Concordance for Catholic legends : a new collection / selected, translated, and arranged from the best sources.

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1.   furnish a few examples of that peculiar beauty which is is so intimately associated wi
2. here of the various types in which that beauty displays itself are more than their nam
3. appear, con- stantially true, so far as being* a representation not only of what in i
4. representation not only of what in its nature may tinually in the history of the myst
5. what in its nature may tinually in the history of the mysterious intercourse between t
6. historical. They are to the eye of the mind what a picture of any TUl PREFACE. is l
7. he eye of the body; con- veying a vivid idea of what in substance occuiTod, but acco
8. s the living reality on the spectator's mind without imposing unwarrantalily upon hi
9. er and weight of these " legends," they will tend to feed the imagination with that
10. " legends," they will tend to feed the imagination with that nourishment which it ardently
11. te connection with the of the invisible world, and not with purely secular romance an
12. and not with purely secular romance and poetry alone. In some cases the narmtives have
13. not been followed with all, And if tlie same plan tlie we must claim tell pri- vileg
14. ur tales whatever style and fashion the nature of each has to require. seemed A very f
15. s have before ap- ])eared in an English form, though not dcntical with their present
16. ntwerp ... . .59 .64 . XII. Our Lady of Good Counsel, at Genazzano XIII. The Three K
17. nterre some of modem Rome wliich are in one way or another like volumes of the stor
18. ence of St. Dominic, and which from his time to our own has ever continued to be occ
19. ual daughters ; for it seems to have no other purpose than, as it were, to be a jn-ee
20. a and San Sisto. pull the convent-bell, will see a half-defaced fi-esco, depicting o
21. l see a half-defaced fi-esco, depicting one in the white habit and black mantle of
22. ced fi-esco, depicting one in the white habit and black mantle of the Fiiai-s-Preache
23. . Dominic, who was himseit' so escorted one night on his return to his convent ; an
24. whom the angels "left com-teously" (as one of his biographers says) You step into
25. or took his scanty rest leaning against one of those pillars on a stone you may see
26. f the more ancient basilicas. there are other paintings, which repeat to you again an
27. of the early romantic chroni; : you In one the yoimg Napoleon is raised to life by
28. In one the yoimg Napoleon is raised to life by the pi-ayer of St. Dominic j in anot
29. other, Hyacinth and Ceslaus receive the habit from his hands that fresco stands over
30. . : ; THE CHURCH OV now ST. 8ABINA. • time to plant the new order in their native
31. ay see the Friars- Preachers chantTheir habit has known no ing' their evening office.
32. no ing' their evening office. retonning change ; it is the same as the day when B. Reg
33. ng office. retonning change ; it is the same as the day when B. Reginald received it
34. e Queen of Heaven. There they sit, each one like the pictured heads of their own An
35. ngelico and if you stay to the end, you will see what recals the old times of which
36. f the order it is thus sung, and to the same SAveet and antique strain ; for the Fri
37. ough the kneeling ranks, sprinkles each one with holy water, and then returns to hi
38. em is finished when they go back in the same order as they came. rrgo," all kneel, a
39. anger to tlie Dominican chronicles, you will be in to another age ; some way carried
40. you, it is like an old painting come to life ; and the 4 whole scene tory and an is
41. scene tory and an is CATHOLIC LEGENDS. one which any one may see has ; a his- the
42. d an is CATHOLIC LEGENDS. one which any one may see has ; a his- the great patriarc
43. riarch St. Dominic was called from this world to his eternal reward, he left the orde
44. hapter, held at Bologna just before his death, the order reckoned sixty convents in d
45. ixty convents in different parts of the world ; and it was found necessary to divide
46. d spirits as men are accustomed to hold one with another. Such was the familiarity
47. blessed angels, says Castiglio, in his history of the oi-dei", that oftentimes they sa
48. anta Sabinu at Home it is written, that being awake one night, and lying so on his be
49. at Home it is written, that being awake one night, and lying so on his bed in tlie
50. iug that way, and looked out to see the cause. lit; saw thi-ee figures habited like f
51. ed thought them tln-ee of the hTethren. One of these walked first bearing the cross
52. ese walked first bearing the cross, &'«other the vessel of holy water, and the third
53. a manner customary in the order at that time. As he watclied them, one of them sj)ok
54. rder at that time. As he watclied them, one of them sj)oke, and said to the others,
55. is dormitory ; who is to be sent to the other ])arts of tlio hou56. RCH OP ST. SABINA. " Our Loi-d has sent other angels to them ; our business was only
57. lironicles of the order were related of one convent only, or on the evidence of one
58. one convent only, or on the evidence of one or two witnesses, we might be excused f
59. attention. But it was far otherwise. At one and the same time, throughout every con
60. ut it was far otherwise. At one and the same time, throughout every convent of the o
61. was far otherwise. At one and the same time, throughout every convent of the order,
62. s and weariness of their nile, so tha^" many returned to tlie world. But very soon t
63. ir nile, so tha^" many returned to tlie world. But very soon there were added to tlie
64. e fathers were those who sufiered most. One ot these, a man of imimpeachable life,
65. hose who sufiered most. One ot these, a man of imimpeachable life, whilst in prayer
66. t. One ot these, a man of imimpeachable life, whilst in prayer in tlie Convent^ of B
67. so gi-eat and terrible a ciy, that the other fathers ran to liis assistance, and foi
68. eml)ling malignant fi CATHOLIC LK0EN08. death shook every limb, and his eyes remained
69. mb, and his eyes remained ever fixed in one direction. And in this state he continu
70. ver fixed in one direction. And in this state he continued the whole of that night. I
71. er," he replied, " do not ask me what I cause. saw. I saw the devil ; bxit in so hoir
72. live were I to see that sight again on one hand, and the fiery furnace of hell on
73. d, and the fiery furnace of hell on the other, I would rather leap alive into the fir
74. leap alive into the fire, than gaze for one moment on a thing so homble." These dre
75. than three years, till the strength and courage of the brethren were well-nigli exhaust
76. exhausted. Long vigils, and fasts, and many prayei-s, wore out tlie vigour of their
77. seemed threatened with destiaicnone had courage to embrace or ])ei"sevei'e in a body wh
78. which seemed to have become the butt of evil creased, ; till for At length the subje
79. apter held at Paris in 1224, during the government of B. Jordan of Saxony ; and lie ordere
80. it. Every where It the apparitions and other disturbances ceased. seemed as though M
81. inging of the Salve at this period have many of them a pecuLar beauty. It Nor were t
82. this period have many of them a pecuLar beauty. It Nor were thev witnessed bv the bret
83. nce she appeared visibly to the eves of many, standing in front of the kneeling rank
84. bowed her head. And as they sang those other words, " Eta ergo advocata nostra" she
85. prayed ; and so disappeared. At another time she came down on the altai", whicli sud
86. little Jesus, she made with it the holy sign above their heads and disappeared. Such
87. e presences which sanctify the house of God. the next legend, we shall see this sam
88. God. the next legend, we shall see this same devotion of the Salve connected with a
89. n of the Salve connected with a tale of one of the earliest marit tyrdoms of the or
90. he Polish nobles, gathering together as many of the fugitive peasantry as liad escap
91. against the enemy for a consjideral)le time. The Tartars were but little used to ha
92. under the cliaracter of aml)assadors of peace; and ollV'rcd to negotiate with the har
93. ad Russians, to arrange the articles of peace. been the plan arranged beforehand by t
94. nsion of hostilities. There was at this time in the Convent of FriarsPreachers estab
95. Sandomir a very holy prior named Sadoc, one of the first companions of Blessed Paul
96. been crowned with martyrdom and ninety other sons of the same glorious order had suf
97. martyrdom and ninety other sons of the same glorious order had suffered death toget
98. of the same glorious order had suffered death together with him at the hands of the b
99. been sent on a mission to Poland where, being appointed prior of the Convent of Sando
100. ns. Matins were now just -ended and all being seated in their places as the custom i?
101. all being seated in their places as the custom i?, one of the younger novices, standin
102. eated in their places as the custom i?, one of the younger novices, standing in the
103. ry; the next tyrs." instant the passing emotion of surprise was put away ; and, faithfu
104. nce to his brethren their own impending fate. The words fell on their astonished ear
105. st sung ?" " Father," replied the young man, with much simphcity, " I only sang wha
106. dear friends," he said, " the Most High God has ; Listen, my children ; sent us ble
107. up that number ? To-morrow, theiefore, will see the golden gates of the New Jerusal
108. m open to receive us ; and doubtless it will be the swords of the Tartars that are t
109. e a short way for us to heaven. blessed death, that shall crown us with the green wre
110. admit us to the embraces ot What can we desire more ? God is Eternal Love calling us h
111. e embraces ot What can we desire more ? God is Eternal Love calling us home from ou
112. hat can we desire more ? God is Eternal Love calling us home from our Ion"' exile ;
113. lling us home from our Ion"' exile ; we will go there right joyfully, and welcome tl
114. ath thither so ciuick and easy. But our time is very short; and we who have so soon
115. Bath of Penance; and in the morning we will receive the Bread of Heaven, which will
116. will receive the Bread of Heaven, which will five us the strength and courage of tru
117. en, which will five us the strength and courage of true mai-tyi-s." he brethren listene
118. t ni^ht was spent in solemn preparaEach one confessed his sins to the tion for deat
119. one confessed his sins to the tion for death. venerable prior, with the teai-s and c
120. summer day which was breaking over the world was to be one of bloodshed and of crime
121. h was breaking over the world was to be one of bloodshed and of crime. There was bu
122. f bloodshed and of crime. There was but one Mass said that morning in the convent c
123. s if nothing imusual were at hand, each one went to his accustomed office and occuj
124. them to refectory and to choir; and no sign of imwontod liaste or excited gesture c
125. ly sometimes sighs and words of fervent desire would " Ah, will the^ never comeT* btir
126. and words of fervent desire would " Ah, will the^ never comeT* btirst fi'om their he
127. had fii-st been given. counted by this time to have been with Jesus and Mary." "Let
128. images and altars," said another ; " it will be a happy thing to die before them or
129. hing to die before them or perhaps even God may suffer us to give our blood in defe
130. ; or perhaps they would have heard from time to time the echoed snouts and cries, wh
131. haps they would have heard from time to time the echoed snouts and cries, which show
132. ughts; and their thoughts were now with God. It even seemed to them that the day ha
133. illness of unwonted prayer over all the world around them. Evening came at last, and
134. were to offer to their Creator in this world, bet'ore being translated to the Surely
135. to their Creator in this world, bet'ore being translated to the Surely never had tlie
136. , Sadoc's voice might be themselves for death. heard giving the blessing, as the offi
137. the office began " May : : the Almighty God grant us a quiet night and a perThen ca
138. shall abide under the protection of the God of heaven. His truth shall compass thee
139. he protection of the God of heaven. His truth shall compass thee as a shield ; thou s
140. h in the day, or for the assault of the evil one in the noon-day. Forsake us not, Lo
141. the day, or for the assault of the evil one in the noon-day. Forsake us not, Lord,
142. the noon-day. Forsake us not, Lord, our God. In manus tuas, Domine, commendo spirit
143. piritum meum." Ah-eady might the Tartar war-cry be heard clear terrible in the very
144. r voices were already mingling with the angel choirs. Then thev knelt, turning to the
145. already wearing something of celo tial beauty. Not a head was moved, not a voice falt
146. upon their lips, singing as they died. One alone moved from his place, and seemed
147. rom his place, and seemed touched by an emotion of ten-or. He rose, and turned to ily ;
148. se, and turned to ily ; but a wonderful sign was given him which restored his courag
149. l sign was given him which restored his courage. " For," says the old chronicle which r
150. ys the old chronicle which records this history, "he perceived that the dismembered and
151. artyrs." In the office granted in their memory by Pope Pius VII., the words which tlie
152. o filled the Cliair of St. Peter at the time of tlieir martyrdom, granted singular p
153. is still observed on the scene of the:, death with exti-aordinar}' devotion and splen
154. wabia now fallen into decay, of a noble family but he had little of the pride of nobih
155. y called him Grotesco, Groteschino, and other epithets equally flattering'. In order
156. n. All these circumstances rendered the life of the scholar full of thorns. He was m
157. nsidered that he had neither readiness, memory, nor intelligence, he said to himself w
158. ved the epithet; and that the career of science wliich he so sincerelv desired to em- 1
159. LEGEN15S. brace perhaps offered him no chance of success. On one occasion, after foll
160. ps offered him no chance of success. On one occasion, after following' a course of
161. orator, tliat he imagined it to be the will* of God that he should retire from the
162. tliat he imagined it to be the will* of God that he should retire from the world an
163. * of God that he should retire from the world and enter this order of PreachingFriai*
164. sixteen, to petition for the Dominican habit; and the new j^enei-al, who came from h
165. from his own country and spoke his own language, having given liim a kind welcome, he w
166. ut, alas ! he found in the cloister the same sorrows he was seeking to avoid. His sl
167. iety and humility long bore him up; his courage did not fail for some time ; he W'as co
168. m up; his courage did not fail for some time ; he W'as constantly hoping that one da
169. e time ; he W'as constantly hoping that one day he should surmount all obstacles, a
170. reak the bonds which seemed to hold his mind ca[)tive. He took the vows, and became
171. ach to the people, to }.>roclaim to the world the faith of Christ and w liich consetj
172. etjuently ought to be distinguished for science and genius as well as for virtue. He co
173. d for science and genius as well as for virtue. He considered that he should never hav
174. should never have either the j)ower of logic or the mastery of elociuence and he sai
175. nd he said to himself: "I have vowed my life to God, I know that He is good when I s
176. id to himself: "I have vowed my life to God, I know that He is good when I shall ap
177. vowed my life to God, I know that He is good when I shall appear before — ; ; ; :
178. : THE VISION OF THE SCHOLAR. 17 Him, He will tiot ask me whether I have spoken well,
179. hether I have done holy actions. At the same time, I am the most But His holy will b
180. r I have done holy actions. At the same time, I am the most But His holy will be ble
181. e same time, I am the most But His holy will be blessed. useless ot His sei-vants. H
182. ; I rashly desired to plead the au^ist cause of Holy Church, to propagate the Cathol
183. rug-gle against heresy. I forg'ot tliut God can raise whom it pleases Him; that He
184. ple twelve ignorant Blessed be His holy Will I will go, then, fishermen. from this s
185. lve ignorant Blessed be His holy Will I will go, then, fishermen. from this sweet cl
186. ring apait, like the solitaries of old, will think God repulses me of notliing but m
187. like the solitaries of old, will think God repulses me of notliing but my own salv
188. ut my own salvation, from the career of science ; but when I shall be alone with Him, I
189. en I shall be alone with Him, I know He will never repulse me from His adored presen
190. presence." In this burst of feeling the good monk thought he perceived that his inte
191. imid to communicate this project to any one ; he knew well that, like every thing e
192. beseeching her to make known to him the will of God, whicli he was seeking, and to w
193. ng her to make known to him the will of God, whicli he was seeking, and to which ab
194. round, knelt down aguin, and prayed to God not to condemn the step that he was tak
195. at these radiant forms were not of this world, and remained in silent expectation. Th
196. o throw iiimself without a guide into a world the dangere The scholar answered withou
197. e you seek in strength of your own weak mind tlie You have in the light which comes
198. ave in the light which comes only fi'om God. Queen of the world a protectress who l
199. hich comes only fi'om God. Queen of the world a protectress who loves you, and knows
200. ave never prayed to her for the gnft of knowledge; as thong"h you were ignorant that all
201. n Beliold her to her, and that with her wisdom dwells. coming towards you in all her s
202. to her without fear ; our intercession will second you." " It is," human ; ; Then t
203. ut now he considered that if he desired science, it was only for the sake of employing
204. e sake of employing it for the glory of God, and that therefore it was a Christian
205. essed himself to Mary, the Queen of the world, and prayed to her that he might be abl
206. e end of all his ardent desires — — science. " Science is great and various, my son
207. l his ardent desires — — science. " Science is great and various, my son," answered
208. ady thing ; and do you not remember the history of our first parent, to whom the fallen
209. to whom the fallen spu'it tlius oftered science : without limit ?" " Oh, no, Blessed Vi
210. ed " I only ask to know what it pleases God I sliould know. I desire not the danger
211. w what it pleases God I sliould know. I desire not the dangerous power of sounding the
212. f sounding the secrets of Heaven I only desire, and that within the limit^s of faith,
213. , and that within the limit^s of faith, philosophy and the science of na; ture." answered
214. he limit^s of faith, philosophy and the science of na; ture." answered the lady kindly.
215. n, you would have done better to prefer theology, which has the power of imveiling to th
216. which has the power of imveiling to the mind all that man can discover of tlie holy
217. power of imveiling to the mind all that man can discover of tlie holy mysteries of
218. can discover of tlie holy mysteries of God. But your pmyer shall not be rejected.
219. d. Only in the pliilosophy which you so love, beware of the pride wliieh it often ca
220. ieh it often causes to spring up in the soul. Long shall you possess the girt; you s
221. all pay for it by the labours whicli it will cause you, nnd the harsli judgments whi
222. ay for it by the labours whicli it will cause you, nnd the harsli judgments which men
223. utlV-d up, and I promise you tliut this science, wliich has ruined so many souls, shall
224. liut this science, wliich has ruined so many souls, shall be witluh-awn from vou the
225. ned for an hour on his knees, bless!T)g God, ferventiv tlianking the Blessed Virgin
226. nking the Blessed Virgin, ques- " Human science ?" is vain, ; 20 of CATHOLIC LEGENDS. t
227. , ; 20 of CATHOLIC LEGENDS. tioning the prudence of his choice, dreading" the ])erils hu
228. his choice, dreading" the ])erils human science, humWing- himself, and asking from God
229. ence, humWing- himself, and asking from God humility, henceforth lus anchor and his
230. ls there was general Alhert was another man amazement. his former heaviness had giv
231. read, was immediately classified in his memory, and remained there in its proper place
232. remained there in its proper place. In one year he passed all his yoxmg companions
233. ret. In a few years he became master in philosophy, and was required to teach it which he
234. e to the sedividing his ductions of the world or of vain-glory beloved solitude betwe
235. between prayer, by whicli he raised his soul to God, and intense study, which enlarg
236. prayer, by whicli he raised his soul to God, and intense study, which enlarged with
237. ed with g'iant stej)S the circle of his knowledge and the scope He never left his convent
238. left his convent except to hear of his mind. sermons and those of St. Anthony of Pa
239. nthony of Padua, who flom-ished at that time, especially charmed him, and He studied
240. lie administered food to his spii-itual life. natural sciences, and found in each cr
241. s he scarcely departed at nil from tlie particular cai'eer which he had marked out for him
242. sally instructed in all that belongs to philosophy and the knowledg'e of natural science t
243. hilosophy and the knowledg'e of natural science that, like Picus of Mirandola in later
244. {de omni re scibili) according; to the state of science at that epoch. The Order of
245. re scibili) according; to the state of science at that epoch. The Order of St. Dominic
246. minic was anxious to produce before the world this wonder formed in its bosom ; and,
247. })hiIosophy and theolog-}' ; which last science he had studied, though with less succes
248. d it was manifest that the blessing- of God was with him. The Chapter asseml)led at
249. ed There he re- and his lessons; and so many shone forth among his scholars, that it
250. ed by Louis the Young, and g-ifted with many privileges by Philip AugiistJis. All me
251. ation, whicli often troubled the public peace. But the king-s of P'rance esteemed the
252. s of P'rance esteemed the protection of science a sacred duty; and St. Louis, who was r
253. emed the protection of science a sacred duty; and St. Louis, who was reigning- at th
254. and St. Louis, who was reigning- at the time of Albert's arrival, liked to see his p
255. t instruction are the 'worst enemies of religion and morals, and therefore necessai-ily
256. rals, and therefore necessai-ily of the happiness of mankind. As soon as the little monk
257. the little monk of Cologne, whose frail form and modest bearing presented a lively c
258. viation of Place Maitre Aubert ; Aubert being the French rendering of the pretty G(>r
259. he pretty G(>rman name of Albert in the same way that, from their dislike to pronoun
260. aut. Among the pupils of Albert at this time, 1245, was and his St. Thomas Acjuiiias
261. im that masterly genius which made him. one of the brightest lights of the Church.
262. he brightest lights of the Church. Some time after this, Albert returned to Colopio
263. i-barians, own The who had the dreadful custom of killing all their children who were
264. ectures, and to expound the Gospel. his love for retreat, he was obliged by his subm
265. ssion to the head of the Church to take many long journeys he had to preach tlie Cru
266. the slightest movement of vanity; when one day, j)reoching at Cologne, and seeing
267. usual, and was, perhaps for tlie first time, about to indulge a thought of selfadmi
268. without bringing it to He had lost his memory. The spirit of phia close. losopliy, wh
269. and he in which it was beback into the state of 24 dulness which he CATHOLIC LEGENDS
270. ghtsi to prepai-ing- himself tor a holy death, whicli took place two years after, the
271. displayed from his earliest years every sign of an extraordinary g-enius. Being- sen
272. every sign of an extraordinary g-enius. Being- sent to tlie University of Coinibra, t
273. f the king- ; who, willing: to mark his sense of the son's talents and the father's l
274. es he having' chosen the ecclesiastical state. T^nhappily, in making- this choice Eg'
275. s disposal, and flattered by tlie proud sense of his own unequalled g-enius and powei
276. s own unequalled g-enius and powei-s of mind, he used his saci-ed office only as a m
277. its duties, and g-ave himself -up to a life of unrestrained indulg-ence and licenti
278. indeed as if the wliole energ-y of his mind, with all its — ; brilliant and varie
279. ried att-ainments, were directed to r.o other end than to j)rocure the deg-radation o
280. han to j)rocure the deg-radation of his soul. His profound science was employed to p
281. deg-radation of his soul. His profound science was employed to provide for him- nfw ex
282. elf ; THE LEGEND OV BLESSED EQIDIUS. of medicine ; and for this purpose raiiversity 25 w
283. oughout Eui-ope in ever}' department of science. On his journey thither he was joined b
284. ourney thither he was joined by a young man, who fell into convereation with liim o
285. and winning address and almost without being aware of it, Egidius suffered him to re
286. the ruin of the unhappy Egidius. Witli many a word of artful eloquence he won his c
287. sive and unrestrained passion for humun science, which, unsanctified by Divine gi-ace,
288. uencliless thirst for the enjoyments of sense, was all laid bare before the keen eye
289. all his designs, he assured liim at the same time that in choosing the study of medi
290. is designs, he assured liim at the same time that in choosing the study of medicine
291. same time that in choosing the study of medicine he had not selected the "There is a bes
292. est means of can-ying them into effect. science," he said, "wliich will bring vou far m
293. into effect. science," he said, "wliich will bring vou far more quickly to your desi
294. you Lave yet attempted Intellectual it will itself aid you to acquire all sciences.
295. yourself in the wildest moments of your imagination, will it pour out at your feet. Nay mor
296. he wildest moments of your imagination, will it pour out at your feet. Nay more, it
297. it pour out at your feet. Nay more, it will secure you also a fame amongst men, whi
298. fame amongst men, whicli no mere Iniman science can ever procure and whilst you enjoy t
299. procure and whilst you enjoy the cup of pleasure to the full, the world will reckon you
300. oy the cup of pleasure to the full, the world will reckon you as her wisest and most
301. cup of pleasure to the full, the world will reckon you as her wisest and most renow
302. r wisest and most renowned master. This science is magic ; and if you : ; ; ; will tnis
303. s science is magic ; and if you : ; ; ; will tnist youi-self to my guidance, I can i
304. three conditions imposed on him before being suffered the first, to renounce obedien
305. ience to become a member to the laws of God ; the second, to abjure the faith and h
306. eforth the pledged bond-slave of Satan. One might well suppose such a contract woul
307. ind and hardened ; but a long course of sin and resistance to inspirations of Divin
308. vine grace, had rendered the deptlis of evil neither new nor terrible to Egidius, an
309. that the devil gets better served than God. Egidius, the votary of pleasure, who w
310. served than God. Egidius, the votary of pleasure, who was impatient of a ilay which did
311. ful and weary apprenticeship in tlie ^' art of magic another proof," stiys his Port
312. hard to attain nnto the enjoyment of a pleasure, which, when attained, does but weary a
313. Toledo a master and in nwre than human knowledge. The secrets of hell, the liidden and m
314. l, the liidden and mysterious forces of nature, were m all his oAvn. Aimed with a powe
315. by a His cures were little dazzling and universal fame. short of miraculous ; his skill i
316. raculous ; his skill in every branch of medicine astonished the most learned : but deepe
317. but deeper and profounder even than his science was the secret coui-se of unbridled vic
318. nce was the secret coui-se of unbridled vice to which he gave himself up, and which
319. into the very recesses of his degi'aded being. Thus dead to gi'ace and sunk in coirup
320. ruption lay the The brilliancy of human soul of the gifted Egidius. intellect and a
321. he gifted Egidius. intellect and a rich imagination were there indeed ; but they were like
322. hideousness that lies beneath. Yet this man, tlie slave of hell and the outcast of
323. ie slave of hell and the outcast of the world, was, in the eternal counsels of God, c
324. world, was, in the eternal counsels of God, chosen to be a living monument of His
325. ris convereion less marvellous than the change it wrought. It was the dead of night, a
326. have shaken tlie heart of any ordinary man, he cried, '' Change thy life, unhappy
327. heart of any ordinary man, he cried, '' Change thy life, unhappy wretch !" repeating t
328. y ordinary man, he cried, '' Change thy life, unhappy wretch !" repeating tin-ice Fo
329. g tin-ice For the moment a the words, " Change thy life" sensation of fear did indeed
330. or the moment a the words, " Change thy life" sensation of fear did indeed pass thi-
331. on of fear did indeed pass thi-ough the soul nl' Egidius. He seemed to sec hell oi)c
332. 28 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. and the hand of God raised to cast liim in. But the feeling
333. next he laughed at his own weakness, at being- disturbed at what he resolved to consi
334. ee days passed away, and ag-ain, at the same time and in the same room, he sat as be
335. ys passed away, and ag-ain, at the same time and in the same room, he sat as before.
