr
4390., or loss, is not a true contrition, or one that entitles us to pardon repentance m
4391.les us to pardon repentance must be for God's sake, and becauso sin has Contrioften
4392.nce must be for God's sake, and becauso sin has Contrioftended him, and is infinite
4393.ereign, that is to say, superior to all other sorrow, so that we may be disposed to l
4394.ther than fall again into pin. In fact, sin is the greatest of all evils, the sover
4395.eprives us of the greatest of all goods good we ought, then, to lament it more than
4396.ought, then, to lament it more than any other misfortune. It is not, however, necessa
4397.nd its effect. Finally, Contrishould be universal, that is to say, extending over all The
4398.ng over all There is no true the mortal sin that one has committed. Contrition so l
4399.ll There is no true the mortal sin that one has committed. Contrition so long as th
4400.g as the heart remains attached to evea one mortal sin, and that because all mortal
4401.art remains attached to evea one mortal sin, and that because all mortal sin is an
4402.mortal sin, and that because all mortal sin is an injury done to God, and therefore
4403.use all mortal sin is an injury done to God, and therefore merits hell. There is no
4404.-. .»L-.k.i '':• 242 therefore, that DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ;*!; . -iT-'i »•-.
4405.tion we can only obregain the favour of God. Of ourselves, tain by humble and ferve
4406.s, tain by humble and fervent prayer to God. we can easily enough offend God ; but
4407.yer to God. we can easily enough offend God ; but without his assistshould, then, r
4408. consider, also, what we iiavfc lost by sin an eternity of bliss was reserved for u
4409.er, also, what we iiavfc lost by sin an eternity of bliss was reserved for us, and we ha
4410.a grievous loss Let us consider to what sin exposes us ; it makes us deserving of h
4411.flect seriously on these truths without being moved to hatred for sin. Contrition is
4412.ruths without being moved to hatred for sin. Contrition is of two sorts perfect and
4413.trition is a sorrow for having offended God, because He is supre»Aiely good and su
4414.ffended God, because He is supre»Aiely good and supremely amiable, and that sin is
4415.ly good and supremely amiable, and that sin is displeasing to him its motive is, th
4416.leasing to him its motive is, then, the love of God its effect is, also, to remit si
4417.to him its motive is, then, the love of God its effect is, also, to remit sin of it
4418.ve of God its effect is, also, to remit sin of itself, provided it be joined with t
4419. itself, provided it be joined with the desire and the intention of confessing, suppos
4420.rition, is a sorrow for having offended God, caused by the shame of having sinned,
4421.aving sinned, the fear of receiving the punishment it deserves, or the forfeiture of etern
4422.eiture of eternal bliss. Attrition, not being produced by motives sufficiently elevat
4423. of Contrition, supernatural^ interior, universal, and sovereign. No sooner had she learn
4424.as Example. it — the past, '' TOWARDS GOD. 243 gttne house of the Phariaee, than,
4425.formerly been instrumental in offending God. Eventually, by the liveliness of her s
4426.ess of her sorrow, and the ardor of her love, she won from the lips of Christ these
4427. lips of Christ these consoling words: "Many sins are forgiven her, because she love
4428.e it III. , OF THE FIRM PURPOSE. f .^ . sin if we do not reour heart, and if we be
4429.in these words ; " Yea, I have sworn, I will fulfil it, I will observe the holy God
4430. Yea, I have sworn, I will fulfil it, I will observe the holy God himself explains t
4431.will fulfil it, I will observe the holy God himself explains to us in decrees of th
4432.imself explains to us in decrees of thy justice " the sacred Scripture the necessity of
4433. thy justice " the sacred Scripture the necessity of this Jirm purpose, cannot obtain for
4434., and let him return to the Lord, and I will show him mercy !** There is, then, no m
4435.hen, no mercy for him who renounces not sin*. God only pardons us our sins in propo
4436.o mercy for him who renounces not sin*. God only pardons us our sins in proportion
4437.ng no more; for would it not be mocking God to ask his forgiveness of a sin which o
4438.mocking God to ask his forgiveness of a sin which one purposed to commit again ? Th
4439.d to ask his forgiveness of a sin which one purposed to commit again ? There are th
4440.oung recognized the first of these is a change of life. man was proud, impetuous, pass
4441.nized the first of these is a change of life. man was proud, impetuous, passionate,
4442.the first of these is a change of life. man was proud, impetuous, passionate, refra
4443.•.'4k**i . , ^ DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN and none may doubt tha
4444.leaily a firm purpose of his it seen no change of conduct, did not really renounce sin
4445.nge of conduct, did not really renounce sin, promises were only on the lips, and no
4446.oid the occasions which usually lead to sin these are of two kinds some, of themsel
4447. two kinds some, of themselves, tend to sin, such as bad books, plays, balls, lasci
4448.d company. Others are only occasions of sin because of the weakness and disposition
4449.and to remain voluntarily in them, is a sign that one has not a firm ourpose of amen
4450.ain voluntarily in them, is a sign that one has not a firm ourpose of amendment. Th
4451.much to break off from the occasions of sin but the sacrifice must be made, if w«
4452.ese words of our Lord hand be to thee a cause of scandal, plucK it out, or cut u off*
4453.cast it from thee for it is better that one oi thv members should perish, than that
4454. : " Even if that whic>' leads you into sin be as dear to you as your eye or hand y
4455.ly to perform actions contrary to these evil habits. For example: actions of mildnes
4456. as often as we have given way to a bad habit. But if one makes no effort to overcome
4457.e have given way to a bad habit. But if one makes no effort to overcome it, and see
4458.efore, if he is not sorry for it before God, and hastens not to purify himself by c
4459. h^^a •i.^r- a certain proof that his life. lie has not had a Hrm resolo* tiun to
4460.peror had him put in I should betray my religion." prison, hoping that the hardship he w
4461. eunuch called Ustazade, who was put to death, : * ft.-. •; .'' 'X'. • . . '. •
4462.e him ; but the saint was very far from being gratified by this mark of respect, and
4463. hia face to let the eunuch see by that sign of contempt how guilty he was in having
4464.ereby renouncing- Christianity, for the man had been a Christian. This reproach whi
4465.e white robe which he wore,, and put on one of black, in token of his repentance th
4466. know the " What has happened to you,** cause and sent for him. said he. "Oh! that ev
4467. '.' • 'JL* ^^^:, ':,: ; 246 ^1 f^M DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN * •r-:''i*'*f''ir-'.
4468.g you I am deserving of a double denth, one for having betrayed Jesug Christ, my ad
4469.ug Christ, my adorable Saviour, and the other for having deceived you !" Ustazade the
4470.im whom he recognirod and adored as his God. On hearing this, Sapor became furious
4471.all the Christians in his empire put to death nevertheless, through jiity for the old
4472.nevertheless, through jiity for the old man, he used every means to try to win him
4473. penitent, " you shall never succeed; I will never again \m such a fool as to pay to
4474., and beseech him, as the reward of the many years he had so faithfully served him,
4475.that Ustazade had not been condemned to death for any crime, but only that, being a C
4476. to death for any crime, but only that, being a Christian, he had refused to betray h
4477.Christian, he had refused to betray his God. Sapor gave his consent, and that the m
4478.gly as he hoped it might intimidate the other Christians, seeing that he showed, no m
4479.that he showed, no mercy even to an old man who had served him long and faithfully.
4480.on and a firm purpose. ; Ecclesiastical History, ARTICLE The ii^ V • IV. OF CONFESSIO
4481.. i* *** ' , sion, or the accusation of one's sins to in order to obtain forgivenes
4482.ins ; but he cannot exercise it save by virtue of a particular mission from his bishop
4483. cannot exercise it save by virtue of a particular mission from his bishop, who determines
4484.terved cases. all the mortal sins which one which are hidden in the depth of the he
4485.and retaining sins in his name, fjr the state of the conscienre cannot be known if it
4486.of Jesus Christ, to make amends for the many sins he has committed, and to sue for a
4487.re, for he must declare the number, the nature, and all the considerable circumstances
4488., by stating as nearly as possible, how many times he has committed each sin the nat
4489.e, how many times he has committed each sin the nature, or kind, for it is not suff
4490.any times he has committed each sin the nature, or kind, for it is not sufficient to s
4491.at he has sinned grievously but he must state in a particular manner what sort of sin
4492.inned grievously but he must state in a particular manner what sort of sin he has commitme
4493.ate in a particular manner what sort of sin he has commitmerited eternal torment, t
4494.is the confessor cannot judge as to the state of the conscience, nor prescril)e the r
4495.tances, and these are of two kinds some change the nature of the sin for instance, to
4496. these are of two kinds some change the nature of the sin for instance, to rob a churc
4497.two kinds some change the nature of the sin for instance, to rob a church is not me
4498.acrilege, which is a much more grievous sin than theft. Others only muke the sin gr
4499.us sin than theft. Others only muke the sin greater, without changing its nature :
4500.e the sin greater, without changing its nature : for example, to steal from anj; : : 2
4501.for example, to steal from anj; : : 248 one is DVTV OF THE CHRISTIAN a theft ; 1 .
4502. three francs from a poot that in tl»o world, is a much greater sin than to take a s
4503. that in tl»o world, is a much greater sin than to take a similar sum from a rich
4504. than to take a similar sum from a rich man, so that this it a But in order to circ
4505.astance which must be dechired. confess one's sins in a proper manner, he must know
4506.er, he must know them exactly hence the necessity of the examination. ^)erson who had but
4507.ess Jane, a princess adorned with every virtue, had chosen for her director St. John N
4508.ss, was exceedingly jealous, and put an evil conetructiun on the most trivial and ii
4509.tions of hi^ wife, whom he suspected of being unfaithful to him. One day when she had
4510.e suspected of being unfaithful to him. One day when she had been to confession, he
4511. confession is inviolable, and that all knowledge obtained through confession is as thoug
4512.ugh it were still unknown. The emperor, being exceedingly angry, maintained a gloomy
4513.othing. Finally, he threatened him with death, in case he still refused to comply wit
4514.nd laid it in a tomb, where il operated many miracles. Fkllkr, Diet. Hist. ; — ; A
4515.unded V. THE EXAMINATION OF CONSCIENCE. Necessity of this examination. This necessity ii
4516.CE. Necessity of this examination. This necessity ii on that of confessing all the sins t
4517.on that of confessing all the sins that one has com- ,i *. • I TOWARDS GOD. mltt
4518.s that one has com- ,i *. • I TOWARDS GOD. mltt€d ; 3^10 ;t;^-fl-.ij>- can they
4519.er ex amination, omitted to confess any one mortal sin, would not ohtain ahsolution
4520.tion, omitted to confess any one mortal sin, would not ohtain ahsolution or remissi
4521. sacrament, and thereby commit a mortal sin We must examine our Condition of the ex
4522.omission as regards our duties, sins of habit, sins of speech, such as too great quic
4523.his class are the sins oppose \ to th'* love of our neighbour, and those wliich outr
4524. go pecially if they sins to confession will have much trouble, (es- ;•• . 4 W
4525. of the devotions fo - confession. They will thus discover the sins of which ta.\v a
4526.." . really wish to discover them ; beg God's assistance for that <*< 1 purpose, an
4527.for that <*< 1 purpose, and following a good method in their examination, they Will
4528. good method in their examination, they Will hearken to the voice of conscience. •
4529.themselves for a general confession, or one embracing several years, it will be use
4530.ion, or one embracing several years, it will be useful for certain persons to write
4531.hey find themselves guilty such persons will do well, during the course of their inv
4532.of their investigation, to reflect that God for ; When i. o :.: 4533. >m^ w ...': . i >', ' .;- '^ .. 250 is DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN • say to him, " Lord
4534.cts of contrition. It is useful at that time to repeat very slowly and with much att
4535.much attention, " I confess to Almighty God," &c. Example. — A person life, who ;
4536.lmighty God," &c. Example. — A person life, who ; desired to lar course of made a
4537.. seeing there the sins of all her past life, her fear was re-doubled, and she took
4538.ched ?" for ever the frivolities of the world, This reflection made her resolve to re
4539.unce and to lead a retired and edifying life. ARTICLE To tions, is VI. OF SACRILEGIO
4540.d void, but it is also committing a new sin, which is nothing less than a sacriThen
4541.fanes a sacrament. peasing the wrath of God one does but outrage him, and trample u
4542.s a sacrament. peasing the wrath of God one does but outrage him, and trample under
4543.r foot the adorable blood of the Son of God, which, falling on an unworthy object,
4544.us perverted into a poison. And yet how many young people What then are the causes o
4545.this crime deplorable a misfortune ? In many cases, it is the shame •i' confessing
4546.f ma! • alt '-^ . r.. • Ot- TOWARDS GOD. 851 Gee and falsehood, diminishes in t
4547.inishes in their eyes the horror of thp sin before it is committed, but shows it to
4548.iolable Becrecy ; and hence to disclose one's sins to him is as il they were never
4549.s as il they were never revealed to any one. Once out of the sacred tribunal, he ca
4550.ness which dictate to him the advice he will give you. Besides, he to whom you confe
4551.to whom you confess your sins is not an angel he is a man like yourself, exposed to y
4552.nfess your sins is not an angel he is a man like yourself, exposed to your own weak
4553.sires only your cure and your return to virtue he is a tender father who will be touch
4554.urn to virtue he is a tender father who will be touched by the confidence you place
4555. you place in him, and whose whole care will be to aid and assist you in your pressi
4556. to aid and assist you in your pressing necessity. Say, would you let shame prevent you f
4557.r disease you might have, especially if death were to be feared from kv.eping it conc
4558.om kv.eping it concealed ? Does not the love of life overcome all repugnance in such
4559.ing it concealed ? Does not the love of life overcome all repugnance in such cases ?
4560.ases ? Why then yield to shame when the soul is mortally wounded ? Why not have cour
4561.soul is mortally wounded ? Why not have courage to revealit to him who can apply a savi
4562.o be gained by now concealing sins from one's confessor ? Can they be concealed fro
4563. confessor ? Can they be concealed from God i Must they not be confessed sooner or
4564.er or later, in order to escape eternal death, and if we would not behold these same
4565.death, and if we would not behold these same sins revealed before the entire world?
4566.se same sins revealed before the entire world? There are others whom the fear of not
4567.? There are others whom the fear of not being permitted to make their first communion
4568. from the first communion or the Easter duty. Of those penitents who thus receive ab
4569.erwards receive, and generally die in a state of impenitence. Others ; ; ; ; Mfc. „
4570.."'-- '. .' *>'^ my.'---: 1^ t^''- 25'^ DUTY OF THE CHRISTlAIt reproaching themselve
4571.in iniquity, and persevere therein till death. peace," said the minister of Christ, t
4572.uity, and persevere therein till death. peace," said the minister of Christ, to these
4573.ister of Christ, to these false peniBut God said to them " Go with my malediction !
4574.tion !" The only remedy for so great an evil is a general confession made virith all
4575.sor, and who has availed himself of the time for proving himself, is well recompense
4576.ch he submitted if he was put off for a time, that delay was short it was soon got o
4577.r, and the result is the testimony of a good conscience he believes that his communi
4578.eves that his communion was >yell made; peace reigns in his heart, and during his who
4579.igns in his heart, and during his whole life he will bless the happy moment when he
4580.his heart, and during his whole life he will bless the happy moment when he obtained
4581.weet tranquillity on earth, and eternal happiness in the in tents. : ; ; ; world to come.
