Concordance for The canary bird / from the German of Christopher von Schmid.

Use the features on this page to analyze and evaluate the text.

View: catalog record
Display words beginning with
Display most frequently used words
Display most frequent word phrases
Search: Show map
Display letters around search term
Sort results by the word on the

Specialized searches: colors; adverbs; gerunds; "big names"; "great ideas"

1.     " Behold, yonder lives the honest old man who is to shelter you." -^- NEW YORK: E
2. ived on the farther bank of the Khine a family named THE CANARY-BIRD. D'Erlau. princip
3. family named THE CANARY-BIRD. D'Erlau. principle Mr. D'Erlau was a man of high his wife
4. D. D'Erlau. principle Mr. D'Erlau was a man of high his wife ; and excellent dispos
5. ; and excellent disposition; was a very good and amiable lady their and two children
6. fields, and orchards, he lived with his family in the deepest solitude, far away from
7. way from the business retainers, of the world. His him as their greatest who honored
8. to his children, he esteemed it a great happiness that he here found time to be himself t
9. it a great happiness that he here found time to be himself their instructor aild his
10. m in gion. He was firmly convinced that religion is alone capable of truly forming a man
11. ion is alone capable of truly forming a man, imparting to him true worth, securing
12. parting to him true worth, securing his happiness, and comforting him in the hour of nece
13. ness, and comforting him in the hour of necessity or of death. His virtuous wife, penetra
14. ting him in the hour of necessity or of death. His virtuous wife, penetrated with the
15. His virtuous wife, penetrated with the same feelings, always sat by during these le
16. ARY-BIRD. the father dwelt with special emotion on God's holy Providence, and on confid
17. he father dwelt with special emotion on God's holy Providence, and on confidence in
18. ss her children, who were doomed stormy world, through and then all des- thought of t
19. hrough and then all des- thought of the love which rules tinies on high, she shed te
20. and her words became truly " spirit and life." What came from to the heart. the hear
21. the heart. the heart found its way The good children listened with the utmost atten
22. n to the most important subject of all, religion, Mr. D'Erlau instructed his children in
23. 'Erlau instructed his children in every other useful and neces- sary science ; nor di
24. n in every other useful and neces- sary science ; nor did he even overlook those things
25. ve to add to the enjoyments of himself, life. He among other accomplishments, played
26. e enjoyments of himself, life. He among other accomplishments, played admirably upon
27. chord, and gentle little Lina to sing. One gloomy and terrific evening in the end
28. r. D'Erlau had written a little hymn to God's protecting Providence, spe- cially fo
29. could have No given her so cried, much pleasure. "Yes," she "God, who has yet protected
30. er so cried, much pleasure. "Yes," she "God, who has yet protected you, be your pow
31. d you, be your powerful Protector." lo! will still But flung —on a sudden the door
32. to the town prison. He was charged with being liberty a royalist, and an enemy of —
33. town prison. He was charged with being liberty a royalist, and an enemy of — this wa
34. ew herself at the feet of the rude her, man who on stood before with dark flashing
35. way their father. The tears chased each other down their cheeks, and in a short time
36. other down their cheeks, and in a short time they could not articulate for sobbing.
37. - ing around her. this pious In a short time, however, and high-souled woman recov-
38. n," she cried, " abandon our hope in 14 God ! 'Tis He who has sent " THE CANARY-BIR
39. BIRD. US this dreadful trial : He, too, will give us grace to support it; He will tu
40. o, will give us grace to support it; He will turn it it to our advantage, and change
41. e will turn it it to our advantage, and change into jo J. hereafter Let us say to * Hi
42. m cheerfully and confidently, Lord, Thy will be doiie.' CHAPTER IL THE mother's flig
43. business, nor even speaking it. to any one upon She flung herself 15 at THE CANARY
44. ll have spoken to statues of stone. Not one of all them was moved obtain from to pi
45. that in a few days he must die a bloody death. When soldiers. she returned, after thr
46. weeping and bewailing her children, rio one could tell her where they were. ; All h
47. aid peril of he, ar- are in at imminent being any moment. In some hasty moment you dr
48. g out to heaven;' 'oppression under the evil-minded semblance' of freedom.' Some per
49. he Rhine, in expectation ; already to I will accompany you him thus to-night, and he
50. accompany you him thus to-night, and he will transport you and your children safely
51. , and you 2* shall, at least, save your life." 17 THE CANARY-BIRD. She went to hones
52. resolution. ** The patient," he said, "will not hold out much longer ; she will not
53. d, "will not hold out much longer ; she will not recover her senses any more, and as
54. w ; be of any use to the poor child het duty to think of her and it is own safety."