336. and ag-ain, at the same time and in the same room, he sat as before. And, as before,
337. e horseman once more entered ; but this time in a far more tenible manner. He spurre
338. eed right at Egidius; and as the fierce animal raised its brazen hoofs, and seemed abo
339. ed about to crush him to the earth, the same voice sounded beneath the closed visor
340. neath the closed visor of the helmet, " Change thy life !" and then the raised lance s
341. losed visor of the helmet, " Change thy life !" and then the raised lance struck on
342. arful trance, and found himself another man. Like Saul, the first words that rose t
343. ord, what wilt Thou have me to do?" The pain of his mysterious wound still smarted i
344. loody compnct, whirli sold him body and soul to the powers of hell; Init he remember
345. ; — : THE LEOEND OF BLESSED EOIUIUS. God, he cast them 29 into the flames. leave
346. nce. His joui-ney was a sad and painful one ; tormented with remoi-se, his niglits
347. in melancnoly reflections. Distress of mind so prej'ed on him that it brought on a
348. Egidius, weary and worn out in body and mind, paused by the building and watched the
349. the unholy labours of his own solitary life. Every tongue was full of the sanctity
350. r po- — — and their heroic work for God. He made a rapid and wise resolution; a
351. , the prior, told him tlie story of his life in the sacred tribunal of confession. T
352. on ; for he saw that his contrition was time and unfeigned. What a weight was lifted
353. f, and he saw the hapj)iness of serving God, and the bondage of a life of sin. One
354. ss of serving God, and the bondage of a life of sin. One day of these new feelings a
355. rving God, and the bondage of a life of sin. One day of these new feelings and desi
356. God, and the bondage of a life of sin. One day of these new feelings and desires w
357. nd desires was enough for the impetuous nature of Egidius. He returned to the convent;
358. ay," he said, " you iiim to receive the habit. saw at your feet the greatest sinner o
359. at your feet the greatest sinner of the world; I tliouglit to find in you a severe ju
360. y the stains of my guilt. That spuit of love which you breathed over me yesterday ha
361. rhood, and teach me how to sanctity the soul so long' drowned in the deep watei-s of
362. and, sending word to his father of his change ; of intention, received the holy habit
363. hange ; of intention, received the holy habit with sentiments of the deepest fervour
364. r of its foundation. The brethren led a life of incredible mortification and iminter
365. mpt obedience, strict silence, charity, peace of such were the elements of the soul,
366. peace of such were the elements of the soul, and hard work, new life to which Egidi
367. lements of the soul, and hard work, new life to which Egidius foimd himself so wonde
368. as a holy paradise a hard stniggle to a nature so long accustomed to indulgence and ha
369. version was indeed sincere; but the old man is not so quickly laid aside as to rend
370. kly laid aside as to render so severe a change at once sweet and supportnble. Tliose s
371. was now resti'ained with so i-igorous a law of silence, that Pi. lliniibert, who wn
372. xercise or pui-sue his darling study of medicine, save under obedience ; as though he de
373. s back on every association of his past life. his profession in 1221, he was soon Co
374. ive coxmtry of Portugal. There he led a life of the same persevering fervour ; but t
375. of Portugal. There he led a life of the same persevering fervour ; but the peace of
376. the same persevering fervour ; but the peace of his soul was still wanting. One thou
377. severing fervour ; but the peace of his soul was still wanting. One thought ever pre
378. he peace of his soul was still wanting. One thought ever preyed on his mind the rec
379. wanting. One thought ever preyed on his mind the recollection of that horrible compa
380. ade after sent to the — bond-servant. Many a night did he lie prostrate before the
381. im from his servitude to the powei-s of evil; then sometimes, feeling that prayer fr
382. s l;e was could not reach the throne of God, he would have recourse to the sure ref
383. ars and discipline to blood; and so for many years did the anguish of his soul remai
384. o for many years did the anguish of his soul remain imabated, whilst he wore out in
385. ed feet. Thus seven years were spent in one unintermpted conflict with the exterior
386. nd interior temptations to despair. The time at last came wlien the vessel, cleansed
387. and odoriferous oil of the Holy Spirit. One nig^ht he was at his usual post before
388. post before that image of the Mother of God, whose presence had a power over his so
389. od, whose presence had a power over his soul like the coo*, mountain breeze as it pa
390. hed for me on the Cross. mercy take the cause into thine own hands for I am tired out
391. altar, and whom you call the Mother of God." Egidius raised his weeping eyes, and
392. had signed at Toledo whilst through the same opening a strnnge and hideous form was
393. the same opening a strnnge and hideous form was escaping with a gesture of baffled
394. and bound himself for tlie rest of his life as slave to that sweet Mother who had b
395. bonds of his servitude and restored his soul to peace. From that hour the darkness a
396. his servitude and restored his soul to peace. From that hour the darkness and tem])t
397. so long endured vanished. In his after-life he his prayers ! ; : ; — some of the
398. deepest of those spiritual consolations God is wont to favour His chosen servants a
399. al of Spain, and died in the year 1265, being universally considered the greatest man
400. ing universally considered the greatest man of his order during the time in which h
401. he greatest man of his order during the time in which he lived. The circumstances of
402. l notice of his lite, yet he assigns no other reason for the omission than the " unli
403. n than the " unlikeliness" of the whole history ; an argument wliich can hardly be admi
404. reating of the supernatural displays of God's power. ; m V. OUR LADY OF CHARTRES. T
405. Christian era the central point of the religion of the Gauls. There was the princij)al
406. nt oaks, an altar to the Virgin who was one day to bring fortli the Saviour ; of th
407. ay to bring fortli the Saviour ; of the world. This image, we are told, represented a
408. down to the feet, with a mantle in the form of tui antique chasuble, and a crown on
409. stians celebrated the holy mysteries in time of j)er- ; 34 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. secutio
410. rgin, who has shown her favour to it by many miracles. In the year 1116, in the rei^
411. tapers. Among- these children there was one especially remarked as being- the most
412. en there was one especially remarked as being- the most dilig-ent and recollected, th
413. three portions, of which he had g-iven one to God, one to the Blessed Vir2;in, and
414. portions, of which he had g-iven one to God, one to the Blessed Vir2;in, and one to
415. ons, of which he had g-iven one to God, one to the Blessed Vir2;in, and one to his
416. to God, one to the Blessed Vir2;in, and one to his mother and ; ; ; hymns these thr
417. ssed Virg-in celebrated without all his being- there to assist : happy except in chur
418. e narrow streets of this ancient town a chance passer-by asked who lie was, he never f
419. , assiduous in frocjuentingthe house of God and never ceased following- liim with h
420. d-.mce on tlie g-ood Bishop, lie formed one of the little l)an(l of wlioni our Lord
421. st step, and in a low voice asked every one she met for tidings of But no one had s
422. every one she met for tidings of But no one had seen him disappear and it her son.
423. er son. ; ; was only then for the first time that they observed that he and his tape
424. s, who sympathised in her anxiety ; the other choristers followed ; then the priests
425. n the priests and monks, and lastly the good Bishop himself. All loved the gracious
426. was to be trusted ; and by the Bishop's desire, tlie most active of those in attendanc
427. e well, where be found tin. in : : : 36 death. CATHOLIC LEGENDS. stiff, poor child, d
428. evive ; indeed, scarcely any except the good Bishop and the little choristers, whose
429. d received ; no injury, and knew at the same time that he lost all consciousness of
430. eived ; no injury, and knew at the same time that he lost all consciousness of life
431. time that he lost all consciousness of life during the hour that he had passed in t
432. prerememhrance of it, he estahlished a custom which has heen observed ever since in t
433. ls are chanting the responses, and that God is hearing them. VI. THE LEGEND OF BLES
434. cclel)rated Egidius was prohe g'ave the habit of the oi'der to a young Gascon named B
435. ommunity for the holy simplicity of his life, that Andrea of Rosende, in his Chronic
436. anners." The czrcumstances attendmg his death, attested by almost At the time that vi
437. mg his death, attested by almost At the time that vincial of Spain, i^ all CATHOLIC
438. l CATHOLIC LEGENDS. the ^vTite^s on the history of the order, are of peculiar beauty. B
439. e history of the order, are of peculiar beauty. Bernard filled the office of sacristan
440. peculiarly delightful to him, fi'om the many opportunities it iii'ave him of indulg'
441. indulg'ing' his devotion unseen by any one out his Lord, whom lie loved to honour
442. ies. Besides this employment, his spare time was occupied in the education of two ch
443. ent, his spare time was occupied in the education of two children, the sons of a neig^hbo
444. oys were permitted to wear the novices' habit of the Friai*s-Preachers, being- probab
445. ovices' habit of the Friai*s-Preachers, being- probably destined for the order, altho
446. rly dear to Blessed Bernard. It was his custom, when busy in the sacristy, to allow th
447. writing their exercises spending- their time quietly and happily nntil their master'
448. home, which tliey took tog-ether in the same place as soon as they had finished thei
449. on them from His iVIother's arms, witli One day, as tlie\ the simple familiarity of
450. ieir ag-e. thus sat on the altar-steps, one of them raised his eyes to the imag-e o
451. ARD AND HIS TWO NOVICES. with us, 39 we will give it to you witli all our heaits." p
452. t to you witli all our heaits." pleased God to reward the innocence and simplfl fai
453. by a wonderful miracle: for the carved form of the Holy Child 'ecame radiant with
454. ly Child 'ecame radiant with — And it life, sat with and coming- down trom His Mot
455. r Divine Lord they grew in such fervent love towards Him, that they wearied for the
456. hastening" to them, and how their only pleasure was the convent, as if it contained a s
457. an artifice in order to obtain a larger quantity of food; and they therefore took no not
458. for their folly. when they repeated the same story to B. Ber- nard, he listened with
459. was nothing unworthy of belief He who, being God, became a little condescend to give
460. othing unworthy of belief He who, being God, became a little condescend to give a m
461. efore, after is the kingdom of heaven." many inquiries, he iiad satisfied himself of
462. iries, he iiad satisfied himself of the truth of in the fact that child, should 40 th
463. THOLIC LEOEXDS. bade them ^ive glory to God for His and then considered whether the
464. ght be made to serve yet further to the happiness and sanctification of goodness; his pup
465. share with them, he bade them the next time He came ask Him how this was, and wheth
466. use. Tlie boys were delighted with this idea; and they failed not to do as they were
467. ot to do as they were directed the next time that they were alone in the chapel. The
468. knew the meaning of this invitation the change that had gradually appeared in his two
469. had seen them, as it were before their time, growing ripe for heaven; and he unders
470. nd he understood that it was the Divine pleasure, after thus training them for Himself i
471. eir hearts had once been touched by the knowledge of sin or the contamination of the worl
472. d once been touched by the knowledge of sin or the contamination of the world. Yet
473. edge of sin or the contamination of the world. Yet he sighed to think that they shoul
474. to be left behind and resolving to make one more trial of the condescension which h
475. e Divine Child that since they wore the habit of the Order, it was necessary for them
476. the company; and on Thm-sday moniing I will receive you all thi-ee Father's house."
477. ogether in Bernard's heart bounded with emotion when he heard these woi-ds. It was then
478. n Day. rangement as for his approaching death, and obtained his two disciples leave o
479. hen Mass was ended, he knelt before the same altar with tlie children, one on My —
480. fore the same altar with tlie children, one on My — and all three commended their
481. and all three commended their souls to God, as though they knew their last hour wa
482. d it was evident that there had been no death-struggle, but that tlieir souls had [)a
483. ir souls had [)assed to the presence of God whilst in the very act of pi-ayer. They
484. Kings, wliich had been the scene of so many of our Lord's visits to the two childre
485. eir burial; and in course of yeai-s the memory of it was lost, and the chapel became d
486. her side, : as before. wisliing to find One of the succeeding triors of the convent
487. l of the diocese present, together with other authorities of distinction and credit.
488. rved stone sarcophagy was found, wlxich being opened, the church was immediately fill
489. le skeleton were of the size of a grown man, whilst those on either side were small
490. showed that they had been buried in the habit of the order. The memory of this histor
491. n buried in the habit of the order. The memory of this history has been presented even
492. habit of the order. The memory of this history has been presented even up times; for f
493. n presented even up times; for from the time of this solemn Mass of the Ascension wa
494. hed, to whom the custody of the anTheir death is supposed by cient inonge was intrust
495. rrated above; except that there was but one child to whom the vision of our Lord ap
496. at it is not a different version of the same event, as might be supposed, but that t
497. to that given above, t occurred at the time uf the great jdaguc in 13A8. THE LAKE O
498. ver, braveiT no less than for his manly beauty. never," say the old chronicles, " had
499. n invasion of Nor- mans came upon them. Many times already since the death of Charle
500. upon them. Many times already since the death of Charlemagne the northem barbarians h
501. ared riding over the waves, and bearing death and misery to France. Reg-nier was brav
502. Weary of his dangerous and advcntuious life, he had vowed to take up his jjormam-nt
503. r him; and the conquest of Huinault was one to kindle all his ambition. It was, the
504. t with des- 44 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. perate courage; he led forth a gigantic army; and the
505. ay returning to the charge with renewed courage. Before long, however, he was forced to
506. he enemy. And Albraide still prayed on. One day she knelt before the altar of the A
507. reams. Alas on the next morning a woful change had fallen upon the castle; all sounds
508. n self the first bitterness it with the idea, that was past, she consoled herwould b
509. asy to ransom her husband by setting at liberty the twelve Norman generals. But, by and
510. countess seemed to lose her presence of mind and her courage. In the restlessness of
511. ed to lose her presence of mind and her courage. In the restlessness of her ag'ony she
512. n, only imploring- to be left alone. No one at- tempted to follow her. There are mo
513. ted to follow her. There are moments in war when only selfish fears can make themse
514. d cpiiet waters lay before her; and her good angel must have trembled for her. Bewil
515. iet waters lay before her; and her good angel must have trembled for her. Bewildered,
516. gth, she was already on the brink, and ,one moment more would have hurried her into
517. the lake rose up before her a venerable man in flowing antique robes, and leaning o
518. taff, they all surrounded her, and with one solemn voice addressed her : The counte
519. The countess hun-ied round " Albraide, God in His mercy saves you fi-om a fearful
520. in His mercy saves you fi-om a fearful sin a thought is in your heart which you ha
521. ll which the barbarian demands, and you will see your Kegnier again." : ; ! : A ligh
522. could not doubt but her preservers from sin and death were no otliers than the twel
523. t doubt but her preservers from sin and death were no otliers than the twelve apostle
524. lt by you." The twelve g"enerals looked one upon the otlier in surprise. Free from
525. an had demanded as ransom, not only the liberty of his twelve generals, but also all th
526. ; and that Albraide should swear by her God, that neither jewels or costly ornament
527. to the people of Mons ; and if by that time the ransom was not paid, they mig'ht ex
528. ed and touched tln-ougli all his rugged nature. Hollo summoneil Hegnier to his presenc
529. ich has fcince been named ^iormandy. In memory of tlie countess's vision, the lake whe
530. f twelve years old, who daily went with other He was a favourite with his children to
531. g-ion ; and after school he Avas in the habit of ling-ering" in the cool evening- hom
532. often heard spoken of as the Mother of God. At the Feast of Easter, which was cele
533. s celebrated with g-reat ])omp and joy, many children approached the holy altar to p
534. own and dearly-loved statue, the little one returned home. The child's frequent abs
535. nobserved by his father, a busy, silent man, who took little heed of his son's doin
536. sion he had been away an unusually long time, and his father broke silence at last,
537. been taught to call it. Ilis father was one of those men who combine utter careless
538. a bitter and persecuting hatred of any other. That his son should have neglected any
539. That his son should have neglected any religion, that he should have grown up an unbeli
540. ld have grown up an unbeliever or a bad man, would have troubled him little ; but t
541. iis was an offence which awakened every evil feeling of his dark that liis child sli
542. child slioiild ever have set and gloomy nature foot in tlie place of worship of tliose
543. enoi-mous faggots after him to make his fate sure. It was over in a moment; and soon
544. ned a sullen demeanour during the whole time, was seen, with an expression of rage,
545. over, the child gave his own simple *' history. It was the kind lady of the church," h
546. in the folds of her white mantle." The fate of the wretched father is unknown ; but
547. r child became Christians. Such was the history of the little Jew may we take example b
548. little villag'e of L'Ariccia. summit of one of those knolls, or minor eminences, wh
549. those knolls, or minor eminences, which form the outskirts of tlie Alban range where
550. set by troops of beggars, imploring the same assistance, and using (in many instance
551. ring the same assistance, and using (in many instances) the very same outward gestur
552. and using (in many instances) the very same outward gesture as their forefathers di
553. and penetmted nearly to the end of the one long narrow street of wbich the village
554. her, and pass under tlie archway at the other extremity of tlie viUage, you find your
555. iat *' Ximus Aricimim ,^' through which many an ancient Avorshi])per of Jupiter Lati
556. ourhood dedicated to the Holy Mother of God, to which the inha'l)itants have a very
557. ity, all sorts of underwood. or by some other motive of which we have no accoimt, he
558. ing on his knees, s])ent a considerable time in jn-ayer and meditation before it. Fo
559. ayer and meditation before it. For some time the boy took a great pride in kepjjing-
560. ry visit to his dear Madonna. He had no other means of finding his way lie to the spo
561. ir attempts, but always failed. At last one of them sug-gested a brilliant idea, wh
562. last one of them sug-gested a brilliant idea, which, with the characteristic thoug-h
563. eded to carry into execution. It was no other than to set fire to the obnoxious imped
564. n their purpose without any mischief to other parts of the wood. When once this feat
565. of ornament ; and although some of the good villagers of L'Ariccia did not quite ap
566. e had also been of its flrst discovery. One day, being somewhat weary on his return
567. o been of its flrst discovery. One day, being somewhat weary on his return from the w
568. se, ran to the spot to see what was the matter other neighbours also were soon A^ gath
569. to the spot to see what was the matter other neighbours also were soon A^ gathered t
570. from beneath the timber, tliey lost no time in rpmoving it, and, to their great ama
571. olo! MadrediDio! Maria santissima!" and other such exclamations; and the boy was call
572. er inhabitants of the village called to mind, that in their younger days they had of
573. rally supposed tliat it was the work of one of the JBasilian monks of Grotta Ferrat
574. tlie Princess Artemisia Savelli (whose family then occupied the palace and lands in L
575. in L'Ariccia now belonging to the Chigi family) had attributed her own unexpect576. ence. Now, however, news of the miracle being every where noised abroad, people natur
577. intercession, spiritual, follows, as a matter of course, that other wonderful cures b
578. l, follows, as a matter of course, that other wonderful cures both temporal and and o
579. r wonderful cures both temporal and and other favours, were soon received at th* same
580. ther favours, were soon received at th* same spot. What has been before now said of
581. of every body, even in matters of tliis world, may be still more truly said of any ou
582. f Mary they do not come singly. *' That one hailstone falls is a proof, not that no
583. tone falls is a proof, not that no more will come, but that others are : coming" sur
584. intercession of Mary ; where we hear of one, immediately we look for another ; it c
585. for whole generations, according to the good pleasm'e of Almighty — God. The grazi
586. ng to the good pleasm'e of Almighty — God. The grazia, then, tlnxt had been recei
587. tliis ancicmt picture, until at lengtii one of the priests of L'Ariccia, by name Pi
588. tage adjoining, as a residence for some one to take care of tJio sanctuary ; and in
589. f her Immaculate Conception, and at the same time religious of tlie congregation of
590. Immaculate Conception, and at the same time religious of tlie congregation of Valla
591. , the coat of plaster on which it stood being too thin and delicate to bear removal.