4582.rnal happiness in the in tents. : ; ; ; world to come. Examples. —" Take care of re
4583.blood of Jesus Christ said a servant of God to himself, u^.-'A . " That blood is of
4584.e, it is the blood of the Just and Holy One; it is the blood of a God by reason of
4585.Just and Holy One; it is the blood of a God by reason of his intimate union with th
4586.e of the Lord for the nourishment of my soul ; bat what a monster of ingratitude I s
4587.ntrition, and then communicating in the state of sin Oh how well he deserves hell who
4588. and then communicating in the state of sin Oh how well he deserves hell who is gui
4589. let me become guilty of your blood ah! death rather than !" that aye, a thousand dea
4590.h he never thought of When opexpecting, being money received in restitution. portunit
4591.knowledged that confession !" is a very good thing St Augustine has had the courage
4592.ery good thing St Augustine has had the courage to write his confession and published h
4593.der to make known the great mercy which God had shown him in pardoning so many crim
4594.which God had shown him in pardoning so many crimes. His humility and heroism in thu
4595.netrated with grief for having offended God, whose minister we We are, at the same
4596.d God, whose minister we We are, at the same time, to recognize in our confessor. hu
4597., whose minister we We are, at the same time, to recognize in our confessor. humble
4598.!" Your confessor is the father of your soul his office in the sacred tribunal is th
4599.rist in your heart, of reviving in your soul the life of grace, if unhappily you had
4600.our heart, of reviving in your soul the life of grace, if unhappily you had lost it,
4601.if you are still living in the sight of God by justice. Regard him as a tender fath
4602.are still living in the sight of God by justice. Regard him as a tender father who is r
4603.nning we rendered ourselves unworthy of being blessed by God through the medium of hi
4604. ourselves unworthy of being blessed by God through the medium of his minister. The
4605.sion, and that of receiving absolution, being well disposed, for that, having had the
4606. for that, having had the misfortune to sin, I repent : ; m.:i: !'». ; ! : \»AUSS
4607. it The words Confiteor it an excellent form for the act of Contrition; ' r»*. V" w
4608.ral way, confess ."'.'1. 22 ; 254 :i>*- DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN our sins to God, to Ma
4609.:i>*- DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN our sins to God, to Mary, to St. Michael, to the holy a
4610.nfessing that the sins which defile our soul are purely our own fault we then recomm
4611.hen recommend ourselves to the mercy of God, and invoke thisaints to the end that t
4612.ously t» cohfessuon to the minister of God. tles, ; We meation how long it is sinc
4613. confessing our sins, we are to bear in mind that we do so in presence of our Judge,
4614.that we are sensible of having offended God, and are sincerely sorry for our offenc
4615. our sins to the say to him that we beg God's pardon of in the sacred tribunal, has
4616.ue sorrow for his sins, does but lie to God in the person of his minister, by sayin
4617.of his minister, by saying that he begs God's pardon and lying to God, is it not mo
4618. that he begs God's pardon and lying to God, is it not mocking him? VVe ask of the
4619.eption, must be punished either in this world or the other here by the sinner himself
4620.be punished either in this world or the other here by the sinner himself, or hereitfi
4621.m. we are to He who, ; ; by an avenging God. By asking absolution he acknowledges t
4622.low the rules of Christian and rational prudence, and can never, without ; betraying his
4623.o think that it wiil not be ratified by God; ; TOWARDS GOD. oly t 255 apofr- wledgi
4624. wiil not be ratified by God; ; TOWARDS GOD. oly t 255 apofr- wledgin^ the siiiK 9
4625.e seal of his reprobation, and the true cause of that leniency, that criminal indulge
4626.— A certam person who had the name of being and did pious, was, nevertheless, too c
4627.aving she had the weakness to fall into one of those sins, the confession of which
4628. " Whatever it costs me," said she, " I will go straight and not apply often to ; en
4629.traight and not apply often to ; enough God ins to the )ardon of true sor- it, and
4630.with confusior, and confound you." When one has had the courage to declare in confe
4631.and confound you." When one has had the courage to declare in confession a sin whose av
4632. the courage to declare in confession a sin whose avowal they find difficult, he fe
4633.ficult, he feels immediately after like one who has succeeded in casting' off a hea
4634., is a reparation of the injury done to God and our neighbour. To satisfy God for c
4635.ne to God and our neighbour. To satisfy God for cur sins is to do or to suffer some
4636. the acceptation of our penanco and thg desire of performing it, h absolutely necessar
4637.e Sacrament of Penance the remission of sin: when one has no intention of satisfyin
4638.t of Penance the remission of sin: when one has no intention of satisfying God, he
4639.when one has no intention of satisfying God, he cannot obtain the remission of his
4640.obtain the remission of his sins. It is God who remits them, and he alone is master
4641.is master of the conditions on which he will this hereafter pi 'fist ; has he T siii
4642.ss. In the Sacrament of Baptism he iibQ DUTY OP THE ; CHBlfcTIAN /• hence the mini
4643.ave previously committed. It is not the same in the Sacrament of Ptnance. God, by th
4644.t the same in the Sacrament of Ptnance. God, by the mouth of the priest, remits tli
4645.hed, and we ought besides to practi.; j other good works with the intention of satisf
4646.nd we ought besides to practi.; j other good works with the intention of satisfying
4647.ks with the intention of satisfying the justice of God. They who die without having i:n
4648. intention of satisfying the justice of God. They who die without having i:ndergonp
4649.punishmer.t, have it to usulenro in the other worlii, and must finish in purgatory th
4650.th-^h sins. In fact, it agrees with the justice of God that tho^ who have abused the fi
4651. In fact, it agrees with the justice of God that tho^ who have abused the first jrr
4652.onoured the gloriouF titles of child of God, member of Jesus Christ, and temple of
4653.cipally through ignorance, bear not the same character of ingratitude. Besides, the
4654.r of ingratitude. Besides, the mercy of God arranges it so that from the very punis
4655.f God arranges it so that from the very punishment which the penitent sinner undergoes, he
4656.te past sins, but also to eradicate the vice from which they sprang ; so for pride h
4657.l the temporal and spiritual assistance God will also accept in satisfacgiven to ou
4658.e temporal and spiritual assistance God will also accept in satisfacgiven to our nei
4659.s, and pergecutions have a value before God, they must be borne in a spirit of pena
4660.and value it is He who presents them to God, and it is on his account that they are
4661. calumny, in his goods by theft, or any other species of damage, or in his person by
4662. bad treatment. We can only obtain from God the pardon of our sins by being reconci
4663.tain from God the pardon of our sins by being reconciled with our neighbour if we hav
4664.it, a Anthony, a St. Mary of Egypt, and many others who followed their example, reno
4665.roots. all this was done to satisfy the justice of God. Example. St. — * . '»>^ "«
4666.this was done to satisfy the justice of God. Example. St. — * . '»>^ "«• *',.
4667.lgence is the remission of the temporal punishment due to sins already remitted as to thei
4668.ns already remitted as to their eternal punishment Whence it follows that Indulgence disch
4669.y from the temporal chastisement due to sin nccording to the rigor of the ancient c
4670.debt which the smner owes to the divine justice on account of his sins, and which must
4671., and which must be paid either in this life V ; -'. • ;* \-4 .'<' if-. «... I fm
4672.;* \-4 .'<' if-. «... I fm 258 or tlie DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN other ; here, by works
4673. I fm 258 or tlie DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN other ; here, by works of satisfacticn, oi he
4674.. Indulgence, therefore, neither remits sin nor its eternal punishment, but merely
4675.ore, neither remits sin nor its eternal punishment, but merely the temporary punishment wh
4676.al punishment, but merely the temporary punishment whioh usually remains to be endured, al
4677.o be endured, although the rtain of the sin has been effaced by the S.acrament of P
4678.her lessens the rigor of that temporary punishment or abridges ; its duration Formerly the
4679.several years' duration and in all that time the sinner had to pray much and often,
4680.couch, to fast, give alms, and practise other good : — — 'it h^M "'A^' My." ";' w
4681. to fast, give alms, and practise other good : — — 'it h^M "'A^' My." ";' works.
4682.t discipline is now laid aside, yet the justice of God is still the same, and sin is sl
4683.e is now laid aside, yet the justice of God is still the same, and sin is slill as
4684.de, yet the justice of God is still the same, and sin is slill as deserving of punis
4685.e justice of God is still the same, and sin is slill as deserving of punishment as
4686. same, and sin is slill as deserving of punishment as it was in the primitive agts. It is
4687.er animated and guided by the spirit of God, grants indulChrist has given that powe
4688.hen it is consistent, with the glory of God and the spiritual good of her children.
4689.with the glory of God and the spiritual good of her children. The Church, in the ear
4690.ce, those sinners She also abridged the time of for whom they interfered. penance, i
4691.vour of those who had commenced it with courage and firmness, when they were threatened
4692.ildren of what they owe : to the divine justice. Indulgences have been called by the ho
4693. absolutions, They are of three sorts : peace, and reconciliations. plenary indulgenc
4694.ial in- dulgences and jubilees. TOWARDS GOD. 25B 'h tf-^:i: A eternal plenary iriHu
4695.the general remission of the tem- poral punishment duo tor all our sins. t A partial indul
4696.on of each supreme Pontiff. 'J'he Pope, being the head of all the Church, can grant i
4697. grant indulgences to all and his power being unlimited, he may gii'6 them plenary or
4698.ntrary, indulgences always suppose that one has performed a part of his penance, or
4699.eally disposed to perform it if he have time and strength, since the Church grants t
4700.sing with it. It is, doubtless, for the same reason that the Council of Trent declar
4701., according to the ancient and approved custom of the Church, they ought only to be gr
4702. alms-deeds, and usually by fasting and other good works. P: • . • . 'i: • '*?
4703.deeds, and usually by fasting and other good works. P: • . • . 'i: • '*? •'1
4704.pious person who had in her youth ''M.' many serious faults, was wont to repeat all
4705.n proportion to yy.V':, « : . 260 lier DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAIf means, and often repe
4706.'ive mercy on me now every moment of my life, and particularly at the hour of my dea
4707.ife, and particularly at the hour of my death this I beg of yon throu/jh the merits o
4708.ce all that I may have to suffer, and I will not gratify myself in any way whatsoeve
4709.s represented to her that the mortified life she led would cer" I must suffer a tain
4710.r existence, she replied little in this life, fearing lest I should have much to suf
4711.and truly contains the body, and blood, soul and divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ,
4712.ity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, under the form of bread and wine it is the greatest an
4713.ust of all the sacraments. In fact, the other sacraments give us grace, while the Euc
4714.Eucharist gives us the Author of grace, God himself. Through it, Jesus Christ dwell
4715.n promised by Our Lord, long before the time when he instituted it, as we read in th
4716." Our Saviour added " The bread which I will give is my flesh for the life of the wo
4717.d which I will give is my flesh for the life of the world." And as the Jews murmured
4718.ll give is my flesh for the life of the world." And as the Jews murmured at this sayi
4719. you do not eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you shall have no
4720.nt, which shall be shed for you and for many unto ihtt as often as ye do this, do it
4721.ye do this, do it in remeo*remission of sin hrance of me." The substance of bread a
4722.* : MM .^i•'.r taste, is the sensible sign when^by we know the invisible VTIATION.
4723.ough theft** appearances, as to colour, form, and taste, remain the sara« after con
4724.ead and wine the substance of the bread being changed into that ot tb«» body of Chr
4725.f his blood so that it then becomes the same body which was fastened to the cross, a
4726. ; " if..; .:^y^ ; • •-.. " . r- 4* form of bread, yet it is really and substant
4727.nd in every particle thereof: under the form of bread, the body of Christ is united
4728.lood, Boul, and divinity, and under the form of wine his blood is : united to his bo
4729. his blood is : united to his body, his soul Christ vided : is, and hir> divinity ;
4730. receive as much by communicating under one in both. single form, as if we communic
4731.communicating under one in both. single form, as if we communicated This wonderful c
4732.m, as if we communicated This wonderful change is effected through the omnipotence of
4733.g of ; " ^ . .. • ^^iis 203 Chanaan ; DUTY or TUB to earth, CK"l)i 'TIA'V and the
4734.now that nothing in is is impossible to God, and we believe on the word of Jesus Cl
4735.this has loved us so much as to operate God that surpass our understanding. miracle
4736.ieve then, on the word of our is a])ove nature. God, who is really present in the Euch
4737.n, on the word of our is a])ove nature. God, who is really present in the Eucharist
4738.unter-evidence of our sensep, that when God the bread and wine are substantially ch
4739.e cannot listen to the testimony of our sense's. Our Lord, to unite us intimately to
4740. ; he has commanded us to drink of that same blood which he has shed for us, and to
4741.fuse in miracles to procure for us that happiness. ; he does his body. wo cannot ; 'i mr
4742.ody. wo cannot ; 'i mr ';3V Ambrose, in one of his discourses, adthe martyr St. Law
4743.. Oh illustrious martyr that invincible courage which enables you to endure the most dr
4744.tioners Communion the strong and mighty God, and it is his blood !" fJiat flows in
4745. FOR RECEIVING THE EUCHARISU with There God is nf sacrament which unites us more cl
4746.he more need tliere is oi It is not for man, bringing holy dispositions to receive
4747.ie body. Tiu) first disposition of tlie soul is purity of conscience. VVu must prove
4748.e feel our^-'elves guilty of any mortal sin, we must have recourse The Eucharist su
4749. to the sacrament of penance. spiritual life in those who receive it, for in order t
4750.for in order to be nourished by it, the soul must be living: it is the (iod of purit
4751.s iiimself to us, and lie can oidy take pleasure in a pure heart. It was to make his Apo
4752. to make his Apostles sen.^ible of this truth, that Jesus Christ washed their feet be
4753. and his blood to drink. It was for the same reason that, in the Primitive Church, t
4754.ive Christ himself, as he came into the world, died to save us, arose gloriously from
4755.s flesh and drinks his blood shall have life eternal, and shall rise again at the la
4756.goodness ? proach the holy table in the same disposition as did the woman in the Gos
4757.• ; 7 If* ^ii ;;.. 'Mm 264 crament of love DUTY OP THE CURISTIAH m^^ it is by an i
4758. 7 If* ^ii ;;.. 'Mm 264 crament of love DUTY OP THE CURISTIAH m^^ it is by an incomp
4759.STIAH m^^ it is by an incompreheFisible love that ; Chiist has instituted it, and wo
4760.to a cold, indifferent heart ? But this love must be accompanied by profound sentime
4761.we receive in the Eucharist ? Is it not God himself, the Creator and Sovereign Masi
4762.e, whose power, whose sanctity, and all other peifecAnd what are we? We ha ? in ourse
4763.in ourselves nought but nothingness and sin. Let us, therefore, humble ourselves be
4764. therefore, humble ourselves before our God, acknowledging with the lions are infin
4765.ristic symbols, he is none the less our God. Let us excite in our hearts a boundles
4766.ament, and she only dispenses with this law in favour of those who, being dangerous
4767.s with this law in favour of those who, being dangerously ill, receive it as the viat
4768.demeanour, announce the sentiments of a soul which humbles itself profoundly before
4769.ore the Supreme Majesty. ; : ; ExAMPLK. Being irritated by the hard-heartedness of Ph
4770.d by the just complaints of his people, God resolved to punish that obstinate princ
4771.ndage under which they groaned When the time appointed by his eternal decrees had ar
4772.crees had arrived, he sent a destroying Angel, who killed in one night all the first-
4773. sent a destroying Angel, who killed in one night all the first-born children of th
4774.the previous evening to eat it in every family, and to mark with its blood the door of
4775.— TOWABDI 60D. S65 house, so that the angel, the minister of his vengeance, might s
4776. The Israelites, who were the people of God, were alone commanded to immolate that
4777.mysterious lamb and the ex; terminating Angel spared reality side all whose doors wer
4778.inister Lamb, and all the Aiv- _•/ of God's vengeance, spares those who •4 are
4779.ul shall often renew this sacrifice, in memory of their deliverance from the slavery o
4780.in memory of their deliverance from the slavery of the devil. The manna, that celestial
4781. is to say, when wie are freed from the slavery of sin. .v-^;. w*'''''- '.; "' .^V'fn.