55. mother stood, pale as THE CANARY-BIRD. death, and her eyes red with weeping, by the
56. cannot leavO you! I care not you!" for life! I will die with :; '. Old Richard and
57. leavO you! I care not you!" for life! I will die with :; '. Old Richard and his good
58. will die with :; '. Old Richard and his good wife besought her with uplifted hands t
59. ves; for to and my wife, our harbor any one for a night, is without giving previous
60. ving previous notice, forbid- den under pain of death." " Well, dearest Lina," said
61. vious notice, forbid- den under pain of death." " Well, dearest Lina," said the heart
62. n render you no further service in this world ; if my re- maining here can serve no e
63. ere can serve no end but to bring these good old people to the scaffold I will now g
64. these good old people to the scaffold I will now go in God's name. Farewell, dearest
65. people to the scaffold I will now go in God's name. Farewell, dearest angel; go to
66. now go in God's name. Farewell, dearest angel; go to the abodes of bHss, where innoce
67. s. " Rejoice, dear Lina," said he, "you will There earth, now be a bright angel in h
68. "you will There earth, now be a bright angel in heaven. you will be far happier than
69. h, now be a bright angel in heaven. you will be far happier than here on 20 THE CAKA
70. darling daughter's sick bed. " To Thee, God," she cried, looking up to heaven, " to
71. rembling in every nerve with suppressed emotion. She now betook herself trusty servant
72. poor lady followed little packet under one arm, and holding with the other hand he
73. ket under one arm, and holding with the other hand her dear little boy, who also carr
74. d these torrents of rain," said the old man, in a low voice, " are pure mercies fro
75. in a low voice, " are pure mercies from God ; they shelter us from our enemies. tha
76. s, the storms, and the gloomy rences of life!" They arrived, at length, at the old f
77. ved, at length, at the old fisherlittle man's house, and went into the sooty room,
78. y to go on board ; but the men gave her courage. in, The oar, old fisherman stepped sei
79. he and with pious confidence predicted, will help us over !" " God Richard fellow ca
80. dence predicted, will help us over !" " God Richard fellow castle, now took his lea
81. nd he pressed the boy to his heart with many is a deep sob. "0, my dear lady!" he sa
82. 0, my dear lady!" he said, "I am an old man, and this the last time I shall ever se
83. id, "I am an old man, and this the last time I shall ever see you and my He dear Cha
84. - not be of farther service to you, but will protect God you ; still has happy days
85. arther service to you, but will protect God you ; still has happy days in store for
86. ill has happy days in store for you. So good a mistress canI not be left a prey to m
87. rescue my and noble master. untried." I will leave nothing They all wept and sobbed
88. are of her husband and her daughter old man faithfully promised this, and assisted
89. ed cried, " up his hands to heaven. " I will kneel here," he and praj ; to God for a
90. " I will kneel here," he and praj ; to God for a safe passage for them I shall not
91. ! that I could bring to them there the same happy news of my dear master and their
92. ountry, and besides the scene of the 25 war THE CANARY-BIKD. was drawing nearer eve
93. Tyrol by the mediation of a benevolent man, shelter in his cottage. little she obt
94. eys. At last, as she reached the mit of one of these mountains, she espied, at a fe
95. onest old ! Below, yonder, lives the is man who to shelter you." Madam The D'Erlau
96. d, Though "With our he was still a hale man. forms of politeness he was entirely un
97. ous forms of address in speaking to any one.* Still he had his own correct notions
98. Still he had his own correct notions of good breeding. And on this day, to testify h
99. rable sleeping closet. the lady thanked God for having granted her even this little
100. he cooked for and spent the rest of the time in knitting and sewing, by which she ea
101. e, he had already begun to learn Latin. One morning S* as she was thinking anxiousl
102. began THE CANARY-BIRD. to ring, and her good, pious hostess came to say that the par
103. er Mass she spoke to him, and found him man. a very intelligent, pious, benevolent
104. great canary-birds, which, are sold far many and near, it. by dealers who make too,
105. these birds were so cheap here, to buy one of them for him. " Lina used always to
106. hem for him. " Lina used always to have one at home," shall said be: *'buy one for
107. have one at home," shall said be: *'buy one for me, and we have something, amid the
108. CANARY-BIRD. the birds, tlie prettiest one, and that which most resembled the bird
109. its bright, black it little In a short time fly became tame, and would his to him w
110. often obliged in in its cage, order to labor without the bird began its interruption
111. ce," said the old Tyrolese to him, lay. one Charles thought the old ing, for man wa
112. y. one Charles thought the old ing, for man was jok- he did not know that birds can
113. NARY-BIRD. taught to sing airs. The old man produced which he called a little a sma
114. ten would play bird now, and always the same piece and when, first at length, the bi
115. rst at length, the bird sang it for the time perfectly and without a mistake, ; he a
116. - bird and the flute were the source of many a pleasant hour to the merry boy, and e