592. islied to jireserve; and this fi-agment being placed on a wooden frame, highly orname
593. This was done by bodies of ten men at a time, continually relieving one another, an|
594. en men at a time, continually relieving one another, an|l moving onwards amid the s
595. anksgiving of the assembled multitudes. Many miraoriginal position in the it 56 cles
596. ter it and were wrought both during its progress was placed in the church, where it was
597. imilar blessings have been renewed from time to time ever since, of which the inhabi
598. lessings have been renewed from time to time ever since, of which the inhabitants of
599. they sang hymns and in a litanies, and many of them walkecl barefooted word, they w
600. tion to the picture Yet, day after day, many a peasant miglit suspended. be seen kne
601. mbination of circumstances, such as the world but in which relig-ion never fails to r
602. which relig-ion never fails to recog"- God, served to protect them from all tbose
603. spersed. Galloro, however, was not this time altogether abandoned. Although the Vall
604. who had been staying with them for some time since the dissolution of tiieir own soc
605. and the quiet retirement of the place, cause it to be constant!}' visited by Withers
606. be constant!}' visited by Withers from other parts who liave been ovenvorked, and st
607. unctions in the church are frequent and good, and the devotion to the sanctuary is p
608. iately after some notorious miracle. At one time, for a period of two months or mor
609. ly after some notorious miracle. At one time, for a period of two months or more, we
610. Uian the villag^es of L'Ariccia on the one side, and of Genzano on the otlier (the
611. nd of Genzano on the otlier (the former being' a little more than half a mile oiF per
612. ng-le year (1846) were upwards of 7060, being" an average of nearly twenty pilgrims a
613. n some degree to realise to himself the habit whicli prevails among the people, of ha
614. ccasions of special devotion during the time of any public or private trial in a wor
615. ANI. In g-lancin^ over the pages of any history, it is curious to remark now capricious
616. nterest seem to cliang^e localities. At one time some particular country crowded al
617. est seem to cliang^e localities. At one time some particular country crowded all the
618. o cliang^e localities. At one time some particular country crowded all the we look at it a
619. has passed on, and is illuminating some other spot, leaving it again, in its turn, to
620. n the present weakened and contemptible state of the Turkish empire, it is difficult
621. re, it is difficult for us to realise a time, and tliat not so very long ago, when t
622. lying almost at their mercy. Among- the many tales which may be found of touching in
623. wing is told concerning the illustrious family of the Justiniani. The oriirinal stock
624. eatness of the period and if at another time, perhaps in the very next is life ; ; 6
625. other time, perhaps in the very next is life ; ; 60 CATHOLIC LEOENOS. though in the
626. sure to find a prince of the Justiniani family at their head, or dying- There was also
627. no less than nine bishops to the Order, one ol whom (Vincent Justiniani) was Master
628. g the pontificate of St. Pius V. At the time of the circumstances ive are about to r
629. te, Timothy Justiniani, a member of the same illustrious order, was bishop of his na
630. y warfare which had been carried on for many years with the Turks. The inhabitants p
631. ad been solemnly granted them, by which peace and quiet seemed to be assured to tliem
632. ssion. And indeed there seemed the less chance of this treaty being broken, for the Tu
633. e seemed the less chance of this treaty being broken, for the Turkisli general, Musta
634. st the aistractions and heresies of the time, gtive a special gladness to the feelin
635. very kind of profanation and sacrileg^e one of the express Justiniani, tnereobjects
636. eaded by their chief. Pasha Piali. This man, rudely pushing" aside the Bishop, laid
637. and cried contemptuously, " Is this the God of " It is Himself," replied the Bishop
638. eplied the Bishop the Christians ?" " I will never deny Him ;" and perhaps lie hoped
639. rown himself in the way. " Strike me to death, if you will," he exclaimed ; the Sacre
640. n the way. " Strike me to death, if you will," he exclaimed ; the Sacred Mysteries s
641. and reverently gathered together every one of the Sacred Hosts, even to the smalle
642. Turks was, if possible, to destroy the family whose enmity they had so mucli cause to
643. e family whose enmity they had so mucli cause to dread. Every member of the Justinian
644. o dread. Every member of the Justiniani family was carefully sought for, and taken cap
645. captivity took refug-e in Italy in a ; state of absolute destitution. A few of them
646. em sent into banishment recovered their liberty, being- ransomed through the interest o
647. nto banishment recovered their liberty, being- ransomed through the interest of the P
648. their former power and distinction. Not one of these, however, but bore himself in
649. yed than in some young childi-en, whose fate was peculiarly melancholy. With a refin
650. had chosen the youngest children of the family to the number of about twenty, and sepa
651. rs, and brinw' them up in the Mussulman religion and they were well aware no agony and n
652. hreats of cruel punisliment could tempt one of these children to disgmce his faith
653. avagely condenmpd them to be whipped to death. This torture was inflicted with imusua
654. ed by a little company of children. Not one gave way ; in the mid655. nspeakable torments they all showed the same constancy, and encouraged one another t
656. owed the same constancy, and encouraged one another to suffer yet more for Jesus Ch
657. to suffer yet more for Jesus Christ. As one of tlie?e little martyrs was dying unde
658. and Dade him only lift his finger as a sign that he renounced Christianity, and he
659. d firmly locked together even after his death. The Pasha himself came to the spot, an
660. ng another, who had as yet survived the punishment, said he should be thrown from the top
661. others," re[)lied the boy ; " but all I desire in this world is to die for Him," On th
662. ed the boy ; " but all I desire in this world is to die for Him," On this he was shut
663. this he was shut up in ?rison, with the idea of wearying out his constancy, le knelt
664. on the floor, and addressing himself to God in words of childish simplicity and con
665. nd confidence, prayed for constancy and courage to die in the faith. After spending thr
666. have been touched with an extraordinary emotion of grief on hearing of these circumAs a
667. d at St. Mark's in the September of the same year, he narrated the story of their ma
668. of the infidels in the Gulf of Lepanto, many a heart was nerved to heroism by a thou
669. to heroism by a thought of the devoted courage of the martvred children of the Justini
670. s design of his soldiers and engines of war. he embarked, together with twelve thou
671. ur cannon and Thirty-six long ships had other pieces of artillery. been built on piu'
672. enty hoi'ses and several instruments of war, such as had never before been In ; ; D
673. B OF ANTWERP. fear from the 66 power of man, and that God alone could hinder him. M
674. fear from the 66 power of man, and that God alone could hinder him. Meanwhile, in t
675. St. Joseph of Avila, and had made such progress in the way of perfection, that her holy
676. of a saint, but Anne does the works of one." was in her arms that the saint died a
677. ater (on the 1st May, 1019) in the very same city. On the vei-y night when Maurice a
678. ich she was imploring the assistance of God to defeat. She declared, however, that
679. t it was not so that she only knew that God was calling her inwardly At two to pray
680. ing her inwardly At two to pray, and to cause them to pray also. o'clock in the morni
681. with iutigiie. In the morning, she told one of the nuns that she wa"^ asweary as th
682. feel as if foi-ced to ; wished to rest, being (;uite exliausted and when my arms, whi
683. I was holding stretclied out to- wards God, dropped for very lassitude, I heard a
684. the wind had changed ; and that by the time tlie prince had reached a town called G
685. foimd on inquiry had proceeded from no one in the house, and which she therefore r
686. el, but had suddenly withdrawn, leaving many of their gams and other instiiiments of
687. thdrawn, leaving many of their gams and other instiiiments of war behind them. So hig
688. of their gams and other instiiiments of war behind them. So high an opinion of the
689. iiiments of war behind them. So high an opinion of the efficacy of Anne's prayers was h
690. ence than a numerous army." OUR LADY OF GOOD COUlfSEL AT OEXAZZANO. 67 XII. OUR LADY
691. lfSEL AT OEXAZZANO. 67 XII. OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL AT GENAZZANO. In the little tow
692. the side of a rang'e of hills skirting- one of the high roads fi-om itome to Naples
693. mber of the Thu-d Order of St. Augnsthe world. She hod had a little property of her o
694. little property of her own, but at the time of our narrative it was all She spent,
695. o our Lady under the title of Mother of Good Counsel. It was but a small and poor bu
696. and neighbours laughed her to scorn, as one who had bogim to build without " having
697. lf of those means of support with which God had ble sod her, in the time of her gre
698. with which God had ble sod her, in the time of her great»-st necessity. Slie wa**
699. sod her, in the time of her great»-st necessity. Slie wa** old and infirm, the}' said ;
700. her own fancy Her answer to " The work will these objections was always the same re
701. rk will these objections was always the same relations Her — not without some had
702. right soon, bpoause it is not my — 68 will CATHOLIC LEQENDS. work, but God's ; our
703. — 68 will CATHOLIC LEQENDS. work, but God's ; our Blessed Lady and St. Augustine
704. what a gran signora, what a noble lady, will soon come and : taixe possession of thi
705. believed hereelf to have received from God ; whereas the Church, in order to ao-ai
706. al messages of this kind, had issued a "law forbidding such things to be attended t
707. , unless they were corroborated by some other external and inde{)endent testimony ; t
708. sanctioned by the Matters were in this state in ecclesiastical authorities. the spri
709. ted the whole imder- guard taking. From time immemonal, the feast of St. Mark the Ev
710. c. a.d. 424 num ubicumque : OUR LADT OF GOOD COUNSEL AT QENAZZANO. 69 name, who live
711. e year in that town. Accordingly it was being celebrated in the usual manner in the y
712. nish ;" but others were soiTy to see so good a work unfinished. Evening was now fast
713. htest hour of the fair, wlien, business being ended, the pleasure of the day be^-an a
714. fair, wlien, business being ended, the pleasure of the day be^-an all were devoting the
715. ad woman had begun to build, : tling on one of the walls of the unfinished building
716. ould not in any way accoimt for. At the same moment the bells of the church and of a
717. the bells of the church and of all the other churches in the town began to sound, ye
718. eople ran fiom their houses to a.sk the cause of this general commotion ; and indisti
719. ere nearest to the spot arrived just in time to see the aged Petruccia come out, lik
720. ready for her, and that the bells were being" rung' in this mii*aculous way only to
721. the bells, accompanied (as is still the custom in many parts of Italy on all festive o
722. accompanied (as is still the custom in many parts of Italy on all festive occasions
723. her had they heard of any extraordinary cause of Others, again, had left the city, an
724. others turned back to investigate tiie cause. These, however, tarried so long to gaz
725. aze at tlie wondrous sight, to hear its history, and to see the marvellous etFects that
726. he aged and infirm, — — OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL AT OENAZZANO. 71 the blind, the
727. 71 the blind, the lame, the maimed, and many others, came or were broug-ht to this n
728. e which reached them, that persons were being' miraculously healed of their infirmiti
729. this strange picture. And the faith of many of these simple-hearted pilg-j-ims rece
730. mb was loosed; the lame walked; nay, in one or two instances, the very dead were re
731. stances, the very dead were restored to life again ; and during the next two or thre
732. e strangers was a Sclavonian, the tory. other an Albanian ; and the story which they
733. ating- a fi'esh invasion, and who, as a matter of fact, did, not many years aftei-ward
734. and who, as a matter of fact, did, not many years aftei-wards, lay waste the whole
735. ay waste the whole country, and destroy many cities with fire and sword. IS'unibers
736. i-ite shrine, and to pray the Mother of God, that, as she with her Divine Son had o
737. ce been forced to flee from the face of one of the king-s of the earth, Avho was pl
738. ugh the air by some invisible hand from one j)lace to another ; iirst to the seanei
739. 35-38. f -'^^ts viii. 39 ;; OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL AT QENAZZANO. coast J 73 them w
740. es of their lost guide ; they went from one church to anotlier, inquiring; for the
741. d that its appearance was followeu by ; many and miracles. as soon as they Immediate
742. o lent no willing; ear to this strang;e history it detracted somewhat li'om the heavenl
743. ry be authenticated, the picture mig-ht one day be reclaimed and carried away. In t
744. wever, as the story g-ot noised abroad, other Albanians, who were scattered up and do
745. d these too confirmed its identity. And many years afterwards, when people wlio took
746. hen people wlio took an interest in the matter, had the opportunity of g'oinp- to Scut
747. the church described that its size and form corresponded exactly to that of tlie )t
748. re and that the colouring- and style of art exhibited in the picture were ])reci.749. ted in the picture were ])reci.same with (hat which characterised all the o
750. e with (hat which characterised all the other parts of the church. Upr ir must be rem
751. piece, still less have transported from one })lace to another without injury. Of co
752. nazzano is situated, was absent at this time -at Avignon the Pope therefore appointe
753. iior Nicole de Cruci, Bishop of Lesina, one of the islands in the Adriatic, near th
754. was most satisfactory, and ])laced the truth of the narrative we have given beyond a
755. heavenly guide, and the descendants of one of them (the Albanian De Giorg-is) stil
756. there and the Sanctuarv of our Ladv of Good Counsel wa.s henceforth established for
757. city of the Philistines; which at that time was occupied by a numerous army, betwee
758. h warriors most prize, that, namely, of being always placed in the hottest of tlie ba
759. service which involves peculiar danger. One day, the advanced sentinels of the Chri
760. ver have reached Ascalon alive but that one of the Saracen chiefs remembered the ra
761. ut there was no tliought of ransom; not one of the little Christian band had return
762. here believed that the As new skirthree good knights of Eppe were dead. mishings wer
763. oes for he admired their lofty stature, beauty of countenance, and micom; THE THREE KN
764. allowed a week of repose, during which time they were guarded, but treated with gi-
765. the proposal, neitiier skil- making the sign of the They were nor theologians, but t
766. they hoped never to be found wanting to God, and never to swerve from the path of h
767. ce iind tlieir arguments in extolling a religion of sensualism and deatli but they made
768. asted more than two years; during which time theu- str ngtli could scarcely have end
769. those immense consolations, such as the world cannot conceive, which Almighty treated
770. They prayed incessantly they asked from God that which He never refuses, the grace
771. our Lord Jesus Christ, captives for His cause, and living imder the eye of God, they
772. His cause, and living imder the eye of God, they suffered in patience, until at la
773. ing a final effort against them. He had one daughter, named Ismeria she was young,
774. far and near as a miracle of genius and wisdom. To her he had often spoken of these Ch
775. plained " My father," said the princess one of their resistance. day in answer, ''
776. y'..«r doctors must {)e unskilful, or God and which : : ; ; ;; THE THREE KNIGHTS
777. ght be able to pei-suade them ;" for in truth the fair Ismeria was curious to see men
778. if my daughter," said the sultan to her one evening, "to-morrow you sliall go to th
779. ve failed and if, either by learning or good fortune, either by your wisdom or J>.ii
780. earning or good fortune, either by your wisdom or J>.ii'" charms, you prevail on them
781. follow the standard of the prophet, it will indeed be an illustrious conquest. Neit
782. conquest. Neither do I shrink from the chance of one of them becoming enamoured of yo
783. Neither do I shrink from the chance of one of them becoming enamoured of you ; for
784. ould be too happy to have such a son-in-law." The next day, the beautiful princess,
785. f the knights. She Knew a little of the language of the Franks, which she had learnt fro
786. of her unexpected appearance her ardent desire to behold warriors of such renown, and,
787. h, the people were clamouring for their death. They replied, that tlie messengers who
788. their destination, and therefore tlieir family doubtless believed tliem to be dead tha
789. no means of paying their nmsom, unless one of them might be permitted to letmn Thi
790. ey felt ui heaiing her speak tlieir own language. Ismeria, touched with compassion for t
791. faith to endeavour to bring them to the religion oflier father, and explained to them Sh
792. he spoke the doctrines of the Mahometan religion. with such entire sincerity, that the k
793. t none of her attendants understood the language of the Franks, they asked her permissio
794. hurch had taught him of the creation of man, of his fall, and its fatal consequence
795. emer ; of the Incarnation, Passion, and Death of our Saviour; of the reconciliation o
796. f our Saviour; of the reconciliation of man with God, and the restoration of woman
797. iour; of the reconciliation of man with God, and the restoration of woman by the bl
798. e Holy Trinity, tlu'ee persons tion. in one God ; he spoke of everlasting blessedne
799. ly Trinity, tlu'ee persons tion. in one God ; he spoke of everlasting blessedness i
800. ught beforeliand wliat ye shall speak I will give you words and wisdom which your ad
801. e shall speak I will give you words and wisdom which your adversaries shall not be abl
802. ences, for that she expected tliey That same night slic had w^ould produce some resu
803. that the princess, honour the Mother of God as she is honoured by Christians, besou
804. to attempt any thing which might be the will of God, they promised, to attempt the p
805. pt any thing which might be the will of God, they promised, to attempt the pious wo
806. r carving. These were soon procured and one of the brethren, having said the Hail M
807. him as best they could, all praj'ing to God to guide their hands, and imploring Mar
808. r asleep, ; but their pious enterprise. One morning, when they awoke, what was thei
809. ed, and radiant with the most exquisite beauty The good knights impatiently awaited th
810. iant with the most exquisite beauty The good knights impatiently awaited the arrival
811. Gladness, in consequence of the joy and happiness it had brought into their prison. Durin
812. ly V'irgin again appeared to her in the same form as before, and commanded her to se
813. irgin again appeared to her in the same form as before, and commanded her to set tli
814. omising her that, after a pure and holy life, she sliould receive iji heaven a crown
815. lves on their knees, giving- tlianks to God and the Holy Virg-in, and swearing to t
816. miracle: When the litt.e or by a happy chance, were open. company had reached tlie ba
817. the dread either of pui'suit or of some other misadventure, induced them to enter a w
818. ch she expressed at this new and fi-esh nature, which she had never seen before, at th
819. which they thoug-ht they recognised as one well known to them. In the midst of all
820. t these noble knig-hts were taken up to God. But," he added, *''you, g-entlemen, by
821. who had let him talk on, because, from emotion, tliey had lost the power of 84 CATHOLI
822. to the Castle of Mai-chais, whicli was one of theii* demesnes. Their mother, who w
823. iraculous image, it was ])laced for the time on a little throne, in a rustic chapel
824. ety continued so fervent, that a shoi't time after she consecrated herself entirely
825. ter she consecrated herself entirely to God among the Holy Virgins. The church of o
826. T OF ST. CECILY. 85 XIV. THE CONVENT OF One when ST. CECILY. day, towards the close
827. inflamed by fanaticisiu, youth, and the evil example of so many others in other part
828. isiu, youth, and the evil example of so many others in other parts of the country, d
829. d the evil example of so many others in other parts of the country, determined to giv
830. so a samj)l(; of their dexterity in the art of imagebreaking. The preacher, who had
831. g provided themselves with crowbars and other instruments of destruction, they i)roce
832. red Scriptures ; and assured of finding many adherents amongst the crowd, they deter
833. THOLIC LEGENDS. till there was not left one stone upon who even before dawn had rec
834. a guard for its protection. But he was one of those who secretly favoured the new
835. ck word that their dear sister was in a state of absolute inseusilnlity, so that it w
836. th axes and crowbai's, and a variety of other similar instruments ; they had spoken i
837. , ordained foi* the honour and glory of God, should at all hazards be celebrated sh
838. ebrated she reminded the steward of his duty to protect with life and limb the High
839. the steward of his duty to protect with life and limb the High Mass and solemn proce
840. the abbess had expressed so great " No matter, sisters, no matter !" was an anxiety.
841. essed so great " No matter, sisters, no matter !" was an anxiety. her reply to the inq
842. earch, the magistrates recollected that many years before, about the period she ment
843. however, or no heed to the information. being struck by many of the particulars given
844. eed to the information. being struck by many of the particulars given, she went one
845. many of the particulars given, she went one day, accompanied by an officer of the c
846. n a chair. To her inquiries as to After many — THE CONVENT OF ST. CECILT. 89 the n
847. y — THE CONVENT OF ST. CECILT. 89 the nature of their insanity, the governor replied
848. of His divinity as the true Son of the one Uving God. He said that they had now le
849. vinity as the true Son of the one Uving God. He said that they had now led this asc
850. said that they had now led this ascetic life for more than six years ; that they sle
851. and solemn character; that whenever any one pronounced them deranged, they compassi
852. more tlian once exclaimed, that if the good town of Aix-la-Chapelle were only to kn
853. only to know as much as they did, every one of its inhabitants would leave his busi
854. down round the crucifix, and employ his time in singing the Gloria in excchlt, like
855. ping to gain some information as to the cause wliich had produced this extraoi-dinaiy
856. n the letter written by the preacher as one who took an active part in the project
857. s narrative in the following words " Mv good ladv, provided you promise not to impli
858. y hereafter arise out of this aftair, I will deal fmnklv with vou, and tell vou all
859. eems to have taken the convent of these good women imder its holy protection. All I
860. ures, your sons had already indulged in many wanton pranks, disturbing the divine se
861. e strange access of deep and speechless emotion ; and after awhile the preacher, tui*ni
862. uwch and disperse. 1 hat evening, after many fruitless inquiries who had not yet ret
863. h a few infoi-mation friends in a great state of alarm to the convent, with the view
864. m what had happened, thus thoroughly to change their whole being ; but thev 2nade no o
865. , thus thoroughly to change their whole being ; but thev 2nade no other reply than by
866. e their whole being ; but thev 2nade no other reply than by pressing our hands, Itjok
867. gazing on the gTourid, and wiping from time to time the tears from their eyes, with
868. on the gTourid, and wiping from time to time the tears from their eyes, with an expr
869. were closed to every thing else in the world, they seated themselves at the table, a
870. riking of the clock, rose abruptly with one accord from their horror, maaam, on beh
871. up staii's to the hall in search of the cause of all this clamour; yet your sons stil
872. itude. At length, when the clock struck one, they suddenly stopped, wiped from thei
873. , who were doubtless jiossesscd by some evil spirit. They were sulijected to medicnl
874. e sulijected to medicnl inspection; and being declared deranged, were lodged in the l
875. ewing with lier own eyes the spot where God nad so smitten her sons to tlie earth,
876. at in on the su])ject of the melancholy history in which they were both so deeply inter
877. answer in the affirmative she rose in a state of gTcat excitement, and examined the u
878. ground. It seemed to her as tliough the same mysterious power which had crushed the
879. umility and re- signation to the Divine Will, she resumed her seat. *' It was God, m
880. e Will, she resumed her seat. *' It was God, my dear lady," said the abbess, ''who
881. children, now so heavily afflicted. No one has the least idea who it was that in t
882. heavily afflicted. No one has the least idea who it was that in the confusion and di
883. morning of that day, but died that very same evening. The Archbishop of who was 94 C
884. om ; is HoHness the Pope expressing the same opinion." * * m to the Haggle, * The la
885. is HoHness the Pope expressing the same opinion." * * m to the Haggle, * The lady retun
886. Catholic Churcii. Her sons passed in a good old age to a calm and peaceful death, a
887. n a good old age to a calm and peaceful death, after intoning once more, according to
888. intoning once more, according to their custom, the Gloria in excehis. XV. THE KNIGHT
889. devoted to jileasure, and spent all his wealth in ; festivities, so tliat at last he f
890. of com])laint, question, or rei)roach. One day, as if to complete tlie distress of
891. ew himself down on the dry gi-ass, in a space where four ways met, enAs he was closed
892. hement gnef, and seeking in vain in his mind for any device whereby he might be enab
893. n him before. The imkno\m dissence of a man gloomy aspect, mounted. " You are in gr
894. e of interest : perhaps, howIf then you will consent to do me homage, I can relieve
895. e. Wliatever I can do to serve you that will not falsify tlie oath of fidelity which
896. f fidelity which I have sworn to him, I will gladly perform, when I am convinced tha
897. ffended ever, I if I beg it to know the cause of it ; know already. you are." " When
898. pagne, Yoiu" suzerain, who in two days' time intends, with a brilliant suite, to sto
899. tterly, only saving' my at the point of death honour, I give myself up to you, for I
900. yoiu Christian ear, and your prejudices will rise up against me, I am he, who, once
901. sed his hand instinctively to make tlie sign of the Cross. The stranger hastily seiz
902. answered the knigljt bitterly ; " but I will have none of your g'ifts." " As you ple
903. our g'ifts." " As you please," said the other ; " in two days " I then, when tlie Cou
904. n what consists the homage to which you desire to subject me ?" g-lancc ])aused for a
905. ee, I must have some guarantee the rest will be more easy. You must sell me the eter
906. itself down; he thought that the rebel angel mi^ht have demanded something yet worse
907. towards heaven, and shurldering all the time at his own baseness, he repented the bl
908. , he repented the blasphemies which the evil spirit dictiited to him, and formally r
909. oug-h he well knew that in denying- his God he had committed a crime still blacker,
910. ed, " after two crimes which destroy my soul, shall I further renounce the Mother of
911. shall I further renounce the Mother of God, the patroness and protectress of my ow
912. to make it posever to be reconciled to God ? No," he continued, speaking- aloud, "
913. No," he continued, speaking- aloud, " I will never submit to this last degradation ;
914. ring them u]), without confiding to any one tlie treaty by which he had made them h
915. d tliey were still more amazed when, on one of the barons in the Count's suite remi
916. inding him that St. Bernard was at that time preaching the second crusade, and invit
917. ith care. The joy of his newly acquired wealth, the perpetual round of festivity in wh
918. aden the anguish which pierced his very soul, when he remembered the fearful promise
919. n him ; his nights were sleepless ; his happiness only a splendid pageant with no reality
920. of this year to reconcile himself witli God ; but a bar of iron seemed to be fixed
921. The knight, whose pride revolted at the idea of confessing from wluit source his ric
922. riches came, had never revealed to any one his dreadful secret. It was only at the
923. the — ; • f him, was now too late. One single h.)])e remained to his young wif
924. o horses. The lady remained but a short time in prayer; and, as soon as she re-appea
925. ^Marie — — been so dear to him. Her beauty, full of modesty, tlie serenity of her
926. ear from him liis heart. Hot tears from time to time rolled down liis clieeks, and h
927. him liis heart. Hot tears from time to time rolled down liis clieeks, and his breas
928. to the saints in heaven, absorbed every other. He dared no longer even look towards h
929. seman came galloping" up, followed this time by numerous squires, all clad like him
930. d to advance a single step. '' Disloyal man," said he at last, adch'essing the knig
931. l to the liour fixed ? you more than my life ; but I am under your spells. '' The co
932. with your blood, base and dishonourable man," interru])ted the demon, " and you ; !
933. , and the Mother of (»od had taken her form, her- ; 102 self to CATHOLIC LEGENDS. a
934. , stupefied with astonishment, felt his mind ana spirit overwhelmed, and threw himse
935. w appeared to him only as the consoling sign of the protection of the Blessed Virgin
936. as thy prey a woman who trusts in me ? Will thy miserable pride be never quelled ?