4782. when wie are freed from the slavery of sin. .v-^;. w*'''''- '.; "' .^V'fn. jTi"':
4783.n loving him perfectly faith brings our mind in subjection to him, and charity attac
4784.s to him our heaot it : We : 23 ' ; 266 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN But there is a union m
4785.ion much more intimate and more perfect being that which is effected by the participa
4786. and unites his body with ours come the same body and the same spirit with him. As t
4787.dy with ours come the same body and the same spirit with him. As the food which we t
4788.ner does the holy Eucharist nourish our soul there is no sort of difference between
4789.and to preserve within ys the spiritual life of grace. Our divine Saviaur, having be
4790. the divine grace he confirms us in his love, and makes us preserve Qiat precious tr
4791.ow what it is that maintains that young man in such edifying piety, and in a regula
4792. edifying piety, and in a regularity of life which renders him a model for all aroun
4793. are all born with a strong tendency to evil it is like a venom infused into our who
4794. is like a venom infused into our whole nature l)y the sin of the first man. The Eucha
4795.m infused into our whole nature l)y the sin of the first man. The Eucharist does no
4796.r whole nature l)y the sin of the first man. The Eucharist does not entiit^ free us
4797. entiit^ free us from this proneness to evil, but it lessens its malignity and hence
4798.erpoison. In reality, this is what mery one feels who communicates frequently and w
4799.ls who communicates frequently and with good dispositions; they feel their own stren
4800.st is to give us the |)iedge of eternal life and of a glorious resurrection. It is C
4801.imself who teaches to us this consoling truth ; : 11: Vj-I- ';,u,.s i^>^ i . :, ! ,"
4802.eternal lite, and ,.»'i;» ' \ TOWARDS GOD. [ 267 :' Li-^s^ t\ will raii-e him up
4803.;» ' \ TOWARDS GOD. [ 267 :' Li-^s^ t\ will raii-e him up at the last day." is, The
4804.raii-e him up at the last day." is, The life which the as it were, the beginof bliss
4805.; it is in them as a seed and a germ of immortality, which shall one day bring them forth f
4806. and a germ of immortality, which shall one day bring them forth from the dust of t
4807.e of tlie holy Eucharist imparts to the soul life V"" 'J- t'\ Eli !' -jw. T, ^ •i
4808.tlie holy Eucharist imparts to the soul life V"" 'J- t'\ Eli !' -jw. T, ^ •i • m
4809.hin us becomes an assured pledge of our immortality, but it is only fervent communion that
4810.id communion, that is to say, to venial sin, leaves the soul in all it which withou
4811.at is to say, to venial sin, leaves the soul in all it which without sincere piety o
4812.n, which is an enormoas crime. Example. One day when Jesus was teaching in the syna
4813.eners " What shall we do to perform the will of God ? " Jesus answered them " The wi
4814.What shall we do to perform the will of God ? " Jesus answered them " The will of G
4815.ll of God ? " Jesus answered them " The will of God Whereis that ye believe in Him w
4816.d ? " Jesus answered them " The will of God Whereis that ye believe in Him whom he
4817.'ue bread from heaven, for the bread of God is He who cometh down from heaven, and
4818.cometh down from heaven, and who giveth life to the world. I am the bread c'' Vie ;
4819.from heaven, and who giveth life to the world. I am the bread c'' Vie ; your fathers
4820. he who eateth of this bread shall have life eternal, and thd bread which I will giv
4821.ave life eternal, and thd bread which I will give is my flesh for the life of the wo
4822.d which I will give is my flesh for the life of the world. He who eateth my flesh an
4823.ll give is my flesh for the life of the world. He who eateth my flesh and drinketh my
4824.od hath eternal ; ; mu •I. t. - and I will raise him up at the last day for my fle
4825.lear than these words " The bread whiob life, ; ; • t%.K' 868 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIA
4826.The bread whiob life, ; ; • t%.K' 868 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN give is •rmm ml I wi
4827.TY OP THE CHRISTIAN give is •rmm ml I will my flesh : my flesh is meat indeed, and
4828.AD COMMUNION. They who communicate in a state of mortal sin, do in. deed receive the
4829.ey who communicate in a state of mortal sin, do in. deed receive the body and blood
4830. Lord unworthily, (that is to say, in a state of sin whereby he is rendered unworthy)
4831.orthily, (that is to say, in a state of sin whereby he is rendered unworthy) is gui
4832.y of the body and blood of Christ Let a man, therefore, prove himself, and so let h
4833.craments, and of all that is holiest in religion it profanes iu the most outrageous mann
4834.ood to flow through veins infected with sin. This crime is liko to that of Judas, i
4835.nks uowarthily, eats and drinks his own judgment and condemiia* the : TOWARDS GOD. don.
4836.n judgment and condemiia* the : TOWARDS GOD. don. 269 fl *•»•• t ( ; he is d
4837.er, when the profaner has ea^&n his own judgment, he has, as it were, changed it into hi
4838.emna* his is no longer changed into the same substance it is - ^-'f. *:^-,-.; '• <
4839.santly with and about him. Oh, dteadful punishment, which can only proceed from the wrath
4840.ch can only proceed from the wrath of a God betrayed and insulted Henoe, it usually
4841.callousness of heart, and a darkness of mind, which lead him have a fearful example
4842.us Judas Eucharist unworthily, when his mind was darkened and his heart, as it were,
4843.d consummated his crime. In despair, in death, and In what did his sacrilege end ? in
4844.has always a resource, for the mercy of God is infinite, and if he seeks it with a
4845., and that if it have happened forbid ! God how ; recouise must be immediately had
4846.ce of an sacred books present to as but one ifn* unworthy communion, being that of
4847. to as but one ifn* unworthy communion, being that of Judas, who received his God int
4848., being that of Judas, who received his God into a soul defiled by avarice, and alr
4849.t of Judas, who received his God into a soul defiled by avarice, and already occupie
4850. enemies neither the kiss of the Sou of God, nor the sweet name o( friend by which
4851.t, as though they could not contain the God who had vouchsafed to enter therein. Hi
4852.vouchsafed to enter therein. His guilty soul endless execration own cast into hell w
4853.lated ages are but a point in the dread eternity of the infernal torments was ! How apos
4854.e holy Eucharist ;" but he says " Let a man, therefore, prove himself, and so let h
4855.approach the holy : ' t ,1*-, '.y "^ '^ good dispositions. To communicate un\v4856.ions. To communicate un\vevil but not to communicate a all is not les
4857.not to communicate a all is not less an evil, and both lead inevitably to eternal de
4858.il, and both lead inevitably to eternal death. The Eucharist is necessary for maintai
4859.; the spiritual for the strength of the soul, like of grace is gradually worn away,
4860.hat purpose by Jesus Christ. the Son of man, and drink gays He himself, "the Hesh o
4861.and drink gays He himself, "the Hesh of life ; that of the body, ' : ' '.. f-, * H J
4862.body, ' : ' '.. f-, * H J '""'' TOWARDS GOD. not his ulood, 271 hi 'i i' ye shall h
4863.is ulood, 271 hi 'i i' ye shall have no life in ^fou." He has instisacrament under t
4864. ^fou." He has instisacrament under the form of bread and wine, to intimate that we
4865.t to be the ordinary nourishment of our soul, aa bread and wine are of our body. In
4866.t as the daily bread of the diildren of God they partook of it, indeed, every day,
4867. day, and feared nothing so much as the being deprived of it. We should endeavour to
4868. of it. We should endeavour to have the same dispositions as they had, and seek to i
4869.the sf)irit of the Church is always the same. The holy Council of Trent says that it
4870.ist Another council expresses a similar desire in these terms " We observe, with sorro
4871.there is no means so well tianity, this truth fXA T. ' -- Jhristiann V J ' ' '. ; A-
4872., therefore, only binds the faithful to one communion in the year, it is not becaus
4873. preserve in her children tho spiritual life of grace she does not wish to use thiea
4874.sgressions or sacrileges but »He would desire that they might be pure enough to i-ece
4875. ; ; short, as would be necessary to by virtue of the Eucharist, the life and liealth
4876.sary to by virtue of the Eucharist, the life and liealth of the soul. If we love God
4877. Eucharist, the life and liealth of the soul. If we love God, we will often unite ou
4878.the life and liealth of the soul. If we love God, we will often unite ourselves with
4879.ife and liealth of the soul. If we love God, we will often unite ourselves with lii
4880.liealth of the soul. If we love God, we will often unite ourselves with liim be invi
4881.ou who are »ore and heavy laden, and I will relieve you come with confidence, and f
4882.often, in pre»t;rve, ; ; : 272 to nie, DUTY OF THE CHRI8TIAW who am your father, an
4883.E CHRI8TIAW who am your father, and ; I will give you the mogl touching pledge of my
4884.my affection come to me, who am your is God and The vals, I will enrich you with tn
4885. me, who am your is God and The vals, I will enrich you with tny mosc precious grace
4886. is, to malw a spiritual communion from time to time in order to do BO we have but t
4887.malw a spiritual communion from time to time in order to do BO we have but to recoll
4888.lect ourselves a moment, make au act of desire of the actual communion, and invite Jes
4889.n, and invite Jesus Christ to enter our soul, after having adored him in the most ho
4890.y day when i3M . r he might receive his God under the Eucharistic veils, and he omi
4891.n action. He had so lively a horror for sin, that he avoided even the appearance of
4892. that he avoided even the appearance of evil. He often said that he. would not suffe
4893.ore Jesus Christ, and he had a constant desire to instruct himself in all that concern
4894.ir entire meaning. The innocence of hia life, his extreme desire to receive the holy
4895. The innocence of hia life, his extreme desire to receive the holy communion, and the
4896.tion he would make a retreat before the time of his communion, during which he made
4897. made a general confession of his whole life. To see the torrents of tears which he
4898.ely sorrow by which he was pen©tiated, one would have said that there had never be
4899.:V|i.ii>^' baptismal robe by any mortal sin but the light of grace by which he was
4900. regard even the slightest faults as so many hideous monsters, and he could not cons
4901.le himself because of having otTended a God who vouchsafed even to become the food
4902.uchsafed even to become the food of his soul. It was in such sentiments as those tha
4903. sentiments as those that he passed the time of his retreat. The joyful moment for w
4904.sighed, arrived at last, and he had the happiness of receiving his God but it would be im
4905.d he had the happiness of receiving his God but it would be impossible to express t
4906.e ^vept and sighed, and broke " Yes, my God," out into transports of love and grati
4907. " Yes, my God," out into transports of love and gratitude. he cried, "since you hav
4908. the goodness to give yourself to me, I will give myself entirely to you ; since you
4909.eatures if I used any reserve towards a God who has loved me beyond measure." ; ! h
4910.nor the engagements contracted with his God. The communion was for him a salu- Nor
4911.munion was for him a salu- Nor was this one of those passing t^^ ';:',![ vanish wit
4912.nourishment whereby he sensibly grew in virtue and Very far from satiating his desires
4913.divine Eucharist is as necessary to our soul as earthly food is to our body, and tha
4914.ntented v»'i(h oaring 274 leave to his DUTY or THE CHR18TIA?f mm ¥Ki^^.^SIBS i£V3
4915.f the cross, which might perpetuate the memory thereof till the end of tlie world, and
4916.the memory thereof till the end of tlie world, and apply its merit:s (Mito us; it was
4917.hat he v ;ia hetrayed, he offered up to God his Father liis body and hif Mood, unde
4918.ather liis body and hif Mood, under the form of bread and wine he gave them t< his a
4919.then established as priests of tlie new law, and by these words " do Ihu remembranc
4920., which apparent separation recalls the memory of the real separation the renewal, bec
4921.paration the renewal, because it is the same victim, the same host, the same sacrifi
4922.wal, because it is the same victim, the same host, the same sacrificer, and conseque
4923. is the same victim, the same host, the same sacrificer, and consequently the same s
4924.e same sacrificer, and consequently the same sacrifice, offered upon the cross the d
4925.e sacrifice of the altar is an unbloody one. Such is the sacrifice of the Christian
4926. Such is the sacrifice of the Christian religion, the august sacrifice which alone compr
4927.ti by the various sacrifices of the old law it is, at the same time, a sacrifice of
4928.sacrifices of the old law it is, at the same time, a sacrifice of adora; : ; : : ; H
4929.fices of the old law it is, at the same time, a sacrifice of adora; : ; : : ; H^^ iM
4930. of nnpetration, by which we obtain yet other favours ; and a sacri* fice of p Oj Ati
4931.of p Oj Atiation whereby we appease his justice. The oblation which Christ makes of him
4932.age which can be rendered his creatures God to his infinite Majesty, and nothing ca
4933. mercy, by placing before him the cruel death to which his beloved Son voluntarily su
4934.|M^ ^jwaf^i^ ^fe';." .;, ,v-i-, TOWARDS GOD. 275 ' ti.i' .' and porp«tuates tho me
4935.OD. 275 ' ti.i' .' and porp«tuates tho memory of his death, vith what piety and grati
4936.' .' and porp«tuates tho memory of his death, vith what piety and gratitude should w
4937.trated M'ith sorrow, coinpuno* tion and love, in sight of so touching a spectacle ?