117. their gloomy apart- ment. Meanwhile the fate of her husband and daughter was ever be
118. er husband and daughter was ever before mind, and caused her Madam D'Erlau's many a
119. re mind, and caused her Madam D'Erlau's many a sad day, and She for intelligence, ma
120. ny a sad day, and She for intelligence, many a sleepless and tearful night. was alwa
121. es, not receiving them oftener himself. One evening, Charles came joyously into the
122. e parish priest," said he, all "had not time to read them through, but he had seen t
123. seen that they contain a great deal of good news." She read eagerly, and found that
124. und that the really very news about the war was and she began 34 good to hope that
125. news about the war was and she began 34 good to hope that she might soon again ventu
126. ent quitted her wasted visibly away and many for a ; a time the old Tyrol ese would
127. wasted visibly away and many for a ; a time the old Tyrol ese would shake his head
128. head and say "Alas! the coming harvest will strew its leaves on the grave of this p
129. now was to save his dear master it from death; for Richard thought extreme of injusti
130. master from prison. They devised every form any that they resolved sort of plan, bu
131. them, he was full of anxiety for their fate. But the sen 37 timent which, with a gl
132. THE CANARY-BIRD. bad uttered wlien his death-sentence was pronounced, his heart —
133. emained unshaken in " Lord, all his Thy will be done !" He I find life, turned thoug
134. , all his Thy will be done !" He I find life, turned thoughts to God. " In whom," sa
135. e !" He I find life, turned thoughts to God. " In whom," said he, among other thing
136. ghts to God. " In whom," said he, among other things, " shall comfort in this the las
137. e, me and with mine, accord- Thy divine will. and K Thou takest me dear children. fr
138. ion ; and in firm reliance upon Thee, I will lay my head upon the block, which is al
139. friends. If, on the contrary. little is many Thou wilt grant me yet a it longer to m
140. stood before him and Save yourself, in God's cried out, " name !" of a in The youn
141. fusion to seize the uniform and arms of one of the soldiers and run with them to M.
142. sely the savage-looking soldiers of the time, and completed his military appearance.
143. the great In this guise difficulty. you will pass, I think, without of your Then mak
144. hout of your Then make father, the best will be way to my who found at the house of
145. 'Erlau and 40 like the apparition of an angel, his words like a message from THE CANA
146. e plan. With the all the earnestness of one who had most important business, he has
147. rrest him or brother, for they had made many enemies and fidelity to the by their at
148. delity to the by their attachment Erlau family. But when the worthy M. D'Erlau, fisher
149. , " dear master !" My and they embraced one anErlau's first other affectionately. q
150. y and they embraced one anErlau's first other affectionately. question was about told
151. rl, indeed, slept in the next room, and being awakened by Richard's joyous exclamatio
152. still peaceful soil of Germany, in the same boat which had transported his wife and
153. The poor were frightened all almost to death, and made the haste they could to reach
154. xample and fell upon his knees to thank God, and Lina and Kichard followed his ; af
155. ll to speak of going. "I shall not have one easy moment," said he to I shall have f
156. we ever make our way thither ? 46 Lina will never be able THE CANARY-BIKD. to trave
157. ou were always benevolent there, to How many Some of this persons are whom you advan
158. r gratitude nor honesty, yet I also met many worthy paid the but, souls, who not onl
159. ad been and gratitude to their lent, in love kind master, added from their own stock
160. great deal," said he, ; " but how long will it last how long can it last !" 48 THE
161. it last !" 48 THE CANARY-BiRI); "Never mind," shall said Eichard. "We shall manage
162. urgent request of the kind-hearted old man, they were obliged always. erland. ride
163. n- vinced that she must have taken some other road ; and they returned to Swabia. Mea
164. bed almost constantly and it was a long time before he was able greater part of the
165. cheer him, to take care of him, and to time pass agreeably. 80 make his to She cont
166. e contrived THE OANARY-BIRD. find a new pleasure for him every day, One time she would s
167. find a new pleasure for him every day, One time she would surprise him with a new
168. d a new pleasure for him every day, One time she would surprise him with a new dish,
169. ch she had herself cooked for the first time ; another time with a new song ; anothe
170. elf cooked for the first time ; another time with a new song ; another, with an agre
171. mass, to offer her thanks to cially to God on this day, and espe- pray for her mot
172. g sun shone with unusual brilliancy and beauty into the window, and THE CANARY-BIRD. e
173. at this evidence of her father's tender love for her. She thanked him with the livel
174. dy and a child driven out into the wide world, without friend or protector, are expos
175. a cheerful heart and so firm a trust in God's Providence often have afraid — ^but
176. er father's neck to console him. " Take courage, dearest father," she cried, " will not
177. courage, dearest father," she cried, " will not forsake us 5* God —He will bring