937. se which thou didst constrain eartli, " Evil liis head, sloAvly yielded the parclime
938. lost for a whole year, the blessing of being able to pray ; and confessed with sobs
939. d know that forgiveness is more easy to God than sin to you ; but remember your tra
940. at forgiveness is more easy to God than sin to you ; but remember your transgressio
941. wife, and confessed to her his : him to sign." The spirit of darkness bowed XULIMA,
942. ed XULIMA, THE MOORISH MAIDKX. enormous sin, 103 and the unexpected help which had
943. ments than bloody battles; and even the death of the Christian hei-oes who fell in th
944. ho fell in them served but to raise the courage of their brethren ; for their obsequies
945. or, at wliich & choir of nuns assisted. One morning- Isabella disting^iiished a voi
946. but that it was joining- for the first time in The queen looked around her, and the
947. lar had formed the project of attacking one of the enemy's outworks, which supports
948. d in tli(> bands of our Among" them was one woman whose despair people. lie drew ne
949. ed, and. as if lipr grief could find no other expression but in song, she took tlie l
950. hords, she began to pour forth, in tlie form of a ballad, a pathe*^ic hiTueiit Aguil
951. and in grjititude she threw hei-self at Art thou not ZuHma, his fpet, and raised he
952. raised her veil. the pearl of all tlie sin^ng;-niaidens of Grenada?' cried Agiiila
953. mission at the court of King- Boahdil I will give thee thy liberty,' he continued. B
954. t of King- Boahdil I will give thee thy liberty,' he continued. But at that moment the
955. emained among* Christians, the grace of God might enlighten her, and bring her back
956. mong us, and that if at the end of that time she should not be awakened to the faith
957. er ringing voice was heard every where. One night, as we were all gathered together
958. n her mouth. " I felt that the grace of God was. manifesting ; : ; itself in this s
959. nderful voice for the glory of our holy religion." The queen rejoiced greatly in the con
960. After her baptism, however, a singular change seemed to come over her she would somet
961. sisters, sing Moorish songs at the very time when the chants of the Church were echo
962. through the cloisters, touching at the same time on her instrument, a light flute-l
963. ugh the cloisters, touching at the same time on her instrument, a light flute-like a
964. e solemn chords of the religious music. One day, when the queen, accompanied by the
965. er by the arm, said in a solemn voice " Sin: thus foi-sakest the service of thy Lor
966. flames she had disappeared. In a short time tlie whole of Isabella's camp was a hea
967. ntinually harassing tlic Spaniards, and many bloody •onflicts took place, in which
968. : who ; 108 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. Returning one day from a parliciilai'ly distingiiishe
969. horse g-allop rapidly ])y, while at the same time a javelin whizzed past his ear. He
970. g-allop rapidly ])y, while at the same time a javelin whizzed past his ear. He rush
971. the chest of his horse, who reared with pain and rage, and threw his rider into the
972. he Moor; "strike him who has vowed tliy death! Learn, Christian, that Ilichem the las
973. f my thoughts. Strike, then, and end my life, since I have not been able to take thi
974. ious voice has ceased to sound, and her life is I'cady to forsake her with her gift
975. hem," he said, " Zuliraa by the laws of war enbghtened by Divine grace, she has for
976. reli^on of Mahomet do not then name the soul of thy thoughts, her who is become my l
977. th the swiftness of lightning-. After a time the Moors, continually repulsed in thei
978. solemn Te Deum in thanksgiving to tlie God of armies. The rage and fury of tlie Mo
979. armies. The rage and fury of tlie Moors being well known, bands of soldiers were plac
980. e procession and Aguilar, who commanded one of these bands, was advancing towards t
981. n the left shoulder by an arrow. At the same moment, a troop of Mooi-s raslied out o
982. from tlie windows of this house woimdod many of Aguilar's soldiers, and he commanded
983. oors who had followed her received that same day the holy Sacrament of Baptism. The
984. n excursion of an altog'ether different nature turaed me for a time aside. In my walks
985. 'ether different nature turaed me for a time aside. In my walks to the Righi, to Sch
986. ok the road thither, and after crossing one or two mountains, and passing a large t
987. ool pure water. All round the galleries form a circle of shops, w^here rosaries, ima
988. of the convent. On entering the church one is struck by the richness of its orname
989. ues, frescoes, and paintings. The whole history of Christianity is depicted beneath the
990. angels, saints, the mysteries, and the life of Jesus, from Bethlehem to Calvary. Th
991. rim- prayers ; this is the object of so many a image (as we shall see in the sequel)
992. eim-ad used to pray. age ; this is tlie time I ascended the lofty steps many famihes
993. is tlie time I ascended the lofty steps many famihes of pilgi-ims had Sinking under
994. of another people, I tliouglit only of God and of the absent ones at home. I now u
995. sent ones at home. I now underetood the nature of a ])ilgriinage, that pious custom of
996. he nature of a ])ilgriinage, that pious custom of our forefathei-s, T understood its p
997. nsj)ire, the confidence wliich sustains one tlirough its toils. It seemed as if a n
998. orous tones, and the voice of more than one mother, who had left perhaps her child
999. gged permission to see the abbey, which being granted, a Benedictine showed me, besid
1000.ction of philosophical instruments, and one of mineralogical specimens. He also tol
1001.alogical specimens. He also told me the history of the abbey, the ravages rising once h
1002.oblest families in Europe, resigned the wealth and honours to whicli he was entitled,
1003.X. 110 near the monastery, lie went out one day, as if for a ramble, and took \iu h
1004.enance could suggest. But even here the world discovered his retreat. Crowds of anxio
1005.nsel, or consolation, or pardon of from one who lived so near to God. In those days
1006.pardon of from one who lived so near to God. In those days it was the custom for al
1007.o near to God. In those days it was the custom for all who had doubts and difficulties
1008.ertainly, they were separated from tlie world, the more surely did their words breath
1009.noblemen, the priest, the lord, the old man and the child, the humble monk and the
1010.to the hermit Meinrad, and received the same cordial welcome, advice, and tender con
1011. to their sins But often, when the poor man went home to his cottage with joy, ligh
1012.lightened of all his troubles, the rich one returned soirowfid to his palace, discp
1013.oirowfid to his palace, discpiet in his soul, and shame upon his forehead. I'or Mein
1014.d. I'or Meinrad, like a true servant of God, spoke faithfully to all, fearing not m
1015.d, spoke faithfully to all, fearing not man, and determined to do justice. However,
1016., fearing not man, and determined to do justice. However, these crowds of visitors dist
1017.. still. Resisting* no more the evident will of concerning him, Meinrad received all
1018.sed away since Meinrad retired from the world, twenty-six of which had been passed in
1019.k Forest, when two raiseral)le men came one day, as if to beg* hospitality from the
1020. to show you mercy at yoiu* last liour. God : my blessing and forgiveness before me
1021.g'ht, I clinrge you, these two candles, one at the head and tlie otlier at the foot
1022.ed them; but beheld them, says the Ger- man tradition, miraculously kindled by invi
1023.ir beaks, as far as the inn, from which one of the servants vainly endeavoured to c
1024. Strasbourg, renouncing all his worldly wealth, came to the Dark Forest, and raised ar
1025.t, and raised around the hut of Meinrad many little wooden cells, wherein he and oth
1026.any little wooden cells, wherein he and other holy men might dwell. This was the orig
1027.of Einsiedeln. Princes poiu-ed in their wealth, and the sanctity of its inmates bestow
1028.es drew from sanctity and countless and wisdom the beginning' of their strength. But a
1029.the beginning' of their strength. But a time of persecution and of darkness succeede
1030.Dark Forest. "But the pious care of the good monks prevented this sacrilege; and whi
1031.ed this sacrilege; and whilst a similar one was taken to Paris, the true relic was
1032.stored monastery. Again, the praises of God i-esound where first the venerable sain
1033.onstance, Ulric Bishop of Augsburg, and other pre lates, came in the year 949 to cele
1034.nsecrated. It may be added that several other churches lay claim to-a similar privile
1035.so add a bull of Pope Leo VIII., to the same effect and the following sentence of th
1036.ross from But two hundred years ago, at one side to the other. which time our histo
1037.o hundred years ago, at one side to the other. which time our history begins, this pa
1038.rs ago, at one side to the other. which time our history begins, this path was neith
1039.t one side to the other. which time our history begins, this path was neither it had a
1040.e nor convenient said to be infested by evil spirits. One day, in the year 1654, as
1041.nt said to be infested by evil spirits. One day, in the year 1654, as a certain Don
1042.g by this way to St. Pietro a Dragonea, one of the hamlets belonging to the parish
1043. of these spirits, just at the mouth of one of those grottoes or natural caverns in
1044. the print remained there, uninjured by time and by the damp, during' a period of fo
1045.lla. Doubtless it had been saluted with many an Ave by the devotion of the passers-b
1046.giolo Maria di Majuri, a lay brother of one of the Franciscan convents in La Cava,
1047.ad prejjared for it in the rock. At the same time he exhorted the neighbours to biu-
1048.ejjared for it in the rock. At the same time he exhorted the neighbours to biu-n a l
1049.its, would ere long become the house of God, and that tlie Mother of God would disp
1050.e house of God, and that tlie Mother of God would dispense from tlience the treasiu
1051.hand. Of course, the first part of this prophecy, so to call it. liad a natural tendency
1052.ency to bring about its own fulfilment. One of the priests, who hnd often listened
1053.o be kept burning, and the litanies and other devotional exercises to be frerjuently
1054.TTA. 121 following year, that as a poor man, named Antonio Casaburi, accompanied by
1055. this path a donkey laden with com, the animal went too near the edg-e of the precipic
1056.m, he arrived at the spot, he found the animal quietly grazing-, the boy busily collec
1057. examination of witnesses, of the exact truth of the mar- which were in circulation.
1058.ass was celebrated in the new church by one of the parish priests, a man whose span
1059. church by one of the parish priests, a man whose span of Hfe had ah'eady exceeded
1060.llages, groups of women, members of the same family, or neighbours in the same villa
1061.s, groups of women, members of the same family, or neighbours in the same village, suf
1062.f the same family, or neighbours in the same village, suffering under some common af
1063.shrine, nothing doubting that, if it be God's will, the sick will receive the same
1064., nothing doubting that, if it be God's will, the sick will receive the same benefit
1065.ing that, if it be God's will, the sick will receive the same benefits from the appl
1066.e God's will, the sick will receive the same benefits from the application of this o
1067. of his days often experienced from the same remedy. : 123 XIX. THE MONKS OF LERINS.
1068. noiseless steps, had gained the choir. One alone seemed deaf to the accustomed sum
1069.to heaven, exclaimed thrice, " Thy holy will be done, my God !'' As soon as he had p
1070.med thrice, " Thy holy will be done, my God !'' As soon as he had pronounced these
1071. the King" of king's, whose Virg-in ]^I other was this day taken up into heaven !" an
1072.rejoice before the Lord ; let us praise God our Saviour ; let us come into His pres
1073.ants, now of penitence, and now of joy. One by one, their arms crossed on their bre
1074.ow of penitence, and now of joy. One by one, their arms crossed on their breasts, t
1075.beloved brethren in Christ .Jesus, this God who has already given His blood for you
1076.Nay, even if he should demand from each one of you the last drop of your blood, whi
1077.ld not burn to exchange this perishable life In this holy soliagainst the crown of i
1078.e In this holy soliagainst the crown of immortality ? tude, you have learnt to renounce not
1079.iildren, now is the moment come when it will be required from at least the larger ;
1080.the holy bread you are about to receive will serve as your viaticum. Be of g'ood che
1081. shall never set for you but its lig'ht will be succeeded bv the eternal brig'htness
1082.with me, my children ; and the guardian angel of these isles, robed in a vestment of
1083.hen to another a branch of palm, at the same time crowning your brows with a resplen
1084.o another a branch of palm, at the same time crowning your brows with a resplendent
1085.eserved, no doubt, by the providence of God, for further conflicts. You already kno
1086.s have invaded Provence their next prey will be this island of oxu's be strong" then
1087.ng you be self-confident, and then none will be apostates. To suffer for a moment, a
1088.ever, such is your blessed destiny. The God whom you see here hidden for love of yo
1089.y. The God whom you see here hidden for love of you, will soon manifest Himself to y
1090.om you see here hidden for love of you, will soon manifest Himself to you in all the
1091.Come, then, unite yourselves to Him and love shall lighten all the anguish that you
1092.ial. ; ; ; 126 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. At the same time the abbot offered to conduct to a
1093.; ; ; 126 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. At the same time the abbot offered to conduct to a place
1094.red to conduct to a place of safety any one among- them who feared death, and calle
1095.f safety any one among- them who feared death, and called to him the youngest of the
1096.h the works they had beg'un copying. No one seeing them thus employed, in such perf
1097.ing them thus employed, in such perfect peace and serenity, could have supposed that
1098.ey were in the immediate expectation of death. Soon, however, a number of barks were
1099.ere resounded from them loud cries of " Death to the Christians !" while at the same
1100.Death to the Christians !" while at the same time a forest of Damascus blades glitte
1101. to the Christians !" while at the same time a forest of Damascus blades glittered i
1102.enemies, and to suffer the extremity of pain rather than renoimce the faith. At the
1103.de and undisturbed serenity of the holy man, the floors drew back astonished j but
1104.chief victim of their rag'e against the religion of Christ. Very soon they had spread th
1105. spit on it, and acknowledge Mahomet on pain of instant death. " Nay, rather," answe
1106. acknowledge Mahomet on pain of instant death. " Nay, rather," answered the abbot mee
1107. abbot meekly, " g-ive me too that holy symbol, that I may happy to die for Him who co
1108.or me." : 128 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. At that same moment the raised scymitar fell, and se
1109.o abjure the more readily the Christian religion. Then the chief thus addressed them " S
1110.s who giiarded you ; they had done with life, whicli has no attractions at their tig
1111." brows are yet unwrinkled, now is your time for enjoyment, and I offer you the menu
1112.the menus of attaining it. Kenoimce the religion of Christ, and emSee Moussa, my lieuten
1113.d I swear to you by the Crescent that I will treat you as I have treated him ; and n
1114. you your choice between the turban and death." " Death, death !" they all cried with
1115.choice between the turban and death." " Death, death !" they all cried with one voice
1116.between the turban and death." " Death, death !" they all cried with one voice, and i
1117." " Death, death !" they all cried with one voice, and immediately beg'an a song of
1118.ogether to claim their crown, four only being* reserved, wlioin the chief ke[)t back
1119.served, wlioin the chief ke[)t back for slavery. These were of lofty stature, and so be
1120.otto, THE MONKS OF LERINS. disappearing one 129 by one in the depths of the sky. Th
1121.ONKS OF LERINS. disappearing one 129 by one in the depths of the sky. Then Colombo
1122.ize nerves heart against the teiTors of death ; I will seek the Saracen ; slavery my
1123. heart against the teiTors of death ; I will seek the Saracen ; slavery my or martyr
1124.rs of death ; I will seek the Saracen ; slavery my or martyrdom, whichever be my lot, c
1125., can nothing avail to shake my faith I will go and try to bury my brethren; in orde
1126.rethren; in order to pay them this last duty, I ought to risk my hfe." brother," ans
1127.while the Saracens are in the island it will be useless to think of : "My burying oi
1128. "My burying oiw brethren to attempt it will be to incur But, however, if you beheve
1129.owever, if you beheve that your certain death. inspiration is of heaven, follow it, a
1130.n is of heaven, follow it, and the Lord will be your helper, covering you with braze
1131.ing you with brazen armour, so that you will be invincible; but for myself, I am vet
1132. vet too weak thus to present myself to death with deliberate purpose. The holy will
1133.death with deliberate purpose. The holy will of God be done." Accordingly, after giv
1134.th deliberate purpose. The holy will of God be done." Accordingly, after giving the
1135. himself by prayer before but he met no one, though threatening cries entering* war
1136.threw liimself on his face sobbing; but one blow from the scymitar of a Sai-acen se
1137.ent over the bodies of his brethren and being unable to procure any thing to make a l
1138.on the sod made holy by the blood of so many maitjTS, At first, his soul was wrapt i
1139.blood of so many maitjTS, At first, his soul was wrapt in sadness at the thought tha
1140.ot denied my faith, therefore you still love me I dare to hope it, and you will not
1141.till love me I dare to hope it, and you will not forget in heaven him who is still l
1142. of his The remembrance of your triumph will sustain foe. my faith, strengthen my ho
1143. joy seemed to pierce the depths of his soul, and he burst fortli invohmtarily into
1144.His next thought was of his own present duty and, some reflection, he resolved to go
1145.s, when lie heard the distant step of a man slowly advancing by the cloister wall.
1146.ood which surrounds me shall support my courage;" anrl he threw himself once more on hi
1147.ough several times he proposed to me to change my religion, yet on my refusing he left
1148.al times he proposed to me to change my religion, yet on my refusing he left me in peace
1149.igion, yet on my refusing he left me in peace. But when I reached the age of sixteen,
1150.f these noble martyrs, and sacrifice my life rather than my faith! At the moment of
1151.n I ceased to be a slave, and from that time began to live what is called a life of
1152.hat time began to live what is called a life of pleasure, but with Some time a bitte
1153. began to live what is called a life of pleasure, but with Some time a bitter sorrow in
1154.alled a life of pleasure, but with Some time a bitter sorrow in the depths of my hea
1155.tiers, and I accompanied him. From this time I have added crime to crime; under the
1156. my voice. How can I hope pardon from a God whom I have so outraged!" " my brother,
1157.d Eleuthenus, " the mercy The Divine of God is greater tlian even your crimes. ray
1158. repentance, and penance sh-all restore peace and felicity to your heart." By this ti
1159.ce and felicity to your heart." By this time the day had dawned, and they both occup
1160.a monk's (h-ess, which lie had found in one of the cells. From tliat time he devote
1161.d found in one of the cells. From tliat time he devoted hiinself to works of ])cnanc
1162.s with the monks whom Eleutherius had g-one and whom he hoped one day to see retm*n
1163.Eleutherius had g-one and whom he hoped one day to see retm*n to the convent. The S
1164.urning* towns, villag'es, and churches. One day, after the destruction of a churcli
1165.hief, Boalkier, remarked, for the first time, the absence of his lieutenant, Moussa,
1166.. They were both robbers by profession, one of whom had escaped from the public pri
1167.scaped from the public prisons, and the other was pursued by justice in consequence o
1168.c prisons, and the other was pursued by justice in consequence of a murder which he had
1169.d themselves from the veng-eauce of the law; the declaration of apostasy being* to
1170.of the law; the declaration of apostasy being* to them a mere formula, which they pro
1171.ced witliout any thoug-ht or conviction one way After taking- counsel together, the
1172. taking- counsel together, they or tlie other. ag-reed to explore first the Isle of L
1173.ng- witli the blood of tlie martyrs, an emotion to which they liad long" been strang-er
1174.nctuary was a monk praying. " Here is a man," said one, " who has had a narrow esca
1175. a monk praying. " Here is a man," said one, " who has had a narrow escape; what ar
1176.with him?" The When they came up to the other made no answer. monk, they saw that his
1177.with your head on your shoulders. It is one of these same Saracens that we are seek
1178.d on your shoulders. It is one of these same Saracens that we are seeking Moussa is
1179.d by example; but since the goodness of God gives me the opportunity of retrieving
1180.e ways of wickedness ; for there is yet time for you as well as for me. His mercy is
1181.te, as I am experiencing; but His wrath will indeed be ; : : dreadful if you continu
1182.ed be ; : : dreadful if you continue in sin." The two renegades looked one upon Btu
1183.tinue in sin." The two renegades looked one upon Btupified with astonishment. They
1184.nce. "What are we to do?" at last asked one of them. "Wliat.''" answered Moussa; "d
1185.eej) and pray, and l)ow befon; the just judgment of Goff. Unworthy as I am, I have taken
1186.I am, I have taken on myself tliis holy habit if you too would wear it, we may be com
1187.in penance, as we have hitherto been in sin." " ]iut have we not to fear the anger
1188.t which seemed consecrated to quiet and peace, sepai-ated by its thick surrounding" w
1189.and turmoils far : Not — of the outer world. In this lovely vale, a fitting- habita
1190.ion for those whose vow bound them to a life of holy retirement, stood a venerable c
1191.e Deacon John Cassian. To this abode of peace nocked innocent maidens and pious widow
1192.ed of the vanity and it; trouble of the world, and anxious to find a refugee from som
1193.iest and brightest years — — of all life, had heard the voice of their Red-eemer
1194.t to ibllow Him. ! Who can describe the happiness of their convent life of the peaceful d
1195.describe the happiness of their convent life of the peaceful days, every moment of w
1196. quickly Who can describe the ])eace of soul which reigned through all the Sisterhoo
1197.ed through all the Sisterhood, in which love of God and charity for each other had c
1198.gh all the Sisterhood, in which love of God and charity for each other had created
1199. which love of God and charity for each other had created one heart, and obedience to
1200. and charity for each other had created one heart, and obedience to their rule and
1201.e to their rule and their superior only one will The superior of this convent at th
1202. their rule and their superior only one will The superior of this convent at the tim
1203.ill The superior of this convent at the time when the event we are about to record t
1204.signifies pious.' This noble virgin was one '^ I'M CATHOLIC LEGENDS. of a family of
1205.n was one '^ I'M CATHOLIC LEGENDS. of a family of wealth and consideration ; but from
1206.'^ I'M CATHOLIC LEGENDS. of a family of wealth and consideration ; but from her tender
1207.ieu to the honours and pleasures of the world, and, what in those days of early g-irl
1208.nd came to lay her rich dowry, her rare beauty, and a devoted heart, all, without rese
1209.md elected her their mother. About this time frig'htful tales of the crimes and outr
1210. been very difficult, while their quiet life went on in its daily routine of duties
1211.alize the horrors under which the outer world was gToaning'j and it is ])robable that
1212.e only community may well be imaainecl. death which they had to fear, t'fiey would ha
1213.derers with calmness, for thougli human nature might shrink from the axe and scourge,
1214.er composure. At the first sound of the evil tiding-s she had soug'ht the foot of th
1215.nestly upon the crucifix, and her whole form immovable as a statue. Suddenly she sta
1216.head, and her eyes beamed like those of one who had received a sudden inspiration b
1217.wards a larg-e cnicifix, which hung- at one end of the cloisters; down on her knees
1218.. Look on His mangled body; there is no beauty there, and yet it is not represented as
1219.the followers of a martyred, a tortured God, to do with beauty? is it meet that we.
1220. a martyred, a tortured God, to do with beauty? is it meet that we. His en atures. His
1221.hich we have vowed ourselves to obtain? Courage, my children, let us save ourselves fro
1222. inspire nothing but horror. Furious at being thus defeated in their end, the barbari
1223.ring the reign of the Emperor Trajan, a man of great and distinguished virtue and r
1224.rajan, a man of great and distinguished virtue and renown, named Placidus, led the Rom
1225.rich in the gentler virtues of domestic life, he was dear to all wlio mingled with h
1226.was necessary to fill up his measure of happiness, riches, honour, earthly love; what moi
1227.e of happiness, riches, honour, earthly love; what moi-e could be deAnd Placidus was
1228.acidus was a sired to satisfy a heathen soul'/ heathen; not one of those joining inv
1229.o satisfy a heathen soul'/ heathen; not one of those joining inveterately in the cr
1230.ys of Trsijan the Merciful, arose ^-oni time to time against the infant little THE L
1231.sijan the Merciful, arose ^-oni time to time against the infant little THE LEGEND OF
1232.a heathen, and shared ax-^owedlv in the universal feeling of contempt with which the imme
1233.rought down upon Placidus the regard of God ? Who shall attempt to limit His grace,
1234.accustomed to spend fice it much of his time in the forests ; finding in piu-suit of
1235.ests ; finding in piu-suit of stags and other game a recreation particularly acceptab
1236.a recreation particularly acceptable to one so long accustomed to tlie activity of
1237.vity of service in the field of battle. One day that Placidus and all his gallant c
1238.s bounded forwanls gladly ; m pui-suit. One it stag, larger and fleeter tlian tlie
1239.eps of tlie majestic stag. Sometimes in one directinn, sometimes in another, up ste
1240.ch. On and on he went, forgetful of the time, the distance, the closing hour of the
1241.ame. Touched in that moment to the very soul, Placidus sank upon his knees, and excl
1242.nk upon his knees, and exclaimed, " Who art thou, Lord ?" " persecutest thou Me, Pl
1243. Placidus the voice replied. " I am the God thou ignorantly \vorshippest; Jesus, th
1244.thy Lord. Thine alms and jirayers have ^one up before Me, and therefore am I come.
1245.ou dost hunt this stag, so henceforward will I hunt thee." "TeU me Thy will, Lord,"
1246.eforward will I hunt thee." "TeU me Thy will, Lord," cried Placidus, A Why f "that I
1247.he voice re" I am the Son of the living God. I created heaven and earth, and divide
1248.ed days, and seasons, and years. formed man out of the dust of the ground and for h
1249.d and for his sake took upon Me his own form. Crucified and buried. on the third day
1250." replied Placidus " yea, and that thou art He who bringest back sinners to tlie wa
1251.be bajrtised. mayest know of thy future life." Long wn\)t in silent awe, Placidus re
1252.might risk alike tlie conversion or the life of an ajiplicant, no hour was too late
1253.: THE LEGEND OF PLACIDUS. 141 venerable man, and repeated his profession of faith,
1254.ice. And thus it spoke to him " Blessed art tliou, Eustace, in that thou hast been
1255.en him to dust, who beg^iiled thee. Now will thy fidelity be shown for he whom thou
1256.be shown for he whom thou hast forsaken will rage continually against thee. Many thi
1257.ken will rage continually against thee. Many things must thou undergo for sake. Thou
1258.nquer ; choose, then, whether thou wilt experience thy trials in thine old age, or forthwi
1259.Eustace," spake the voice, for the last time. " Be bold; My grace can bear thee up."