4938.-f". ! the sacrifice of the mass is the same as that of the cross, it ought to inspi
4939. cross, it ought to inspire us with the same sentiments. We should tiiko care to uni
4940.e graces of which in need, and to thank God tor all those which we L.ive ai eady re
4941.ich we L.ive ai eady received. It is to God alone that the sacrifice is offered, be
4942. and of our servitude. We to rtMidor to God ri'ie worship which only coaimenjorate
4943.the mass, to praise anled God for the victories them to obtain, and t
4944.also for all those who have died in the state of grace, and who may have still some s
4945.e freed therefrom to enter upon eternal life. This custom of oflfering up the holy s
4946.refrom to enter upon eternal life. This custom of oflfering up the holy sacriMoc for t
4947. of the apostles. » ,f - A mother of a family, who had conday assisting at mass, hear
4948.t; on Thursday to acquit herself of her duty towards Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament
4949.nd on Saturday to place herself and her family under the protection of Mary. She asser
4950.s. —A ; certain tracted the excellent habit of every : ; \t- ; ; ; from this pious
4951.BSTER, N.Y. 14580 (716) 872-4503 &? 276 DUTY OP THE CHKISTIAN William Ruffin, a youn
4952.N William Ruffin, a young scholar whose life might serve as a model for Christian yo
4953.for Christian youth, found his greatest pleasure He discharged this delightful duty with
4954. pleasure He discharged this delightful duty with in serving mass. touching piety an
4955.y and with such angelic fervour that no one could look upon him without being moved
4956.that no one could look upon him without being moved to devotion. It may be truly said
4957. by this holy exercise he obtained from God so many graces that he was raised to a
4958.s holy exercise he obtained from God so many graces that he was raised to a high deg
4959.as raised to a high degree of sanctity. Life of Ruffin, by the Mbi Carron. CHAPTER V
4960.Carron. CHAPTER VI. OP EXTREME UNCTION. God, who is infinitely good, has not only p
4961.EXTREME UNCTION. God, who is infinitely good, has not only provided us with salutary
4962.lutary assistance for the course of our life, and a state of health, but he has also
4963.tance for the course of our life, and a state of health, but he has also established
4964.lished a sacrament to console U& in the time of sickness, and especially at the appr
4965.ness, and especially at the approach of death, when temptations are more violent ^nd
4966.is sacrament is called Extreme Unction, being the last unction that a Christian recei
4967.s by the apostle St. James, in " If any one be sick amongst you, let the following
4968.e prjiy(^r of faith shall save the sick man the Lord will comfort him, and if he be
4969. faith shall save the sick man the Lord will comfort him, and if he be guilty of any
4970.comfort him, and if he be guilty of any sin, it shall be re* : tierst even ; : jiT
4971.t committed by sight, by : ff i TOWARDS GOD. smell, 277 and by the other senses." A
4972.ff i TOWARDS GOD. smell, 277 and by the other senses." A prajTr both powerful and eff
4973.d, by the mouth oi his Apostle, that he will always hear it. This sacrament has thre
4974.tations of the devil, and the horror of death it confirms their faith and confidence
4975. confirms their faith and confidence in God, and by that means fortifies them again
4976.f the devil it excites in the heart the desire and the hope of possessing God, and thu
4977.t the desire and the hope of possessing God, and thus fortifies against the fear of
4978. and thus fortifies against the fear of death the more ardent is this desire, and fir
4979.e fear of death the more ardent is this desire, and firmer this hope, the less they fe
4980.reme Unction is to efface the traces of sin, together with the sins themselves, if
4981.of penance. By the traces or remains of sin is understood a weakness and languor of
4982.is understood a weakness and languor of soul which continues even after the sin has
4983. of soul which continues even after the sin has been forgiven, which produces a lin
4984.that weakness, by detaching us from the world and making us desire heaven. It also re
4985.taching us from the world and making us desire heaven. It also remits venial sin, and
4986.us desire heaven. It also remits venial sin, and even those mortal sins which may h
4987.living, and ought to be received in the state of grace. The third effect of Extreme U
4988.ore be deferred till the last extremity time to ask for health when one is about to
4989.t extremity time to ask for health when one is about to breathe his last, for that
4990.he his last, for that would be to tempt God, since the person's recovery could not
4991.when it is received with sound and free judgment one is better disposea for its receptio
4992.s received with sound and free judgment one is better disposea for its reception, a
4993. it much more profit therefrom. moment, one runs the often happens that they Beside
4994.us postpone it, are for finally : ! 278 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAN Although this prevente
4995.HE CHRISTIAN Although this prevented by death from receiving it at all. sacrament be
4996.it at all. sacrament be not of absolute necessity, we are neverthe- bound to receive it w
4997.the ordinary means of obtaining a happy death those who neglect it less , disobey a p
4998.xpose themselves to the danger of a bad death, which i? *he greatest of all misfortun
4999.ructions she had received at Catechism. Being alone with her father, she said to him
5000.est say at Catechism that it is a great sin to let any one die without confession,
5001.chism that it is a great sin to let any one die without confession, and no one vent
5002. any one die without confession, and no one ventures to tell you " I thank you," th
5003.u, for I shall be indebted to you aft^r God, for my salvation." The priest came, an
5004.nd gave the last sacraments to the sick man, who died next day. After : — ! —
5005.ral times exclaimed " Without my little one my dear child, what would have " — be
5006. them sentiments of penance, and at the same time to inspire the assistants with sim
5007. sentiments of penance, and at the same time to inspire the assistants with similar
5008.es and circum- fipw^ l^i'v; ; : TOWARDS GOD. : 279 the two fol« itances wherein th
5009. of hands and we read in Ecclesiastical History that the first bishops established by t
5010.sion, which has never been interrupted, will continue in the Church till the end of
5011.mely, sub-deacon, deacon, and priest. A state so holy requires great dispositions in
5012.t upon himself to enter. If there be no state into which ft is lawful to enter withou
5013.awful to enter without having consulted God to know whether it be one's vocation, t
5014.ing consulted God to know whether it be one's vocation, that precaution is still mo
5015.ore necessary when the question is of a state whose functions ; : '•;:?* r '4 * . ;
5016.• . ; : We ; ; !'>•* ; >i;!-, ; 280 DUTY OF THE CIIKI8TIAN " It is not you who h
5017.tering upon the eccle fruit." siastical state, is to be inspired with zeal for the gl
5018. be inspired with zeal for the glory of God, and the salvation of men wo to them wh
5019.n of men wo to them who enter thif holy state M'ith merely human motives, consulting
5020.d it, and led an edifying and blameless life. Finally, the fourth it would be a horr
5021.uld be a horridisposition is to be in a state of grace ble sacrilege to receive a sac
5022.crament so holy with a con; ! — ; ; ; science defiled by mortal sin. Example. — Do
5023.; ! — ; ; ; science defiled by mortal sin. Example. — Do you know what it is to
5024.e mention of the word ? A priest is, by virtue of his office, ; the friend, the living
5025.s, and your fatal doctrines. His entire life is but one long and heroic course of de
5026.fatal doctrines. His entire life is but one long and heroic course of devotion to t
5027.ng and heroic course of devotion to the happiness Which of you would consent to of his fe
5028.domestic joys, the pleasures, Jiiid the wealth which men seek so eagerly, for obscure
5029.rt, and revolts the senses, and make so many sacrifices to gather no other fruit tha
5030.nd make so many sacrifices to gather no other fruit than disdain, ingratitude, and in
5031.still fast asleep in your bed, when the man of charity, long before the dawn, has b
5032.t, fortified the weak, and confirmed in virtue souls whom the storm of passion had dis
5033.ut brings not repose, — •ust at the time md parties, when pleasure calls you to
5034.— •ust at the time md parties, when pleasure calls you to theatres, balls, some one
5035.sure calls you to theatres, balls, some one is hurrying for the priest a Christian
5036.a contagious malady it matters not, the good pas not suffer that soul to depart this
5037.tters not, the good pas not suffer that soul to depart this world without imparting
5038.pas not suffer that soul to depart this world without imparting relief to its anguish
5039.pe and Faith without praying beside the death-bed to the God who died for that soul,
5040.out praying beside the death-bed to the God who died for that soul, and who even th
5041. death-bed to the God who died for that soul, and who even then gives it, in the sac
5042.even then gives it, in the sacrament of love, a sure pledge of immortality. To the e
5043.the sacrament of love, a sure pledge of immortality. To the eye of faith he is more than al
5044.m, but as he really appears amongst tor will ; ; ; you. •i*!i CHAPTER world, VIII.
5045.gst tor will ; ; ; you. •i*!i CHAPTER world, VIII. ON THE SACRAMENT OF MATRIMONY. f
5046.mpanion the woman whom he had formed of one of his ribs, and by a special blessing
5047.it he has rendered it the image and the sign of a great mystery, of his intimate and
5048.an disinstituted Marriage has been when God gave to man ; ; i* positions. to sacram
5049.uted Marriage has been when God gave to man ; ; i* positions. to sacrament which gi
5050.sitions. to sacrament which gives grace man and woman. It is a certain truth that t
5051.es grace man and woman. It is a certain truth that those who contract marriage after
5052.ontract marriage after having consulted God, and with Christian intentions, receive
5053.fy the lawful companionship of t::, 282 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN m faithful fulfilment
5054.thful fulfilment of the duties of thtir state. Before de. ciding on embracing this st
5055.te. Before de. ciding on embracing this state, we sliould address our fervent prayers
5056. sliould address our fervent prayers to God that he may make known to us whothor we
5057.uld contract rashly and contrary to the will of God, an irrevo- cable engagement unb
5058.ract rashly and contrary to the will of God, an irrevo- cable engagement unblessed
5059.j)ose our salvation to imminent danger. God never fails to make known his will to t
5060.nger. God never fails to make known his will to those who invoke him with all their
5061.fair so important, on which depends our happiness for time and for eternity. There are th
5062.ant, on which depends our happiness for time and for eternity. There are three princ
5063. depends our happiness for time and for eternity. There are three principal dispo^tions
5064.h a conscience purified from all mortal sin, because matrmony, being a sacrament of
5065. from all mortal sin, because matrmony, being a sacrament of the living, the spiritua
5066. sacrament of the living, the spiritual life of grace is supposed to exist in those
5067.horts persons who would enter upon this state, to approach the holy Eucharist in orde
5068.eive it with the intention of doing the will of God, and serving him in that state.
5069.with the intention of doing the will of God, and serving him in that state. We shou
5070.he will of God, and serving him in that state. We should propose to ourselves to plea
5071.e should propose to ourselves to please God in all our actions, even the most commo
5072.ldren of saints," said the young is for life. Tobias to Sarah his wife, "and we ough
5073. to marry like the Pagans, who know not God." Let those who think them. selves call
5074.ink them. selves called to the marriage state, enter therein solely with a view to sa
5075.ceive it with modesty, decency, and the other virtues : ; suitiible to the sanctity o
5076.immodest demeanour, would be to offeiid God at the very foot of his altar, and prof
5077.ip and in perfect una : — ; t TOWARDS GOD. iiimity, 28.*^ mutually to keep the co
5078.njugal faith which thov pledged to each other hetbre (tocI's holy altar, to assist ea
5079.tbre (tocI's holy altar, to assist each other in every necessity, and finally to give
5080.ly altar, to assist each other in every necessity, and finally to give their children r C
5081.ally to give their children r Christian education, teaching thorn early to pray, to God a
5082.ation, teaching thorn early to pray, to God and piously to perform the other duties
5083.pray, to God and piously to perform the other duties of religion oftei repeating to t
5084. piously to perform the other duties of religion oftei repeating to them the maxims of t
5085. the maxims of the (xospel, giving then good example in all things, and watching ove
5086.at could lead them tc ; , c >* ?t4f-;'' evil. Example. —A young physician of Paris
5087.ces. He was introduced by a friend to a family much respected for their virtues, and h
5088.oon after to take place, when the young man called one day and asked his intended t
5089.o take place, when the young man called one day and asked his intended the doctor,
5090.ended the doctor, The nuptial mother-in-law words in private to fiir ! possible, he
5091.o see your daughter I have only had the pleasure of seeing her three or four times in co
5092.rtance to say to her." " In that case I will call her, if you desire it, and you can
5093. " In that case I will call her, if you desire it, and you can speak to her in my pres
5094.hter has never been left alone with any man." " But am not i to be her husband very
5095. very soon ? " " Then, sir, my daughter will be no longer mine to controul — —
5096.J must fulfil and Christian mother." my dutyduty of a —"Ah, madam!" exclaimed
5097.lfil and Christian mother." my dutyduty of a —"Ah, madam!" exclaimed the pru-
5098.IAN ever remained faithful to that holy religion which actuatei your estimable conduct.
5099.have called you my son. Go, pious young man, your sentiments assure me that both yo
5100.ughter shall be happy/' excellent young man did not stop there. Every day, for eigh
5101.e worthy father and mother of the young man, (both shedding tears of joy,) and the
5102.oung people ! what a le8« •on for so many parents who are either indifferent or i
5103.tranquil wsuld society b« \ W- TOWARDS GOD. 885 SECOND TREATISE. ON PRAYER. "if *
5104.ace it is an elevation of the heart and mind to God, oflToring to him our homage, an
5105.s an elevation of the heart and mind to God, oflToring to him our homage, and beggi
5106.sary for us. Prayer is an indispensable duty, and cannot be omitted without sin Jesu
5107.ble duty, and cannot be omitted without sin Jesus Christ has made it an express com
5108.yer, or rather, so to speak, his entire life was one continued prayer. Christ had ce
5109.ather, so to speak, his entire life was one continued prayer. Christ had certainly
5110. holy exercise is then of indispensable necessity and even though the Gospel did not make
5111.h the Gospel did not make it a positive law to pray, and pray without ceasing, the
5112. to pray, and pray without ceasing, the sense of our own misery would alone suffice t
5113.misery would alone suffice to prove its necessity. Do not the ever-present wants of our s
5114. ; : ; •V f : — ; :*.*... we who is DUTY OP THE uloiio CIIRl«TlA!t Is it can ro
5115.o should eiposu them to him, to make us desire with more ardour the blessings ho has i
5116.e for us, and to render us by that very desire more capable of receiving them. The des
5117.ire more capable of receiving them. The desire of the everlasting treasures is inflame
5118.ise of prayer, and tho more ardent that desire, tho more do we receive from God he giv
5119.hat desire, tho more do we receive from God he gives food to the hungry ; and sends
5120.hat they require nothing from him. Were God to grant us his favours without our ask
5121. imagine that, to fulfil this essential duty, it is sufficient to employ a few minut
5122.ew minutes, and to pass the rest of our time without thinking of God we must frequen
5123.he rest of our time without thinking of God we must frequently have recourse God ch
5124.of God we must frequently have recourse God chooses to be solito prayer, and persev
5125. incesEarthly kings do not permit every one to speak to them that is a favour which
5126.n occasions ; but it is not so with our God, who suffers us to address him at all t
5127. even offended with us. to approach its God, and creature thus it is for a vile san
5128.xAMi>LEs. — " Prayer in all tii.ii we desire? is the door by which the Lord it " If
5129.cise, I a Christian. was lost for ever. Life of St. fnema. David, although placed on
5130.ill chante'l in the Church ol ; the new law. Several great princes, such as Cii«»
5131.te under its : the influence ail of the philosophy of the eighteenth century, then in its
5132.med, before and after meals, to pray to God, thanking him for tne repast which they
5133.aken. Is it not very wrong, and, at the same time, very ridiculous of wine and poure
5134. Is it not very wrong, and, at the same time, very ridiculous of wine and poured tio
5135.so n'^tural act of gratitude ple and of religion should be regarded by peoof the great w
5136. from tmr example to be un- grateful to God, will accustom them>- elves to be the s
5137. tmr example to be un- grateful to God, will accustom them>- elves to be the sam* ow
5138. to be the sam* owards us." r.im i< 288 DUTY OF THE CHKISTIAIT ARTICLE II. ON THE EF
5139.shall ask of the Father, in my name, he will give unto you." Finallj', to dissipate
5140.he asks for bread and if he ask a fish, will he give him a serpent? If ye, then, per
5141.n, perverse as ye are, know how to give good things to your children, how much more
5142. things to your children, how much more will your heavenly father give thoni to thos
5143.hem of him." After a promise so formal, one must have lost all faith, before they c
5144.we depend on the promises of an upright man, how much more may we rely on the promi
5145., nay, the oath of Jesus Christ, who is truth itself It would be doing him an in: ; !
5146.m an in: ; ! jury to let distrust enter one's mind. Ah whence could that distrust a
5147.n: ; ! jury to let distrust enter one's mind. Ah whence could that distrust arise ?