178. r," she cried, " will not forsake us 5* God —He will bring us all S3 THE CANARY-B
179. ied, " will not forsake us 5* God —He will bring us all S3 THE CANARY-BIRD. once m
180. were It was a moment of deep and pious emotion for them all. When, song, lo ! on a sud
181. clapped her hands in amazement. " "0 my God!" That is she cried, first what is this
182. air !" said Lina. is ** Pre- cisely the same —not a single note " want- ing !" "Th
183. taking off his cap. I believe merciful God ! Thou wilt restore my dear It is wife
184. HE CANARY-BIRD. Richard remained a long time away and M. D'Erlau and their time in h
185. long time away and M. D'Erlau and their time in his daughter spent most anxious expe
186. d with the young Tyrolese but the young man could ; not give any particular informa
187. but the young man could ; not give any particular information about the bird. He had boug
188. must certainly be thej !" They thanked God with many a for disclosing to them, tea
189. tainly be thej !" They thanked God with many a for disclosing to them, tear, by His
190. r journey withhis M. D'Erlau forgot the good weak- news strengthened him more than t
191. gthened him more than the most powerful medicine. Lina assisted him in packing, and litt
192. ge and M. D'Erlau and Lina had the from time to time during the pleasure, journey, o
193. . D'Erlau and Lina had the from time to time during the pleasure, journey, of being
194. na had the from time to time during the pleasure, journey, of being entertained livening
195. o time during the pleasure, journey, of being entertained livening notes. by its en-
196. ged. her son were still alive. "But the good lady," said the priest, "lives in the d
197. d a packet of newspapers, and selecting one of them, placed it before him eyes, and
198. to escape. It grieved M. D'Erlau to the soul, to learn that this false but melanchol
199. enses with The lady the desired the old man to down upon 62 wooden stool which THE
200. t speak of the dearest, kindest, bloody death of my most too excellent husband! —th
201. f my most too excellent husband! —the memory is gloomy. But what has happened Lina?
202. country, where her 63 THE CANARY-BIKD. life is not safe for a single hour? How coul
203. llected than he had imagined. The great happiness of seeing the good old man once more
204. ined. The great happiness of seeing the good old man once more — ^the still greate
205. great happiness of seeing the good old man once more — ^the still greater deligh
206. oice of ecstasy is "He \r^:T alive! Oh, God's mercy.be 65 for praised, 6* which del
207. the to describe little fire. Unable the happiness which thrilled soul, through her she ex
208. re. Unable the happiness which thrilled soul, through her she exclaimed, "Oh, what h
209. l, through her she exclaimed, "Oh, what happiness awaits us in heaven, where we shall see
210. in heaven, where we shall see again so many little dear ones^ whom on earth we bewa
211. CANARY-BIRD. and shared heartily in the happiness of their guests. On made the following
212. rning another guest his appearance, and one who, under 'God, had had the chief shar
213. est his appearance, and one who, under 'God, had had the chief share in bringing ab
214. ringing about the reunion of this noble family. Richard brought in the canary-bird, wh
215. ife shed and gratitude, at the wondrous good dispensation of Providence. " Yes, God!
216. good dispensation of Providence. " Yes, God!" she cried, clasping her hands, "it it
217. s mother's thanks.' "Was it not a happy idea of mine," he said, "to teach the bird t
218. o distressed about the loss of my bird, God had only taken it from me, in order to
219. oo, into the bargain. This shows us how God, out of a tune, trivial misfor may prep
220. said his father. "It was with this view God took fronj us all our earthly goods, in
221. es, we have in been gained to piety and virtue, com- parison with which splendor and r
222. ft try, had been discovered miles away. many life," Never again, in my said the boy,
223. y, had been discovered miles away. many life," Never again, in my said the boy, " wi
224. fe," Never again, in my said the boy, " will I be guilty act, for of a dishonest the
225. ly, it no roguery so clever that last." will not be detected at M. D'Erlau resolved
226. s humble roof was restored it lodged in one of the neighboring cottages the canary-
227. ple. ter days, leaf or a fresh slice of Many when a time, in the bright win- the hap
228. s, leaf or a fresh slice of Many when a time, in the bright win- the happy family we
229. en a time, in the bright win- the happy family were little parlor, all seated together
230. e sentiments inspired.- And even in the many gloomy occurrences to and melancholy fo
231. oly forebodings always no which it this family were afterwards subjected, trifling sol
232. vely, cheerful shake. would say, "we 70 will trust in Him who already has aided us s
233. can aid us in a thousand ways, and so, will !" has already done continue his pro- t
234. cannot be down- hearted any longer, no matter things with may look, us. He who or how
235. d it may go air, cares for birds of the will not forget us." 71 ; THE CANARY-BIRD. T
236. t us." 71 ; THE CANARY-BIRD. This noble family were destined to live for a while longe
237. e and son, the old fisherman, and every one who had shown them kindness. 72 U'-' BR

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: http://concordance.library.nd.edu/app/