1260.y trial." if it may be But a very short time passed by before Eustace became conscio
1261.ce became conscious of an extraordinary change in all his worldly prospects; and had n
1262.doned thorn. But, enlightened by Divine wisdom, Eustace recognised with joy that his p
1263. that his portion was no longer in this world and that it was tlirough a narrow way,
1264.at he was to follow his heavenly Guide. One by one his treasures dropped away. Dise
1265.as to follow his heavenly Guide. One by one his treasures dropped away. Disease con
1266.ed his possessiDns ravao-ed; he and his family gTanually became destitute and homeless
1267. became destitute and homeless. In this state he resolved, for the sake of his family
1268. state he resolved, for the sake of his family, to apply to Trajan; but the news of hi
1269. for the voyage but on per; ceiving the beauty of Theosbyta, his wife, a diabolical sc
1270.s wife, a diabolical scheme entered his mind; he consented, and the ChrisNo sooner h
1271.s resolute in pressing his claim and on being assured by Eustace that he Imd nothing
1272.n now were all remaining to him in this world, once a treaSilent and musing on the my
1273. mysterisure-house of joys. ous ways of God, but still without a murmur, Eustace, c
1274.t the biink of a wide river, and on the other side Eustace perceived a group of trees
1275.sbytus, and placed him in safety on the other side retui-ning" for Ag'apetus, what wa
1276.f some bushes by the river side. By the time Eustace had strug-g-led to the nearest
1277., ren had been earned out of sig-ht. my God !" cried Eustace, fling-ing* himself fa
1278.fling-ing* himself face downwaras " Thy will be done; henceforward I on the g"round.
1279.f all, except the presence of an unseen angel that came and comforted him. When human
1280.that came and comforted him. When human nature had wept its full, and divine consolati
1281.ations had strengthened and cleared his mind, Eustace arose once more, and jour; A n
1282.ss on the bare ground, a vision sent by God came like bnlm into his tortured heart.
1283.ing the dress of soldiers, noble and in angel beauty they stood before him, their mot
1284.e dress of soldiers, noble and in angel beauty they stood before him, their mother bea
1285.CATHOLIC LEGENDS. recalled Eustace to a sense of his bereavement, he felt that tender
1286.that tender comfoi-t ling-ering- in his mind, he felt that he should yet meet with l
1287.ls began to subside; and every effort a man so ])!)or and destitute of friends coul
1288.ess at last, he committed the future to God, and settled himself down as the hired
1289.self more willingly beneath the hand of God. " Tliou doest all things well !" he wh
1290.re forgetfvd of himself than others; no one knew more than this; he never spoke but
1291.w more than this; he never spoke but of necessity, and then never of himself. In fifteen
1292. without a wish to cliange his Meantime peace no longer reigiiod in liome, enelife. m
1293.se the emperor, some trembling- for the fate of their country, and a few from affect
1294. generous zeal beyond the others, amved one day, footsore and weary, before the cot
1295. made inquiries of their host as to the fate of Placidus. Eustace started, but conce
1296.us. Eustace started, but concealing his emotion, evaded their questions, for he had no
1297., evaded their questions, for he had no desire to brave once more tlie dangers and tem
1298.earts of thousands. that of a king, his wealth houndless, his prosperity unThey wept w
1299. have spent there the remaindei" of his life he shrunk from the thought of Rome, the
1300.gan city, rich in idol shrines and this world's lujnuy, underneath all which, in sile
1301.nt, bowed itself secretly the Church of God but fearing that in this unwillingness
1302.nd committing his future to the care of God, quitted his lonely dwelling with his g
1303.might offer up their souls in prayer to God, for they were Christians. Unconsciousl
1304.en years before, and paused beneath the same group of trees which had allured him to
1305.ig-ht so shadowy and motionless, that a sense of awe, as if in the presence of some s
1306.if in the presence of some supernatural being-, mingled with the instinctive reverenc
1307.ose, but not in terror; she seemed like one who has nothing; any long-er The young-
1308.ady they they had long- since told each other the wonderful tale of tlieir preservati
1309.ther. " Your name .'"' they g-asj)ed in one Itrcatli. "Tlieosbvta,'' she answered,
1310.ere brothers, for 148 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. one wild cry, as they threw themselves impe
1311.aptismal innocence before the throne of God, to plead for him and their imha})py mo
1312. spiritual visitations glanced over his mind ; but on one of the young men looking u
1313.itations glanced over his mind ; but on one of the young men looking up, he recogni
1314.Roman armies, was a Christian. Making a sign to his brother, Theosbytus rose upon hi
1315.thful eye pierced through the veil that time and grief had wrouglit over her feature
1316. was to be the portion of thy Christian life." ''The will of God be done in all thin
1317.e portion of thy Christian life." ''The will of God be done in all thing-s," replied
1318.n of thy Christian life." ''The will of God be done in all thing-s," replied Eustac
1319.n!" echoed by his wife and sons brought peace into their heai-ts, almost too deeply m
1320.pt as a slave by the wicked captain for many years of anxious misery, but that God h
1321. many years of anxious misery, but that God had guarded her ; and when, after her m
1322.rded her ; and when, after her master's death, she became once more free, she had lab
1323.her that the lion which had seized him, being- pursued by hunters before it had time
1324.being- pursued by hunters before it had time to do him any serious injury, dropped h
1325.ther of their parents, they had remamed many years with the friendly villagers, unti
1326.)resence of their leader inspired every man with confidence and courage, and news w
1327. inspired every man with confidence and courage, and news was sent to Rome that filled
1328.ut tlie return of the army was for some time delayed; pursuing his conI Then Theosby
1329. Christian !" Adrian caught the word. " Art tliou a Cljristian?" he demanded '' fie
1330.his altar," whispered a friendly voice. will die first !" cried Eustace, kindling at
1331.e whisper, for he knew it to be that of one to bcfithenism, since won back —who h
1332.words, detei-mined now to share the Hor fate of her bfloved ones, whntever that inig
1333.those who stooa around, and echoea from one to another till he heard and understood
1334.ard and understood them. " There is but one fate for you all," he answered ; " take
1335.and understood them. " There is but one fate for you all," he answered ; " take them
1336. his wife and sons. But not a quiver of emotion was discernible a holy smile of triumph
1337.t even Eustace, on proclaiming' himself one, had lost at once all title to their es
1338.o arts of mag-ic. Already the Christian family were exposed before the raging- beasts
1339.posed before the raging- beasts but not one would open its mouth against them. Calm
1340.or in the side of tlie figin-e o})ened. One 1)y one the martyrs ascended the ladder
1341.e side of tlie figin-e o})ened. One 1)y one the martyrs ascended the ladder, entere
1342. immense multitude held their breath as one m;in, and a shudder of irrepressible li
1343.de radiant the faces of Eustace and his family as they disappeared one by one within i
1344.tace and his family as they disappeared one by one within its cavity, and looking*
1345.d his family as they disappeared one by one within its cavity, and looking* on each
1346.within its cavity, and looking* on each other they marvelled how these Christians sho
1347.arvelled how these Christians should to death. Then games and processions honour of t
1348. the martyrs calmly, side by side ; the same smile was on their faces, no change or
1349.; the same smile was on their faces, no change or smell of fire had passed over them.
1350. or smell of fire had passed over them. God had given His beloved sleep. The martyr
1351.d given His beloved sleep. The martyred family still lives in the memory of the Church
1352. The martyred family still lives in the memory of the Church ; and the Catholic travel
1353.the Church ; and the Catholic traveller will recall their affecting story as he visi
1354. is long since gone, like tlie house of God. known now is, that it was the mansion
1355.at it was the mansion of an illustrious family, that signalised themselves in arms ; a
1356.eeds extended far and wide, so that her memory has been handed down to, and respected
1357. The people, who have forgotten all her other titles, still call her the blessed one.
1358.ther titles, still call her the blessed one. On one of these days, at the close of
1359.les, still call her the blessed one. On one of these days, at the close of winter,
1360.ng along the avenue of her chateau, her mind Having arrived at tlie occupied with pi
1361.s not a little surprised at seeing that one of the bushes was already charged with
1362.iful small stars, she carefully removed one of its branches for the ]nir})ose of su
1363.urned, her heart surcharged with joy at being tlie bearer of this simple offering. Wh
1364. Jesus, or that a peculiar, undefinable pleasure is reserved for the slightest effusion
1365. tender heart towards the object of its love, the soul of the lady of the manor neve
1366.art towards the object of its love, the soul of the lady of the manor never experien
1367.ined faitliful to lier enfresh garland. One day, however, wlien g-agemeiit who can
1368.-worms, brought out belore their proper time, could not with any possibility be imag
1369. self-imposed, presenting itself to her mind, and somewhat giving her courage, she a
1370.lf to her mind, and somewhat giving her courage, she advanced slowly with bated bi-eath
1371.e mystery, on the following day, at the same hour in the evening, she repaired to th
1372. thicket, accompanied by a faithful The same delicious servant, and by her old chapl
1373.s tlie flowery thorns, chanting* at the same time a cliurcli hynm, and removed them
1374.e flowery thorns, chanting* at the same time a cliurcli hynm, and removed them aside
1375.d a It was an image of the Blessed long time motionless. Virgin, rudely carved in wo
1376.nounced these words, would have induced one to imag-ine that they were reHe then so
1377. unconsciously, in the highest style of poetry; and after renewed acts of adoration, h
1378.ristians who experienced such unalloyed happiness at finding it. What unknown sin could h
1379.d happiness at finding it. What unknown sin could have brought down this disgi-ace
1380.shness of the grove, there to taste the peace of her soHtude and the sweet odour of h
1381.s, then, is the temple that you prefer. will be done." And in a little time after, a
1382. prefer. will be done." And in a little time after, a temple gorgeous smd a temple s
1383.nded far and wide through the Christian world, and induced a gTeat many pious women t
1384.he Christian world, and induced a gTeat many pious women to fix their abode in the v
1385. appointment of superioress and after a life of good works and edifying examples, wh
1386.ment of superioress and after a life of good works and edifying examples, which, lik
1387.Flem'ies. XXIII. CATHERINE OF ROME. the time of the second visit of the great paDomi
1388. pursuing his apostolic labours at that time, yet he could not resist the appeal whi
1389. the view of remedying the idleness and vice of those attached to the court ; whilst
1390. attached to the court ; whilst, at the same time, he preached daily in the churches
1391.ched to the court ; whilst, at the same time, he preached daily in the churches to t
1392.urs an abundant fruit of souls. at this time by the preaching and propagation of the
1393. devotion of the Rosary; and among- the many wonderful effects which followed on the
1394.ng' story is related. There was at that time in Rome a woman, named Cathei-iue, who
1395.d long' lived in the violation of every law of God, and whose hou-se was the resort
1396. lived in the violation of every law of God, and whose hou-se was the resort of the
1397.ated society of the city, over whom her beauty and talents g-ave her a fatally powerfu
1398., although she had long neglected every duty of religion, was induced by the novelty
1399.gh she had long neglected every duty of religion, was induced by the novelty which attac
1400.St. Dominic's preaching, to go and hear one of his sermons. It made so deep an impr
1401.-ther; and receiving from his own hands one of the rosaries, which he was accustome
1402.rson, and began the daily recital of it many years having passed since she had said
1403.she had said a single prayer imtil that time. But long habits of a worldly and sinfu
1404.But long habits of a worldly and sinful life were not to be overcome by a temporary
1405.nd Catherine's new devotion produced no change in her manner of living. But God design
1406. no change in her manner of living. But God designed to make this soul a special mo
1407.f living. But God designed to make this soul a special monument of His mercy, and at
1408.ecial monument of His mercy, and at the same time to mark, by the manner of her conv
1409. monument of His mercy, and at the same time to mark, by the manner of her conversio
1410. attach to the devotion of tlie Rosary. One day, as she was walking near her own ho
1411.ar her own house, there met her a young man of noble and majestic appearance, whose
1412. aspect felt before. filled her with an emotion she had never Addressing himself to her
1413.y attracted her heart, filled it at the same time witli a certain sensation of awe,
1414.racted her heart, filled it at the same time witli a certain sensation of awe, he bi
1415. to become her guest. Catherine lost no time in making every tiling ready, and they
1416.t first steeped in the " In the name of God," said the '^lood of his Lord ?" terrif
1417.en, " tell me who you are, and what you desire of " That you shall presently know," re
1418.at we may be alone together." The order being duly obeyed, he rose from his seat, and
1419.to that of a little child of surpassing beauty, yet a beauty His face had all the love
1420.ittle child of surpassing beauty, yet a beauty His face had all the lovelirather divin
1421.etfidness of terrible remorse her whole life came before her soul with a vivid inten
1422. remorse her whole life came before her soul with a vivid intenbut the sit}' which w
1423.inting spirits, as He said, " Enough of sin and liardness of heart, my sister; look
1424.sed not to endure uj) to the hour of My death." Then another change passed over the f
1425. to the hour of My death." Then another change passed over the figure before her, and
1426.d the whole body bathed in the sweat of death. This vision lasted but a few moments ;
1427. person. It was not only from face nrid form that this glory beamed forth as from a
1428.spect, was now clotlied with a wondrous beauty, beyond all human loveliness, and flash
1429.ons, meditation on the mysteries of His life and death which are given in the Mosary
1430.tation on the mysteries of His life and death which are given in the Mosary is what i
1431.sed, placed the direction of her future life in his hands ; for lie seemed to her as
1432.his hands ; for lie seemed to her as an angel of God sent to guide her yet further on
1433. ; for lie seemed to her as an angel of God sent to guide her yet further on that w
1434.ion was completed ; and the rest of her life was spent in so penitent and holy a man
1435.e transformation which, by the mercy of God, had been wrought in her soul. Hencefor
1436.e mercy of God, had been wrought in her soul. Henceforth meditation on those divine
1437.e, was her constant devotion and at her death (which took place many years aftenvards
1438.tion and at her death (which took place many years aftenvards, when she had distril)
1439. the poor, and had herself retired to a life of strict poverty and continual prayer)
1440.irgin appeared to her, and received her soul at the moment that she expired. Her bod
1441.f blood. Enter into the church, and you will feel that the mere surface of humanity
1442.n'ound you have tested the realities of life ; and the future has nothing terrible f
1443.est ; if you look more attentively, you will see the insignia of their rank. Some ma
1444. an aureole of glory even in this lower life. Listen the heart of that mighty multit
1445.ighty multitude goes up as the voice of one man in thanksgiving to God. 'I'hat sole
1446.y multitude goes up as the voice of one man in thanksgiving to God. 'I'hat solemn a
1447.the voice of one man in thanksgiving to God. 'I'hat solemn ancient chant, it bowed
1448. themselves or their own sufferings not one thoug-ht of self-g-ratulation marred th
1449.e making- atonement, they were thanking God for those mystei-ies of faith, tliat Ch
1450.e mystei-ies of faith, tliat Christ was God, that God had died in human form for ma
1451.es of faith, tliat Christ was God, that God had died in human form for man. Far awa
1452.ist was God, that God had died in human form for man. Far away over the blue Meditei
1453.od, that God had died in human form for man. Far away over the blue MediteiTanean t
1454. in such a flood of light and spiritual beauty as is only to be seen beneath the sunse
1455.sound, and bore it before the throne of God. In its eager impetuosity of love it tr
1456.one of God. In its eager impetuosity of love it tried to make amends to the sacred h
1457.in semicircles on either side. He was a man of tall statm-e and commanding countena
1458.nderstood when we remember that even in life he A\as reckoned nmong tlie number of t
1459. stood tliere, addressing for the first time the flock wlach had been committed to h
1460.leaivoice made on the hearts of all was one of recollection, humility, and peace. T
1461. was one of recollection, humility, and peace. The dove, wherein reposed the adorable
1462.ed himself anathema, rather than behold one of his children fall away from the fait
1463.goes back into the past, with his whole soul filled with thoughts of those among who
1464.of the faith were at the very height of peace and prosperity. The voice of the gTcat
1465.mselves in vain, was scarcely hushed in death; the Church of Carthage seemed to sit e
1466.aters brought to her feet the learning, wealth, and respectful salutations of the rest
1467.rian armies, and in an incredibly short space of time the whole country was laid wnst
1468.es, and in an incredibly short space of time the whole country was laid wnste. These
1469. These Vandals wei-e, for the greater |)art, Arians, and joined the sacrilegious ma
1470.here had the see had been vacant twenty-one years. been small time for ceremony or
1471.een vacant twenty-one years. been small time for ceremony or preparation ; the sliep
1472. he espoused the Church of Carthage was one of certain suifering, and almost certai
1473.f certain suifering, and almost certain death; knowing that the present lull in the s
1474.could have seen in that moment the real life that lay before him; the long lingering
1475.ng lingering martyrdom, harder far than death the agony of betrayal and apostasy amon
1476.sy amongst some he trusted most. But we will not anticipate but listen as he stands
1477.ith the foot of lowliness, fearing only sin, which will easily make an apost-ate of
1478.t of lowliness, fearing only sin, which will easily make an apost-ate of a confessor
1479.of pride upliltoth Chastity, therefore, being the splendour of charity, and martyrdom
1480.splendour of charity, and martyrdom the particular crown of both, humility is their safest
1481.ve no fear that the weakest amongst you will fall away benpath any temptation yea, e
1482.n sliall be strong, ana up her child to death, gazing on the Mother o£ the tender of
1483.zing on the Mother o£ the tender offer God beneath the Cross." into the sea, and s
1484.Eugenius. He burst forth " angels of my God, glorious patriarchs and prophets, inte
1485.ll the maimed and tortured body rest in peace ; soon shall the everlasting niiptials
1486.tials of the Lamb be celebrated, and He will lead the choice ones of His flock into
1487. men left the " liouse and the dove" in peace. will conduct our readers over some s|i
1488.ft the " liouse and the dove" in peace. will conduct our readers over some s|i!ice o
1489.onduct our readers over some s|i!ice of time, in which the pledge Eugenius gave thnt
1490.ys of its Roman occupation. Jhit at the time of which we are speaking, the gi'acefid
1491. power before which the mistress of the world had sunk into the dust was to be launch
1492.But now through the deserted streets of one a that old city two men are passing qui
1493.o men are passing quickly venerable old man in the dress of an ecclesiastic ; the o
1494.n in the dress of an ecclesiastic ; the other clearly showing by his fair complexion,
1495.nd short, firm-set stature, that he was one of the Scipiano," which led to : warlik
1496.sake of your saintly -Master, hold your peace imtil we reach the open shore; there sh
1497.he blood came ; but his hand traced the sign of the cross, and the fury which his Sc
1498.bore Scipio to the conquest of this new world. To the east lay the mausoleum of the r
1499.royal ! ! — My : 166 CATHOMC LEGENDS. family of Massinissa, now vulg-arly called " t
1500.." Above the resting-place of the dead, one fair solitary palm-tree stood out ag;ai
1501. a palm-tree in Cades. The quiet of the time and place seemed to still the stormy sp
1502.gainst Eugenius the holy, the wise, the good, and it scarcely stirs your blood." The
1503. it scarcely stirs your blood." The old man gazed out upon the waste of waters, as
1504.out upon the waste of waters, as though other scenes than those he looked on were beH
1505. paused long- before he spoke, fore his mind's eye. and then seemed rather tliinking
1506.e within its walls. companion : alive ; One old man vkxs amongst tliem, wliose spir
1507. its walls. companion : alive ; One old man vkxs amongst tliem, wliose spirit was w
1508.ought of torture and insult and violent death. He looked to the distant shores of Spa
1509.and at least of rest and a quiet grave. one of the last to embai'k, and as he looke
1510.-rowfully to the land he was leaving, a form seemed to float Tqion the edge of the b
1511.m, and a voice breathed into his inmost soul, ' Can it be that ; THE MIRACLE OF TYPA
1512.nging- for martyrdom, would not embark. Love rekindled the failing- torch of faith.
1513.die with them. My son, call not the old man g-ift indifferent because his God has g
1514.e old man g-ift indifferent because his God has given him the Theobald fell on his
1515.knees and of patience." pressed the old man's hand to his lips ; he would have poiu
1516.iddings of our holy bisliop ; but first will it please you to declare, in brief word
1517. Eug-enius' name on the lips of all, as one whoso sanctity and wonderful gifts made
1518. ^he doors of the churches and when any one passed in clothed in the habit of a Van
1519.d when any one passed in clothed in the habit of a Vandal, tliey struck them on the h
1520.ogether. The agony was so intense tliat many died, and many lost their eye-sight but
1521.ony was so intense tliat many died, and many lost their eye-sight but not one would
1522., and many lost their eye-sight but not one would give up their faith." Theobald co
1523.a wandering sheep, into the fold. I saw one, Dionysia, a matron of noble birth and
1524. that gaze. When they had wreaked their will on her, they turned to the son. His che
1525.used she started to the mother from her death-like swoon her feet, and in a voice whi
1526., as he endured the torment with heroic courage and when he coidd no longer stand, his
1527.hou hast become the spiritual mother of many children in Christ. And the end, my son
1528.other offers the daily sacrifice of her life." "And the clerg}' ?" asked the priest
1529.ugh the miseries of the times ; and the love of his children for him is strong as de
1530.ve of his children for him is strong as death. The moon is not new since nearly 5000
1531.nd said they must now return, for their time was not yet come. Then the air was rent
1532.ve, but of those who were returning* to life. Mothers cast their babes at the feet o
1533.hom do you leave yoiu" desolate fiock ? will baptise our children ? will bin y us wi
1534.ate fiock ? will baptise our children ? will bin y us with solemn supplication after
1535.bin y us with solemn supplication after death ? By whom sliall the Divine Who Who rai
1536.ert, which should lighten the Christian world that if their voices wore hushed in dea
1537.rld that if their voices wore hushed in death, God would raise tlie dead, or make tli
1538.t if their voices wore hushed in death, God would raise tlie dead, or make tlie dum
1539.ie dumb to speak, rather than allow His truth to be without a witSacrifice be offered
1540.he name of Christ. brought us, that not one of those tenible serpents have dared to
1541.e we ! pai't for the night." " They are evil tidings," said Theobald, after a " I wo
1542.ishop has informed him of your stedfast opposition to his intrusion of your courageous cel
1543. their worst. What that worst may be no one knows but the bishop sends you health a
1544.fourscore years and more Thou hast done good things unto me, A "0 and now thou dost
1545. dost suffer mains of this miserable me life. to give Thee all that re- Blessed be T
1546.d be thou of the Lord, my son, for tlie good tidings thou Iiast brought me this day.
1547.MIRACLE OF TYPASUS. the barbarians; and will 171 tell him, by the grace of God, we w
1548. and will 171 tell him, by the grace of God, we word, that the beacon which has bee
1549.ll know redeem his ; and own that He is God who weak and contemptible tliing-s of g
1550.tliing-s of g-iveth victory to the this world. And now depart quickly, ray son," he s
1551.d of the youth, who knelt in speechless emotion to receive his parting* blessing*. "It
1552.ng* blessing*. "It seemeth that the sun will soon rise, which sliall not set until t
1553.est heart's blood for thy Lord. But the time is not yet ; therefore depart in peace,
1554.e time is not yet ; therefore depart in peace, and do my bidding- with the holy bisho
1555.ric hoped by the mere multiplication of animal strength to subdue tliat si)iritual ene
1556.ng from their pastors they strengthened one another for the fiery trial which await
1557.ial which awaited them ; they gave each other the kiss of peace, and sang their "Nunc
1558.them ; they gave each other the kiss of peace, and sang their "Nunc dimittis" with jo
1559.tizens, the children of the north tomed many words. One change, and one onlv, of and
1560.children of the north tomed many words. One change, and one onlv, of and liberty an
1561.dren of the north tomed many words. One change, and one onlv, of and liberty and honou
1562.north tomed many words. One change, and one onlv, of and liberty and honour lies be
1563.words. One change, and one onlv, of and liberty and honour lies before you. Submit to t
1564.he Catholic Church, and in her bosom we will die. For Clirist is very God, and the v
1565. bosom we will die. For Clirist is very God, and the virgin Mother of God stood ben
1566.t is very God, and the virgin Mother of God stood beneath the cross of her Son." Th
1567.on their jirey, and tearing deal not in life — THE MIRACLE OF TYPASUS. " 173 shout
1568.ou seized hast given me I have lost not one." The Vandal then knelt upon his breast
1569.And so it went on. The it is marvellous life remained. subdeacon Reparatus was the n
1570. even tlwy seemed satiated. Human foes. nature seemed laid as low as Iniman hands coul
1571.ht; and preparing to leave them to xn^' fate, the foremost, giving a contemptuous ki
1572.ng a contemptuous kick to th% prostrate form of Ileparatus tlie subdeacon, exchumed,
1573.deacon, exchumed, " Ha, blasphemer thou art silenced once and for ever now why stan
1574.d ye not wp nnd jircach as of old, of a God dying on a cross, and a»v()inan, the m
1575.cross, and a»v()inan, the motlier of a God Clioice witnesses are ye t'"\ly^ ^y^9S
1576.ing* the sentence, " The Chnsfc is very God of very God; and Mary the Mothei of God
1577.tence, " The Chnsfc is very God of very God; and Mary the Mothei of God stood benea
1578.God of very God; and Mary the Mothei of God stood beneath the cross of her Son." Th
1579.on the sj)ot of their torture, g'iving" God thanks for the miraculous gift He had v
1580.ence of these wondrous witnesses of the truth; and ever as the ''Credo" came from the
1581. of all who heard them, of the might of God's power, and the strength of His Church
1582.xe gleaming over him, he was still tlie same, the : — unslirinking confessor of th
1583.hat precious faitli, dearer to him than life. Still it seemed as though the yearning
1584. though the yearninglive longing of his soul miglit not be gratified he was to winte
1585.ound of sullorings, to which his eag'cr love of tlie Cross continually added acre. H
1586. for whicli lie could not account. "The Evil One is busv," he muttered : THE MIRACLE
1587.whicli lie could not account. "The Evil One is busv," he muttered : THE MIRACLE OF
1588.poke no word, and the "Speak, my strong man's face was wet with tears. son," said t
1589.liis face, and spoke in the low tone of one whose heart is torn by .every word he u
1590. of at Tripolis have fallen into deadly sin, and they are speechless. In their mif^
1591.out all the Churches, that the mercy of God may In-ing them to repentance: and do y
1592.Eugenius died at last in exile, full of good works, and in a monastery which he hims
1593.ied sufferings of his long and agitated life, the agony of that night was the only o
1594.e, the agony of that night was the only one which seemed woi-th remembering. But th
1595.ring. But the tears which the saints of God weep for the had 176 CATHOLIC LEGENDS.