5148.worthiness ? But is not the goodness of God purely gratuitous; and is not the very
5149. covered by never has the prayer of the sin; ner been rejected, when he humbles him
5150.ejected, when he humbles himself before God;— ascends to the throne of the Eterna
5151.d is sure to draw Jown blessings on the soul whence it arose. " Is there any one," s
5152.he soul whence it arose. " Is there any one," says the prophet, " wlio, having inhi
5153. despised? Our fathers cidled ; TOWARDS GOD. ; 2S0 in inis Upon the Lord, and they
5154.h the name of the Lord shall be saved." God honoured by this full, entire, and boun
5155.odness, it ia a Komage obtains all, for God the mountain, and the enemies of God's
5156.or God the mountain, and the enemies of God's people are defeated ; Judith pnvys, a
5157.ered the pious king Ezcchias prays, and God revokes the sentence of death which he
5158. prays, and God revokes the sentence of death which he and Jo his •an refuse fideli
5159.an prays, and her sins are remitted the good thief prays on the cross, and although
5160.d " That which excites our confidence m God, is that he hears us in all that we ask
5161.s in all that we ask conformable to his will for we know that he will hear us in all
5162.ormable to his will for we know that he will hear us in all what soever we ask of hi
5163.when we are exhortea to the practice of virtue, let us never again say that we are car
5164.carried away by our natural tendency to evil, or that we cannot resist the violence
5165.our passions. We can i»ray, and prayer will sustain our feebleness we can pray, and
5166. our feebleness we can pray, and prayer will fortify us against our evil inclination
5167. and prayer will fortify us against our evil inclinations we can pray, and prayer wi
5168.il inclinations we can pray, and prayer will moderate the violence of our We have ne
5169.er to practise passions. the lessons of wisdom: let us ask, and God will grant " If an
5170. the lessons of wisdom: let us ask, and God will grant " If any one wants wisdom,"
5171. lessons of wisdom: let us ask, and God will grant " If any one wants wisdom," says
5172.let us ask, and God will grant " If any one wants wisdom," says the us that grace.
5173., and God will grant " If any one wants wisdom," says the us that grace. St. James, "
5174.t grace. St. James, " let him ask it of God, who givoth apostle No one freely to al
5175.im ask it of God, who givoth apostle No one freely to all, and wisdom shall be give
5176.ivoth apostle No one freely to all, and wisdom shall be given him." ever fails then to
5177.m." ever fails then to obtain help from God, provided i* be asked in a fitting mann
5178.ur own it is because we do not upply to God with that confidence which wins every b
5179.ert that some manner more powerful than God himsucceeds in bending his will, and in
5180.ful than God himsucceeds in bending his will, and in making • ^ . • Mk ^^ u m$fx
5181.' • •»,? [*f-:• i-U i Ji \ 200 DUTY or THE CKKISTIATf him retract the sente
5182.sOf this we have an example gressed the law of God, and set up in the desert a gold
5183.s we have an example gressed the law of God, and set up in the desert a golden calf
5184.en calf as the object of their worship, God, ever clement, seemed to fear the effic
5185.ntion, that is to say, we must think of God, and the subject of our petition. God h
5186.f God, and the subject of our petition. God hears more willingPrayer ly the voice o
5187.at of the mouth. is an elevation of the soul to God, so that we do not pray at all,
5188.e mouth. is an elevation of the soul to God, so that we do not pray at all, when du
5189.ry, do not render the prayer faulty but God is offended by those foi which we have
5190.t the reproach of their presence. which God addressed to the Jews of old " This peo
5191.irm, since founded on the power TOWARDS GOD. Gou, 201 iio is able to do infinitely
5192.d 'generosity, and yet fail to apply tn God in even our epiritual wants, although h
5193.ites us to have recourse to Him as to a good father! Is not such distiust injurious
5194.the kindness of men compared to that of God ? Finally, we are to pray with persever
5195.nally, we are to pray with perseverance God, in his inexplicable wisdom and goodnes
5196.h perseverance God, in his inexplicable wisdom and goodness, sometimes defers granting
5197.anded by Christ and to make us feel the necessity of perseverto do so ance, he makes use
5198.a cruel judge, and forces him to do her justice; the second is that of a man, who, in t
5199.do her justice; the second is that of a man, who, in the middle of the night, goes
5200. refuses. to rise from his bed; but the other is not discouraged, and continues to kn
5201.rseverance. prayer, is perhaps the very one which God had appointed for hearing us.
5202.. prayer, is perhaps the very one which God had appointed for hearing us. Remember
5203. : ; ; was," says a pious writer, " the custom of a child of quality, to offer his hea
5204.ious writer, " the custom of a child of quality, to offer his heart to God, every morni
5205.child of quality, to offer his heart to God, every morning with much fervour, and t
5206.f all " If I I'ail," said he, " in this duty, the actions of the day. Example. —"
5207.hild, before he had completed Ms 292 *' DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ! twelfth year, died,
5208. THE CHRISTIAN ! twelfth year, died, My God " I and with sentiments of the rarest j
5209.f the rarest j;icty " he exclaimed from time to time during his lasl have made an al
5210.rest j;icty " he exclaimed from time to time during his lasl have made an almost dai
5211.daily sacrifice of my I now offer up my life as the last sacrifice I illness, heart
5212. and be exact like him in our hearts to God every morning, that we may die, as he d
5213.that we may die, as he did, an edifying death. Arviskkkt. jfferiiig can make." Let n^
5214.RTICLE fft I. ON WHAT IS TO BE ASKED OF GOD. Our Lord has himself taught us what we
5215.himself taught us what we are to beg of God, and the order in which it is to be ask
5216. his name, and to leave us an excellent form of prayer, which is thence called The L
5217.sus Christ," says St. Cyprian, "amongst other salutary advices and precepts, which he
5218.and our that prayer must be pleasing to God which comes from himself, and strikes h
5219.ediator ; he assures us that the Father will grant whatever is asked in his name; ho
5220. her oflices she fore, pray," adds this God hath directed us ; ; TOWAKUS GOD. li..t
5221.s this God hath directed us ; ; TOWAKUS GOD. li..t/-)vi(:c«'s it 293 evenin<^, Mi'
5222.sts, of which the three first relate to God, and the other four concern ourselves;
5223. the three first relate to God, and the other four concern ourselves; it contains all
5224.ll it is the rule by whick tliat ue can desire and ask of God we are to form our sentw
5225.by whick tliat ue can desire and ask of God we are to form our sentwnents and our d
5226. ue can desire and ask of God we are to form our sentwnents and our desires. VVo may
5227.desires. VVo may,' indeed, ntaUe use of other words in our prayers, but we are to ask
5228.r prayers, but we are to ask nothing of God save what is contained in this model an
5229.nsists of these words " Our Father, who art in Iicai:('n,'l Jesus Christ has thrown
5230.ds all that is most capable of engaging God to hear us, and of inspiring within our
5231. sentiments of respect, confidence, and love call God our Father, for so has Christ
5232.s of respect, confidence, and love call God our Father, for so has Christ instructe
5233.Father, for so has Christ instructed us God is indeed our father by creation, since
5234. creation, since He has to do. given us life, and formed us to his own image he is s
5235.der," says the Apostle St. John, " what love the Father has had for us, since he wou
5236.en, and really be so!" adds St. Paul, " God has sent into your hearts the spirit of
5237.- We ; My of sweetness and delight what love, wha'. gratitude, and what confidence s
5238.excite in your heart If it be true that God is your Father, can you fear that your
5239.r Father, can you fear that your prayer will be rejected when you remind him of a na
5240.im of a name by full ! ! which he takes pleasure in hearing us address him ? What does H
5241.se.f unworthy to be called die child of God that alone can obstruct tht How of his
5242.her," and not My Bays, wlien addressing God Father, because having all the same fat
5243.sing God Father, because having all the same father, and expecting ; : .C4 294 DUTY
5244. same father, and expecting ; : .C4 294 DUTY OF THB CHRISTIAN m from him the same in
5245.94 DUTY OF THB CHRISTIAN m from him the same inheritance, we are not only to pray fo
5246.rch, whose members we are. We add " Wha art in heaven" for although God is every wh
5247.e add " Wha art in heaven" for although God is every where in his immensity, we nev
5248.d excite in our hearts the hope and the desire of possessing God. after having " It is
5249.s the hope and the desire of possessing God. after having " It is now," said St. Fr
5250. ! : Examples. — * Our Father, is who art in heaven.' Oh how noble God is his Fat
5251.er, is who art in heaven.' Oh how noble God is his Father the state and quality of
5252.en.' Oh how noble God is his Father the state and quality of a Christian ! A certain
5253.w noble God is his Father the state and quality of a Christian ! A certain young shephe
5254.an ! A certain young shepherd had got a habit of praying Being asked if he did not so
5255.ung shepherd had got a habit of praying Being asked if he did not somewhile he tended
5256.ailing source of consoling thoughts and good sentiments, so that at times it took hi
5257.epetition of that pi-uyor for so long a time, would certamly do him harm. He replied
5258. on the con« trary, I feel it doing me good." Lasaussk. ::.v\' TOWARDS GOD. 295 I A
5259.oing me good." Lasaussk. ::.v\' TOWARDS GOD. 295 I ARTICLE II. HALLOWED BE THY NAME
5260.AME. ' It is very proper that our first desire and our firs petition Bhould have the g
5261. firs petition Bhould have the glory of God for their object^ If we are liis childr
5262.ay, honoured and glorified. The name of God is of itself holy, and can acquire no n
5263.by these words is that the holy name of God may 4 I J*>- We 1. .J. i ; ])e known, p
5264.es, infidel nations who know nothing of God we pray him to draw them forth from the
5265.eir errors, that they may recognize the truth, and that they may return to the bosom
5266.ere are bad Christians who do not serve God, but outrage him by their sins, profani
5267.e we pray that they may be converted to God by sincere repentance, and that.they ma
5268.en, begin to glorify him by an edifying life. for the just, who already honoui- the
5269.e just, who already honoui- the name of God by their virtues, to the end that they
5270.than to the end in righteousness all to desire is, that ourselves may hallow the name
5271., that ourselves may hallow the name of God, by consecrating our entire life to glo
5272.name of God, by consecrating our entire life to glorify him and cause him hallow the
5273.ting our entire life to glorify him and cause him hallow the name of God by to be glo
5274.fy him and cause him hallow the name of God by to be glorified by others. our thoug
5275.he divine Majesty, in never thinking of God nor of the things of God but with profo
5276.er thinking of God nor of the things of God but with profound respect and religious
5277.ous veneration. We sanctify the name of God by our words, in never speak; ; ; ; We
5278.peak; ; ; ; We DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN U)g of Him but with a
5279.y awe and fear. in leading an exemplary life, whereby we incite others to should, th
5280.thers to should, therefore, when praise God and serve him. Hallowed he thy name hav
5281.me have a sinrepeating these words cere desire of promoting the glory of God as much a
5282.s cere desire of promoting the glory of God as much as we possibly can of inducing
5283.hem by our discourse and example with a love of virtue, and a taste for piety. Witho
5284.ur discourse and example with a love of virtue, and a taste for piety. Without this de
5285.ue, and a taste for piety. Without this desire, our heart would belie our mouth, and o
5286. witness against us, since wo would not desire that which we appeared to ask. How woul
5287.k. How would it be if, while begging of God mat his name may be hallowed, we were o
5288.rain from bless of his father ; all his pleasure is in hearing him praised ; as to see h
5289. or spurned would give him the greatest pain. It is thus that a Christian should act
5290.hus that a Christian should act towards God ; his heart is animated with zeal for t
5291.hemy of the impious horror. freezes his soul with ARTICLE lA III. THY KINGDOM COME.
5292.which we ought to co-operate, and which God makes depend on our consent; ; — a ki
5293.r consent; ; — a kingdom, wherein the soul, anticipated and asby grace, obeys volu
5294.y and willingly all the inspirations of God, conforms itself in all things and with
5295.re* spiritual sisted •'H serve to his good pleasure, executes all his orders with
5296.piritual sisted •'H serve to his good pleasure, executes all his orders with fidelity,
5297.ll his orders with fidelity, and has no other rule of action than his law and his div
5298.nd has no other rule of action than his law and his divine commandments a reign in
5299.n in M'hich the heart — ^^m . TOWARDS GOD. fftves itself *jsn .*4*>V: ri, up to G
5300.D. fftves itself *jsn .*4*>V: ri, up to God, that he may possess it wholly, thai it
5301.nt. Such is the kingdom which we beg of God to establish vvitliin ue. There is a ki
5302.n ue. There is a kingdom of glory where God has prepared for his elect an immortal
5303. and ever. This is the kingdom which we desire to see. What we ask, then, is that God
5304.sire to see. What we ask, then, is that God may reign for the future over our heart
5305.ver our hearts by grace, so that we may one day reign with him in his glory. In mak
5306.ng this petition, we ought sinceiely to desire that the reign of sin, the dominion of
5307.t sinceiely to desire that the reign of sin, the dominion of the passions may be de
5308.ay be destroyed within us, and that our mind, heart, and body may be submissive to G
5309.d, heart, and body may be submissive to God, so that He may be our sovereign and on
5310. governed by bad habits and enslaved by vice, we must bewail that unhappy servitude,
5311. bewail that unhappy servitude, we must desire tc> break our bonds asunder, and enter
5312.k our bonds asunder, and enter into the liberty of the children of God we must elevate
5313.ter into the liberty of the children of God we must elevate our thoughts and our de
5314. ,'** - .k .« * * Ml ; ; troubles. The life of man so short in its duration, is fil
5315..k .« * * Ml ; ; troubles. The life of man so short in its duration, is filled «
5316.rt in its duration, is filled « . with many life, ive IS an- How are destined for l
5317. its duration, is filled « . with many life, ive IS an- How are destined for life e
5318.y life, ive IS an- How are destined for life eternal ? can we apprehend the separati
5319.ble body, which prevents us from seeing God, and from What greatei joining the soci
5320.ing the society of the blessed spirits? good could happen to us than to quit this ea
5321. who 1^'' »' t,f fc ' -'I *- If"':': > world wherein we are exposed to so many dange
5322.': > world wherein we are exposed to so many dangers, where we are surrounded b^ bna
5323.es, and at every moment run the risk of being lost A good Christian has ever before h
5324.ery moment run the risk of being lost A good Christian has ever before his eyes the
5325. a traveller here below he is already a citizen of heaven through ihe liveUnost sitting
5326.. \ '.'. . : *•;•• mm -d 296 Ion, DUTY OF THB CHRISTIAN he bitterly weeps over
5327.s to that holy mountain, the dwelhng of peace, the lot of his inheritance, where Chri
5328.y happy. ; Example. —" The ?088 of my wealth is of small conse* ; quence to me," sai
5329.o take pos; session of it." ARTICLE THY WILL BE DONE ON EARTH IV. AS IT IS IN HEAVEN
5330.ch is to be our portion, we must do his will. Our Lord himself " Not every one who s
5331. his will. Our Lord himself " Not every one who saith to me tells us so, in the gos
5332.the kingdom of heaven, bat : who do the will of my Father." There is in God a which
5333. do the will of my Father." There is in God a which is the rule of our duties, by w
5334.ule of our duties, by which He commands good, and forbids evil it was this will that
5335. by which He commands good, and forbids evil it was this will that the ProI^et desir
5336.ands good, and forbids evil it was this will that the ProI^et desired to execute whe
5337.cute when he said " Teach me to do tliy will, make me walk in the way of thy command
5338.of thy commandments, give to my heart a love for thy holy ordinances." This they wil
5339.ove for thy holy ordinances." This they will : : divine will is manifested to us in
5340. ordinances." This they will : : divine will is manifested to us in the commandments
5341.ns of our superiors. Thus, in saying to God Thy will he done on earth as it is in h
5342.r superiors. Thus, in saying to God Thy will he done on earth as it is in heaven, we
5343.ven, we ask of him grace to observe his Law, to obey the Church and all who are pla
5344.urch and all who are placed over us; we desire that our obedience may be as perfect as
5345.he blest in heaven. In heaven, all obey God, with promptness, with punctuality, and
5346.tongue it would be to .speak falsely to God if WB asked of him with our lips that w
5347.s that which the heart does notdesica : God and ; I. TOWARDS GOD. There life : 599
5348.t does notdesica : God and ; I. TOWARDS GOD. There life : 599 .11 . God which is th
5349.esica : God and ; I. TOWARDS GOD. There life : 599 .11 . God which is the cause of t
5350. I. TOWARDS GOD. There life : 599 .11 . God which is the cause of the cvonta happen
5351.There life : 599 .11 . God which is the cause of the cvonta happens in the world is r
5352. the cause of the cvonta happens in the world is regulated hy the will of God, and it
5353.appens in the world is regulated hy the will of God, and it depends not on us cither
5354.n the world is regulated hy the will of God, and it depends not on us cither to arr
5355.er to arrest or delay their course; our duty with rv'gard to this di'i will IS to ad
5356.rse; our duty with rv'gard to this di'i will IS to adore it, to submit to it, to acc
5357.er, the rtrokes it may intlicl upon us. God permits these evils to befall us becaus
5358.ave us, and that they may li"lp to is a will of that •i'i.vf of all .> ; Hence it
5359.n kindness than in punishes us in tliis life, which m.i le the Apostle say that he c
5360.hy his father ?'* What we ask, then, of God by the words, thy will he done, is that
5361. we ask, then, of God by the words, thy will he done, is that we may endure with ent
5362.signed, and perfectly conformed both in mind and heart to the decrees of We, therefo
5363. Providence. well by renouncing our own will, or endeavouring to renounce it; nothin
5364.g is, in fact, more advantageous for us Man has than to subject ourselves to the wi
5365.an has than to subject ourselves to the will of God. fallen solely by preferring his
5366.han to subject ourselves to the will of God. fallen solely by preferring his own wi
5367.od. fallen solely by preferring his own will to that of God, and be can only be save
5368.y by preferring his own will to that of God, and be can only be saved by preferring
5369. only be saved by preferring the divine will to his own. " Take away self-will," sai
5370.ivine will to his own. " Take away self-will," said St. Bernard, " and Our Lord has
5371." and Our Lord has set us the examthere will be no more hell." " I came ple of this
5372.e ple of this perfect conformity to the will of God expiate our sins. justice that G
5373. this perfect conformity to the will of God expiate our sins. justice that God ; ;
5374.ty to the will of God expiate our sins. justice that God ; ; : into the world," says wi
5375.l of God expiate our sins. justice that God ; ; : into the world," says will of my
5376.r sins. justice that God ; ; : into the world," says will of my Father ;" He, " not t
5377.ce that God ; ; : into the world," says will of my Father ;" He, " not to do my own
5378. of my Father ;" He, " not to do my own will, but the and again, " my meat is to do
5379.t the and again, " my meat is to do the will of Him who : Kanour was I'ather l'» In
5380.our was I'ather l'» In fact the entire life of our }>iessed sent me." but the exact
5381.aths, it was because he would have liie will of his Father accornplished, rather tha
5382.n. ; ft- f .:;* J*' 1% I 4" 31K) \']\.% DUTY OF THE CIIHIHTIAN ni'LE. * —" Obey th
5383.F THE CIIHIHTIAN ni'LE. * —" Obey the will woiM! said pajr.'iu " ol)oy, or we beas
5384. up to the flar.ies, to the also have a Law," ro.Oied thu generous the coniliata'ts
5385. coniliata'ts for the faith, " and that law is the will of God; it forhids us to ad
5386.ts for the faith, " and that law is the will of God; it forhids us to adore idols, a
5387.he faith, " and that law is the will of God; it forhids us to adore idols, and decr
5388.fae in the faith, US the riches of this world ; them wo our duties. obey, but seek on
5389.eavenly Father all that body and of the soul. to the ^lory is necessary for the dail
5390.to the ^lory is necessary for the daily life of the God is the sourre of all good, a
5391. is necessary for the daily life of the God is the sourre of all good, and it is He
5392.ly life of the God is the sourre of all good, and it is He who provides for all our
5393. for all our wants both in the order of nature and in that of grace. are all before hi
5394.eatures," says the prophet, speaking of God, " all creatures expect We Wm from you
5395.at all they possess is from the hand of God, that they hold it from his liberality,
5396.for them. Let us observe that we ask of God, not super: fluous riches, not the our
5397.for our sub w-.tci-je, according to our state again, wo are only to ask It fr> "' •
5398.ry day we should have re course to him, being well assured that we shall every day fi
5399.ured that we shall every day find him a good father, ever disposed to grant to his c
5400. drink pride, • ; ; • : : ' TOWARDS GOD ing for the support of your life, 801 b
5401.TOWARDS GOD ing for the support of your life, 801 body; your need of all rfitht^r wh
5402.Hav no «are for the morrow: in lieaven evil tliereoi." day .s Thi. oiifidouoe in Pr
5403.ev* make us idit and prdBumptuous; (rod will not favour tht* dolent; but vsill!! tha
5404.r the wants of the body. We have also a soul which requires >irituai nourishment, su
5405. i .» ' ' I ' ; 1 i I iy' bread of the soul that we chiefly ask in this prayer. The
5406.fly ask in this prayer. The food of our soul is the woi d of God, his divine grace,
5407.r. The food of our soul is the woi d of God, his divine grace, and the holy Euchari
5408.ce, and the holy Eucharist. The word of God nourishes our soul streifgthons tlw it
5409.ucharist. The word of God nourishes our soul streifgthons tlw it heals sinners just
5410. sinners just and makes them advance in virtue and leads them back to the life of gr i
5411.ce in virtue and leads them back to the life of gr ice it is the usual and it is thi
5412.ual and it is this ; ; ; means of which God makes use to infuse in >t the soul and
5413.which God makes use to infuse in >t the soul and increase therein the knowledge and
5414.in >t the soul and increase therein the knowledge and the lov of tiie truths of salvation
5415.ith respect, with attention, and with a desire to profit by it. Grace is as necessary
5416.it by it. Grace is as necessary for the life of the sou as material upports the bi'e
5417.dy it is grace that we have, therefore, soul, strengthens it, and makes it act God w
5418. soul, strengthens it, and makes it act God wills that we should ask it, and contin
5419., the holy Eucharist is the food of our soul, as Jesus Christ assures us " Verily, v
5420., if ye eat not the flesh of the Son of man, and drink not hia I am the living brea
5421.e living bread blood, you shall have no life in you which came down from heaven he w
5422.st Christians received daily ahall have life eternal." this celestial bread, and it
5423.o be wished that we might ; ; : word of God ,, * v,-t ; ; da as they did, because t
5424. * v,-t ; ; da as they did, because the soul faints away and dies when but as the he
5425.ve the holy Eucharist, when we b«'g of God to give us daily the bread of life, we
5426.'g of God to give us daily the bread of life, we ask *' * - i 802 of DUTY OF piofit.
5427.e bread of life, we ask *' * - i 802 of DUTY OF piofit. THJB CHBISTIAIf Him that pur
5428.d lead me to deneither give me abundant wealth, lest, that being spair puffed up with
5429.her give me abundant wealth, lest, that being spair puffed up with pride, I might fan
5430.ay continually give praise to thee, who art the Lord Diy God! Example. — ! ; ! AR
5431.ve praise to thee, who art the Lord Diy God! Example. — ! ; ! ARTICLE A VI. ^ FOR
5432.E FORGIVE THEM WHO TRESPASS AGAINST US. God so good, a Father so tender should ever
5433.VE THEM WHO TRESPASS AGAINST US. God so good, a Father so tender should ever find in
5434.children a perfect docility to his holy Law, together with a constant and inviolabl
5435.uct of men should be such towards their God. But they offend him every day the grea
5436.t indeed commit those crimes which give death to the but they do every day Boul and s
5437. do every day Boul and separate it from God " There is no man free from things whic
5438. and separate it from God " There is no man free from things which displease him. a
5439.ease him. and if we say that we have no sin, we are liars, and sin These are the wo
5440. that we have no sin, we are liars, and sin These are the words of the Aposthe trut
5441. sin These are the words of the Aposthe truth is not in us." Hence it is that our div
5442.owing tie St. John. the weakness of our nature, has made it a duty foi- us tc just tha
5443.e weakness of our nature, has made it a duty foi- us tc just than that the sentiment
5444.at the sentiments : ; ; ; ask pardon of God every day, for our offences. He ha^ onl
5445.e by repenting of our sins, for it is a principle in religion, that without contrition, n
5446.g of our sins, for it is a principle in religion, that without contrition, no sin, wheth
5447.n religion, that without contrition, no sin, whether mortal or ; ^•^^v x* TOWABDS
5448.WABDS 60D. renial, 308 can be remitted. God only pardons those who are : 4 sorry fo
5449.o him " Forgive its contrary, ask it of God. mir trespasses, we beg of him the grac
5450.disposition we are sure of our sins. of being favourably heard, and of attaining to a
5451. reconciliation with HEM WHO be just to desire that God should remit our offences, whi
5452.ion with HEM WHO be just to desire that God should remit our offences, whilst we pa
5453.? Would it be reasonable to expect that God would be indulgent towards us, and forg
5454.received from them. We every day say to God Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive
5455.re, the measure of that which we ask of God for our own faults ; if we forgive our
5456.n faults ; if we forgive our neighbour, God will forgive us if we refuse to pardon
5457.ults ; if we forgive our neighbour, God will forgive us if we refuse to pardon other
5458. if we refuse to pardon others, so also will God refuse to pardon us. To make this r
5459.e refuse to pardon others, so also will God refuse to pardon us. To make this reque
5460.ve offended us, is as much as to say to God " Do not forgive me, because I will not
5461.y to God " Do not forgive me, because I will not forgive those who have annoyed me r
5462.ed me revenge yourself on me, because I will be revenged on them." This would be pro
5463.tment which we give to others. it : ; : God. But would '%- •*.. Example. — St.
5464.as just about As it was usual for every one present to reto celebrate. cite the Lor
5465.ite the Lord's prayer, the saint made a sign to the person terving mass, to stop at
5466.your nesd : own sentence ; you asked of God not to forgive you, since ' t: ^1 ".-:
5467.' t: ^1 ".-:•: aM you do not all that DUTY OF ! 'X 'E CHBIBTIAN forgive The noblem
5468.EMPTATION. not enough that the mercy of God forgives us those we have already commi
5469.g again. We are every moment exposed to sin by reason of the many temptations which
5470. moment exposed to sin by reason of the many temptations which assail us, and hence
5471.ence it is that we implore the mercy of God, saying to him " Lead us not into tempt
5472.rwise give us grace to surmount it. The world, the devil, and our own concupiscence c
5473.cence conspire for our destruction. The world tempts us by its bad example, by its di
5474.ils us by impressing our senses and our imagination with images which suggest to us bad tho
5475.es which suggest to us bad thoughts and evil desires. There is no stratagem which he
5476.ence, that is to say the inclination to evil which is born with us, is ever promptin
5477.s born with us, is ever prompting us to sin it follows us everywhere it is with us
5478.ike a domestic enemy, and furnishes the world and the devil with arms to use against
5479. with advantage. To be tempted is not a sin, but is often, on the contrary, an occa
5480. resistance we oppose to it but it is a sin to consent to the temptation. If, by th
5481.emptation. If, by the fear of offending God, we repress the first movements which a
5482. we constantly refuse to consent to the evil thing, there is no sin ; that resistanc
5483. consent to the evil thing, there is no sin ; that resistance is even an act of vir
5484.sin ; that resistance is even an act of virtue which God will one day reward but if we
5485.sistance is even an act of virtue which God will one day reward but if we dwell on
5486.ance is even an act of virtue which God will one day reward but if we dwell on it wi
5487.is even an act of virtue which God will one day reward but if we dwell on it with c
5488.ence is obAlthough served, then it is a sin, and we become guilty. the temptation i
5489. guilty. the temptation is in itself no sin, yet it is always attended with danger.
5490.ith danger. Nevertheless, we ask not of God to be freed from all temptation it is i
5491.all temptation it is inevitable in this life, which is a ness, he ; ; ; ; ; ; ; TOWA
5492.ich is a ness, he ; ; ; ; ; ; ; TOWARDS GOD. : doa •"V '* th these eoB tinual war
5493. and senses •ource is in the grace of God let us then beg of him to spare us thos
5494. come otr victorious. and protection of God he is powerful enough to bring us safe
5495.n make them profitable unto us. This he will do if we watch over ourselves so as not
5496. cannot avoid; then we fight not alone; God himself " God is fights on our side, an
5497. then we fight not alone; God himself " God is fights on our side, and our victory
5498.ure. faithfui." says St. Paul, " and he will not suffer you to be ; n We ; f irse, i
5499.n tempted beyond your strength ; but he will enable you to derive advantage even fro
5500.on, to the end that you may persevere." God*s word can never fail he has promised t
5501.protect those who invoke his name. They will be attacked, but nothing shall have pow
5502.ng shall have power to hurt them whilst God is their refuge he will bring them vict
5503.hurt them whilst God is their refuge he will bring them victorious from the struggle
5504.struggle temptation ; ; every. urnishes will serve to perfect and to confirm their v
5505.l serve to perfect and to confirm their virtue, so that they may persevere even to the
5506.very you do not prevent -p t I'M' me, 1 will make it much larger by my unfaithfulnes
5507.ot a if moment I to myself, oh 3fuse to other saint, " for you do perish." — Lord !