1596.s his Never had they departed from that law which bride. sent them daily from house
1597. tliey passed, for tliey bore back your imagination to Judea and the streets of Jenzsalom,
1598.m, and filled you with tlie thoughts of One who was the first to stamp the mark of
1599.tion they imitated so well. Now, at the time of which we * 'l"he trutli of tiio mira
1600.e is as well ascertained as any fact in history. It has recently been critically examin
1601. driven away with curses and abuse, and many a hard word was levelled against the *'
1602. complaining at what seemed as much a j)art ot their state as the habit that they w
1603.at what seemed as much a j)art ot their state as the habit that they wore. Now this r
1604.d as much a j)art ot their state as the habit that they wore. Now this resignation an
1605.st the fnars and the very appearance of one of them in the street was a signal for
1606.he brethren became excessive. There was one of tlie citizens named Louis, the riche
1607. tlie citizens named Louis, the richest man in the town, who had lately married a y
1608.hout giving tlioni some trifie i'or the love of God. It was late in the day wlien th
1609.ing tlioni some trifie i'or the love of God. It was late in the day wlien the poor
1610. LEGENDS. He bad still been on foot for many hours, and bis ba^ was It discourag-ed.
1611.olinesses, why, work like honest men we will have no vagrants V ; here." "May it fri
1612.s V ; here." "May it friar, please you, good sir," replied the trembling It has plea
1613.o try us during this last week as seems good to Him, and none of us have broken fast
1614. us have broken fast this day ; but you will scarce refuse to help us for His love ;
1615.u will scarce refuse to help us for His love ;" and he held out his little box with
1616.e Lady Octavia forsooth !" returned the other; " let her look well to it ere she have
1617.to souls." Begone, and tell fast if you will us it is jjrofitable to our He friar bu
1618.nd would have shut the door; to speak. "Good we have ward you sir," " I verily toile
1619.en nothing; send me not away empty, and God will i-eyour charity, even as though yo
1620.othing; send me not away empty, and God will i-eyour charity, even as though you did
1621.f a stick. " Say that name again, and I will send you home THE DEMON-PHEACHKIl. 179
1622.ll yonr bag-," was the angry i-e" Here, good neigiiboni-s, help me to drive this plv
1623.me to the convent-giites, it was a hard matter for the poor friar to eifect his entran
1624. heavy hearts and downcast eyes, whilst one of them read aloud, as was their custom
1625.st one of them read aloud, as was their custom and the tables were covered as usual, b
1626.e only disturbed the ])ub]ic quiet. The courage of many ; "of the friars was fast faili
1627.urbed the ])ub]ic quiet. The courage of many ; "of the friars was fast failing them
1628.done better to have accepted lands like other of our communities," said one. " Our fa
1629.ds like other of our communities," said one. " Our father Francis meant not that hi
1630. we be sons of ])Overty, wooden vessels will serve our turn, and befit us be-^t. ' t
1631.t on us, and which bind us under mortal sin ? Fear not for the future for God Himse
1632.ortal sin ? Fear not for the future for God Himself has surely promised His help to
1633.promised His help to them that keep the same ; and His promises are not void." But t
1634.," said those angelic tones, "wherefore art thou here ? I come to drive thee hqnce,
1635. humble thy pride." "Thou mayest do thy will," returned the malignant spirit; "but I
1636.but I, too, have had mine: there is not one of all these friars but has done me goo
1637.one of all these friars but has done me good service this day, for they have doubted
1638.service this day, for they have doubted God's woi-d and inisti-usted His promise. I
1639.e them thus." " But not tlius shalt and evil serpent," returaed the archangel thou l
1640. and shall brin^ Louis also to a better mind, and shall restore chai'ity to the hear
1641. the citizens yea, so that of their own will they shall build another convent within
1642. convent within these city walls, where God shall be served and praised, and the ni
1643.t ag'ainst mine own house, least of all will I do work for that Francis of whom you
1644.emy." " Therefore is it given thee as a punishment for thy malice to do even as he would d
1645.and thou must obey. Thou shalt take the form of one of his friars, and shalt enter t
1646. must obey. Thou shalt take the form of one of his friars, and shalt enter the hous
1647. friars, and shalt enter the house; and good words shall ilow from thy lips ag-ainst
1648.s shall ilow from thy lips ag-ainst thy will; and thoii shalt recall the friai's to
1649. learn well what it is to fight against God and His saints." Tiiere was a knock at
1650.t to expect. monk, dressed in the rough habit of the order, stooil without ; but it w
1651. order, stooil without ; but it was not one of the coiinnunity, and the good friar
1652.was not one of the coiinnunity, and the good friar did not recollect ever to have A
1653.ce startled them strangely. " Mother of God !" exclaimed the astonished guardian, "
1654. far, and I was led here by the hand of God," replied the stranger; "so very far aw
1655.not on it as on yours." "And your name, good brother; you are of our oi-der?" "I am
1656.d Obedientus Obligatus; and I I wear it habit, as you they called me " Well, good bro
1657.it habit, as you they called me " Well, good brother," replied the guardian, " you a
1658.his city have risen up ag'ainst us, and will do notliing and we are oven now prepari
1659.ret we perisli for very want." The tall form of tlie strange awe was into all lofty;
1660.HE DEMON-PREACHER. 183 might be worn by one who ever bore about him some secret pai
1661.one who ever bore about him some secret pain; and as he spoke, his lips assumed for
1662.nfidence ? You ti-usted and prayed when God gave you abundance, and were ready with
1663.after two days of trial, your faith and courage have all fled away, and you are ready t
1664.away, and you are ready to believe that God's word, which He promised to your fathe
1665.out to fail much as you do wrong to the truth and fidelity of the Most High." And as
1666." And as he spoke, an expression of new pain shot ! across his face. " Saw you that
1667.s his face. " Saw you that ?" whispered one of the younger brothers to his nearest
1668.st neighbour ; " he is surely a saintly soul, whom it grieveth even to speak of sin;
1669.soul, whom it grieveth even to speak of sin; but he is about to speak again. I wot
1670.u who so lately didst give tliy vows to God, standest now before Him half resolved
1671.heart, did ye not know that sooner than one word of His shoukl fail, the angels the
1672.t resist or you speak Ijy the Spirit of God. gainsay your words, for they have a st
1673.my pai*t, I feel that, come what may, I will now die a thousand deaths ere I abandon
1674. ere I abandon this house, or infring;e one letter of the rule of Francis." nor I !
1675.uered, father, and are to us even as an angel of God ; do with us ns you will, for we
1676.ther, and are to us even as an angel of God ; do with us ns you will, for we know v
1677. as an angel of God ; do with us ns you will, for we know verily that He speaks by y
1678.tured him but brother Oblig'atus had no will of his own ; tliere was a stronger powe
1679.he brethren thoug'ht it was to Imle the emotion which their words produced), he continu
1680. produced), he continued " My brethren, God has been ang-ry ; but He will be appeas
1681. brethren, God has been ang-ry ; but He will be appeased by your prayers and humilia
1682.vide in His name for all your wants." " Good father," said tlie giiardian, " if you
1683.us ; " but c-et you to tlie clioir, and cause tlie g-atcs to be opened, for t will no
1684.d cause tlie g-atcs to be opened, for t will not return empty-handed." And now the u
1685.he appeals for charity, and all for the love of God. love of God words wliich came f
1686.ls for charity, and all for the love of God. love of God words wliich came fortli w
1687.r charity, and all for the love of God. love of God words wliich came fortli witli s
1688.y, and all for the love of God. love of God words wliich came fortli witli so sad a
1689.covetousness which takes the heart from God, and binds it like a galley-slave to Sa
1690.ave to Satan, and of the pride and self-love that likens them to devils, and defaces
1691.st men thought it all but the energy of one who laboured for fit words in which to
1692.red for fit words in which to ntter his idea, and the zeal for the salvation of soul
1693.ve in their hearts ; it was a wonderful change. And what was woi-st of all was to have
1694.rity, my masters, charity, for the dear love of God !" and as tliey dropped tlieir c
1695. masters, charity, for the dear love of God !" and as tliey dropped tlieir coins in
1696.to bow low, and promise prayers for his good benefactDrs, and to ask God to bless th
1697.rs for his good benefactDrs, and to ask God to bless them and reward their liberali
1698. received a divine revelation as to the truth ; and so indeed he had, but he did not
1699.y he did not seek his company, vet this time he could scarce avoid addressing him. l
1700., I could have done it in five days." " God does not work miracles without necessit
1701.." " God does not work miracles without necessity," answered the guardian coldly, for he
1702. saying-, witli an impatient gesture, " God always God / could have done it, I say.
1703.itli an impatient gesture, " God always God / could have done it, I say. " 1 know y
1704. that." the guardian, " and I know that God permits your presence here ; I know, to
1705.vout and than before tliere remains but one task laid on you by heaven to be accomp
1706.their liberal ; — THE DEMON-PREACHER. will be baffled. 187 Go, then, and convert t
1707.im, for the friar Obligatus was a great man in the town, the popular favounte, and
1708., there was that in his manner which no one dared openly to affront so Louis endure
1709.he physicians declared him in danger of death ; his wife hung over his bed, and implo
1710.lored him now at length to think of his soul ; but still he babbled of his money and
1711. it was a hopeless case. " Oh, would to God," said the weeping Octavia, " that the
1712.ar Obligatus were but here Run for him, good Beppo," she added, tuniing to an attend
1713.come at last." Then turning to the sick man, his whole form seemed to dilate, as he
1714.Then turning to the sick man, his whole form seemed to dilate, as he bui-st forth in
1715.seemed to dilate, as he bui-st forth in one of those strains of thrilling eloquence
1716.g the last five months. He spoke of the soul and of its loss its death tliat never d
1717.e spoke of the soul and of its loss its death tliat never dies, and tlie anguish of t
1718.hearers bristled on their heads, " That man must surely have seen tlie things where
1719.peak he of heaven or of hell, it is all one; it is as thoiigh he gazed on them with
1720. possessed but of the eternal regret of one that had been created to enjoy it and t
1721.ess it, and had once half tasted of its happiness, and then had lost it, and lost it thro
1722.emed to rise round the bed of the dying man it was the loss of God whereof he spoke
1723.bed of the dying man it was the loss of God whereof he spoke, of God the supreme be
1724.as the loss of God whereof he spoke, of God the supreme beauty, the supreme truth ;
1725.od whereof he spoke, of God the supreme beauty, the supreme truth ; of God the end of
1726. of God the supreme beauty, the supreme truth ; of God the end of all desires and all
1727. supreme beauty, the supreme truth ; of God the end of all desires and all love (an
1728.; of God the end of all desires and all love (and the plaintive echoes of his voice
1729.l lost lost lost ^' My master is a bold man," muttered Beppo to another attendant ;
1730.tus had uttered the last syllables, the death! ! — — — rattle was in his throat
1731.h from the lips of the speaker, he gave one convulsive motion of the hands, and fel
1732.ph, " mine own at length. Michael, thou art baffled now !" "Alas! the good friar is
1733.ael, thou art baffled now !" "Alas! the good friar is beside liimself," said the bys
1734.ndeed done your utmost with the unhappy man; we pray you take some rest ; your much
1735.g as witli some strong power, which his will. Broken sentences burst cannot nay, I w
1736.l. Broken sentences burst cannot nay, I will not he is mine, I say." Then turning to
1737.ER. 189 and demons have carried oiF his soul," said they one to another j " doubtles
1738.s have carried oiF his soul," said they one to another j " doubtless, Father ObUgat
1739.ess, Father ObUgatus hath witnessed the same, and hath much on his mind to speak to
1740.itnessed the same, and hath much on his mind to speak to us it will be a rare discou
1741.hath much on his mind to speak to us it will be a rare discourse." And so curiosity,
1742. at least had never heard the like. How many a sinner was roused from his dream of l
1743.they opened hell beneath his feet ; how many a ; cold, indifferent heart now felt fo
1744.ent what it was to have, and to lose, a soul. Yes, Louis had indeed become the victi
1745.varice and impiety but the loss of that one soul was tlie conversion of thousands.
1746.ce and impiety but the loss of that one soul was tlie conversion of thousands. And m
1747.l was tlie conversion of thousands. And many a man had afterwards reason to ; thank
1748.lie conversion of thousands. And many a man had afterwards reason to ; thank God da
1749. a man had afterwards reason to ; thank God day, which him from a for firet having
1750.oiight him to penitence, and saved like fate. The last sermon of the demon-friar was
1751.umph was over. Tearing off liis friar's habit, and casting it from liim, he cried, "
1752.apuchins," he said, " and to-morrow lie will declare to you what these things mean ;
1753.what these things mean ; but never more will ye behold the Friar Obligatus." As he s
1754.ords, and tlio casting away of the holy habit, perplexed them sorely, till the truth
1755. habit, perplexed them sorely, till the truth was declared, and then a yet more solem
1756.r been lost ; but far and wide, through many a city of Italy, and in other lands, ma
1757.e, through many a city of Italy, and in other lands, may still be found, in broken fr
1758. skill in battle, no less than hj their wisdom and prudence in time of peace, had acqu
1759.attle, no less than hj their wisdom and prudence in time of peace, had acquired great co
1760.ss than hj their wisdom and prudence in time of peace, had acquired great considerat
1761.hj their wisdom and prudence in time of peace, had acquired great consideration among
1762.ed banners, his ducal hat, his sword of state, the three larg-e diamonds, celebrated
1763.oor mountaineers, who, with the help of God, had defended their liberty against the
1764.ith the help of God, had defended their liberty against the cupidity and pride of a for
1765.normous loss, and Charles fled a second time, having with him only thirty men. Tlie
1766.eld at Zui'ich, in 1478, for concluding peace with Burg-undy, were to be seen envoys
1767. did not wear so serene an They cast at one aspect as might have been expected. ^no
1768.. have conjectxu'ed that these were the same men who, a hefore, had fought so loyall
1769.en who, a hefore, had fought so loyally one for the other, and who had owed the suc
1770.fore, had fought so loyally one for the other, and who had owed the success or their
1771. the present; the very prosperity which God had granted them became their misfortim
1772.re fiiU of gold ; but the old manner of life, in which their fathers found strength
1773.rculate of their pure and disinterested love for their country. The heart of more tl
1774. their country. The heart of more tlian one old Confederate must have bled to see t
1775.t sentiments of loyalty and the fear of God so visibly declining among the people;
1776.iorities sought zealously to arrest the progress of evil. But laws could not long preser
1777.ght zealously to arrest the progress of evil. But laws could not long preserve their
1778.ld not long preserve their vigour, when vice poisoned tlie soul of the community. Th
1779.e their vigour, when vice poisoned tlie soul of the community. The arrogance of 3'ou
1780.ere unceasingly embittered against each other. There were two parties in the assembly
1781.s in the assembly at variance with each other; that of the towns, and that of The pea
1782.eys, inaccessible to the enemy, desired peace beyond every thing; and distrusted the
1783.assembled for consultation for the last time at Stantz. The animosity of party, howe
1784., and separated without taking leave of one another, to meet again, perhaps, only i
1785. perhaps, only in the conflict of civil war. That whicli neitlier the power of Aust
1786. by their internal dissensions; ana the liberty and happiness of their country stood in
1787.ternal dissensions; ana the liberty and happiness of their country stood in tlie most imm
1788. peril. These considerations filled all good citizens with sorrow and alarm ; and, a
1789.amed Henri Im Grand, a Lucernois, and a man full of piotv and zeal for the good of
1790.nd a man full of piotv and zeal for the good of his country. As lie reflectecl on th
1791.mit, Brother Nicholas, of Kauft, " This man," said he to liimself, " lives in the p
1792.; all honour ; he is, perhaps, the only man whose voice will command att-ention fro
1793.e is, perhaps, the only man whose voice will command att-ention from these adverse p
1794.ention from these adverse parties." The man of God rose up, took his staff, and asc
1795.from these adverse parties." The man of God rose up, took his staff, and ascending
1796.ose up, took his staff, and ascending ; God him as a saint o 194 CATHOLIC LEGENDS.
1797.welt the hermit-saint. Let us leave the good cur6 to accomplish his journey with the
1798.accomplish his journey with the help of God ; he has almost four leagues to travel,
1799. to travel, and the Swiss leagues are a good measure ; and while we meantime inquire
1800.uired such influence and authority. The man who at this epoch, not only in the moun
1801.our yeai-s previously (in 1417), at the time tlie bishops of the Catholic Church sat
1802.iai'ming villages, beautiful Crosses in many parts churches, and modest chapels. mar
1803. modest chapels. mark the spots where a good action has been performed, or a crime c
1804. where the wild and frightful aspect of nature makes the heart sliudder from the consc
1805.f gTiilt, and cast itself helplessly on God. P'our cantons, IJri, Scliwytz, Luceine
1806.S. 195 rama of mountains, elevating the soul by its grandeur and variety. It was her
1807.ere that IS icholas de Flue was born in one of these solitary valleys, where the si
1808. of Alpine ton*ents. He fi'om a race of good and pious shepherds, in whom were trans
1809. brought up their children in piety and virtue. They tended their flocks with unwearie
1810.flocks with unwearied care and, after a life of tranquillity, fell asl ep in God, fu
1811. a life of tranquillity, fell asl ep in God, full of confidence; for they had walke
1812.ifested always an obedient spirit and a love of virtue ; gentle and pious even from
1813.always an obedient spirit and a love of virtue ; gentle and pious even from the days o
1814.on to elevated contemplation. When some one, out of kindness, warned him not to rui
1815.lied, with sweetness, that such was the will of God concerning him. Notwithstanding
1816.th sweetness, that such was the will of God concerning him. Notwithstanding his fer
1817.y all the duties which his condition of life imposed upon him. He entered upon manho
1818.anhood endowed with a noble firmness of soul, a penetniting intelligence, and great
1819.e ngainst Zuricli ; and again, fourteen time of the occupation of Thurgovia, : ; 196
1820.t more lionourable circumstance in tlie same expedition was tlie saving; of the mona
1821.cord. In battle he carried his sword in one hand, his chaplet in the other he showe
1822.s sword in one hand, his chaplet in the other he showed himself at once a fearless so
1823.irector and fi'iend, revealed after his death. Nicholas had one day said to him on th
1824. revealed after his death. Nicholas had one day said to him on this subject, " I ha
1825.on this subject, " I have received from God the gift of an upriglit spirit. I have
1826.y but, througli I liave also pronounced many judgments Divine grace, I do not rememb
1827.ave I (!ver (leparted from tlie ways of justice." The higli dignity of Landaniman was d
1828. and, without cloubt, he felt nlso that God had reserved him for some other and gre
1829.nlso that God had reserved him for some other and greater thing. Nicholas had thus li
1830.as had thus livod liftv vcsirs for thgood ; ; THE HERMIT NICHOLAS. 197 of his cou
1831.HERMIT NICHOLAS. 197 of his country and family, and esteemed by all, when, in the year
1832.6?, he felt himself moved by an ai-dent desire of being more intimately united with Go
1833.t himself moved by an ai-dent desire of being more intimately united with God, in a l
1834.re of being more intimately united with God, in a life of entire separation fi'om t
1835.g more intimately united with God, in a life of entire separation fi'om the world. H
1836.n a life of entire separation fi'om the world. His eldest " My father son, Jean de Fl
1837.ks of him always retired to rest at the same time as his children and servants; but
1838. him always retired to rest at the same time as his children and servants; but every
1839.m praying in his chamber until morning. Many times, also, he would repair in the sil
1840.o the old church of St. Nicholas, or to other holy places. These hours of solitude we
1841.were to him the happiest moments of his life ; and the interior impiilse became even
1842.rful to consecrate the remainder of his life to the devout contemplation of eternal
1843.evout contemplation of eternal tioiths. God also favoured him frequently with mirac
1844.th miraculous intimations of His divine will. On one occasion, when he went to visit
1845.lous intimations of His divine will. On one occasion, when he went to visit his flo
1846.upon the grass, and began to pray, when God vouchsafed him a consoling vision. He b
1847.he regaled himself with the perfume and beauty of the flower, his flock came gambollin
1848.lestial joys reserved for him." Another time, while engaged in the ordinary business
1849. men approach him, of venerable aspect, one of whom addressed him thus " Tell us, N
1850.addressed him thus " Tell us, Nicholas, will you put body and soul into our power?"