5508.o devil suggested to thee.'* !* i": \ c DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAJf ARTICLE We finish thi
5509.CHRISTIAJf ARTICLE We finish this VIII. EVIL. BUT DELIVER US FROM deliver us God tha
5510.I. EVIL. BUT DELIVER US FROM deliver us God that ho jnay that is to say, from the m
5511. from eternal prayer by begging of from evil, damnation. life ! To how many ; evils
5512.yer by begging of from evil, damnation. life ! To how many ; evils are we not expose
5513. of from evil, damnation. life ! To how many ; evils are we not exposed ! ia this Wi
5514.bitterness is it not filled Disease and pain besiege our body trouble and anxiety, a
5515., and grief attack our spul. It is with truth that the Church calls this we live a va
5516. a privilege belongs not to our present state what we ask is, that we may be delivere
5517.d from what would be to us occasions of sin, and prejudicial to our salvation. Ther
5518. with our justification in the sight of God. If infirmities, indigence, and calamit
5519.it can only be because they disturb the soul, exposing it to impatience, murmuring a
5520. despair because we hive not sufficient virtue to support them without sin but those i
5521.fficient virtue to support them without sin but those ills which we bear patiently,
5522. ills which we bear patiently, far from being prejudicial to us, only serve to purify
5523.er of Providence, the chastise- ment of sin, and the means of obtaining eternal hap
5524.sin, and the means of obtaining eternal happiness. ** He must pass," says the apostle, "
5525.must pass," says the apostle, " through many tribulations and sufferings, in order t
5526.eaven." are permitted, nevertheless, to desire and to ask to be delivered from these e
5527.n a spirit of entire resignation to the will of God, and that we be disposed to btar
5528.it of entire resignation to the will of God, and that we be disposed to btar them w
5529.isposed to btar them with submission if God considers them necessary and useful for
5530.he true remedy for our misfortunes, and God will hear our prayers, either deliverin
5531.rue remedy for our misfortunes, and God will hear our prayers, either delivering us,
5532.om the enemies of our salvation, and in particular from tlie devil, who is our most cruel
5533.devil, who is our most cruel We TOWARDS GOD. csnemy. 307 That spirit of darkness, n
5534. deluge of misery, never ceases to make war upon us, aiid lay snares for our destru
5535.iid lay snares for our destruction; but God restrains his fury, and prescribes to h
5536.nds which he may not Finally, we ask of God that He may deliver us from pass. everl
5537.byss of wretchedness, in that miserable eternity that there is no more asking to be deli
5538.sking to be delivered there the unhappy soul has to endure for ever and ever the ful
5539.no more redemption to hope for, no more happiness to expect, no more salvation to seek, b
5540.rayer regularly, whilst we still have a chance of bemg heard and saved. ; ! jij«*.'-'
5541.l, archbishop of Cesarea, than commit a sin by obeying the commands of the emperor
5542.r the Catholics, constantly opposed his will. ordered the prefect Modestus to threat
5543.property, with banishment, torments and death, if he still refused to obey. Basil sai
5544.ks and the rags which cover me. whither will you banish me ? Heaven alone is my coun
5545. torments which you may inflict upon me will not be of long duration, for I am very
5546.m very weak, and I If shall esteem it a happiness to suffer for Christ's sake. you think
5547.to intimidate me by threatening me with death, know that I will receive it as a great
5548. threatening me with death, know that I will receive it as a great favour. To suffer
5549.r. To suffer all and to die rather than sin." The prefect to lose all went to make
5550.— : We are overcome ; Basil fears but one thing, and that is sin." Ecclesiastical
5551. Basil fears but one thing, and that is sin." Ecclesiastical History, i"- *k 908 DU
5552.thing, and that is sin." Ecclesiastical History, i"- *k 908 DUTY OF THE CIIBISTXAIT CHA
5553.in." Ecclesiastical History, i"- *k 908 DUTY OF THE CIIBISTXAIT CHAPTER On After God
5554.UTY OF THE CIIBISTXAIT CHAPTER On After God, is III. OF TIIK ANGELICAL SALUTATION.
5555.omage and the Blessed Virgin, Mother of God she was chosen before all ages to be th
5556.ges to be the living tennple of eternal wisdom, and the glorious instrument of the sal
5557. of the salvation of men. By her august quality of Mother of God she is elevated above
5558.men. By her august quality of Mother of God she is elevated above all saints and an
5559.inct from that which she renders to any other saint Endowed, from her very conception
5560.tues, and the holiest of all creatures; being exempt by a special Full of tenderness
5561.rness she is, and prerogative, from all sin. her heart is the heart of a mother ; w
5562.. " Never," says St. Bernard, " has any one invoked her without feeling the efl^*»
5563. whose weakness she knows she knows the many dangers she sees how they are attacked
5564.dangers ; ; ; of that age. To qrote but one, it was through the assistance of this
5565. a moment from a dangeious 'f Tc'-vards god. 309 temptation by which he had leen lo
5566.er her power has no bounds, because the love ol Christ for his mother is infinite. H
5567. the tenderest of mothers he shares, if one may say so, his authority with her, and
5568. graces he bestows on men and it is hib will that we should address ourselves to her
5569.in danger if any dark cloud oppress our mind, or any passion agitate our heart, in o
5570., and more especially in our hearts she will console us, she will dissipate our doub
5571. in our hearts she will console us, she will dissipate our doubts, she will calm our
5572. us, she will dissipate our doubts, she will calm our agitation, and sustain our wea
5573.ustain our weakness. If we are just she will confirm us in virtue, If we she will ma
5574.. If we are just she will confirm us in virtue, If we she will make us persevere and g
5575.he will confirm us in virtue, If we she will make us persevere and grow in justice.
5576. she will make us persevere and grow in justice. have had the misfortune to fall into a
5577.ave had the misfortune to fall into any sin, let us quickly have recourse to that M
5578.he is the refuge Let us of sinners, and will reconcile us with her Son. pray her to
5579. the grace of a sincere conversion. She will ask and obtain for us that powerful aid
5580.d obtain for us that powerful aid which will bring us forth from the slavery of the
5581. aid which will bring us forth from the slavery of the devil and restore us : ; We 'i*:
5582.I V 't... ; -ffh : to the Btate sweet liberty of the children of God. In whatever pla
5583. Btate sweet liberty of the children of God. In whatever placed, let us consider th
5584.er true children, and she v/ill — 810 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN PrHyer. Th.5 prayer, s
5585.ding gin us of her great influence with God, and of her great kindThis prayc- is ca
5586.e it commences with the words which the Angel Gabriel addressed to the Blessed Virgin
5587.e blessed These last words were shortly art thou amongst women." after repeated 6y
5588.ded the words ceived from the Mother of God " 4nd blessed is the fruit of thy womb.
5589.d .by the Church " Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us, sinners, now and at the h
5590. reciting this prayer, we ought to have death. the intention of thanking (rod for the
5591.throughout all nations. Mary, Mother of God, you behold our miseries, you are sensi
5592.purity. Pray for "as at the hour of our death. We are your children redouble your ten
5593.s for us, in that terrible passage from time to eternity, and strengthen us .igainst
5594., in that terrible passage from time to eternity, and strengthen us .igainst the support
5595.uggle ; ; ; T0WARU8 OOD. 811 terrors of death; grant that kq may expire while propres
5596.yourself at the throne of your Son, who will then bo our judge, and obtain for us a
5597.eeling down fulfilled that self-imposed duty. On one occasion Beau-Sejour was on the
5598.wn fulfilled that self-imposed duty. On one occasion Beau-Sejour was on the battle-
5599. hir accustomed prayers, and making the sign of the ci'oss, he ig'dn. His comrades,
5600.es, on either side, seeing him make the sign of the cross, and perceiving that he wa
5601., stood alone of all the front rank not one escaped but he. He saw extended at his
5602. who had him and mocked his devotion. war was ended he received his discharge, an
5603.eternal monument power of the Mother of God, since it is to her that tendoiM is ind
5604.er of the ChrisChris- Selim, of the S12 DUTY OP THE CIIHI8TIAW f. Island of Cyprus,
5605.ope Pius V., Philip II., king of Spain, world. and the Venetians, had joined their fo
5606.rough the intercession of the Mother of God. Don Juan of Austria, the general-in-ch
5607.d lost in in the inorning thousand men, one hundred and sixteen pieces of large can
5608.d sixteen pieces of large cannon, Avith one hundred and fifty culverins one hundred
5609., Avith one hundred and fifty culverins one hundred and eighty galleys and seventy
5610.rst Sunday of October. ; Ecclesiastical History. In the year 1683, the Turks, proud of
5611.ch city they intended to besiege. Every one fled at their approach, and the Emperor
5612.ly quitted his* capital. He went out by one gate just as the barbarians entered by
5613.iti. rapidity. To crown the misfortune, one of the M^4 TOWARDS nOD. fire, and the c
5614.y, continually and confidently invoked, will never abandon those who throw themselve
5615.the fire suddenly stopped, and hope and courage revived in hearts that wero before hope
5616. obtained by confiding in the Mother of God! On the feast of the Nativity, the citi
5617.f the Sovereign Pontiff", a solemn and, being filled with a holy ardour, and with reb
5618.he powerful protection of the Mother of God !" Soon did the little army behold, spr
5619.h fear, and instantly acknowledged that God alone could give them a victory but tho
5620.d : ; — ; ; 27 914 Tartnry, terrified DUTY OP by the TIIR rilRISTIATV cl.arge of t
5621.Latin the head of the shall conquer." : God and holding a scroll where" By this ima
5622.ourse to Queen of Heaven Ecclesiastical History. CHAPTER It life, IV. LIFE. ON THE HAPP
5623.aven Ecclesiastical History. CHAPTER It life, IV. LIFE. ON THE HAPPINESS OF A CHRIST
5624.siastical History. CHAPTER It life, IV. LIFE. ON THE HAPPINESS OF A CHRISTIAN is but
5625.tory. CHAPTER It life, IV. LIFE. ON THE HAPPINESS OF A CHRISTIAN is but too common to for
5626.ESS OF A CHRISTIAN is but too common to form a false idea of the Christian and to re
5627.STIAN is but too common to form a false idea of the Christian and to regard it as gl
5628.his so widelydiffused prejudice against virtue and piety. It is important, dear childr
5629. iniportant to convince yourselves that happiness is the lot of virtue if you doubt it, h
5630.yourselves that happiness is the lot of virtue if you doubt it, hearken to the Holy Gh
5631.sand places of the Holy Scripture, that justice, which signifies the exact fulfilment o
5632.h signifies the exact fulfilment of the law of (iod, is ever accompanied by peace o
5633.the law of (iod, is ever accompanied by peace of mind and soul, and by that delicious
5634.f (iod, is ever accompanied by peace of mind and soul, and by that delicious leeling
5635.s ever accompanied by peace of mind and soul, and by that delicious leeling which ar
5636.t delicious leeling which arises from a good conscience and consequently, that virtu
5637. good conscience and consequently, that virtue, and virtue alone, renders man truly ha
5638.ence and consequently, that virtue, and virtue alone, renders man truly happy. Every w
5639. that virtue, and virtue alone, renders man truly happy. Every where that He speaks
5640. He speaks of fidelity in observing the law of G od, He speaks also of peace ror, o
5641.ving the law of G od, He speaks also of peace ror, or to get rid of ; ; tI ». Hiv ;
5642.y shall ho to tliee a source of joy and peace he who observes the law of the Lord sha
5643.ce of joy and peace he who observes the law of the Lord shall make his dwelling in
5644. of the Lord shall make his dwelling in peace." (l*rov. 13.) Observe that he does not
5645.hat he does not only say, he shall find peace, he shall enjoy peace, but he shall mak
5646.ay, he shall find peace, he shall enjoy peace, but he shall make his dwelling in peac
5647.eace, but he shall make his dwelling in peace ho shall abide in it he shall be, as it
5648.it were, surrounded by the blessings of peace and that peace shall be profound and ab
5649.nded by the blessings of peace and that peace shall be profound and abillt^dant, for
5650.iat solid, and lasting, and ! heartfelt pleasure, v/hich is tasted he then whose delight
5651.n light, and that they who bear it find peace of mind. It is then a truth founded on
5652.and that they who bear it find peace of mind. It is then a truth founded on the word
5653.ear it find peace of mind. It is then a truth founded on the word of God, that a Chri
5654. is then a truth founded on the word of God, that a Christian life is a happy life,
5655.ed on the word of God, that a Christian life is a happy life, and that true happines
5656.f God, that a Christian life is a happy life, and that true happiness is only to be
5657.ian life is a happy life, and that true happiness is only to be found in the exact fulfil
5658.be found in the exact fulfilment of the law of God. This truth is also confirmed by
5659.d in the exact fulfilment of the law of God. This truth is also confirmed by experi
5660.xact fulfilment of the law of God. This truth is also confirmed by experience. I am a
5661.of God. This truth is also confirmed by experience. I am about to cite for you a witness,
5662.ations, only by the just. Happy laws of God — is — of a sinner and that of the
5663.ersion he had led a sensual and worldly life, and had passed many years in utter for
5664.ensual and worldly life, and had passed many years in utter forgetfulness of God, an
5665.ed many years in utter forgetfulness of God, and in the indulgence of his passions.
5666.f his passions. Recalled, at length, to virtue, hear what he says in the Book of his C
5667.s in the Book of his Con fessions: " My God, thou hast broken my bonds ; may niy th
5668.thou hast broken my bonds ; may niy the life heart and given my tongue praise thee f
5669.sweet yoke, and the light burden of thy law. How much sweetness and pleasure have W
5670.rden of thy law. How much sweetness and pleasure have What I found in renouncing the vai
5671.in renouncing the vain pleasures of the world joy have I felt in giving up what I had
5672. I had most feared to lose For thou who art the oidy true pleasure capable of filli
5673. to lose For thou who art the oidy true pleasure capable of filling a Boul, in withdrawi
5674.nd take their place vereign delight, my mind was already freed from the pierome ! ;
5675.om the pierome ! ; ! hi - f^'t I, I 816 DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN ing anguish arising fr
5676.arising from ambition, avarice, and the desire of plunging into the filtliy pleasures
5677. sweets of conversing with thee, oh, my God ! who see, art my light, my treasure, l
5678.ersing with thee, oh, my God ! who see, art my light, my treasure, life and my salv
5679.d ! who see, art my light, my treasure, life and my salvation." of sin and disorder
5680.my treasure, life and my salvation." of sin and disorder is a hard bondage, wherein
5681.and disorder is a hard bondage, wherein one is torn by continual uneasiness; a virt
5682.orn by continual uneasiness; a virtuous life, on the contrary, is a life of sweetnes
5683. a virtuous life, on the contrary, is a life of sweetness, and full of consolation.
5684. that a You my the sacrifices made to a soul that has tasted God are well repaid by
5685.crifices made to a soul that has tasted God are well repaid by the testimony of a g
5686.d are well repaid by the testimony of a good conscience, and by that hope of eternal
5687.conscience, and by that hope of eternal happiness which fills the soul with What St. Augu
5688.pe of eternal happiness which fills the soul with What St. Augustine experienced, is
5689.s also the case joy. with all who serve God like him. Do you not know several ]jers
5690.re distinguished. The serenity of their soul the profound calm which they enis paint
5691.enis painted on their face joy, and the peace of their heart shine forth, if one may
5692.he peace of their heart shine forth, if one may say so, on their brow. Undoubtedly,
5693.w. Undoubtedly, that calm, that blessed peace, is the fruit of virtue. But, why have
5694.lm, that blessed peace, is the fruit of virtue. But, why have recourse to Have you not
5695. that period of piness that accompanies virtue ? your youth when, touched by the grace
5696.our youth when, touched by the grace of God, you puriwhen admitted for the first ti
5697.od, you puriwhen admitted for the first time to fied your soul from sin the Holy Tab
5698.dmitted for the first time to fied your soul from sin the Holy Table, you experience
5699.r the first time to fied your soul from sin the Holy Table, you experienced how swe
5700.n your heart, disengaged from those who love him. the bond? of the passions, and mad
5701.passions, and made pure in the sight of God, tasted but Him, desired but Him, sighe
5702.our heart then filled how delicious the peace that pervaded your soul! how sweet were
5703. delicious the peace that pervaded your soul! how sweet were the tears you shed on t
5704. how ! you then desired K> rin' ' happy state, and never and you render homage to rel
5705.ate, and never and you render homage to religion Never, no never did you pass happier mo
5706.e fairest and the brightest of all your life. to depart from ! — it ! —Confess t
5707.n you understood ?^ it be found in that truth, that happiness i» only to serving the
5708.tood ?^ it be found in that truth, that happiness i» only to serving the Lord ; then you
5709. ; then you were penetrated ; ; TOWARDS GOD. the desire usncss, and lee, 317 oh, my
5710.ou were penetrated ; ; TOWARDS GOD. the desire usncss, and lee, 317 oh, my ilvation."
5711.ance costs 'ifices made and jcience, [6 soul with the case sev- 30 t know ul fulfihi
5712.iicnt int joy, that of temper, of their soul ich they enif I, one may that bless- re
5713. temper, of their soul ich they enif I, one may that bless- recourse to elt the hap
5714. animated the Prophet when he " Yes, my God, a single day passed in thy service is
5715.nts of piety, that pre. cious taste for virtue, bless the Lord for it you are ut no lo
5716.o loss to understand what I said on the happiness of a Christian life if, on the contrary
5717. I said on the happiness of a Christian life if, on the contrary, that virtue which
5718.hristian life if, on the contrary, that virtue which formerly had so many rharms lor y
5719.rary, that virtue which formerly had so many rharms lor you, is now become importuna
5720. of fidelity in the performance of your duty. If you had constantly walked in the wa
5721.ou had constantly walked in the ways of God, you would ever hcive enjoyed undisturb
5722.ou would ever hcive enjoyed undisturbed peace. But you have make at once a generous r
5723.o still a resource, observe exactly the law of God, and to repress the very Return
5724. a resource, observe exactly the law of God, and to repress the very Return to your
5725.ther a first motions of reluctance. You will sigh disarms him, and He is appeased by
5726.peased by a tear. goon feel within your soul those interior consolations and that me
5727.that meflable delight which formed your happiness in the days of your innocence. Can any
5728. in the days of your innocence. Can any one be unhappy when serving you. Oh my God,
5729. one be unhappy when serving you. Oh my God, you who are the source of all good? No
5730.h my God, you who are the source of all good? No, Lord, no; your yoke is sweet, and
5731. agitated until Vainly would I seek for happiness elseit reposes in you. where, for I sho
5732. •i' ! I'm •'*' ih V:'!i 'CM- first time to weary it my empty heart, or else rea
5733.uble and anxiety. You have told : Oh my God, is no peace poignant remorse, apprehen
5734.xiety. You have told : Oh my God, is no peace poignant remorse, apprehension, and con
5735. ow et delicious were the ather! 3, how soul that serves you. Oh my God ! it is ever
5736.her! 3, how soul that serves you. Oh my God ! it is ever tranquil, ever It has, wit
5737.r tranquil, ever It has, without doubt, many sacricontent, ever happy. make, but the
5738. therefore, Oh Lord, to rang« my- your life, the side of virtue, persuaded as I is
5739.d, to rang« my- your life, the side of virtue, persuaded as I is am, that tin- litie
5740.sand times more pleasant than that ol I will be faithful in the observance of youi 3
5741.ul in the observance of youi 3' " ; 318 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAIf holy law, and by that
5742. 3' " ; 318 DUTY OP THE CHRISTIAIf holy law, and by that fidelity I shall procure f
5743.lity I shall procure for myself all the happiness that this earth can afford, and that pe
5744. reserve for those who lead a Christian life. At a time when a purple fever was maki
5745.r those who lead a Christian life. At a time when a purple fever was making ravages,
5746.e capital, amongst the poor who had not time to drag themselves to the Hotel Dieu, t
5747.community of the priests of St. Marcel, being unable themselves to attend to all the
5748. and entered a low shed where there was one lying ill of He was an old man, apparen
5749.here was one lying ill of He was an old man, apparently dying, the fearful malady.
5750.tchet, and two saws. These were all his wealth, together with his arms, when he could
5751.m, but then they were lying power" Have courage, less, for he was unable to move them.
5752.ting this where you have had nought but pain and trouble " Trouble," interrupted the
5753.ouble " Trouble," interrupted the dying man in a faint voice, ; God now »vorld,
5754.upted the dying man in a faint voice, ; God now »vorld, — pi. " you are entirely
5755.onsoled me in all my toil and privation religion made me happy, and I lived content. The
5756.s poor, but with health and the fear of God, I never wanted any necessaries. If I r
5757. If I recover, which I do not expect, I will return to the timber-yard, and continue
5758.yard, and continue to bless the hand of God which has hitherto preserved me. Oh Fat
5759.o preserved me. Oh Father how lovely is religion and what precious treasures it contains
5760.and what precious treasures it contains peace, contentment, and — Ci — ! — : ha
5761.ce, contentment, and — Ci — ! — : happiness, are the lot of those who love it." The
5762. : happiness, are the lot of those who love it." The confessor, as edified as surpr
5763.fessor, as edified as surprised by such language, could not refrain from expressing his
5764.nishment; and after returning thanks to God for the favour of condue4« TOWARDS GOD
5765.God for the favour of condue4« TOWARDS GOD. 319 . Ing him to that wretched hovel h
5766.that wretched hovel he said to the sick man '* Although this life has not been pain
5767.e said to the sick man '* Although this life has not been painful to you, you must n
5768.you, you must nevertheless make up your mind to leave it, for the will of God must b
5769. make up your mind to leave it, for the will of God must be obeyed." " Certainly," r
5770. your mind to leave it, for the will of God must be obeyed." " Certainly," replied
5771.beyed." " Certainly," replied the dying man, with a firm voice, and an animated loo
5772. knew how to live, and I know how thank God for having given me life and for bringi
5773. know how thank God for having given me life and for bringing me through death to re
5774.ven me life and for bringing me through death to reign with Him. I feel my last momen
5775.feel my last moment approaching, so you will please to give me the rites of the Chur
5776.urch, for that is all I want now." That man died as he had lived, a child of grace,
5777.fessor and neighbours who witnessed his death full of admiration for the power of Rel
5778.ath full of admiration for the power of Religion over a heart that is docile to the sugg
5779. FAITH. 1. I BBrLiEVE that there is but one God, and that there could not be more t
5780.TH. 1. I BBrLiEVE that there is but one God, and that there could not be more than
5781., and that there could not be more than one. 2. I believe that there are three pers
5782.believe that there are three persons in God, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghos
5783.and the Holy Ghost, these three persons being but one God, and not three, because the
5784.ly Ghost, these three persons being but one God, and not three, because they have b
5785.host, these three persons being but one God, and not three, because they have but o
5786.d, and not three, because they have but one and the same nature and divinity. 3. I
5787.hree, because they have but one and the same nature and divinity. 3. I believe that
5788. because they have but one and the same nature and divinity. 3. I believe that the Son
5789. divinity. 3. I believe that the Son of God, the second person of the most Holy Tri
5790.rson of the most Holy Trinity, was made man for love of us, and died on a cross to
5791.the most Holy Trinity, was made man for love of us, and died on a cross to satisfy G
5792.e of us, and died on a cross to satisfy God for our sins, to deliver us from the pa
5793.ns of hell, and to merit for us eternal life. 4. I believe that they who have lived
5794. they who have lived well while in this world, and died in the state of grace, shall
5795.ll while in this world, and died in the state of grace, shall be rewarded, after deat
5796.tate of grace, shall be rewarded, after death, with eternal bliss in heaven, where th
5797.l bliss in heaven, where they shall see God as He really is. 5. I believe that they
5798.ho have lived badly, and died in mortal sin, shall be damned, that is to say, depri
5799.hat is to say, deprived of the sight of God, and left to burn in hell for all otern
5800.-'f f II i •SjiliMlH 11; — 320 6. I DUTY OF THE CHRISTIAN believe that there are
5801. that we are we are to commatidments of God, and bound to observe them all I believ
5802.are usu; ally six in 7. number. in that state to I believe that it is sufficient to t
5803. I believe that it is sufficient to tal sin and die have committed one mor. be cons
5804.cient to tal sin and die have committed one mor. be consigned to eternal tor* nient
5805.ten to have recourse to prayer and that one cannot be saved without praying to God.
5806. one cannot be saved without praying to God. 9. I believe that there are seven Sacr
5807.aptism effaces both Original and Actual Sin, and makes us Christians that Penance r
5808.ist really contains the body and blood, soul and divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ,
5809.pplies himself to fulfil with fidelof a good Christian, and to that end he should :
5810.he should : observe what follows He and will often have recourse to prayer in his ne
5811.have recourse to prayer in his necessi- will never fail to say devoutly his morning
5812.ass every day, if it be possible. 2. He will say every day some prayers in honour of
5813.a decade of the Rosary. 3. Every day he will read a portion of some pious book, such
5814.d take care to avoid reading any bad He will every day give to his parents some mark
5815.rents some marks books. of respect 4 He will only associate with prudent friends, an
5816.nly associate with prudent friends, and will shun libertines as he would serpents. |
5817. he would serpents. |i i ! t'^h TOWARDS GOD. od, S2I mortal sin, if and 5. He will
5818.|i i ! t'^h TOWARDS GOD. od, S2I mortal sin, if and 5. He will try to quit the stat
5819.S GOD. od, S2I mortal sin, if and 5. He will try to quit the state of he has 1< •
5820. sin, if and 5. He will try to quit the state of he has 1< • ' • • Iso that are
5821.into it. 6. On Sundays and holy days he will assist with devotioi* at the Holy Mass,
5822.ith devotioi* at the Holy Mass, and the other offices of the Church. He will confess
5823.and the other offices of the Church. He will confess and receive Communion, at least
5824.ssor and on the day ol his Communion he will say a Pater and an Ave for the liv ing
5825.onging to the Church.^ » 7. Lastly, he will never forget that he is on the earth on
5826.t that he is on the earth only to serve God, and that his eternal happiness or eter
5827.only to serve God, and that his eternal happiness or eternal misery depends on the perfor
5828.sery depends on the performance of that duty. Praised and glorified for ever be the
5829.GIN. Most Holy Mother cred feet, 1 ; of God ! humbly prostrate at thy sa ith fidell
5830.outh I present to thee my homage and my love as the Queen of Angels and of men I rev
5831. as the Mother of the Incarnate Word. I will now choose thee as my mother, in order
5832.Preserv^^ me, oh sacred Virgin from all evil, and especially from bin, which would d
5833.from bin, which would deprive me of the happiness of seeing thee, loving thee, and contem
5834.the Kl«»?i'«M Virgin Mary, Mothei of God, offer ; M " IT mV ! t, -4 any bad le m
5835.. FIRST PART.— FIRST TREATISE. ON THE KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF GOD. CHAP. — Of the Creed
5836. FIRST TREATISE. ON THE KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF GOD. CHAP. — Of the Creed, which t
5837. TREATISE. ON THE KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF GOD. CHAP. — Of the Creed, which the abri
5838.abridgement of the truths of Faith, — Art I.— Of the Apostles' Creed in general
5839. Apostles' Creed in general, Article —Necessity of Revelation, 13 —Existence of God,
5840.ssity of Revelation, 13 —Existence of God, —Art. IV.- -Unity of God, 17-20 Arti
5841. Revelation, 13 —Existence of God, —Art. IV.- -Unity of God, 17-20 Article Arti
5842.xistence of God, —Art. IV.- -Unity of God, 17-20 Article Article V. — Perljecti
5843.0 Article Article V. — Perljection of God, 29 Article VI. — MyRery of the Holy
5844.•. mm^ Creation, fi the Angels and of Man, 34 Article I. Of the Angels, Article I
5845.rticle I. Of the Angels, Article II. Of Man, 34-37 On the Immortality of the Soul,
5846.ngels, Article II. Of Man, 34-37 On the Immortality of the Soul, Article III. 38 Article IV
5847.Of Man, 34-37 On the Immortality of the Soul, Article III. 38 Article IV.— On the
5848.e III. 38 Article IV.— On the Fall of Man, 40 CHAP. III. Article I. The Promise o
5849.octrine of Jesus Christ, Article IV. 5S Life and Miracles of Chri.st, Article V. 62
5850.en, and sitteth at the right 86 hand of God, CHAP. VIII. From thence he shall come
5851.l come to judge the living and the dead Art. I.— On death,— Art. II.— On Judg
5852.e the living and the dead Art. I.— On death,— Art. II.— On Judgment, 88-92 95 C
5853.ng and the dead Art. I.— On death,— Art. II.— On Judgment, 88-92 95 CHAP. IX.
5854. Art. I.— On death,— Art. II.— On Judgment, 88-92 95 CHAP. IX.— I believe in the
5855.the flesh, 120 CHAP. XIII. I lelieve in Life everlasting. 120-123 Article I. Of Purg
5856.ting. 120-123 Article I. Of Purgator ', Art. II. Of Heaven, 127 Article III.— Of
5857.icle III.— Of Hell, CHAP. XIV and the sign Article VII.— The CHAP. II.— Of —
5858.« 3 » SECOND TREATISE. ON THE LOVB OF GOD AND OVR NEIGHBOUR Pao« CHAP. I. — Of
5859.HAP. li.— On the first Commandment of God «' I am the Lord, thy God, &c.— Art.
5860.mmandment of God «' I am the Lord, thy God, &c.— Art. I.— Of Faith, 132 Articl
5861. God «' I am the Lord, thy God, &c.— Art. I.— Of Faith, 132 Article II.— Of
5862.Of Charity, 1S6.139 : \e neral, . 11 13 Art, IV. —Of Adoration, — Art.V. —Res
5863., . 11 13 Art, IV. —Of Adoration, — Art.V. —Respect due : d, . n-20 29 28 fi
5864.46 III.— On the second Commandment of God: "Thou shalt not take the name, &c." 14
5865. Commandment " Receive your Article IV. God about great Easter-day, Article V. On t
5866.- d^iys flesh I (cen- CHAP. XIII.— Of Sin, CHAP. XIV.— Of the Capital, or deadl
5867.IV.— Of the Capital, or deadly Sins—Art. I.— Pride, 105 106 . 109 113 . 115 1
5868.R. FIRST TREATISE. ON THE SACRAMENTS. e sign Ihtroduction 129 On the necess'ty of Gr
5869.in General, • Baptism, . . Article I. Necessity ol" this Sacrament, Article H, The Mini
5870.V. —Of the Baptismal Vows, CHAP. III. Art. I. On the nature and effects of Confir
5871.ptismal Vows, CHAP. III. Art. I. On the nature and effects of Confirmation Aiticle II.
5872.Of the Sacrament of Penance, Article I. Nature, form, and necessity of Penance, CHAP.
5873.acrament of Penance, Article I. Nature, form, and necessity of Penance, CHAP. T. —
5874.f Penance, Article I. Nature, form, and necessity of Penance, CHAP. T. — Of CHAP. n.
5875.TREATISE. — Of Prayer in general, — Art. — Necessity of Prayer 235 —Efficac
5876. — Of Prayer in general, — Art. — Necessity of Prayer 235 —Efficacy of Prayer, Ar
5877.rd's Prayer, — Of what to be asked of God, 292 Article —Hallowed by thy name, 2
5878.ticle in heaven. 298 Article IV. —Thy will be done on earth as 300 Article V. —
5879.lessed Virgin, 314 CHAP. IV. — On the happiness of a Christian Life, CHAP. I. I. ------
5880.IV. — On the happiness of a Christian Life, CHAP. I. I. ------' IT. ON PRAYER. III
5881.II. . . - I. is IT. ... it is - ITT. m. evil, ... • , Profession OF Faith, Pious P
5882.der; or Book of OrAtory—la iMrtw, end will ba reiidjr aX aa oarlj day. ^ 1000 The
5883.d enlarged edtUOn. 85(' ?agei, ISmo The Duty of a Christian—Translated from By Mn.
5884. American Arithmetic. Shea's Elementary History Fractieal Ar ^ted .to States*. The Amer

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/