1851.ell us, Nicholas, will you put body and soul into our power?" '' I give myself to no
1852.to none," replied he, "but the Almighty God, whom I have long desired to serve with
1853.om I have long desired to serve with my soul and body." At these words the strangers
1854. smile from ; : 198 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. : one towards the other, and the first answer
1855.198 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. : one towards the other, and the first answered " Because thou
1856.cause thou hast given thyself wholly to God, and ait bound to Him for ever, I promi
1857.delivered from all the troubles of this world. Remain, then, constant in thy resoluti
1858.us banner in the midst of the armies of God, if thou hast borne with patience the c
1859.th he disclosed to separating- from the world. his wife the desire of his soul, and e
1860.eparating- from the world. his wife the desire of his soul, and entreated hei", for th
1861.m the world. his wife the desire of his soul, and entreated hei", for the love of Go
1862.f his soul, and entreated hei", for the love of God, to g'ive him permission to fulf
1863.ul, and entreated hei", for the love of God, to g'ive him permission to fulfil the
1864.fulfil the vocaShe consented tion which God had indicated to him. witli calm resign
1865.own him, : exhorted tliem for tlie last time to fear God before all things then lie
1866.horted tliem for tlie last time to fear God before all things then lie g'ave them h
1867.requent exfu'essions of thankfulness to God that ite had strengthened him to overco
1868.ned him to overcome for His service the love he bore to his wife and cliildren. Nich
1869. Nicholas set out for the place whither God should see good to lead him with a tran
1870.ut for the place whither God should see good to lead him with a tranquil heart he wo
1871.ming an appearance of sanctity ; at the same time he dreaded ostentation, and endeav
1872.an appearance of sanctity ; at the same time he dreaded ostentation, and endeavoured
1873.to point out a solitary spot where This man e might be able to carry it into effect
1874.erates were not always well received in other parts, he might be unfavourably regarde
1875.gh in Switzerland whei*e he might serve God in peace. Brother Nicholas thanked his
1876.witzerland whei*e he might serve God in peace. Brother Nicholas thanked his host for
1877.ther Nicholas thanked his host for this good counsel, and retook the same evening th
1878.t for this good counsel, and retook the same evening the road to his native place. H
1879. the end of his pilgrimage, and praying God to enlighten him. Soon he fell asleep,
1880.following moniing he rose, and went the same day without stopping as far as Melchtha
1881.chthal, his native place he repaired to one of his pastures called tiie Kluster ; t
1882.is account, since he had experienced no evil result up to that time. Nevertheless, t
1883.d experienced no evil result up to that time. Nevertheless, that he might not seem t
1884.heless, that he might not seem to tempt God, he : ; 200 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. named Osw
1885.able priest, the whole case. This g-ood man gave tne following- testimony after the
1886.following- testimony after the hermit's death, as may be read in the parish record of
1887.uld come only from the source of divine love, I counselled Bi Nicholas to persevere
1888. as he found himself able and from this time to the day of his death, a period of mo
1889.le and from this time to the day of his death, a period of more than twenty years, he
1890.liar bodily food. with me than with any other person, I sought earnestly to learn fro
1891.im how his strength was sustained ; and one day he told me in great secrecy, that w
1892.\yhich enabled him to refi-ain from all other nourishment," When the fame of this mir
1893.ment," When the fame of this miraculous life spread abroad, people flocked from all
1894. people flocked from all parts to see a man whom God nad so distinguished, and to c
1895.locked from all parts to see a man whom God nad so distinguished, and to convince t
1896.l inhabitant of the solitude. His quiet life was in consequence so much disturbed, t
1897.ng from heaven. this indication of tlie will of God, he built there a little hut, su
1898.heaven. this indication of tlie will of God, he built there a little hut, sun-ounde
1899.rter of a league from his former house. same year, his neighbours, the inhabitants o
1900.bwalden, : THE HERMIT NICHOLAS. edified life, 201 to be neither by his holy an impos
1901.dwelling-, and continued there to serve God in the and knowing- him same supernatur
1902.re to serve God in the and knowing- him same supernatural life. Meanwhile the renown
1903. the and knowing- him same supernatural life. Meanwhile the renown of his extraordin
1904.mode of existence extended far and wide many were unwilling to believe that a man co
1905.e many were unwilling to believe that a man could thus live miraculously by the sol
1906. the Almigphty, whilst others glorified God on his behalf. It was only on Sundays a
1907.ently. He consecrated to the service of God all the hours from midnight to midday,
1908.hours from midnight to midday, at which time he prayed and meditated, especially on
1909.man originally from Bavaria, who, after many remarkable adventures, had quitted the
1910. remarkable adventures, had quitted the world to esLodged tablish himself near Nichol
1911.ude. in the liollow of a rock, he led a life similar to his, save only that he could
1912.stone a pillow. The holy and miraculous life of a man so entirely separated from the
1913.llow. The holy and miraculous life of a man so entirely separated from the world, i
1914.of a man so entirely separated from the world, inspired all Christians, without disti
1915.he power for of his prayers, and in the wisdom of his counsels, that in the Swiss cant
1916.they went away astonished at the simple wisdom, the clear and profound insip^ht into t
1917.insiedeln, to invoke the holy Mother of God, did not think they could return in pea
1918.God, did not think they could return in peace to tlieir firesides, if they had not vi
1919.here the pious brother had lived for so many years was so low that he touched the ce
1920.left were little windows tlie size of a man's hand, and a door and window opened to
1921.oor and window opened to the chapel. No other furniture was to be seen but the bed, w
1922.rlet, on whicli the hermit reposed. The good cure explained to the brother tlie grea
1923.sembly, and implored him in the name of God to come and succour : ; : ; THE HERMIT
1924.mething to propose to them, and that he will repair to them speedily." The cure, ful
1925. with tears in his eyes, in the name of God and of Brother Nicholas, to be again re
1926. reconciled, and to listen for the last time to the counsels and proposition of the
1927.resting his fine majestic figure, which time had scarcely bent, was to be seen advan
1928.to the town-hall. He wore, according to custom, his simple dark-coloured dress, which
1929.to his feet ; he carried his chaplet in one liand, and grasped his stafiF witli the
1930.liand, and grasped his stafiF witli the other; he was, as usual, barefoot and barehea
1931.ell upon his shouldei-s. Wlien the holy man entered the hall before all the Confede
1932.l the Confederates, and they beheld the peace which irradiated his coimt^nance, and t
1933. veneration for tlie hixmble servant of God penetrated tlie whole assembly, and the
1934.nfederates, I salute you in the name of God, our good Father and Master, who has se
1935.s, I salute you in the name of God, our good Father and Master, who has sent me here
1936.beloved country. I am a ])Oor unlearned man; but I will give you counsel in all the
1937.ntry. I am a ])Oor unlearned man; but I will give you counsel in all the sincerity o
1938. in all the sincerity of ray heart, nnd will speak to you as God inspires me. Would
1939. of ray heart, nnd will speak to you as God inspires me. Would ; : 304 CATHOLIC LEG
1940.at my words may bring" you to unity and peace! dear Confederates discuss your affairs
1941.a spirit of friendship and kindness for one g-ood leads to another. Believe me that
1942.d since, in recompense of this concord, God has vouchsafed you such noble victories
1943.om all dissension, from all distrust in God we ought always to find peace God, who
1944.distrust in God we ought always to find peace God, who is peace itself, :s not subjec
1945.st in God we ought always to find peace God, who is peace itself, :s not subject to
1946. ought always to find peace God, who is peace itself, :s not subject to any change bu
1947. is peace itself, :s not subject to any change but discord is the parent of change, an
1948.any change but discord is the parent of change, and leads to destruction. For this ; :
1949.nd leads to destruction. For this ; : ; cause I conjure you, dear Confederates of the
1950.try, receive into your alliance the two good towns of Fribourg and Soleure; they hav
1951. in danger, they have suffered with you good and bad and they have lost much in your
1952.and bad and they have lost much in your cause. I and counsel you, I will also entreat
1953.uch in your cause. I and counsel you, I will also entreat you earnestly, because I k
1954.arnestly, because I know that it is the will of GoQ. A time will come when you will
1955.se I know that it is the will of GoQ. A time will come when you will have great need
1956.know that it is the will of GoQ. A time will come when you will have great need of H
1957. will of GoQ. A time will come when you will have great need of His assistance and s
1958.ce and support. And 3'ou, Confefortune, will not only exhort derates of the cities r
1959.tion, that you may tlie better maintain peace and unity, and enjoy in repose the libe
1960.eace and unity, and enjoy in repose the liberty so dearly purchased. Do not meddle with
1961.early purchased. Do not meddle with too many external affairs, nor ally yom-selves w
1962.erve in all your relations your natimil justice; divide the booty according to the serv
1963. wars by the liope of pillage ; live in peace and in good understanding with your nei
1964.liope of pillage ; live in peace and in good understanding with your neighbours if t
1965.ay 3'our hearts. ; THE HERMIT NICHOLAS. justice 205 amongst allies. youi-selves, Christ
1966.ngst allies. youi-selves, Christian May God !" and love one another as protect you,
1967.. youi-selves, Christian May God !" and love one another as protect you, and be with
1968.i-selves, Christian May God !" and love one another as protect you, and be with you
1969.as protect you, and be with you for all eternity Thus spoke Nicholas de Flue; and God ga
1970.ernity Thus spoke Nicholas de Flue; and God gave His grace to the words of the holy
1971.e worthy chronicler Ischudi; so that in one hour all were smoothed away, and base p
1972.gh shame before the severe counsel of a man who appeared before this assembly with
1973.rds heaven, even as a prophet sent from God. The Confederates, in accordance with N
1974. confirmed, and further consolidated by being established on the basis of new laws im
1975.gistrates against the disturbers of the peace, the division of booty according to the
1976.ended with so much animosity, came this same day to an entire agreement. The brother
1977.ire agreement. The brother returned the same evening to his peaceful hermitage. At S
1978. of Granson and Morat, and with as just cause for there the Confederates had delivere
1979., for he wished that they should honour God alone as the author of all good. In acc
1980.d honour God alone as the author of all good. In accordance with this desire, the in
1981.or of all good. In accordance with this desire, the inhabitants of Soleure sent him tw
1982.ound a perpetual mass. Fribourg did the same. Berne sent a courier with a letter ot
1983.ought the brothei' to Stantz. From this time the general veneration for, and confide
1984. longer in his peacefid reAt length the time arrived when God would call His faithfi
1985.cefid reAt length the time arrived when God would call His faithfiil servant from t
1986.thfiil servant from the miseries of the world to eternal joys in His unchangeable tre
1987.ch in benedictions. presence. The whole life of the saint had been an unceasing comb
1988.en an unceasing combat with his earthly nature, a combat which was to continue to his
1989.rt every — trial on earth. Before his death God sent liim a sharp which indescribab
1990.ry — trial on earth. Before his death God sent liim a sharp which indescribable p
1991. exhort those who surrounded his bed of death so to conduct themselves in this life t
1992. death so to conduct themselves in this life that they might leave it with a peacefu
1993.le to fall into the hands of the living God." When his pains were a little relieved
1994.re a little relieved, and the moment of death drew near, Nicholas desired with all th
1995.ment of Extreme Unction. Near the dying man stood his faithful companion Brother Uh
1996.e pious ancliorite Cecil, who after his death led for seventy years the same solitary
1997.ter his death led for seventy years the same solitary life in a neighbouring cell ;
1998.led for seventy years the same solitary life in a neighbouring cell ; his faithful w
1999.kens of deep humility ; then he thanked God anew for all the oenefits He had dispen
2000.o him, prostrated himself, and died the death of the just. This event took place on t
2001.ar 1487, the feast of St. Benedict, the same on which seventy yeare previous he was
2002.s bora. The lily had been the favourite symbol of this pure calm soul; the lily in flo
2003. the favourite symbol of this pure calm soul; the lily in flower, resplendent with a
2004.Nicholas himself, the humble servant of God, whose name it is said even St. Charles
2005.ring to verify the fact of the monastic life of Blessed Nicholas, sent oificers, who
2006.d Nicholas, sent oificers, who, for the space of a month, occupied day and night all
2007.uke Si;;ismond of Austria sent, for tne same purpose, his physician, the liarned and
2008.e expedients served only to confirm the truth. who visited him were so struck with th
2009.he piety and humility of the servant of God, that all their doubts vanished, and th
2010.t without food, his simple reply was, " God ; knows." 208 CATHOLIC LEQENDS. XXVII.
2011.NDS. XXVII. THE MARTYR OF RCEUX. At the time when the children of Clovis reined in G
2012.her, the pious., Bishop Brendan. Adlin, one of the king's of Scotland, had a dauo;h
2013. the King- Finnloga's son waS'- smitten religion ot Christ. with her beauty, and married
2014.'- smitten religion ot Christ. with her beauty, and married her, but privately, becaus
2015.to be burnt. In vain liis relations and other persons of influence represented to him
2016.ns of influence represented to him that man oug-ht not to separate what God had joi
2017.im that man oug-ht not to separate what God had joined 5 he or- " dered the stake t
2018. prodigy, but he consented to spare the life of his daughter, and he condemned her t
2019.exile. She retired with lier husband to good Bisliop Brendan, Fursy, her imcle, and
2020.to devote tliemselves to the service of God, and they embarked as missionaries for
2021.l." So far the chronicler. Fursy, after many labours and hardships, attained Foillan
2022.ude was he had been resting for a short space. at this time the abbess of the convent
2023.been resting for a short space. at this time the abbess of the convent of Nivelles,
2024.hospitality for the lastery of Vincent. being and ])avinffmoreoverjRs he thought, los
2025. way, he began ciiicnce, ; and wit^ut ^ many intricate paths in solitude meeting" an
2026.ct, the heart of the saint suspected no evil, and he at once desired two of men to a
2027.es. Foillan conversed with the men from time to time as they jn-ocoeded along the ro
2028.lan conversed with the men from time to time as they jn-ocoeded along the rough and
2029.e in reply. pagans, he spoke to them of God, His goodness and mercy, of the redempt
2030.oodness and mercy, of the redemption of man ly the blood of the Crucified, and of t
2031.pared for those wlio believe and do His will. All his "words, however, fell unheeded
2032.rce him to sacrifice like them to their god, or whether they thought only of robbin
2033.losed in a beautiful chapel; and on the same spot, at a later period, was raised a m
2034.of coming fi'om a higher Source, and of being far out of the reach of those on whom t
2035.as the "" '^ions of genius the gifts of nature ; and in the annals he saints there are
2036.nd presumption that The these i^yjts of nature are onljf the gifts of God. very^ remar
2037.i^yjts of nature are onljf the gifts of God. very^ remarkable instance of Albert th
2038.riking, is to be found in our own early history it is that of the great : ^ : Saxon sai
2039.tural abilities, and had passed all his life in the drudgery of his servile Ctt^ing,
2040.was seasoned and made sw^eet 212 to his soul CATHOLIC LEGENDS. by a lioly and simple
2041.CATHOLIC LEGENDS. by a lioly and simple life, and the Jiabit of prayer. He was accus
2042.ngs, according* to tlie favourite Saxon custom, music and sing'ing", of tlie rude and
2043.m a display of incomprehensible talent. One evening, as he sat with his comrades ro
2044.omrades round a blazing- winter hearth, one of the company proposed that all presen
2045.urn to the music of a small lute, which being" handed from one to another, should ind
2046. a small lute, which being" handed from one to another, should indicate the person
2047. they produced in our own da}' the rude war-song-s of ouiSaxon forefathers were giv
2048.of nervous terror. It was not the first time wlien he knev/ he shoiild be obliged to
2049.ing* avowal that he could not sing; and good and holy as he was, it g*ave him pain.
2050.d good and holy as he was, it g*ave him pain. Canlnion was an English saint, and he
2051.ure, well, and painful consciousness of being* awkward and stupid his gay companions.
2052.ore turns, g-ond C/.edmon, and the hite will be in your hands, and you will liave, a
2053.the hite will be in your hands, and you will liave, a« usual, to pass it on and say
2054.strument left the hands of the next but one to himself, Caedmon had determined on f
2055., and can find not a word to say, while other tongiies are so glib sea-kings and the
2056.of the IS'orthumbrian's song." And then good Ciedmon's heart smote him a little to t
2057.ing ; and how far better it was to sing God's ])raises in his heart, and remain the
2058.rustic hind tliat he was, than to abuse God's gifts by an unworthy use of them; ; a
2059.icule of his companions^ with a patient will. And with these thoughts in his head, a
2060.," he &aid, bending" over his sleeping" form, "I pray you rise, and sing" me a song"
2061.vertheless, thou shalt sing"," said the other. came "Ne- "And what am about .•*" as
2062. beasts and the fields I to sing" ; are God's creatures, and his ; show forth His p
2063.i^dmon felt a marvellous chang-e in his soul came flocking" on his mind, and they we
2064.ang-e in his soul came flocking" on his mind, and they were not so much new tiling's
2065.s this CJJUMOW. 215 of theix' all; for, beauty was sinking- into his soul. ming-ling-
2066. all; for, beauty was sinking- into his soul. ming-ling- with the imag-es of nature
2067.is soul. ming-ling- with the imag-es of nature and the excellence of created thing-s,
2068.e Lord who had made them, notions about God, and aspirations after Him, which had f
2069.he had toiled at work, and which in old time had seemed plain and homely like himsel
2070.mself, but now were all bathed in a new beauty, as though the sunshine had suddenly be
2071.Most to make it worth our notice beyond other dreams. men can remember times when the
2072.ht them ])ack to commonplace and common sense ; but with C;edmon it wns not He went o
2073.or all that, he knew he wns at the snme time anotlier man. T!iat wonderful gift was
2074.e knew he wns at the snme time anotlier man. T!iat wonderful gift was within him wh
2075.lent for earth, are ever mingled with a pain, yet whose pains if this Now were ; 216
2076.he power which had l)een given him from God refiecting w'ithin himself that the cha
2077.God refiecting w'ithin himself that the change which could have transformed a rustic h
2078.stic herdsman into a poet, in the short space of a winter's nig'ht, was nothing short
2079.onviction was, that he was bound to im])art the news of this strange transformation
2080.ing. exclaimed the steward ; " now thou art surely beside thyself, or the strong al
2081. ever sittest silent in tJiy comer like one of thine own beasts, when it is time fo
2082.ike one of thine own beasts, when it is time for merrymaking; and now, when thou sho
2083. night as I lay in the stable; and none other than an angel of God, as I deem him, ha
2084.y in the stable; and none other than an angel of God, as I deem him, hath taught me h
2085.stable; and none other than an angel of God, as I deem him, hath taught me how to s
2086.hat I have made, for truly I would have other man's judgment than my own wdiat these
2087.have made, for truly I would have other man's judgment than my own wdiat these thin
2088.ade, for truly I would have other man's judgment than my own wdiat these things may mean
2089. seemed to him as if he had never heard poetry or music until then. " Good Cuedmon," h
2090.ver heard poetry or music until then. " Good Cuedmon," he said, when the song was fi
2091., that he craved to speak with her on a matter that would admit of no delay. They were
2092. her. " Tliou desirest nie to hear this man sing," she said, addressing the stev/ar
2093. stand here, there is a mystery in this matter which ghostly hands alone can unravel.
2094.avel. spirit liath surely spoken to the man, but whether good or bad it is for your
2095.h surely spoken to the man, but whether good or bad it is for your reverence to dech
2096.d a quicker and readier response in her soul than tliey had done in that of liis les
2097.inded master. He began by an address to God, and de- : UlS CATHOLIC LEGENDS. voted
2098.ds of the Father of g'lory. The Eternal God was, he said, the author of all miracle
2099. poem. When Hilda had listened for some time in profound silence and attention, she
2100.e true, and tliese words thine own, the matter is too hig'h ibr my poor wit to judge o
2101.heir learning' ma}' see farther in this matter than doth my : simplicity." jPerha})s n
2102.ntful morning'; thrice within an hour's space to repeat his verse, and each time befo
2103.r's space to repeat his verse, and each time before a noble presence. It was no smal
2104.er as the gTeatest person in tlie whole world but to be broug-ht before the Ai-chbish
2105.hbishop of Canterbury, the most learned man of Christendom, as men were wont to cal
2106. be put '' : upon him ?" " You say fore will rig-htly," answered Theodore there- a p
2107.ge of Holy Writ ; and if he can put the same into like verses with those he lias eve
2108.e may no longer doul)t that the hand of God is on him for some high purpose ; if no
2109.llent verse ; and moreover the grace of God was so evident in tlie luminousness and
2110.de, " the abbess embracing the orace of God in the man, instructed him to quit tlie
2111.bbess embracing the orace of God in the man, instructed him to quit tlie secular ha
2112.an, instructed him to quit tlie secular habit and take upon him the monastic life whi
2113.ar habit and take upon him the monastic life which being accordingly done, she assoc
2114.d take upon him the monastic life which being accordingly done, she associated him to
2115.be taught the wliole s(n-i(>s of sacred history. Thus Ceedmon, keej)ing in mind all he
2116.cred history. Thus Ceedmon, keej)ing in mind all he heard, and as it were chewing th
2117. it were chewing the cud, converted the same into most harmonious verse, and sweetly
2118.onious verse, and sweetly repeating the same made his masters in their tui-n his hea
2119.is hearers. He sang the creation of the world, the origin of man, and all the history
2120.he creation of the world, the origin of man, and all the history of Genesis, with m
2121.e world, the origin of man, and all the history of Genesis, with many other histori(>s
2122.n, and all the history of Genesis, with many other histori(>s from Holy Writ; and of
2123.d all the history of Genesis, with many other histori(>s from Holy Writ; and of the i
2124.separate and distinct cuniniiinitiv';., one of nio:i and tlie utlier of \v2125.er of \vsame head. III we choose out * tlien called,
2126.ien called, there 220 CATHOLIC LEGENDS. other things about the divine benefits and ju
2127.e endeavoured to turn men away from the love of vice, and to excite them to g-ood "
2128.oured to turn men away from the love of vice, and to excite them to g-ood " And by l
2129.o g-ood " And by liis vei^es," adds the same histoactions," rian, " the mind-; ot ma
2130.dds the same histoactions," rian, " the mind-; ot many were often excited to despise
2131.me histoactions," rian, " the mind-; ot many were often excited to despise many the
2132.; ot many were often excited to despise many the worhi, and to asj)ire to heaven. Ot
2133.are witli him, for he did not learn the art of poetry from men, but from God; for w
2134.li him, for he did not learn the art of poetry from men, but from God; for which reaso
2135.rn the art of poetry from men, but from God; for which reason he never could compos
2136.al poem, but only those which relate to religion suited his relignous tong-ue." story of
2137.- his powers directly from tlie hand of God, is bound by his calling' to dedicate t
2138.ully pointed out, namely, the praise of God, and the exciting- of men's hearts to T
2139.be considered as the father of Eng-lish poetry. He lived many years in the monastery,
2140.the father of Eng-lish poetry. He lived many years in the monastery, where his life
2141. many years in the monastery, where his life was as sweet and holy as were his woi-d
2142. woi-ds; " for he was a very relig-ious man," continues the same author, " humbly s
2143.s a very relig-ious man," continues the same author, " humbly submissive to reg-ular
2144.ine, for which reason he also ended his life happily." will g-ive the account of his
2145.reason he also ended his life happily." will g-ive the account of his death in the w
2146.happily." will g-ive the account of his death in the words of his bioAfter telling- u
2147.de this request wondered wliy he should desire it, because there were no sig-ns of Jii
2148.the Eucharist.' And having received the same into his hnnds, he asked whether they w
2149.r turn asked him whether he was in tlie same mind towards them ? He answered, ' I am
2150.n asked him whether he was in tlie same mind towards them ? He answered, ' I am in c
2151., my children, with all the servants of God,' Then lie streng-thening' himself with
2152.cum, prepared the entrance into another life, and asked how near the time was when t
2153.to another life, and asked how near the time was when the hrotliei-s were to he awak
2154.t hour ;' and sigTiing himself with the sign of the cross, he laid his head on the p
2155.lling Thus it into a shmiher, ended his life so in silence. came to pass, that as he
2156.ce. came to pass, that as he had served God with a simple and pure mind and imdistu
2157.e had served God with a simple and pure mind and imdisturhed devotion, so he now dep
2158. departed to His ])resence, leaving the world by a quiet death and that tongaie which
2159.])resence, leaving the world by a quiet death and that tongaie which had com[)osed so
2160.and that tongaie which had com[)osed so many holy words in praise of the Creator, ut
2161.to His hands." Miracles followed on his death: and in the days of the Concpieror his
2162. ; portions of Cfedmon's poem on on the same subject in the raradise Lost have been
2163.writers so remarkable as to justify the opinion that Milton was familiar with the Engli
2164.referred to, says, " the resemblance of language is so striking, that much of this porti
2165." the Fall of * The resemblance between Man and passan:c.s ; 222 CATHOLIC LEGENDS.
2166.trict in the south of France, about the time when B. Alan de la Roche was re\aving-
2167.le lady, who governed her household and family in all holy discipline, and who was amo
2168.onfraternity in honour of the Mother of God, on its re-establishment in that countr
2169.ished for the ang'elic innocence of his life than for the endowment of is mind. He A
2170.f his life than for the endowment of is mind. He Avas sent by his mother to study at
2171. abilitv; and he even made considerable progress in some of his studies, especially in g
2172.s wanting- in quickness and vivacity of imagination; and tlie composition of French and Lat
2173.n of French and Latin verses, which was one of the common school tasks of liis clas
2174.s, became an insurmountable difficulty. Many a weary hour did the poor boy spend, st
2175.ilsome perseverance, to accomplish what many a thoug-htless, quick-witted scapesTace
2176.ading into tlie garden, and leaning his One evening", THE SCHOLAH OK THE KOSARY. he
2177. cared that he should grow up a learned man, and then he was at the bottom of his c
2178.om of his class, with the reputation of being- the dunce of the school ; and all beca
2179.emed an unreasonable thing' to spend so many a long' day in trying' to become what n
2180.y a long' day in trying' to become what nature had not made him. Verses, he thought, w
2181.ep to simple prose ; he cotxld save his soul and tlie souls of other people, and nev
2182. cotxld save his soul and tlie souls of other people, and never have mastered the sca
2183.d hands, that something unusual was the matter. *' Bernard," she said, and at the soun
2184.r boy started to his feet " what is the matter ? Your hair is hanging about your eyes,
2185.hose white cheeks this is not the first time that you have come home in the same way
2186.rst time that you have come home in the same way ; but for many weeks past I have wa
2187.ave come home in the same way ; but for many weeks past I have watched you with an a
2188.-nard hung his head, Init did not say a Science." " Do you not speak, my child ? " cont
2189. I fault that you would deem a grievous one : ; ; 22-t CATHOLIC LEGENDS. And with t
2190.s were happier or trouble t better than other men, that you should crave a g-it't tha
2191.se stands with boys we have to learn so many thing;s you would marvel to find the us
2192.rave enoiig-h in plain-speaking- prose, will never do for verse tlien there are line
2193.can help to mend your verses, but I may chance to be able It was but the other day tha
2194. I may chance to be able It was but the other day that to mend your courag-e. Master
2195.ht have been different if they had been poetry." " His way was a very simple one," rep
2196.en poetry." " His way was a very simple one," replied* his mother ; " he asked our
2197.is little to hinder you from doing- the same. Master Alan has given you a Rosary, th
2198.e has taught you ; and remember that no one ever pi-ayed to Mary without obtaining
2199.tar. Nor was it long before a sing-ular change was observed in the boy not only did hi
2200.d, should it have been otlierwiser* His soul was drinking at the very sources of s])
2201.ated to tlie very depths of that divine life and pfi-^sion, which supj)lied him witl
2202.eover, the gra-^ the study of any human emotion. cious names which were thus constantly
2203.sh intellect with the Hame of spiritual love; and whilst in his school-versos, that
2204.was caiig'ht from no phantom of earthly imagination, but from the influence of an abiding-
2205.- Reality. The masters marvelled at the change, and said ma^y learned things about the
2206.s for the boy himself, the light in his soul had stolen into it with such a soft and
2207.iet gentleness, that he hardly knew the change ; and when they praised and questioned
2208., with a wondering simplicity, that any one might do the same, for he found it all
2209.g simplicity, that any one might do the same, for he found it all in the Rosary. Thi
2210.ons of the Scholar of the Rosary. Every one now predicted great things of Bernard h
2211.ery diiferent distinction was in store. One day he came home as usual, and complain
2212.e as usual, and complained of an aching pain in his eyes before the mommg the inflam
2213.d bestow, he suflered tlie extremity of pain. For two montlis he lay in this state,
2214.of pain. For two montlis he lay in this state, wliilst the disease gradually nssumed
2215.y obeyed. Nevertheless, in spite of his pain and increasing weakness, nothing- preve
2216.atened him, by saying* his devotion was one winch needed neither book nor daylight
2217. blindness was before long not the only evil she had to di'ead; it was soon evident
2218.ent that the malady had reached a fatal form, which no human skill could avail to re
2219. were now loud in deploring the loss of one from whom so brilliant a career might h
2220. too; for she knew the innocence of his soul, and had the sure hope that she was but
2221. pi-iest. my child," she replied. " You will try and bear tlie light for d few minut
2222.r tlie light for d few minutes; for the good father is come to hear yotu" confession
2223.ho was hy this " Your mother and I iu-e time hending: over him. standing here, but t
2224. to return to his own dominions on tlie death of Ebroin, which is connected with a le
2225.that struck to tiieir hearts like for a time in the service of ice " are demons, who
2226." are demons, who are carrying away the soul of Ebroin, mayor of the palace to king
2227.king unfitting words at an unseasonable time." And with this warning the sound of th
2228. reached the ears of Hubert; for at the time of I'^liroiii's detith, and his own ret
2229.irtues which he practised, even in this time of heathen ignorance, drew on him the f
2230.ance, drew on him the favourable eye of God, who called him to the faith by soul. H
2231. of God, who called him to the faith by soul. He was a special miracle, similar to t
2232.yr Placidus.* dicted to the chase ; and one Friday he rode out with a great hunting
2233.n the forests When they had ridden some time, there of Aquitain. suddenly sprang" ou
2234.lk-white, and of a g'entle and delicate form, and she bounded alongthe forest-g'lade
2235.een her horns the figure of a crucified man surrounded by a great light. He checked
2236.port, a day whereon I, wlio am the true God, died for thee and all mfen, even as th
2237.t with p. 139. ST. HUBERT. 231 tears of emotion before the figure of his Lord. Tlie tru
2238.ad no difficult}' in underetanding" the language which he heard, and which he hesitated
2239.ot to interpret as a divine call to the religion he had hitlierto despised moreover, the
2240.ents of deep humility, " my Lord and my God, hitherto I have not known Thee; but no
2241.therto I have not known Thee; but now I will serve Thee in all things whereunto Thou
2242.f similarity existed between tlie early history of these two men. Lambert, like Hubert,
2243.he had been raised to the episcopal tlu'one of Maestricht, from which the cabals an
2244.ing him. After wandering about for some time as ji lionie- 232 less CATHOLIC LEGENDS
2245.as vmfit. This lumiility was evinced on many occasions, one of which is thus One nig
2246.umiility was evinced on many occasions, one of which is thus One night, it is said,
2247.on many occasions, one of which is thus One night, it is said, as he rose related i
2248.f doors, and remain there for a certain space. Lambert meekly obeyed; nor did he vent
2249.n the office was finished, according to custom they assembled before the fire, to warm
2250.The abbot looked around him, and missed one of '^ the number. Where is the Bishop L
2251.dged by the ; ; ; brethren, to whom the history of his misfortunes and exile were well
2252.ll known. it please you, my lord," said one of tliem, praying by the cross outside;
2253.lest apj)earance of anger, " My father, one learns patience at the foot of the cros
2254.foot of the cross yonder." Such was the man to whom Hubert now applied for instru;
2255.ay '*he is ; ; ; ST. HUBERT. 233 of the world, and all care for liis riches and lands
2256.ty toNi^s of honour which vested of all love had hitherto seemed g-ood and desirable
2257.to him, by an entire abandonment of the world. His bondmen were set at liberty, his r
2258.t of the world. His bondmen were set at liberty, his retainers dismissed with generous
2259.nd Hubert saw himself reduced frorn the state and condition of a powerful count to th
2260.t heart on the county where but a short time before he had ruled and been honoured a
2261.y himself with greater diligence to the life which he had resolved to follow. This w
2262.presented him witli ali he required. In one of the most savage of these deserts he
2263. cell and cliapel, where lie spent some time in a life of prayer :ind penance, whicl
2264.cliapel, where lie spent some time in a life of prayer :ind penance, whicli offered
2265.s, so tliat they grew familiar with his form, and ranged fearlessly about his cell;
2266.r, too, were especially dear to him, in memory of that " milk-white doe" who had been
2267.ation which had taken place in Hubert's nature, that the bold and ardent sportsman was
2268.d yet, despite his hard and penitential life, Hubert felt that he had never known ha
2269.fe, Hubert felt that he had never known happiness before. And yet there were not wantinge
2270.ed up, and saw a beautiful and heavenly form bending* over his couch the lovely head
2271. of gold, wings of dazzling- lustre and many colours floated from the shoulders, and
2272.yes looked down on him with a brother's love. Hubei-t knew that his guardian-angel w
2273.'s love. Hubei-t knew that his guardian-angel was beside him. " Arise," said the swee
2274.nough in this solitude; and lienceforth God liath olhei- ways fur thee to walk in a
2275. arise, and go to Kome, it is there His will shall be declared to tliee." one niglit
2276.e His will shall be declared to tliee." one niglit, as Now awakened by a brig-htand
2277.tei-niined, therefore, to lay the whole matter before his spiritual master St. Lambert
2278.e, for this thing' is from the hands of God ofo, and fear nothing- for verily I kno
2279.holy Bishop Lambert was wont to reprove sin wheresoever he met with it, could scarc
2280.Two of the most unprinfail to raise him many enemies. cipled men of Utrecht, who had
2281.m, which ended in the loss of their own life. relation of these two men, named Dodo,
2282.ch ended in the loss of their own life. relation of these two men, named Dodo, and an of
2283.pin's household, swore to revenge their death, and the opportunity of gratifying- his
2284.subjected himself by the license of his life to the reprimands of his Bisliop, who,
2285.his boldness had caused in the prince's mind, Dodo persuaded him to g-ive him the co
2286.hop's ])alace, and bade him prepare for death. St. Lambert's death was wortliy of his
2287.de him prepare for death. St. Lambert's death was wortliy of his life ; wliilst the r
2288. St. Lambert's death was wortliy of his life ; wliilst the ruffians were battering a
2289.them confess their sins and prepare for death and having given them his blessmg, he h
2290.r he awoke, and started as he beheld an angel standing by his bed. "Sleepest thou, Se
2291. thou, Sergius ?" said the messenger of God ; " mark well the words I say, and forg
2292.deed done in Utrecht, and the Church of God hath lost a faithful and true pastor fo
2293. for the holy Bishop Lambert is gone to God. The sword tears ; ; of the ruffian Dod
2294. been led hither, save that the hand of God He it is, Sergius, whom thou must is gi
2295.im. name to the vacant see, nor shall a sign be wonting to show thee that this is tl
2296.ing to show thee that this is tlie sure will of God for this is the staff which thou
2297.how thee that this is tlie sure will of God for this is the staff which thou shalt
2298.rthy to bear it." Witli these words the angel placed in the hands of the astonished P
2299.should be found and brought before him. Many hours had not elapsed before the messen
2300. sixteen years of solitude had wrouglit many changes in the ; : ST. HUBEKT. 237 gall
2301.r and penance, which still, neither the one nor the other, had diminished aught of
2302.e, which still, neither the one nor the other, had diminished aught of the gladness a
2303.length, after Hubert had knelt for some time in silence at his feet. "They call me H
2304.or the " I come from Aquitain, and have history of his life. perfect rest in " What is
2305. from Aquitain, and have history of his life. perfect rest in " What is by the order
2306.us gently, for he feared to declare the fate of the murdered bishop with too much su
2307.enness; "when did you hear of tlie holy man, and what tidings did you gather?" " Ma
2308.])lied Hubert, " I have travelled these many weeks over mountains and desert roads o
2309. on foot, and have scarce spoken to any man, nor have I heard aught of my good fath
2310.o any man, nor have I heard aught of my good father and master since the day I parte
2311.u shalt come with me to a place where I will tell thee tidings of him, which were be
2312.he holy Lambert had met with a martyr's death. Hubert wej)t bitterly, for the love he
2313.s death. Hubert wej)t bitterly, for the love he bore his saintly bishop was a true a
2314.is saintly bishop was a true and filial one. *-Thou must take courage," said the vo
2315.a true and filial one. *-Thou must take courage," said the voice of the good travelled
2316.st take courage," said the voice of the good travelled hither whom I am — : 238 Po
2317. for my tiding-s are not ended yet thou art lie whom God designs to fill the throne
2318.g-s are not ended yet thou art lie whom God designs to fill the throne wliich the s
2319.ert, must not refuse to obey ; for thou art now Bishop of Utrecht." Hubert was sile
2320.Serg-ius, and replied, "All praise, and love, and honour, and glory be to God, for e
2321., and love, and honour, and glory be to God, for ever and ; ever. Amen." They were
2322.imself in obedience to the unquestioned will of g"ius God ; and Ser- understood thei
2323.ience to the unquestioned will of g"ius God ; and Ser- understood their import. Giv
2324.aced him affectionately, and said, " We will both ]M-ay before the altar of the Apos
2325.y before the altar of the Apostles, and will ask the ]\Iother of gi'ace and mercy to
2326.ce and mercy to guide us aright in this matter;" and both accorcl- mgiy for prostrated
2327.ent prayer. It may be said of the whole life of Hubert, that it was passed under the
2328.ing, perhn})s, in his gentle and loving nature, made him very dear to those lieavenly
2329. brought as befor(! by tlie hands of an angel. He stood belbre them holding- a stole
2330.nd added, " and this from the Prince of God's Church and })eo])le, and with it slia
2331.and the key, he knew that the v.-\\\ of God was clear and manifest, and he dared no
2332.e oflBce to which he appointed. for the soul of Lambert Avas the minster of Utrecht
2333. cKant. Some weeks had passed since his death, and at first they had scarce dared to
2334.al, all Utrecht assembled to honour the memory of one whom they hesitated not to decla
2335.recht assembled to honour the memory of one whom they hesitated not to declare had
2336.ated not to declare had died a martyr's death. The news of their proceedings reached
2337.CATHOLIC LEGENDS. ; became evident witb many a blaspberay and word of"impious/)ut-ra
2338.y and word of"impious/)ut-rage ag-ainst God and the saints, Dodo called on his men
2339.s; and Hidjert, whose heart bounded for one short moment with delig-ht, as the hope
2340.as a fearful chasm in the road, that at one moment before lay so peacefully in the
2341.t with inexpressible joy, and his after-life was worthy of its beginnings. His dioce
2342.rites were still practised in secret by many. St. Hubert ])enetrated in person throu
2343.e and savage pagans were knit to him in love. Ardennes long- ke])t his memory with a
2344.o him in love. Ardennes long- ke])t his memory with a loyal fidelity; and in one of tl
2345.is memory with a loyal fidelity; and in one of tlie churches erected on tlie scenes
2346.ved to govern the Church of Utrecht for many years, but he ceased not to sig'h for t
2347.gth, and not without a warning from his angel-fiiend, a year before that it was at ha
2348.es were gaily decorated with boughs and many-coloured banners, and the very streets,
2349.t was to oppose the rapid and alarming* progress ofPelag'ianism, that a council of Galil
2350.led the church was chiefly composed The chance of rude shepherds and village artisans.
2351.royes was a great event in their simple history and when it was known that the legate w
2352.rmanus was in all respects a remarkable man ; his and episcopate presents us with o
2353.n ; his and episcopate presents us with one of those instances of sudden conversion
2354.re of his Bishop Amator by a passionate love of tidd-sports, which had led liim into
2355.aware that his ;ip:spi utor wasthe verv man chosejito be his succos; THE SHEPHERDES
2356.NTERIIE. sor. 243 As the moment of liis death drew near, he ordered Germanus by forcf
2357.ve him the tonsure, assuring him at the same time that such was the will of God: the
2358.m the tonsure, assuring him at the same time that such was the will of God: the comm
2359. him at the same time that such was the will of God: the command was obeyed, and he
2360.the same time that such was the will of God: the command was obeyed, and he who but
2361.o seize untameable a spirit, offered no opposition to their probut gave himself blindly an
2362. heathen noble transformed into another man; his life was one of penance and extrao
2363.noble transformed into another man; his life was one of penance and extraordinary sa
2364.nsformed into another man; his life was one of penance and extraordinary sanctity,
2365.y sanctity, nor was it long" before the universal reputation which he enjoyed raised him
2366.g's, the Galilean Bishops. Such was the man who, standing- on the altar-steps of th
2367.f and appropriate words of exhortation. One of the most learned and accomplished me
2368.d men of the dny, he was perfect in the art of adaptinghis thoug-ht and lang-uage t
2369. in turn with a fatherly sweetness; and many a mother's heart was made prouder and l
2370.cely seven years of age, whose singular beauty was apparent in spite of tlie extreme j
2371. Nanterre and, young' as slie was, lier life had already heg-un in hard labour, as s
2372.e evening'. And so when we speak of the beauty of Genevieve, it was a beauty which cer
2373.ak of the beauty of Genevieve, it was a beauty which certainly had little of worldly a
2374.ly accompaniments to set it off, and to many it might perhaps have seemed a perversi
2375.s Genevieve/' he rephed, " the child of one of our oldest villagers. Severus and hi
2376.st dwellers in Nanterre; but they serve God faithfully, and Genevieve knows how to
2377.ows how to say her prayers better tlian many who are twice her age." "Are her parent
2378.Germanus addressed them with the air of one who was yielding to a Divine inspiratio
2379.nd the day is not I'ar distant when she will recal sinners from the error of their w
2380.olly to Him who has chosen you from all eternity to he His spouse ?" The singular addres
2381.d without hesitation, ^' It is what, by God's grace, I have always " Then be of goo
2382.God's grace, I have always " Then be of good courage," replied Gerresolved." manus,
2383. grace, I have always " Then be of good courage," replied Gerresolved." manus, " and pr
2384.o what your lips profess. afraid of the opposition of man nor devil for the Lord will supp
2385.ps profess. afraid of the opposition of man nor devil for the Lord will support you
2386.pposition of man nor devil for the Lord will support you, and strengthen you with gr
2387.iich these incidents made on the little world of N nnterre may be easily supposed whe
2388. have attaclied to those of an ordinary man and when, verv early on the following m
2389.iu"- with some of the eoclevieve, ** my will ; ; ; ; ; ; 246 Biastics of his CATHOLI
2390.sterday, that you would consecrate your soul and body wholly and entirely to God ?"
2391.ur soul and body wholly and entirely to God ?" " Yes, father," she replied, as simp
2392.-, Always carry this round your neck in memory of me, and of the words you nave spoken
2393. touch your neck, and resolve, were the world to offer you all the jewels and ])earls
2394.xcitement caused by his visit had For a time, indeed, the sinlor a moment interru])t
2395.towards Genevieve formed the subject of many long- speculations; l)ut g-radiially th
2396.ittle shepherdess leading- her ordinary life among- them, with no chang-e eitlier in
2397.own importance, or im])atien(-e for any other kind of lif(>. It is tnie, neither liRr
2398.pai-ents saw interest died much for her time of what passed in Genevieve's heart was
2399.evieve's heart was spent for the mo^t j)art on the lonely hills where she watched h
2400.ation which day by day deepenfid in her soul, fill; ing- it with the |)ei-j)etnal me
2401.ul, fill; ing- it with the |)ei-j)etnal memory of Ilim to whom she had been so solemnl
2402.dei-stand. ller mother Gerontia, though good and kind-hearted in her own way, was in
2403.shop of Auxerre, Gerontia was preparing one morning to set out for the village from
2404. she desired her to remain at home, and mind the house in her absence. For once, how
2405. surprised to meet witli something like opposition from the child, Avho rather pertinaciou
2406.o keep their fete like grown women. You will be wanting earrings, and a silken kerch
2407.cross; but he told me likewise to serve God, and always to hear Mass on feast-days;
2408.ho felt a secret consciousness that the pleasure of exhibiting her own gay holiday dress
2409.a sudden fear. "Genevieve, child, where art thou, what hast thou done ?" she cried,
2410.e ?" she cried, extending- her arms, as one who feels in the dai-k ; " it is surely
2411.years passed away, and though she tried many remedies, notliing- availed to restore
2412.before been a stranger. Now it happened one day that Genevieve had g'one to the spr
2413.t happened one day that Genevieve had g'one to the spring- which was at a little di
2414.prevented her from taking- any active ])art in the affairs of the liousehold she sa
2415.ed Him my spouse if He is my spouse, He will surely do what I ask Him; and when I go
2416.do what I ask Him; and when I go back I will ask Him to cure my mother " And witJi t
2417.n; for I veiily beheve that this day He will " give me back my sight." mother !" exc
2418.t is what I have been praying' but what will you do with the water?" Gerontia did no
2419.r, slie desired her to make over it the sign of the cross. Genevieve having obeyed,
2420., thi'ough the merits of her child. Her time of suffering had produced its effect, a
2421.mal and solemn manner, according to the custom of the times, on the occrision of the B
2422.l three stood before him, Genevieve, as being the youngest, was ])laced the last in t
2423.- that youngest child to the front, for God has ah-eadv sancti- commencing' the cer
2424. some of fied her." is Genevieve," said one of those standing by the holy father Ge
2425.e, and prophesied that great designs of God should " It "and be accomplished in her
2426.complished in her." And so for a second time the attention of the people was directe
2427.ated in their own homes, and followed a life of devotion and mortification, without
2428.r the reception of the sacred veil, the death of both her parents obliged Genevieve t
2429.ther, who resided at Paris and with her change of residence a new life openeil before
2430. and with her change of residence a new life openeil before her. The celebrity attac
2431. and the visits of charity in which her time was spent. These visits extended far be
2432.aid open to her and her arbitration and judgment were accepted in many a feud wliich mig
2433.bitration and judgment were accepted in many a feud wliich might else have found its
2434.etted that so much of the sea of blood. history of this period of her life is sunk in t
2435.of blood. history of this period of her life is sunk in tlie obscmnty of the times;
2436.iose who were living like liprself in a state consecrated to relie-ion. whilst vt not
2437. relie-ion. whilst vt not to of Heaven. God remained ; — ; THE SHEPHERDESS OF NAN
2438.NTERRE. 251 wholly separated fi-ora the world, and who considered themselves her spir
2439.fered had the effect of disturbing; for one moment the interior calm of a soul whic
2440.; for one moment the interior calm of a soul which united the contemplation of a sol
2441.herine, she had her enemies ; and for a time the world banded ag-ainst her, and deno
2442.he had her enemies ; and for a time the world banded ag-ainst her, and denounced her
2443.r, too, the mysterious and supernatural life of ecstasy and miracle ming-led with th
2444.ence ; and whilst the marvels of such a life made some venerate her as a saint, many
2445.life made some venerate her as a saint, many others were equally ready to persecute
2446. in the langoiag-e 'of an old legendary life of tlie fourteenth " Tiien having- retu
2447.eople, who are ever more ready to speak evil than well of g-ood people, replied that
2448.er wherefore lie took no count of their evil speech, but as soon as he had entered t
2449. a sort, that the people who beheld the same marvelled greatly; and then he showed t
2450. related to them the bog-inning- of her life, and Iioav it had been made known to hi
2451. him at Nantcrre that she was chosen of God, and tliereforc he had recommended her
2452.GENDS. They even determined to take her life, and were preparing; to drown her as a
2453.rag-g-uig- their unresisting" victim to death, the archdeacon of Auxerre arrived on a
2454. blessed bread, which Germanus, after a custom of the time, had sent her as a special
2455., which Germanus, after a custom of the time, had sent her as a special token of est
2456. to retain during" the remainder of her life. But events were at hand which were des
2457.re destined to exhibit Genevieve to the world in a new character, and to g-ive her a
2458.that they had, sent their property into other cities that were more secure. In this g
2459.ve undertook to reanimate the drooping- courage of the ])eople, and "^ ohe admonto enco
2460.ould powerfully resist and overcome the tyranny of the enemies, even as the two holy wo
2461.oly women Esther and Juditli did in old time. And they obeyed her, watching mnny day
2462. this unexj^ec'ed direction of Orleans. change in the plan of the bai-barians was not
2463.s were not slow in afributing ic to the particular gi-ace of God, who liad guarded tlie ci
2464.ributing ic to the particular gi-ace of God, who liad guarded tlie city by the pray
2465.stern em; a 254 pire. CATHOLIC LEGENDS. One night, as they were on their way, the r
2466.mpestuotis violence, and rendered their progress slow and difficult. At leng"th the lamp
2467.and they were left in total ; darkness. Many of them were frig-htened and dishearten
2468.of her sweet and g-entle voice restored courage in the hearts of her children, even tho
2469. even though they could not discern her form ; " I will light you to the church." An
2470.h they could not discern her form ; " I will light you to the church." And taking' i
2471.erior suffering's, and the martyrdom of love which each^endured, they were not less
2472.d most hardl}' torment her body all her life for the preventing- of sin ; her only d
2473.ody all her life for the preventing- of sin ; her only delights were fasting, praye
2474.n heart, beshall not pause to enumerate cause they see God." the many miracles which
2475.l not pause to enumerate cause they see God." the many miracles which she performed
2476.e to enumerate cause they see God." the many miracles which she performed but hasten
2477.rmed but hasten to another scene in her life, when she was called from her prayers a
2478. during which to advance against Paris. time the suffei-ings of the half-starved inh
2479.d destitution. That heart was, however, one of too truly heroic a nature to be cont
2480.was, however, one of too truly heroic a nature to be content with giving ])ity and com
2481. they could procure a supply of com and other provisions for the distressed city. The
2482.they said, " there are in plenty but we will not man them as well die in Paris for w
2483., " there are in plenty but we will not man them as well die in Paris for want of b
2484.• ^loreover," said another, ''all the world knows that for higher uj), near tile Se
2485.t tree has fallen ov(>r the river, an(l many boats that have attempted the passage h
2486.-o myself;" and so saying, she loosened one of tlie smaller boats from its moorings
2487.ver, it" our mother perish alone," said one of the men ; " I for one will surely go
2488.h alone," said one of the men ; " I for one will surely go with her one can die but
2489.one," said one of the men ; " I for one will surely go with her one can die but once
2490.n ; " I for one will surely go with her one can die but once." His words revived th
2491.an die but once." His words revived the courage of another ; and so she set out on her
2492.hem not to fear, but to put We their in God. had gathered in great numbers on the b
2493.d their ears ; and the possible loss of one they counted as their mother was for th
2494.hey counted as their mother was for the time a sorer trouble than the perils of the
2495.jopulace to tlie shore ; and in a short space Genevieve hmded safe amid her fellow-ci
2496.she liacl collected at the peiil of her life from the surrounding villages on the Se
2497.enevieve, however, could only defer the fate of the city, which fell into the hands
2498.at appeal, we may judge THE SHEPHERDESS other cities 3F NANTERRE. 257 fi-om the fact,
2499.ally have conceived some enmity against one who had proved herself so stedfast an o
2500.approached her, and whose most powerful element was probably to be found in that iniion
2501. veneration during the remainder of his life; and his successor, Clovis, who embrace
2502.tion released prisonei-s, and performed other acts of g-enerosity and mercy. lived to
2503.o the age of eighty-nine years, all her being illustrated by miracles of every kind.
2504.rsions which she made, both dui'ing her life and after death, were far more, numerou
2505.e made, both dui'ing her life and after death, were far more, numerous and move glori
2506. move glorious to her name than all the other offering* which long- adoi-ned She viev
2507.u-e to say, that rich as the subsequent history of her country has been in both charact
2508.try has been in both characters, France will scarcely find any to equal her as a her

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/